Science.gov

Sample records for mrna secondary structure

  1. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation. PMID:26495981

  2. mRNA secondary structure optimization using a correlated stemloop prediction

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Paulo; Moura, Gabriela; Santos, Manuel A. S.; Oliveira, Jos Lus

    2013-01-01

    Secondary structure of messenger RNA plays an important role in the bio-synthesis of proteins. Its negative impact on translation can reduce the yield of protein by slowing or blocking the initiation and movement of ribosomes along the mRNA, becoming a major factor in the regulation of gene expression. Several algorithms can predict the formation of secondary structures by calculating the minimum free energy of RNA sequences, or perform the inverse process of obtaining an RNA sequence for a given structure. However, there is still no approach to redesign an mRNA to achieve minimal secondary structure without affecting the amino acid sequence. Here we present the first strategy to optimize mRNA secondary structures, to increase (or decrease) the minimum free energy of a nucleotide sequence, without changing its resulting polypeptide, in a time-efficient manner, through a simplistic approximation to hairpin formation. Our data show that this approach can efficiently increase the minimum free energy by >40%, strongly reducing the strength of secondary structures. Applications of this technique range from multi-objective optimization of genes by controlling minimum free energy together with CAI and other gene expression variables, to optimization of secondary structures at the genomic level. PMID:23325845

  3. Leader length and secondary structure modulate mRNA function under conditions of stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, M.

    1988-07-01

    Simina virus 40-based plasmids that direct the synthesis of preproinsulin in cultured monkey cells were used to study the effects of mRNA structure on translational efficiency. Lengthening the leader sequence enhanced translation in this system. The enhancement was most obvious when an unstructured sequence (two, four, or eight copies of the oligonculeotide AGCTAAGTAAGTAAGTA) was inserted upstream from a region of deliberate secondary structure; the degree of enhancement was proportional to the number of copies of the inserted oligonucleotide. Lengthening the leader sequence on the 3' side of a stem-and-loop structure, in contrast, did not offset the potentially inhibitory effect of the hairpin structure. Both the facilitating effect of length and the inhibitory effect of secondary structure were demonstrated most easily under conditions of mRNA competition, which was brought about by an abrupt shift in the tonicity of the culture medium. These experiments suggest a simple structural basis for the long-recognized differential response of viral and cellular mRNAs to hypertonic stress. The fact that the translatability of structure-prone mRNAs varies with changes in the environment may also have general implications for gene expression in eucaryotic cells.

  4. Volatility in mRNA secondary structure as a design principle for antisense

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erik; Srivastava, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    Designing effective antisense sequences is a formidable problem. A method for predicting efficacious antisense holds the potential to provide fundamental insight into this biophysical process. More practically, such an understanding increases the chance of successful antisense design as well as saving considerable time, money and labor. The secondary structure of an mRNA molecule is believed to be in a constant state of flux, sampling several different suboptimal states. We hypothesized that particularly volatile regions might provide better accessibility for antisense targeting. A computational framework, GenAVERT was developed to evaluate this hypothesis. GenAVERT used UNAFold and RNAforester to generate and compare the predicted suboptimal structures of mRNA sequences. Subsequent analysis revealed regions that were particularly volatile in terms of intramolecular hydrogen bonding, and thus potentially superior antisense targets due to their high accessibility. Several mRNA sequences with known natural antisense target sites as well as artificial antisense target sites were evaluated. Upon comparison, antisense sequences predicted based upon the volatility hypothesis closely matched those of the naturally occurring antisense, as well as those artificial target sites that provided efficient down-regulation. These results suggest that this strategy may provide a powerful new approach to antisense design. PMID:23161691

  5. A MYLK variant regulates asthmatic inflammation via alterations in mRNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Saadat, Laleh; Garcia, Joe GN

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light-chain kinase (MYLK) is a gene known to be significantly associated with severe asthma in African Americans. Here we further examine the molecular function of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), located in the non-muscle myosin light-chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK), in asthma susceptibility and pathobiology. We identified nmMLCK variant (reference SNP: rs9840993, NM_053025: 721C>T, c.439C>T) with a distinct mRNA secondary structure from the other variants. The nmMLCK variant (721C) secondary structure exhibits increased stability with an elongated half-life in the human endothelial cell, and greater efficiency in protein translation initiation owing to an increased accessibility to translation start site. Finally, nmMLCK expression of 721C- and 721T-containing MYLK transgenes were compared in nmMLCK−/− mice and confirmed deleterious effects of nmMLCK expression on asthmatic indices and implicated the augmented influence of MYLK 721C>T (c.439C>T) SNP on asthma severity. The confirmation of the novel mechanism of the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by a MYLK advances knowledge of the genetic basis for asthma disparities, and further suggests the potential of nmMLCK as a therapeutic target. Our study suggests that in addition to altering protein structure and function, non-synonymous SNPs may also lead to phenotypic disparity by altering protein expression. PMID:25271083

  6. hiCLIP reveals the in vivo atlas of mRNA secondary structures recognized by Staufen 1

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Yoichiro; Vigilante, Alessandra; Darbo, Elodie; Zirra, Alexandra; Militti, Cristina; D’Ambrogio, Andrea; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Ule, Jernej

    2015-01-01

    mRNA structure is important for post-transcriptional regulation, largely because it affects binding of trans-acting factors1. However, little is known about the in vivo structure of full-length mRNAs. Here we present hiCLIP, a high-throughput technique to identify RNA secondary structures interacting with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in vivo. Using this technique to investigate RNA structures bound by Staufen 1 (STAU1), we uncover a dominance of intra-molecular RNA duplexes, a depletion of duplexes from coding regions of highly translated mRNAs, an unforeseen prevalence of long-range duplexes in 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), and a decreased incidence of SNPs in duplex-forming regions. We also discover a duplex spanning 858nts in the 3′ UTR of the X-box binding Protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA that regulates its cytoplasmic splicing and stability. Our study reveals the fundamental role of mRNA secondary structures in gene regulation and introduces hiCLIP as a widely applicable method for discovering novel, especially long-range, RNA duplexes. PMID:25799984

  7. Secondary Structure of a Conserved Domain in an Intron of Influenza A M1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus utilizes RNA throughout infection. Little is known, however, about the roles of RNA structures. A previous bioinformatics survey predicted multiple regions of influenza A virus that are likely to generate evolutionarily conserved and stable RNA structures. One predicted conserved structure is in the pre-mRNA coding for essential proteins, M1 and M2. This structure starts 79 nucleotides downstream of the M2 mRNA 5? splice site. Here, a combination of biochemical structural mapping, mutagenesis, and NMR confirms the predicted three-way multibranch structure of this RNA. Imino proton NMR spectra reveal no change in secondary structure when 80 mM KCl is supplemented with 4 mM MgCl2. Optical melting curves in 1 M NaCl and in 100 mM KCl with 10 mM MgCl2 are very similar, with melting temperatures ?14 C higher than that for 100 mM KCl alone. These results provide a firm basis for designing experiments and potential therapeutics to test for function in cell culture. PMID:25026548

  8. Signs of Selection in Synonymous Sites of the Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Gene of Baikal Oilfish (Comephoridae) by mRNA Secondary Structure Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Teterina, Veronika I.; Mamontov, Anatoliy M.; Sukhanova, Lyubov V.; Kirilchik, Sergei V.

    2015-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have shown a significant role of synonymous mutations in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, which is particularly associated with messenger RNA (mRNA) secondary structure alterations. Most studies focused on prokaryote genomes and the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes while little is known about the regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene expression. This paper reveals signs of selection in synonymous sites of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (Cytb) of Baikal oilfish or golomyankas (Comephoridae) directed towards altering the secondary structure of the mRNA and probably altering the character of mtDNA gene expression. Our findings are based on comparisons of intraspecific genetic variation patterns of small golomyanka (Comephorus dybowski) and two genetic groups of big golomyanka (Comephorus dybowskii). Two approaches were used: (i) analysis of the distribution of synonymous mutations between weak-AT (W) and strong-GC (S) nucleotides within species and groups in accordance with mutation directions from central to peripheral haplotypes and (ii) approaches based on the predicted mRNA secondary structure. PMID:26114105

  9. Signs of Selection in Synonymous Sites of the Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Gene of Baikal Oilfish (Comephoridae) by mRNA Secondary Structure Alterations.

    PubMed

    Teterina, Veronika I; Mamontov, Anatoliy M; Sukhanova, Lyubov V; Kirilchik, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    Studies over the past decade have shown a significant role of synonymous mutations in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, which is particularly associated with messenger RNA (mRNA) secondary structure alterations. Most studies focused on prokaryote genomes and the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes while little is known about the regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) gene expression. This paper reveals signs of selection in synonymous sites of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (Cytb) of Baikal oilfish or golomyankas (Comephoridae) directed towards altering the secondary structure of the mRNA and probably altering the character of mtDNA gene expression. Our findings are based on comparisons of intraspecific genetic variation patterns of small golomyanka (Comephorus dybowski) and two genetic groups of big golomyanka (Comephorus dybowskii). Two approaches were used: (i) analysis of the distribution of synonymous mutations between weak-AT (W) and strong-GC (S) nucleotides within species and groups in accordance with mutation directions from central to peripheral haplotypes and (ii) approaches based on the predicted mRNA secondary structure. PMID:26114105

  10. Optimisation of the mRNA secondary structure to improve the expression of interleukin-24 (IL-24) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chaogang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Aiyou; Wei, Dongzhi; Yang, Shengli

    2014-08-01

    Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a novel cytokine selectively inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells but with little effect on normal cells. However, IL-24 is difficult to express in Escherichia coli. In this study, we optimised the secondary structure of the translation initiation region using computational approach to obtain non-fusion recombinant IL-24 (nrIL-24). The Gibbs free energy of the region was decreased from -22 to -9.07 kcal mol(-1), potentially promoting a loose secondary structure formation and improving the translation initiation efficiency. As a result, the expression of nrIL-24 was increased to 26 % of the total cellular protein from being barely initially detectable. nrIL-24 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of A375 cells but had little effect on normal human cells. These results demonstrate that this method in increasing nrIL-24 expression is effective and efficient. PMID:24752814

  11. Secondary structure model for mouse beta Maj globin mRNA derived from enzymatic digestion data, comparative sequence and computer analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lockard, R E; Currey, K; Browner, M; Lawrence, C; Maizel, J

    1986-01-01

    A model for the secondary structure of mouse beta Maj globin messenger RNA is presented based on enzymatic digestion data, comparative sequence and computer analysis. Using 5'-32P-end-labeled beta globin mRNA as a substrate, single-stranded regions were determined with S1 and T1 nucleases and double-stranded regions with V1 ribonuclease from cobra venom. The structure data obtained for ca. 75% of the molecule was introduced into a computer algorithm which predicts secondary structures of minimum free energy consistent with the enzymatic data. Two prominent base paired regions independently derived by phylogenetic analysis were also present in the computer generated structure lending support for the model. An interesting feature of the model is the presence of long-range base pairing interactions which permit the beta globin mRNA to fold back on itself, thereby bringing the 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions within close proximity. This feature is consistent with data from other laboratories suggesting an interaction of the 5'- and 3'-domains in the mammalian globin mRNAs. Images PMID:3737415

  12. Effect of 3′UTR RET Variants on RET mRNA Secondary Structure and Disease Presentation in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ceolin, Lucieli; Romitti, Mirian; Rodrigues Siqueira, Débora; Vaz Ferreira, Carla; Oliboni Scapineli, Jessica; Assis-Brazil, Beatriz; Vieira Maximiano, Rodolfo; Dias Amarante, Tauanne; de Souza Nunes, Miriam Celi; Weber, Gerald; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Background The RET S836S variant has been associated with early onset and increased risk for metastatic disease in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). However, the mechanism by which this variant modulates MTC pathogenesis is still open to discuss. Of interest, strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between RET S836S and 3'UTR variants has been reported in Hirschsprung's disease patients. Objective To evaluate the frequency of the RET 3’UTR variants (rs76759170 and rs3026785) in MTC patients and to determine whether these variants are in LD with S836S polymorphism. Methods Our sample comprised 152 patients with sporadic MTC. The RET S836S and 3’UTR (rs76759170 and rs3026785) variants were genotyped using Custom TaqMan Genotyping Assays. Haplotypes were inferred using the phase 2.1 program. RET mRNA structure was assessed by Vienna Package. Results The mean age of MTC diagnosis was 48.5±15.5 years and 57.9% were women. The minor allele frequencies of RET polymorphisms were as follows: S836S, 5.6%; rs76759170, 5.6%; rs3026785, 6.2%. We observed a strong LD among S836S and 3’UTR variants (|D’| = -1, r2 = 1 and |D’| = -1, r2 = 0,967). Patients harboring the S836S/3’UTR variants presented a higher percentage of lymph node and distant metastasis (P = 0.013 and P<0.001, respectively). Accordingly, RNA folding analyses demonstrated different RNA secondary structure predictions for WT(TCCGT), S836S(TTCGT) or 3’UTR(GTCAC) haplotypes. The S836S/3’UTR haplotype presented a greater number of double helices sections and lower levels of minimal free energy when compared to the wild-type haplotype, suggesting that these variants provides the most thermodynamically stable mRNA structure, which may have functional consequences on the rate of mRNA degradation. Conclusion The RET S836S polymorphism is in LD with 3’UTR variants. In silico analysis indicate that the 3’UTR variants may affect the secondary structure of RET mRNA, suggesting that these variants might play a role in posttranscriptional control of the RET transcripts. PMID:26829565

  13. Secondary structure prediction and in vitro accessibility of mRNA as tools in the selection of target sites for ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Amarzguioui, Mohammed; Brede, Gaute; Babaie, Eshrat; Grtli, Morten; Sproat, Brian; Prydz, Hans

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the relative merits of two commonly used methods for target site selection for ribozymes: secondary structure prediction (MFold program) and in vitro accessibility assays. A total of eight methylated ribozymes with DNA arms were synthesized and analyzed in a transient co-transfection assay in HeLa cells. Residual expression levels ranging from 23 to 72% were obtained with anti-PSKH1 ribozymes compared to cells transfected with an irrelevant control ribozyme. Ribozyme efficacy depended on both ribozyme concentration and the steady state expression levels of the target mRNA. Allylated ribozymes against a subset of the target sites generally displayed poorer efficacy than their methylated counterparts. This effect appeared to be influenced by in vivo accessibility of the target site. Ribozymes designed on the basis of either selection method displayed a wide range of efficacies with no significant differences in the average activities of the two groups of ribozymes. While in vitro accessibility assays had limited predictive power, there was a significant correlation between certain features of the predicted secondary structure of the target sequence and the efficacy of the corresponding ribozyme. Specifically, ribozyme efficacy appeared to be positively correlated with the presence of short stem regions and helices of low stability within their target sequences. There were no correlations with predicted free energy or loop length. PMID:11058107

  14. A Conserved Secondary Structural Element in the Coding Region of the Influenza A Virus Nucleoprotein (NP) mRNA Is Important for the Regulation of Viral Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Soszynska-Jozwiak, Marta; Michalak, Paula; Moss, Walter N.; Kierzek, Ryszard; Kierzek, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a threat to humans due to seasonal epidemics and infrequent, but dangerous, pandemics that lead to widespread infection and death. Eight segments of RNA constitute the genome of this virus and they encode greater than eight proteins via alternative splicing of coding (+)RNAs generated from the genomic (-)RNA template strand. RNA is essential in its life cycle. A bioinformatics analysis of segment 5, which encodes nucleoprotein, revealed a conserved structural motif in the (+)RNA. The secondary structure proposed by energy minimization and comparative analysis agrees with structure predicted based on experimental data using a 121 nucleotide in vitro RNA construct comprising an influenza A virus consensus sequence and also an entire segment 5 (+)RNA (strain A/VietNam/1203/2004 (H5N1)). The conserved motif consists of three hairpins with one being especially thermodynamically stable. The biological importance of this conserved secondary structure is supported in experiments using antisense oligonucleotides in cell line, which found that disruption of this motif led to inhibition of viral fitness. These results suggest that this conserved motif in the segment 5 (+)RNA might be a candidate for oligonucleotide-based antiviral therapy. PMID:26488402

  15. Exon B of human surfactant protein A2 mRNA, alone or within its surrounding sequences, interacts with 14-3-3; role of cis-elements and secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Noutsios, Georgios T.; Silveyra, Patricia; Bhatti, Faizah

    2013-01-01

    Human surfactant protein A, an innate immunity molecule, is encoded by two genes: SFTPA1 (SP-A1) and SFTPA2 (SP-A2). The 5? untranslated (5?UTR) splice variant of SP-A2 (ABD), but not of SP-A1 (AD), contains exon B (eB), which is an enhancer for transcription and translation. We investigated whether eB contains cis-regulatory elements that bind trans-acting factors in a sequence-specific manner as well as the role of the eB mRNA secondary structure. Binding of cytoplasmic NCI-H441 proteins to wild-type eB, eB mutant, AD, and ABD 5?UTR mRNAs were studied by RNA electromobility shift assays (REMSAs). The bound proteins were identified by mass spectroscopy and specific antibodies (Abs). We found that 1) proteins bind eB mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, with two cis-elements identified within eB to be important; 2) eB secondary structure is necessary for binding; 3) mass spectroscopy and specific Abs in REMSAs identified 14-3-3 proteins to bind (directly or indirectly) eB and the natural SP-A2 (ABD) splice variant but not the SP-A1 (AD) splice variant; 4) other ribosomal and cytoskeletal proteins, and translation factors, are also present in the eB mRNA-protein complex; 5) knockdown of 14-3-3 ?/? isoform resulted in a downregulation of SP-A2 expression. In conclusion, proteins including the 14-3-3 family bind two cis-elements within eB of hSP-A2 mRNA in a sequence- and secondary structure-specific manner. Differential regulation of SP-A1 and SP-A2 is mediated by the 14-3-3 protein family as well as by a number of other proteins that bind UTRs with or without eB mRNA. PMID:23525782

  16. A cis-encoded sRNA, Hfq and mRNA secondary structure act independently to suppress IS200 transposition

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Michael J.; Trussler, Ryan S.; Haniford, David B.

    2015-01-01

    IS200 is found throughout Enterobacteriaceae and transposes at a notoriously low frequency. In addition to the transposase protein (TnpA), IS200 encodes an uncharacterized Hfq-binding sRNA that is encoded opposite to the tnpA 5'UTR. In the current work we asked if this sRNA represses tnpA expression. We show here that the IS200 sRNA (named art200 for antisense regulator of transposase IS200) basepairs with tnpA to inhibit translation initiation. Unexpectedly, art200-tnpA pairing is limited to 40 bp, despite 90 nt of perfect complementarity. Additionally, we show that Hfq and RNA secondary structure in the tnpA 5'UTR each repress tnpA expression in an art200-independent manner. Finally, we show that disrupting translational control of tnpA expression leads to increased IS200 transposition in E.?coli. The current work provides new mechanistic insight into why IS200 transposition is so strongly suppressed. The possibility of art200 acting in trans to regulate a yet-unidentified target is discussed as well as potential applications of the IS200 system for designing novel riboregulators. PMID:26044710

  17. A cis-encoded sRNA, Hfq and mRNA secondary structure act independently to suppress IS200 transposition.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Trussler, Ryan S; Haniford, David B

    2015-07-27

    IS200 is found throughout Enterobacteriaceae and transposes at a notoriously low frequency. In addition to the transposase protein (TnpA), IS200 encodes an uncharacterized Hfq-binding sRNA that is encoded opposite to the tnpA 5'UTR. In the current work we asked if this sRNA represses tnpA expression. We show here that the IS200 sRNA (named art200 for antisense regulator of transposase IS200) basepairs with tnpA to inhibit translation initiation. Unexpectedly, art200-tnpA pairing is limited to 40 bp, despite 90 nt of perfect complementarity. Additionally, we show that Hfq and RNA secondary structure in the tnpA 5'UTR each repress tnpA expression in an art200-independent manner. Finally, we show that disrupting translational control of tnpA expression leads to increased IS200 transposition in E.?coli. The current work provides new mechanistic insight into why IS200 transposition is so strongly suppressed. The possibility of art200 acting in trans to regulate a yet-unidentified target is discussed as well as potential applications of the IS200 system for designing novel riboregulators. PMID:26044710

  18. Secondary Structure Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled…

  19. Secondary Structure Switch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled

  20. Genome-wide Measurement of RNA Secondary Structure in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Elad; Rinn, John L.; Nutter, Robert C.; Chang, Howard Y.; Segal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    The structures of RNA molecules are often important for their function and regulation1-6, yet there are no experimental techniques for genome-scale measurement of RNA structure. Here, we describe a novel strategy termed Parallel Analysis of RNA Structure (PARS), which is based on deep sequencing fragments of RNAs that were treated with structure-specific enzymes, thus providing simultaneous in-vitro profiling of the secondary structure of thousands of RNA species at single nucleotide resolution. We apply PARS to profile the secondary structure of the mRNAs of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and obtain structural profiles for over 3000 distinct transcripts. Analysis of these profiles reveals several RNA structural properties of yeast transcripts, including the existence of more secondary structure over coding regions compared to untranslated regions, a three-nucleotide periodicity of secondary structure across coding regions, and a relationship between the efficiency with which an mRNA is translated and the lack of structure over its translation start site. PARS is readily applicable to other organisms and to profiling RNA structure in diverse conditions, thus enabling studies of the dynamics of secondary structure at a genomic scale. PMID:20811459

  1. Influence of mRNA self-structure on hybridization: computational tools for antisense sequence selection.

    PubMed

    Toschi, N

    2000-11-01

    Antisense targeting, an innovative technology based on preventing biosynthesis through sequence-specific hybridization of mRNA to synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), is used to selectively and transiently downregulate the expression of any gene product. Its potential applications are both investigative (neurobiology and related disciplines) and therapeutic (oncology, virology, genetic diseases), and several antisense-based drugs are currently undergoing clinical trials. However, the reported efficiencies vary and there is still a lack of clarity in the underlying mechanisms of action. A critical factor of antisense efficiency is the issue of target site selection, as both mRNA and ODN molecules exhibit a significant amount of highly heterogeneous self-structure and the region selected for targeting may well be sterically or energetically inaccessible. Because of the prohibitively large chain length, mRNA structural information is not accessible by X-ray crystallography or NMR, making a modeling approach indispensable. I outline how the latest molecular modeling techniques can be employed to establish the secondary (2D) and tertiary (3D) structures into which a given mRNA folds during and after transcription. The aim should be to integrate 2D prediction results achieved by (a) free-energy minimization, (b) kinetic folding simulations, (c) iterative population breeding by genetic algorithms, and (d) phylogenetic comparison techniques. These results can form the input of a 3D structure prediction paradigm based on constraint-satisfying programming, governed by experimental molecular mechanical constraints, and refined by molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, the automated docking (by simulated annealing) of ODN molecules to the mRNA structure can provide information about the accessibility of target mRNA regions for hybridization. To date, the great majority of studies that employ antisense as a tool select their target sequences more or less randomly. Although the wealth of molecular interactions that take place within a cell makes complete predictability unrealistic, the kind of information that can be extracted from such techniques is of relevance to every application of antisense technology, both investigative and therapeutic. PMID:11071822

  2. Genetic analysis of bacteriophage lambda cIII gene: mRNA structural requirements for translation initiation.

    PubMed Central

    Kornitzer, D; Teff, D; Altuvia, S; Oppenheim, A B

    1989-01-01

    The bacteriophage lambda cIII gene product regulates the lysogenic pathway. The cIII gene is located in the leftward operon, which is transcribed from the pL promoter. We have previously shown (S. Altuvia and A. B. Oppenheim, J. Bacteriol. 167:415-419, 1986) that mutations that show elevated expression lie within the cIII coding sequence. We isolated mutants that show decreased CIII activity. All the mutations were found to cause a drastic reduction in the rate of initiation of cIII translation. Several mutations were found to be scattered within the first 40 nucleotides of the cIII coding region. Additional mutations affected the AUG initiation codon, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence, and the upstream RNaseIII processing site. Computer folding of the cIII mRNA suggested the presence of two alternative RNA structures. All the mutations within the coding region that reduce expression reduce the stability of one specific mRNA structure (structure B). Mutations that increase expression lie in the loops of this structure and may in fact stabilize it by interfering with the formation of the alternative structure (structure A). Thus, it appears that a specific mRNA secondary structure at the beginning of the cIII coding region is essential for efficient translation, suggesting that changes in mRNA structure regulate cIII expression. Images PMID:2523380

  3. A balanced secondary structure predictor.

    PubMed

    Nasrul Islam, Md; Iqbal, Sumaiya; Katebi, Ataur R; Tamjidul Hoque, Md

    2016-01-21

    Secondary structure (SS) refers to the local spatial organization of a polypeptide backbone atoms of a protein. Accurate prediction of SS can provide crucial features to form the next higher level of 3D structure of a protein accurately. SS has three different major components, helix (H), beta (E) and coil (C). Most of the SS predictors express imbalanced accuracies by claiming higher prediction performances in predicting H and C, and on the contrary having low accuracy in E predictions. E component being in low count, a predictor may show very good overall performance by over-predicting H and C and under predicting E, which can make such predictors biologically inapplicable. In this work we are motivated to develop a balanced SS predictor by incorporating 33 physicochemical properties into 15-tuble peptides via Chou?s general PseAAC, which allowed obtaining higher accuracies in predicting all three SS components. Our approach uses three different support vector machines for binary classification of the major classes and then form optimized multiclass predictor using genetic algorithm (GA). The trained three binary SVMs are E versus non-E (i.e., E/E), C/C and H/H. This GA based optimized and combined three class predictor, called cSVM, is further combined with SPINE X to form the proposed final balanced predictor, called MetaSSPred. This novel paradigm assists us in optimizing the precision and recall. We prepared two independent test datasets (CB471 and N295) to compare the performance of our predictors with SPINE X. MetaSSPred significantly increases beta accuracy (QE) for both the datasets. QE score of MetaSSPred on CB471 and N295 were 71.7% and 74.4% respectively. These scores are 20.9% and 19.0% improvement over the QE scores given by SPINE X alone on CB471 and N295 datasets respectively. Standard deviations of the accuracies across three SS classes of MetaSSPred on CB471 and N295 datasets were 4.2% and 2.3% respectively. On the other hand, for SPINE X, these values are 12.9% and 10.9% respectively. These findings suggest that the proposed MetaSSPred is a well-balanced SS predictor compared to the state-of-the-art SPINE X predictor. PMID:26549467

  4. Regulatory impact of RNA secondary structure across the Arabidopsis transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Zheng, Qi; Vandivier, Lee E; Willmann, Matthew R; Chen, Ying; Gregory, Brian D

    2012-11-01

    The secondary structure of an RNA molecule plays an integral role in its maturation, regulation, and function. However, the global influence of this feature on plant gene expression is still largely unclear. Here, we use a high-throughput, sequencing-based, structure-mapping approach in conjunction with transcriptome-wide sequencing of rRNA-depleted (RNA sequencing), small RNA, and ribosome-bound RNA populations to investigate the impact of RNA secondary structure on gene expression regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. From this analysis, we find that highly unpaired and paired RNAs are strongly correlated with euchromatic and heterochromatic epigenetic histone modifications, respectively, providing evidence that secondary structure is necessary for these RNA-mediated posttranscriptional regulatory pathways. Additionally, we uncover key structural patterns across protein-coding transcripts that indicate RNA folding demarcates regions of protein translation and likely affects microRNA-mediated regulation of mRNAs in this model plant. We further reveal that RNA folding is significantly anticorrelated with overall transcript abundance, which is often due to the increased propensity of highly structured mRNAs to be degraded and/or processed into small RNAs. Finally, we find that secondary structure affects mRNA translation, suggesting that this feature regulates plant gene expression at multiple levels. These findings provide a global assessment of RNA folding and its significant regulatory effects in a plant transcriptome. PMID:23150631

  5. Amino acid code of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Shestopalov, B V

    2003-01-01

    The calculation of protein three-dimensional structure from the amino acid sequence is a fundamental problem to be solved. This paper presents principles of the code theory of protein secondary structure, and their consequence--the amino acid code of protein secondary structure. The doublet code model of protein secondary structure, developed earlier by the author (Shestopalov, 1990), is part of this theory. The theory basis are: 1) the name secondary structure is assigned to the conformation, stabilized only by the nearest (intraresidual) and middle-range (at a distance no more than that between residues i and i + 5) interactions; 2) the secondary structure consists of regular (alpha-helical and beta-structural) and irregular (coil) segments; 3) the alpha-helices, beta-strands and coil segments are encoded, respectively, by residue pairs (i, i + 4), (i, i + 2), (i, i = 1), according to the numbers of residues per period, 3.6, 2, 1; 4) all such pairs in the amino acid sequence are codons for elementary structural elements, or structurons; 5) the codons are divided into 21 types depending on their strength, i.e. their encoding capability; 6) overlappings of structurons of one and the same structure generate the longer segments of this structure; 7) overlapping of structurons of different structures is forbidden, and therefore selection of codons is required, the codon selection is hierarchic; 8) the code theory of protein secondary structure generates six variants of the amino acid code of protein secondary structure. There are two possible kinds of model construction based on the theory: the physical one using physical properties of amino acid residues, and the statistical one using results of statistical analysis of a great body of structural data. Some evident consequences of the theory are: a) the theory can be used for calculating the secondary structure from the amino acid sequence as a partial solution of the problem of calculation of protein three-dimensional structure from the amino acid sequence, and the calculated secondary structure and codon strength distribution can be used for simulating the next step of protein folding; b) one can propose that the same secondary structures can be folded into different tertiary structures and, vice versa, different secondary structures can be folded into the same tertiary structures, provided codon distributions are considered also; c) codons can be considered as first elements of protein three-dimensional structure language. PMID:14989164

  6. Flexible Structures and Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Considers the problems inherent in British secondary school organization, the resistance to change built into the organizational systems, and possible organizational concepts that could serve the same general purposes (curricular oversight and student services) while adapting more successfully to changing needs and conditions. (PGD)

  7. Coupling of mRNA Structure Rearrangement to Ribosome Movement during Bypassing of Non-coding Regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin; Coakley, Arthur; O'Connor, Michelle; Petrov, Alexey; O'Leary, Sen E; Atkins, John F; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2015-11-19

    Nearly half of the ribosomes translating a particular bacteriophage T4 mRNA bypass a region of 50 nt, resuming translation 3' of this gap. How this large-scale, specific hop occurs and what determines whether a ribosome bypasses remain unclear. We apply single-molecule fluorescence with zero-mode waveguides to track individual Escherichia coli ribosomes during translation of T4's gene 60 mRNA. Ribosomes that bypass are characterized by a 10- to 20-fold longer pause in a non-canonical rotated state at the take-off codon. During the pause, mRNA secondary structure rearrangements are coupled to ribosome forward movement, facilitated by nascent peptide interactions that disengage the ribosome anticodon-codon interactions for slippage. Close to the landing site, the ribosome then scans mRNA in search of optimal base-pairing interactions. Our results provide a mechanistic and conformational framework for bypassing, highlighting a non-canonical ribosomal state to allow for mRNA structure refolding to drive large-scale ribosome movements. PMID:26590426

  8. Pairwise amino acid secondary structural propensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmama, Ilan E.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the propensities for amino acids to form a specific secondary structure when they are paired with other amino acids. Our investigations use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and we compare the results to those from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Proper comparison requires weighting of the MD results in a manner consistent with the relative frequency of appearance in the PDB of each possible pair of amino acids. We find that the propensity for an amino acid to assume a secondary structure varies dramatically depending on the amino acid that is before or after it in the primary sequence. This cooperative effect means that when selecting amino acids to facilitate the formation of a secondary structure in peptide engineering experiments, the adjacent amino acids must be considered. We also examine the preference for a secondary structure in bacterial proteins and compare the results to those of human proteins.

  9. Current perspectives on RNA secondary structure probing

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Julia; Prestwood, Liam; Lever, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The range of roles played by structured RNAs in biological systems is vast. At the same time as we are learning more about the importance of RNA structure, recent advances in reagents, methods and technology mean that RNA secondary structural probing has become faster and more accurate. As a result, the capabilities of laboratories that already perform this typeof structural analysis have increased greatly, and it has also become more widely accessible. The present review summarizes established and recently developed techniques. The information we can derive from secondary structural analysis is assessed, together with the areas in which we are likely to see exciting developments in the near future. PMID:25110033

  10. Secondary structural predictions for the clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lebeda, F J; Olson, M A

    1994-12-01

    The primary structures of a family of ten clostridial neurotoxins have recently been deduced yet little information is presently available concerning their secondary or tertiary structures. Because the overall similarity percentage of multiply aligned sequences is high, the secondary structures of these metalloendopeptidases are also expected to be conserved. The neural net program, PHD (Rost and Sander, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:7558-7562, 1993), predicted that the secondary structures of the neurotoxins were indeed conserved in both single and multiple sequence modes of analysis. Predictions for the amounts of helical, extended, and loop states from the single sequence analyses were consistent with previously published data from circular dichroism studies on some of these neurotoxins. In the single analysis mode, only the aligned regions were predicted to show conservation of the three-state structure. In contrast, the multiple sequence analysis predicted that a conserved state (variable loops) also exists in non-aligned regions. Alignments with the primary structure of the prototypic metalloendopeptidase thermolysin showed that about 25% of the residues within this enzyme are similar to those in the neurotoxins. A comparison of thermolysin's known secondary structure with the predictions from this study showed that about 80% of thermolysin's residues could be structurally aligned with those in the neurotoxins. These predictions provide the necessary framework to build a homologous low-resolution tertiary structure of the neurotoxin active site that will be essential in the development of synthetic inhibitors. PMID:7731948

  11. The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 determines parathyroid hormone mRNA levels and stability in rat models of secondary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Nechama, Morris; Uchida, Takafumi; Mor Yosef-Levi, Irit; Silver, Justin; Naveh-Many, Tally

    2009-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism is a major complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In experimental models of secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by hypocalcemia or CKD, parathyroid hormone (PTH) mRNA levels increase due to increased PTH mRNA stability. K-homology splicing regulator protein (KSRP) decreases the stability of PTH mRNA upon binding a cis-acting element in the PTH mRNA 3? UTR region. As the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) Pin1 has recently been shown to regulate the turnover of multiple cytokine mRNAs, we investigated the role of Pin1 in regulating PTH mRNA stability in rat parathyroids and transfected cells. The data generated were consistent with Pin1 being a PTH mRNA destabilizing protein. Initial analysis indicated that Pin1 activity was decreased in parathyroid protein extracts from both hypocalcemic and CKD rats and that pharmacologic inhibition of Pin1 increased PTH mRNA levels posttranscriptionally in rat parathyroid and in transfected cells. Pin1 mediated its effects via interaction with KSRP, which led to KSRP dephosphorylation and activation. In the rat parathyroid, Pin1 inhibition decreased KSRPPTH mRNA interactions, increasing PTH mRNA levels. Furthermore, Pin1/ mice displayed increased serum PTH and PTH mRNA levels, suggesting that Pin1 determines basal PTH expression in vivo. These results demonstrate that Pin1 is a key mediator of PTH mRNA stability and indicate a role for Pin1 in the pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism in individuals with CKD. PMID:19770516

  12. DSSPcont: continuous secondary structure assignments for proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Phil; Andersen, Claus A. F.; Rost, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    The DSSP program automatically assigns the secondary structure for each residue from the three-dimensional co-ordinates of a protein structure to one of eight states. However, discrete assignments are incomplete in that they cannot capture the continuum of thermal fluctuations. Therefore, DSSPcont (http://cubic.bioc.columbia.edu/services/DSSPcont) introduces a continuous assignment of secondary structure that replaces static by dynamic states. Technically, the continuum results from calculating weighted averages over 10 discrete DSSP assignments with different hydrogen bond thresholds. A DSSPcont assignment for a particular residue is a percentage likelihood of eight secondary structure states, derived from a weighted average of the ten DSSP assignments. The continuous assignments have two important features: (i) they reflect the structural variations due to thermal fluctuations as detected by NMR spectroscopy; and (ii) they reproduce the structural variation between many NMR models from one single model. Therefore, functionally important variation can be extracted from a single X-ray structure using the continuous assignment procedure. PMID:12824310

  13. PEGylated nanoparticles: protein corona and secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runa, Sabiha; Hill, Alexandra; Cochran, Victoria L.; Payne, Christine K.

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticles have important biological and biomedical applications ranging from drug and gene delivery to biosensing. In the presence of extracellular proteins, a "corona" of proteins adsorbs on the surface of the nanoparticles, altering their interaction with cells, including immune cells. Nanoparticles are often functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to reduce this non-specific adsorption of proteins. To understand the change in protein corona that occurs following PEGylation, we first quantified the adsorption of blood serum proteins on bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles using gel electrophoresis. We find a threefold decrease in the amount of protein adsorbed on PEGylated gold nanoparticles compared to the bare gold nanoparticles, showing that PEG reduces, but does not prevent, corona formation. To determine if the secondary structure of corona proteins was altered upon adsorption onto the bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles, we use CD spectroscopy to characterize the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin following incubation with the nanoparticles. Our results show no significant change in protein secondary structure following incubation with bare or PEGylated nanoparticles. Further examination of the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin, ?2-macroglobulin, and transferrin in the presence of free PEG showed similar results. These findings provide important insights for the use of PEGylated gold nanoparticles under physiological conditions.

  14. Folding and Finding RNA Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, David H.; Moss, Walter N.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Optimal exploitation of the expanding database of sequences requires rapid finding and folding of RNAs. Methods are reviewed that automate folding and discovery of RNAs with algorithms that couple thermodynamics with chemical mapping, NMR, and/or sequence comparison. New functional noncoding RNAs in genome sequences can be found by combining sequence comparison with the assumption that functional noncoding RNAs will have more favorable folding free energies than other RNAs. When a new RNA is discovered, experiments and sequence comparison can restrict folding space so that secondary structure can be rapidly determined with the help of predicted free energies. In turn, secondary structure restricts folding in three dimensions, which allows modeling of three-dimensional structure. An example from a domain of a retrotransposon is described. Discovery of new RNAs and their structures will provide insights into evolution, biology, and design of therapeutics. Applications to studies of evolution are also reviewed. PMID:20685845

  15. Secondary structure formation in peptide amphiphile micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirrell, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are capable of self-assembly into micelles for use in the targeted delivery of peptide therapeutics and diagnostics. PA micelles exhibit a structural resemblance to proteins by having folded bioactive peptides displayed on the exterior of a hydrophobic core. We have studied two factors that influence PA secondary structure in micellar assemblies: the length of the peptide headgroup and amino acids closest to the micelle core. Peptide length was systematically varied using a heptad repeat PA. For all PAs the addition of a C12 tail induced micellization and secondary structure. PAs with 9 amino acids formed beta-sheet interactions upon aggregation, whereas the 23 and 30 residue peptides were displayed in an apha-helical conformation. The 16 amino acid PA experienced a structural transition from helix to sheet, indicating that kinetics play a role in secondary structure formation. A p53 peptide was conjugated to a C16 tail via various linkers to study the effect of linker chemistry on PA headgroup conformation. With no linker the p53 headgroup was predominantly alpha helix and a four alanine linker drastically changed the structure of the peptide headgroup to beta-sheet, highlighting the importance of hydrogen boding potential near the micelle core.

  16. Regulation of protein translation through mRNA structure influences MHC class I loading and T cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Tellam, Judy; Smith, Corey; Rist, Michael; Webb, Natasha; Cooper, Leanne; Vuocolo, Tony; Connolly, Geoff; Tscharke, David C.; Devoy, Michael P.; Khanna, Rajiv

    2008-01-01

    Many viruses avoid immune surveillance during latent infection through reduction in the synthesis of virally encoded proteins. Although antigen presentation critically depends on the level of viral protein synthesis, the precise mechanism used to regulate the generation of antigenic peptide precursors remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that a purine overloaded virally encoded mRNA lacking secondary structure significantly impacts the efficiency of protein translation and prevents endogenous antigen presentation. Reducing this purine bias through the generation of constructs expressing codon-modified sequences, while maintaining the encoded protein sequence, increased the stemloop structure of the corresponding mRNA and dramatically enhanced self-synthesis of the viral protein. As a consequence, a higher number of HLApeptide complexes were detected on the surface of cells expressing this viral protein. Furthermore, these cells were more efficiently recognized by virus-specific T cells compared with those expressing the same antigen expressed by a purine-biased mRNA. These findings delineate a mechanism by which viruses regulate self-synthesis of proteins and offer an effective strategy to evade CD8+ T cell-mediated immune regulation. PMID:18591662

  17. Structure-function analysis of the triphosphatase component of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L; Martins, A; Deng, L; Shuman, S

    1997-01-01

    The N-terminal 60 kDa (amino acids 1 to 545) of the D1 subunit of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme is an autonomous bifunctional domain with triphosphatase and guanylyltransferase activities. We previously described two alanine cluster mutations, R77 to A (R77A)-K79A and E192A-E194A, which selectively inactivated the triphosphatase component. Here, we characterize the activities of 11 single alanine mutants-E37A, E39A, Q60A, E61A, T67A, T69A, K75A, R77A, K79A, E192A, and E194A-and a quadruple mutant in which four residues (R77, K79, E192, and E194) were replaced by alanine. We report that Glu-37, Glu-39, Arg-77, Glu-192, and Glu-194 are essential for gamma-phosphate cleavage. The five essential residues are conserved in the capping enzymes of Shope fibroma virus, molluscum contagiosum virus, and African swine fever virus. Probing the structure of D1(1-545) by limited V8 proteolysis suggested a bipartite subdomain structure. The essential residue Glu-192 is the principal site of V8 cleavage. Secondary cleavage by V8 occurs at the essential residue Glu-39. The triphosphatase-defective quadruple mutant transferred GMP to the triphosphate end of poly(A) to form a tetraphosphate cap structure, GppppA. We report that GppppA-capped RNA is a poor substrate for cap methylation by the vaccinia virus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA (guanine-7) methyltransferases. The transcription termination factor activity of the D1-D12 capping enzyme heterodimer was not affected by mutations that abrogated ATPase activity. Thus, the capping enzyme is not responsible for the requirement for ATP hydrolysis during transcription termination. PMID:9371657

  18. Multiple structural alignment by secondary structures: algorithm and applications.

    PubMed

    Dror, Oranit; Benyamini, Hadar; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim J

    2003-11-01

    We present MASS (Multiple Alignment by Secondary Structures), a novel highly efficient method for structural alignment of multiple protein molecules and detection of common structural motifs. MASS is based on a two-level alignment, using both secondary structure and atomic representation. Utilizing secondary structure information aids in filtering out noisy solutions and achieves efficiency and robustness. Currently, only a few methods are available for addressing the multiple structural alignment task. In addition to using secondary structure information, the advantage of MASS as compared to these methods is that it is a combination of several important characteristics: (1) While most existing methods are based on series of pairwise comparisons, and thus might miss optimal global solutions, MASS is truly multiple, considering all the molecules simultaneously; (2) MASS is sequence order-independent and thus capable of detecting nontopological structural motifs; (3) MASS is able to detect not only structural motifs, shared by all input molecules, but also motifs shared only by subsets of the molecules. Here, we show the application of MASS to various protein ensembles. We demonstrate its ability to handle a large number (order of tens) of molecules, to detect nontopological motifs and to find biologically meaningful alignments within nonpredefined subsets of the input. In particular, we show how by using conserved structural motifs, one can guide protein-protein docking, which is a notoriously difficult problem. MASS is freely available at http://bioinfo3d.cs.tau.ac.il/MASS/. PMID:14573862

  19. Sequence and structure analysis of a mirror tRNA located upstream of the cytochrome oxidase I mRNA in mouse mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Okui, Saya; Ushida, Chisato; Kiyosawa, Hidenori; Kawai, Gota

    2016-03-01

    RNA fragments corresponding to the mirror tRNA that is located upstream of the cytochrome oxidase I (COXI) gene in the mouse mitochondrial genome were found in the sequences obtained from the mouse brain by the next generation sequencing. RNA fragments corresponding to the 5' terminal of COXI mRNA were also found and it was suggested that the precursor of the COXI mRNA is processed at three residues upstream of the first AUG codon. The mirror tRNA fragment has poly(A) in its 3' terminal and variable 5' terminal, suggesting that this RNA is produced during the 5' processing of COXI mRNA. Secondary structure prediction and NMR analysis indicated that the mirror tRNA is folded into a tRNA-like secondary structure, suggesting that the tRNA-like conformation of the 5' adjacent sequence of COXI mRNA is involved in the COXI mRNA maturation in the mouse mitochondria. PMID:26519737

  20. The structure of the SOLE element of oskar mRNA.

    PubMed

    Simon, Bernd; Masiewicz, Pawel; Ephrussi, Anne; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-08-01

    mRNA localization by active transport is a regulated process that requires association of mRNPs with protein motors for transport along either the microtubule or the actin cytoskeleton. oskar mRNA localization at the posterior pole of the Drosophila oocyte requires a specific mRNA sequence, termed the SOLE, which comprises nucleotides of both exon 1 and exon 2 and is assembled upon splicing. The SOLE folds into a stem-loop structure. Both SOLE RNA and the exon junction complex (EJC) are required for oskar mRNA transport along the microtubules by kinesin. The SOLE RNA likely constitutes a recognition element for a yet unknown protein, which either belongs to the EJC or functions as a bridge between the EJC and the mRNA. Here, we determine the solution structure of the SOLE RNA by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. We show that the SOLE forms a continuous helical structure, including a few noncanonical base pairs, capped by a pentanucleotide loop. The helix displays a widened major groove, which could accommodate a protein partner. In addition, the apical helical segment undergoes complex dynamics, with potential functional significance. PMID:26089324

  1. The structure of the SOLE element of oskar mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Bernd; Masiewicz, Pawel; Ephrussi, Anne; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    mRNA localization by active transport is a regulated process that requires association of mRNPs with protein motors for transport along either the microtubule or the actin cytoskeleton. oskar mRNA localization at the posterior pole of the Drosophila oocyte requires a specific mRNA sequence, termed the SOLE, which comprises nucleotides of both exon 1 and exon 2 and is assembled upon splicing. The SOLE folds into a stem–loop structure. Both SOLE RNA and the exon junction complex (EJC) are required for oskar mRNA transport along the microtubules by kinesin. The SOLE RNA likely constitutes a recognition element for a yet unknown protein, which either belongs to the EJC or functions as a bridge between the EJC and the mRNA. Here, we determine the solution structure of the SOLE RNA by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. We show that the SOLE forms a continuous helical structure, including a few noncanonical base pairs, capped by a pentanucleotide loop. The helix displays a widened major groove, which could accommodate a protein partner. In addition, the apical helical segment undergoes complex dynamics, with potential functional significance. PMID:26089324

  2. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    PubMed

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned. PMID:23702539

  3. Secondary structure switching in Cro protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Newlove, Tracey; Konieczka, Jay H; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2004-04-01

    We report the solution structure of the Cro protein from bacteriophage P22. Comparisons of its sequence and structure to those of lambda Cro strongly suggest an alpha-to-beta secondary structure switching event during Cro evolution. The folds of P22 Cro and lambda Cro share a three alpha helix fragment comprising the N-terminal half of the domain. However, P22 Cro's C terminus folds as two helices, while lambda Cro's folds as a beta hairpin. The all-alpha fold found for P22 Cro appears to be ancestral, since it also occurs in cI proteins, which are anciently duplicated paralogues of Cro. PSI-BLAST and transitive homology analyses strongly suggest that the sequences of P22 Cro and lambda Cro are globally homologous despite encoding different folds. The alpha+beta fold of lambda Cro therefore likely evolved from its all-alpha ancestor by homologous secondary structure switching, rather than by nonhomologous replacement of both sequence and structure. PMID:15062080

  4. The mRNA of the translationally controlled tumor protein P23/TCTP is a highly structured RNA, which activates the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase PKR.

    PubMed Central

    Bommer, Ulrich-Axel; Borovjagin, Anton V; Greagg, Martin A; Jeffrey, Ian W; Russell, Paul; Laing, Kenneth G; Lee, Melanie; Clemens, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    The dsRNA-activated protein kinase PKR is involved in signal transduction pathways that mediate cellular processes as diverse as cell growth and differentiation, the stress response, and apoptosis. PKR was originally described as an interferon-inducible elF2alpha kinase involved in the antiviral defense mechanism of the cell. The interaction of the kinase with specific viral RNAs has been studied in much detail, but information about cellular mRNAs, which are able to bind and activate PKR, is scarce. In search for such cellular mRNAs, we developed a cloning strategy to identify individual mRNA species from the dsRNA-rich fraction of Daudi cell poly(A)+ RNA. Two out of five cDNA clones we obtained contained sequences derived from the mRNA of the translationally controlled tumor protein P23/TCTP, indicating that this mRNA is present in the dsRNA-rich fraction. Secondary structure predictions and gel electrophoretic mobility investigations on P23/TCTP transcripts confirmed the potential of this mRNA to form extensive secondary structure. A full-length P23 transcript, but not a truncated version thereof, was able to bind to PKR in vitro and in vivo. Transient transfection experiments in human 293 cells showed that coexpression of full-length P23 mRNA leads to partial inhibition of the expression of a beta-galactosidase reporter gene in trans. Additional coexpression of a dominant negative mutant of PKR or of adenovirus VA1 RNA suppressed this inhibition, indicating that it is mediated by PKR. Studies on P23/TCTP expression in cells from PKR-knockout mice suggest that P23/TCTP mRNA translation is regulated by PKR. Hence, our results demonstrate that the mRNA of P23/TCTP may both activate PKR and be subject to translational regulation by this kinase. PMID:11991642

  5. Expected degree for RNA secondary structure networks.

    PubMed

    Clote, Peter

    2015-01-15

    Consider the network of all secondary structures of a given RNA sequence, where nodes are connected when the corresponding structures have base pair distance one. The expected degree of the network is the average number of neighbors, where average may be computed with respect to the either the uniform or Boltzmann probability. Here, we describe the first algorithm, RNAexpNumNbors, that can compute the expected number of neighbors, or expected network degree, of an input sequence. For RNA sequences from the Rfam database, the expected degree is significantly less than the constrained minimum free energy structure, defined to have minimum free energy (MFE) over all structures consistent with the Rfam consensus structure. The expected degree of structural RNAs, such as purine riboswitches, paradoxically appears to be smaller than that of random RNA, yet the difference between the degree of the MFE structure and the expected degree is larger than that of random RNA. Expected degree does not seem to correlate with standard structural diversity measures of RNA, such as positional entropy and ensemble defect. The program RNAexpNumNbors is written in C, runs in cubic time and quadratic space, and is publicly available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAexpNumNbors. PMID:25382310

  6. Secondary flow structures in large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvet, H.; Devauchelle, O.; Metivier, F.; Limare, A.; Lajeunesse, E.

    2012-04-01

    Measuring the velocity field in large rivers remains a challenge, even with recent measurement techniques such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). Indeed, due to the diverging angle between its ultrasonic beams, an ADCP cannot detect small-scale flow structures. However, when the measurements are limited to a single location for a sufficient period of time, averaging can reveal large, stationary flow structures. Here we present velocity measurements in a straight reach of the Seine river in Paris, France, where the cross-section is close to rectangular. The transverse modulation of the streamwise velocity indicates secondary flow cells, which seem to occupy the entire width of the river. This observation is reminiscent of the longitudinal vortices observed in laboratory experiments (e.g. Blanckaert et al., Advances in Water Resources, 2010, 33, 1062-1074). Although the physical origin of these secondary structures remains unclear, their measured velocity is sufficient to significantly impact the distribution of streamwise momentum. We propose a model for the transverse profile of the depth-averaged velocity based on a crude representation of the longitudinal vortices, with a single free parameter. Preliminary results are in good agreement with field measurements. This model also provides an estimate for the bank shear stress, which controls bank erosion.

  7. Capped mRNAs with reduced secondary structure can function in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sonenberg, N.; Guertin, D.; Lee, K.A.W.

    1982-12-01

    Extracts form poliovirus-infected HeLa cells were used to study ribosome binding of native and denatured reovirus mRNAs and translation of capped mRNAs with different degrees of secondary structure. Here, the authors demonstrate that ribosomes in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells could form initiation complexes with denatured reovirus mRNA, in contrast to their inability to bind native reovirus mRNA. Furthermore, the capped alfalfa mosiac virus 4 RNA, which is most probable devoid of stable secondary structure at its 5' end, could be translated at much higher efficiency than could other capped mRNAs in extracts from poliovirus-infected cells.

  8. Computing folding pathways between RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Dotu, Ivan; Lorenz, William A.; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Clote, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Given an RNA sequence and two designated secondary structures A, B, we describe a new algorithm that computes a nearly optimal folding pathway from A to B. The algorithm, RNAtabupath, employs a tabu semi-greedy heuristic, known to be an effective search strategy in combinatorial optimization. Folding pathways, sometimes called routes or trajectories, are computed by RNAtabupath in a fraction of the time required by the barriers program of Vienna RNA Package. We benchmark RNAtabupath with other algorithms to compute low energy folding pathways between experimentally known structures of several conformational switches. The RNApathfinder web server, source code for algorithms to compute and analyze pathways and supplementary data are available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNApathfinder. PMID:20044352

  9. Enumeration of Secondary Structure Element Bundles

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-26

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is implemented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidation of transmembrane protein structures. Algorithm Overview: The ESSEB algorithm works by dividing the conforrnational space of each secondary structure element (SSE) into a set of cells. For each cell there is a representative conformation and for each atom in the SSE for which a distance restraint is available, there is an associated internal error, The internal error for a distance restraint is the maximum distance that the atom, when positioned in any conformation within a cell, can be from the atom in the representative conformation. The algorithm works recursively by positioning one representative conformation of an SSE. AdI distance restraints are checked with a tolerance that includes both the experimental and internal error. If all restraints are satisfied, every representative conformation of the next SSE is checked, otherwise, the program moves on to the next representative conformation of the current SSE. In addition to the distance restraints, other constraints on protein conformation can be enforced. These include the distance of closest approach between SSE axes, a restraint which prevents the crossover of loops connecting adjacent SSEs, and a restriction on the minimum and maximum distances between axis end-points. Any protein conformation satisfying all of the restraints is enumerated for later scoring and possible refinement. Additionally, in order to make run-times feasible, a divide-and-conquer approach is used in which the cells of each SSE in an accepted protein conformation can be further divided such that the internal errors are reduced and the new representative conformations can be evaluated.

  10. Maximum expected accuracy structural neighbors of an RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since RNA molecules regulate genes and control alternative splicing by allostery, it is important to develop algorithms to predict RNA conformational switches. Some tools, such as paRNAss, RNAshapes and RNAbor, can be used to predict potential conformational switches; nevertheless, no existent tool can detect general (i.e., not family specific) entire riboswitches (both aptamer and expression platform) with accuracy. Thus, the development of additional algorithms to detect conformational switches seems important, especially since the difference in free energy between the two metastable secondary structures may be as large as 15-20 kcal/mol. It has recently emerged that RNA secondary structure can be more accurately predicted by computing the maximum expected accuracy (MEA) structure, rather than the minimum free energy (MFE) structure. Results Given an arbitrary RNA secondary structure S0 for an RNA nucleotide sequence a = a1,..., an, we say that another secondary structure S of a is a k-neighbor of S0, if the base pair distance between S0 and S is k. In this paper, we prove that the Boltzmann probability of all k-neighbors of the minimum free energy structure S0 can be approximated with accuracy ε and confidence 1 - p, simultaneously for all 0 ≤ k < K, by a relative frequency count over N sampled structures, provided that N>N(ε,p,K)=Φ-1p2K24ε2, where Φ(z) is the cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the standard normal distribution. We go on to describe the algorithm RNAborMEA, which for an arbitrary initial structure S0 and for all values 0 ≤ k < K, computes the secondary structure MEA(k), having maximum expected accuracy over all k-neighbors of S0. Computation time is O(n3 · K2), and memory requirements are O(n2 · K). We analyze a sample TPP riboswitch, and apply our algorithm to the class of purine riboswitches. Conclusions The approximation of RNAbor by sampling, with rigorous bound on accuracy, together with the computation of maximum expected accuracy k-neighbors by RNAborMEA, provide additional tools toward conformational switch detection. Results from RNAborMEA are quite distinct from other tools, such as RNAbor, RNAshapes and paRNAss, hence may provide orthogonal information when looking for suboptimal structures or conformational switches. Source code for RNAborMEA can be downloaded from http://sourceforge.net/projects/rnabormea/ or http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAborMEA/. PMID:22537010

  11. Drawing and editing the secondary structure(s) of RNA.

    PubMed

    Ponty, Yann; Leclerc, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Secondary structure diagrams are essential, in RNA biology, to communicate functional hypotheses and summarize structural data, and communicate them visually as drafts or finalized publication-ready figures. While many tools are currently available to automate the production of such diagrams, their capacities are usually partial, making it hard for a user to decide which to use in a given context. In this chapter, we guide the reader through the steps involved in the production of expressive publication-quality illustrations featuring the RNA secondary structure. We present major existing representations and layouts, and give precise instructions to produce them using available free software, including jViz.RNA, the PseudoViewer, RILogo, R-chie, RNAplot, R2R, and VARNA. We describe the file formats and structural descriptions accepted by popular RNA visualization tools. We also provide command lines and Python scripts to ease the user's access to advanced features. Finally, we discuss and illustrate alternative approaches to visualize the secondary structure in the presence of probing data, pseudoknots, RNA-RNA interactions, and comparative data. PMID:25577373

  12. RNA STRAND: The RNA Secondary Structure and Statistical Analysis Database

    PubMed Central

    Andronescu, Mirela; Bereg, Vera; Hoos, Holger H; Condon, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. Results In this paper we describe RNA STRAND – the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. Conclusion RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at . PMID:18700982

  13. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1.

    PubMed

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, Jos; Rodrguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem-loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3' splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  14. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  15. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  16. Translation with secondary structure: Dynamic blockages in totally asymmetric simple exclusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Leah

    2011-03-01

    The totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) is often used as a model for protein synthesis, with the lattice and particles representing the mRNA and ribosomes, respectively. Here we model the effect of secondary structure (folding) of the mRNA by introducing a dynamic blockage region in the lattice. If the region is unoccupied by particles, the blockage can close and prevent upstream particles from moving into it, representing the folding of that section of mRNA. Reopening of the blockage, allowing particles to pass, represents unfolding. We study the effects of the blockage size, closing/opening probabilities, and TASEP parameters on the particle current and blockage switching rates.

  17. Prediction of protein folding rates from simplified secondary structure alphabet.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jitao T; Wang, Titi; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2015-10-21

    Protein folding is a very complicated and highly cooperative dynamic process. However, the folding kinetics is likely to depend more on a few key structural features. Here we find that secondary structures can determine folding rates of only large, multi-state folding proteins and fails to predict those for small, two-state proteins. The importance of secondary structures for protein folding is ordered as: extended ? strand > ? helix > bend > turn > undefined secondary structure>310 helix > isolated ? strand > ? helix. Only the first three secondary structures, extended ? strand, ? helix and bend, can achieve a good correlation with folding rates. This suggests that the rate-limiting step of protein folding would depend upon the formation of regular secondary structures and the buckling of chain. The reduced secondary structure alphabet provides a simplified description for the machine learning applications in protein design. PMID:26247139

  18. Enumeration of Secondary Structure Element Bundles

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-10-26

    A deterministic algorithm for enumeration of transmembrane protein folds is implemented. Using a set of sparse pairwise atomic distance constraints (such as those obtained from chemical cross-linking, FRET, or dipolar EPR experiments), the algorithm performs an exhaustive search of secondary structure element packing conformations distributed throughout the entire conformational space. The end result is a set of distinct protein conformations which can be scored and refined as part of a process designed for computational elucidationmore » of transmembrane protein structures. Algorithm Overview: The ESSEB algorithm works by dividing the conforrnational space of each secondary structure element (SSE) into a set of cells. For each cell there is a representative conformation and for each atom in the SSE for which a distance restraint is available, there is an associated internal error, The internal error for a distance restraint is the maximum distance that the atom, when positioned in any conformation within a cell, can be from the atom in the representative conformation. The algorithm works recursively by positioning one representative conformation of an SSE. AdI distance restraints are checked with a tolerance that includes both the experimental and internal error. If all restraints are satisfied, every representative conformation of the next SSE is checked, otherwise, the program moves on to the next representative conformation of the current SSE. In addition to the distance restraints, other constraints on protein conformation can be enforced. These include the distance of closest approach between SSE axes, a restraint which prevents the crossover of loops connecting adjacent SSEs, and a restriction on the minimum and maximum distances between axis end-points. Any protein conformation satisfying all of the restraints is enumerated for later scoring and possible refinement. Additionally, in order to make run-times feasible, a divide-and-conquer approach is used in which the cells of each SSE in an accepted protein conformation can be further divided such that the internal errors are reduced and the new representative conformations can be evaluated.« less

  19. SCFGs in RNA secondary structure prediction RNA secondary structure prediction: a hands-on approach.

    PubMed

    Sksd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Lyngs, Rune

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) were first established in the context of natural language modelling, and only later found their applications in RNA secondary structure prediction. In this chapter, we discuss the basic SCFG algorithms (CYK and inside-outside algorithms) in an application-centered manner and use the pfold grammar as a case study to show how the algorithms can be adapted to a grammar in a nonstandard form. We extend our discussion to the use of grammars with additional information (such as evolutionary information) to improve the quality of predictions. Finally, we provide a brief survey of programs that use stochastic context-free grammars for RNA secondary structure prediction and modelling. PMID:24639159

  20. Secondary structure adventures with Carl Woese

    PubMed Central

    Noller, Harry F

    2014-01-01

    Not long after my arrival at UCSC as an assistant professor, I came across Carl Woese's paper Molecular Mechanics of Translation: A Reciprocating Ratchet Mechanism.1 In the days before the crystal structure of tRNA was known, Fuller and Hodgson2 had proposed two alternative conformations for its anticodon loop; one was stacked on the 3? side (as later found in the crystal structure) and the other on the 5? side. In an ingenious and elegant model, Woese proposed that the conformation of the loop flips between Fuller and Hodgson's 5?- and 3?-stacked forms during protein synthesis, changing the local direction of the mRNA such that the identities of the tRNA binding sites alternated between binding aminoacyl-tRNA and peptidyl-tRNA. The model predicted that there are no A and P sites, only two binding sites whose identities changed following translation of each codon, and that there would be no translocation of tRNAs in the usual senseonly binding and release. I met Carl in person the following year when he presented a seminar on his ratchet model in Santa Cruz. He was chatting in my colleague Ralph Hinegardner's office in what Carl termed a Little Jack Horner appointment (the visitor sits and listens to his host describing What a good boy am I). He was of compact stature, and bore a striking resemblance to Oskar Werner in Truffaut's film Jules and Jim. He projected the impression of a New-Age gurua shiny black amulet suspended over the front of his black turtleneck sweater and a crown of prematurely white hair. Ralph asked me to explain to Carl what we were doing with ribosomes. I quickly summarized our early experiments that were pointing to a functional role for 16S rRNA. Carl regarded me silently, with a penetrating stare. He then turned to Ralph and said, in an ominous low voice, I'm going to have some more tanks made as soon as I get back. Carl's beautiful model was, unfortunately, wrongit was simpler and more elegant than the complex mechanism that Nature actually uses. Unyielding, Carl railed against the A-site-P-site model at every opportunity,3,4 and although we ended up enjoying a long, intense, and fruitful collaboration, and became close, life-long friends, I finally gave up trying to describe to him our biochemical and crystallographic results on the A, P, and E sites. PMID:24637459

  1. Secondary structure adventures with Carl Woese.

    PubMed

    Noller, Harry F

    2014-01-01

    Not long after my arrival at UCSC as an assistant professor, I came across Carl Woese's paper "Molecular Mechanics of Translation: A Reciprocating Ratchet Mechanism." (1) In the days before the crystal structure of tRNA was known, Fuller and Hodgson (2) had proposed two alternative conformations for its anticodon loop; one was stacked on the 3' side (as later found in the crystal structure) and the other on the 5' side. In an ingenious and elegant model, Woese proposed that the conformation of the loop flips between Fuller and Hodgson's 5'- and 3'-stacked forms during protein synthesis, changing the local direction of the mRNA such that the identities of the tRNA binding sites alternated between binding aminoacyl-tRNA and peptidyl-tRNA. The model predicted that there are no A and P sites, only two binding sites whose identities changed following translation of each codon, and that there would be no translocation of tRNAs in the usual sense--only binding and release. I met Carl in person the following year when he presented a seminar on his ratchet model in Santa Cruz. He was chatting in my colleague Ralph Hinegardner's office in what Carl termed a "Little Jack Horner appointment" (the visitor sits and listens to his host describing "What a good boy am I"). He was of compact stature, and bore a striking resemblance to Oskar Werner in Truffaut's film "Jules and Jim." He projected the impression of a New-Age guru--a shiny black amulet suspended over the front of his black turtleneck sweater and a crown of prematurely white hair. Ralph asked me to explain to Carl what we were doing with ribosomes. I quickly summarized our early experiments that were pointing to a functional role for 16S rRNA. Carl regarded me silently, with a penetrating stare. He then turned to Ralph and said, in an ominous low voice, "I'm going to have some more tanks made as soon as I get back." Carl's beautiful model was, unfortunately, wrong--it was simpler and more elegant than the complex mechanism that Nature actually uses. Unyielding, Carl railed against the A-site-P-site model at every opportunity, and although we ended up enjoying a long, intense, and fruitful collaboration, and became close, life-long friends, I finally gave up trying to describe to him our biochemical and crystallographic results on the A, P, and E sites. PMID:24637459

  2. RNAstructure: Web servers for RNA secondary structure prediction and analysis.

    PubMed

    Bellaousov, Stanislav; Reuter, Jessica S; Seetin, Matthew G; Mathews, David H

    2013-07-01

    RNAstructure is a software package for RNA secondary structure prediction and analysis. This contribution describes a new set of web servers to provide its functionality. The web server offers RNA secondary structure prediction, including free energy minimization, maximum expected accuracy structure prediction and pseudoknot prediction. Bimolecular secondary structure prediction is also provided. Additionally, the server can predict secondary structures conserved in either two homologs or more than two homologs. Folding free energy changes can be predicted for a given RNA structure using nearest neighbor rules. Secondary structures can be compared using circular plots or the scoring methods, sensitivity and positive predictive value. Additionally, structure drawings can be rendered as SVG, postscript, jpeg or pdf. The web server is freely available for public use at: http://rna.urmc.rochester.edu/RNAstructureWeb. PMID:23620284

  3. Regulation of cytochrome P450 mRNA expression in primary porcine hepatocytes by selected secondary plant metabolites from chicory (Cichorium intybus L.).

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Martin Kryer; Klausen, Christina Lindgaard; Ekstrand, Bo

    2014-03-01

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus) has been shown to induce enzymes of pharmacokinetic relevance (cytochrome P450; CYP). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of selected secondary plant metabolites with a global extract of chicory root, on the expression of hepatic CYP mRNA (1A2, 2A19, 2C33, 2D25, 2E1 and 3A29), using primary porcine hepatocytes. Of the tested secondary plant metabolites, artemisinin, scoparone, lactucin and esculetin all induced increased expression of specific CYPs, while esculin showed no effect. In contrast, a global extract of chicory root decreased the expression of CYP1A2, 2C33, 2D25 and 3A29 at high concentrations. The results suggest that purified secondary metabolites from chicory affect CYP expression and thereby might affect detoxification in general, and that global extracts of plants can have effects different from individual components. PMID:24176340

  4. Toward a next-generation atlas of RNA secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Youhuang; Dai, Xiaozhuan; Harrison, Andrew; Johnston, Caroline; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-01

    RNA structure plays a crucial role in gene maturation, regulation and function. Determining the form and frequency of RNA folds is essential for a better understanding of how RNA exerts its functions. Low-throughput studies have focused on RNA primary sequences and expression levels, but with an emphasis on relatively small numbers of transcripts. However, with the recent advent of high-throughput technologies, it is realistic to begin analyzing RNA secondary structures on a genome-wide scale. Here, we review genome-wide RNA secondary structure profiles as well as advances in computational structure predictions. We further discuss the novel characteristics of RNA secondary structure across messenger RNAs. Probing RNA secondary structure by high-throughput sequencing will enable us to build atlases of RNA secondary structures, an important step in helping us to understand the versatility of RNA functions in diverse cellular processes. PMID:25922372

  5. Structure and function of the selenium translation element in the 3'-untranslated region of human cellular glutathione peroxidase mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Q; Leonard, J L; Newburger, P E

    1995-01-01

    In eukaryotes, incorporation of selenocysteine into the polypeptide chain at a UGA codon requires a unique sequence motif, or "selenium translation element" (STE), located in the 3'-untranslated region of the mRNA. The present study examines structure-function relationships of conserved sequence elements and of the putative stem-loop secondary structure in the STE of human GPX1 mRNA, which encodes the important antioxidant enzyme cellular glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9). Deletion of the basal stem, upper stem, or apical loop of the stem-loop structure eliminated the ability of the STE to direct selenocysteine incorporation at the UGA codon of an epitope-tagged GPX1 reporter construct transfected into COS1 cells. However, mutations that change the primary nucleotide sequence of nonconserved portions of the stem-loop, but preserve its overall secondary structure, by inversion of apical loop sequences or exchange of 5' and 3' sides of stem segments, had little or no effect on selenocysteine incorporation. Effects of single- and double-nucleotide substitutions in three short, highly conserved elements in the GPX1 STE depended in large part on their computer-predicted perturbation of the stem-loop and its midstem bulge. Only in the conserved "AAA" apical loop sequence did mutations show major effects on function without predicted changes in secondary structure. Our results demonstrate the critical role of the three short, highly conserved sequences. However, outside of these elements, the function of the human GPX1 STE appears to depend strongly on the stem-loop secondary structure. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7489513

  6. Secondary stresses on transmission tower structures

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S.; Fang, S.J.; Rossow, E.C.

    1984-06-01

    The power industry is moving toward the use of high-voltage transmission lines on tall, flexible towers. These towers are designed for heavier loadings than were previous towers, but the secondary effects of tower displacement tend to be ignored in the present day tower analysis. This paper examines the secondary effects from the large displacement of flexible towers, reviews the secondary stresses arising from joint rigidity and member continuity, and examines the reliability of tower strength predicted by the ASCE design guidelines. More realistic tower test acceptance criteria and a more reliable tower design methodology are suggested.

  7. Neural network definitions of highly predictable protein secondary structure classes

    SciTech Connect

    Lapedes, A. |; Steeg, E.; Farber, R.

    1994-02-01

    We use two co-evolving neural networks to determine new classes of protein secondary structure which are significantly more predictable from local amino sequence than the conventional secondary structure classification. Accurate prediction of the conventional secondary structure classes: alpha helix, beta strand, and coil, from primary sequence has long been an important problem in computational molecular biology. Neural networks have been a popular method to attempt to predict these conventional secondary structure classes. Accuracy has been disappointingly low. The algorithm presented here uses neural networks to similtaneously examine both sequence and structure data, and to evolve new classes of secondary structure that can be predicted from sequence with significantly higher accuracy than the conventional classes. These new classes have both similarities to, and differences with the conventional alpha helix, beta strand and coil.

  8. Widespread signatures of local mRNA folding structure selection in four Dengue virus serotypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It is known that mRNA folding can affect and regulate various gene expression steps both in living organisms and in viruses. Previous studies have recognized functional RNA structures in the genome of the Dengue virus. However, these studies usually focused either on the viral untranslated regions or on very specific and limited regions at the beginning of the coding sequences, in a limited number of strains, and without considering evolutionary selection. Results Here we performed the first large scale comprehensive genomics analysis of selection for local mRNA folding strength in the Dengue virus coding sequences, based on a total of 1,670 genomes and 4 serotypes. Our analysis identified clusters of positions along the coding regions that may undergo a conserved evolutionary selection for strong or weak local folding maintained across different viral variants. Specifically, 53-66 clusters for strong folding and 49-73 clusters for weak folding (depending on serotype) aggregated of positions with a significant conservation of folding energy signals (related to partially overlapping local genomic regions) were recognized. In addition, up to 7% of these positions were found to be conserved in more than 90% of the viral genomes. Although some of the identified positions undergo frequent synonymous / non-synonymous substitutions, the selection for folding strength therein is preserved, and thus cannot be trivially explained based on sequence conservation alone. Conclusions The fact that many of the positions with significant folding related signals are conserved among different Dengue variants suggests that a better understanding of the mRNA structures in the corresponding regions may promote the development of prospective anti- Dengue vaccination strategies. The comparative genomics approach described here can be employed in the future for detecting functional regions in other pathogens with very high mutations rates. PMID:26449467

  9. Statistical model of amino acid code of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Shestopalov, B V

    2003-01-01

    In the previous paper (Shestopalov, 2003) we presented the amino acid code of protein secondary structure as a partial solution of the fundamental problem of the protein three-dimensional structure calculation from the amino acid sequence. Here a statistical model of the code is described. The model is based on the structural data from 2258 protein chains (417,112 amino acid residues used). 60 and 61% of the secondary structure, calculated using the model, coincide, respectively, with the observed secondary structure in the training subset and test subset (104 protein chains and 21,166 residues used). This is equal to the threshold value for all the secondary structure calculations, based on the models, where, similarly as here, only the nearest and middle-range interactions are considered. Therefore the constructed model can be applied for the protein structure prediction from the amino acid sequence, especially when additional information is used along with expert analysis, as in the most successful prediction methods. The model can be used for analysis of the secondary structure changes during protein folding by comparison of the calculated and observed secondary structures. The information about the conformationally invariant segments can serve for the simulation of the supersecondary structure formation. One can try to obtain and examine the protein subset, in which the calculated and observed secondary structures are very similar. PMID:14989165

  10. Phytoene desaturase is localized exclusively in the chloroplast and up-regulated at the mRNA level during accumulation of secondary carotenoids in Haematococcus pluvialis (Volvocales, chlorophyceae).

    PubMed

    Grnewald, K; Eckert, M; Hirschberg, J; Hagen, C

    2000-04-01

    The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow is known for its massive accumulation of ketocarotenoids under various stress conditions. Therefore, this microalga is one of the favored organisms for biotechnological production of these antioxidative compounds. Astaxanthin makes up the main part of the secondary carotenoids and is accumulated mostly in an esterified form in extraplastidic lipid vesicles. We have studied phytoene desaturase, an early enzyme of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. The increase in the phytoene desaturase protein levels that occurs following induction is accompanied by a corresponding increase of its mRNA during the accumulation period, indicating that phytoene desaturase is regulated at the mRNA level. We also investigated the localization of the enzyme by western-blot analysis of cell fractions and by immunogold labeling of ultrathin sections for electron microscopy. In spite of the fact that secondary carotenoids accumulate outside the chloroplast, no extra pathway specific for secondary carotenoid biosynthesis in H. pluvialis was found, at least at this early stage in the biosynthesis. A transport process of carotenoids from the site of biosynthesis (chloroplast) to the site of accumulation (cytoplasmatic located lipid vesicles) is implicated. PMID:10759523

  11. Structural model of an mRNA in complex with the bacterial chaperone Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi; Curtis, Joseph E.; Fang, Xianyang; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    The Sm-like protein Hfq (host factor Q-beta phage) facilitates regulation by bacterial small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) in response to stress and other environmental signals. Here, we present a low-resolution model of Escherichia coli Hfq bound to the rpoS mRNA, a bacterial stress response gene that is targeted by three different sRNAs. Selective 2?-hydroxyl acylation and primer extension, small-angle X-ray scattering, and Monte Carlo molecular dynamics simulations show that the distal face and lateral rim of Hfq interact with three sites in the rpoS leader, folding the RNA into a compact tertiary structure. These interactions are needed for sRNA regulation of rpoS translation and position the sRNA target adjacent to an sRNA binding region on the proximal face of Hfq. Our results show how Hfq specifically distorts the structure of the rpoS mRNA to enable sRNA base pairing and translational control. PMID:25404287

  12. Resistance of mRNAs with AUG-proximal nonsense mutations to nonsense-mediated decay reflects variables of mRNA structure and translational activity

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco J.C.; Teixeira, Alexandre; Kong, Jian; Barbosa, Cristina; Silva, Ana Lusa; Marques-Ramos, Ana; Liebhaber, Stephen A.; Romo, Lusa

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a surveillance pathway that recognizes and selectively degrades mRNAs carrying premature termination codons (PTCs). The level of sensitivity of a PTC-containing mRNA to NMD is multifactorial. We have previously shown that human ?-globin mRNAs carrying PTCs in close proximity to the translation initiation AUG codon escape NMD. This was called the AUG-proximity effect. The present analysis of nonsense codons in the human ?-globin mRNA illustrates that the determinants of the AUG-proximity effect are in fact quite complex, reflecting the ability of the ribosome to re-initiate translation 3? to the PTC and the specific sequence and secondary structure of the translated ORF. These data support a model in which the time taken to translate the short ORF, impacted by distance, sequence, and structure, not only modulates translation re-initiation, but also impacts on the exact boundary of AUG-proximity protection from NMD. PMID:26068473

  13. Resistance of mRNAs with AUG-proximal nonsense mutations to nonsense-mediated decay reflects variables of mRNA structure and translational activity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Francisco J C; Teixeira, Alexandre; Kong, Jian; Barbosa, Cristina; Silva, Ana Lusa; Marques-Ramos, Ana; Liebhaber, Stephen A; Romo, Lusa

    2015-07-27

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is a surveillance pathway that recognizes and selectively degrades mRNAs carrying premature termination codons (PTCs). The level of sensitivity of a PTC-containing mRNA to NMD is multifactorial. We have previously shown that human ?-globin mRNAs carrying PTCs in close proximity to the translation initiation AUG codon escape NMD. This was called the 'AUG-proximity effect'. The present analysis of nonsense codons in the human ?-globin mRNA illustrates that the determinants of the AUG-proximity effect are in fact quite complex, reflecting the ability of the ribosome to re-initiate translation 3' to the PTC and the specific sequence and secondary structure of the translated ORF. These data support a model in which the time taken to translate the short ORF, impacted by distance, sequence, and structure, not only modulates translation re-initiation, but also impacts on the exact boundary of AUG-proximity protection from NMD. PMID:26068473

  14. Sequence periodicity and secondary structure propensity in model proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bellesia, Giovanni; Jewett, Andrew Iain; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2010-01-01

    We explore the question of whether local effects (originating from the amino acids intrinsic secondary structure propensities) or nonlocal effects (reflecting the sequence of amino acids as a whole) play a larger role in determining the fold of globular proteins. Earlier circular dichroism studies have shown that the pattern of polar, non polar amino acids (nonlocal effect) dominates over the amino acid intrinsic propensity (local effect) in determining the secondary structure of oligomeric peptides. In this article, we present a coarse grained computational model that allows us to quantitatively estimate the role of local and nonlocal factors in determining both the secondary and tertiary structure of small, globular proteins. The amino acid intrinsic secondary structure propensity is modeled by a dihedral potential term. This dihedral potential is parametrized to match with experimental measurements of secondary structure propensity. Similarly, the magnitude of the attraction between hydrophobic residues is parametrized to match the experimental transfer free energies of hydrophobic amino acids. Under these parametrization conditions, we systematically explore the degree of frustration a given polar, non polar pattern can tolerate when the secondary structure intrinsic propensities are in opposition to it. When the parameters are in the biophysically relevant range, we observe that the fold of small, globular proteins is determined by the pattern of polar, non polar amino acids regardless of their instrinsic secondary structure propensities. Our simulations shed new light on previous observations that tertiary interactions are more influential in determining protein structure than secondary structure propensity. The fact that this can be inferred using a simple polymer model that lacks most of the biochemical details points to the fundamental importance of binary patterning in governing folding. PMID:19937649

  15. Elimination of cap structures generated by mRNA decay involves the new scavenger mRNA decapping enzyme Aph1/FHIT together with DcpS

    PubMed Central

    Taverniti, Valerio; Sraphin, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic 5? mRNA cap structures participate to the post-transcriptional control of gene expression before being released by the two main mRNA decay pathways. In the 3?-5? pathway, the exosome generates free cap dinucleotides (m7GpppN) or capped oligoribonucleotides that are hydrolyzed by the Scavenger Decapping Enzyme (DcpS) forming m7GMP. In the 5?-3? pathway, the decapping enzyme Dcp2 generates m7GDP. We investigated the fate of m7GDP and m7GpppN produced by RNA decay in extracts and cells. This defined a pathway involving DcpS, NTPs and the nucleoside diphosphate kinase for m7GDP elimination. Interestingly, we identified and characterized in vitro and in vivo a new scavenger decapping enzyme involved in m7GpppN degradation. We show that activities mediating cap elimination identified in yeast are essentially conserved in human. Their alteration may contribute to pathologies, possibly through the interference of cap (di)nucleotide with cellular function. PMID:25432955

  16. Combinatorics of RNA Secondary Structures with Base Triples.

    PubMed

    Mller, Robert; Nebel, Markus E

    2015-07-01

    The structure of RNA has been the subject of intense research over the last decades due to its importance for the correct functioning of RNA molecules in biological processes. Hence, a large number of models for RNA folding and corresponding algorithms for structure prediction have been developed. However, previous models often only consider base pairs, although every base is capable of up to three edge-to-edge interactions with other bases. Recently, Hner zu Siederdissen et al. presented an extended model of RNA secondary structure, including base triples together with a folding algorithm-the first thermodynamics-based algorithm that allows the prediction of secondary structures with base triples. In this article, we investigate the search space processed by this new algorithm, that is, the combinatorics of extended RNA secondary structures with base triples. We present generalized definitions for structural motifs like hairpins, stems, bulges, or interior loops occurring in structures with base triples. Furthermore, we prove precise asymptotic results for the number of different structures (size of search space) and expectations for various parameters associated with structural motifs (typical shape of folding). Our analysis shows that the asymptotic number of secondary structures of size n increases exponentially to [Formula: see text] compared to the classic model by Stein and Waterman for which [Formula: see text] structures exist. A comparison with the classic model reveals large deviations in the expected structural appearance, too. The inclusion of base triples constitutes a significant refinement of the combinatorial model of RNA secondary structure, which, by our findings, is quantitatively characterized. Our results are of special theoretical interest, because a closer look at the numbers involved suggests that extended RNA secondary structures constitute a new combinatorial class not bijective with any other combinatorial objects studied so far. PMID:26098199

  17. Bayesian Model of Protein Primary Sequence for Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiwei; Dahl, David B.; Vannucci, Marina; Hyun Joo; Tsai, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the primary structure (i.e., amino acid sequence) of a protein has become cheaper, faster, and more accurate. Higher order protein structure provides insight into a proteins function in the cell. Understanding a proteins secondary structure is a first step towards this goal. Therefore, a number of computational prediction methods have been developed to predict secondary structure from just the primary amino acid sequence. The most successful methods use machine learning approaches that are quite accurate, but do not directly incorporate structural information. As a step towards improving secondary structure reduction given the primary structure, we propose a Bayesian model based on the knob-socket model of protein packing in secondary structure. The method considers the packing influence of residues on the secondary structure determination, including those packed close in space but distant in sequence. By performing an assessment of our method on 2 test sets we show how incorporation of multiple sequence alignment data, similarly to PSIPRED, provides balance and improves the accuracy of the predictions. Software implementing the methods is provided as a web application and a stand-alone implementation. PMID:25314659

  18. A method for rapid similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Wang, Tianming

    2006-01-01

    Background Owing to the rapid expansion of RNA structure databases in recent years, efficient methods for structure comparison are in demand for function prediction and evolutionary analysis. Usually, the similarity of RNA secondary structures is evaluated based on tree models and dynamic programming algorithms. We present here a new method for the similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures. Results Three sets of real data have been used as input for the example applications. Set I includes the structures from 5S rRNAs. Set II includes the secondary structures from RNase P and RNase MRP. Set III includes the structures from 16S rRNAs. Reasonable phylogenetic trees are derived for these three sets of data by using our method. Moreover, our program runs faster as compared to some existing ones. Conclusion The famous Lempel-Ziv algorithm can efficiently extract the information on repeated patterns encoded in RNA secondary structures and makes our method an alternative to analyze the similarity of RNA secondary structures. This method will also be useful to researchers who are interested in evolutionary analysis. PMID:17090331

  19. Bayesian model of protein primary sequence for secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiwei; Dahl, David B; Vannucci, Marina; Hyun Joo; Tsai, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Determining the primary structure (i.e., amino acid sequence) of a protein has become cheaper, faster, and more accurate. Higher order protein structure provides insight into a protein's function in the cell. Understanding a protein's secondary structure is a first step towards this goal. Therefore, a number of computational prediction methods have been developed to predict secondary structure from just the primary amino acid sequence. The most successful methods use machine learning approaches that are quite accurate, but do not directly incorporate structural information. As a step towards improving secondary structure reduction given the primary structure, we propose a Bayesian model based on the knob-socket model of protein packing in secondary structure. The method considers the packing influence of residues on the secondary structure determination, including those packed close in space but distant in sequence. By performing an assessment of our method on 2 test sets we show how incorporation of multiple sequence alignment data, similarly to PSIPRED, provides balance and improves the accuracy of the predictions. Software implementing the methods is provided as a web application and a stand-alone implementation. PMID:25314659

  20. Computing the Partition Function for Kinetically Trapped RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, William A.; Clote, Peter

    2011-01-01

    An RNA secondary structure is locally optimal if there is no lower energy structure that can be obtained by the addition or removal of a single base pair, where energy is defined according to the widely accepted Turner nearest neighbor model. Locally optimal structures form kinetic traps, since any evolution away from a locally optimal structure must involve energetically unfavorable folding steps. Here, we present a novel, efficient algorithm to compute the partition function over all locally optimal secondary structures of a given RNA sequence. Our software, RNAlocopt runs in time and space. Additionally, RNAlocopt samples a user-specified number of structures from the Boltzmann subensemble of all locally optimal structures. We apply RNAlocopt to show that (1) the number of locally optimal structures is far fewer than the total number of structures – indeed, the number of locally optimal structures approximately equal to the square root of the number of all structures, (2) the structural diversity of this subensemble may be either similar to or quite different from the structural diversity of the entire Boltzmann ensemble, a situation that depends on the type of input RNA, (3) the (modified) maximum expected accuracy structure, computed by taking into account base pairing frequencies of locally optimal structures, is a more accurate prediction of the native structure than other current thermodynamics-based methods. The software RNAlocopt constitutes a technical breakthrough in our study of the folding landscape for RNA secondary structures. For the first time, locally optimal structures (kinetic traps in the Turner energy model) can be rapidly generated for long RNA sequences, previously impossible with methods that involved exhaustive enumeration. Use of locally optimal structure leads to state-of-the-art secondary structure prediction, as benchmarked against methods involving the computation of minimum free energy and of maximum expected accuracy. Web server and source code available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAlocopt/. PMID:21297972

  1. Description of protein secondary structure using dual quaternions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokov, Jitka

    2014-11-01

    The main aim of this paper is to introduce the application of dual quaternions in one interesting problem in structural biology, i.e., the description of protein structure. The secondary protein structure is a specific geometric shape and the description uses Chasles theorem which states that any rigid body displacement can be described by a screw motion. We will briefly introduce the theory of dual quaternions in connection with the screw motion. Consequently, it is shown that modeling based on dual quaternions is an elegant mathematical method and a compact formula for the description of secondary protein structure is derived using the dual quaternion calculus.

  2. Structural basis for specific recognition of multiple mRNA targets by a PUF regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yeming; Opperman, Laura; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2010-08-19

    Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 binding factor (FBF) is a founding member of the PUMILIO/FBF (PUF) family of mRNA regulatory proteins. It regulates multiple mRNAs critical for stem cell maintenance and germline development. Here, we report crystal structures of FBF in complex with 6 different 9-nt RNA sequences, including elements from 4 natural mRNAs. These structures reveal that FBF binds to conserved bases at positions 1-3 and 7-8. The key specificity determinant of FBF vs. other PUF proteins lies in positions 4-6. In FBF/RNA complexes, these bases stack directly with one another and turn away from the RNA-binding surface. A short region of FBF is sufficient to impart its unique specificity and lies directly opposite the flipped bases. We suggest that this region imposes a flattened curvature on the protein; hence, the requirement for the additional nucleotide. The principles of FBF/RNA recognition suggest a general mechanism by which PUF proteins recognize distinct families of RNAs yet exploit very nearly identical atomic contacts in doing so.

  3. Structural basis for specific recognition of multiple mRNA targets by a PUF regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yeming; Opperman, Laura; Wickens, Marvin; Tanaka Hall, Traci M.

    2011-11-02

    Caenorhabditis elegans fem-3 binding factor (FBF) is a founding member of the PUMILIO/FBF (PUF) family of mRNA regulatory proteins. It regulates multiple mRNAs critical for stem cell maintenance and germline development. Here, we report crystal structures of FBF in complex with 6 different 9-nt RNA sequences, including elements from 4 natural mRNAs. These structures reveal that FBF binds to conserved bases at positions 1-3 and 7-8. The key specificity determinant of FBF vs. other PUF proteins lies in positions 4-6. In FBF/RNA complexes, these bases stack directly with one another and turn away from the RNA-binding surface. A short region of FBF is sufficient to impart its unique specificity and lies directly opposite the flipped bases. We suggest that this region imposes a flattened curvature on the protein; hence, the requirement for the additional nucleotide. The principles of FBF/RNA recognition suggest a general mechanism by which PUF proteins recognize distinct families of RNAs yet exploit very nearly identical atomic contacts in doing so.

  4. Principles for Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Design Difficulty.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2016-02-27

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt and MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry and specific difficult-to-design motifs such as zigzags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assess "designability" of single RNA structures, as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26902426

  5. Structure-function Studies of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport of Retroviral Genomic RNA by mRNA Export Factor TAP

    SciTech Connect

    M Teplova; L Wohlbold; N Khin; E Izaurralde; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    mRNA export is mediated by the TAP-p15 heterodimer, which belongs to the family of NTF2-like export receptors. TAP-p15 heterodimers also bind to the constitutive transport element (CTE) present in simian type D retroviral RNAs, and they mediate the export of viral unspliced RNAs to the host cytoplasm. We have solved the crystal structure of the RNA recognition and leucine-rich repeat motifs of TAP bound to one symmetrical half of the CTE RNA. L-shaped conformations of protein and RNA are involved in a mutual molecular embrace on complex formation. We have monitored the impact of structure-guided mutations on binding affinities in vitro and transport assays in vivo. Our studies define the principles by which CTE RNA subverts the mRNA export receptor TAP, thereby facilitating the nuclear export of viral genomic RNAs, and, more generally, provide insights on cargo RNA recognition by mRNA export receptors.

  6. Secondary Structure Determination of Peptides and Proteins After Immobilization.

    PubMed

    North, Stella H; Taitt, Chris R

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of immobilized peptides and other small biomolecules attached to surfaces can be greatly affected by the attachment chemistry and linking moieties, resulting in altered activity and specificity. For this reason, it is critical to understand how the various aspects of surface immobilization-underlying substrate properties, tether structure, and site of linkage-affect the secondary and quaternary structures of the immobilized species. Here, we present methods for attaching cysteine-containing peptides to quartz surfaces and determining the secondary structure of surface-immobilized peptides. We specifically show that, even when covalently immobilized, changes in peptide conformation can still occur, with measurement occurring in real time. PMID:26490466

  7. Drosophila germ granules are structured and contain homotypic mRNA clusters.

    PubMed

    Trcek, Tatjana; Grosch, Markus; York, Andrew; Shroff, Hari; Lionnet, Timothe; Lehmann, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Germ granules, specialized ribonucleoprotein particles, are a hallmark of all germ cells. In Drosophila, an estimated 200 mRNAs are enriched in the germ plasm, and some of these have important, often conserved roles in germ cell formation, specification, survival and migration. How mRNAs are spatially distributed within a germ granule and whether their position defines functional properties is unclear. Here we show, using single-molecule FISH and structured illumination microscopy, a super-resolution approach, that mRNAs are spatially organized within the granule whereas core germ plasm proteins are distributed evenly throughout the granule. Multiple copies of single mRNAs organize into 'homotypic clusters' that occupy defined positions within the center or periphery of the granule. This organization, which is maintained during embryogenesis and independent of the translational or degradation activity of mRNAs, reveals new regulatory mechanisms for germ plasm mRNAs that may be applicable to other mRNA granules. PMID:26242323

  8. A New Secondary Structure Assignment Algorithm Using Cα Backbone Fragments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chen; Wang, Guishen; Liu, An; Xu, Shutan; Wang, Lincong; Zou, Shuxue

    2016-01-01

    The assignment of secondary structure elements in proteins is a key step in the analysis of their structures and functions. We have developed an algorithm, SACF (secondary structure assignment based on Cα fragments), for secondary structure element (SSE) assignment based on the alignment of Cα backbone fragments with central poses derived by clustering known SSE fragments. The assignment algorithm consists of three steps: First, the outlier fragments on known SSEs are detected. Next, the remaining fragments are clustered to obtain the central fragments for each cluster. Finally, the central fragments are used as a template to make assignments. Following a large-scale comparison of 11 secondary structure assignment methods, SACF, KAKSI and PROSS are found to have similar agreement with DSSP, while PCASSO agrees with DSSP best. SACF and PCASSO show preference to reducing residues in N and C cap regions, whereas KAKSI, P-SEA and SEGNO tend to add residues to the terminals when DSSP assignment is taken as standard. Moreover, our algorithm is able to assign subtle helices (310-helix, π-helix and left-handed helix) and make uniform assignments, as well as to detect rare SSEs in β-sheets or long helices as outlier fragments from other programs. The structural uniformity should be useful for protein structure classification and prediction, while outlier fragments underlie the structure-function relationship. PMID:26978354

  9. Rabbit milk protein genes: from mRNA identification to chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Jolivet, G; Daniel-Carlier, N; Thépot, D; Rival-Gervier, S; Houdebine, L M

    2008-03-01

    Milk protein genes are among the most intensively expressed and they are active only in epithelial mammary cells of lactating animals. They code for proteins which represent 30% of the proteins consumed by humans in developed countries. Mammary gland development occurs essentially during each pregnancy. This offers experimenters attractive models to study the expression mechanisms of genes controlled by known hormones and factors (prolactin, glucocorticoids, progesterone, insulin-like growth factor-1 and others) as well as extracellular matrix. In the mid-1970s, it became possible to identify and quantify mRNAs from higher living organisms using translation in reticulocyte lysate. A few years later, the use of radioactive cDNAs as probes made it possible for the quantification of mRNA in various physiological situations using hybridisation in the liquid phase. Gene cloning offered additional tools to measure milk protein mRNAs and also to identify transcription factors. Gene transfer in cultured mammary cells and in animals contributed greatly to these studies. It is now well established that most if not all genes of higher eukaryotes are under the control of multiple distal regulatory elements and that local modifications of the chromatin structure play an essential role in the mechanisms of differentiation from embryos to adults. The technique, known as ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation), is being implemented to identify the factors that modify chromatin structure at the milk protein gene level during embryo development, mammogenesis and lactogenesis, including the action of hormones and extracellular matrix. Transgenesis is not just a tool to study gene regulation and function, it is also currently used for various biotechnological applications including the preparation of pharmaceutical proteins in milk. This implies the design of efficient vectors capable of directing the secretion of recombinant proteins in milk at a high concentration. Milk protein gene promoters and long genomic-DNA fragments containing essentially all the regulatory elements of milk protein genes are used to optimise recombinant protein production in milk. PMID:22445034

  10. A stemloop structure directs oskar mRNA to microtubule minus ends

    PubMed Central

    Jambor, Helena; Mueller, Sandra; Bullock, Simon L.; Ephrussi, Anne

    2014-01-01

    mRNA transport coupled with translational control underlies the intracellular localization of many proteins in eukaryotic cells. This is exemplified in Drosophila, where oskar mRNA transport and translation at the posterior pole of the oocyte direct posterior patterning of the embryo. oskar localization is a multistep process. Within the oocyte, a spliced oskar localization element (SOLE) targets oskar mRNA for plus end-directed transport by kinesin-1 to the posterior pole. However, the signals mediating the initial minus end-directed, dynein-dependent transport of the mRNA from nurse cells into the oocyte have remained unknown. Here, we show that a 67-nt stemloop in the oskar 3? UTR promotes oskar mRNA delivery to the developing oocyte and that it shares functional features with the fs(1)K10 oocyte localization signal. Thus, two independent cis-acting signals, the oocyte entry signal (OES) and the SOLE, mediate sequential dynein- and kinesin-dependent phases of oskar mRNA transport during oogenesis. The OES also promotes apical localization of injected RNAs in blastoderm stage embryos, another dynein-mediated process. Similarly, when ectopically expressed in polarized cells of the follicular epithelium or salivary glands, reporter RNAs bearing the oskar OES are apically enriched, demonstrating that this element promotes mRNA localization independently of cell type. Our work sheds new light on how oskar mRNA is trafficked during oogenesis and the RNA features that mediate minus end-directed transport. PMID:24572808

  11. A stem-loop structure directs oskar mRNA to microtubule minus ends.

    PubMed

    Jambor, Helena; Mueller, Sandra; Bullock, Simon L; Ephrussi, Anne

    2014-04-01

    mRNA transport coupled with translational control underlies the intracellular localization of many proteins in eukaryotic cells. This is exemplified in Drosophila, where oskar mRNA transport and translation at the posterior pole of the oocyte direct posterior patterning of the embryo. oskar localization is a multistep process. Within the oocyte, a spliced oskar localization element (SOLE) targets oskar mRNA for plus end-directed transport by kinesin-1 to the posterior pole. However, the signals mediating the initial minus end-directed, dynein-dependent transport of the mRNA from nurse cells into the oocyte have remained unknown. Here, we show that a 67-nt stem-loop in the oskar 3' UTR promotes oskar mRNA delivery to the developing oocyte and that it shares functional features with the fs(1)K10 oocyte localization signal. Thus, two independent cis-acting signals, the oocyte entry signal (OES) and the SOLE, mediate sequential dynein- and kinesin-dependent phases of oskar mRNA transport during oogenesis. The OES also promotes apical localization of injected RNAs in blastoderm stage embryos, another dynein-mediated process. Similarly, when ectopically expressed in polarized cells of the follicular epithelium or salivary glands, reporter RNAs bearing the oskar OES are apically enriched, demonstrating that this element promotes mRNA localization independently of cell type. Our work sheds new light on how oskar mRNA is trafficked during oogenesis and the RNA features that mediate minus end-directed transport. PMID:24572808

  12. Predicting RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots by MCMC sampling.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Dirk; Nebel, Markus E

    2008-01-01

    The most probable secondary structure of an RNA molecule, given the nucleotide sequence, can be computed efficiently if a stochastic context-free grammar (SCFG) is used as the prior distribution of the secondary structure. The structures of some RNA molecules contain so-called pseudoknots. Allowing all possible configurations of pseudoknots is not compatible with context-free grammar models and makes the search for an optimal secondary structure NP-complete. We suggest a probabilistic model for RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots and present a Markov-chain Monte-Carlo Method for sampling RNA structures according to their posterior distribution for a given sequence. We favor Bayesian sampling over optimization methods in this context, because it makes the uncertainty of RNA structure predictions assessable. We demonstrate the benefit of our method in examples with tmRNA and also with simulated data. McQFold, an implementation of our method, is freely available from http://www.cs.uni-frankfurt.de/~metzler/McQFold. PMID:17589847

  13. Functional and Structural Analysis of the Internal Ribosome Entry Site Present in the mRNA of Natural Variants of the HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Maricarmen; Carvajal, Felipe; Pino, Karla; Navarrete, Camilo; Ferres, Marcela; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Sargueil, Bruno; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The 5′untranslated regions (UTR) of the full length mRNA of the HIV-1 proviral clones pNL4.3 and pLAI, harbor an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). In this study we extend this finding by demonstrating that the mRNA 5′UTRs of natural variants of HIV-1 also exhibit IRES-activity. Cap-independent translational activity was demonstrated using bicistronic mRNAs in HeLa cells and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The possibility that expression of the downstream cistron in these constructs was due to alternative splicing or to cryptic promoter activity was ruled out. The HIV-1 variants exhibited significant 5′UTR nucleotide diversity with respect to the control sequence recovered from pNL4.3. Interestingly, translational activity from the 5′UTR of some of the HIV-1 variants was enhanced relative to that observed for the 5′UTR of pNL4.3. In an attempt to explain these findings we probed the secondary structure of the variant HIV-1 5′UTRs using enzymatic and chemical approaches. Yet subsequent structural analyses did not reveal significant variations when compared to the pNL4.3-5′UTR. Thus, the increased IRES-activity observed for some of the HIV-1 variants cannot be ascribed to a specific structural modification. A model to explain these findings is proposed. PMID:22496887

  14. Mechanical tuning of elastomers via peptide secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanasekara, Nandula; Johnson, J. Casey; Korley, Lashanda T. J.

    2014-03-01

    Nature utilizes an array of design tools for engineering materials with multiple functions and tunable mechanical properties. The precise control of hierarchical structure, self-assembly, and secondary structure is essential to achieve the desired properties in bio-inspired materials design. We have developed a series of peptidic-poyurea hybrids to determine the effects of peptide secondary structure and hydrogen bonding arrangement on morphology, thermal and mechanical properties. These materials were fabricated by incorporating peptide segments containing either poly(β-benzyl-L-aspartate) or poly(ɛ-carbobenzyloxy-L-lysine) into non-chain extended polyureas to form either β-sheets or α-helix conformations based on peptide length. Infrared analysis proved the retention of peptide secondary structure when incorporated into peptidic-polyureas. The polymers containing β-sheet forming peptide blocks exhibited higher modulus and toughness due to intermolecular H-bonding. Additionally, higher peptide weight fractions lead to higher plateau moduli due to a transition of continuous domain morphology from a soft segment continuous to a fibrous and interconnected stiffer peptide domain. All the polymers exhibited microphase separated morphology with nanofibrous or ribbon-like structures. It is observed that fiber aspect ratio and percolation were influenced by the peptide secondary structure and the weight fraction.

  15. Quantifying variances in comparative RNA secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the advancement of next-generation sequencing and transcriptomics technologies, regulatory effects involving RNA, in particular RNA structural changes are being detected. These results often rely on RNA secondary structure predictions. However, current approaches to RNA secondary structure modelling produce predictions with a high variance in predictive accuracy, and we have little quantifiable knowledge about the reasons for these variances. Results In this paper we explore a number of factors which can contribute to poor RNA secondary structure prediction quality. We establish a quantified relationship between alignment quality and loss of accuracy. Furthermore, we define two new measures to quantify uncertainty in alignment-based structure predictions. One of the measures improves on the reliability score reported by PPfold, and considers alignment uncertainty as well as base-pair probabilities. The other measure considers the information entropy for SCFGs over a space of input alignments. Conclusions Our predictive accuracy improves on the PPfold reliability score. We can successfully characterize many of the underlying reasons for and variances in poor prediction. However, there is still variability unaccounted for, which we therefore suggest comes from the RNA secondary structure predictive model itself. PMID:23634662

  16. Evidence for an alternative genomic structure, mRNA and protein sequence of human ABCA13.

    PubMed

    Mae, Marten B; Stolle, Katrin; Cullen, Paul; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2013-02-25

    ABC transporters form one of the major families of transport proteins. In humans, the ABC family comprises seven subfamilies named A to G, of which the A subfamily contains twelve members. Among these are several well-characterized transporters, including ABCA1, which is involved in cellular cholesterol transport and HDL formation, and ABCA4, which is a transporter for vitamin A derivatives in photoreceptor cells. The function of another subfamily member termed ABCA13 is unknown. The human ABCA13 gene has been reported to span 450kb of genomic DNA at chromosomal locus 7p12.3 and to encode a 5058 amino acid protein that includes two unusually large exons close to the N-terminus. We now show that the gene as well as the corresponding mRNA and protein may be considerably shorter than previously thought. We used PCR and RACE to identify a genomic sequence spanning about 350kb and encoding a protein of 2323 amino acids. This corresponds to the C-terminal half of the previously reported ABCA13 protein but lacks the residues reportedly encoded by the two very big N-terminal exons. Using immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses we identified a protein of about 260kDa in size likely representing the shorter protein proposed here. Computer analyses showed that our proposed sequence contains all the structural elements of an ABCA protein and agrees well with the mouse ABCA13 protein sequence. Additionally, we identified a putative promoter region containing well-conserved TATA and CAAT boxes just upstream of our transcription start site. Overall, our data provide good evidence for an alternative human ABCA13 transcript and protein. PMID:23266639

  17. The secondary structure of milk proteins and their biological function.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, L; Holt, C

    1993-10-01

    A brief overview is given of the methods of determining and predicting secondary structure in proteins. The secondary structures of the milk serum proteins, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, lysozyme, and beta-lactoglobulin, as determined by x-ray crystallography, are compared with the results of a joint prediction method. This comparison evaluates critically the degree of success achieved and helps define what can reasonably be expected from a prediction in the absence of a known structure. The value of supplementary information from spectroscopic methods and the use of templates and sequence information from related proteins in improving the confidence of predictions are illustrated. One point that emerges is the general overprediction of helix content by the joint prediction method such that, for an all-beta protein such as beta-lactoglobulin, the method of Garnier, Osguthorpe, and Robson, applied with the correctly selected decision constants, provides a somewhat better approach. Secondary structure of the caseins can be predicted with less confidence than for globular proteins, and the results should be interpreted as evidence of a propensity to form transient secondary structures of the indicated type in view of the generally open and flexible conformation of caseins in solution. PMID:8227631

  18. Ensemble-based prediction of RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate structure prediction methods play an important role for the understanding of RNA function. Energy-based, pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction is one of the most widely used and versatile approaches, and improved methods for this task have received much attention over the past five years. Despite the impressive progress that as been achieved in this area, existing evaluations of the prediction accuracy achieved by various algorithms do not provide a comprehensive, statistically sound assessment. Furthermore, while there is increasing evidence that no prediction algorithm consistently outperforms all others, no work has been done to exploit the complementary strengths of multiple approaches. Results In this work, we present two contributions to the area of RNA secondary structure prediction. Firstly, we use state-of-the-art, resampling-based statistical methods together with a previously published and increasingly widely used dataset of high-quality RNA structures to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of existing RNA secondary structure prediction procedures. The results from this evaluation clarify the performance relationship between ten well-known existing energy-based pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structure prediction methods and clearly demonstrate the progress that has been achieved in recent years. Secondly, we introduce AveRNA, a generic and powerful method for combining a set of existing secondary structure prediction procedures into an ensemble-based method that achieves significantly higher prediction accuracies than obtained from any of its component procedures. Conclusions Our new, ensemble-based method, AveRNA, improves the state of the art for energy-based, pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structure prediction by exploiting the complementary strengths of multiple existing prediction procedures, as demonstrated using a state-of-the-art statistical resampling approach. In addition, AveRNA allows an intuitive and effective control of the trade-off between false negative and false positive base pair predictions. Finally, AveRNA can make use of arbitrary sets of secondary structure prediction procedures and can therefore be used to leverage improvements in prediction accuracy offered by algorithms and energy models developed in the future. Our data, MATLAB software and a web-based version of AveRNA are publicly available at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/labs/beta/Software/AveRNA. PMID:23617269

  19. Synthetic Polyamines to Regulate mRNA Translation through the Preservative Binding of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4E to the Cap Structure.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hirokuni; Itaka, Keiji; Uchida, Satoshi; Ishii, Takehiko; Suma, Tomoya; Miyata, Kanjiro; Oba, Makoto; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-02-10

    Polyion complexes (PICs) of mRNA with synthetic polyamines are receiving increasing attention as mRNA delivery vehicles, and the search for polyamine structure maximizing the translational efficiency of complexed mRNA becomes a critical research topic. Herein, we discovered that fine-tuning of the protonation status of synthetic polyamines can regulate mRNA translation through the preservative binding of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E to m(7)GpppN (cap structure) on the 5' end of mRNA. A series of polyamines with varied numbers of aminoethylene repeats in their side chains were prepared by an aminolysis reaction of poly(β-benzyl-l-aspartate) and paired with mRNA to form PICs. PICs formed from polyamines with higher numbers of aminoethylene repeats preserved the original translational efficiency to naked mRNA, whereas the efficiency significantly dropped by decreasing the number of aminoethylene repeats in the polyamines. Immunoprecipitation assays using anti-eIF4E antibodies revealed that the binding affinity of eIF4E to the cap structure of mRNA in the PIC was sensitive to the number of charged aminoethylene repeats in the polyamine side chain and was strongly correlated with their translational efficiency. These results indicate that the fine-tuning of the polyamine structure plays a critical role in maximizing the translational efficiency of mRNA in the PICs having potential utility as mRNA delivery vehicles. PMID:26811205

  20. JPred4: a protein secondary structure prediction server.

    PubMed

    Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Cole, Christian; Procter, James; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2015-07-01

    JPred4 (http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jpred4) is the latest version of the popular JPred protein secondary structure prediction server which provides predictions by the JNet algorithm, one of the most accurate methods for secondary structure prediction. In addition to protein secondary structure, JPred also makes predictions of solvent accessibility and coiled-coil regions. The JPred service runs up to 94 000 jobs per month and has carried out over 1.5 million predictions in total for users in 179 countries. The JPred4 web server has been re-implemented in the Bootstrap framework and JavaScript to improve its design, usability and accessibility from mobile devices. JPred4 features higher accuracy, with a blind three-state (?-helix, ?-strand and coil) secondary structure prediction accuracy of 82.0% while solvent accessibility prediction accuracy has been raised to 90% for residues <5% accessible. Reporting of results is enhanced both on the website and through the optional email summaries and batch submission results. Predictions are now presented in SVG format with options to view full multiple sequence alignments with and without gaps and insertions. Finally, the help-pages have been updated and tool-tips added as well as step-by-step tutorials. PMID:25883141

  1. JPred4: a protein secondary structure prediction server

    PubMed Central

    Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Cole, Christian; Procter, James; Barton, Geoffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    JPred4 (http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jpred4) is the latest version of the popular JPred protein secondary structure prediction server which provides predictions by the JNet algorithm, one of the most accurate methods for secondary structure prediction. In addition to protein secondary structure, JPred also makes predictions of solvent accessibility and coiled-coil regions. The JPred service runs up to 94 000 jobs per month and has carried out over 1.5 million predictions in total for users in 179 countries. The JPred4 web server has been re-implemented in the Bootstrap framework and JavaScript to improve its design, usability and accessibility from mobile devices. JPred4 features higher accuracy, with a blind three-state (?-helix, ?-strand and coil) secondary structure prediction accuracy of 82.0% while solvent accessibility prediction accuracy has been raised to 90% for residues <5% accessible. Reporting of results is enhanced both on the website and through the optional email summaries and batch submission results. Predictions are now presented in SVG format with options to view full multiple sequence alignments with and without gaps and insertions. Finally, the help-pages have been updated and tool-tips added as well as step-by-step tutorials. PMID:25883141

  2. RNA Movies 2: sequential animation of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Krger, Jan; Evers, Dirk J

    2007-07-01

    RNA Movies is a simple, yet powerful visualization tool in likeness to a media player application, which enables to browse sequential paths through RNA secondary structure landscapes. It can be used to visualize structural rearrangement processes of RNA, such as folding pathways and conformational switches, or to browse lists of alternative structure candidates. Besides extending the feature set, retaining and improving usability and availability in the web is the main aim of this new version. RNA Movies now supports the DCSE and RNAStructML input formats besides its own RNM format. Pseudoknots and 'entangled helices' can be superimposed on the RNA secondary structure layout. Publication quality output is provided through the Scalable Vector Graphics output format understood by most current drawing programs. The software has been completely re-implemented in Java to enable pure client-side operation as applet and web-start application available at the Bielefeld Bioinformatics Server http://bibiserv.techfak.uni-bielefeld.de/rnamovies. PMID:17567618

  3. Light can transform the secondary structure of silk protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Y.; Ikejiri, T.; Shiga, S.; Yamada, K.; Itaya, A.

    Fibroin is the main component of silk and is expected to be used as a novel functional material in medicine and bioelectronics. The main secondary structures of this protein are of the random-coil and the ?-sheet types. In this study, we carried out laser-induced transformation of the secondary structure, from the random-coil type to the ?-sheettype, in solid fibroin films. We prepared two types of fibroin films with the random-coil structure. One is a fibroin film doped with a dye as a photosensitizer with a small amount (1 wt%), and the other is a neat fibroin film. The former was excited at 532 nm and the latter was excited at 266 nm. Irradiations were carried out with fluences much lower than each ablation threshold. The excitation of the dye at 532 nm did not affect the secondary structure of the random-coil type. By contrast, 266-nm laser irradiation, which excites tryptophan (an amino-acid residue) involved in fibroin, created the ?-sheetdomain in the film. The structural transformation was revealed by infrared absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  4. Computation of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, K; Kitamura, Y; Yoshikura, H

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a computer analysis of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids. For a given single stranded nucleic acid, we generated "structure map" which included all the annealing structures in the sequence. The map was transformed into "energy map" by rough approximation; here, the energy level of every pairing structure consisting of more than 2 successive nucleic acid pairs was calculated. By using the "energy map", the probability of occurrence of each annealed structure was computed, i.e., the structure was computed statistically. The basis of computation was the 8-queen problem in the chess game. The validity of our computer programme was checked by computing tRNA structure which has been well established. Successful application of this programme to small nuclear RNAs of various origins is demonstrated. PMID:6198622

  5. Computation of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Kitamura, Y; Yoshikura, H

    1984-01-11

    This paper presents a computer analysis of statistical secondary structure of nucleic acids. For a given single stranded nucleic acid, we generated "structure map" which included all the annealing structures in the sequence. The map was transformed into "energy map" by rough approximation; here, the energy level of every pairing structure consisting of more than 2 successive nucleic acid pairs was calculated. By using the "energy map", the probability of occurrence of each annealed structure was computed, i.e., the structure was computed statistically. The basis of computation was the 8-queen problem in the chess game. The validity of our computer programme was checked by computing tRNA structure which has been well established. Successful application of this programme to small nuclear RNAs of various origins is demonstrated. PMID:6198622

  6. Prediction of protein continuum secondary structure with probabilistic models based on NMR solved structures

    PubMed Central

    Bodn, Mikael; Yuan, Zheng; Bailey, Timothy L

    2006-01-01

    Background The structure of proteins may change as a result of the inherent flexibility of some protein regions. We develop and explore probabilistic machine learning methods for predicting a continuum secondary structure, i.e. assigning probabilities to the conformational states of a residue. We train our methods using data derived from high-quality NMR models. Results Several probabilistic models not only successfully estimate the continuum secondary structure, but also provide a categorical output on par with models directly trained on categorical data. Importantly, models trained on the continuum secondary structure are also better than their categorical counterparts at identifying the conformational state for structurally ambivalent residues. Conclusion Cascaded probabilistic neural networks trained on the continuum secondary structure exhibit better accuracy in structurally ambivalent regions of proteins, while sustaining an overall classification accuracy on par with standard, categorical prediction methods. PMID:16478545

  7. Proposed secondary structure of eukaryotic U14 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Shanab, G M; Maxwell, E S

    1991-01-01

    U14 snRNA is a small nuclear RNA that plays a role in the processing of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA. We have investigated the folded structure of this snRNA species using comparative analysis of evolutionarily diverse U14 snRNA primary sequences coupled with nuclease digestion analysis of mouse U14 snRNA. Covariant nucleotide analysis of aligned mouse, rat, human, and yeast U14 snRNA primary sequences suggested a basic folding pattern in which the 5' and 3' termini of all U14 snRNAs were base-paired. Subsequent digestion of mouse U14 snRNA with mung bean (single-strand-specific), T2 (single-strand-preferential), and V1 (double-strand-specific) nucleases defined the major and minor cleavage sites for each nuclease. This digestion data was then utilized in concert with the comparative sequence analysis of aligned U14 snRNA primary sequences to refine the secondary structure model suggested by computer-predicted folding. The proposed secondary structure of U14 snRNA is comprised of three major hairpin/helical regions which includes the helix of base-paired 5' and 3' termini. Strict and semiconservative covariation of specific base-pairs within two of the three major helices, as well as nucleotide changes that strengthen or extend base-paired regions, support this folded conformation as the evolutionary conserved secondary structure for U14 snRNA. Images PMID:1923756

  8. A dynamic Bayesian network approach to protein secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Zhu, Huaiqiu; She, Zhen-Su

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein secondary structure prediction method based on probabilistic models such as hidden Markov model (HMM) appeals to many because it provides meaningful information relevant to sequence-structure relationship. However, at present, the prediction accuracy of pure HMM-type methods is much lower than that of machine learning-based methods such as neural networks (NN) or support vector machines (SVM). Results In this paper, we report a new method of probabilistic nature for protein secondary structure prediction, based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBN). The new method models the PSI-BLAST profile of a protein sequence using a multivariate Gaussian distribution, and simultaneously takes into account the dependency between the profile and secondary structure and the dependency between profiles of neighboring residues. In addition, a segment length distribution is introduced for each secondary structure state. Tests show that the DBN method has made a significant improvement in the accuracy compared to other pure HMM-type methods. Further improvement is achieved by combining the DBN with an NN, a method called DBNN, which shows better Q3 accuracy than many popular methods and is competitive to the current state-of-the-arts. The most interesting feature of DBN/DBNN is that a significant improvement in the prediction accuracy is achieved when combined with other methods by a simple consensus. Conclusion The DBN method using a Gaussian distribution for the PSI-BLAST profile and a high-ordered dependency between profiles of neighboring residues produces significantly better prediction accuracy than other HMM-type probabilistic methods. Owing to their different nature, the DBN and NN combine to form a more accurate method DBNN. Future improvement may be achieved by combining DBNN with a method of SVM type. PMID:18218144

  9. Structure of the histone mRNA hairpin required for cell cycle regulation of histone gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Zanier, Katia; Luyten, Ingrid; Crombie, Catriona; Muller, Berndt; Schümperli, Daniel; Linge, Jens P; Nilges, Michael; Sattler, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Expression of replication-dependent histone genes requires a conserved hairpin RNA element in the 3' untranslated regions of poly(A)-less histone mRNAs. The 3' hairpin element is recognized by the hairpin-binding protein or stem-loop-binding protein (HBP/SLBP). This protein-RNA interaction is important for the endonucleolytic cleavage generating the mature mRNA 3' end. The 3' hairpin and presumably HBP/SLBP are also required for nucleocytoplasmic transport, translation, and stability of histone mRNAs. RNA 3' processing and mRNA stability are both regulated during the cell cycle. Here, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of a 24-mer RNA comprising a mammalian histone RNA hairpin using heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The hairpin adopts a novel UUUC tetraloop conformation that is stabilized by base stacking involving the first and third loop uridines and a closing U-A base pair, and by hydrogen bonding between the first and third uridines in the tetraloop. The HBP interaction of hairpin RNA variants was analyzed in band shift experiments. Particularly important interactions for HBP recognition are mediated by the closing U-A base pair and the first and third loop uridines, whose Watson-Crick functional groups are exposed towards the major groove of the RNA hairpin. The results obtained provide novel structural insight into the interaction of the histone 3' hairpin with HBP, and thus the regulation of histone mRNA metabolism. PMID:11871659

  10. Structural basis for Pan3 binding to Pan2 and its function in mRNA recruitment and deadenylation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jana; Valkov, Eugene; Allen, Mark D; Meineke, Birthe; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Olsen, Tayla M; Robinson, Carol V; Bycroft, Mark; Stewart, Murray; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-07-17

    The conserved eukaryotic Pan2-Pan3 deadenylation complex shortens cytoplasmic mRNA 3' polyA tails to regulate mRNA stability. Although the exonuclease activity resides in Pan2, efficient deadenylation requires Pan3. The mechanistic role of Pan3 is unclear. Here, we show that Pan3 binds RNA directly both through its pseudokinase/C-terminal domain and via an N-terminal zinc finger that binds polyA RNA specifically. In contrast, isolated Pan2 is unable to bind RNA. Pan3 binds to the region of Pan2 that links its N-terminal WD40 domain to the C-terminal part that contains the exonuclease, with a 2:1 stoichiometry. The crystal structure of the Pan2 linker region bound to a Pan3 homodimer shows how the unusual structural asymmetry of the Pan3 dimer is used to form an extensive high-affinity interaction. This binding allows Pan3 to supply Pan2 with substrate polyA RNA, facilitating efficient mRNA deadenylation by the intact Pan2-Pan3 complex. PMID:24872509

  11. Protein secondary structure controlled with light and photoresponsive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Chun; Lee, C Ted

    2006-08-17

    The interaction of a light-responsive azobenzene surfactant with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been investigated as a means to examine photoreversible changes in protein secondary structure. The cationic azobenzene surfactant undergoes a reversible photoisomeriztion upon exposure to the appropriate wavelength of light, with the visible-light (trans) form being more hydrophobic and, thus, inducing a greater degree of protein unfolding than the UV-light (cis) form. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is used to provide quantitative information on the secondary structure elements in the protein (alpha-helices, beta-strands, beta-turns, and unordered domains). Comparing the secondary structure changes induced by light illumination in the presence of the photoresponsive surfactant with previous measurements of the tertiary structure of BSA obtained from small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) allows the three discrete conformation changes in BSA to be fully characterized. At low surfactant concentrations, an alpha-helix --> beta-structure rearrangement is observed as the tertiary structure of BSA changes from a heart-shaped to a distorted heart-shaped conformation. Intermediate surfactant concentrations lead to a dramatic decrease in the alpha-helix fraction in favor of unordered structures, which is accompanied by an unfolding of the C-terminal portion of the protein as evidenced from SANS. Further increases in photosurfactant concentration lead to a beta --> unordered transition with the protein adopting a highly elongated conformation in solution. Each of these protein conformational changes can be precisely and reversibly controlled with light illumination, as revealed through FT-IR spectra collected during repeated visible-light <--> UV-light cycles. PMID:16898769

  12. A graphic approach to evaluate algorithms of secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C T; Zhang, R

    2000-04-01

    Algorithms of secondary structure prediction have undergone the developments of nearly 30 years. However, the problem of how to appropriately evaluate and compare algorithms has not yet completely solved. A graphic method to evaluate algorithms of secondary structure prediction has been proposed here. Traditionally, the performance of an algorithm is evaluated by a number, i.e., accuracy of various definitions. Instead of a number, we use a graph to completely evaluate an algorithm, in which the mapping points are distributed in a three-dimensional space. Each point represents the predictive result of the secondary structure of a protein. Because the distribution of mapping points in the 3D space generally contains more information than a number or a set of numbers, it is expected that algorithms may be evaluated and compared by the proposed graphic method more objectively. Based on the point distribution, six evaluation parameters are proposed, which describe the overall performance of the algorithm evaluated. Furthermore, the graphic method is simple and intuitive. As an example of application, two advanced algorithms, i.e., the PHD and NNpredict methods, are evaluated and compared. It is shown that there is still much room for further improvement for both algorithms. It is pointed out that the accuracy for predicting either the alpha-helix or beta-strand in proteins with higher alpha-helix or beta-strand content, respectively, should be greatly improved for both algorithms. PMID:10798528

  13. Coating concrete secondary containment structures exposed to agrichemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, M.F.; Nguyen, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    Concrete has traditionally been the material of choice for building secondary containment structures because it is relatively inexpensive and has structural properties which make it ideal for supporting the loads of vehicles and large tanks. However, concrete`s chemical properties make it susceptible to corrosion by some common fertilizers. Though fairly impervious to water movement, concrete is easily penetrated by vapors and solvents. It is also prone to cracking. For these reasons, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believes that concrete alone may not provide an effective barrier to pesticide movement and has proposed that concrete in pesticide secondary containment structures be sealed or coated to reduce its permeability. Some state secondary containment regulations require that concrete exposed to fertilizers and pesticides be sealed or protected with a coating. Lacking guidelines, some retailers have used penetrating sealants to satisfy the law, even though these products provide little protection from chemical attack nor do they prevent pesticide egress. Other retailers who have applied thick film coatings which were properly selected have had disastrous results because the application was poorly done. Consequently, much skepticism exists regarding the performance and benefit of protective coatings.

  14. Role of the highly structured 5'-end region of MDR1 mRNA in P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Randle, Rebecca A; Raguz, Selina; Higgins, Christopher F; Yage, Ernesto

    2007-09-15

    Overexpression of P-glycoprotein, encoded by the MDR1 (multidrug resistance 1) gene, is often responsible for multidrug resistance in acute myeloid leukaemia. We have shown previously that MDR1 (P-glycoprotein) mRNA levels in K562 leukaemic cells exposed to cytotoxic drugs are up-regulated but P-glycoprotein expression is translationally blocked. In the present study we show that cytotoxic drugs down-regulate the Akt signalling pathway, leading to hypophosphorylation of the translational repressor 4E-BP [eIF (eukaryotic initiation factor) 4E-binding protein] and decreased eIF4E availability. The 5'-end of MDR1 mRNA adopts a highly-structured fold. Fusion of this structured 5'-region upstream of a reporter gene impeded its efficient translation, specifically under cytotoxic stress, by reducing its competitive ability for the translational machinery. The effect of cytotoxic stress could be mimicked in vivo by blocking the phosphorylation of 4E-BP by mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) using rapamycin or eIF4E siRNA (small interfering RNA), and relieved by overexpression of either eIF4E or constitutively-active Akt. Upon drug exposure MDR1 mRNA was up-regulated, apparently stochastically, in a small proportion of cells. Only in these cells could MDR1 mRNA compete successfully for the reduced amounts of eIF4E and translate P-glycoprotein. Consequent drug efflux and restoration of eIF4E availability results in a feed-forward relief from stress-induced translational repression and to the acquisition of drug resistance. PMID:17573715

  15. Effect of acute resistance exercise and sex on human patellar tendon structural and regulatory mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Bridget E.; Carroll, Chad C.; Jemiolo, Bozena; Trappe, Scott W.; Magnusson, S. Peter; Dssing, Simon; Kjaer, Michael; Trappe, Todd A.

    2009-01-01

    Tendon is mainly composed of collagen and an aqueous matrix of proteoglycans that are regulated by enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Although it is known that resistance exercise (RE) and sex influence tendon metabolism and mechanical properties, it is uncertain what structural and regulatory components contribute to these responses. We measured the mRNA expression of tendon's main fibrillar collagens (type I and type III) and the main proteoglycans (decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin, and versican) and the regulatory enzymes MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 at rest and after RE. Patellar tendon biopsy samples were taken from six individuals (3 men and 3 women) before and 4 h after a bout of RE and from a another six individuals (3 men and 3 women) before and 24 h after RE. Resting mRNA expression was used for sex comparisons (6 men and 6 women). Collagen type I, collagen type III, and MMP-2 were downregulated (P < 0.05) 4 h after RE but were unchanged (P > 0.05) 24 h after RE. All other genes remained unchanged (P > 0.05) after RE. Women had higher resting mRNA expression (P < 0.05) of collagen type III and a trend (P = 0.08) toward lower resting expression of MMP-3 than men. All other genes were not influenced (P > 0.05) by sex. Acute RE appears to stimulate a change in collagen type I, collagen type III, and MMP-2 gene regulation in the human patellar tendon. Sex influences the structural and regulatory mRNA expression of tendon. PMID:19023016

  16. Improving the accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction using structural alignment

    PubMed Central

    Montgomerie, Scott; Sundararaj, Shan; Gallin, Warren J; Wishart, David S

    2006-01-01

    Background The accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction has steadily improved over the past 30 years. Now many secondary structure prediction methods routinely achieve an accuracy (Q3) of about 75%. We believe this accuracy could be further improved by including structure (as opposed to sequence) database comparisons as part of the prediction process. Indeed, given the large size of the Protein Data Bank (>35,000 sequences), the probability of a newly identified sequence having a structural homologue is actually quite high. Results We have developed a method that performs structure-based sequence alignments as part of the secondary structure prediction process. By mapping the structure of a known homologue (sequence ID >25%) onto the query protein's sequence, it is possible to predict at least a portion of that query protein's secondary structure. By integrating this structural alignment approach with conventional (sequence-based) secondary structure methods and then combining it with a "jury-of-experts" system to generate a consensus result, it is possible to attain very high prediction accuracy. Using a sequence-unique test set of 1644 proteins from EVA, this new method achieves an average Q3 score of 81.3%. Extensive testing indicates this is approximately 4–5% better than any other method currently available. Assessments using non sequence-unique test sets (typical of those used in proteome annotation or structural genomics) indicate that this new method can achieve a Q3 score approaching 88%. Conclusion By using both sequence and structure databases and by exploiting the latest techniques in machine learning it is possible to routinely predict protein secondary structure with an accuracy well above 80%. A program and web server, called PROTEUS, that performs these secondary structure predictions is accessible at . For high throughput or batch sequence analyses, the PROTEUS programs, databases (and server) can be downloaded and run locally. PMID:16774686

  17. Identification of local variations within secondary structures of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prasun; Bansal, Manju

    2015-05-01

    Secondary-structure elements (SSEs) play an important role in the folding of proteins. Identification of SSEs in proteins is a common problem in structural biology. A new method, ASSP (Assignment of Secondary Structure in Proteins), using only the path traversed by the C(α) atoms has been developed. The algorithm is based on the premise that the protein structure can be divided into continuous or uniform stretches, which can be defined in terms of helical parameters, and depending on their values the stretches can be classified into different SSEs, namely α-helices, 310-helices, π-helices, extended β-strands and polyproline II (PPII) and other left-handed helices. The methodology was validated using an unbiased clustering of these parameters for a protein data set consisting of 1008 protein chains, which suggested that there are seven well defined clusters associated with different SSEs. Apart from α-helices and extended β-strands, 310-helices and π-helices were also found to occur in substantial numbers. ASSP was able to discriminate non-α-helical segments from flanking α-helices, which were often identified as part of α-helices by other algorithms. ASSP can also lead to the identification of novel SSEs. It is believed that ASSP could provide a better understanding of the finer nuances of protein secondary structure and could make an important contribution to the better understanding of comparatively less frequently occurring structural motifs. At the same time, it can contribute to the identification of novel SSEs. A standalone version of the program for the Linux as well as the Windows operating systems is freely downloadable and a web-server version is also available at http://nucleix.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/assp/index.php. PMID:25945573

  18. Evolution of quantitative methods in protein secondary structure determination via deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Roach, Carol A; Simpson, John V; JiJi, Renee D

    2012-02-01

    Deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectra is sensitive to secondary structural motifs but, similar to circular dichroism (CD) and infrared spectroscopy, requires the application of multivariate and advanced statistical analysis methods to resolve the pure secondary structure Raman spectra (PSSRS) for determination of secondary structure composition. Secondary structure motifs are selectively enhanced by different excitation wavelengths, a characteristic that inspired the first methods for quantifying secondary structures by DUVRR. This review traces the evolution of multivariate methods and their application to secondary structure composition analyses of proteins by DUVRR spectroscopy from the first experiments using two-wavelengths, and culminating with recent studies utilizing time-resolved DUVRR measurements. PMID:22146490

  19. Secondary electron emission from surfaces with small structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhanoev, A. R.; Spahn, F.; Yaroshenko, V.; Lhr, H.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-09-01

    It is found that for objects possessing small surface structures with differing radii of curvature the secondary electron emission (SEE) yield may be significantly higher than for objects with smooth surfaces of the same material. The effect is highly pronounced for surface structures of nanometer scale, often providing a more than 100 % increase of the SEE yield. The results also show that the SEE yield from surfaces with structure does not show a universal dependence on the energy of the primary, incident electrons as it is found for flat surfaces in experiments. We derive conditions for the applicability of the conventional formulation of SEE using the simplifying assumption of universal dependence. Our analysis provides a basis for studying low-energy electron emission from nanometer structured surfaces under a penetrating electron beam important in many technological applications.

  20. Machine learning approach for the prediction of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    King, R D; Sternberg, M J

    1990-11-20

    PROMIS (protein machine induction system), a program for machine learning, was used to generalize rules that characterize the relationship between primary and secondary structure in globular proteins. These rules can be used to predict an unknown secondary structure from a known primary structure. The symbolic induction method used by PROMIS was specifically designed to produce rules that are meaningful in terms of chemical properties of the residues. The rules found were compared with existing knowledge of protein structure: some features of the rules were already recognized (e.g. amphipathic nature of alpha-helices). Other features are not understood, and are under investigation. The rules produced a prediction accuracy for three states (alpha-helix, beta-strand and coil) of 60% for all proteins, 73% for proteins of known alpha domain type, 62% for proteins of known beta domain type and 59% for proteins of known alpha/beta domain type. We conclude that machine learning is a useful tool in the examination of the large databases generated in molecular biology. PMID:2254939

  1. Interactions of mRNAs and gRNAs involved in trypanosome mitochondrial RNA editing: Structure probing of a gRNA bound to its cognate mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Laura E.; Koslowsky, Donna J.

    2006-01-01

    Expression of mitochondrial genes in Trypanosoma brucei requires RNA editing of its mRNA transcripts. During editing, uridylates are precisely inserted and deleted as directed by the gRNA template to create the protein open reading frame. This process involves the bimolecular interaction of the gRNA with its cognate pre-edited mRNA and the assembly of a protein complex with the enzymatic machinery required. While a considerable amount of work has been done identifying the protein components of the editing complex, very little is known about how a functional editosome is assembled. In addition, the importance of RNA structure in establishing a functional editing complex is poorly understood. Work in our lab suggests that different mRNA/gRNA pairs can form similar secondary structures suggesting that a common core architecture may be important for editosome recognition and function. Using solution structure probing, we have investigated the structure of theinitiating gRNA, gCYb-558, in the mRNA/gRNA complex with pre-edited apocytochrome b mRNA. Our data indicate that the stemloop formed by the guiding region of the gRNA alone is maintained in its interaction with the pre-edited message. In addition, our data suggest that a gRNA stemloop structure is maintained through the first few editing events by the use of alternative base-pairing with the U-tail. PMID:16618968

  2. Protein secondary structure prediction using logic-based machine learning.

    PubMed

    Muggleton, S; King, R D; Sternberg, M J

    1992-10-01

    Many attempts have been made to solve the problem of predicting protein secondary structure from the primary sequence but the best performance results are still disappointing. In this paper, the use of a machine learning algorithm which allows relational descriptions is shown to lead to improved performance. The Inductive Logic Programming computer program, Golem, was applied to learning secondary structure prediction rules for alpha/alpha domain type proteins. The input to the program consisted of 12 non-homologous proteins (1612 residues) of known structure, together with a background knowledge describing the chemical and physical properties of the residues. Golem learned a small set of rules that predict which residues are part of the alpha-helices--based on their positional relationships and chemical and physical properties. The rules were tested on four independent non-homologous proteins (416 residues) giving an accuracy of 81% (+/- 2%). This is an improvement, on identical data, over the previously reported result of 73% by King and Sternberg (1990, J. Mol. Biol., 216, 441-457) using the machine learning program PROMIS, and of 72% using the standard Garnier-Osguthorpe-Robson method. The best previously reported result in the literature for the alpha/alpha domain type is 76%, achieved using a neural net approach. Machine learning also has the advantage over neural network and statistical methods in producing more understandable results. PMID:1480619

  3. Parallel protein secondary structure prediction based on neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Altun, Gulsah; Tian, Xinmin; Harrison, Robert; Tai, Phang C; Pan, Yi

    2004-01-01

    Protein secondary structure prediction has a fundamental influence on today's bioinformatics research. In this work, binary and tertiary classifiers of protein secondary structure prediction are implemented on Denoeux belief neural network (DBNN) architecture. Hydrophobicity matrix, orthogonal matrix, BLOSUM62 and PSSM (position specific scoring matrix) are experimented separately as the encoding schemes for DBNN. The experimental results contribute to the design of new encoding schemes. New binary classifier for Helix versus not Helix ( approximately H) for DBNN produces prediction accuracy of 87% when PSSM is used for the input profile. The performance of DBNN binary classifier is comparable to other best prediction methods. The good test results for binary classifiers open a new approach for protein structure prediction with neural networks. Due to the time consuming task of training the neural networks, Pthread and OpenMP are employed to parallelize DBNN in the hyperthreading enabled Intel architecture. Speedup for 16 Pthreads is 4.9 and speedup for 16 OpenMP threads is 4 in the 4 processors shared memory architecture. Both speedup performance of OpenMP and Pthread is superior to that of other research. With the new parallel training algorithm, thousands of amino acids can be processed in reasonable amount of time. Our research also shows that hyperthreading technology for Intel architecture is efficient for parallel biological algorithms. PMID:17270901

  4. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin wasmore » determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable dynamic pathways that facilitate the formation of aggregates and, eventually, amyloid fibrils.« less

  5. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable dynamic pathways that facilitate the formation of aggregates and, eventually, amyloid fibrils.

  6. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, ?-helices, and ?-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of ?-helix and ?-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards ?-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly ?-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable dynamic pathways that facilitate the formation of aggregates and, eventually, amyloid fibrils. PMID:26221949

  7. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses…

  8. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses

  9. Peptoid nanosheets exhibit a new secondary-structure motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannige, Ranjan V.; Haxton, Thomas K.; Proulx, Caroline; Robertson, Ellen J.; Battigelli, Alessia; Butterfoss, Glenn L.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Whitelam, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    A promising route to the synthesis of protein-mimetic materials that are capable of complex functions, such as molecular recognition and catalysis, is provided by sequence-defined peptoid polymers--structural relatives of biologically occurring polypeptides. Peptoids, which are relatively non-toxic and resistant to degradation, can fold into defined structures through a combination of sequence-dependent interactions. However, the range of possible structures that are accessible to peptoids and other biological mimetics is unknown, and our ability to design protein-like architectures from these polymer classes is limited. Here we use molecular-dynamics simulations, together with scattering and microscopy data, to determine the atomic-resolution structure of the recently discovered peptoid nanosheet, an ordered supramolecular assembly that extends macroscopically in only two dimensions. Our simulations show that nanosheets are structurally and dynamically heterogeneous, can be formed only from peptoids of certain lengths, and are potentially porous to water and ions. Moreover, their formation is enabled by the peptoids' adoption of a secondary structure that is not seen in the natural world. This structure, a zigzag pattern that we call a ?(`sigma')-strand, results from the ability of adjacent backbone monomers to adopt opposed rotational states, thereby allowing the backbone to remain linear and untwisted. Linear backbones tiled in a brick-like way form an extended two-dimensional nanostructure, the ?-sheet. The binary rotational-state motif of the ?-strand is not seen in regular protein structures, which are usually built from one type of rotational state. We also show that the concept of building regular structures from multiple rotational states can be generalized beyond the peptoid nanosheet system.

  10. Hot spot of structural ambivalence in prion protein revealed by secondary structure principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Norifumi

    2014-08-21

    The conformational conversion of proteins into an aggregation-prone form is a common feature of various neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Huntington's, Parkinson's, and prion diseases. In the early stage of prion diseases, secondary structure conversion in prion protein (PrP) causing ?-sheet expansion facilitates the formation of a pathogenic isoform with a high content of ?-sheets and strong aggregation tendency to form amyloid fibrils. Herein, we propose a straightforward method to extract essential information regarding the secondary structure conversion of proteins from molecular simulations, named secondary structure principal component analysis (SSPCA). The definite existence of a PrP isoform with an increased ?-sheet structure was confirmed in a free-energy landscape constructed by mapping protein structural data into a reduced space according to the principal components determined by the SSPCA. We suggest a "spot" of structural ambivalence in PrP-the C-terminal part of helix 2-that lacks a strong intrinsic secondary structure, thus promoting a partial ?-helix-to-?-sheet conversion. This result is important to understand how the pathogenic conformational conversion of PrP is initiated in prion diseases. The SSPCA has great potential to solve various challenges in studying highly flexible molecular systems, such as intrinsically disordered proteins, structurally ambivalent peptides, and chameleon sequences. PMID:25101991

  11. DNA secondary structures: stability and function of G-quadruplex structures

    PubMed Central

    Bochman, Matthew L.; Paeschke, Katrin; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the canonical double helix, DNA can fold into various other inter- and intramolecular secondary structures. Although many such structures were long thought to be in vitro artefacts, bioinformatics demonstrates that DNA sequences capable of forming these structures are conserved throughout evolution, suggesting the existence of non-B-form DNA in vivo. In addition, genes whose products promote formation or resolution of these structures are found in diverse organisms, and a growing body of work suggests that the resolution of DNA secondary structures is critical for genome integrity. This Review focuses on emerging evidence relating to the characteristics of G-quadruplex structures and the possible influence of such structures on genomic stability and cellular processes, such as transcription. PMID:23032257

  12. Platelet-derived growth factor A chain: gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Bonthron, D T; Morton, C C; Orkin, S H; Collins, T

    1988-03-01

    Genomic clones encoding the A chain of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) have been isolated. The gene contains seven exons spanning about 24 kilobases of DNA. The positions of intervening sequences closely match those of the related B-chain (c-sis) gene on chromosome 22. In situ hybridization was used to localize the PDGF A-chain gene to the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 7 (7p21-p22). Within the (G + C)-rich 5' region, a single transcriptional start site was identified approximately equal to 36 base pairs downstream of a TATAA consensus promoter element. The three size classes of A-chain mRNA probably arise by selection of alternative poly(A) sites in exon 7, but only a single consensus AATAAA signal was identified in this region. Two functionally different A-chain precursors, which differ by the presence or absence of a basic C terminus, are generated as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 6. This and other structural features of the A-chain gene suggest that PDGF expression may be modulated at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:3422746

  13. Gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing of the human VCAM1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Fries, J.W.U.; Williams, A.J.; Sultan, P.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Collins, T. ); Eddy, R.; Byers, M.; Shows, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein adhesive for certain blood leukocytes and tumor cells, which is expressed by activated endothelium in a variety of pathologic conditions including atherosclerosis. Genomic clones encoding the VCAM1 gene were isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. The gene, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, contains 9 exons spanning {approx}25 kilobases of DNA. Exons 2-8 contain C2 or H-type immunoglobulin domains. At least two different VCAM-1 precursors can be generated from the human gene as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 5. A consensus TATAA element is located upstream of the transcriptional start site. The VCAM1 promoter contains consensus binding sites for NF-{kappa}B, the GATA family of transcription factors, as well as an AP1 site. The VCAM1 gene was assigned to the 1p31-32 region of chromosome 1 based on the analysis of human-mouse hybrid cell lines and in situ hybridization. Structural analysis of the human VCAM1 gene provides the basis for alternative mRNA splicing and an initial approach to elucidating the regulation of VCAM-1 expression.

  14. Gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing of the human VCAM1 gene.

    PubMed

    Cybulsky, M I; Fries, J W; Williams, A J; Sultan, P; Eddy, R; Byers, M; Shows, T; Gimbrone, M A; Collins, T

    1991-09-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein adhesive for certain blood leukocytes and tumor cells, which is expressed by activated endothelium in a variety of pathologic conditions including atherosclerosis. Genomic clones encoding the VCAM1 gene were isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. The gene, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, contains 9 exons spanning approximately 25 kilobases of DNA. Exons 2-8 contain C2 or H-type immunoglobulin domains. At least two different VCAM-1 precursors can be generated from the human gene as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 5. A consensus TATAA element is located upstream of the transcriptional start site. The VCAM1 promoter contains consensus binding sites for NF-kappa B, the GATA family of transcription factors, as well as an AP1 site. The VCAM1 gene was assigned to the 1p31-32 region of chromosome 1 based on the analysis of human-mouse hybrid cell lines and in situ hybridization. Structural analysis of the human VCAM1 gene provides the basis for alternative mRNA splicing and an initial approach to elucidating the regulation of VCAM-1 expression. PMID:1715583

  15. Secondary Structure of Huntingtin Amino-Terminal Region

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mee Whi; Chelliah, Yogarany; Kim, Sang Woo; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2010-09-21

    Huntington's disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder resulting from polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion (>36Q) within the first exon of Huntingtin (Htt) protein. We applied X-ray crystallography to determine the secondary structure of the first exon (EX1) of Htt17Q. The structure of Htt17Q-EX1 consists of an amino-terminal {alpha} helix, poly17Q region, and polyproline helix formed by the proline-rich region. The poly17Q region adopts multiple conformations in the structure, including {alpha} helix, random coil, and extended loop. The conformation of the poly17Q region is influenced by the conformation of neighboring protein regions, demonstrating the importance of the native protein context. We propose that the conformational flexibility of the polyQ region observed in our structure is a common characteristic of many amyloidogenic proteins. We further propose that the pathogenic polyQ expansion in the Htt protein increases the length of the random coil, which promotes aggregation and facilitates abnormal interactions with other proteins in cells.

  16. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility. PMID:26752681

  17. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility. PMID:26752681

  18. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility.

  19. On the base-stacking in the 5'-terminal cap structure of mRNA: a fluorescence study.

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Y; Takahashi, S; Yamamoto, T; Tsuboi, M; Hattori, M; Miura, K; Yamaguchi, K; Ohtani, S; Hata, T

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescence at 370 nm of the 7-methylguanosine residue (m7G) is found to be quenched when the base residue is involved in a stacking interaction with the adenosine residue in the cap structure m7G5' pppA of an eukaryotic mRNA. On the basis of the observed degree of quenching, the amounts of the stacked and unstacked forms in the cap structure have been determined at various temperatures and pH's. It has been found that at pH 6.2 effective enthalpy and entropy in the unstacked leads to stacked change are delta H degrees = 4.4 +/- 0.1 kcal/mole and delta S degrees = - 14.3 +/- 0.2 e.u., respectively. The pka value for the m7G residue is found to be 7.7 at 10 degrees C and 7.3 at 30 degrees C. The stacked structure seems to be less favourable in the deprotonated form that occurs in the higher pH solution. A similar analysis of some other cap structures indicates that the stacked form in m7G5' pppN structure is favourable if N is a purine nucleoside or a 2'-O-methylpyrimidine nucleoside but not for an unmethylated pyrimidine nucleoside. PMID:7443542

  20. Conformational Features of Topologically Classified RNA Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Jimmy Ka Ho; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2012-01-01

    Background Current RNA secondary structure prediction approaches predict prevalent pseudoknots such as the H-pseudoknot and kissing hairpin. The number of possible structures increases drastically when more complex pseudoknots are considered, thus leading to computational limitations. On the other hand, the enormous population of possible structures means not all of them appear in real RNA molecules. Therefore, it is of interest to understand how many of them really exist and the reasons for their preferred existence over the others, as any new findings revealed by this study might enhance the capability of future structure prediction algorithms for more accurate prediction of complex pseudoknots. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel algorithm was devised to estimate the exact number of structural possibilities for a pseudoknot constructed with a specified number of base pair stems. Then, topological classification was applied to classify RNA pseudoknotted structures from data in the RNA STRAND database. By showing the vast possibilities and the real population, it is clear that most of these plausible complex pseudoknots are not observed. Moreover, from these classified motifs that exist in nature, some features were identified for further investigation. It was found that some features are related to helical stacking. Other features are still left open to discover underlying tertiary interactions. Conclusions Results from topological classification suggest that complex pseudoknots are usually some well-known motifs that are themselves complex or the interaction results of some special motifs. Heuristics can be proposed to predict the essential parts of these complex motifs, even if the required thermodynamic parameters are currently unknown. PMID:22792195

  1. Hairpin structure within the 3?UTR of DNA polymerase ? mRNA acts as a post-transcriptional regulatory element and interacts with Hax-1

    PubMed Central

    Sarnowska, El?bieta; Grzybowska, Ewa A.; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Konopi?ski, Ryszard; Wilczy?ska, Anna; Szwarc, Maria; Sarnowski, Tomasz J.; Krzy?osiak, W?odzimierz J.; Siedlecki, Janusz A.

    2007-01-01

    Aberrant expression of DNA polymerase ?, a key enzyme involved in base excision repair, leads to genetic instability and carcinogenesis. Pol ? expression has been previously shown to be regulated at the level of transcription, but there is also evidence of post-transcriptional regulation, since rat transcripts undergo alternative polyadenylation, and the resulting 3?UTR contain at least one regulatory element. Data presented here indicate that RNA of the short 3?UTR folds to form a strong secondary structure (hairpin). Its regulatory role was established utilizing a luciferase-based reporter system. Further studies led to the identification of a protein factor, which binds to this elementthe anti-apoptotic, cytoskeleton-related protein Hax-1. The results of in vitro binding analysis indicate that the formation of the RNAprotein complex is significantly impaired by disruption of the hairpin motif. We demonstrate that Hax-1 binds to Pol ? mRNA exclusively in the form of a dimer. Biochemical analysis revealed the presence of Hax-1 in mitochondria, but also in the nuclear matrix, which, along with its transcript-binding properties, suggests that Hax-1 plays a role in post-transcriptional regulation of expression of Pol ?. PMID:17704138

  2. Consequential secondary structure alterations and aggregation during prolonged casein glycation.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Supriya; Naeem, Aabgeena

    2013-05-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) of casein is a process used not just to ameliorate the quality of dairy products but also to increase the shelf life of canned foods, including baby milk supplements. Incubation of ?-casein with reducing sugars for 15 days at physiological temperature showed the formation of a molten globule state at day 9 and 12 during fructation and glucation respectively. This state exhibits substantial secondary structure and maximum ANS binding. Later on, glycation resulted in the formation of aggregates at day 12 in presence of fructose and day 15 in presence of glucose. Aggregates possess extensive ?-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and FTIR. These aggregates showed altered tryptophan environment, decrease ANS binding relative to molten globule state and increase in Thioflavin T fluorescence. Aggregates were also accompanied by the accumulation of AGEs, indicative of structural damage to the protein and formation of potentially harmful species at the physiological level. Fructose was more reactive than glucose and thus caused early and significant changes in the protein. From our studies, we conclude that controlling the extent of the Maillard reaction in the food industry is essential to counter its negative effects and expand its safety spectrum. PMID:23408088

  3. Template-directed synthesis of a small molecule-antisense conjugate targeting an mRNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Rodriguez, Lilia; Wolfe, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    The targeting of structural features in mRNA with specificity remains a great chemical challenge. A hairpin structure near exon 10 in the pre-mRNA encoding the tau protein controls its splicing, and dementia-causing mutations that disrupt this structure increase exon 10 splicing. We previously reported the discovery of small molecules, mitoxantrone (MTX) and analogs, which bind to the tau RNA hairpin structure and the design of bipartite antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that simultaneously bind to the discontinuous sequences that flank this hairpin. Herein we report the synthesis of a bipartite ASO conjugated to MTX using the tau RNA hairpin and flanking sequences as a template. A set of six MTX analogs, each containing a linker-azide, and a set of ten bipartite ASOs, each containing a branched linker-alkyne, were synthesized and tested in combinatorial fashion for their ability to conjugate in the presence or absence of template RNA. A single template-dependent MTXASO conjugate was identified from among the 60 reaction mixtures, demonstrating that the MTX and ASO precursors could simultaneously bind the RNA template and allow proper positioning of azide and alkyne for 1,3-cycloaddition. While the MTXASO conjugate proved too cytotoxic for cell-based assays, the conjugate inhibited tau exon 10 splicing under cell-free conditions more effectively than MTX or bipartite ASO alone. PMID:24691171

  4. Structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cet1-Ceg1 mRNA Capping Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meigang; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-05-04

    The 5{prime} guanine-N7 cap is the first cotranscriptional modification of messenger RNA. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the first two steps in capping are catalyzed by the RNA triphosphatase Cet1 and RNA guanylyltransferase Ceg1, which form a complex that is directly recruited to phosphorylated RNA polymerase II (RNAP IIo), primarily via contacts between RNAP IIo and Ceg1. A 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cet1-Ceg1 revealed a 176 kDa heterotetrameric complex composed of one Cet1 homodimer that associates with two Ceg1 molecules via interactions between the Ceg1 oligonucleotide binding domain and an extended Cet1 WAQKW amino acid motif. The WAQKW motif is followed by a flexible linker that would allow Ceg1 to achieve conformational changes required for capping while maintaining interactions with both Cet1 and RNAP IIo. The impact of mutations as assessed through genetic analysis in S. cerevisiae is consonant with contacts observed in the Cet1-Ceg1 structure.

  5. Causal signals between codon bias, mRNA structure, and the efficiency of translation and elongation

    PubMed Central

    Pop, Cristina; Rouskin, Silvi; Ingolia, Nicholas T; Han, Lu; Phizicky, Eric M; Weissman, Jonathan S; Koller, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome profiling data report on the distribution of translating ribosomes, at steady-state, with codon-level resolution. We present a robust method to extract codon translation rates and protein synthesis rates from these data, and identify causal features associated with elongation and translation efficiency in physiological conditions in yeast. We show that neither elongation rate nor translational efficiency is improved by experimental manipulation of the abundance or body sequence of the rare AGG tRNA. Deletion of three of the four copies of the heavily used ACA tRNA shows a modest efficiency decrease that could be explained by other rate-reducing signals at gene start. This suggests that correlation between codon bias and efficiency arises as selection for codons to utilize translation machinery efficiently in highly translated genes. We also show a correlation between efficiency and RNA structure calculated both computationally and from recent structure probing data, as well as the Kozak initiation motif, which may comprise a mechanism to regulate initiation. PMID:25538139

  6. Secondary use of structured patient data: interim results of a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vuokko, Riikka; Mkel-Bengs, Pivi; Hyppnen, Hannele; Doupi, Persephone

    2015-01-01

    In addition to patient care, EHR data are increasingly in demand for secondary purposes, e.g. administration, research and enterprise resource planning. We conducted a systematic literature review and subsequent analysis of 85 articles focusing on the secondary use of structured patient records. We grounded the analysis on how patient records have been structured, how these structures have been evaluated and what are the main results achieved from the secondary use viewpoint. We conclude that secondary use requires complete and interoperable patient records, which in turn depend on better alignment of primary and secondary users' needs and benefits. PMID:25991152

  7. Structure of 13Be probed via secondary-beam reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randisi, G.; Leprince, A.; Al Falou, H.; Orr, N. A.; Marqus, F. M.; Achouri, N. L.; Anglique, J.-C.; Ashwood, N.; Bastin, B.; Bloxham, T.; Brown, B. A.; Catford, W. N.; Curtis, N.; Delaunay, F.; Freer, M.; de Ges Brennand, E.; Haigh, P.; Hanappe, F.; Harlin, C.; Laurent, B.; Lecouey, J.-L.; Ninane, A.; Patterson, N.; Price, D.; Stuttg, L.; Thomas, J. S.

    2014-03-01

    The low-lying level structure of the unbound neutron-rich nucleus 13Be has been investigated via breakup on a carbon target of secondary beams of 14,15B at 35 MeV/nucleon. The coincident detection of the beam velocity 12Be fragments and neutrons permitted the invariant mass of the 12Be+n and 12Be+n+n systems to be reconstructed. In the case of the breakup of 15B, a very narrow structure at threshold was observed in the 12Be+n channel. Analysis of the 12Be+n+n events demonstrated that this resulted from the sequential decay of the unbound 14Be(2+) state rather than a strongly interacting s-wave virtual state in 13Be, as had been surmised in stable beam fragmentation studies. Single-proton removal from 14B was found to populate a broad low-lying structure some 0.7 MeV above the neutron-decay threshold, in addition to a less prominent feature at around 2.4 MeV. Based on the selectivity of the reaction and a comparison with (0-3)?? shell-model calculations, the low-lying structure is concluded to arise from closely spaced J?=1/2+ and 5/2+ resonances (Er=0.400.03 and 0.85-0.11+0.15 MeV), while the broad higher-lying feature is a second 5/2+ level (Er=2.350.14 MeV). Taken in conjunction with earlier studies, the results suggest that the lowest 1/2+ and 1/2- levels lie relatively close together below 1 MeV.

  8. Phytoene Desaturase Is Localized Exclusively in the Chloroplast and Up-Regulated at the mRNA Level during Accumulation of Secondary Carotenoids in Haematococcus pluvialis (Volvocales, Chlorophyceae)12

    PubMed Central

    Grnewald, Kay; Eckert, Manfred; Hirschberg, Joseph; Hagen, Christoph

    2000-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis Flotow is known for its massive accumulation of ketocarotenoids under various stress conditions. Therefore, this microalga is one of the favored organisms for biotechnological production of these antioxidative compounds. Astaxanthin makes up the main part of the secondary carotenoids and is accumulated mostly in an esterified form in extraplastidic lipid vesicles. We have studied phytoene desaturase, an early enzyme of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. The increase in the phytoene desaturase protein levels that occurs following induction is accompanied by a corresponding increase of its mRNA during the accumulation period, indicating that phytoene desaturase is regulated at the mRNA level. We also investigated the localization of the enzyme by western-blot analysis of cell fractions and by immunogold labeling of ultrathin sections for electron microscopy. In spite of the fact that secondary carotenoids accumulate outside the chloroplast, no extra pathway specific for secondary carotenoid biosynthesis in H. pluvialis was found, at least at this early stage in the biosynthesis. A transport process of carotenoids from the site of biosynthesis (chloroplast) to the site of accumulation (cytoplasmatic located lipid vesicles) is implicated. PMID:10759523

  9. Relating secondary structure to the mechanical properties of polypeptide hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Sharon Anne

    Biomimetic hydrogels are being developed for use in medicine as drug delivery devices and tissue engineering matrices, and the mechanical properties of the materials play an important role in their performance. For example, in tissue engineering, gene expression and cell adhesion have been closely linked to the mechanical properties of the surrounding hydrogel matrix. In poly-L-lysine hydrogels, a five-fold increase in storage modulus, a 50% increase in equilibrium modulus, and a 62% decrease in swelling degree are shown to occur as the hydrogel network chains transition from an alpha-helix to a beta-sheet conformation. The manipulation of the network's mechanical behavior through changes in the secondary structure of the polymer chains offers an additional design variable in the development of biosynthetic materials. Analogous to poly-L-lysine, elastin-mimetic proteins based on the consensus repeat sequence of elastin (VPGVG) undergo a temperature-dependent secondary structure transition from a random coil to a beta-spiral. In this research, chemically-crosslinked poly[(VPGVG)4(VPGKG)] hydrogels are shown to possess temperature- and pH-dependent swelling. Following scaling law predictions (G ?2n), the hydrogels have been shown to behave as ideal elastic networks when the crosslink density is varied at synthesis (theory: n = 9/4, experimental: n = 2.0 +/- 0.1), and behave as flexible networks above and below their structural transition temperature of 35C (theory: n = 1/3, experimental: n = 0.45 +/- 0.06). Evaluation of published data on elastin-mimetic hydrogels shows that the hydrogels behave as ideal elastic networks for all crosslinking techniques, crosslink spacings, and crosslink functionalities reported. As a contrast to chemically-crosslinked hydrogels, a novel elastin-mimetic triblock (EMT) copolymer was evaluated because of its potential use in cell encapsulation without potentially harmful side reactions. Unlike other thermally gelling copolymers, the EMT hydrogel shrinks to approximately 50% of its original size when heated from 30C to 50C in water. This physically-crosslinked hydrogel exhibits reproducible swelling kinetics (Dp 4 x 10-7 cm2/s), similar to chemically-crosslinked, thermally-responsive hydrogels such as poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). The addition of salts to the synthesis solution of EMT hydrogels reduces the equilibrium swelling by 85% and increases the shear modulus 14- to 17-fold depending on the type of salt.

  10. Changes in secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Analía V.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The protein folding induced by 0.25% SSL (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate) (GS0.25, Gluten + 0.25% SSL) included an increase in α-helix conformation and a decrease in β-sheet, turns and random coil. The same behavior, although in a less degree, was observed for 0.5% gluten-DATEM (Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides) system. The low burial of Tryptophan residues to a more hydrophobic environment and the low percentage area of the C-H stretching band for GS0.25 (Gluten + 0.25% SSL), could be related to the increased in α-helix conformation. This behavior was also confirmed by changes in stretching vibrational modes of disulfide bridges (S-S) and the low exposure of Tyrosine residues. High levels of SSL (0.5% and 1.0%) and DATEM (1.0%) led to more disordered protein structures, with different gluten networks. SSL (1.0%) formed a more disordered and opened gluten matrix than DATEM, the last one being laminar and homogeneous.

  11. [A method for prediction of conserved RNA secondary structures].

    PubMed

    Mironov, A A

    2007-01-01

    The RNA secondary structure prediction is a classical problem in bioinformatics. The most efficient approach to this problem is based on the idea of a comparative analysis. In this approach the algorithms utilize multiple alignment of the RNA sequences and find common RNA structure. This paper describes a new algorithm for this task. This algorithm does not require predefined multiple alignment. The main idea of the algorithm is based on MEME-like iterative searching of abstract profile on different levels. On the first level the algorithm searches the common blocks in the RNA sequences and creates chain of this blocks. On the next step the algorithm refines the chain of common blocks. On the last stage the algorithm searches sets of common helices that have consistent locations relative to common blocks. The algorithm was tested on sets of tRNA with a subset of junk sequences and on RFN riboswitches. The algorithm is implemented as a web server (http://bioinf.fbb.msu.ru/RNAAlign/). PMID:17936993

  12. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observedmore »when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.« less

  13. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observed when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.

  14. Structural Basis for the Function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gfd1 Protein in mRNA Nuclear Export*♦

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chao; Fasken, Milo B.; Marshall, Neil J.; Brockmann, Christoph; Rubinson, Max E.; Wente, Susan R.; Corbett, Anita H.; Stewart, Murray

    2010-01-01

    Following transcription, mRNA is processed, packaged into messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles, and transported through nuclear pores (NPCs) to the cytoplasm. At the NPC cytoplasmic face, Dbp5 mediates mRNP remodeling and mRNA export factor dissociation, releasing transcripts for translation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the conserved poly(A) RNA-binding protein, Nab2, facilitates NPC targeting of transcripts and also modulates poly(A) tail length. Dbp5 removes Nab2 from mRNPs at the cytoplasmic face of the pore and, importantly, a Nab2 RNA-binding mutant suppresses the thermosensitive rat8-2 (dbp5) mutant. GFD1 is a multicopy suppressor of rat8-2 (dbp5), and Gfd1 interacts physically with both Dbp5 and the Nab2 N-terminal domain (Nab2-N). Here, we present a structural and functional analysis of the Gfd1/Nab2-N interaction. Crystallography, supported by solution NMR, shows that Gfd1 residues 126–150 form an α-helix when bound to Nab2-N. Engineered Nab2-N and Gfd1 mutants that inhibit this interaction in vitro were used to probe its function in vivo using the genetic interaction between GFD1 and NAB2. Although GFD1 is not essential for viability, its deletion severely impairs growth of rat8-2 (dbp5) cells. Moreover, although Gfd1 overexpression suppresses rat8-2 (dbp5), Gfd1 mutants that do not bind Nab2 only partially suppress rat8-2 (dbp5). Furthermore, rat8-2 (dbp5) cells that express nab2-Y34A, in which binding to Gfd1 is impaired, show a synthetic growth phenotype and nuclear accumulation of poly(A) RNA. These data support the importance of the Gfd1/Nab2 interaction for Dbp5 activity and provide further molecular details of the interactions that facilitate Dbp5-mediated mRNP remodeling in the terminal step of mRNA export. PMID:20463024

  15. Frame disruptions in human mRNA transcripts, and their relationship with splicing and protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Paul; Yu, Zhan

    2007-01-01

    Background Efforts to gather genomic evidence for the processes of gene evolution are ongoing, and are closely coupled to improved gene annotation methods. Such annotation is complicated by the occurrence of disrupted mRNAs (dmRNAs), harbouring frameshifts and premature stop codons, which can be considered indicators of decay into pseudogenes. Results We have derived a procedure to annotate dmRNAs, and have applied it to human data. Subsequences are generated from parsing at key frame-disruption positions and are required to align significantly within any original protein homology. We find 419 high-quality human dmRNAs (3% of total). Significant dmRNA subpopulations include: zinc-finger-containing transcription factors with long disrupted exons, and antisense homologies to distal genes. We analysed the distribution of initial frame disruptions in dmRNAs with respect to positions of: (i) protein domains, (ii) alternatively-spliced exons, and (iii) regions susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). We find significant avoidance of protein-domain disruption (indicating a selection pressure for this), and highly significant overrepresentation of disruptions in alternatively-spliced exons, and 'non-NMD' regions. We do not find any evidence for evolution of novelty in protein structures through frameshifting. Conclusion Our results indicate largely negative selection pressures related to frame disruption during gene evolution. PMID:17937804

  16. Characterization of a trifunctional mimivirus mRNA capping enzyme and crystal structure of the RNA triphosphatase domain.

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Delphine; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2008-04-01

    The RNA triphosphatase (RTPase) components of the mRNA capping apparatus are a bellwether of eukaryal taxonomy. Fungal and protozoal RTPases belong to the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) family, exemplified by yeast Cet1. Several large DNA viruses encode metal-dependent RTPases unrelated to the cysteinyl-phosphatase RTPases of their metazoan host organisms. The origins of DNA virus RTPases are unclear because they are structurally uncharacterized. Mimivirus, a giant virus of amoeba, resembles poxviruses in having a trifunctional capping enzyme composed of a metal-dependent RTPase module fused to guanylyltransferase (GTase) and guanine-N7 methyltransferase domains. The crystal structure of mimivirus RTPase reveals a minimized tunnel fold and an active site strikingly similar to that of Cet1. Unlike homodimeric fungal RTPases, mimivirus RTPase is a monomer. The mimivirus TTM-type RTPase-GTase fusion resembles the capping enzymes of amoebae, providing evidence that the ancestral large DNA virus acquired its capping enzyme from a unicellular host. PMID:18400173

  17. Characterization of a Trifunctional Mimivirus mRNA Capping Enzyme and Crystal Structure of the RNA Triphosphatase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Benarroch,D.; Smith, P.; Shuman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The RNA triphosphatase (RTPase) components of the mRNA capping apparatus are a bellwether of eukaryal taxonomy. Fungal and protozoal RTPases belong to the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) family, exemplified by yeast Cet1. Several large DNA viruses encode metal-dependent RTPases unrelated to the cysteinyl-phosphatase RTPases of their metazoan host organisms. The origins of DNA virus RTPases are unclear because they are structurally uncharacterized. Mimivirus, a giant virus of amoeba, resembles poxviruses in having a trifunctional capping enzyme composed of a metal-dependent RTPase module fused to guanylyltransferase (GTase) and guanine-N7 methyltransferase domains. The crystal structure of mimivirus RTPase reveals a minimized tunnel fold and an active site strikingly similar to that of Cet1. Unlike homodimeric fungal RTPases, mimivirus RTPase is a monomer. The mimivirus TTM-type RTPase-GTase fusion resembles the capping enzymes of amoebae, providing evidence that the ancestral large DNA virus acquired its capping enzyme from a unicellular host.

  18. A 3D graphical representation of RNA secondary structures based on chaos game representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Tian-ming

    2008-03-01

    In this Letter, based on chaos game representation (CGR), we propose a 3D graphical representation for RNA secondary structures in terms of classifications of bases of nucleic acids. Some information on the base distribution and compositions of RNA secondary structure can be intuitively reflected by the graphical representation. Furthermore, the numerical characterization of the graphical representation is applied to compute the similarities of RNA secondary structures. As application, we make quantitative comparisons for two sets of RNA secondary structures based on the graphical representation.

  19. Ground state and glass transition of the RNA secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, S.; Tang, L.-H.

    2006-09-01

    RNA molecules form a sequence-specific self-pairing pattern at low temperatures. We analyze this problem using a random pairing energy model as well as a random sequence model that includes a base stacking energy in favor of helix propagation. The free energy cost for separating a chain into two equal halves offers a quantitative measure of sequence specific pairing. In the low temperature glass phase, this quantity grows quadratically with the logarithm of the chain length, but it switches to a linear behavior of entropic origin in the high temperature molten phase. Transition between the two phases is continuous, with characteristics that resemble those of a disordered elastic manifold in two dimensions. For designed sequences, however, a power-law distribution of pairing energies on a coarse-grained level may be more appropriate. Extreme value statistics arguments then predict a power-law growth of the free energy cost to break a chain, in agreement with numerical simulations. Interestingly, the distribution of pairing distances in the ground state secondary structure follows a remarkable power-law with an exponent -4/3, independent of the specific assumptions for the base pairing energies.

  20. Can computationally designed protein sequences improve secondary structure prediction?

    PubMed

    Bondugula, Rajkumar; Wallqvist, Anders; Lee, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Computational sequence design methods are used to engineer proteins with desired properties such as increased thermal stability and novel function. In addition, these algorithms can be used to identify an envelope of sequences that may be compatible with a particular protein fold topology. In this regard, we hypothesized that sequence-property prediction, specifically secondary structure, could be significantly enhanced by using a large database of computationally designed sequences. We performed a large-scale test of this hypothesis with 6511 diverse protein domains and 50 designed sequences per domain. After analysis of the inherent accuracy of the designed sequences database, we realized that it was necessary to put constraints on what fraction of the native sequence should be allowed to change. With mutational constraints, accuracy was improved vs. no constraints, but the diversity of designed sequences, and hence effective size of the database, was moderately reduced. Overall, the best three-state prediction accuracy (Q(3)) that we achieved was nearly a percentage point improved over using a natural sequence database alone, well below the theoretical possibility for improvement of 8-10 percentage points. Furthermore, our nascent method was used to augment the state-of-the-art PSIPRED program by a percentage point. PMID:21282334

  1. Human recombinant thiamine triphosphatase: purification, secondary structure and catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Lakaye, Bernard; Makarchikov, Alexander F; Wins, Pierre; Margineanu, Ilca; Roland, Séverine; Lins, Laurence; Aichour, Ridha; Lebeau, Luc; El Moualij, Benaïssa; Zorzi, Willy; Coumans, Bernard; Grisar, Thierry; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2004-07-01

    Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found in most living organisms and it may act as a phosphate donor for protein phosphorylation. We have recently cloned the cDNA coding for a highly specific mammalian 25 kDa thiamine triphosphatase (ThTPase; EC 3.6.1.28). As the enzyme has a high catalytic efficiency and no sequence homology with known phosphohydrolases, it was worth investigating its structure and catalytic properties. For this purpose, we expressed the untagged recombinant human ThTPase (hThTPase) in E. coli, produced the protein on a large scale and purified it to homogeneity. Its kinetic properties were similar to those of the genuine human enzyme, indicating that the recombinant hThTPase is completely functional. Mg2+ ions were required for activity and Ca2+ inhibited the enzyme by competition with Mg2+. With ATP as substrate, the catalytic efficiency was 10(-4)-fold lower than with ThTP, confirming the nearly absolute specificity of the 25 kDa ThTPase for ThTP. The activity was maximum at pH 8.5 and very low at pH 6.0. Zn2+ ions were inhibitory at micromolar concentrations at pH 8.0 but activated at pH 6.0. Kinetic analysis suggests an activator site for Mg2+ and a separate regulatory site for Zn2+. The effects of group-specific reagents such as Woodward's reagent K and diethylpyrocarbonate suggest that at least one carboxyl group in the active site is essential for catalysis, while a positively charged amino group may be involved in substrate binding. The secondary structure of the enzyme, as determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, was predominantly beta-sheet and alpha-helix. PMID:15109578

  2. Structurally Coloured Secondary Particles Composed of Black and White Colloidal Particles

    PubMed Central

    Takeoka, Yukikazu; Yoshioka, Shinya; Teshima, Midori; Takano, Atsushi; Harun-Ur-Rashid, Mohammad; Seki, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the colourful secondary particles formed by controlling the aggregation states of colloidal silica particles and the enhancement of the structural colouration of the secondary particles caused by adding black particles. We obtained glossy, partially structurally coloured secondary particles in the absence of NaCl, but matte, whitish secondary particles were obtained in the presence of NaCl. When a small amount of carbon black was incorporated into both types of secondary particles, the incoherent multiple scattering of light from the amorphous region was considerably reduced. However, the peak intensities in the reflection spectra, caused by Bragg reflection and by coherent single wavelength scattering, were only slightly decreased. Consequently, a brighter structural colour of these secondary particles was observed with the naked eye. Furthermore, when magnetite was added as a black particle, the coloured secondary particles could be moved and collected by applying an external magnetic field. PMID:23917891

  3. Structurally Coloured Secondary Particles Composed of Black and White Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeoka, Yukikazu; Yoshioka, Shinya; Teshima, Midori; Takano, Atsushi; Harun-Ur-Rashid, Mohammad; Seki, Takahiro

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the colourful secondary particles formed by controlling the aggregation states of colloidal silica particles and the enhancement of the structural colouration of the secondary particles caused by adding black particles. We obtained glossy, partially structurally coloured secondary particles in the absence of NaCl, but matte, whitish secondary particles were obtained in the presence of NaCl. When a small amount of carbon black was incorporated into both types of secondary particles, the incoherent multiple scattering of light from the amorphous region was considerably reduced. However, the peak intensities in the reflection spectra, caused by Bragg reflection and by coherent single wavelength scattering, were only slightly decreased. Consequently, a brighter structural colour of these secondary particles was observed with the naked eye. Furthermore, when magnetite was added as a black particle, the coloured secondary particles could be moved and collected by applying an external magnetic field.

  4. Tertiary structure prediction of RNA-RNA complexes using a secondary structure and fragment-based method.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Satoshi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Asai, Kiyoshi; Fukui, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-24

    A method has been developed for predicting the tertiary structures of RNA-RNA complex structures using secondary structure information and a fragment assembly algorithm. The linker base pair and secondary structure potential derived from the secondary structure information are particularly useful for prediction. Application of this method to several kinds of RNA-RNA complex structures, including kissing loops, hammerhead ribozymes, and other functional RNAs, produced promising results. Use of the secondary structure potential effectively restrained the conformational search space, leading to successful prediction of kissing loop structures, which mainly consist of common structural elements. The failure to predict more difficult targets had various causes but should be overcome through such measures as tuning the balance of the energy contributions from the Watson-Crick and non- Watson-Crick base pairs, by obtaining knowledge about a wider variety of RNA structures. PMID:24479711

  5. IFNL3 mRNA structure is remodeled by a functional non-coding polymorphism associated with hepatitis C virus clearance

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Mauger, David M.; Goldstein, David B.; Urban, Thomas J.; Weeks, Kevin M.; Bradrick, Shelton S.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms near the interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3) gene strongly predict clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We analyzed a variant (rs4803217 G/T) located within the IFNL3 mRNA 3′ untranslated region (UTR); the G allele (protective allele) is associated with elevated therapeutic HCV clearance. We show that the IFNL3 3′ UTR represses mRNA translation and the rs4803217 allele modulates the extent of translational regulation. We analyzed the structures of IFNL3 variant mRNAs at nucleotide resolution by SHAPE-MaP. The rs4803217 G allele mRNA forms well-defined 3′ UTR structure while the T allele mRNA is more dynamic. The observed differences between alleles are among the largest possible RNA structural alterations that can be induced by a single nucleotide change and transform the UTR from a single well-defined conformation to one with multiple dynamic interconverting structures. These data illustrate that non-coding genetic variants can have significant functional effects by impacting RNA structure. PMID:26531896

  6. Formation of circular polyribosomes on eukaryotic mRNA without cap-structure and poly(A)-tail: a cryo electron tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Afonina, Zhanna A.; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Shirokov, Vladimir A.; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Spirin, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    The polyribosomes newly formed on recombinant GFP-encoding mRNAs in a wheat germ cell-free translation system were analyzed using cryo-electron tomography, with sub-tomogram averaging of polysomal ribosomes and reconstruction of 3D structures of individual polyribosomes. The achieved level of resolution in the reconstructed polyribosomes allowed deducing the mRNA path by connecting adjacent exit and entry sites at the ribosomes inside each polyribosome. In this way, the circularity of a significant fraction (about 50%) of translating polyribosomes was proved in the case of the capped poly(A)-tailed mRNA, in agreement with the existing paradigm of the circularization via interaction of cap-bound initiation factor eIF4F with poly(A)-binding protein. However, translation of the capped mRNA construct without poly(A) tail, but with unspecific 3?-UTR derived from non-coding plasmid sequence, also led to the formation of circular polyribosomes in similar proportion (40%). Moreover, the polyribosomes formed on the uncapped non-polyadenylated mRNA with non-synergistic 5?- and 3?-UTRs proved to be circular as well, and appeared in the same proportion as in the previous cases. Thus, the formation of circular polyribosomes was found to be virtually independent of the presence of cap structure and poly(A) tail in mRNA, in contrast to the longstanding paradigm in the field. PMID:25016525

  7. Inferences from structural comparison: flexibility, secondary structure wobble and sequence alignment optimization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Work on protein structure prediction is very useful in biological research. To evaluate their accuracy, experimental protein structures or their derived data are used as the 'gold standard'. However, as proteins are dynamic molecular machines with structural flexibility such a standard may be unreliable. Results To investigate the influence of the structure flexibility, we analysed 3,652 protein structures of 137 unique sequences from 24 protein families. The results showed that (1) the three-dimensional (3D) protein structures were not rigid: the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the backbone C? of structures with identical sequences was relatively large, with the average of the maximum RMSD from each of the 137 sequences being 1.06 ; (2) the derived data of the 3D structure was not constant, e.g. the highest ratio of the secondary structure wobble site was 60.69%, with the sequence alignments from structural comparisons of two proteins in the same family sometimes being completely different. Conclusion Proteins may have several stable conformations and the data derived from resolved structures as a 'gold standard' should be optimized before being utilized as criteria to evaluate the prediction methods, e.g. sequence alignment from structural comparison. Helix/?-sheet transition exists in normal free proteins. The coil ratio of the 3D structure could affect its resolution as determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:23046301

  8. Ire1-mediated decay in mammalian cells relies on mRNA sequence, structure, and translational status

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kristin; Hollien, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress occurs when misfolded proteins overwhelm the capacity of the ER, resulting in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Ire1, an ER transmembrane nuclease and conserved transducer of the UPR, cleaves the mRNA encoding the transcription factor Xbp1 at a dual stem-loop (SL) structure, leading to Xbp1 splicing and activation. Ire1 also cleaves other mRNAs localized to the ER membrane through regulated Ire1-dependent decay (RIDD). We find that during acute ER stress in mammalian cells, Xbp1-like SLs within the target mRNAs are necessary for RIDD. Furthermore, depletion of Perk, a UPR transducer that attenuates translation during ER stress, inhibits RIDD in a substrate-specific manner. Artificially blocking translation of the SL region of target mRNAs fully restores RIDD in cells depleted of Perk, suggesting that ribosomes disrupt SL formation and/or Ire1 binding. This coordination between Perk and Ire1 may serve to spatially and temporally regulate RIDD. PMID:26108623

  9. SVM-based method for protein structural class prediction using secondary structural content and structural information of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Tabrez Anwar Shamim; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu Adimurthy

    2011-08-01

    The knowledge collated from the known protein structures has revealed that the proteins are usually folded into the four structural classes: all-α, all-β, α/β and α + β. A number of methods have been proposed to predict the protein's structural class from its primary structure; however, it has been observed that these methods fail or perform poorly in the cases of distantly related sequences. In this paper, we propose a new method for protein structural class prediction using low homology (twilight-zone) protein sequences dataset. Since protein structural class prediction is a typical classification problem, we have developed a Support Vector Machine (SVM)-based method for protein structural class prediction that uses features derived from the predicted secondary structure and predicted burial information of amino acid residues. The examination of different individual as well as feature combinations revealed that the combination of secondary structural content, secondary structural and solvent accessibility state frequencies of amino acids gave rise to the best leave-one-out cross-validation accuracy of ~81% which is comparable to the best accuracy reported in the literature so far. PMID:21776605

  10. Structural analysis of human 2'-O-ribose methyltransferases involved in mRNA cap structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smietanski, Miroslaw; Werner, Maria; Purta, Elzbieta; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Nowotny, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    The 5' cap of human messenger RNA contains 2'-O-methylation of the first and often second transcribed nucleotide that is important for its processing, translation and stability. Human enzymes that methylate these nucleotides, termed CMTr1 and CMTr2, respectively, have recently been identified. However, the structures of these enzymes and their mechanisms of action remain unknown. In the present study, we solve the crystal structures of the active CMTr1 catalytic domain in complex with a methyl group donor and a capped oligoribonucleotide, thereby revealing the mechanism of specific recognition of capped RNA. This mechanism differs significantly from viral enzymes, thus providing a framework for their specific targeting. Based on the crystal structure of CMTr1, a comparative model of the CMTr2 catalytic domain is generated. This model, together with mutational analysis, leads to the identification of residues involved in RNA and methyl group donor binding.

  11. Structural analysis of human 2?-O-ribose methyltransferases involved in mRNA cap structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Smietanski, Miroslaw; Werner, Maria; Purta, Elzbieta; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Nowotny, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    The 5? cap of human messenger RNA contains 2?-O-methylation of the first and often second transcribed nucleotide that is important for its processing, translation and stability. Human enzymes that methylate these nucleotides, termed CMTr1 and CMTr2, respectively, have recently been identified. However, the structures of these enzymes and their mechanisms of action remain unknown. In the present study, we solve the crystal structures of the active CMTr1 catalytic domain in complex with a methyl group donor and a capped oligoribonucleotide, thereby revealing the mechanism of specific recognition of capped RNA. This mechanism differs significantly from viral enzymes, thus providing a framework for their specific targeting. Based on the crystal structure of CMTr1, a comparative model of the CMTr2 catalytic domain is generated. This model, together with mutational analysis, leads to the identification of residues involved in RNA and methyl group donor binding. PMID:24402442

  12. Secondary Impacts on Structures on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric; Walker, James D.; Grosch, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    The Altair Lunar Lander is being designed for the planned return to the Moon by 2020. Since it is hoped that lander components will be re-used by later missions, studies are underway to examine the exposure threat to the lander sitting on the Lunar surface for extended periods. These threats involve both direct strikes of meteoroids on the vehicle as well as strikes from Lunar regolith and rock thrown by nearby meteorite strikes. Currently, the lander design is comprised of up to 10 different types of pressure vessels. These vessels included the manned habitation module, fuel, cryogenic fuel and gas storage containers, and instrument bays. These pressure vessels have various wall designs, including various aluminum alloys, honeycomb, and carbon-fiber composite materials. For some of the vessels, shielding is being considered. This program involved the test and analysis of six pressure vessel designs, one of which included a Whipple bumper shield. In addition to the pressure vessel walls, all the pressure vessels are wrapped in multi-layer insulation (MLI). Two variants were tested without the MLI to better understand the role of the MLI in the impact performance. The tests of performed were to examine the secondary impacts on these structures as they rested on the Lunar surface. If a hypervelocity meteor were to strike the surface nearby, it would throw regolith and rock debris into the structure at a much lower velocity. Also, when the manned module departs for the return to Earth, its rocket engines throw up debris that can impact the remaining lander components and cause damage. Glass spheres were used as a stimulant for the regolith material. Impact tests were performed with a gas gun to find the V50 of various sized spheres striking the pressure vessels. The impacts were then modeled and a fast-running approximate model for the V50 data was developed. This model was for performing risk analysis to assist in the vessel design and in the identification of ideal long-term mission sites. This paper reviews the impact tests and analysis and modeling examining the impact threat to various components in the lander design.

  13. G quadruplex RNA structures in PSD-95 mRNA: potential regulators of miR-125a seed binding site accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, Snezana; Bassell, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability caused by the CGG trinucleotide expansion in the 3?-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome, that silences the expression of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to bind to a G-rich region within the PSD-95 mRNA which encodes for the postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and together with the microRNA miR-125a, to play an important role in the reversible inhibition of the PSD-95 mRNA translation in neurons. The loss of FMRP in Fmr1 KO mice disables this translation control in the production of the PSD-95 protein. Interestingly, the miR-125a binding site on PSD-95 mRNA is embedded in the G-rich region bound by FMRP and postulated to adopt one or more G quadruplex structures. In this study, we have used different biophysical techniques to validate and characterize the formation of parallel G quadruplex structures and binding of miR-125a to its complementary sequence located within the 3? UTR of PSD-95 mRNA. Our results indicate that the PSD-95 mRNA G-rich region folds into alternate G quadruplex conformations that coexist in equilibrium. miR-125a forms a stable complex with PSD-95 mRNA, as evident by characteristic WatsonCrick base-pairing that coexists with one of the G quadruplex forms, suggesting a novel mechanism for G quadruplex structures to regulate the access of miR-125a to its binding site. PMID:25406362

  14. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Hafsa, Noor E.; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I′, II′ and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. PMID:25979265

  15. PCASSO: A Fast and Efficient C?-based Method for Accurately Assigning Protein Secondary Structure Elements

    PubMed Central

    Law, Sean M.; Frank, Aaron T.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are often characterized in terms of their primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure. Algorithms such as DSSP can automatically assign protein secondary structure based on the backbone hydrogen-bonding pattern. However, the assignment of secondary structure elements becomes a challenge when only the C? coordinates are available. In the current work, we present PCASSO (Protein C-Alpha Secondary Structure Output), a fast and accurate program for assigning protein secondary structure elements using only the C? positions. PCASSO achieves ~95% accuracy with respect to DSSP and takes ~0.1 s using a single processor to analyze a 1,000 residue system with multiple chains. Our approach was compared with current state-of-the-art C?-based methods and was found to outperform all of them in both speed and accuracy. A practical application is also presented and discussed. PMID:24995959

  16. Structure of Secondary Crystals in Ethylene-Based Ionomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Loo, Y.-L.; Huang, Y. E.; Lee, L.-B. W.; Register, R. A.

    2003-03-01

    A typical DSC thermogram of an ethylene-(meth)acrylic acid ionomer displays two melting endotherms: one near 100^oC reflecting the melting of primary ethylene crystals, and one at 40-60^oC which we have shown via simultaneous SAXS/WAXS/DSC to arise from the melting of interlamellar secondary crystals. Dynamic DSC (DDSC) confirms that the two peaks reflect a bimodal crystal thickness distribution, rather than a superposition of melting and recrystallization events. The melting temperature of these secondary crystals, estimated to be 2.5-3.5 nm thick, is sensitive to annealing history. DDSC also indicates that these secondary crystals melt irreversibly, as expected if each must be individually nucleated. The 2-D SAXS patterns of highly-oriented blown films of such ionomers show intense peaks, arising from the polyethylene lamellar crystallites, along the direction of principal orientation. Comparing the azimuthal variation in SAXS peak intensity at temperatures below and above the low-temperature endotherm reveals that the secondary crystallites are significantly oriented, but less so than the primary lamellae. Thus, the secondary interlamellar crystals also have a lamellar (anisotropic) habit, rather than resembling fringed micelles (isotropic).

  17. Visualizing the global secondary structure of a viral RNA genome with cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garmann, Rees F; Gopal, Ajaykumar; Athavale, Shreyas S; Knobler, Charles M; Gelbart, William M; Harvey, Stephen C

    2015-05-01

    The lifecycle, and therefore the virulence, of single-stranded (ss)-RNA viruses is regulated not only by their particular protein gene products, but also by the secondary and tertiary structure of their genomes. The secondary structure of the entire genomic RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) was recently determined by selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE). The SHAPE analysis suggested a single highly extended secondary structure with much less branching than occurs in the ensemble of structures predicted by purely thermodynamic algorithms. Here we examine the solution-equilibrated STMV genome by direct visualization with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), using an RNA of similar length transcribed from the yeast genome as a control. The cryo-EM data reveal an ensemble of branching patterns that are collectively consistent with the SHAPE-derived secondary structure model. Thus, our results both elucidate the statistical nature of the secondary structure of large ss-RNAs and give visual support for modern RNA structure determination methods. Additionally, this work introduces cryo-EM as a means to distinguish between competing secondary structure models if the models differ significantly in terms of the number and/or length of branches. Furthermore, with the latest advances in cryo-EM technology, we suggest the possibility of developing methods that incorporate restraints from cryo-EM into the next generation of algorithms for the determination of RNA secondary and tertiary structures. PMID:25752599

  18. Measures for the assessment of fuzzy predictions of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Julian

    2006-11-01

    Many of the recent secondary structure prediction methods incorporate the idea of fuzzy set theory, where instead of assigning a definite secondary structure to a query residue, probability for the residue being in each of the conformational states is estimated. Moreover, continuous assignment of conformational states to the experimentally observed protein structures can be performed in order to reflect inherent flexibility. Although various measures have been developed for evaluating performances of secondary structure prediction methods, they depend only on the most probable secondary structures. They do not assess the accuracy of the probabilities produced by fuzzy prediction methods, and they cannot incorporate information contained in continuous assignments of conformational states to observed structures. Three important measures for evaluating performance of a secondary structure prediction algorithm, Q score, Segment OVerlap (SOV) measure, and the k-state correlation coefficient (Corr), are deformed into fuzzy measures F score, Fuzzy OVerlap (FOV) measure, and the fuzzy correlation coefficient (Forr), so that the new measures not only assess probabilistic outputs of fuzzy prediction methods, but also incorporate information from continuous assignments of secondary structure. As an example of application, prediction results of four fuzzy secondary structure prediction methods, PSIPRED, PROFking, SABLE, and PREDICT, are assessed using the new fuzzy measures. PMID:16948155

  19. Structure-Based Alignment and Consensus Secondary Structures for Three HIV-Related RNA Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Christopher A.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    HIV and related primate lentiviruses possess single-stranded RNA genomes. Multiple regions of these genomes participate in critical steps in the viral replication cycle, and the functions of many RNA elements are dependent on the formation of defined structures. The structures of these elements are still not fully understood, and additional functional elements likely exist that have not been identified. In this work, we compared three full-length HIV-related viral genomes: HIV-1NL4-3, SIVcpz, and SIVmac (the latter two strains are progenitors for all HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains, respectively). Model-free RNA structure comparisons were performed using whole-genome structure information experimentally derived from nucleotide-resolution SHAPE reactivities. Consensus secondary structures were constructed for strongly correlated regions by taking into account both SHAPE probing structural data and nucleotide covariation information from structure-based alignments. In these consensus models, all known functional RNA elements were recapitulated with high accuracy. In addition, we identified multiple previously unannotated structural elements in the HIV-1 genome likely to function in translation, splicing and other replication cycle processes; these are compelling targets for future functional analyses. The structure-informed alignment strategy developed here will be broadly useful for efficient RNA motif discovery. PMID:25992893

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing region. Evidence for a secondary structure between the mooring sequence and the 3' efficiency element.

    PubMed

    Hersberger, M; Patarroyo-White, S; Arnold, K S; Innerarity, T L

    1999-12-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) B mRNA editing is the deamination of C(6666) to uridine, which changes the codon at position 2153 from a genomically encoded glutamine (CAA) to an in-frame stop codon (UAA). The apoB mRNA-editing enzyme complex recognizes the editing region of the apoB pre-mRNA with exquisite precision. Four sequence elements spanning 139 nucleotides (nt) on the apoB mRNA have been identified that specify this precision. In cooperation with the indispensable mooring sequence and spacer element, a 5' efficiency element and a 3' efficiency element enhance editing in vitro. A phylogenetic comparison of 32 species showed minor differences in the apoB mRNA sequence, and the apoB mRNA from 31 species was robustly edited in vitro. However, guinea pig mRNA was poorly edited. Compared with the consensus sequences of these 31 species, guinea pig apoB mRNA has three variations in the 3' efficiency element, and the conversion of these to the consensus sequence increased editing to the levels in the other species. From this information, a model for the secondary structure was formulated in which the mooring sequence and the 3' efficiency element form a double-stranded stem. Thirty-one mammalian apoB mRNA sequences are predicted to form this stem positioning C(6666) two nucleotides upstream of the stem. However, the guinea pig apoB mRNA has a mutation in the 3' efficiency element (C(6743) to U) that predicts an extension of the stem and hence the lower editing efficiency. A test of this model demonstrated that a single substitution at 6743 (U to C) in the guinea pig apoB mRNA, that should reduce the stem, enhanced editing, and mutations in the 3' efficiency element that extended the stem for three base pairs dramatically reduced editing. Furthermore, the addition of a 20-nucleotide 3' efficiency element RNA, to a 58-nucleotide guinea pig apoB mRNA lacking the 3' efficiency element more than doubled the in vitro editing activity. Based on these results, a model is proposed in which the mooring sequence and the 3' efficiency element form a double-stranded stem, thus suggesting a mechanism of how the 3' efficiency element enhances editing. PMID:10574922

  1. A probabilistic model for secondary structure prediction from protein chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Mechelke, Martin; Habeck, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Protein chemical shifts encode detailed structural information that is difficult and computationally costly to describe at a fundamental level. Statistical and machine learning approaches have been used to infer correlations between chemical shifts and secondary structure from experimental chemical shifts. These methods range from simple statistics such as the chemical shift index to complex methods using neural networks. Notwithstanding their higher accuracy, more complex approaches tend to obscure the relationship between secondary structure and chemical shift and often involve many parameters that need to be trained. We present hidden Markov models (HMMs) with Gaussian emission probabilities to model the dependence between protein chemical shifts and secondary structure. The continuous emission probabilities are modeled as conditional probabilities for a given amino acid and secondary structure type. Using these distributions as outputs of first- and second-order HMMs, we achieve a prediction accuracy of 82.3%, which is competitive with existing methods for predicting secondary structure from protein chemical shifts. Incorporation of sequence-based secondary structure prediction into our HMM improves the prediction accuracy to 84.0%. Our findings suggest that an HMM with correlated Gaussian distributions conditioned on the secondary structure provides an adequate generative model of chemical shifts. PMID:23292699

  2. Importance of cis Determinants and Nitrogenase Activity in Regulated Stability of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Nitrogenase Structural Gene mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Holly M.; Gosink, Mark M.; Roberts, Gary P.

    1999-01-01

    The Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogen fixation (nif) mRNAs are unusually stable, with half-lives of 20 to 30 min under conditions favorable to nitrogen fixation (limiting nitrogen, anaerobiosis, temperatures of 30C). Addition of O2 or fixed nitrogen or temperature increases to 37C or more result in the dramatic destabilization of the nif mRNAs, decreasing the half-lives by a factor of 3 to 5. A plasmid expression system, independent of nif transcriptional regulation, was used to define cis determinants required for the regulated stability of the 5.2-kb nifHDKTY mRNA and to test the model suggested by earlier work that NifA is required in trans to stabilize nif mRNA under nif-derepressing conditions. O2 regulation of nifHDKTY mRNA stability is impaired in a plasmid containing a deletion of a 499-bp region of nifH, indicating that a site(s) required for the O2-regulated stability of the mRNA is located within this region. The simple model suggested from earlier work that NifA is required for stabilizing nif mRNA under conditions favorable for nitrogen fixation was disproved, and in its place, a more complicated model involving the sensing of nitrogenase activity as a component of the system regulating mRNA stability is proposed. Analysis of nifY mutants and overexpression suggests a possible involvement of the protein in this sensing process. PMID:10368150

  3. Importance of cis determinants and nitrogenase activity in regulated stability of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase structural gene mRNA.

    PubMed

    Simon, H M; Gosink, M M; Roberts, G P

    1999-06-01

    The Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogen fixation (nif) mRNAs are unusually stable, with half-lives of 20 to 30 min under conditions favorable to nitrogen fixation (limiting nitrogen, anaerobiosis, temperatures of 30 degrees C). Addition of O2 or fixed nitrogen or temperature increases to 37 degrees C or more result in the dramatic destabilization of the nif mRNAs, decreasing the half-lives by a factor of 3 to 5. A plasmid expression system, independent of nif transcriptional regulation, was used to define cis determinants required for the regulated stability of the 5.2-kb nifHDKTY mRNA and to test the model suggested by earlier work that NifA is required in trans to stabilize nif mRNA under nif-derepressing conditions. O2 regulation of nifHDKTY mRNA stability is impaired in a plasmid containing a deletion of a 499-bp region of nifH, indicating that a site(s) required for the O2-regulated stability of the mRNA is located within this region. The simple model suggested from earlier work that NifA is required for stabilizing nif mRNA under conditions favorable for nitrogen fixation was disproved, and in its place, a more complicated model involving the sensing of nitrogenase activity as a component of the system regulating mRNA stability is proposed. Analysis of nifY mutants and overexpression suggests a possible involvement of the protein in this sensing process. PMID:10368150

  4. Effect of peptide secondary structure on peptide amphiphile supramolecular structure and interactions

    PubMed Central

    Missirlis, Dimitris; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Fu, Caroline J.; Khant, Htet A.; Krogstad, Daniel V.; Tirrell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Bottom-up fabrication of self-assembled nanomaterials requires control over forces and interactions between building blocks. We here report on the formation and architecture of supramolecular structures constructed from two different peptide amphiphiles. Inclusion of four alanines between a 16-mer peptide and a 16-carbon long aliphatic tail resulted in a secondary structure shift of the peptide headgroups from alpha helices to beta sheets. A concomitant shift in self-assembled morphology from nano-ribbons to core-shell wormlike micelles was observed by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In presence of divalent magnesium ions, these a priori formed supramolecular structures interacted in distinct manners, highlighting the importance of peptide amphiphile design in self-assembly. PMID:21488620

  5. Effect of the peptide secondary structure on the peptide amphiphile supramolecular structure and interactions.

    PubMed

    Missirlis, Dimitris; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Fu, Caroline J; Khant, Htet A; Krogstad, Daniel V; Tirrell, Matthew

    2011-05-17

    Bottom-up fabrication of self-assembled nanomaterials requires control over forces and interactions between building blocks. We report here on the formation and architecture of supramolecular structures constructed from two different peptide amphiphiles. Inclusion of four alanines between a 16-mer peptide and a 16 carbon long aliphatic tail resulted in a secondary structure shift of the peptide headgroups from ? helices to ? sheets. A concomitant shift in self-assembled morphology from nanoribbons to core-shell worm-like micelles was observed by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the presence of divalent magnesium ions, these a priori formed supramolecular structures interacted in distinct manners, highlighting the importance of peptide amphiphile design in self-assembly. PMID:21488620

  6. STITCHER: Dynamic assembly of likely amyloid and prion β-structures from secondary structure predictions

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Allen W; O’Donnell, Charles W; Menke, Matthew; Cowen, Lenore J; Lindquist, Susan; Berger, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    The supersecondary structure of amyloids and prions, proteins of intense clinical and biological interest, are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Previous work has demonstrated that probability-based prediction of discrete β-strand pairs can offer insight into these structures. Here, we devise a system of energetic rules that can be used to dynamically assemble these discrete β-strand pairs into complete amyloid β-structures. The STITCHER algorithm progressively ‘stitches’ strand-pairs into full β-sheets based on a novel free-energy model, incorporating experimentally observed amino-acid side-chain stacking contributions, entropic estimates, and steric restrictions for amyloidal parallel β-sheet construction. A dynamic program computes the top 50 structures and returns both the highest scoring structure and a consensus structure taken by polling this list for common discrete elements. Putative structural heterogeneity can be inferred from sequence regions that compose poorly. Predictions show agreement with experimental models of Alzheimer’s amyloid beta peptide and the Podospora anserina Het-s prion. Predictions of the HET-s homolog HET-S also reflect experimental observations of poor amyloid formation. We put forward predicted structures for the yeast prion Sup35, suggesting N-terminal structural stability enabled by tyrosine ladders, and C-terminal heterogeneity. Predictions for the Rnq1 prion and alpha-synuclein are also given, identifying a similar mix of homogenous and heterogeneous secondary structure elements. STITCHER provides novel insight into the energetic basis of amyloid structure, provides accurate structure predictions, and can help guide future experimental studies. Proteins 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22095906

  7. STITCHER: Dynamic assembly of likely amyloid and prion β-structures from secondary structure predictions.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Allen W; O'Donnell, Charles W; Menke, Matthew; Cowen, Lenore J; Lindquist, Susan; Berger, Bonnie

    2012-02-01

    The supersecondary structure of amyloids and prions, proteins of intense clinical and biological interest, are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Previous work has demonstrated that probability-based prediction of discrete β-strand pairs can offer insight into these structures. Here, we devise a system of energetic rules that can be used to dynamically assemble these discrete β-strand pairs into complete amyloid β-structures. The STITCHER algorithm progressively 'stitches' strand-pairs into full β-sheets based on a novel free-energy model, incorporating experimentally observed amino-acid side-chain stacking contributions, entropic estimates, and steric restrictions for amyloidal parallel β-sheet construction. A dynamic program computes the top 50 structures and returns both the highest scoring structure and a consensus structure taken by polling this list for common discrete elements. Putative structural heterogeneity can be inferred from sequence regions that compose poorly. Predictions show agreement with experimental models of Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide and the Podospora anserina Het-s prion. Predictions of the HET-s homolog HET-S also reflect experimental observations of poor amyloid formation. We put forward predicted structures for the yeast prion Sup35, suggesting N-terminal structural stability enabled by tyrosine ladders, and C-terminal heterogeneity. Predictions for the Rnq1 prion and alpha-synuclein are also given, identifying a similar mix of homogenous and heterogeneous secondary structure elements. STITCHER provides novel insight into the energetic basis of amyloid structure, provides accurate structure predictions, and can help guide future experimental studies. PMID:22095906

  8. Testing Mediation Using Multiple Regression and Structural Equation Modeling Analyses in Secondary Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Spencer D.

    2011-01-01

    Mediation analysis in child and adolescent development research is possible using large secondary data sets. This article provides an overview of two statistical methods commonly used to test mediated effects in secondary analysis: multiple regression and structural equation modeling (SEM). Two empirical studies are presented to illustrate the

  9. Determination of Secondary School Students' Cognitive Structure, and Misconception in Ecological Concepts through Word Association Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ycel, Elif zata; zkan, Mulis

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we determined cognitive structures and misconceptions about basic ecological concepts by using "word association" tests on secondary school students, age between 12-14 years. Eighty-nine students participated in this study. Before WAT was generated, basic ecological concepts that take place in the secondary science

  10. The Structure of Secondary School Teacher Job Satisfaction and Its Relationship with Attrition and Work Enthusiasm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiqi, Chen

    2007-01-01

    This study used the results of a questionnaire survey of 230 secondary school teachers to analyze the factors constituting job satisfaction and its effects on teacher attrition and work enthusiasm. The results show that (a) the structure of secondary school teacher job satisfaction is made up of ten components and is consistent with the model put

  11. Determination of Secondary School Students' Cognitive Structure, and Misconception in Ecological Concepts through Word Association Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yücel, Elif Özata; Özkan, Mulis

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we determined cognitive structures and misconceptions about basic ecological concepts by using "word association" tests on secondary school students, age between 12-14 years. Eighty-nine students participated in this study. Before WAT was generated, basic ecological concepts that take place in the secondary science…

  12. Minimum message length inference of secondary structure from protein coordinate data

    PubMed Central

    Konagurthu, Arun S.; Lesk, Arthur M.; Allison, Lloyd

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Secondary structure underpins the folding pattern and architecture of most proteins. Accurate assignment of the secondary structure elements is therefore an important problem. Although many approximate solutions of the secondary structure assignment problem exist, the statement of the problem has resisted a consistent and mathematically rigorous definition. A variety of comparative studies have highlighted major disagreements in the way the available methods define and assign secondary structure to coordinate data. Results: We report a new method to infer secondary structure based on the Bayesian method of minimum message length inference. It treats assignments of secondary structure as hypotheses that explain the given coordinate data. The method seeks to maximize the joint probability of a hypothesis and the data. There is a natural null hypothesis and any assignment that cannot better it is unacceptable. We developed a program SST based on this approach and compared it with popular programs, such as DSSP and STRIDE among others. Our evaluation suggests that SST gives reliable assignments even on low-resolution structures. Availability: http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~karun/sst Contact: arun.konagurthu@monash.edu (or lloyd.allison@monash.edu) PMID:22689785

  13. Improving protein secondary structure prediction based on short subsequences with local structure similarity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background When characterizing the structural topology of proteins, protein secondary structure (PSS) plays an important role in analyzing and modeling protein structures because it represents the local conformation of amino acids into regular structures. Although PSS prediction has been studied for decades, the prediction accuracy reaches a bottleneck at around 80%, and further improvement is very difficult. Results In this paper, we present an improved dictionary-based PSS prediction method called SymPred, and a meta-predictor called SymPsiPred. We adopt the concept behind natural language processing techniques and propose synonymous words to capture local sequence similarities in a group of similar proteins. A synonymous word is an n-gram pattern of amino acids that reflects the sequence variation in a proteins evolution. We generate a protein-dependent synonymous dictionary from a set of protein sequences for PSS prediction. On a large non-redundant dataset of 8,297 protein chains (DsspNr-25), the average Q3 of SymPred and SymPsiPred are 81.0% and 83.9% respectively. On the two latest independent test sets (EVA Set_1 and EVA_Set2), the average Q3 of SymPred is 78.8% and 79.2% respectively. SymPred outperforms other existing methods by 1.4% to 5.4%. We study two factors that may affect the performance of SymPred and find that it is very sensitive to the number of proteins of both known and unknown structures. This finding implies that SymPred and SymPsiPred have the potential to achieve higher accuracy as the number of protein sequences in the NCBInr and PDB databases increases. Conclusions Our experiment results show that local similarities in protein sequences typically exhibit conserved structures, which can be used to improve the accuracy of secondary structure prediction. For the application of synonymous words, we demonstrate an example of a sequence alignment which is generated by the distribution of shared synonymous words of a pair of protein sequences. We can align the two sequences nearly perfectly which are very dissimilar at the sequence level but very similar at the structural level. The SymPred and SymPsiPred prediction servers are available at http://bio-cluster.iis.sinica.edu.tw/SymPred/. PMID:21143813

  14. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  15. Structural Characterization of the Chaetomium thermophilum TREX-2 Complex and its Interaction with the mRNA Nuclear Export Factor Mex67:Mtr2.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Valkov, Eugene; Aibara, Shintaro; Flemming, Dirk; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Hurt, Ed; Stewart, Murray

    2015-07-01

    The TREX-2 complex integrates mRNA nuclear export into the gene expression pathway and is based on aSac3 scaffold to which Thp1, Sem1, Sus1, and Cdc31 bind. TREX-2 also binds the mRNA nuclear export factor, Mex67:Mtr2, through the Sac3 N-terminal region (Sac3N). Here, we characterize Chaetomium thermophilum TREX-2, show that the invitro reconstituted complex has an annular structure, and define the structural basis for interactions between Sac3, Sus1, Cdc31, and Mex67:Mtr2. Crystal structures show that the binding of C.thermophilum Sac3N to the Mex67 NTF2-like domain (Mex67(NTF2L)) is mediated primarily through phenylalanine residues present in a series of repeating sequence motifs that resemble those seen in many nucleoporins, and Mlp1 also binds Mex67:Mtr2 using a similar motif. Deletion of Sac3N generated growth and mRNA export defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and we propose TREX-2 and Mlp1 function to facilitate export by concentrating mature messenger ribonucleoparticles at the nuclear pore entrance. PMID:26051714

  16. Structural Characterization of the Chaetomium thermophilum TREX-2 Complex and its Interaction with the mRNA Nuclear Export Factor Mex67:Mtr2

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Lyudmila; Valkov, Eugene; Aibara, Shintaro; Flemming, Dirk; McLaughlin, StephenH.; Hurt, Ed; Stewart, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Summary The TREX-2 complex integrates mRNA nuclear export into the gene expression pathway and is based on aSac3 scaffold to which Thp1, Sem1, Sus1, and Cdc31 bind. TREX-2 also binds the mRNA nuclear export factor, Mex67:Mtr2, through the Sac3 N-terminal region (Sac3N). Here, we characterize Chaetomium thermophilum TREX-2, show that the invitro reconstituted complex has an annular structure, and define the structural basis for interactions between Sac3, Sus1, Cdc31, and Mex67:Mtr2. Crystal structures show that the binding of C.thermophilum Sac3N to the Mex67 NTF2-like domain (Mex67NTF2L) is mediated primarily through phenylalanine residues present in a series of repeating sequence motifs that resemble those seen in many nucleoporins, and Mlp1 also binds Mex67:Mtr2 using a similar motif. Deletion of Sac3N generated growth and mRNA export defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and we propose TREX-2 and Mlp1 function to facilitate export by concentrating mature messenger ribonucleoparticles at the nuclear pore entrance. PMID:26051714

  17. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Interactions with a G quadruplex structure in the 3?-Untranslated Region of NR2B mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Stefanovic, Snezana; DeMarco, Brett A.; Underwood, Ayana; Williams, Kathryn R.; Bassell, Gary J.; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by a trinucleotide CGG expansion in the 5?-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene, which leads to the loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP, an RNA-binding protein that regulates the translation of specific mRNAs, has been shown to bind a subset of its mRNA targets by recognizing G quadruplex structures. It has been suggested that FMRP controls the local protein synthesis of several protein components of the Post Synaptic Density (PSD) in response to specific cellular needs. We have previously shown that the interactions between FMRP and mRNAs of the PSD scaffold proteins PSD-95 and Shank1 are mediated via stable G-quadruplex structures formed within the 3?-untranslated regions of these mRNAs. In this study we used biophysical methods to show that a comparable G quadruplex structure forms in the 3?-untranslated region of the glutamate receptor subunit NR2B mRNA encoding for a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that is recognized specifically by FMRP, suggesting a common theme for FMRP recognition of its dendritic mRNA targets. PMID:26412477

  18. 4SALE A tool for synchronous RNA sequence and secondary structure alignment and editing

    PubMed Central

    Seibel, Philipp N; Mller, Tobias; Dandekar, Thomas; Schultz, Jrg; Wolf, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    Background In sequence analysis the multiple alignment builds the fundament of all proceeding analyses. Errors in an alignment could strongly influence all succeeding analyses and therefore could lead to wrong predictions. Hand-crafted and hand-improved alignments are necessary and meanwhile good common practice. For RNA sequences often the primary sequence as well as a secondary structure consensus is well known, e.g., the cloverleaf structure of the t-RNA. Recently, some alignment editors are proposed that are able to include and model both kinds of information. However, with the advent of a large amount of reliable RNA sequences together with their solved secondary structures (available from e.g. the ITS2 Database), we are faced with the problem to handle sequences and their associated secondary structures synchronously. Results 4SALE fills this gap. The application allows a fast sequence and synchronous secondary structure alignment for large data sets and for the first time synchronous manual editing of aligned sequences and their secondary structures. This study describes an algorithm for the synchronous alignment of sequences and their associated secondary structures as well as the main features of 4SALE used for further analyses and editing. 4SALE builds an optimal and unique starting point for every RNA sequence and structure analysis. Conclusion 4SALE, which provides an user-friendly and intuitive interface, is a comprehensive toolbox for RNA analysis based on sequence and secondary structure information. The program connects sequence and structure databases like the ITS2 Database to phylogeny programs as for example the CBCAnalyzer. 4SALE is written in JAVA and therefore platform independent. The software is freely available and distributed from the website at PMID:17101042

  19. Multiple Structurally Distinct ERα mRNA Variants in Zebrafish are Differentially Expressed by Tissue Type, Stage of Development and Estrogen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Kellie A.; Yershov, Anya; Novillo, Apolonia; Callard, Gloria V.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that estrogen-like environmental chemicals interact with the ligand-binding site of estrogen receptors (ER) to disrupt transcriptional control of estrogen responsive targets. Here we investigate the possibility that estrogens also impact splicing decisions on estrogen responsive genes, such as that encoding ERα itself. Targeted PCR cloning was applied to identify six ERα mRNA variants in zebrafish. Sequencing revealed alternate use of transcription and translation start sites, multiple exon deletions, intron retention and alternate polyadenylation. As determined by quantitative (q)PCR, N-terminal mRNA variants predicting long (ERαL) and short (ERαS) isoforms were differentially expressed by tissue-type, sex, stage of development and estrogen exposure. Whereas ERαL mRNA was diffusely distributed in liver, brain, heart, eye, and gonads, ERαS mRNA was preferentially expressed in liver (female > male) and ovary. Neither ERαL nor ERαS transcripts varied significantly during development, but 17β-estradiol selectively increased accumulation of ERαS mRNA (~170-fold by 120 hpf), an effect mimicked by bisphenol-A and diethylstilbestrol. Significantly, a C-truncated variant (ERαS-Cx) lacking most of the ligand binding and AF-2 domains was transcribed exclusively from the short isoform promoter and was similar to ERαS in its tissue-, stage- and estrogen inducible expression. These results support the idea that promoter choice and alternative splicing of the esr1 gene of zebrafish are part of the autoregulatory mechanism by which estrogen modulates subsequent ERα expression, and further suggest that environmental estrogens could exert some of their toxic effects by altering the relative abundance of structurally and functionally distinct ERα isoforms. PMID:24090614

  20. Knowledge base and neural network approach for protein secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Maulika S; Mazumdar, Himanshu S

    2014-11-21

    Protein structure prediction is of great relevance given the abundant genomic and proteomic data generated by the genome sequencing projects. Protein secondary structure prediction is addressed as a sub task in determining the protein tertiary structure and function. In this paper, a novel algorithm, KB-PROSSP-NN, which is a combination of knowledge base and modeling of the exceptions in the knowledge base using neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction (PSSP), is proposed. The knowledge base is derived from a proteomic sequence-structure database and consists of the statistics of association between the 5-residue words and corresponding secondary structure. The predicted results obtained using knowledge base are refined with a Backpropogation neural network algorithm. Neural net models the exceptions of the knowledge base. The Q3 accuracy of 90% and 82% is achieved on the RS126 and CB396 test sets respectively which suggest improvement over existing state of art methods. PMID:25128736

  1. RNACluster: An integrated tool for RNA secondary structure comparison and clustering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Olman, V; Liu, Huiqing; Ye, Xiuzi; Qiu, Shilun; Xu, Ying

    2008-07-15

    RNA structure comparison is a fundamental problem in structural biology, structural chemistry, and bioinformatics. It can be used for analysis of RNA energy landscapes, conformational switches, and facilitating RNA structure prediction. The purpose of our integrated tool RNACluster is twofold: to provide a platform for computing and comparison of different distances between RNA secondary structures, and to perform cluster identification to derive useful information of RNA structure ensembles, using a minimum spanning tree (MST) based clustering algorithm. RNACluster employs a cluster identification approach based on a MST representation of the RNA ensemble data and currently supports six distance measures between RNA secondary structures. RNACluster provides a user-friendly graphical interface to allow a user to compare different structural distances, analyze the structure ensembles, and visualize predicted structural clusters. PMID:18271070

  2. Mechanism of mRNA binding to bovine mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Denslow, N D; Michaels, G S; Montoya, J; Attardi, G; O'Brien, T W

    1989-05-15

    The binding of mRNA to bovine mitochondrial ribosomes was investigated using triplet codons, homopolymers and heteropolymers of various lengths, and human mitochondrial mRNAs. In the absence of initiation factors and initiator tRNA, mitochondrial ribosomes do not bind triplet codons (AUG and UUU) or homopolymers (oligo(U] shorter than about 10 nucleotides. The RNA binding domain on the 28 S mitoribosomal subunit spans approximately 80 nucleotides of the mRNA, judging from the size of the fragments of poly(U,G) and natural mRNAs protected from RNase T1 digestion by this subunit, but the major binding interaction with the ribosome appears to occur over a 30-nucleotide stretch. Human mitochondrial mRNAs coding for subunits II and III of cytochrome c oxidase and subunit 1 of the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) were used in studying in detail the binding of mRNA to the small subunit of bovine mitochondrial ribosomes. We have determined that these mRNAs have considerable secondary structure in their 5'-terminal regions and that the initiation codon of each mRNA is sequestered in a stem structure. Little mRNA was bound to ribosomes in a manner conferring protection of the 5' termini from RNase T1 digestion, under standard conditions supporting the binding of artificial templates, but such binding was greatly stimulated by the addition of a mitochondrial extract. Initiation factors and tRNAs from Escherichia coli were unable to stimulate the 5' terminus protected binding of these mRNA molecules, demonstrating a requirement for homologous factors. Our results strongly suggest that mitochondrial initiation factors are required for the proper recognition and melting of the secondary structure in the 5'-terminal region of mitochondrial mRNAs, as a prerequisite for initiation of protein synthesis in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:2542274

  3. Structural Requirement in Clostridium perfringens Collagenase mRNA 5′ Leader Sequence for Translational Induction through Small RNA-mRNA Base Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Kouji

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium Clostridium perfringens is pathogenic to humans and animals, and the production of its toxins is strictly regulated during the exponential phase. We recently found that the 5′ leader sequence of the colA transcript encoding collagenase, which is a major toxin of this organism, is processed and stabilized in the presence of the small RNA VR-RNA. The primary colA 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) forms a long stem-loop structure containing an internal bulge and masks its own ribosomal binding site. Here we found that VR-RNA directly regulates colA expression through base pairing with colA mRNA in vivo. However, when the internal bulge structure was closed by point mutations in colA mRNA, translation ceased despite the presence of VR-RNA. In addition, a mutation disrupting the colA stem-loop structure induced mRNA processing and ColA-FLAG translational activation in the absence of VR-RNA, indicating that the stem-loop and internal bulge structure of the colA 5′ leader sequence is important for regulation by VR-RNA. On the other hand, processing was required for maximal ColA expression but was not essential for VR-RNA-dependent colA regulation. Finally, colA processing and translational activation were induced at a high temperature without VR-RNA. These results suggest that inhibition of the colA 5′ leader structure through base pairing is the primary role of VR-RNA in colA regulation and that the colA 5′ leader structure is a possible thermosensor. PMID:23585542

  4. Atomic model of a cypovirus built from cryo-EM structure provides insight into the mechanism of mRNA capping.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lingpeng; Sun, Jingchen; Zhang, Kai; Mou, Zongjun; Huang, Xiaoxing; Ji, Gang; Sun, Fei; Zhang, Jingqiang; Zhu, Ping

    2011-01-25

    The cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) from the family Reoviridae belongs to a subgroup of "turreted" reoviruses, in which the mRNA capping activity occurs in a pentameric turret. We report a full atomic model of CPV built from a 3D density map obtained using cryoelectron microscopy. The image data for the 3D reconstruction were acquired exclusively from a CCD camera. Our structure shows that the enzymatic domains of the pentameric turret of CPV are topologically conserved and that there are five unique channels connecting the guanylyltransferase and methyltransferase regions. This structural organization reveals how the channels guide nascent mRNA sequentially to guanylyltransferase, 7-N-methyltransferase, and 2'-O-methyltransferase in the turret, undergoing the highly coordinated mRNA capping activity. Furthermore, by fitting the deduced amino acid sequence of the protein VP5 to 120 large protrusion proteins on the CPV capsid shell, we confirmed that this protrusion protein is encoded by CPV RNA segment 7. PMID:21220303

  5. The Role of Structural Elements of the 5'-Terminal Region of p53 mRNA in Translation under Stress Conditions Assayed by the Antisense Oligonucleotide Approach

    PubMed Central

    Swiatkowska, Agata; Zydowicz, Paulina; Gorska, Agnieszka; Suchacka, Julia; Dutkiewicz, Mariola; Ciesio?ka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The p53 protein is one of the major factors responsible for cell cycle regulation and stress response. In the 5-terminal region of p53 mRNA, an IRES element has been found which takes part in the translational regulation of p53 expression. Two characteristic hairpin motifs are present in this mRNA region: G56-C169, with the first AUG codon, and U180-A218, which interacts with the Hdm2 protein (human homolog of mouse double minute 2 protein). 2?-OMe modified antisense oligomers hybridizing to the 5'-terminal region of p53 mRNA were applied to assess the role of these structural elements in translation initiation under conditions of cellular stress. Structural changes in the RNA target occurring upon oligomers binding were monitored by the Pb2+-induced cleavage method. The impact of antisense oligomers on the synthesis of two proteins, the full-length p53 and its isoform ?40p53, was analysed in HT-29, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, under normal conditions and under stress, as well as in vitro conditions. The results revealed that the hairpin U180-A218 and adjacent single-stranded region A219-A228 were predominantly responsible for high efficacy of IRES-mediated translation in the presence of stress factors. These motifs play a role of cis-acting elements which are able to modulate IRES activity, likely via interactions with protein factors. PMID:26513723

  6. A Comparative Taxonomy of Parallel Algorithms for RNA Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khatib, Ra’ed M.; Abdullah, Rosni; Rashid, Nur’Aini Abdul

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecules have been discovered playing crucial roles in numerous biological and medical procedures and processes. RNA structures determination have become a major problem in the biology context. Recently, computer scientists have empowered the biologists with RNA secondary structures that ease an understanding of the RNA functions and roles. Detecting RNA secondary structure is an NP-hard problem, especially in pseudoknotted RNA structures. The detection process is also time-consuming; as a result, an alternative approach such as using parallel architectures is a desirable option. The main goal in this paper is to do an intensive investigation of parallel methods used in the literature to solve the demanding issues, related to the RNA secondary structure prediction methods. Then, we introduce a new taxonomy for the parallel RNA folding methods. Based on this proposed taxonomy, a systematic and scientific comparison is performed among these existing methods. PMID:20458364

  7. Cloning, structure and mRNA expression of human Cctg, which encodes the chaperonin subunit CCT gamma.

    PubMed

    Walkley, N A; Demaine, A G; Malik, A N

    1996-01-15

    We describe the cloning, DNA sequence analysis and mRNA expression analysis of human Cctg (HsCctg), a gene that encodes the gamma-subunit of the eukaryotic cytosolic 'chaperonin-containing TCP-1' (CCT). Partial clones representing the 3' region of HsCctg cDNA were isolated from a human kidney cDNA library, and the missing 5' region was amplified directly from human kidney cDNA. The Cctg mRNA transcript is expressed in numerous human and mouse tissues and, like Tcp-1/Ccta, Cctg mRNA is expressed at higher levels in mouse testis when compared with kidney and brain. Southern-blot analysis has also revealed the Cctg gene to be highly conserved in mouse, rat, sheep and frog. The 1901 bp HsCctg cDNA has a coding region of 1635 bp and encodes a predicted 60 kDa protein (544 amino acids). The predicted HsCCT gamma amino acid sequence shares a high degree of sequence similarity with gamma-subunits from the mouse Mus musculus (98% similarity), the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (75% similarity) and the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis (76% similarity) as well as with other members of the TF55/TCP-1 family, such as human TCP-1/CCT alpha (55% similarity) and TCP-20/CCT zeta (54% similarity). HsCCT gamma also shares conserved domains previously identified in the TF55/TCP-1 family of chaperonins and more distantly related chaperonins such as GroEL and Hsp60. PMID:8573069

  8. Efficient calculation of exact probability distributions of integer features on RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the needs for analyses of secondary structures of RNAs are increasing, prediction of the secondary structures of RNAs are not always reliable. Because an RNA may have a complicated energy landscape, comprehensive representations of the whole ensemble of the secondary structures, such as the probability distributions of various features of RNA secondary structures are required. Results A general method to efficiently compute the distribution of any integer scalar/vector function on the secondary structure is proposed. We also show two concrete algorithms, for Hamming distance from a reference structure and for 5? ? 3? distance, which can be constructed by following our general method. These practical applications of this method show the effectiveness of the proposed method. Conclusions The proposed method provides a clear and comprehensive procedure to construct algorithms for distributions of various integer features. In addition, distributions of integer vectors, that is a combination of different integer scores, can be also described by applying our 2D expanding technique. PMID:25560710

  9. Structure of the coding region and mRNA variants of the apyrase gene from pea (Pisum sativum)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibata, K.; Abe, S.; Davies, E.

    2001-01-01

    Partial amino acid sequences of a 49 kDa apyrase (ATP diphosphohydrolase, EC 3.6.1.5) from the cytoskeletal fraction of etiolated pea stems were used to derive oligonucleotide DNA primers to generate a cDNA fragment of pea apyrase mRNA by RT-PCR and these primers were used to screen a pea stem cDNA library. Two almost identical cDNAs differing in just 6 nucleotides within the coding regions were found, and these cDNA sequences were used to clone genomic fragments by PCR. Two nearly identical gene fragments containing 8 exons and 7 introns were obtained. One of them (H-type) encoded the mRNA sequence described by Hsieh et al. (1996) (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank Z32743), while the other (S-type) differed by the same 6 nucleotides as the mRNAs, suggesting that these genes may be alleles. The six nucleotide differences between these two alleles were found solely in the first exon, and these mutation sites had two types of consensus sequences. These mRNAs were found with varying lengths of 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTR). There are some similarities between the 3'-UTR of these mRNAs and those of actin and actin binding proteins in plants. The putative roles of the 3'-UTR and alternative polyadenylation sites are discussed in relation to their possible role in targeting the mRNAs to different subcellular compartments.

  10. Argumentation in Secondary School Students' Structured and Unstructured Chat Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen, Timo; Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Joint construction of new knowledge demands that persons can express their statements in a convincing way and explore other people's arguments constructively. For this reason, more knowledge on different means to support collaborative argumentation is needed. This study clarifies whether structured interaction supports students' critical and

  11. Argumentation in Secondary School Students' Structured and Unstructured Chat Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salminen, Timo; Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Joint construction of new knowledge demands that persons can express their statements in a convincing way and explore other people's arguments constructively. For this reason, more knowledge on different means to support collaborative argumentation is needed. This study clarifies whether structured interaction supports students' critical and…

  12. Charge-Induced Unzipping of Isolated Proteins to a Defined Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    González Flórez, Ana Isabel; Mucha, Eike; Ahn, Doo-Sik; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Pagel, Kevin; von Helden, Gert

    2016-03-01

    Here we present a combined experimental and theoretical study on the secondary structure of isolated proteins as a function of charge state. In infrared spectra of the proteins ubiquitin and cytochrome c, amide I (C=O stretch) and amide II (N-H bend) bands can be found at positions that are typical for condensed-phase proteins. For high charge states a new band appears, substantially red-shifted from the amide II band observed at lower charge states. The observations are interpreted in terms of Coulomb-driven transitions in secondary structures from mostly helical to extended C5 -type hydrogen-bonded structures. Support for this interpretation comes from simple energy considerations as well as from quantum chemical calculations on model peptides. This transition in secondary structure is most likely universal for isolated proteins that occur in mass spectrometric experiments. PMID:26847383

  13. A secondary-structure model for the self-cleaving region of Neurospora VS RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, T L; Olive, J E; Collins, R A

    1995-01-01

    Neurospora VS RNA performs an RNA-mediated self-cleavage reaction whose products contain 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl termini. This reaction is similar to those of hammerhead, hairpin, and hepatitis delta virus ribozymes; however, VS RNA is not similar in sequence to these other self-cleaving motifs. Here we propose a model for the secondary structure of the self-cleaving region of VS RNA, supported by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification structure probing data. The secondary structure of VS RNA is distinct from those of the other naturally occurring RNA self-cleaving domains. In addition to a unique secondary structure, several Mg-dependent interactions occur during the folding of VS RNA into its active tertiary conformation. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7753865

  14. FTIR analysis of protein secondary structure in cheddar cheese during ripening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Ai-ping; Ren, Fa-zheng; Zhang, Xiao-ying; Stephanie, Clark; Zhang, Lu-da; Guo, Hui-yuan

    2011-07-01

    Proteolysis is one of the most important biochemical reactions during cheese ripening. Studies on the secondary structure of proteins during ripening would be helpful for characterizing protein changes for assessing cheese quality. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), with self-deconvolution, second derivative analysis and band curve-fitting, was used to characterize the secondary structure of proteins in Cheddar cheese during ripening. The spectra of the amide I region showed great similarity, while the relative contents of the secondary structures underwent a series of changes. As ripening progressed, the alpha-helix content decreased and the beta-sheet content increased. This structural shift was attributed to the strengthening of hydrogen bonds that resulted from hydrolysis of caseins. In summary, FTIR could provide the basis for rapid characterization of cheese that is undergoing ripening. PMID:21942024

  15. Macromolecular ab initio phasing enforcing secondary and tertiary structure

    PubMed Central

    Milln, Claudia; Sammito, Massimo; Usn, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio phasing of macromolecular structures, from the native intensities alone with no experimental phase information or previous particular structural knowledge, has been the object of a long quest, limited by two main barriers: structure size and resolution of the data. Current approaches to extend the scope of ab initio phasing include use of the Patterson function, density modification and data extrapolation. The authors approach relies on the combination of locating model fragments such as polyalanine ?-helices with the program PHASER and density modification with the program SHELXE. Given the difficulties in discriminating correct small substructures, many putative groups of fragments have to be tested in parallel; thus calculations are performed in a grid or supercomputer. The method has been named after the Italian painter Arcimboldo, who used to compose portraits out of fruit and vegetables. With ARCIMBOLDO, most collections of fragments remain a still-life, but some are correct enough for density modification and main-chain tracing to reveal the proteins true portrait. Beyond ?-helices, other fragments can be exploited in an analogous way: libraries of helices with modelled side chains, ?-strands, predictable fragments such as DNA-binding folds or fragments selected from distant homologues up to libraries of small local folds that are used to enforce nonspecific tertiary structure; thus restoring the ab initio nature of the method. Using these methods, a number of unknown macromolecules with a few thousand atoms and resolutions around 2? have been solved. In the 2014 release, use of the program has been simplified. The software mediates the use of massive computing to automate the grid access required in difficult cases but may also run on a single multicore workstation (http://chango.ibmb.csic.es/ARCIMBOLDO_LITE) to solve straightforward cases. PMID:25610631

  16. Scoring a Semi-Structured Interview for Assessment of Beginning Secondary Mathematics Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Barbara W.; And Others

    The semi-structured interview was investigated as a content-based assessment designed to take into account the complexity of teaching. A semi-structured interview licensing assessment for secondary mathematics teachers was developed and tested by the Connecticut State Department of Education. The scoring system converted the open-ended verbal

  17. Aging of Dry Desiccation-Tolerant Pollen Does Not Affect Protein Secondary Structure.

    PubMed Central

    Wolkers, W. F.; Hoekstra, F. A.

    1995-01-01

    Protein secondary structure and membrane phase behavior in aging Typha latifolia pollen were studied by means of Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR). Membranes isolated from fresh pollen occurred mainly in the liquid crystalline phase at room temperature, whereas the membrane fluidity of aged pollen was drastically decreased. This decrease did not result in large-scale irreversible protein aggregation, as was concluded from in situ FTIR assessment of the amide-1 bands. Curve-fitting on the infrared absorbance spectra enabled estimation of the proportion of different classes of protein secondary structure. Membrane proteins had a relatively large amount of [alpha]-helical structure (48%; band at 1658 cm-1), and turn-like structures (at 1637 and 1680 cm-1) were also detected. The secondary protein structure of isolated cytoplasmic proteins resembled that of proteins in whole pollen and was conserved upon drying in the absence of sucrose. The isolated cytoplasmic proteins had a large amount of [alpha]-helical structure (43%), and also [beta]-sheet (at 1637 and 1692 cm-1) and turn structures were detected. Heat-denaturing experiments with intact hydrated pollen showed low (1627 cm-1) and high (1692 cm-1) wave number bands indicating irreversible protein aggregates. The results presented in this paper show that FTIR is an extremely suitable technique to study protein secondary structure in intact plant cells of different hydration levels and developmental stages. PMID:12228641

  18. Using neural network predicted secondary structure information in automatic protein NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Choy, W Y; Sanctuary, B C; Zhu, G

    1997-01-01

    In CAPRI, an automated NMR assignment software package that was developed in our laboratory, both chemical shift values and coupling topologies of spin patterns are used in a procedure for amino acids recognition. By using a knowledge base of chemical shift distributions of the 20 amino acid types, fuzzy mathematics, and pattern recognition theory, the spin coupling topological graphs are mapped onto specific amino acid residues. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of using secondary structure information of proteins as predicted by neural networks in the automated NMR assignment. As the 1H and 13C chemical shifts of proteins are known to correlate to their secondary structures, secondary structure information is useful in improving the amino acid recognition. In this study, the secondary structures of proteins predicted by the PHD protein server and our own trained neural networks are used in the amino acid type recognition. The results show that the predicted secondary structure information can help to improve the accuracy of the amino acid recognition. PMID:9392858

  19. Structuring Free-text Microbiology Culture Reports For Secondary Use.

    PubMed

    Yim, Wen-Wai; Evans, Heather L; Yetisgen, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology lab culture reports are a frequently used diagnostic tool for clinical providers. However, their incorporation into clinical surveillance applications and evidence-based medicine can be severely hindered by the free-text nature of these reports. In this work, we (1) created a microbiology culture template to structure free-text microbiology reports, (2) generated an annotated microbiology report corpus, and (3) built a microbiology information extraction system. Specifically, we combined rule-based, hybrid, and statistical techniques to extract microbiology entities and fill templates for structuring data. System performances were favorable, with entity f1-score 0.889 and relation f1-score 0.795. We plan to incorporate these extractions as features for our ongoing ventilator-associated pneumonia surveillance project, though this tool can be used as an upstream process in other applications. Our newly created corpus includes 1442 unique gram stain and culture microbiology reports generated from a cohort of 715 patients at the University of Washington Medical Facilities. PMID:26306288

  20. Parity-Violation Energy of Biomolecules - IV: Protein Secondary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faglioni, Francesco; Cuesta, Inmaculada García

    2011-06-01

    The parity-violation energy difference between enantiomeric forms of the same amino acid sequence, from the amyloid β-peptide involved in Alzheimer's desease, in both α-helix and β-sheet configurations, is investigated with ab-initio techniques. To this end, we develop an extension of the N2 computational scheme that selectively includes neighboring amino acids to preserve the relevant H-bonds. In agreement with previous speculations, it is found that the helical α structure is associated with larger parity-violation energy differences than the corresponding β form. Implications for the evolution of biological homochirality are discussed as well as the relative importance of various effects in determining the parity-violation energy.

  1. RNA secondary structure prediction from sequence alignments using a network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers.

    PubMed

    Bindewald, Eckart; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2006-03-01

    We present a machine learning method (a hierarchical network of k-nearest neighbor classifiers) that uses an RNA sequence alignment in order to predict a consensus RNA secondary structure. The input to the network is the mutual information, the fraction of complementary nucleotides, and a novel consensus RNAfold secondary structure prediction of a pair of alignment columns and its nearest neighbors. Given this input, the network computes a prediction as to whether a particular pair of alignment columns corresponds to a base pair. By using a comprehensive test set of 49 RFAM alignments, the program KNetFold achieves an average Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.81. This is a significant improvement compared with the secondary structure prediction methods PFOLD and RNAalifold. By using the example of archaeal RNase P, we show that the program can also predict pseudoknot interactions. PMID:16495232

  2. Regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase transcription by hnRNP K and DNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Kasturi; Wang, Meng; Cai, Elizabeth; Fujiwara, Nana; Baker, Harriet; Cave, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene (Th) transcription is critical for specifying and maintaining the dopaminergic neuronal phenotype. Here we define a molecular regulatory mechanism for Th transcription conserved in tetrapod vertebrates. We show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a transactivator of Th transcription. It binds to previously unreported and evolutionarily conserved G:C-rich regions in the Th proximal promoter. hnRNP K directly binds C-rich single DNA strands within these conserved regions and also associates with double-stranded sequences when proteins, such as CREB, are bound to an adjacent cis-regulatory element. The single DNA strands within the conserved G:C-rich regions adopt either G-quadruplex or i-motif secondary structures. We also show that small molecule-mediated stabilization of these secondary structures represses Th promoter activity. These data suggest that these secondary structures are targets for pharmacological modulation of the dopaminergic phenotype. PMID:25493445

  3. RNA secondary structure prediction based on SHAPE data in helix regions.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mohadeseh; Zare-Mirakabad, Fatemeh; Montaseri, Soheila

    2015-09-01

    RNA molecules play important and fundamental roles in biological processes. Frequently, the functional form of single-stranded RNA molecules requires a specific tertiary structure. Classically, RNA structure determination has mostly been accomplished by X-Ray crystallography or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance approaches. These experimental methods are time consuming and expensive. In the past two decades, some computational methods and algorithms have been developed for RNA secondary structure prediction. In these algorithms, minimum free energy is known as the best criterion. However, the results of algorithms show that minimum free energy is not a sufficient criterion to predict RNA secondary structure. These algorithms need some additional knowledge about the structure, which has to be added in the methods. Recently, the information obtained from some experimental data, called SHAPE, can greatly improve the consistency between the native and predicted RNA secondary structure. In this paper, we investigate the influence of SHAPE data on four types of RNA substructures, helices, loops, base pairs from the start and end of helices and two base pairs from the start and end of helices. The results show that SHAPE data in helix regions can improve the prediction. We represent a new method to apply SHAPE data in helix regions for finding RNA secondary structure. Finally, we compare the results of the method on a set of RNAs to predict minimum free energy structure based on considering all SHAPE data and only SHAPE data in helix regions as pseudo free energy and without SHAPE data (without any pseudo free energy). The results show that RNA secondary structure prediction based on considering only SHAPE data in helix regions is more successful than not considering SHAPE data and it provides competitive results in comparison with considering all SHAPE data. PMID:26037307

  4. ITS2 Secondary Structure Improves Discrimination between Medicinal Mu Tong Species when Using DNA Barcoding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Shuo; Huang, Jianjun; Huang, Luqi

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a promising species identification method, but it has proved difficult to find a standardized DNA marker in plant. Although the ITS/ITS2 RNA transcript has been proposed as the core barcode for seed plants, it has been criticized for being too conserved in some species to provide enough information or too variable in some species to align it within the different taxa ranks. We selected 30 individuals, representing 16 species and four families, to explore whether ITS2 can successfully resolve species in terms of secondary structure. Secondary structure was predicted using Mfold software and sequence-structure was aligned by MARNA. RNAstat software transformed the secondary structures into 28 symbol code data for maximum parsimony (MP) analysis. The results showed that the ITS2 structures in our samples had a common four-helix folding type with some shared motifs. This conserved structure facilitated the alignment of ambiguous sequences from divergent families. The structure alignment yielded a MP tree, in which most topological relationships were congruent with the tree constructed using nucleotide sequence data. When the data was combined, we obtained a well-resolved and highly supported phylogeny, in which individuals of a same species were clustered together into a monophyletic group. As a result, the different species that are often referred to as the herb Mu tong were successfully identified using short fragments of 250 bp ITS2 sequences, together with their secondary structure. Thus our analysis strengthens the potential of ITS2 as a promising DNA barcode because it incorporates valuable secondary structure information that will help improve discrimination between species. PMID:26132382

  5. Secondary structure models of the 3' untranslated regions of diverse R2 RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ruschak, Amy M; Mathews, David H; Bibillo, Arkadiusz; Spinelli, Sherry L; Childs, Jessica L; Eickbush, Thomas H; Turner, Douglas H

    2004-06-01

    The RNA structure of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the R2 retrotransposable element is recognized by the R2-encoded reverse transcriptase in a reaction called target primed reverse transcription (TPRT). To provide insight into structure-function relationships important for TPRT, we have created alignments that reveal the secondary structure for 22 Drosophila and five silkmoth 3' UTR R2 sequences. In addition, free energy minimization has been used to predict the secondary structure for the 3' UTR R2 RNA of Forficula auricularia. The predicted structures for Bombyx mori and F. auricularia are consistent with chemical modification data obtained with beta-ethoxy-alpha-ketobutyraldehyde (kethoxal), dimethyl sulfate, and 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate. The structures appear to have common helices that are likely important for function. PMID:15146081

  6. Secondary structure models of the 3? untranslated regions of diverse R2 RNAs

    PubMed Central

    RUSCHAK, AMY M.; MATHEWS, DAVID H.; BIBILLO, ARKADIUSZ; SPINELLI, SHERRY L.; CHILDS, JESSICA L.; EICKBUSH, THOMAS H.; TURNER, DOUGLAS H.

    2004-01-01

    The RNA structure of the 3? untranslated region (UTR) of the R2 retrotransposable element is recognized by the R2-encoded reverse transcriptase in a reaction called target primed reverse transcription (TPRT). To provide insight into structurefunction relationships important for TPRT, we have created alignments that reveal the secondary structure for 22 Drosophila and five silkmoth 3? UTR R2 sequences. In addition, free energy minimization has been used to predict the secondary structure for the 3? UTR R2 RNA of Forficula auricularia. The predicted structures for Bombyx mori and F. auricularia are consistent with chemical modification data obtained with ?-ethoxy-?-ketobutyraldehyde (kethoxal), dimethyl sulfate, and 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate. The structures appear to have common helices that are likely important for function. PMID:15146081

  7. A method for WD40 repeat detection and secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Jiang, Fan; Zhuo, Zhu; Wu, Xian-Hui; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2013-01-01

    WD40-repeat proteins (WD40s), as one of the largest protein families in eukaryotes, play vital roles in assembling protein-protein/DNA/RNA complexes. WD40s fold into similar β-propeller structures despite diversified sequences. A program WDSP (WD40 repeat protein Structure Predictor) has been developed to accurately identify WD40 repeats and predict their secondary structures. The method is designed specifically for WD40 proteins by incorporating both local residue information and non-local family-specific structural features. It overcomes the problem of highly diversified protein sequences and variable loops. In addition, WDSP achieves a better prediction in identifying multiple WD40-domain proteins by taking the global combination of repeats into consideration. In secondary structure prediction, the average Q3 accuracy of WDSP in jack-knife test reaches 93.7%. A disease related protein LRRK2 was used as a representive example to demonstrate the structure prediction. PMID:23776530

  8. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  9. Accurate secondary structure prediction and fold recognition for circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Micsonai, Andrs; Wien, Frank; Kernya, Linda; Lee, Young-Ho; Goto, Yuji; Rfrgiers, Matthieu; Kardos, Jzsef

    2015-06-16

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a widely used technique for the study of protein structure. Numerous algorithms have been developed for the estimation of the secondary structure composition from the CD spectra. These methods often fail to provide acceptable results on ?/?-mixed or ?-structure-rich proteins. The problem arises from the spectral diversity of ?-structures, which has hitherto been considered as an intrinsic limitation of the technique. The predictions are less reliable for proteins of unusual ?-structures such as membrane proteins, protein aggregates, and amyloid fibrils. Here, we show that the parallel/antiparallel orientation and the twisting of the ?-sheets account for the observed spectral diversity. We have developed a method called ?-structure selection (BeStSel) for the secondary structure estimation that takes into account the twist of ?-structures. This method can reliably distinguish parallel and antiparallel ?-sheets and accurately estimates the secondary structure for a broad range of proteins. Moreover, the secondary structure components applied by the method are characteristic to the protein fold, and thus the fold can be predicted to the level of topology in the CATH classification from a single CD spectrum. By constructing a web server, we offer a general tool for a quick and reliable structure analysis using conventional CD or synchrotron radiation CD (SRCD) spectroscopy for the protein science research community. The method is especially useful when X-ray or NMR techniques fail. Using BeStSel on data collected by SRCD spectroscopy, we investigated the structure of amyloid fibrils of various disease-related proteins and peptides. PMID:26038575

  10. Artificial Intelligence in Prediction of Secondary Protein Structure Using CB513 Database

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Zikrija; Purisevic, Elvir; Omanovic, Samir; Coralic, Zlatan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe CB513 a non-redundant dataset, suitable for development of algorithms for prediction of secondary protein structure. A program was made in Borland Delphi for transforming data from our dataset to make it suitable for learning of neural network for prediction of secondary protein structure implemented in MATLAB Neural-Network Toolbox. Learning (training and testing) of neural network is researched with different sizes of windows, different number of neurons in the hidden layer and different number of training epochs, while using dataset CB513. PMID:21347158

  11. Determination of the secondary structure of epoxide hydrolase by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Y D; Izotov, A A; Rukavishnikov, I G; Uvarov VYu

    1993-03-01

    The secondary structure of microsomal epoxide hydrolase was determined by Raman spectroscopy and the effect of the membrane microenvironment studied. The ratios of the four secondary structure contents, alpha-helix: beta-strand:turn:undefined, were found to be 47:24:17:11 and 58:17:15:10 for the solubilized and the membrane-bound epoxide hydrolase, respectively. Based on the spectral analysis in the 2800-2900 cm-1 range, it was concluded that the protein studied produces the disordering effect on the lipid dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer at 16 degrees C. PMID:8448187

  12. New charge-bearing amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Stacy J; Almeida, Aaron M; Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-11-26

    Proteinogenic amino acid residues that promote β-sheet secondary structure are hydrophobic (e.g., Ile or Val) or only moderately polar (e.g., Thr). The design of peptides intended to display β-sheet secondary structure in water typically requires one set of residues to ensure conformational stability and an orthogonal set, with charged side chains, to ensure aqueous solubility and discourage self-association. Here we describe new amino acids that manifest substantial β-sheet propensity, by virtue of β-branching, and also bear an ionizable group in the side chain. PMID:25393077

  13. Web-Beagle: a web server for the alignment of RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Eugenio; Pietrosanto, Marco; Ferr, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Web-Beagle (http://beagle.bio.uniroma2.it) is a web server for the pairwise global or local alignment of RNA secondary structures. The server exploits a new encoding for RNA secondary structure and a substitution matrix of RNA structural elements to perform RNA structural alignments. The web server allows the user to compute up to 10 000 alignments in a single run, taking as input sets of RNA sequences and structures or primary sequences alone. In the latter case, the server computes the secondary structure prediction for the RNAs on-the-fly using RNAfold (free energy minimization). The user can also compare a set of input RNAs to one of five pre-compiled RNA datasets including lncRNAs and 3? UTRs. All types of comparison produce in output the pairwise alignments along with structural similarity and statistical significance measures for each resulting alignment. A graphical color-coded representation of the alignments allows the user to easily identify structural similarities between RNAs. Web-Beagle can be used for finding structurally related regions in two or more RNAs, for the identification of homologous regions or for functional annotation. Benchmark tests show that Web-Beagle has lower computational complexity, running time and better performances than other available methods. PMID:25977293

  14. Secondary structure assignment for conformationally irregular peptides: comparison between DSSP, STRIDE and KAKSI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Sagui, Celeste

    2015-02-01

    Secondary structure assignment codes were built to explore the regularities associated with the periodic motifs of proteins, such as those in backbone dihedral angles or in hydrogen bonds between backbone atoms. Precise structure assignment is challenging because real-life secondary structures are susceptible to bending, twist, fraying and other deformations that can distance them from their geometrical prototypes. Although results from codes such as DSSP and STRIDE converge in well-ordered structures, the agreement between the secondary structure assignments is known to deteriorate as the conformations become more distorted. Conformationally irregular peptides therefore offer a great opportunity to explore the differences between these codes. This is especially important for unfolded proteins and intrinsically disordered proteins, which are known to exhibit residual and/or transient secondary structure whose characterization is challenging. In this work, we have carried out Molecular Dynamics simulations of (relatively) disordered peptides, specifically gp41659-671 (ELLELDKWASLWN), the homopeptide polyasparagine (N18), and polyasparagine dimers. We have analyzed the resulting conformations with DSSP and STRIDE, based on hydrogen-bond patterns (and dihedral angles for STRIDE), and KAKSI, based on α-Carbon distances; and carefully characterized the differences in structural assignments. The full-sequence Segment Overlap (SOV) scores, that quantify the agreement between two secondary structure assignments, vary from 70% for gp41659-671 (STRIDE as reference) to 49% for N18 (DSSP as reference). Major differences are observed in turns, in the distinction between α and 310 helices, and in short parallel-sheet segments. PMID:25424660

  15. "Parallel factor analysis of multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra for protein secondary structure determination".

    PubMed

    Oshokoya, Olayinka O; JiJi, Renee D

    2015-09-10

    Protein secondary structural analysis is important for understanding the relationship between protein structure and function, or more importantly how changes in structure relate to loss of function. The structurally sensitive protein vibrational modes (amide I, II, III and S) in deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectra resulting from the backbone C-O and N-H vibrations make DUVRR a potentially powerful tool for studying secondary structure changes. Experimental studies reveal that the position and intensity of the four amide modes in DUVRR spectra of proteins are largely correlated with the varying fractions of ?-helix, ?-sheet and disordered structural content of proteins. Employing multivariate calibration methods and DUVRR spectra of globular proteins with varying structural compositions, the secondary structure of a protein with unknown structure can be predicted. A disadvantage of multivariate calibration methods is the requirement of known concentration or spectral profiles. Second-order curve resolution methods, such as parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), do not have such a requirement due to the "second-order advantage." An exceptional feature of DUVRR spectroscopy is that DUVRR spectra are linearly dependent on both excitation wavelength and secondary structure composition. Thus, higher order data can be created by combining protein DUVRR spectra of several proteins collected at multiple excitation wavelengths to give multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman data (ME-UVRR). PARAFAC has been used to analyze ME-UVRR data of nine proteins to resolve the pure spectral, excitation and compositional profiles. A three factor model with non-negativity constraints produced three unique factors that were correlated with the relative abundance of helical, ?-sheet and poly-proline II dihedral angles. This is the first empirical evidence that the typically resolved "disordered" spectrum represents the better defined poly-proline II type structure. PMID:26388475

  16. Accurate secondary structure prediction and fold recognition for circular dichroism spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Micsonai, András; Wien, Frank; Kernya, Linda; Lee, Young-Ho; Goto, Yuji; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Kardos, József

    2015-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a widely used technique for the study of protein structure. Numerous algorithms have been developed for the estimation of the secondary structure composition from the CD spectra. These methods often fail to provide acceptable results on α/β-mixed or β-structure–rich proteins. The problem arises from the spectral diversity of β-structures, which has hitherto been considered as an intrinsic limitation of the technique. The predictions are less reliable for proteins of unusual β-structures such as membrane proteins, protein aggregates, and amyloid fibrils. Here, we show that the parallel/antiparallel orientation and the twisting of the β-sheets account for the observed spectral diversity. We have developed a method called β-structure selection (BeStSel) for the secondary structure estimation that takes into account the twist of β-structures. This method can reliably distinguish parallel and antiparallel β-sheets and accurately estimates the secondary structure for a broad range of proteins. Moreover, the secondary structure components applied by the method are characteristic to the protein fold, and thus the fold can be predicted to the level of topology in the CATH classification from a single CD spectrum. By constructing a web server, we offer a general tool for a quick and reliable structure analysis using conventional CD or synchrotron radiation CD (SRCD) spectroscopy for the protein science research community. The method is especially useful when X-ray or NMR techniques fail. Using BeStSel on data collected by SRCD spectroscopy, we investigated the structure of amyloid fibrils of various disease-related proteins and peptides. PMID:26038575

  17. Direct-Coupling Analysis of nucleotide coevolution facilitates RNA secondary and tertiary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    DeLeonardis, Eleonora; Lutz, Benjamin; Ratz, Sebastian; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Rmi; Schug, Alexander; Weigt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Despite the biological importance of non-coding RNA, their structural characterization remains challenging. Making use of the rapidly growing sequence databases, we analyze nucleotide coevolution across homologous sequences via Direct-Coupling Analysis to detect nucleotide-nucleotide contacts. For a representative set of riboswitches, we show that the results of Direct-Coupling Analysis in combination with a generalized Nussinov algorithm systematically improve the results of RNA secondary structure prediction beyond traditional covariance approaches based on mutual information. Even more importantly, we show that the results of Direct-Coupling Analysis are enriched in tertiary structure contacts. By integrating these predictions into molecular modeling tools, systematically improved tertiary structure predictions can be obtained, as compared to using secondary structure information alone. PMID:26420827

  18. Direct-Coupling Analysis of nucleotide coevolution facilitates RNA secondary and tertiary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    De Leonardis, Eleonora; Lutz, Benjamin; Ratz, Sebastian; Cocco, Simona; Monasson, Rmi; Schug, Alexander; Weigt, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Despite the biological importance of non-coding RNA, their structural characterization remains challenging. Making use of the rapidly growing sequence databases, we analyze nucleotide coevolution across homologous sequences via Direct-Coupling Analysis to detect nucleotide-nucleotide contacts. For a representative set of riboswitches, we show that the results of Direct-Coupling Analysis in combination with a generalized Nussinov algorithm systematically improve the results of RNA secondary structure prediction beyond traditional covariance approaches based on mutual information. Even more importantly, we show that the results of Direct-Coupling Analysis are enriched in tertiary structure contacts. By integrating these predictions into molecular modeling tools, systematically improved tertiary structure predictions can be obtained, as compared to using secondary structure information alone. PMID:26420827

  19. The four ingredients of single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction. A unifying perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Any method for RNA secondary structure prediction is determined by four ingredients. The architecture is the choice of features implemented by the model (such as stacked basepairs, loop length distributions, etc.). The architecture determines the number of parameters in the model. The scoring scheme is the nature of those parameters (whether thermodynamic, probabilistic, or weights). The parameterization stands for the specific values assigned to the parameters. These three ingredients are referred to as “the model.” The fourth ingredient is the folding algorithms used to predict plausible secondary structures given the model and the sequence of a structural RNA. Here, I make several unifying observations drawn from looking at more than 40 years of methods for RNA secondary structure prediction in the light of this classification. As a final observation, there seems to be a performance ceiling that affects all methods with complex architectures, a ceiling that impacts all scoring schemes with remarkable similarity. This suggests that modeling RNA secondary structure by using intrinsic sequence-based plausible “foldability” will require the incorporation of other forms of information in order to constrain the folding space and to improve prediction accuracy. This could give an advantage to probabilistic scoring systems since a probabilistic framework is a natural platform to incorporate different sources of information into one single inference problem. PMID:23695796

  20. Structurally distinct elements mediate internal ribosome entry within the 5'-noncoding region of a voltage-gated potassium channel mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jang, Gwendolyn M; Leong, Louis E-C; Hoang, Lily T; Wang, Ping H; Gutman, George A; Semler, Bert L

    2004-11-12

    The approximately 1.2-kb 5'-noncoding region (5'-NCR) of mRNA species encoding mouse Kv1.4, a member of the Shaker-related subfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels, was shown to mediate internal ribosome entry in cells derived from brain, heart, and skeletal muscle, tissues known to express Kv1.4 mRNA species. We also show that the upstream approximately 1.0 kb and the downstream approximately 0.2 kb of the Kv1.4 5'-NCR independently mediated internal ribosome entry; however, separately, these sequences were less efficient in mediating internal ribosome entry than when together in the complete (and contiguous) 5'-NCR. Using enzymatic structure probing, the 3'-most approximately 0.2 kb was predicted to form three distinct stem-loop structures (stem-loops X, Y, and Z) and two defined single-stranded regions (loops Psi and Omega) in the presence and absence of the upstream approximately 1.0 kb. Although the systematic deletion of sequences within the 3'-most approximately 0.2 kb resulted in distinct changes in expression, enzymatic structure probing indicated that local RNA folding was not completely altered. Structure probing analysis strongly suggested an interaction between stem-loop X and a downstream polypyrimidine tract; however, opposing changes in activity were observed when sequences within these two regions were independently deleted. Moreover, deletions correlating with positive as well as negative changes in expression altered RNase cleavage within stem-loop X, indicating that this structure may be an integral element. Therefore, these findings indicate that Kv1.4 expression is mediated through a complex interplay between many distinct RNA regions. PMID:15339906

  1. Description and recognition of regular and distorted secondary structures in proteins using the automated protein structure analysis method.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Sushilee; Izotov, Dmitry; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2009-08-01

    The Automated Protein Structure Analysis (APSA) method, which describes the protein backbone as a smooth line in three-dimensional space and characterizes it by curvature kappa and torsion tau as a function of arc length s, was applied on 77 proteins to determine all secondary structural units via specific kappa(s) and tau(s) patterns. A total of 533 alpha-helices and 644 beta-strands were recognized by APSA, whereas DSSP gives 536 and 651 units, respectively. Kinks and distortions were quantified and the boundaries (entry and exit) of secondary structures were classified. Similarity between proteins can be easily quantified using APSA, as was demonstrated for the roll architecture of proteins ubiquitin and spinach ferridoxin. A twenty-by-twenty comparison of all alpha domains showed that the curvature-torsion patterns generated by APSA provide an accurate and meaningful similarity measurement for secondary, super secondary, and tertiary protein structure. APSA is shown to accurately reflect the conformation of the backbone effectively reducing three-dimensional structure information to two-dimensional representations that are easy to interpret and understand. PMID:19205025

  2. Reactivity of molybdovanadophosphoric acids: Influence of the presence of vanadium in the primary and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casarini, D.; Centi, G.; Lena, V.; Tvaruzkova, Z. ); Jiru, P. )

    1993-10-01

    The catalytic behavior in butadiene and n-butane oxidation of molybdovanadophosphoric acids with vanadium localized inside the primary (oxoanion) and/or the secondary structure is reported. The samples are characterized by infrared, [sup 31]P-NMR, [sup 51]V-NMR, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopies in order to obtain information on the nature and localization of vanadium in the samples before reaction and the possible changes occurring during the course of the catalytic reaction. In particular, it is shown that vanadium localized initially in the secondary structure can exchange with the molybdenum atoms of the oxoanion during the catalytic reaction. Introduction of vanadium in the molybdophosphoric acid structure enhances the selective formation of maleic anhydride from the butadiene when vanadium is present both inside the oxoanion or localized in the secondary structure (before the catalytic tests), but the maximum in catalytic performance is found for different amounts of vanadium, depending on where the vanadium is localized initially. However, when present in the secondary structure, vanadium also has a negative influence on the activity of the heteropoly acid. On the contrary, in n-butane oxidation, the presence of vanadium enhances the rate of alkane activation due to the different rate-determining step. The presence of V ions also affects the maximum selectivity and yield to maleic anhydride from butane. V ions in the secondary structure are more selective at low conversion, while V ions inside the oxoanion are more selective at higher conversions and thus allow better maximum yields to maleic anhydride. 40 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Correlation of RNA secondary structure statistics with thermodynamic stability and applications to folding.

    PubMed

    Wu, Johnny C; Gardner, David P; Ozer, Stuart; Gutell, Robin R; Ren, Pengyu

    2009-08-28

    The accurate prediction of the secondary and tertiary structure of an RNA with different folding algorithms is dependent on several factors, including the energy functions. However, an RNA higher-order structure cannot be predicted accurately from its sequence based on a limited set of energy parameters. The inter- and intramolecular forces between this RNA and other small molecules and macromolecules, in addition to other factors in the cell such as pH, ionic strength, and temperature, influence the complex dynamics associated with transition of a single stranded RNA to its secondary and tertiary structure. Since all of the factors that affect the formation of an RNAs 3D structure cannot be determined experimentally, statistically derived potential energy has been used in the prediction of protein structure. In the current work, we evaluate the statistical free energy of various secondary structure motifs, including base-pair stacks, hairpin loops, and internal loops, using their statistical frequency obtained from the comparative analysis of more than 50,000 RNA sequences stored in the RNA Comparative Analysis Database (rCAD) at the Comparative RNA Web (CRW) Site. Statistical energy was computed from the structural statistics for several datasets. While the statistical energy for a base-pair stack correlates with experimentally derived free energy values, suggesting a Boltzmann-like distribution, variation is observed between different molecules and their location on the phylogenetic tree of life. Our statistical energy values calculated for several structural elements were utilized in the Mfold RNA-folding algorithm. The combined statistical energy values for base-pair stacks, hairpins and internal loop flanks result in a significant improvement in the accuracy of secondary structure prediction; the hairpin flanks contribute the most. PMID:19540243

  4. EFFECT OF SOLVENT AND TEMPERATURE ON SECONDARY AND TERTIARY STRUCTURE OF ZEIN BY CIRCULAR DICHROISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circular dichroism studies were performed on various samples of commercial zein to determine how the secondary and tertiary structure changes with different solvents, temperatures or pH. It was found that alcoholic solvent type and common denaturants, such as SDS and low amounts of urea, had little...

  5. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFONATED AZO DYES USING LIQUID SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight monosulfonated and disulfonated azo dyes were analyzed using liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry, in the negative ion mode, under low-energy conditions (110-150 eV). any structurally characteristic fragment ions were obtained, several of which ha...

  6. The Turn of the Screw: An Exercise in Protein Secondary Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pikaart, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An exercise using simple paper strips to illustrate protein helical and sheet secondary structures is presented. Drawing on the rich historical context of the use of physical models in protein biochemistry by early practitioners, in particular Linus Pauling, the purpose of this activity is to cultivate in students a hands-on, intuitive sense of…

  7. Secondary structure of NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase examined by circular dichroism and prediction methods.

    PubMed Central

    Birve, S J; Selstam, E; Johansson, L B

    1996-01-01

    To study the secondary structure of the enzyme NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (PCOR), a novel method of enzyme isolation was developed. The detergent isotridecyl poly-(ethylene glycol) ether (Genapol X-080) selectively solubilizes the enzyme from a prolamellar-body fraction isolated from wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The solubilized fraction was further purified by ion-exchange chromatography. The isolated enzyme was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy at 77 K, and by CD spectroscopy. The fluorescence-emission spectra revealed that the binding properties of the substrate and co-substrate were preserved and that photo-reduction occurred. The CD spectra of PCOR were analysed for the relative amounts of the secondary structures, alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn and random coil. The secondary structure composition was estimated to be 33% alpha-helix, 19% beta-sheet, 20% turn and 28% random coil. These values are in agreement with those predicted by the Predict Heidelberg Deutschland and self-optimized prediction method from alignments methods. The enzyme has some amino acid identity with other NADPH-binding enzymes containing the Rossmann fold. The Rossmann-fold fingerprint motif is localized in the N-terminal region and at the expected positions in the predicted secondary structure. It is suggested that PCOR is anchored to the interfacial region of the membrane by either a beta-sheet or an alpha-helical region containing tryptophan residues. A hydrophobic loop-region could also be involved in membrane anchoring. PMID:8713084

  8. The Turn of the Screw: An Exercise in Protein Secondary Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pikaart, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An exercise using simple paper strips to illustrate protein helical and sheet secondary structures is presented. Drawing on the rich historical context of the use of physical models in protein biochemistry by early practitioners, in particular Linus Pauling, the purpose of this activity is to cultivate in students a hands-on, intuitive sense of

  9. Towards New Structures of Post-Secondary Education; A Preliminary Statement of Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    This report deals with some of the basic problems member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development have to face as they approach the threshold of mass higher education. Part I deals with the issues in the planning of future overall structures of post-secondary education. Specifically, it discusses: (1) prospects of

  10. Assessing the impact of secondary structure and solvent accessibility on protein evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, N; Thorne, J L; Jones, D T

    1998-01-01

    Empirically derived models of amino acid replacement are employed to study the association between various physical features of proteins and evolution. The strengths of these associations are statistically evaluated by applying the models of protein evolution to 11 diverse sets of protein sequences. Parametric bootstrap tests indicate that the solvent accessibility status of a site has a particularly strong association with the process of amino acid replacement that it experiences. Significant association between secondary structure environment and the amino acid replacement process is also observed. Careful description of the length distribution of secondary structure elements and of the organization of secondary structure and solvent accessibility along a protein did not always significantly improve the fit of the evolutionary models to the data sets that were analyzed. As indicated by the strength of the association of both solvent accessibility and secondary structure with amino acid replacement, the process of protein evolution-both above and below the species level-will not be well understood until the physical constraints that affect protein evolution are identified and characterized. PMID:9584116

  11. [Conserved motifs in the primary and secondary ITS1 structures in bryophytes].

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatov, M S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ITS1 nucleotide sequences of 1000 moss species of 62 families, 11 liverwort species from five orders, and one hornwort Anthoceros agrestis identified five highly conserved motifs (CM1-CM5), which are presumably involved in pre-rRNA processing. Although the ITS1 sequences substantially differ in length and the extent of divergence, the conserved motifs are found in all of them. ITS1 secondary structures were constructed for 76 mosses, and main regularities at conserved motif positioning were observed. The positions of processing sites in the ITS1 secondary structure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to be similar to the positions of the conserved motifs in the ITS1 secondary structures of mosses and liverworts. In addition, a potential hairpin formation in the putative secondary structure of a pre-rRNA fragment was considered for the region between ITS1 CM4-CM5 and a highly conserved region between hairpins 49 and 50 (H49 and H50) of the 18S rRNA. PMID:26107892

  12. A Pascal microcomputer program for prediction of protein secondary structure and hydropathic segments.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, A; Domnech, A; Querol, E

    1986-09-01

    This paper describes a simple Pascal microcomputer program for prediction of protein secondary structure according to the Chou and Fasman algorithm. In addition, it performs an analysis of the hydropathic character of the residues for prediction of external/internal regions of the polypeptide chain. Also it searches for probable glycosylation and phosphorylation sites. PMID:3507244

  13. PolyprOnline: polyproline helix II and secondary structure assignment database

    PubMed Central

    Chebrek, Romain; Leonard, Sylvain; de Brevern, Alexandre G.; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The polyproline helix type II (PPII) is a regular protein secondary structure with remarkable features. Many studies have highlighted different crucial biological roles supported by this local conformation, e.g. in the interactions between biological macromolecules. Although PPII is less frequently present than regular secondary structures such as canonical alpha helices and beta strands, it corresponds to 3–10% of residues. Up to now, PPII is not assigned by most popular assignment tools, and therefore, remains insufficiently studied. PolyprOnline database is, therefore, dedicated to PPII structure assignment and analysis to facilitate the study of PPII structure and functional roles. This database is freely accessible from www.dsimb.inserm.fr/dsimb_tools/polyproline. PMID:25380779

  14. Detection of Secondary and Supersecondary Structures of Proteins from Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Goswami, Samrat; Zhang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) have enabled the quantitative visualization of the structural building blocks of proteins at improved resolutions. We provide algorithms to detect the secondary structures (?-helices and ?-sheets) from proteins for which the volumetric maps are reconstructed at 610 resolution. Additionally, we show that when the resolution is coarser than 10, some of the super-secondary structures can be detected from 3D EM maps. For both these algorithms, we employ tools from computational geometry and differential topology, specifically the computation of stable/unstable manifolds of certain critical points of the distance function induced by the molecular surface. Our results connect mathematically well-defined constructions with bio-chemically induced structures observed in proteins. PMID:22186625

  15. RNA secondary structures in a polymer-zeta model how foldings should be shaped for sparsification to establish a linear speedup.

    PubMed

    Jin, Emma Yu; Nebel, Markus E

    2016-02-01

    Various tools used to predict the secondary structure for a given RNA sequence are based on dynamic programming used to compute a conformation of minimum free energy. For structures without pseudoknots, a worst-case runtime proportional to [Formula: see text], with [Formula: see text] being the length of the sequence, results since a table of dimension [Formula: see text] has to be filled in while a single entry gives rise to a linear computational effort. However, it was recently observed that reformulating the corresponding dynamic programming recursion together with the bookkeeping of potential folding alternatives (a technique called sparsification) may reduce the runtime to [Formula: see text] on average, assuming that nucleotides of distance [Formula: see text] form a hydrogen bond (i.e. are paired) with probability [Formula: see text] for some constants [Formula: see text]. The latter is called the polymer-zeta model and plays a crucial role in speeding up the above mentioned algorithm. In this paper we discuss the application of the polymer-zeta property for the analysis of sparsification, showing that it must be applied conditionally on first and last positions to pair. Afterwards, we will investigate the combinatorics of RNA secondary structures assuming that the corresponding conditional probabilities behave according to a polymer-zeta probability model. We show that even if some of the structural parameters exhibit an almost realistic behavior on average, the expected shape of a folding in that model must be assumed to highly differ from those observed in nature. More precisely, we prove our polymer-zeta model to be appropriate for mRNA molecules but to fail in connection with almost every other family of RNA. Those findings explain the huge speedup of the dynamic programming algorithm observed empirically by Wexler et al. when applying sparsification in connection with mRNA data. PMID:26001743

  16. Secondary grain-boundary dislocations in (001) twist boundaries in MgO. II. Extrinsic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.P.; Balluffi, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Extrinsic secondary grain boundary dislocation (GBD) structures were observed by weak beam transmission electron microscopy in a variety of (001) twist boundaries in MgO. These structures were derived from segments of lattice dislocations embedded in the boundaries and could be interpreted as the result of the decomposition of the lattice dislocations into extrinsic GBDs and the subsequent interaction of the product GBDs with the intrinsic boundary structure. The results demonstrate that lattice dislocations in MgO are attracted to grain boundaries over a wide range of conditions and tend to remain embedded in the boundaries as extrinsic GBD structures.

  17. A permutation based simulated annealing algorithm to predict pseudoknotted RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Herbert H; Wiese, Kay C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoknots are RNA tertiary structures which perform essential biological functions. This paper discusses SARNA-Predict-pk, a RNA pseudoknotted secondary structure prediction algorithm based on Simulated Annealing (SA). The research presented here extends previous work of SARNA-Predict and further examines the effect of the new algorithm to include prediction of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. An evaluation of the performance of SARNA-Predict-pk in terms of prediction accuracy is made via comparison with several state-of-the-art prediction algorithms using 20 individual known structures from seven RNA classes. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of nine prediction algorithms. Three of these are dynamic programming algorithms: Pseudoknot (pknotsRE), NUPACK, and pknotsRG-mfe. One is using the statistical clustering approach: Sfold and the other five are heuristic algorithms: SARNA-Predict-pk, ILM, STAR, IPknot and HotKnots algorithms. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that SARNA-Predict-pk can out-perform other state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of prediction accuracy. This supports the use of the proposed method on pseudoknotted RNA secondary structure prediction of other known structures. PMID:26558299

  18. Protein secondary-structure description with a coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Kneller, Gerald R; Hinsen, Konrad

    2015-07-01

    A coarse-grained geometrical model for protein secondary-structure description and analysis is presented which uses only the positions of the C(α) atoms. A space curve connecting these positions by piecewise polynomial interpolation is constructed and the folding of the protein backbone is described by a succession of screw motions linking the Frenet frames at consecutive C(α) positions. Using the ASTRAL subset of the SCOPe database of protein structures, thresholds are derived for the screw parameters of secondary-structure elements and demonstrate that the latter can be reliably assigned on the basis of a C(α) model. For this purpose, a comparative study with the widely used DSSP (Define Secondary Structure of Proteins) algorithm was performed and it was shown that the parameter distribution corresponding to the ensemble of all pure C(α) structures in the RCSB Protein Data Bank matches that of the ASTRAL database. It is expected that this approach will be useful in the development of structure-refinement techniques for low-resolution data. PMID:26143913

  19. Evaluation of several lightweight stochastic context-free grammars for RNA secondary structure prediction

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Robin D; Eddy, Sean R

    2004-01-01

    Background RNA secondary structure prediction methods based on probabilistic modeling can be developed using stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs). Such methods can readily combine different sources of information that can be expressed probabilistically, such as an evolutionary model of comparative RNA sequence analysis and a biophysical model of structure plausibility. However, the number of free parameters in an integrated model for consensus RNA structure prediction can become untenable if the underlying SCFG design is too complex. Thus a key question is, what small, simple SCFG designs perform best for RNA secondary structure prediction? Results Nine different small SCFGs were implemented to explore the tradeoffs between model complexity and prediction accuracy. Each model was tested for single sequence structure prediction accuracy on a benchmark set of RNA secondary structures. Conclusions Four SCFG designs had prediction accuracies near the performance of current energy minimization programs. One of these designs, introduced by Knudsen and Hein in their PFOLD algorithm, has only 21 free parameters and is significantly simpler than the others. PMID:15180907

  20. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Interaction Between the Nucleoporin Nup98 and the mRNA Export Facto Rae1

    SciTech Connect

    Y Ren; H Seo; G Blobel; A Hoelz

    2011-12-31

    The export of mRNAs is a multistep process, involving the packaging of mRNAs into messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs), their transport through nuclear pore complexes, and mRNP remodeling events prior to translation. Ribonucleic acid export 1 (Rae1) and Nup98 are evolutionarily conserved mRNA export factors that are targeted by the vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein to inhibit host cell nuclear export. Here, we present the crystal structure of human Rae1 in complex with the Gle2-binding sequence (GLEBS) of Nup98 at 1.65 {angstrom} resolution. Rae1 forms a seven-bladed {beta}-propeller with several extensive surface loops. The Nup98 GLEBS motif forms an {approx}50-{angstrom}-long hairpin that binds with its C-terminal arm to an essentially invariant hydrophobic surface that extends over the entire top face of the Rae1 {beta}-propeller. The C-terminal arm of the GLEBS hairpin is necessary and sufficient for Rae1 binding, and we identify a tandem glutamate element in this arm as critical for complex formation. The Rae1 {center_dot} Nup98{sup GLEBS} surface features an additional conserved patch with a positive electrostatic potential, and we demonstrate that the complex possesses single-stranded RNA-binding capability. Together, these data suggest that the Rae1 {center_dot} Nup98 complex directly binds to the mRNP at several stages of the mRNA export pathway.

  1. Crystal Structure of A. aeolicus Argonaute, a Site-Specific DNA-Guided Endoribonuclease, Provides Insights into RISC-Mediated mRNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yu-Ren; Pei, Yi; Ma, Jin-Biao; Kuryavyi, Vitaly; Zhadina, Maria; Meister, Gunter; Chen, Hong-Ying; Dauter, Zbigniew; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5? phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in slicer activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC. PMID:16061186

  2. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus argonaute, a site-specific DNA-guided endoribonuclease, provides insights into RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Ma, J.; Kuryavyi, V.; Zhadina, M.; Meister, G.; Chen, H.; Dauter, Z.; Tuschi, T.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5' phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in 'slicer' activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC.

  3. NMR structure of the apoB mRNA stem-loop and its interaction with the C to U editing APOBEC1 complementary factor.

    PubMed

    Maris, Christophe; Masse, James; Chester, Ann; Navaratnam, Naveenan; Allain, Frdric H-T

    2005-02-01

    We have solved the NMR structure of the 31-nucleotide (nt) apoB mRNA stem-loop, a substrate of the cytidine deaminase APOBEC1. We found that the edited base located at the 5' end of the octa-loop is stacked between two adenosines in both the unedited (cytidine 6666) and the edited (uridine 6666) forms and that the rest of the loop is unstructured. The 11-nt "mooring" sequence essential for editing is partially flexible although it is mostly in the stem of the RNA. The octa-loop and the internal loop in the middle of the stem confer this flexibility. These findings shed light on why APOBEC1 alone cannot edit efficiently the cytidine 6666 under physiological conditions, the editing base being buried in the loop and not directly accessible. We also show that APOBEC1 does not specifically bind apoB mRNA and requires the auxiliary factor, APOBEC1 complementary factor (ACF), to edit specifically cytidine 6666. The binding of ACF to both the mooring sequence and APOBEC1 explains the specificity of the reaction. Our NMR study lead us to propose a mechanism in which ACF recognizes first the flexible nucleotides of the mooring sequence (the internal loop and the 3' end octa-loop) and subsequently melts the stem-loop, exposing the amino group of the cytidine 6666 to APOBEC1. Thus, the flexibility of the mooring sequence plays a central role in the RNA recognition by ACF. PMID:15659357

  4. Structural and functional analysis of the interaction between the nucleoporin Nup98 and the mRNA export factor Rae1

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Yi; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Blobel, Gnter; Hoelz, Andr

    2010-07-23

    The export of mRNAs is a multistep process, involving the packaging of mRNAs into messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs), their transport through nuclear pore complexes, and mRNP remodeling events prior to translation. Ribonucleic acid export 1 (Rae1) and Nup98 are evolutionarily conserved mRNA export factors that are targeted by the vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein to inhibit host cell nuclear export. Here, we present the crystal structure of human Rae1 in complex with the Gle2-binding sequence (GLEBS) of Nup98 at 1.65 {angstrom} resolution. Rae1 forms a seven-bladed {beta}-propeller with several extensive surface loops. The Nup98 GLEBS motif forms an {approx} 50-{angstrom}-long hairpin that binds with its C-terminal arm to an essentially invariant hydrophobic surface that extends over the entire top face of the Rae1 {beta}-propeller. The C-terminal arm of the GLEBS hairpin is necessary and sufficient for Rae1 binding, and we identify a tandem glutamate element in this arm as critical for complex formation. The Rae1 {center_dot} Nup98{sup GLEBS} surface features an additional conserved patch with a positive electrostatic potential, and we demonstrate that the complex possesses single-stranded RNA-binding capability. Together, these data suggest that the Rae1 {center_dot} Nup98 complex directly binds to the mRNP at several stages of the mRNA export pathway.

  5. From sequences to shapes and back: a case study in RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Schuster, P; Fontana, W; Stadler, P F; Hofacker, I L

    1994-03-22

    RNA folding is viewed here as a map assigning secondary structures to sequences. At fixed chain length the number of sequences far exceeds the number of structures. Frequencies of structures are highly non-uniform and follow a generalized form of Zipf's law: we find relatively few common and many rare ones. By using an algorithm for inverse folding, we show that sequences sharing the same structure are distributed randomly over sequence space. All common structures can be accessed from an arbitrary sequence by a number of mutations much smaller than the chain length. The sequence space is percolated by extensive neutral networks connecting nearest neighbours folding into identical structures. Implications for evolutionary adaptation and for applied molecular evolution are evident: finding a particular structure by mutation and selection is much simpler than expected and, even if catalytic activity should turn out to be sparse of RNA structures, it can hardly be missed by evolutionary processes. PMID:7517565

  6. BCL::ScoreKnowledge Based Energy Potentials for Ranking Protein Models Represented by Idealized Secondary Structure Elements

    PubMed Central

    Woetzel, Nils; Karaka?, Mert; Staritzbichler, Rene; Mller, Ralf; Weiner, Brian E.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The topology of most experimentally determined protein domains is defined by the relative arrangement of secondary structure elements, i.e. ?-helices and ?-strands, which make up 5070% of the sequence. Pairing of ?-strands defines the topology of ?-sheets. The packing of side chains between ?-helices and ?-sheets defines the majority of the protein core. Often, limited experimental datasets restrain the position of secondary structure elements while lacking detail with respect to loop or side chain conformation. At the same time the regular structure and reduced flexibility of secondary structure elements make these interactions more predictable when compared to flexible loops and side chains. To determine the topology of the protein in such settings, we introduce a tailored knowledge-based energy function that evaluates arrangement of secondary structure elements only. Based on the amino acid C? atom coordinates within secondary structure elements, potentials for amino acid pair distance, amino acid environment, secondary structure element packing, ?-strand pairing, loop length, radius of gyration, contact order and secondary structure prediction agreement are defined. Separate penalty functions exclude conformations with clashes between amino acids or secondary structure elements and loops that cannot be closed. Each individual term discriminates for native-like protein structures. The composite potential significantly enriches for native-like models in three different databases of 10,00012,000 protein models in 8094% of the cases. The corresponding application, BCL::ScoreProtein, is available at www.meilerlab.org. PMID:23173051

  7. Secondary Structure Transition and Critical Stress for a Model of Spider Silk Assembly.

    PubMed

    Giesa, Tristan; Perry, Carole C; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Spiders spin their silk from an aqueous solution to a solid fiber in ambient conditions. However, to date, the assembly mechanism in the spider silk gland has not been satisfactorily explained. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to model Nephila clavipes MaSp1 dragline silk formation under shear flow and determine the secondary structure transitions leading to the experimentally observed fiber structures. While no experiments are performed on the silk fiber itself, insights from this polypeptide model can be transferred to the fiber scale. The novelty of this study lies in the calculation of the shear stress (300-700 MPa) required for fiber formation and identification of the amino acid residues involved in the transition. This is the first time that the shear stress has been quantified in connection with a secondary structure transition. By study of molecules containing varying numbers of contiguous MaSp1 repeats, we determine that the smallest molecule size giving rise to a "silk-like" structure contains six polyalanine repeats. Through a probability analysis of the secondary structure, we identify specific amino acids that transition from ?-helix to ?-sheet. In addition to portions of the polyalanine section, these amino acids include glycine, leucine, and glutamine. The stability of ?-sheet structures appears to arise from a close proximity in space of helices in the initial spidroin state. Our results are in agreement with the forces exerted by spiders in the silking process and the experimentally determined global secondary structure of spidroin and pulled MaSp1 silk. Our study emphasizes the role of shear in the assembly process of silk and can guide the design of microfluidic devices that attempt to mimic the natural spinning process and predict molecular requirements for the next generation of silk-based functional materials. PMID:26669270

  8. Male secondary sexual structures and the systematics of the Thereus oppia species group (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Eumaeini)

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Robert K.; Heredia, María Dolores; Busby, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Thereus oppia species group includes species with and without a scent pad, which is a histologically and morphologically characterized male secondary sexual structure on the dorsal surface of the forewing. To assess the hypothesis that these structures are lost evolutionarily, but not regained (Dollo’s Law), the taxonomy of this species group is revised. Thereus lomalarga sp. n., and Thereus brocki sp. n., are described. Diagnostic traits, especially male secondary structures, within the Thereus oppia species group are illustrated. Distributional and biological information is summarized for each species. Three species have been reared, and the caterpillars eat Loranthaceae. An inferred phylogeny is consistent with the hypothesis that scent pads in the Thereus oppia species group have been lost evolutionarily twice (in allopatry), and not re-gained. PMID:26448715

  9. Male secondary sexual structures and the systematics of the Thereus oppia species group (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae, Eumaeini).

    PubMed

    Robbins, Robert K; Heredia, Mara Dolores; Busby, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    The Thereus oppia species group includes species with and without a scent pad, which is a histologically and morphologically characterized male secondary sexual structure on the dorsal surface of the forewing. To assess the hypothesis that these structures are lost evolutionarily, but not regained (Dollo's Law), the taxonomy of this species group is revised. Thereus lomalarga sp. n., and Thereus brocki sp. n., are described. Diagnostic traits, especially male secondary structures, within the Thereus oppia species group are illustrated. Distributional and biological information is summarized for each species. Three species have been reared, and the caterpillars eat Loranthaceae. An inferred phylogeny is consistent with the hypothesis that scent pads in the Thereus oppia species group have been lost evolutionarily twice (in allopatry), and not re-gained. PMID:26448715

  10. Obtaining information about protein secondary structures in aqueous solution using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huayan; Yang, Shouning; Kong, Jilie; Dong, Aichun; Yu, Shaoning

    2015-03-01

    Fourier transform IR (FTIR) spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique for structural characterization of proteins and polypeptides. The IR spectral data of polymers are usually interpreted in terms of the vibrations of a structural repeat. The repeat units in proteins give rise to nine characteristic IR absorption bands (amides A, B and I-VII). Amide I bands (1,700-1,600 cm(-1)) are the most prominent and sensitive vibrational bands of the protein backbone, and they relate to protein secondary structural components. In this protocol, we have detailed the principles that underlie the determination of protein secondary structure by FTIR spectroscopy, as well as the basic steps involved in protein sample preparation, instrument operation, FTIR spectra collection and spectra analysis in order to estimate protein secondary-structural components in aqueous (both H2O and deuterium oxide (D2O)) solution using algorithms, such as second-derivative, deconvolution and curve fitting. Small amounts of high-purity (>95%) proteins at high concentrations (>3 mg ml(-1)) are needed in this protocol; typically, the procedure can be completed in 1-2 d. PMID:25654756

  11. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Jonathan D; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2015-09-01

    Poly-l-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. We have characterized the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. When probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure. PMID:25690698

  12. Influence of MLS laser radiation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity and secondary structure of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Kamila; Nowacka, Olga; Wrbel, Dominika; Pieszy?ski, Ireneusz; Bryszewska, Maria; Kujawa, Jolanta

    2014-03-01

    The biostimulating activity of low level laser radiation of various wavelengths and energy doses is widely documented in the literature, but the mechanisms of the intracellular reactions involved are not precisely known. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of low level laser radiation from an multiwave locked system (MLS) of two wavelengths (wavelength=808nm in continuous emission and 905nm in pulsed emission) on the human erythrocyte membrane and on the secondary structure of human serum albumin (HSA). Human erythrocytes membranes and HSA were irradiated with laser light of low intensity with surface energy density ranging from 0.46 to 4.9Jcm(-2) and surface energy power density 195mWcm(-2) (1,000Hz) and 230mWcm(-2) (2,000Hz). Structural and functional changes in the erythrocyte membrane were characterized by its fluidity, while changes in the protein were monitored by its secondary structure. Dose-dependent changes in erythrocyte membrane fluidity were induced by near-infrared laser radiation. Slight changes in the secondary structure of HSA were also noted. MLS laser radiation influences the structure and function of the human erythrocyte membrane resulting in a change in fluidity. PMID:24357115

  13. Influence of secondary ion bombardment on the composition, structure and surface properties of platinum thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, S.; Satyam, P. V.; Lakshminarayanan, V.; Mohan, S.

    2004-05-01

    Platinum (Pt) thin films were deposited by dual ion beam sputtering (DIBS) techniques on oxidized silicon substrates maintained at ambient temperature. Argon ions with energy of 1 keV and beam current of 15 mA were used to sputter the platinum target. The films during deposition were continuously bombarded by argon from a secondary argon ion source with ion energy of 150 eV and ion current density in the range 100-250 ?A/cm 2. The influence of the secondary ion beam parameters on the grain size, composition and surface morphology of the films were studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of all the films showed (1 1 1) orientation with other reflections being absent which is a stable structure for FCC crystals. The grain size of the Pt films prepared by DIBS at ambient temperature were found to be higher than those prepared at higher substrate temperature by low energy plasma sputtering. The presence of Ar impurities in the sputter deposited thin films is known to modify their properties. In this paper we report a method to control the Ar content in the films by secondary Ar ion bombardment of the growing films. The modification of the surface features by secondary ion beam current was studied by scanning tunneling microscope and is also presented in this paper. The surface analysis indicates a decrease in the surface roughness for the Pt films prepared at a secondary ion beam current density of 150 ?A/cm 2.

  14. Structural basis for recognition of the tra mRNA precursor by the Sex-lethal protein.

    PubMed

    Handa, N; Nureki, O; Kurimoto, K; Kim, I; Sakamoto, H; Shimura, Y; Muto, Y; Yokoyama, S

    1999-04-15

    The Sex-lethal (Sxl) protein of Drosophila melanogaster regulates alternative splicing of the transformer (tra) messenger RNA precursor by binding to the tra polypyrimidine tract during the sex-determination process. The crystal structure has now been determined at 2.6 A resolution of the complex formed between two tandemly arranged RNA-binding domains of the Sxl protein and a 12-nucleotide, single-stranded RNA derived from the tra polypyrimidine tract. The two RNA-binding domains have their beta-sheet platforms facing each other to form a V-shaped cleft. The RNA is characteristically extended and bound in this cleft, where the UGUUUUUUU sequence is specifically recognized by the protein. This structure offers the first insight, to our knowledge, into how a protein binds specifically to a cognate RNA without any intramolecular base-pairing. PMID:10217141

  15. Assessing the influence of electrostatic schemes on molecular dynamics simulations of secondary structure forming peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticelli, Luca; Simões, Carlos; Belvisi, Laura; Colombo, Giorgio

    2006-04-01

    Electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in determining the structure and dynamics of biomolecules in solution. However the accurate representation of electrostatics in classical mechanics based simulation approaches such as molecular dynamics (MD) is a challenging task. Given the growing importance that MD simulation methods are taking on in the study of protein folding, protein stability and dynamics, and in structure prediction and design projects, it is important to evaluate the influence that different electrostatic schemes have on the results of MD simulations. In this paper we performed long timescale simulations (500 ns) of two peptides, beta3 and RN24 forming different secondary structures, using for each peptide four different electrostatic schemes (namely PME, reaction field correction, and cut-off schemes with and without neutralizing counterions) for a total of eight 500 ns long MD runs. The structural and conformational features of each peptide under the different conditions were evaluated in terms of the time dependence of the flexibility, secondary structure evolution, hydrogen-bonding patterns, and several other structural parameters. The degree of sampling for each simulation as a function of the electrostatic scheme was also critically evaluated. Our results suggest that, while in the case of the short peptide RN24 the performances of the four methods are comparable, PME and RF schemes perform better in maintaining the structure close to the native one for the β-sheet peptide beta3, in which long range contacts are mostly responsible for the definition of the native structure.

  16. Resonance assignments, secondary structure and topology of leukaemia inhibitory factor in solution.

    PubMed

    Hinds, M G; Maurer, T; Zhang, J G; Nicola, N A; Norton, R S

    1997-02-01

    The chemical shift assignments and secondary structure of a murine-human chimera, MH35, of leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), a 180-residue protein of molecular mass 20 kDa, have been determined from multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectra acquired on a uniformly 13C, 15N-labelled sample. Secondary structure elements were defined on the basis of chemical shifts, NH-C alpha H coupling constants; medium-range NOEs and the location of slowly exchanging amide protons. The protein contains four alpha-helices, the relative orientations of which were determined on the basis of long-range, interhelical NOEs. The four helices are arranged in an up-up-down-down orientation, as found in other four-helical bundle cytokines. The overall topology of MH35-LIF is similar to that of the X-ray crystallographic structure for murine LIF [Robinson et al. (1994) Cell, 77, 1101-1116]. Differences between the X-ray structure and the solution structure are evident in the N-terminal tail, where the solution structure has a trans-Pro17 compared with the cis-Pro17 found in the crystal structure and the small antiparallel beta-sheet encompassing residues in the N-terminus and CD loop in the crystal structure is less stable. PMID:9090127

  17. The secondary structure control of silk fibroin thin films by post treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, I.; Nakayama, S.; Nagare, S.; Senna, M.

    2005-05-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) thin film was prepared via colloid chemical routes (CC) and by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Secondary structure of the CC film, as examined by FT-IR, was random coil. By a post treatment with methanol, it transforms to ?-sheet. As for PLD films, the ?-sheet structure of SF powder was mostly preserved as deposited. This suggests that the post treatment is effective to restore the original ?-sheet structure in the thin films. Transformation from random coil to ?-sheet is easier in the film on the substrate of polyethylene than Si(1 0 0) due to weaker affinity to silk fibroin.

  18. A secondary mirror adjustment system with hexapod structure for optical telescope application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nan; Li, Chuang; Gao, Wei; Song, ZongXi; Zhao, Chao; Ren, GuoRui; Jing, Nan

    2014-09-01

    Benefiting from low cost, light weight and reduced volume in launch, deployable optical telescopes will be extensively applied in microsatellites. As a result of manufactured tolerance and external disturbance, the secondary mirror can't arrive at designed position precisely after a deployable telescope is unfolded. We investigate an adjustment system with six degrees of freedom based on hexapod structure to solve this problem. There are mainly four parts in this paper. Firstly, the adjustment methods of deployable telescopes for microsatellites are introduced. Generally several kinds of optical components can be adjusted to align a deployed telescope: primary mirror, tip/tilt mirror and secondary mirror. Due to its high sensitivity and convenience, the secondary mirror is chosen to collimate the optical system of the telescope. Secondly, an adjustment system with hexapod structure is designed for a secondary mirror with 85 mm diameter. After comparing the characteristics of step motors, piezo actuators and voice coil motors (VCMs), VCMs are selected as the linear actuators. By using optical gratings as displacement sensors in the system, we can make closed-loop control come true. The hexapod structure mainly consists of 6 VCMs, 6 optical gratings and 6 oblique legs with flexible hinges. The secondary mirror adjustment system is 83 mm in diameter and 55 mm high. It has tip/tilt rotational ranges of +/-2.205 with resolution of better than +/-0.007, and translational ranges of +/-1.545 mm with resolution of better than +/-0.966 ?m. Thirdly, the maximum stress and the maximum deformation in the adjustment system are computed with finite element method. At last, the kinematics problems of the adjustment system are discussed.

  19. Structures of RNA complexes with the Escherichia coli RNA pyrophosphohydrolase RppH unveil the basis for specific 5'-end-dependent mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, Nikita; Serganov, Alexander

    2015-04-10

    5'-End-dependent RNA degradation impacts virulence, stress responses, and DNA repair in bacteria by controlling the decay of hundreds of mRNAs. The RNA pyrophosphohydrolase RppH, a member of the Nudix hydrolase superfamily, triggers this degradation pathway by removing pyrophosphate from the triphosphorylated RNA 5' terminus. Here, we report the x-ray structures of Escherichia coli RppH (EcRppH) in apo- and RNA-bound forms. These structures show distinct conformations of EcRppHRNA complexes on the catalytic pathway and suggest a common catalytic mechanism for Nudix hydrolases. EcRppH interacts with RNA by a bipartite mechanism involving specific recognition of the 5'-terminal triphosphate and the second nucleotide, thus enabling discrimination against mononucleotides as substrates. The structures also reveal the molecular basis for the preference of the enzyme for RNA substrates bearing guanine in the second position by identifying a protein cleft in which guanine interacts with EcRppH side chains via cation-? contacts and hydrogen bonds. These interactions explain the modest specificity of EcRppH at the 5' terminus and distinguish the enzyme from the highly selective RppH present in Bacillus subtilis. The divergent means by which RNA is recognized by these two functionally and structurally analogous enzymes have important implications for mRNA decay and the regulation of protein biosynthesis in bacteria. PMID:25657011

  20. Effects of water activity and lipid addition on secondary structure of zein in powder systems.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Yukiko; Matsumura, Yasuki; Imamura, Koreyoshi; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro; Mori, Tomohiko

    2003-01-01

    The effects of water activity (A(w)) and lipid addition on the secondary structure of powdery zein were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two fatty acid esters, i.e., the linolenic and eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl esters (LAE and EPE), were mixed with the zein powder. The powders were stored in the "dry" state (with silica gel) and the "humid" state (A(w) = 0.9). The powdery zein without the lipids was shown to have a high content of the intermolecular hydrogen-bonded beta-sheet in the "dry" state, indicating the presence of protein aggregates. An increase in A(w) induced a decrease in this beta-sheet, concomitant with increases in the alpha-helix and beta-turn structures. The addition of LAE caused decreases in the alpha-helix and intermolecular hydrogen-bonded beta-sheet of zein when the powder was stored in the "humid" state, suggesting the strong interaction of LAE and zein molecules. However, LAE did not affect the secondary structure of zein in the "dry" state. The addition of EPE hardly influenced the secondary structure of zein, irrespective of A(w). These results are discussed in relation to the antioxidative activity of zein in the powder system, which had studied previously. PMID:12502413

  1. Predicting the secondary structures and tertiary interactions of 211 group I introns in IE subgroup

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhijie; Zhang, Yi

    2005-01-01

    The large number of currently available group I intron sequences in the public databases provides opportunity for studying this large family of structurally complex catalytic RNA by large-scale comparative sequence analysis. In this study, the detailed secondary structures of 211 group I introns in the IE subgroup were manually predicted. The secondary structure-favored alignments showed that IE introns contain 14 conserved stems. The P13 stem formed by long-range base-pairing between P2.1 and P9.1 is conserved among IE introns. Sequence variations in the conserved core divide IE introns into three distinct minor subgroups, namely IE1, IE2 and IE3. Co-variation of the peripheral structural motifs with core sequences supports that the peripheral elements function in assisting the core structure folding. Interestingly, host-specific structural motifs were found in IE2 introns inserted at S516 position. Competitive base-pairing is found to be conserved at the junctions of all long-range paired regions, suggesting a possible mechanism of establishing long-range base-pairing during large RNA folding. These findings extend our knowledge of IE introns, indicating that comparative analysis can be a very good complement for deepening our understanding of RNA structure and function in the genomic era. PMID:15843683

  2. Analysis of the secondary structure of a protein's N-terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floare, C. G.; Bogdan, M.; Horovitz, O.; Mocanu, A.; Tomoaia-Cotisel, M.

    2009-08-01

    The major protein component from aleurone cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), PACB, is related to 7S globulins present in other cereals and to the vicilin-type 7S globulins of legumes and cotton seed. It contains 4 subunits of about 20, 25, 40 and 50 kDa molecular weights. The N-terminal sequence of 16 amino acids (over 260 atoms) in the protein was previously determined, and our aim is the prediction of its secondary structure. The empirical Chou-Fasman method was applied in an improved version as well as the empirical DSC method (discrimination of protein secondary structure class) with quite similar results. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed, using the FF99SB forcefield within AMBER version 9.0. Solvation effects were incorporated using the Born model. The results are compared and a 3D model is proposed.

  3. Perturbation of the Secondary Structure of the Scrapie Prion Protein Under Conditions that Alter Infectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasset, Maria; Baldwin, Michael A.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) generates PrP 27-30, which polymerizes into amyloid. By attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, PrP 27-30 polymers contained 54% ?-sheet, 25% ?-helix, 10% turns, and 11% random coil; dispersion into detergent-lipid-protein-complexes preserved infectivity and secondary structure. Almost 60% of the ?-sheet was low-frequency infrared-absorbing, reflecting intermolecular aggregation. Decreased low-frequency ?-sheet and increased turn content were found after SDS/PAGE, which disassembled the amyloid polymers, denatured PrP 27-30, and diminished scrapie infectivity. Acid-induced transitions were reversible, whereas alkali produced an irreversible transition centered at pH 10 under conditions that diminished infectivity. Whether PrPSc synthesis involves a transition in the secondary structure of one or more domains of the cellular prion protein from ?-helical, random coil, or turn into ?-sheet remains to be established.

  4. SOPMA: significant improvements in protein secondary structure prediction by consensus prediction from multiple alignments.

    PubMed

    Geourjon, C; Delage, G

    1995-12-01

    Recently a new method called the self-optimized prediction method (SOPM) has been described to improve the success rate in the prediction of the secondary structure of proteins. In this paper we report improvements brought about by predicting all the sequences of a set of aligned proteins belonging to the same family. This improved SOPM method (SOPMA) correctly predicts 69.5% of amino acids for a three-state description of the secondary structure (alpha-helix, beta-sheet and coil) in a whole database containing 126 chains of non-homologous (less than 25% identity) proteins. Joint prediction with SOPMA and a neural networks method (PHD) correctly predicts 82.2% of residues for 74% of co-predicted amino acids. Predictions are available by Email to deleage@ibcp.fr or on a Web page (http:@www.ibcp.fr/predict.html). PMID:8808585

  5. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Xianyang; Stagno, Jason R.; Bhandari, Yuba R.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2015-02-01

    Whereas the structures of small to medium-sized well folded RNA molecules often can be determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, obtaining structural information for large RNAs using experimental, computational, or combined approaches remains a major interest and challenge. RNA is very sensitive to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to high electron density along phosphate-sugar backbones, whose scattering contribution dominates SAXS intensity. For this reason, SAXS is particularly useful in obtaining global RNA structural information that outlines backbone topologies and, therefore, molecular envelopes. Such information is extremely valuable in bridging the gap between the secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures of RNAmolecules, particularly those that have proven difficult to study using other structuredetermination methods. Here we review published results of RNA topological structures derived from SAXS data or in combination with other experimental data, as well as details on RNA sample preparation for SAXS experiments.

  6. A fast and robust iterative algorithm for prediction of RNA pseudoknotted secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Improving accuracy and efficiency of computational methods that predict pseudoknotted RNA secondary structures is an ongoing challenge. Existing methods based on free energy minimization tend to be very slow and are limited in the types of pseudoknots that they can predict. Incorporating known structural information can improve prediction accuracy; however, there are not many methods for prediction of pseudoknotted structures that can incorporate structural information as input. There is even less understanding of the relative robustness of these methods with respect to partial information. Results We present a new method, Iterative HFold, for pseudoknotted RNA secondary structure prediction. Iterative HFold takes as input a pseudoknot-free structure, and produces a possibly pseudoknotted structure whose energy is at least as low as that of any (density-2) pseudoknotted structure containing the input structure. Iterative HFold leverages strengths of earlier methods, namely the fast running time of HFold, a method that is based on the hierarchical folding hypothesis, and the energy parameters of HotKnots V2.0. Our experimental evaluation on a large data set shows that Iterative HFold is robust with respect to partial information, with average accuracy on pseudoknotted structures steadily increasing from roughly 54% to 79% as the user provides up to 40% of the input structure. Iterative HFold is much faster than HotKnots V2.0, while having comparable accuracy. Iterative HFold also has significantly better accuracy than IPknot on our HK-PK and IP-pk168 data sets. Conclusions Iterative HFold is a robust method for prediction of pseudoknotted RNA secondary structures, whose accuracy with more than 5% information about true pseudoknot-free structures is better than that of IPknot, and with about 35% information about true pseudoknot-free structures compares well with that of HotKnots V2.0 while being significantly faster. Iterative HFold and all data used in this work are freely available at http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~hjabbari/software.php. PMID:24884954

  7. Extremely Slow Dynamics of an Abiotic Helical Assembly: Unusual Relevance to the Secondary Structure of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Avinash, M B; Govindaraju, T

    2013-02-21

    Serendipitously, we found that isoleucine methylester functionalized perylenediimide 1 undergoes an extremely slow supramolecular helical assembly over a day's time. Surprisingly, heating led to irreversible chiral denaturation. However, reversible helical assembly could be achieved only in the presence of nondenatured aggregates of 1, which act as seeds. The intriguing functional relevance deduced from 1 was employed to draw parallels with the secondary structure of proteins, envisaging its plausible implications. PMID:26281870

  8. TMPyP4, a Stabilizer of Nucleic Acid Secondary Structure, Is a Novel Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Nana; Mazzola, Michael; Cai, Elizabeth; Wang, Meng; Cave, John W.

    2015-01-01

    The porphyrin compound, TMPyP4 (5,10,15,20-Tetrakis-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphine), is widely used as a photosensitizer and a modulator of nucleic acid secondary structure stability. Our group recently showed in cultured cells and forebrain slice cultures that this compound can also down regulate expression of Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, by stabilizing DNA secondary structures in the Th proximal promoter. The current study sought to establish whether treatment with TMPyP4 could modify mouse Th expression levels in vivo. Intraperitoneal administration of low TMPyP4 doses (10mg/kg), similar to those used for photosensitization, did not significantly reduce Th transcript levels in several catecholaminergic regions. Administration of a high dose (40 mg/kg), similar to those used for tumor xenograph reduction, unexpectedly induced flaccid paralysis in an age and sex-dependent manner. In vitro analyses revealed that TMPyP4, but not putative metabolites, inhibited Acetylcholinesterase activity and pre-treatment of TMPyP4 with Hemeoxygenase-2 (HO-2) rescued Acetylcholinesterase function. Age-dependent differences in HO-2 expression levels may account for some of the variable in vivo effects of high TMPyP4 doses. Together, these studies indicate that only low doses of TMPyP4, such as those typically used for photosensitization, are well tolerated in vivo. Thus, despite its widespread use in vitro, TMPyP4 is not ideal for modifying neuronal gene expression in vivo by manipulating nucleic acid secondary structure stability, which highlights the need to identify more clinically suitable compounds that can modulate nucleic acid secondary structure and gene expression. PMID:26402367

  9. Terminal 7-methyl-guanosine cap structure on the normally uncapped 5' noncoding region of poliovirus mRNA inhibits its translation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hambidge, S J; Sarnow, P

    1991-01-01

    We have used an RNA transfection assay to study the translation of cellular and viral mRNAs with and without 5'-terminal m7GpppG cap structures in human tissue culture cells. HeLa cells were transfected with in vitro-transcribed hybrid RNA molecules containing the 5' noncoding regions of either luciferase or poliovirus linked to the coding region of the firefly luciferase gene. Transcripts containing a capped luciferase 5' noncoding region produced luciferase, while similar uncapped transcripts did not. In contrast, transcripts containing a capped 5' noncoding region of poliovirus accumulated 10-fold-lower levels of luciferase than similar transcripts without a terminal cap structure. Inhibition of poliovirus mRNA translation by a 5'-terminal cap structure was not observed in in vitro translation systems. This finding indicates that factors involved in cap-independent translation of poliovirus RNA are quantitatively or qualitatively different in human tissue culture cells and in in vitro translation systems. Furthermore, this study emphasizes the importance of studying translational control of mRNAs in intact cells. Images PMID:1656097

  10. Secondary relaxation dynamics in rigid glass-forming molecular liquids with related structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangqian; Wang, Meng; Liu, Riping; Ngai, Kia L.; Tian, Yongjun; Wang, Li-Min; Capaccioli, Simone

    2015-09-01

    The dielectric relaxation in three glass-forming molecular liquids, 1-methylindole (1MID), 5H-5-Methyl-6,7-dihydrocyclopentapyrazine (MDCP), and Quinaldine (QN) is studied focusing on the secondary relaxation and its relation to the structural ?-relaxation. All three glass-formers are rigid and more or less planar molecules with related chemical structures but have dipoles of different strengths at different locations. A strong and fast secondary relaxation is detected in the dielectric spectra of 1MID, while no resolved ?-relaxation is observed in MDCP and QN. If the observed secondary relaxation in 1MID is identified with the Johari-Goldstein (JG) ?-relaxation, then apparently the relation between the ?- and ?-relaxation frequencies of 1MID is not in accord with the Coupling Model (CM). The possibility of the violation of the prediction in 1MID as due to either the formation of hydrogen-bond induced clusters or the involvement of intramolecular degree of freedom is ruled out. The violation is explained by the secondary relaxation originating from the in-plane rotation of the dipole located on the plane of the rigid molecule, contributing to dielectric loss at higher frequencies and more intense than the JG ?-relaxation generated by the out-of-plane rotation. MDCP has smaller dipole moment located in the plane of the molecule; however, presence of the change of curvature of dielectric loss, ??(f), at some frequency on the high-frequency flank of the ?-relaxation reveals the JG ?-relaxation in MDCP and which is in accord with the CM prediction. QN has as large an in-plane dipole moment as 1MID, and the absence of the resolved secondary relaxation is explained by the smaller coupling parameter than the latter in the framework of the CM.

  11. CPU-GPU hybrid accelerating the Zuker algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prediction of ribonucleic acid (RNA) secondary structure remains one of the most important research areas in bioinformatics. The Zuker algorithm is one of the most popular methods of free energy minimization for RNA secondary structure prediction. Thus far, few studies have been reported on the acceleration of the Zuker algorithm on general-purpose processors or on extra accelerators such as Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Units (GPU). To the best of our knowledge, no implementation combines both CPU and extra accelerators, such as GPUs, to accelerate the Zuker algorithm applications. Results In this paper, a CPU-GPU hybrid computing system that accelerates Zuker algorithm applications for RNA secondary structure prediction is proposed. The computing tasks are allocated between CPU and GPU for parallel cooperate execution. Performance differences between the CPU and the GPU in the task-allocation scheme are considered to obtain workload balance. To improve the hybrid system performance, the Zuker algorithm is optimally implemented with special methods for CPU and GPU architecture. Conclusions Speedup of 15.93 over optimized multi-core SIMD CPU implementation and performance advantage of 16% over optimized GPU implementation are shown in the experimental results. More than 14% of the sequences are executed on CPU in the hybrid system. The system combining CPU and GPU to accelerate the Zuker algorithm is proven to be promising and can be applied to other bioinformatics applications. PMID:22369626

  12. Xenopus laevis 28S ribosomal RNA: a secondary structure model and its evolutionary and functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, C G; Tague, B W; Ware, V C; Gerbi, S A

    1984-01-01

    Based upon the three experimentally derived models of E. coli 23S rRNA (1-3) and the partial model for yeast 26S rRNA (4), which was deduced by homology to E. coli, we derived a secondary structure model for Xenopus laevis 28S rRNA. This is the first complete model presented for eukaryotic 28S rRNA. Compensatory base changes support the general validity of our model and offer help to resolve which of the three E. coli models is correct in regions where they are different from one another. Eukaryotic rDNA is longer than prokaryotic rDNA by virtue of introns, expansion segments and transcribed spacers, all of which are discussed relative to our secondary structure model. Comments are made on the evolutionary origins of these three categories and the processing fates of their transcripts. Functionally important sites on our 28S rRNA secondary structure model are suggested by analogy for ribosomal protein binding, the GTPase center, the peptidyl transferase center, and for rRNA interaction with tRNA and 5S RNA. We discuss how RNA-RNA interactions may play a vital role in translocation. PMID:6147812

  13. Rapid assessment of contact-dependent secondary structure propensity: relevance to amyloidogenic sequences.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sukjoon; Welsh, William J

    2005-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that calculation of contact-dependent secondary structure propensity (CSSP) is highly sensitive in detecting non-native beta-strand propensities in the core sequences of known amyloidogenic proteins. Here we describe a CSSP method based on an artificial neural network that rapidly and accurately quantifies the influence of tertiary contacts (TCs) on secondary structure propensity in local regions of protein sequences. The present method exhibited 72% accuracy in predicting the alternate secondary structure adopted by chameleon sequences located in highly disparate TC regions. Analysis of 1930 nonhomologous protein domains reveals that the alpha-helix and the beta-strand largely share the same sequence context, and that tertiary context is a major determinant of the native conformation. Conversely, it appears that the propensity of random coils for either the alpha-helix or the beta-strand is largely invariant to tertiary effects. The present CSSP method successfully reproduced the amyloidogenic character observed in local regions of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP). Furthermore, CSSP profiles were strongly correlated (r = 0.76) with the observed mutational effects on the aggregation rate of acylphosphatase. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence in support of the present CSSP approach as a sensitive probe useful for analysis of full-length proteins and for detection of core sequences that may trigger amyloid fibril formation. The combined speed and simplicity of the CSSP method lends itself to proteome-wide analysis of the amyloidogenic nature of common proteins. PMID:15849755

  14. Secondary structure encodes a cooperative tertiary folding funnel in the Azoarcus ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Mustoe, Anthony M.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    A requirement for specific RNA folding is that the free-energy landscape discriminate against non-native folds. While tertiary interactions are critical for stabilizing the native fold, they are relatively non-specific, suggesting additional mechanisms contribute to tertiary folding specificity. In this study, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to explore how secondary structure shapes the tertiary free-energy landscape of the Azoarcus ribozyme. We show that steric and connectivity constraints posed by secondary structure strongly limit the accessible conformational space of the ribozyme, and that these so-called topological constraints in turn pose strong free-energy penalties on forming different tertiary contacts. Notably, native A-minor and base-triple interactions form with low conformational free energy, while non-native tetraloop/tetraloop–receptor interactions are penalized by high conformational free energies. Topological constraints also give rise to strong cooperativity between distal tertiary interactions, quantitatively matching prior experimental measurements. The specificity of the folding landscape is further enhanced as tertiary contacts place additional constraints on the conformational space, progressively funneling the molecule to the native state. These results indicate that secondary structure assists the ribozyme in navigating the otherwise rugged tertiary folding landscape, and further emphasize topological constraints as a key force in RNA folding. PMID:26481360

  15. Secondary structure encodes a cooperative tertiary folding funnel in the Azoarcus ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Mustoe, Anthony M; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Brooks, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    A requirement for specific RNA folding is that the free-energy landscape discriminate against non-native folds. While tertiary interactions are critical for stabilizing the native fold, they are relatively non-specific, suggesting additional mechanisms contribute to tertiary folding specificity. In this study, we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to explore how secondary structure shapes the tertiary free-energy landscape of the Azoarcus ribozyme. We show that steric and connectivity constraints posed by secondary structure strongly limit the accessible conformational space of the ribozyme, and that these so-called topological constraints in turn pose strong free-energy penalties on forming different tertiary contacts. Notably, native A-minor and base-triple interactions form with low conformational free energy, while non-native tetraloop/tetraloop-receptor interactions are penalized by high conformational free energies. Topological constraints also give rise to strong cooperativity between distal tertiary interactions, quantitatively matching prior experimental measurements. The specificity of the folding landscape is further enhanced as tertiary contacts place additional constraints on the conformational space, progressively funneling the molecule to the native state. These results indicate that secondary structure assists the ribozyme in navigating the otherwise rugged tertiary folding landscape, and further emphasize topological constraints as a key force in RNA folding. PMID:26481360

  16. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotypeswitch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens. PMID:23665381

  17. Prediction of complex super-secondary structure ??? motifs based on combined features

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lixia; Hu, Xiuzhen; Li, Shaobo; Jiang, Zhuo; Li, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Prediction of a complex super-secondary structure is a key step in the study of tertiary structures of proteins. The strand-loop-helix-loop-strand (???) motif is an important complex super-secondary structure in proteins. Many functional sites and active sites often occur in polypeptides of ??? motifs. Therefore, the accurate prediction of ??? motifs is very important to recognizing protein tertiary structure and the study of protein function. In this study, the ??? motif dataset was first constructed using the DSSP package. A statistical analysis was then performed on ??? motifs and non-??? motifs. The target motif was selected, and the length of the loop-?-loop varies from 10 to 26 amino acids. The ideal fixed-length pattern comprised 32 amino acids. A Support Vector Machine algorithm was developed for predicting ??? motifs by using the sequence information, the predicted structure and function information to express the sequence feature. The overall predictive accuracy of 5-fold cross-validation and independent test was 81.7% and 76.7%, respectively. The Matthews correlation coefficient of the 5-fold cross-validation and independent test are 0.63 and 0.53, respectively. Results demonstrate that the proposed method is an effective approach for predicting ??? motifs and can be used for structure and function studies of proteins. PMID:26858540

  18. Peptide contour length determines equilibrium secondary structure in protein-analogous micelles.

    PubMed

    Marullo, Rachel; Kastantin, Mark; Drews, Laurie B; Tirrell, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    This work advances bottom-up design of bioinspired materials built from peptide-amphiphiles, which are a class of bioconjugates in which a biofunctional peptide is covalently attached to a hydrophobic moiety that drives self-assembly in aqueous solution. Specifically, this work highlights the importance of peptide contour length in determining the equilibrium secondary structure of the peptide as well as the self-assembled (i.e., micelle) geometry. Peptides used here repeat a seven-amino acid sequence between one and four times to vary peptide contour length while maintaining similar peptide-peptide interactions. Without a hydrophobic tail, these peptides all exhibit a combination of random coil and ?-helical structure. Upon self-assembly in the crowded environment of a micellar corona, however, short peptides are prone to ?-sheet structure and cylindrical micelle geometry while longer peptides remain helical in spheroidal micelles. The transition to ?-sheets in short peptides is rapid, whereby amphiphiles first self-assemble with ?-helical peptide structure, then transition to their equilibrium ?-sheet structure at a rate that depends on both temperature and ionic strength. These results identify peptide contour length as an important control over equilibrium peptide secondary structure and micelle geometry. Furthermore, the time-dependent nature of the helix-to-sheet transition opens the door for shape-changing bioinspired materials with tunable conversion rates. PMID:23794370

  19. Template-based C8-SCORPION: a protein 8-state secondary structure prediction method using structural information and context-based features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Secondary structures prediction of proteins is important to many protein structure modeling applications. Correct prediction of secondary structures can significantly reduce the degrees of freedom in protein tertiary structure modeling and therefore reduces the difficulty of obtaining high resolution 3D models. Methods In this work, we investigate a template-based approach to enhance 8-state secondary structure prediction accuracy. We construct structural templates from known protein structures with certain sequence similarity. The structural templates are then incorporated as features with sequence and evolutionary information to train two-stage neural networks. In case of structural templates absence, heuristic structural information is incorporated instead. Results After applying the template-based 8-state secondary structure prediction method, the 7-fold cross-validated Q8 accuracy is 78.85%. Even templates from structures with only 20%~30% sequence similarity can help improve the 8-state prediction accuracy. More importantly, when good templates are available, the prediction accuracy of less frequent secondary structures, such as 3-10 helices, turns, and bends, are highly improved, which are useful for practical applications. Conclusions Our computational results show that the templates containing structural information are effective features to enhance 8-state secondary structure predictions. Our prediction algorithm is implemented on a web server named "C8-SCORPION" available at: http://hpcr.cs.odu.edu/c8scorpion. PMID:25080939

  20. A novel representation of RNA secondary structure based on element-contact graphs

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Wenjie; Bo, Xiaochen; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shengqi

    2008-01-01

    Background Depending on their specific structures, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) play important roles in many biological processes. Interest in developing new topological indices based on RNA graphs has been revived in recent years, as such indices can be used to compare, identify and classify RNAs. Although the topological indices presented before characterize the main topological features of RNA secondary structures, information on RNA structural details is ignored to some degree. Therefore, it is necessity to identify topological features with low degeneracy based on complete and fine-grained RNA graphical representations. Results In this study, we present a complete and fine scheme for RNA graph representation as a new basis for constructing RNA topological indices. We propose a combination of three vertex-weighted element-contact graphs (ECGs) to describe the RNA element details and their adjacent patterns in RNA secondary structure. Both the stem and loop topologies are encoded completely in the ECGs. The relationship among the three typical topological index families defined by their ECGs and RNA secondary structures was investigated from a dataset of 6,305 ncRNAs. The applicability of topological indices is illustrated by three application case studies. Based on the applied small dataset, we find that the topological indices can distinguish true pre-miRNAs from pseudo pre-miRNAs with about 96% accuracy, and can cluster known types of ncRNAs with about 98% accuracy, respectively. Conclusion The results indicate that the topological indices can characterize the details of RNA structures and may have a potential role in identifying and classifying ncRNAs. Moreover, these indices may lead to a new approach for discovering novel ncRNAs. However, further research is needed to fully resolve the challenging problem of predicting and classifying noncoding RNAs. PMID:18402706

  1. Sheath structure in plasma with two species of positive ions and secondary electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Yun, Zhao; Nong, Xiang; Jing, Ou; De-Hui, Li; Bin-Bin, Lin

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a collisionless plasma sheath are investigated by using a fluid model in which two species of positive ions and secondary electrons are taken into account. It is shown that the positive ion speeds at the sheath edge increase with secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient, and the sheath structure is affected by the interplay between the two species of positive ions and secondary electrons. The critical SEE coefficients and the sheath widths depend strongly on the positive ion charge number, mass and concentration in the cases with and without SEE. In addition, ion kinetic energy flux to the wall and the impact of positive ion species on secondary electron density at the sheath edge are also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475220 and 11405208), the Program of Fusion Reactor Physics and Digital Tokamak with the CAS “One-Three-Five” Strategic Planning, the National ITER Program of China (Grant No. 2015GB101003), and the Higher Education Natural Science Research Project of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. 2015KJ009).

  2. New method for protein secondary structure assignment based on a simple topological descriptor.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Todd; Rivera, Margarita; Wilson, Glenda; Vaisman, Iosif I

    2005-08-15

    A simple, five-element descriptor, derived from the Delaunay tessellation of a protein structure in a single point per residue representation, can be assigned to each residue in the protein. The descriptor characterizes main-chain topology and connectivity in the neighborhood of the residue and does not explicitly depend on putative hydrogen bonds or any geometric parameter, including bond length, angles, and areas. Rules based on this descriptor can be used for accurate, robust, and computationally efficient secondary structure assignment that correlates well with the existing methods. PMID:15887224

  3. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, J. Ramiro; Alonso, Leonardo G.; Snchez, Ignacio E.

    2015-01-01

    Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis. PMID:26674530

  4. Coupling of Zinc-Binding and Secondary Structure in Nonfibrillar A?40 Peptide Oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Shan, Shengsheng; Chen, Yonggang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2015-06-22

    Nonfibrillar neurotoxic amyloid ? (A?) oligomer structures are typically rich in ?-sheets, which could be promoted by metal ions like Zn(2+). Here, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we systematically examined combinations of A?40 peptide conformations and Zn(2+) binding modes to probe the effects of secondary structure on A? dimerization energies and kinetics. We found that random conformations do not contribute to dimerization either thermodynamically or kinetically. Zn(2+) couples with preformed secondary structures (?-helix and ?-hairpin) to speed dimerization and stabilize the resulting dimer. Partial ?-helices increase the dimerization speed, and dimers with ?-helix rich conformations have the lowest energy. When Zn(2+) coordinates with residues D1, H6, H13, and H14, A?40 ?-hairpin monomers have the fastest dimerization speed. Dimers with experimentally observed zinc coordination (E11, H6, H13, and H14) form with slower rate but have lower energy. Zn(2+) cannot stabilize fibril-like ?-arch dimers. However, Zn(2+)-bound ?-arch tetramers have the lowest energy. Collectively, zinc-stabilized ?-hairpin oligomers could be important in the nucleation-polymerization of cross-? structures. Our results are consistent with experimental findings that ?-helix to ?-structural transition should accompany A? aggregation in the presence of zinc ions and that Zn(2+) stabilizes nonfibrillar A? oligomers and, thus, inhibits formation of less toxic A? fibrils. PMID:26017140

  5. Formation of C-terminally truncated version of the Taz1 protein employs cleavage-box structure in mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gunisova, Stanislava; Bartosova, Zdenka; Kramara, Juraj; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2010-02-12

    When expressed in various hosts the taz1{sup +} gene encoding the fission yeast telomere-binding protein produces two forms of polypeptides: full-length (Taz1p) and truncated (Taz1p{Delta}C) version lacking almost entire Myb-domain. Whereas Taz1p binds telomeric DNA in vitro, Taz1p{Delta}C forms long filaments unable of DNA binding. The formation of Taz1p{Delta}C is a result of neither site-specific proteolysis, nor premature termination of transcription. In silico analysis of the taz1{sup +} RNA transcript revealed a stem-loop structure at the site of cleavage (cleavage box; CB). In order to explore whether it possesses inherent destabilizing effects, we cloned CB sequence into the open reading frame (ORF) of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and observed that when expressed in Escherichia coli the engineered gene produced two forms of the reporter protein. The formation of the truncated version of GST was abolished, when CB was replaced with recoded sequence containing synonymous codons thus indicating that the truncation is based on structural properties of taz1{sup +} mRNA.

  6. Structural basis of UGUA recognition by the Nudix protein CFIm25 and implications for a regulatory role in mRNA 3′ processing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qin; Gilmartin, Gregory M.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Human Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm) is an essential component of the pre-mRNA 3′ processing complex that functions in the regulation of poly(A) site selection through the recognition of UGUA sequences upstream of the poly(A) site. Although the highly conserved 25 kDa subunit (CFIm25) of the CFIm complex possesses a characteristic α/β/α Nudix fold, CFIm25 has no detectable hydrolase activity. Here we report the crystal structures of the human CFIm25 homodimer in complex with UGUAAA and UUGUAU RNA sequences. CFIm25 is the first Nudix protein to be reported to bind RNA in a sequence-specific manner. The UGUA sequence contributes to binding specificity through an intramolecular G:A Watson–Crick/sugar-edge base interaction, an unusual pairing previously found to be involved in the binding specificity of the SAM-III riboswitch. The structures, together with mutational data, suggest a novel mechanism for the simultaneous sequence-specific recognition of two UGUA elements within the pre-mRNA. Furthermore, the mutually exclusive binding of RNA and the signaling molecule Ap4A (diadenosine tetraphosphate) by CFIm25 suggests a potential role for small molecules in the regulation of mRNA 3′ processing. PMID:20479262

  7. Secondary structure and domain architecture of the 23S and 5S rRNAs.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Anton S; Bernier, Chad R; Hershkovits, Eli; Xue, Yuzhen; Waterbury, Chris C; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Stepanov, Victor G; Gaucher, Eric A; Grover, Martha A; Harvey, Stephen C; Hud, Nicholas V; Wartell, Roger M; Fox, George E; Williams, Loren Dean

    2013-08-01

    We present a de novo re-determination of the secondary (2°) structure and domain architecture of the 23S and 5S rRNAs, using 3D structures, determined by X-ray diffraction, as input. In the traditional 2° structure, the center of the 23S rRNA is an extended single strand, which in 3D is seen to be compact and double helical. Accurately assigning nucleotides to helices compels a revision of the 23S rRNA 2° structure. Unlike the traditional 2° structure, the revised 2° structure of the 23S rRNA shows architectural similarity with the 16S rRNA. The revised 2° structure also reveals a clear relationship with the 3D structure and is generalizable to rRNAs of other species from all three domains of life. The 2° structure revision required us to reconsider the domain architecture. We partitioned the 23S rRNA into domains through analysis of molecular interactions, calculations of 2D folding propensities and compactness. The best domain model for the 23S rRNA contains seven domains, not six as previously ascribed. Domain 0 forms the core of the 23S rRNA, to which the other six domains are rooted. Editable 2° structures mapped with various data are provided (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RibosomeGallery). PMID:23771137

  8. Prediction of common secondary structures of RNAs: a genetic algorithm approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jih-H.; Le, Shu-Yun; Maizel, Jacob V.

    2000-01-01

    In this study we apply a genetic algorithm to a set of RNA sequences to find common RNA secondary structures. Our method is a three-step procedure. At the first stage of the procedure for each sequence, a genetic algorithm is used to optimize the structures in a population to a certain degree of stability. In this step, the free energy of a structure is the fitness criterion for the algorithm. Next, for each structure, we define a measure of structural conservation with respect to those in other sequences. We use this measure in a genetic algorithm to improve the structural similarity among sequences for the structures in the population of a sequence. Finally, we select those structures satisfying certain conditions of structural stability and similarity as predicted common structures for a set of RNA sequences. We have obtained satisfactory results from a set of tRNA, 5S rRNA, rev response elements (RRE) of HIV-1 and RRE of HIV-2/SIV, respectively. PMID:10648793

  9. Perturbation-induced secondary flow structures due to fractured stents in arterial curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Popma, Christopher; Penna, Leanne; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    An in vitro experimental investigation of secondary flow structures was performed downstream of a model stent that embodied a ``Type-IV'' stent fracture, i.e. complete transverse fracture of elements and element displacement (of 3 diameters). One part of the fractured stent was located in the curved region of a test section comprised of a 180-degree bent tube, and the velocity field measured with PIV. Secondary flow morphologies downstream of the stent were identified with a continuous wavelet transform (CWT) algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) using a 2D Ricker wavelet. A comparison of wavelet transformed vorticity fields of fractured and unfractured model stents is presented under physiological inflow conditions. During systolic deceleration, a breakdown in symmetry of vortical structures occurred with the unfractured stent, but not with the fractured model stent. Potential mechanisms to explain the differences in secondary flow morphologies include redirection of vorticity from the meridional plane of the bend to the normal plane and diffusion of vorticity. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  10. Representation of the secondary and tertiary structure of group I introns.

    PubMed

    Cech, T R; Damberger, S H; Gutell, R R

    1994-05-01

    Group I introns, which are widespread in nature, carry out RNA self-splicing. The secondary structure common to these introns was for the most part established a decade ago. Information about their higher order structure has been derived from a range of experimental approaches, comparative sequence analysis, and molecular modelling. This information now provides the basis for a new two-dimensional structural diagram that more accurately represents the domain organization and orientation of helices within the intron, the coaxial stacking of certain helices, and the proximity of key nucleotides in three-dimensional space. It is hoped that this format will facilitate the detailed comparison of group I intron structures. PMID:7545072

  11. Subcellular structure containing mRNA for beta subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase in rat hepatocytes is translationally active.

    PubMed Central

    Ricart, J; Egea, G; Izquierdo, J M; San Martn, C; Cuezva, J M

    1997-01-01

    We have recently reported that the nuclear-encoded mRNA for the beta subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (beta-mRNA) is localized in rounded, electron-dense clusters in the cytoplasm of rat hepatocytes. Clusters of beta-mRNA are often found in close proximity to mitochondria. These findings suggested a role for these structures in controlling the cytoplasmic expression and sorting of the encoded mitochondrial precursor. Here we have addressed the question of whether the structures containing beta-mRNA are translationally active. For this purpose a combination of high-resolution in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical procedures was used. Three different co-localization criteria showed that beta-mRNA-containing structures always revealed positive immunoreactive signals for mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (F1-ATPase), ribosomal and hsc70 proteins. Furthermore, clusters show evidence in situ of developmental changes in the translational efficiency of the beta-mRNA. These findings suggest that structures containing beta-mRNA are translationally active irrespective of their cytoplasmic location. The immunocytochemical quantification of the cytoplasmic presentation of hsc70 in the hepatocyte reveals that approx. 86% of the protein has a dispersed distribution pattern. However, the remaining hsc70 is presented in clusters of which only half reveal positive hybridization for beta-mRNA. The interaction of hsc70 with the beta-F1-ATPase precursor protein is documented by the co-localization of F1-ATPase immunoreactive material within cytoplasmic clusters of hsc70 and by the co-immunoprecipitation of hsc70 with the beta-subunit precursor from liver post-mitochondrial supernatants. Taken together, these results suggest a role for hsc70 in the translation/sorting pathway of the mammalian precursor of the beta-F1-ATPase protein. PMID:9182728

  12. Precursors linked via the zipper-like structure or the filopodium during the secondary fusion of osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Takito, Jiro; Nakamura, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the transient appearance of an actin superstructure, called the zipper-like structure, during the primary fusion (fusion of mononuclear precursors) and the secondary fusion (fusion of multinucleated cells) of osteoclasts. Here, we focus on the actin-based superstructures that link two precursor cells during the secondary fusion event. In one type of secondary fusion, the osteoclasts transformed the podosome belts into the zipper-like structure at the site of cell contact and the apposed plasma membranes in the zipper-like structure attached to each other via a discontinuous interface. In another type of secondary fusion, the osteoclasts used a filopodium-like protrusion that linked the two cells. Both types of cell fusion required a lag period between the adhesion of the cells and the fusion of cell bodies. Thus, the secondary fusion of osteoclasts uses actin-based superstructures for cell-cell interactions before the definitive fusion of the plasma membranes. PMID:23181159

  13. Combining secondary-structure and protein solvent-accessibility predictions in methionine substitution for anomalous dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-Yi; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    In X-ray crystallographic analysis, the single-wavelength and multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD and MAD) methods have been widely used in order to solve the phase problem. Selenium-labelled methionine has been shown to be very effective for anomalous dispersion phasing, and at least one selenomethionine is required for every 100 amino acids. Some proteins, such as the Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid lumen protein AtTLP18.3, can be overexpressed in an Escherichia coli system and high-quality protein crystals can be obtained. However, AtTLP18.3 contains no methionine residues, and site-directed mutagenesis was required in order to introduce methionine residues into the protein. A criterion for the mutated residues is that they should avoid affecting the structure and function. In this study, several leucine and isoleucine residues were selected for methionine substitution by combining secondary-structure and solvent-accessibility predictions. From the secondary-structure prediction, mutated residues were first determined in the coil or loop regions at the junction of two secondary structures. Since leucine and isoleucine residues are hydrophobic and are normally buried within the protein core, these residues should have a higher solvent-accessibility prediction so that they would be partially buried or exposed in the protein. In addition, five residues (Leu107, Leu202, Ile133, Leu128 and Ile159) of AtTLP18.3 were mutated to methionine residues. After overexpression and purification, only two single-mutant lines, L128M and I159M, could be crystallized. Finally, a double-mutation line of truncated AtTLP18.3 with L128M and I159M mutations was constructed. The structure of the double mutant AtTLP18.3 protein was resolved using the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method at 2.6? resolution. The results indicated that a combination of secondary-structure and solvent-accessibility prediction for methionine substitution is a useful method in SAD and MAD phasing. PMID:24598932

  14. Structural effects of liana presence in secondary tropical dry forests using ground LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Azofeifa, A.; Portillo-Quintero, C.; Durán, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    Lianas, woody vines, are a key component of tropical forest because they may reduce carbon storage potential. Lianas are increasing in density and biomass in tropical forests, but it is unknown what the potential consequences of these increases are for forest dynamics. Lianas may proliferate in disturbed areas, such as regenerating forests, but little is known about the role of lianas in secondary succession. In this study, we evaluated the potential of the ground LiDAR to detect differences in the vertical structure of stands of different ages with and without lianas in tropical dry forests. Specifically, we used a terrestrial laser scanner called VEGNET to assess whether liana presence influences the vertical signature of stands of different ages, and whether successional trajectories as detected by the VEGNET could be altered by liana presence. We deployed the VEGNET ground LiDAR system in 15 secondary forests of different ages early (21 years old since land abandonment), intermediate (32-35 years old) and late stages (> 80 years old) with and without lianas. We compared laser-derived vegetation components such as Plant Area Index (PAI), plant area volume density (PAVD), and the radius of gyration (RG) across forest stands between liana and no-liana treatments. In general forest stands without lianas show a clearer distinction of vertical strata and the vertical height of accumulated PAVD. A significant increase of PAI was found from intermediate to late stages in stands without lianas, but in stands where lianas were present there was not a significant trend. This suggests that lianas may be influencing successional trajectories in secondary forests, and these effects can be captured by terrestrial laser scanners such as the VEGNET. This research contributes to estimate the potential effects of lianas in secondary dry forests and highlight the role of ground LiDAR to monitor structural changes in tropical forests due to liana presence.

  15. In situ protein secondary structure determination in ice: Raman spectroscopy-based process analytical tool for frozen storage of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Roessl, Ulrich; Leitgeb, Stefan; Pieters, Sigrid; De Beer, Thomas; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A Raman spectroscopy-based method for in situ monitoring of secondary structural composition of proteins during frozen and thawed storage was developed. A set of reference proteins with different α-helix and β-sheet compositions was used for calibration and validation in a chemometric approach. Reference secondary structures were quantified with circular dichroism spectroscopy in the liquid state. Partial least squares regression models were established that enable estimation of secondary structure content from Raman spectra. Quantitative secondary structure determination in ice was accomplished for the first time and correlation with existing (qualitative) protein structural data from the frozen state was achieved. The method can be used in the presence of common stabilizing agents and is applicable in an industrial freezer setup. Raman spectroscopy represents a powerful, noninvasive, and flexibly applicable tool for protein stability monitoring during frozen storage. PMID:24985932

  16. Determination of the secondary structure of selected melittin analogues with different haemolytic activities.

    PubMed Central

    Prez-Pay, E; Houghten, R A; Blondelle, S E

    1994-01-01

    In earlier studies, we have reported that minor modifications in the amino acid sequence of melittin result in dramatic changes in its biological activity. In the current study, we have investigated the secondary structure of melittin analogues with either increased or decreased haemolytic activity in order to further our understanding of the structural features involved in the binding and/or insertion of peptides into a phospholipid membrane from solution. This was accomplished by analysing the c.d. spectra of the analogues in solutions of various ionic strength and, separately, in the presence of micelles. These studies permit the assessment of the effect of small sequence modifications (i.e. single amino acid omission or substitution) on the self-association-induced secondary structure of melittin in aqueous solution, as well as its binding affinity to micelles. It was found that amphipathicity, as well as interchain distances and the orientation of hydrophobic residues, were involved in the induction of stabilized structures. PMID:8172621

  17. Importance of the RNA secondary structure for the relative accumulation of clustered viral microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Contrant, Maud; Fender, Aurlie; Chane-Woon-Ming, Batrice; Randrianjafy, Ramy; Vivet-Boudou, Valrie; Richer, Delphine; Pfeffer, Sbastien

    2014-01-01

    Micro (mi)RNAs are small non-coding RNAs with key regulatory functions. Recent advances in the field allowed researchers to identify their targets. However, much less is known regarding the regulation of miRNAs themselves. The accumulation of these tiny regulators can be modulated at various levels during their biogenesis from the transcription of the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) to the stability of the mature miRNA. Here, we studied the importance of the pri-miRNA secondary structure for the regulation of mature miRNA accumulation. To this end, we used the Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus, which encodes a cluster of 12 pre-miRNAs. Using small RNA profiling and quantitative northern blot analysis, we measured the absolute amount of each mature miRNAs in different cellular context. We found that the difference in expression between the least and most expressed viral miRNAs could be as high as 60-fold. Using high-throughput selective 2?-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension, we then determined the secondary structure of the long primary transcript. We found that highly expressed miRNAs derived from optimally structured regions within the pri-miRNA. Finally, we confirmed the importance of the local structure by swapping stem-loops or by targeted mutagenesis of selected miRNAs, which resulted in a perturbed accumulation of the mature miRNA. PMID:24831544

  18. RNA-d2: a computer program for editing and display of RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Perochon-Dorisse, J; Chetouani, F; Aurel, S; Iscolo, N; Michot, B

    1995-02-01

    RNA-d2 is a user-friendly program developed for interactively generating aesthetic and non-overlapping drawings of RNA secondary structures. It designed so that the drawings can be edited in a very natural and intuitive way, in order to emphasize structural homologies between several molecules, as well as the foldings themselves to update the base-pair sets according to new data. The program automatically produces a polygonal display in which the unpaired nucleotides are regularly positioned on circles and the stems harmoniously distributed on their periphery. RNA secondary structures can be encoded via the keyboard, but the program also automatically draws output files from thermodynamic prediction programs. The user interacts directly on different screen displays according to the editing functions. Rotation/translation of any subdomain and deletion of stems are performed on a coloured backbone view to make easier the identification of structural features, whereas addition of new base-pairings and numbering manipulation are realized on a complete polygonal view. Each modification is displayed in real time on the screen. When the display is obscured by numerous overlaps despite the colour code of the backbone view, an automatic function progressively straightens the subdomains which are highly compacted by very dissymmetric internal loops. RNA-d2 allows easy untangling and editing of RNA molecules > 1000 nucleotides long. PMID:7540936

  19. Role of Backbone Dipole Interactions in the Formation of Secondary and Supersecondary Structures of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a generic solvated coarse-grained protein model that can be used to characterize the driving forces behind protein folding. Each amino acid is coarse-grained with two beads, a backbone, and a side chain. Although the backbone beads are modeled as polar entities, side chains are hydrophobic, polar, or charged, thus allowing the exploration of how sequence patterning determines a protein fold. The change in orientation of the atoms of the coarse-grained unit is captured by the addition of two oppositely charged dummy particles inside the backbone coarse-grained bead. These two dummy charges represent a dipole that can fluctuate, thus introducing structural polarization into the coarse-grained model. Realistic ?/? content is achieved de novo without any biases in the force field toward a particular secondary structure. The dipoles created by the dummy particles interact with each other and drive the protein models to fold into unique structures depending on the amino acid patterning and presence of capping residues. We have also characterized the role of dipoledipole and dipolecharge interactions in shaping the secondary and supersecondary structure of proteins. Formation of helix bundles and ?-strands are also discussed. PMID:24932137

  20. Unit-cell intergrowth of pyrochlore and hexagonal tungsten bronze structures in secondary tungsten minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, Ian E.; Birch, William D.; Bougerol, Catherine; Mills, Stuart J.

    2006-12-01

    Structural relations between secondary tungsten minerals with general composition A x[(W,Fe)(O,OH) 3] yH 2O are described. Phyllotungstite ( A=predominantly Ca) is hexagonal, a=7.31(3) , c=19.55(1) , space group P6 3/ mmc. Pittongite, a new secondary tungsten mineral from a wolframite deposit near Pittong in Victoria, southeastern Australia ( A=predominantly Na) is hexagonal, a=7.286(1) , c=50.49(1) , space group P-6 m2. The structures of both minerals can be described as unit-cell scale intergrowths of (111) py pyrochlore slabs with pairs of hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) layers. In phyllotungstite, the (111) py blocks have the same thickness, 6 , whereas pittongite contains pyrochlore blocks of two different thicknesses, 6 and 12 . The structures can alternatively be described in terms of chemical twinning of the pyrochlore structure on (111) py oxygen planes. At the chemical twin planes, pairs of HTB layers are corner connected as in hexagonal WO 3.

  1. Evidence of novel secondary structure in DNA-bound protamine is revealed by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hud, N V; Milanovich, F P; Balhorn, R

    1994-06-21

    Raman spectroscopy studies of protamine-DNA complexes are reported for samples in the solid state at 98% relative humidity. Previous reports utilizing other physical techniques have indicated the presence of B-form DNA in protamine-DNA complexes. The present Raman data support the assignment of a modified B-form which is characterized by appreciable unstacking of the bases. The quality of the present spectra has made it possible, for the first time, to obtain the Raman spectrum of DNA-bound protamine by digital spectral subtraction. The difference spectrum indicates that protamine adopts an unusual secondary structure upon binding to DNA. A dominant amide I band is observed at 1683 cm-1 which is indicative of neither an alpha-helix or beta-sheet conformation. An amide I band at this position has been associated with the 1-->3 hydrogen bond that occurs within a gamma-turn [Bandekar, J., & Krimm, S. (1985) Int. J. Pept. Protein Res. 26, 158-165]. On the basis of this assignment, as well as preliminary results obtained by computer modeling, we propose a new model for the secondary structure of DNA-bound protamine that is rich in 1-->3 hydrogen bonding. Spectral data demonstrate that this structure is absent in protamine molecules in solution. Analyses of spectra of polyarginine-DNA complexes suggest that polyarginine, although similar to protamine in primary structure, assumes a conformation when bound to DNA that is distinct from that adopted by protamine. PMID:8011618

  2. The importance of larger data sets for protein secondary structure prediction with neural networks.

    PubMed Central

    Chandonia, J. M.; Karplus, M.

    1996-01-01

    A neural network algorithm is applied to secondary structure and structural class prediction for a database of 318 nonhomologous protein chains. Significant improvement in accuracy is obtained as compared with performance on smaller databases. A systematic study of the effects of network topology shows that, for the larger database, better results are obtained with more units in the hidden layer. In a 32-fold cross validated test, secondary structure prediction accuracy is 67.0%, relative to 62.6% obtained previously, without any evolutionary information on the sequence. Introduction of sequence profiles increases this value to 72.9%, suggesting that the two types of information are essentially independent. Tertiary structural class is predicted with 80.2% accuracy, relative to 73.9% obtained previously. The use of a larger database is facilitated by the introduction of a scaled conjugate gradient algorithm for optimizing the neural network. This algorithm is about 10-20 times as fast as the standard steepest descent algorithm. PMID:8845767

  3. Infrared spectroscopic study of photoreceptor membrane and purple membrane. Protein secondary structure and hydrogen deuterium exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Downer, N.W.; Bruchman, T.J.; Hazzard, J.H.

    1986-03-15

    Infrared spectroscopy in the interval from 1800 to 1300 cm-1 has been used to investigate the secondary structure and the hydrogen/deuterium exchange behavior of bacteriorhodopsin and bovine rhodopsin in their respective native membranes. The amide I' and amide II' regions from spectra of membrane suspensions in D2O were decomposed into constituent bands by use of a curve-fitting procedure. The amide I' bands could be fit with a minimum of three theoretical components having peak positions at 1664, 1638, and 1625 cm-1 for bacteriorhodopsin and 1657, 1639, and 1625 cm-1 for rhodopsin. For both of these membrane proteins, the amide I' spectrum suggests that alpha-helix is the predominant form of peptide chain secondary structure, but that a substantial amount of beta-sheet conformation is present as well. The shape of the amide I' band was pH-sensitive for photoreceptor membranes, but not for purple membrane, indicating that membrane-bound rhodopsin undergoes a conformation change at acidic pH. Peptide hydrogen exchange of bacteriorhodopsin and rhodopsin was monitored by observing the change in the ratio of integrated absorbance (Aamide II'/Aamide I') during the interval from 1.5 to 25 h after membranes were introduced into buffered D2O. The fraction of peptide groups in a very slowly exchanging secondary structure was estimated to be 0.71 for bacteriorhodopsin at pD 7. The corresponding fraction in vertebrate rhodopsin was estimated to be less than or equal to 0.60. These findings are discussed in relationship to previous studies of hydrogen exchange behavior and to structural models for both proteins.

  4. Prediction of RNA secondary structures: from theory to models and real molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Peter

    2006-05-01

    RNA secondary structures are derived from RNA sequences, which are strings built form the natural four letter nucleotide alphabet, {AUGC}. These coarse-grained structures, in turn, are tantamount to constrained strings over a three letter alphabet. Hence, the secondary structures are discrete objects and the number of sequences always exceeds the number of structures. The sequences built from two letter alphabets form perfect structures when the nucleotides can form a base pair, as is the case with {GC} or {AU}, but the relation between the sequences and structures differs strongly from the four letter alphabet. A comprehensive theory of RNA structure is presented, which is based on the concepts of sequence space and shape space, being a space of structures. It sets the stage for modelling processes in ensembles of RNA molecules like evolutionary optimization or kinetic folding as dynamical phenomena guided by mappings between the two spaces. The number of minimum free energy (mfe) structures is always smaller than the number of sequences, even for two letter alphabets. Folding of RNA molecules into mfe energy structures constitutes a non-invertible mapping from sequence space onto shape space. The preimage of a structure in sequence space is defined as its neutral network. Similarly the set of suboptimal structures is the preimage of a sequence in shape space. This set represents the conformation space of a given sequence. The evolutionary optimization of structures in populations is a process taking place in sequence space, whereas kinetic folding occurs in molecular ensembles that optimize free energy in conformation space. Efficient folding algorithms based on dynamic programming are available for the prediction of secondary structures for given sequences. The inverse problem, the computation of sequences for predefined structures, is an important tool for the design of RNA molecules with tailored properties. Simultaneous folding or cofolding of two or more RNA molecules can be modelled readily at the secondary structure level and allows prediction of the most stable (mfe) conformations of complexes together with suboptimal states. Cofolding algorithms are important tools for efficient and highly specific primer design in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and help to explain the mechanisms of small interference RNA (si-RNA) molecules in gene regulation. The evolutionary optimization of RNA structures is illustrated by the search for a target structure and mimics aptamer selection in evolutionary biotechnology. It occurs typically in steps consisting of short adaptive phases interrupted by long epochs of little or no obvious progress in optimization. During these quasi-stationary epochs the populations are essentially confined to neutral networks where they search for sequences that allow a continuation of the adaptive process. Modelling RNA evolution as a simultaneous process in sequence and shape space provides answers to questions of the optimal population size and mutation rates. Kinetic folding is a stochastic process in conformation space. Exact solutions are derived by direct simulation in the form of trajectory sampling or by solving the master equation. The exact solutions can be approximated straightforwardly by Arrhenius kinetics on barrier trees, which represent simplified versions of conformational energy landscapes. The existence of at least one sequence forming any arbitrarily chosen pair of structures is granted by the intersection theorem. Folding kinetics is the key to understanding and designing multistable RNA molecules or RNA switches. These RNAs form two or more long lived conformations, and conformational changes occur either spontaneously or are induced through binding of small molecules or other biopolymers. RNA switches are found in nature where they act as elements in genetic and metabolic regulation. The reliability of RNA secondary structure prediction is limited by the accuracy with which the empirical parameters can be determined and by principal deficiencies, for example by the lack of energy contributions resulting from tertiary interactions. In addition, native structures may be determined by folding kinetics rather than by thermodynamics. We address the first problem by considering base pair probabilities or base pairing entropies, which are derived from the partition function of conformations. A high base pair probability corresponding to a low pairing entropy is taken as an indicator of a high reliability of prediction. Pseudoknots are discussed as an example of a tertiary interaction that is highly important for RNA function. Moreover, pseudoknot formation is readily incorporated into structure prediction algorithms. Some examples of experimental data on RNA secondary structures that are readily explained using the landscape concept are presented. They deal with (i) properties of RNA molecules with random sequences, (ii) RNA molecules from restricted alphabets, (iii) existence of neutral networks, (iv) shape space covering, (v) riboswitches and (vi) evolution of non-coding RNAs as an example of evolution restricted to neutral networks.

  5. Insight into the secondary structure of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase type I computer analysis and FT-IR spectroscopic characterization of the protein structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, A. E.; Karamancheva, I. R.

    2001-05-01

    The secondary structure of chloramphenicol O-acetyltransferase type I (CAT I) and an N-terminal deleted mutant has been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The analysis of the amide I band of different samples (KBr, hydrated films and buffer solution) by Fourier self-deconvolution followed by a curve fitting was performed. The spectroscopic data have been utilized to determine the ?-helix and ?-structure % contents, which depend strongly on the protein sample preparation. Furthermore, the secondary structure of the enzyme-inhibitor Crystal Violet complex was analyzed. The observed difference in the secondary structural contents suggests that some conformational changes of the enzyme are induced by the inhibitor after binding.

  6. Structural basis for inhibition of the MDM2:p53 interaction by an optimized MDM2-binding peptide selected with mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takashi; Shirakawa, Kie; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Shiheido, Hirokazu; Tabata, Noriko; Sakuma-Yonemura, Yuko; Horisawa, Kenichi; Katahira, Masato; Doi, Nobuhide; Yanagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The oncoprotein MDM2 binds to tumor suppressor protein p53 and inhibits its anticancer activity, which leads to promotion of tumor cell growth and tumor survival. Abrogation of the p53:MDM2 interaction reportedly results in reactivation of the p53 pathway and inhibition of tumor cell proliferation. We recently performed rigorous selection of MDM2-binding peptides by means of mRNA display and identified an optimal 12-mer peptide (PRFWEYWLRLME), named MDM2 Inhibitory Peptide (MIP), which shows higher affinity for MDM2 (and also its homolog, MDMX) and higher tumor cell proliferation suppression activity than known peptides. Here we determined the NMR solution structure of a MIP-MDM2 fusion protein to elucidate the structural basis of the tight binding of MIP to MDM2. A region spanning from Phe3 to Met11 of MIP forms a single α-helix, which is longer than those of the other MDM2-binding peptides. MIP shares a conserved Phe3-Trp7-Leu10 triad, whose side chains are oriented towards and fit into the hydrophobic pockets of MDM2. Additionally, hydrophobic surface patches that surround the hydrophobic pockets of MDM2 are covered by solvent-exposed MIP residues, Trp4, Tyr6, and Met11. Their hydrophobic interactions extend the interface of the two molecules and contribute to the strong binding. The potential MDM2 inhibition activity observed for MIP turned out to originate from its enlarged binding interface. The structural information obtained in the present study provides a road map for the rational design of strong inhibitors of MDM2:p53 binding. PMID:25275651

  7. Use of tiling array data and RNA secondary structure predictions to identify noncoding RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Weile, Christian; Gardner, Paul P; Hedegaard, Mads M; Vinther, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    Background Within the last decade a large number of noncoding RNA genes have been identified, but this may only be the tip of the iceberg. Using comparative genomics a large number of sequences that have signals concordant with conserved RNA secondary structures have been discovered in the human genome. Moreover, genome wide transcription profiling with tiling arrays indicate that the majority of the genome is transcribed. Results We have combined tiling array data with genome wide structural RNA predictions to search for novel noncoding and structural RNA genes that are expressed in the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS. Using this strategy, we identify thousands of human candidate RNA genes. To further verify the expression of these genes, we focused on candidate genes that had a stable hairpin structures or a high level of covariance. Using northern blotting, we verify the expression of 2 out of 3 of the hairpin structures and 3 out of 9 high covariance structures in SK-N-AS cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that many human noncoding, structured and conserved RNA genes remain to be discovered and that tissue specific tiling array data can be used in combination with computational predictions of sequences encoding structural RNAs to improve the search for such genes. PMID:17645787

  8. Landscape and variation of RNA secondary structure across the human transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yue; Qu, Kun; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Flynn, Ryan A; Manor, Ohad; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Zhang, Jiajing; Spitale, Robert C; Snyder, Michael P; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard Y

    2014-01-30

    In parallel to the genetic code for protein synthesis, a second layer of information is embedded in all RNA transcripts in the form of RNA structure. RNA structure influences practically every step in the gene expression program. However, the nature of most RNA structures or effects of sequence variation on structure are not known. Here we report the initial landscape and variation of RNA secondary structures (RSSs) in a human family trio (mother, father and their child). This provides a comprehensive RSS map of human coding and non-coding RNAs. We identify unique RSS signatures that demarcate open reading frames and splicing junctions, and define authentic microRNA-binding sites. Comparison of native deproteinized RNA isolated from cells versus refolded purified RNA suggests that the majority of the RSS information is encoded within RNA sequence. Over 1,900 transcribed single nucleotide variants (approximately 15% of all transcribed single nucleotide variants) alter local RNA structure. We discover simple sequence and spacing rules that determine the ability of point mutations to impact RSSs. Selective depletion of 'riboSNitches' versus structurally synonymous variants at precise locations suggests selection for specific RNA shapes at thousands of sites, including 3' untranslated regions, binding sites of microRNAs and RNA-binding proteins genome-wide. These results highlight the potentially broad contribution of RNA structure and its variation to gene regulation. PMID:24476892

  9. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolini, C.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Wang, C.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils.Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A molecular model for the peptide studied and the charge chart associated to it. In addition, an AFM image of pH 4 fibrils is presented. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05109b

  10. Rigidity, Secondary Structure, and the Universality of the Boson Peak in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Nickels, Jonathan D.; Ehlers, Georg; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary neutron- and light-scattering results on nine proteins and amino acids reveal the role of rigidity and secondary structure in determining the time- and lengthscales of low-frequency collective vibrational dynamics in proteins. These dynamics manifest in a spectral feature, known as the boson peak (BP), which is common to all disordered materials. We demonstrate that BP position scales systematically with structural motifs, reflecting local rigidity: disordered proteins appear softer than α-helical proteins; which are softer than β-sheet proteins. Our analysis also reveals a universal spectral shape of the BP in proteins and amino acid mixtures; superimposable on the shape observed in typical glasses. Uniformity in the underlying physical mechanism, independent of the specific chemical composition, connects the BP vibrations to nanometer-scale heterogeneities, providing an experimental benchmark for coarse-grained simulations, structure/rigidity relationships, and engineering of proteins for novel applications. PMID:24940784

  11. Understanding of Relation Structures of Graphical Models by Lower Secondary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buuren, Onne; Heck, Andr; Ellermeijer, Ton

    2015-06-01

    A learning path has been developed on system dynamical graphical modelling, integrated into the Dutch lower secondary physics curriculum. As part of the developmental research for this learning path, students' understanding of the relation structures shown in the diagrams of graphical system dynamics based models has been investigated. One of our main findings is that only some students understand these structures correctly. Reality-based interpretation of the diagrams can conceal an incorrect understanding of diagram structures. As a result, students seemingly have no problems interpreting the diagrams until they are asked to construct a graphical model. Misconceptions have been identified that are the consequence of the fact that the equations are not clearly communicated by the diagrams or because the icons used in the diagrams mislead novice modellers. Suggestions are made for improvements.

  12. NMR structure and dynamics of the RNA-binding site for the histone mRNA stem-loop binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    DeJong, Eric S; Marzluff, William F; Nikonowicz, Edward P

    2002-01-01

    The 3' end of replication-dependent histone mRNAs terminate in a conserved sequence containing a stem-loop. This 26-nt sequence is the binding site for a protein, stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), that is involved in multiple aspects of histone mRNA metabolism and regulation. We have determined the structure of the 26-nt sequence by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. There is a 16-nt stem-loop motif, with a conserved 6-bp stem and a 4-nt loop. The loop is closed by a conserved U.A base pair that terminates the canonical A-form stem. The pyrimidine-rich 4-nt loop, UUUC, is well organized with the three uridines stacking on the helix, and the fourth base extending across the major groove into the solvent. The flanking nucleotides at the base of the hairpin stem do not assume a unique conformation, despite the fact that the 5' flanking nucleotides are a critical component of the SLBP binding site. PMID:11871662

  13. Nucleobase-Modified PNA Suppresses Translation by Forming a Triple Helix with a Hairpin Structure in mRNA In?Vitro and in Cells.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Tamaki; Hnedzko, Dziyana; Rozners, Eriks; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Compounds that bind specifically to double-stranded regions of RNA have potential as regulators of structure-based RNA function; however, sequence-selective recognition of double-stranded RNA is challenging. The modification of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with unnatural nucleobases enables the formation of PNA-RNA triplexes. Herein, we demonstrate that a 9-mer PNA forms a sequence-specific PNA-RNA triplex with a dissociation constant of less than 1?nm at physiological pH. The triplex formed within the 5' untranslated region of an mRNA reduces the protein expression levels both in?vitro and in cells. A single triplet mismatch destabilizes the complex, and in this case, no translation suppression is observed. The triplex-forming PNAs are unique and potent compounds that hold promise as inhibitors of cellular functions that are controlled by double-stranded RNAs, such as RNA interference, RNA editing, and RNA localization mediated by protein-RNA interactions. PMID:26473504

  14. Prediction of Long Loops with Embedded Secondary Structure using the Protein Local Optimization Program

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Edward B.; Murrett, Colleen S.; Zhu, Kai; Zhao, Suwen; Goldfeld, Dahlia A.; Bylund, Joseph H.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Robust homology modeling to atomic-level accuracy requires in the general case successful prediction of protein loops containing small segments of secondary structure. Further, as loop prediction advances to success with larger loops, the exclusion of loops containing secondary structure becomes awkward. Here, we extend the applicability of the Protein Local Optimization Program (PLOP) to loops up to 17 residues in length that contain either helical or hairpin segments. In general, PLOP hierarchically samples conformational space and ranks candidate loops with a high-quality molecular mechanics force field. For loops identified to possess ?-helical segments, we employ an alternative dihedral library composed of (?,?) angles commonly found in helices. The alternative library is searched over a user-specified range of residues that define the helical bounds. The source of these helical bounds can be from popular secondary structure prediction software or from analysis of past loop predictions where a propensity to form a helix is observed. Due to the maturity of our energy model, the lowest energy loop across all experiments can be selected with an accuracy of sub-ngstrm RMSD in 80% of cases, 1.0 to 1.5 RMSD in 14% of cases, and poorer than 1.5 RMSD in 6% of cases. The effectiveness of our current methods in predicting hairpin-containing loops is explored with hairpins up to 13 residues in length and again reaching an accuracy of sub-ngstrm RMSD in 83% of cases, 1.0 to 1.5 RMSD in 10% of cases, and poorer than 1.5 RMSD in 7% of cases. Finally, we explore the effect of an imprecise surrounding environment, in which side chains, but not the backbone, are initially in perturbed geometries. In these cases, loops perturbed to 3 RMSD from the native environment were restored to their native conformation with sub-ngstrm RMSD. PMID:23814507

  15. Enzyme activity inhibition and secondary structure disruption of nano-TiO2 on pepsin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong-Rong; Wang, Wen-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shi-Long

    2010-09-01

    In this study, the binding and enzyme activity inhibitory effect of nano-TiO(2) on pepsin was explored compared with micro-TiO(2). Nano-TiO(2) was about 60 nm and micro-TiO(2) was about 200 nm, both round in shape. The activity of pepsin was depressed significantly by nano-TiO(2) comparing to micro-ones. The results of UV spectrometry, HPLC, SDS-PAGE and CD assay proved that micro-TiO(2) has only physical absorption effect on pepsin, but no impairment on primary sequences or secondary structure. However, nano-TiO(2) had coordination interaction with pepsin besides physical binding effect. The secondary structure of pepsin was unfolded with the treatment of nano-TiO(2) at pH 6.5 and pH 3.53, which might consequently affect the beta-hairpin loop that protects the active center of pepsin, and then reduce the enzyme activity. Furthermore, the thermodynamic mechanisms of interaction between nano-TiO(2) and pepsin were explored by fluorescence spectrum and ITC analysis. According to the results of thermodynamic analysis, the K value was 3.64x10(6), stoichiometry (N(pepsin:nano-TiO2)) was 3.04x10(3), the total DeltaH was -2277 cal/mol, DeltaS was 22.7 cal/(K mol), therefore the nano-TiO(2)-pepsin interaction is spontaneous. The depression of activity and the unfolding of secondary structure of pepsin were resulted from non-covalent reactions, including electrostatic force and hydrophobic binding. This work studied the different inhibitory effects and revealed mechanisms of the interaction between micro/nano-TiO(2) and pepsin, and provided a useful approach for evaluating the health risk of nano-materials on level of proteins. PMID:20541600

  16. The secondary structure of the 7SL RNA in the signal recognition particle: functional implications.

    PubMed Central

    Zwieb, C

    1985-01-01

    The secondary structure of the 7SL RNA in the signal recognition particle was determined by applying both a theoretical and an experimental approach. The compensatory base change approach was taken comparing the published sequences of human, Drosophila and Xenopus 7SL RNA's. The deduced secondary structure was confirmed by post-labeling of an RNase V1-nicked dog SRP with P32-pCp and RNA-ligase and analysis of the labeled RNA-fragments by non-denaturing/denaturing 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two interesting features in the secondary structure were revealed: Firstly, bases at positions 122 to 127 of the human 7SL RNA are not only able to pair with bases at positions 167 to 170, but also with a single-stranded region of the bases at positions 223 to 228, suggesting an alternative base pairing scheme for the 7SL RNA in all three organisms. In agreement with this finding, four different conformations were identified after transcription of the 7SL RNA from the genomic human clone. The involvement of the particular basepairing interaction postulated was confirmed by the analysis of a 7SL RNA deletion mutant (Sma1-409). Secondly, a significant sequence homology of the paired bases at positions 236 to 255 and 104 to 109 in 7SL RNA with bases in 5S ribosomal RNA at the positions 84 to 110 was noticed, suggesting that 5S ribosomal and 7SL RNA interact with the same target during protein biosynthesis. These findings are summarized by proposing a mechanism for the translational arrest of protein synthesis by the signal recognition particle using specific sequences and an alternative configuration in the 7SL RNA. Images PMID:2413423

  17. The effect of coherent structures on the secondary flow in a square duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, A.; Pinelli, A.; Uhlmann, M.; Kawahara, G.

    The appearance of secondary flow of Prandtl's second kind is a well-known phenomenon in fully developed turbulent rectangular duct flow. The intensity of the secondary flow is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the mean streamwise velocity; however, it plays an important role in the crossstreamwise momentum, heat and mass transfer. Our recent study [1] revealed that the mean secondary flow is a statistical footprint of the turbulent flow structures, i.e. streamwise vortices and streaks which are observed in the nearwall region, whose cross-sectional positions are constrained by the presence of the side walls at marginal Reynolds number (approximately 1100, based on the bulk velocity and the duct half width, corresponding to a friction Reynolds number of about 80). In this marginal case, one low-speed streak associated with a pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices can exist over each wall and they are self-sustained [2]. When considering the higher Reynolds numbers, the increment of duct width in wall unit allows the simultaneous presence of multiple low velocity streaks and pairs of streamwise vortices upon the wall.

  18. Secondary structure of corona proteins determines the cell surface receptors used by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Candace C; Payne, Christine K

    2014-12-11

    Nanoparticles used for biological and biomedical applications encounter a host of extracellular proteins. These proteins rapidly adsorb onto the nanoparticle surface, creating a protein corona. Poly(ethylene glycol) can reduce, but not eliminate, the nonspecific adsorption of proteins. As a result, the adsorbed proteins, rather than the nanoparticle itself, determine the cellular receptors used for binding, the internalization mechanism, the intracellular transport pathway, and the subsequent immune response. Using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, we first characterize a set of polystyrene nanoparticles in which the same adsorbed protein, bovine serum albumin, leads to binding to two different cell surface receptors: native albumin receptors and scavenger receptors. Using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of the adsorbed bovine serum albumin protein controls the cellular receptors used by the protein-nanoparticle complexes. These results show that protein secondary structure is a key parameter in determining the cell surface receptor used by a protein-nanoparticle complex. We expect this link between protein structure and cellular outcomes will provide a molecular basis for the design of nanoparticles for use in biological and biomedical applications. PMID:24779411

  19. In Silico Analysis of ?-Galactosidases Primary and Secondary Structure in relation to Temperature Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Sharma, Nikhil; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2014-01-01

    ?-D-Galactosidases (EC 3.2.1.23) hydrolyze the terminal nonreducing ?-D-galactose residues in ?-D-galactosides and are ubiquitously present in all life forms including extremophiles. Eighteen microbial ?-galactosidase protein sequences, six each from psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic microbes, were analyzed. Primary structure reveals alanine, glycine, serine, and arginine to be higher in psychrophilic ?-galactosidases whereas valine, glutamine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine, threonine, and tyrosine are found to be statistically preferred by thermophilic ?-galactosidases. Cold active ?-galactosidase has a strong preference towards tiny and small amino acids, whereas high temperature inhabitants had higher content of basic and aromatic amino acids. Thermophilic ?-galactosidases have higher percentage of ?-helix region responsible for temperature tolerance while cold loving ?-galactosidases had higher percentage of sheet and coil region. Secondary structure analysis revealed that charged and aromatic amino acids were significant for sheet region of thermophiles. Alanine was found to be significant and high in the helix region of psychrophiles and valine counters in thermophilic ?-galactosidase. Coil region of cold active ?-galactosidase has higher content of tiny amino acids which explains their high catalytic efficiency over their counterparts from thermal habitat. The present study has revealed the preference or prevalence of certain amino acids in primary and secondary structure of psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic ?-galactosidase. PMID:24790757

  20. 5' and 3' untranslated regions of pestivirus genome: primary and secondary structure analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Deng, R; Brock, K V

    1993-01-01

    Within the conserved 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the pestivirus genome three highly variable regions were identified. Preceding the polyprotein start codon, multiple cryptic AUG codons and several small open reading frames are characteristic for all the five pestiviruses. Inspection of the context of AUGs revealed that the polyprotein initiation AUG of pestivirus has a weak context for efficient translation initiation. The most favorable context was found in two of the cryptic AUGs. Two oligopyrimidine-rich tracts upstream to the conserved either cryptic or authentic AUG in the 5'-UTR of pestivirus were identified and 83.3% of their nucleotide sequences are complementary to the consensus sequence at the 3' terminus of eucaryotic 18S rRNA. A secondary structure model for the 5'-UTR of pestivirus was predicted. Nucleotide sequence comparison among five pestiviruses led to the identification of a variable region and a conserved region in the 3'-UTR. A deletion of 41 nucleotides was found within the variable region in Osloss. A secondary structure model for the 3'-UTR was also predicted. The structural similarity of the 5'-UTR between pestiviruses and picornaviruses and hepatitis C viruses was demonstrated and the possible implications of features of the 5' and 3'-UTR of pestiviruses are discussed. PMID:8388102

  1. The secondary structure and sequence optimization of an RNA ligase ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Ekland, E H; Bartel, D P

    1995-01-01

    In vitro selection can generate functional sequence variants of an RNA structural motif that are useful for comparative analysis. The technique is particularly valuable in cases where natural variation is unavailable or non-existent. We report the extension of this approach to a new extreme--the identification of a 112 nt ribozyme secondary structure imbedded within a 186 nt RNA. A pool of 10(14) variants of an RNA ligase ribozyme was generated using combinatorial chemical synthesis coupled with combinatorial enzymatic ligation such that 172 of the 186 relevant positions were partially mutagenized. Active variants of this pool were enriched using an in vitro selection scheme that retains the sequence variability at positions very close to the ligation junction. Ligases isolated after four rounds of selection catalyzed self-ligation up to 700 times faster than the starting sequence. Comparative analysis of the isolates indicated that when complexed with substrate RNAs the ligase forms a nested, double pseudo-knot secondary structure with seven stems and several important joining segments. Comparative analysis also suggested the identity of mutations that account for the increased activity of the selected ligase variants; designed constructs incorporating combinations of these changes were more active than any of the individual ligase isolates. Images PMID:7667099

  2. Morphology, secondary structure and thermal properties of silk fibroin/gelatin blend film.

    PubMed

    Watcharin, Ong-chiari; Yaowalak, Srisuwan; Wilaiwan, Simcheur; Prasong, Srihanam

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to prepare Silk Fibroin (SF) and Gelatin (G) blend film and study its morphology, secondary structure and thermal properties compared to native SF and G films. The films were prepared from the SF solution by casting on the polystyrene plates. They were investigated their secondary structure by fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, morphology using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). In addition, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG) and Differential TG (DTG) were used for thermal properties investigation. The results found that the SF/G blend film composed of both alpha-helix and beta-sheet structures which were similar characteristics of the native SF and G. This result was similar to the TG and DTG analysis according to blending between SF and G is not enhancing thermal stability of the film. However, changes in some absorption bands and temperatures were also observed from the blend film. The result suggested that chemical interaction and hydrogen bonding between SF and G could be formed. The formation could be affected to the uniform of the surface throughout the film under SEM. PMID:20180331

  3. Secondary Structure of Corona Proteins Determines the Cell Surface Receptors Used by Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles used for biological and biomedical applications encounter a host of extracellular proteins. These proteins rapidly adsorb onto the nanoparticle surface, creating a protein corona. Poly(ethylene glycol) can reduce, but not eliminate, the nonspecific adsorption of proteins. As a result, the adsorbed proteins, rather than the nanoparticle itself, determine the cellular receptors used for binding, the internalization mechanism, the intracellular transport pathway, and the subsequent immune response. Using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, we first characterize a set of polystyrene nanoparticles in which the same adsorbed protein, bovine serum albumin, leads to binding to two different cell surface receptors: native albumin receptors and scavenger receptors. Using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of the adsorbed bovine serum albumin protein controls the cellular receptors used by the proteinnanoparticle complexes. These results show that protein secondary structure is a key parameter in determining the cell surface receptor used by a proteinnanoparticle complex. We expect this link between protein structure and cellular outcomes will provide a molecular basis for the design of nanoparticles for use in biological and biomedical applications. PMID:24779411

  4. Structures in secondary flow under simple harmonic inflow in a 180 degree curved pipe model of an artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Autumn L.; Seagrave, Sarah L.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2011-11-01

    Inward centrifuging of fluid in a 180 degree curved pipe leads to development of secondary flow vortical structures. These Dean's vortices have been widely studied in steady flows. Complex secondary flow structures were observed under (unsteady) physiological flow forcing associated with the cardiac cycle, as well as simple harmonic forcing. These structures were investigated under several simple harmonic inflow conditions with phase-locked 2-D PIV measurements to examine the formation of coherent structures in the secondary flow. Experimental velocity field data were acquired at various cross-sectional planes along the bend. Multiple vortex pairs were observed at 90 degrees into the bend for all waveforms investigated. The overarching goal of this study is to understand the effect of driving waveform characteristics, i.e. period, flow acceleration, etc. on secondary flow morphologies and to characterize these morphologies in terms of dimensionless parameters describing the flow. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-0828903.

  5. MacSECPROT: two programs in BASIC to evaluate protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Luttke, A

    1989-12-01

    Two interactive programs in BASIC are described, which provide useful tools to evaluate protein secondary structure. Output is given in two formats: (1) graphics are displayed on screen, which can be printed immediately, and (2) textfiles are saved to disk as permanent records and can be printed with a word-processing program. The programs are fast and easy to use and could be a valuable teaching aid in biochemical and molecular biology courses. Program lists are written in Microsoft BASIC for the Apple Macintosh, but can be adapted to other machines accepting graphic commands. PMID:2606566

  6. Maintenance of secondary power and structural systems for electric arc furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Surgeon, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Key components and assemblies utilized on the secondary side of electric arc melting (or refining furnaces) have been discussed with emphasis on maintenance, design and modification of current-carrying and structural equipment. Common causes of failure for electrode holders and pads, water-cooled furnace cables and mast arm assemblies have been reviewed, and the cause and effect relationship of production demands with equipment life evaluated. Normal and expected wear vs excessive and premature damage are discussed, and recommendations made on how to prolong equipment life leading to a reduction in production delays due to unscheduled maintenance downtime.

  7. Comparative structure and biomechanics of plant primary and secondary cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Jarvis, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent insights into the physical biology of plant cell walls are reviewed, summarizing the essential differences between primary and secondary cell walls and identifying crucial gaps in our knowledge of their structure and biomechanics. Unexpected parallels are identified between the mechanism of expansion of primary cell walls during growth and the mechanisms by which hydrated wood deforms under external tension. There is a particular need to revise current “cartoons” of plant cell walls to be more consistent with data from diverse approaches and to go beyond summarizing limited aspects of cell walls, serving instead as guides for future experiments and for the application of new techniques. PMID:22936943

  8. Accurate ab Initio Study on the Hydrogen-Bond Pairs in Protein Secondary Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Wu, Chun; Lei, Hongxing; Duan, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio calculations up to the MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ//MP2/6-311+G** level have been carried out to characterize the four patterns of hydrogen-bond (H-bond) pairs in protein secondary structures. The unblocked and methyl-blocked glycine dipeptide dimers were arranged to model the H-bond pairs in ?-helix (?HH) and antiparallel (A??-C5 and A??-C7) and parallel ?-sheet (P??) secondary structures. The study uncovers that, in addition to the primary CO?NH H-bonds and the crossing secondary interactions, the CH?OC H-bonds and the tertiary effect (as we call it) also contribute substantially. The tertiary effect is due to the interpolarization between the donor and acceptor of a H-bond. This effect, which enhances the dipoledipole interactions between two nearby H-bonds, stabilizes the ?-sheet-like but destabilizes the helix-like H-bond pairs. The MP2 binding energies of the complexes were further refined by extrapolating to the complete basis set limit (CBS) according to Truhlar and co-workers and by a three-basis-set-based method. The best extrapolated CBS(aD-aT-aQ) binding energies of the unblocked dimers are ?13.1 (?HH), ?11.3 (A??-C5), ?19.2 (A??-C7), and ?14.8 kcal/mol (P??). For the methyl-blocked counterparts, the best extrapolated CBS(D-T-Q) binding energies are ?14.8, ?13.4, ?20.8, and ?16.7 kcal/mol, respectively. The interactions in the parallel ? conformations are very close to the averages of the C5 and C7 antiparallel ? conformations, and both are stronger than the helical dimers. Because the additive force fields are unable to account for the tertiary effect owing to the lack of polarization, all examined additive force fields significantly overestimate the interaction energies of the helix conformations relative to the ?-sheet conformations. Notably, the agreement between molecular mechanical and quantum mechanical binding energies is improved after turning on the polarization. The study provides reference ab initio structures and binding energies for characterizing the backbone H-bonds of the protein secondary structures, which can be used for the parametrization of empirical molecular mechanics force fields. PMID:26221082

  9. Differential flexibility of the secondary structures of lysozyme and the structure and ordering of surrounding water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy

    2011-03-01

    We have performed an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of an aqueous solution of hen egg-white lysozyme at room temperature with explicit water molecules. Several analyses have been carried out to explore the differential flexibility of the secondary structural segments of the protein and the structure and ordering of water around them. It is found that the overall flexibility of the protein molecule is primarily controlled by few large-amplitude bistable motions exhibited by two coils; one connecting two ?-helical segments in domain-1 and the other connecting a 310 helix and a ?-sheet in domain-2 of the protein. The heterogeneous structuring of water around the segments of the protein has been found to depend on the degree of exposure of the segments to water. The ordering of water molecules around the protein segments and their tagged potential energies have been found to be anticorrelated with each other. Some of these findings can be verified by suitable experimental studies.

  10. Identify five kinds of simple super-secondary structures with quadratic discriminant algorithm based on the chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Kou, Gaoshan; Feng, Yonge

    2015-09-01

    The biological function of protein is largely determined by its spatial structure. The research on the relationship between structure and function is the basis of protein structure prediction. However, the prediction of super secondary structure is an important step in the prediction of protein spatial structure. Many algorithms have been proposed for the prediction of protein super secondary structure. However, the parameters used by these methods were primarily based on amino acid sequences. In this paper, we proposed a novel model for predicting five kinds of protein super secondary structures based on the chemical shifts (CSs). Firstly, we analyzed the statistical distribution of chemical shifts of six nuclei in five kinds of protein super secondary structures by using the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Secondly, we used chemical shifts of six nuclei as features, and combined with quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) to predict five kinds of protein super secondary structures. Finally, we achieved the averaged sensitivity, specificity and the overall accuracy of 81.8%, 95.19%, 82.91%, respectively in seven-fold cross-validation. Moreover, we have performed the prediction by combining the five different chemical shifts as features, the maximum overall accuracy up to 89.87% by using the C,C?,C?,N,H? of H? chemical shifts, which are clearly superior to that of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) algorithm by using 20 amino acid compositions (AAC) as feature in the seven-fold cross-validation. These results demonstrated that chemical shifts (CSs) are indeed an outstanding parameter for the prediction of five kinds of super secondary structures. In addition, we compared the prediction of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) with that of support vector machine (SVM) by using the same six CSs as features. The result suggested that the quadratic discriminant analysis method by using chemical shifts as features is a good predictor for protein super secondary structures. PMID:26087283

  11. Protein-coding structured RNAs: A computational survey of conserved RNA secondary structures overlapping coding regions in drosophilids.

    PubMed

    Findeiss, Sven; Engelhardt, Jan; Prohaska, Sonja J; Stadler, Peter F

    2011-11-01

    Functional RNA elements can be embedded also within exonic sequences coding for functional proteins. While not uncommon in viruses, only a few examples of this type have been described in some detail for eukaryotic genomes. Here we use RNAz and RNAcode, two comparative genomics methods that measure signatures of stabilizing selection acting on RNA secondary structure and peptide sequence, resp., to survey the fruit fly genomes. We estimate that there might be on the order of 1000 loci that are subject to dual selection pressure. The used genome-wide screens also expose the limitations of the currently available methods. PMID:21835221

  12. Ambient modal identification of a primary-secondary structure by Fast Bayesian FFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Siu-Kui; Zhang, Feng-Liang

    2012-04-01

    The Mong Man Wai Building is a seven-storied reinforced concrete structure situated on the campus of the City University of Hong Kong. On its roof a two-storied steel frame has been recently constructed to host a new wind tunnel laboratory. The roof frame and the main building form a primary-secondary structure. The dynamic characteristics of the resulting system are of interest from a structural dynamics point of view. This paper presents work on modal identification of the structure using ambient vibration measurement. An array of tri-axial acceleration data has been obtained using a number of setups to cover all locations of interest with a limited number of sensors. Modal identification is performed using a recently developed Fast Bayesian FFT method. In addition to the most probable modal properties, their posterior uncertainties can also be assessed using the method. The posterior uncertainty of mode shape is assessed by the expected value of the Modal Assurance Criteria (MAC) of the most probable mode shape with a random mode shape consistent with the posterior distribution. The mode shapes of the overall structural system are obtained by assembling those from individual setups using a recently developed least-square method. The identification results reveal a number of interesting features about the structural system and provide important information defining the baseline modal properties of the building. Practical interpretation of the statistics of modal parameters calculated from frequentist and Bayesian context is also discussed.

  13. Structure prediction and functional characterization of secondary metabolite proteins of Ocimum.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sudeep; Maheshwari, Nidhi; Chauhan, Rashi; Sen, Naresh Kumar; Sharma, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Various species of Ocimum have acquired special attention due to their medicinal properties. Different parts of the plant (root, stem, flower, leaves) are used in the treatment of a wide range of disorders from centuries. Experimental structures (X-ray and NMR) of proteins from different Ocimum species, are not yet available in the Protein Databank (PDB). These proteins play a key role in various metabolic pathways in Ocimum. 3D structures of the proteins are essential to determine most of their functions. Homology modeling approach was employed in order to derive structures for these proteins. A program meant for comparative modeling- Modeller 9v7 was utilized for the purpose. The modeled proteins were further validated by Prochek and Verify-3d and Errat servers. Amino acid composition and polarity of these proteins was determined by CLC-Protein Workbench tool. Expasy's Prot-param server and Cys_rec tool were used for physico-chemical and functional characterization of these proteins. Studies of secondary structure of these proteins were carried out by computational program, Profunc. Swiss-pdb viewer was used to visualize and analyze these homology derived structures. The structures are finally submitted in Protein Model Database, PMDB so that they become accessible to other users for further studies. PMID:21769194

  14. A Tool Preference Choice Method for RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by SVM with Statistical Tests

    PubMed Central

    Hor, Chiou-Yi; Yang, Chang-Biau; Chang, Chia-Hung; Tseng, Chiou-Ting; Chen, Hung-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    The Prediction of RNA secondary structures has drawn much attention from both biologists and computer scientists. Many useful tools have been developed for this purpose. These tools have their individual strengths and weaknesses. As a result, based on support vector machines (SVM), we propose a tool choice method which integrates three prediction tools: pknotsRG, RNAStructure, and NUPACK. Our method first extracts features from the target RNA sequence, and adopts two information-theoretic feature selection methods for feature ranking. We propose a method to combine feature selection and classifier fusion in an incremental manner. Our test data set contains 720 RNA sequences, where 225 pseudoknotted RNA sequences are obtained from PseudoBase, and 495 nested RNA sequences are obtained from RNA SSTRAND. The method serves as a preprocessing way in analyzing RNA sequences before the RNA secondary structure prediction tools are employed. In addition, the performance of various configurations is subject to statistical tests to examine their significance. The best base-pair accuracy achieved is 75.5%, which is obtained by the proposed incremental method, and is significantly higher than 68.8%, which is associated with the best predictor, pknotsRG. PMID:23641141

  15. Transcriptome-wide interrogation of RNA secondary structure in living cells with icSHAPE.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Spitale, Robert C; Lee, Byron; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-02-01

    icSHAPE (in vivo click selective 2-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment) captures RNA secondary structure at a transcriptome-wide level by measuring nucleotide flexibility at base resolution. Living cells are treated with the icSHAPE chemical NAI-N3 followed by selective chemical enrichment of NAI-N3-modified RNA, which provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with similar methods leveraging deep sequencing. Purified RNA is then reverse-transcribed to produce cDNA, with SHAPE-modified bases leading to truncated cDNA. After deep sequencing of cDNA, computational analysis yields flexibility scores for every base across the starting RNA population. The entire experimental procedure can be completed in ?5 d, and the sequencing and bioinformatics data analysis take an additional 4-5 d with no extensive computational skills required. Comparing in vivo and in vitro icSHAPE measurements can reveal in vivo RNA-binding protein imprints or facilitate the dissection of RNA post-transcriptional modifications. icSHAPE reactivities can additionally be used to constrain and improve RNA secondary structure prediction models. PMID:26766114

  16. Membrane association and destabilization by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin requires changes in secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Walters, M J; Brown, A C; Edrington, T C; Baranwal, S; Du, Y; Lally, E T; Boesze-Battaglia, K

    2013-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a common inhabitant of the upper aerodigestive tract of humans and non-human primates and is associated with disseminated infections, including lung and brain abscesses, pediatric infective endocarditis, and localized aggressive periodontitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans secretes a repeats-in-toxin protein, leukotoxin, which exclusively kills lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1-bearing cells. The toxin's pathological mechanism is not fully understood; however, experimental evidence indicates that it involves the association with and subsequent destabilization of the target cell's plasma membrane. We have long hypothesized that leukotoxin secondary structure is strongly correlated with membrane association and destabilization. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by analysing lipid-induced changes in leukotoxin conformation. Upon incubation of leukotoxin with lipids that favor leukotoxin-membrane association, we observed an increase in leukotoxin α-helical content that was not observed with lipids that favor membrane destabilization. The change in leukotoxin conformation after incubation with these lipids suggests that membrane binding and membrane destabilization have distinct secondary structural requirements, suggesting that they are independent events. These studies provide insight into the mechanism of cell damage that leads to disease progression by A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:23678967

  17. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  18. Application of multiple sequence alignment profiles to improve protein secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Cuff, J A; Barton, G J

    2000-08-15

    The effect of training a neural network secondary structure prediction algorithm with different types of multiple sequence alignment profiles derived from the same sequences, is shown to provide a range of accuracy from 70.5% to 76.4%. The best accuracy of 76.4% (standard deviation 8.4%), is 3.1% (Q(3)) and 4.4% (SOV2) better than the PHD algorithm run on the same set of 406 sequence non-redundant proteins that were not used to train either method. Residues predicted by the new method with a confidence value of 5 or greater, have an average Q(3) accuracy of 84%, and cover 68% of the residues. Relative solvent accessibility based on a two state model, for 25, 5, and 0% accessibility are predicted at 76.2, 79.8, and 86. 6% accuracy respectively. The source of the improvements obtained from training with different representations of the same alignment data are described in detail. The new Jnet prediction method resulting from this study is available in the Jpred secondary structure prediction server, and as a stand-alone computer program from: http://barton.ebi.ac.uk/. Proteins 2000;40:502-511. PMID:10861942

  19. Determination of Penetratin Secondary Structure in Live Cells with Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jing; Fox, Sara A.; Cudic, Mare; Rezler, Evonne M.; Lauer, Janelle L.; Fields, Gregg B.; Terentis, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have attracted recent interest as drug delivery tools, although the mechanisms by which CPPs are internalized by cells are not well defined. Here we report a new experimental approach for the detection and secondary structure determination of CPPs in live cells using Raman microscopy with heavy isotope labeling of the peptide. As a first demonstration of principle Penetratin, a sixteen-residue CPP derived from the Antennapedia homeodomain protein of Drosophila, was measured in single, living melanoma cells. Carbon-13 labeling of the Phe residue of penetratin was used to shift the intense aromatic ring-breathing vibrational mode from 1003 cm?1 to 967 cm?1, thereby enabling the peptide to be traced in cells. Difference spectroscopy and principal components analysis (PCA) were used independently to resolve the Raman spectrum of the peptide from the background cellular Raman signals. Based on the position of the amide I vibrational band in the Raman spectra, the secondary structure of the peptide was found to be mainly random coil and ?-strand in the cytoplasm, and possibly assembling as ?-sheets in the nucleus. The rapid entry and almost uniform cellular distribution of the peptide, as well as the lack of correlation between peptide and lipid Raman signatures, indicated that the mechanism of internalization under the conditions of study was probably non-endocytotic. This experimental approach can be used to study a wide variety of CPPs as well as other classes of peptides in living cells. PMID:20041639

  20. Proton NMR assignments and secondary structure of the snake venom protein echistatin

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Chen; Baum, J. ); Pitzenberger, S.M.; Garsky, V.M.; Lumma, P.K.; Sanyal, G. )

    1991-12-17

    The snake venom protein echistatin is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation. The inhibitory properties of echistatin have been attributed to the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence at residues 24-26. In this paper, sequence-specific nuclear magnetic resonance assignments are presented for the proton resonances of echistatin in water. The single-chain protein contains 49 amino acids and 4 cystine bridges. All of the backbone amide, C{sub alpha}H, and side-chain resonances, except for the {eta}-NH of the arginines, have been assigned. The secondary structure of the protein was characterized from the pattern of nuclear Overhauser enhancements, from the identification of slowly exchanging amide protons, from {sup 3}J{sub c{alpha}H-NH} coupling constants, and from circular dichroism studies. The data suggest that the secondary structure consists of a type I {beta}-turn, a short {beta}-hairpin, and a short-, irregular, antiparallel {beta}-sheet and that the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence is in a flexible loop connecting two strands of the distorted antiparallel {beta}-sheet.

  1. Cygnus Pressured Cargo Module: Validation of Mathematical Model and Dynamic Qualification of Secondary Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, Marina; Luison, Dario; Tizzani, Luca

    2012-07-01

    Thales Alenia Space Italy is in charge to develop build- up, integrate and verify Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module (PCM). This cargo is characterized by the large amount of payload, wrapped in foam, transferred in soft stowage bags, connected to the structure of support by belts. The paper summarizes the several tests performed to acquire the dynamic properties of bags. On the basis of the empirical results a reliable linear model was generated and used for a successful campaign of qualification of secondary structure. It is also demonstrated that the empirical-linear model of the soft-stowage bag was also the reason of a significant reduction of loads, which allowed achieving more easily the goal of carried mass, for PCM. The validation of PCM by Modal Survey Test is presented as well, emphasizing that the more realistic modeling of the soft bags has made easier the definition of a very simple test configuration.

  2. Probing secondary structures of peptide chains using gas phase laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mons, Michel

    2006-03-01

    A bottom-up approach involving conformer-specific IR studies of short peptide sequences enables us to map the intramolecular interactions that shape the peptide backbone, in particular those H-bonds that are responsible for stability and formation of secondary structures in proteins, like turns or helices. The combination of laser-desorption of solid samples coupled to the efficient cooling in a supersonic expansion makes it possible to isolate in the gas phase the lowest conformations of the energy landscape of small flexible biomolecules. The low temperature achieved enables spectroscopists to record UV spectra in which the contribution of each conformer populated can be distinguished and the corresponding conformation identified using IR/UV double resonance spectroscopy. Data collected are directly comparable to the best quantum chemistry calculations on these species and therefore constitute a severe test for the theoretical methods used. It will be shown how investigation of sequences with an increasing number of building blocks permits to deduce the robust structural trends of a peptide backbone: i) local conformational preference of the backbone in one-residue chains, ii) in capped dipeptides, the competition between a succession of local conformational preferences and overall folded structures, in which a different type of H-bonding scheme, involving distant H-bonding sites along the backbone, takes place: in particular beta-turns, the secondary structure responsible for chain reversals, and finally iii) evidence for the spontaneous helical folding (short 3-10 helix) of three-residue chains will be presented, illustrating the relative weakness of the H-bonding in these molecular assemblies.

  3. Ab initio study of novel carbon nanofoam structure as an anode material for Li secondary battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hanjin; Park, Sora; Kang, Seoung-Hun; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    2014-03-01

    Using ab inito density functional theory, we investigate the adsorption and diffusion properties of Li atoms on a new carbon nanostructure, which may be used as an anode of Li secondary battery. We focus on a special carbon nanofoam structure consisting of Schwarzite structures with negative Gaussian curvature as core parts, which are interconnected through (4,4) CNT segments. Considering the symmetry of the nanofoam structure, we find various Li adsorption sites exhibiting relatively large binding energies (>= 2 . 00 eV). Based on these adsorption sites, we identify several diffusion paths on the outside or inside surface of the nanofoam structure and examine the diffusion barriers along the paths. Our results show that Li atom can diffuse almost freely due to its low energy barriers on both outside and inside surfaces. Finally, we also evaluate the energy gain tendency and the volume expansion as well as the average binding energy while adding Li atoms to estimate the Li-capacity and recyclability of the system, which are important characterisitics for anode materials. We conclude that the carbon nanofoam structure would be better as an anode material than graphite in Li capacity and volume expansion.

  4. SeqFold: genome-scale reconstruction of RNA secondary structure integrating high-throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Zhengqing; Snyder, Michael P; Chang, Howard Y

    2013-02-01

    We present an integrative approach, SeqFold, that combines high-throughput RNA structure profiling data with computational prediction for genome-scale reconstruction of RNA secondary structures. SeqFold transforms experimental RNA structure information into a structure preference profile (SPP) and uses it to select stable RNA structure candidates representing the structure ensemble. Under a high-dimensional classification framework, SeqFold efficiently matches a given SPP to the most likely cluster of structures sampled from the Boltzmann-weighted ensemble. SeqFold is able to incorporate diverse types of RNA structure profiling data, including parallel analysis of RNA structure (PARS), selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension sequencing (SHAPE-Seq), fragmentation sequencing (FragSeq) data generated by deep sequencing, and conventional SHAPE data. Using the known structures of a wide range of mRNAs and noncoding RNAs as benchmarks, we demonstrate that SeqFold outperforms or matches existing approaches in accuracy and is more robust to noise in experimental data. Application of SeqFold to reconstruct the secondary structures of the yeast transcriptome reveals the diverse impact of RNA secondary structure on gene regulation, including translation efficiency, transcription initiation, and protein-RNA interactions. SeqFold can be easily adapted to incorporate any new types of high-throughput RNA structure profiling data and is widely applicable to analyze RNA structures in any transcriptome. PMID:23064747

  5. Internal transcribed spacer 1 secondary structure analysis reveals a common core throughout the anaerobic fungi (Neocallimastigomycota).

    PubMed

    Koetschan, Christian; Kittelmann, Sandra; Lu, Jingli; Al-Halbouni, Djamila; Jarvis, Graeme N; Müller, Tobias; Wolf, Matthias; Janssen, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) is a popular barcode marker for fungi and in particular the ITS1 has been widely used for the anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota). A good number of validated reference sequences of isolates as well as a large number of environmental sequences are available in public databases. Its highly variable nature predisposes the ITS1 for low level phylogenetics; however, it complicates the establishment of reproducible alignments and the reconstruction of stable phylogenetic trees at higher taxonomic levels (genus and above). Here, we overcame these problems by proposing a common core secondary structure of the ITS1 of the anaerobic fungi employing a Hidden Markov Model-based ITS1 sequence annotation and a helix-wise folding approach. We integrated the additional structural information into phylogenetic analyses and present for the first time an automated sequence-structure-based taxonomy of the ITS1 of the anaerobic fungi. The methodology developed is transferable to the ITS1 of other fungal groups, and the robust taxonomy will facilitate and improve high-throughput anaerobic fungal community structure analysis of samples from various environments. PMID:24663345

  6. Sequential NMR resonance assignment and secondary structure of ferrocytochrome c553 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Marion, D; Guerlesquin, F

    1992-09-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assign the proton resonances of ferrocytochrome c553 from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenbourough at 37 degrees C and pH = 5.9. Only a few side-chain protons were not identified because of degeneracy or overlap. The spin systems of the 79 amino acids were identified by DQF-COSY and HOHAHA spectra in H2O and D2O. Sequential assignments were obtained from NOESY connectivities between adjacent amide, C alpha H, and C beta H protons. From sequential NH(i)----NH(i + 1) and long-range C alpha H(i)----NH(i + 3) connectivities, four stretches of helices were identified (2----8, 34----46, 53----59, 67----77). Long-range NOE between residues in three different helices provide qualitative information on the tertiary structure, in agreement with the general folding pattern of cytochrome c. The heme protons, including the propionate groups, were assigned, and the identification of Met 57 as sixth heme ligand was established. The dynamical behavior of the ring protons of the six tyrosines was analyzed in detail in terms of steric hindrance. The NMR data for ferrocytochrome c553 are consistent with the X-ray structure for the homologous cytochrome from D. vulgaris Miyazaki. On the basis of the secondary structure element and of observed chemical shift due to the heme ring current, a structural alignment of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cytochromes c is proposed. PMID:1326323

  7. Evidence for a premature termination mechanism of subgenomic mRNA transcription in a carmovirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Baodong; Oliveri, Stefanie; Mandic, Jana; White, K Andrew

    2010-08-01

    The transcriptional mechanism utilized by turnip crinkle carmovirus to synthesize subgenomic (sg) mRNAs was investigated by analyzing viral RNAs and their associated regulatory RNA elements. In vivo analyses revealed the following: (i) that minus-strand sg RNAs are detectable in infections, (ii) that minus-strand sg RNA accumulation can be partially uncoupled from that of their plus-strand sg mRNA counterparts, and (iii) that an RNA secondary structure located upstream of the sg mRNA start site mediates transcription by functioning in the plus strand of the viral genome. Collectively, these observations are consistent with this carmovirus using a premature termination mechanism for sg mRNA transcription. PMID:20504939

  8. Methods for isolation, purification and structural elucidation of bioactive secondary metabolites from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Ebada, Sherif S; Edrada, Ru Angelie; Lin, Wenhan; Proksch, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In the past few decades, marine natural products bioprospecting has yielded a considerable number of drug candidates. Two marine natural products have recently been admitted as new drugs: Prialt (also known as ziconotide) as a potent analgesic for severe chronic pain and Yondelis (known also as trabectedin or E-743) as antitumor agent for the treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma. In this protocol, methods for bioactivity-guided isolation, purification and identification of secondary metabolites from marine invertebrates such as sponges, tunicates, soft corals and crinoids are discussed. To achieve this goal, solvent extraction of usually freeze-dried sample of marine organisms is performed. Next, the extract obtained is fractionated by liquid-liquid partitioning followed by various chromatographic separation techniques including thin layer chromatography, vacuum liquid chromatography, column chromatography (CC) and preparative high-performance reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Isolation of bioactive secondary metabolites is usually monitored by bioactivity assays, e.g., antioxidant (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl) and cytotoxicity (microculture tetrazolium) activities that ultimately yield the active principles. Special care should be taken when performing isolation procedures adapted to the physical and chemical characteristics of the compounds isolated, particularly their lipo- or hydrophilic characters. Examples of isolation of compounds of different polarities from extracts of various marine invertebrates will be presented in this protocol. Structure elucidation is achieved using recent spectroscopic techniques, especially 2D NMR and mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:18989260

  9. Suppression of secondary electron yield by micro-porous array structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, M.; He, Y. N.; Hu, S. G.; Wang, R.; Hu, T. C.; Yang, J.; Cui, W. Z.

    2013-02-21

    We study secondary electron yield (SEY) suppression for metal materials using a roughened surface with a micro-porous array. First, we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the electron trajectory in a single cylindrical well using a phenomenological model of secondary electron emission and the SEY suppression efficiency of a micro-porous array. The simulation results show that the SEY of a roughened surface is affected significantly by the aspect ratio of the micro-pores and the surface porosity of the metal plate. Then, to verify the simulation results, we produce a micro-porous array on metal plates using photolithography and measure their SEYs. We show that the micro-porous array structure can efficiently suppress the SEY of metal materials, and the measurements agree quantitatively with the corresponding simulation results. Finally, we derive an analytical formula to evaluate easily the SEY suppression efficiency of the Ag micro-porous array. In total, the micro-porous array proposed in this paper offers an alternative to SEY suppression in related areas such as multipactor effects in satellite payloads or electron cloud effects in accelerators.

  10. mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Van Lint, Sandra; Heirman, Carlo; Thielemans, Kris; Breckpot, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Two decades ago, mRNA became the focus of research in molecular medicine and was proposed as an active pharmaceutical ingredient for the therapy of cancer. In this regard, mRNA has been mainly used for ex vivo modification of antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs). This vaccination strategy has proven to be safe, well tolerated and capable of inducing tumor antigen-specific immune responses. Recently, the direct application of mRNA for in situ modification of APCs, hence immunization was shown to be feasible and at least as effective as DC-based immunization in pre-clinical models. It is believed that application of mRNA as an off-the-shelf vaccine represents an important step in the development of future cancer immunotherapeutic strategies. Here, we will discuss the use of ex vivo mRNA-modified DCs and “naked mRNA” for cancer immunotherapy focusing on parameters such as the employed DC subtype, DC activation stimulus and route of immunization. In addition, we will provide an overview on the clinical trials published so far, trying to link their outcome to the aforementioned parameters. PMID:23291946

  11. Laser Raman evidence for new cloverleaf secondary structures for eukaryotic 5.8S RNA and prokaryotic 5S RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Luoma, G A; Marshall, A G

    1978-01-01

    Neither of the two previously proposed secondary structures for eukaryotic 5.8S RNA is consistent with the present laser Raman results. A new, highly stable "cloverleaf" secondary structure not only fits the Raman data but also accounts for previously determined enzymatic partial cleavage patterns, base sequence and pairing homologies, and G-C and A-U base pair numbers and ratios. The new cloverleaf model also conserves several structural features (constant loops, bulges, and stems) consistent with known 5.8S RNA functions. Finally, we propose a similar new cloverleaf secondary structure for Escherichia coli 5S RNA, consonant with many known properties of prokaryotic 5S RNA. PMID:368804

  12. Alignment editing and identification of consensus secondary structures for nucleic acid sequences: interactive use of dot matrix representations.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J P; Janjić, N; Pribnow, D; Zichi, D A

    1995-01-01

    We present a computer-aided approach for identifying and aligning consensus secondary structure within a set of functionally related oligonucleotide sequences aligned by sequence. The method relies on visualization of secondary structure using a generalization of the dot matrix representation appropriate for consensus sequence data sets. An interactive computer program implementing such a visualization of consensus structure has been developed. The program allows for alignment editing, data and display filtering and various modes of base pair representation, including co-variation. The utility of this approach is demonstrated with four sample data sets derived from in vitro selection experiments and one data set comprising tRNA sequences. Images PMID:7501472

  13. Secondary structural analysis of the carboxyl-terminal domain from different connexin isoforms.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Galle; Al-Mugotir, Mona; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Zach, Sydney; Li, Hanjun; Trease, Andrew J; Stauch, Kelly L; Grosely, Rosslyn; Cervantes, Matthew; Sorgen, Paul L

    2016-03-01

    The connexin carboxyl-terminal (CxCT) domain plays a role in the trafficking, localization, and turnover of gap junction channels, as well as the level of gap junction intercellular communication via numerous post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions. As a key player in the regulation of gap junctions, the CT presents itself as a target for manipulation intended to modify function. Specific to intrinsically disordered proteins, identifying residues whose secondary structure can be manipulated will be critical toward unlocking the therapeutic potential of the CxCT domain. To accomplish this goal, we used biophysical methods to characterize CxCT domains attached to their fourth transmembrane domain (TM4). Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance were complementary in demonstrating the connexin isoforms that form the greatest amount of ?-helical structure in their CT domain (Cx45>Cx43>Cx32>Cx50>Cx37?Cx40?Cx26). Studies compared the influence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, pH, phosphorylation, and mutations (Cx32, X-linked Charcot-Marie Tooth disease; Cx26, hearing loss) on the TM4-CxCT structure. While pH modestly influences the CT structure, a major structural change was associated with phosphomimetic substitutions. Since most connexin CT domains are phosphorylated throughout their life cycle, studies of phospho-TM4-CxCT isoforms will be critical toward understanding the role that structure plays in regulating gap junction function. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 143-162, 2016. PMID:26542351

  14. Design and analysis of supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror on a space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenjie; Chai, Wenyi; Feng, Liangjie; Yang, Wengang; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xuewu

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical stability is a significant segment for an on-axis space telescope to assure its assembly accuracy as well as the image quality in the rigorous space environment, supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror as a main structure of the on-axis space telescope must be designed reasonably to meet the mission requirements of the space telescope. Meanwhile, in view of the limitation of the satellite launching cost, it is necessary to reduce the weight and power compensation during the supporting structure design based on the satisfaction of telescope performance. Two types of supporting structure for a space telescope are designed, one is three-tripod structure which has three tripods located on the optical bench to support the secondary mirror assemblies and keep the distance between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror, the other is barrel supporting structure which includes a tube and a secondary mirror support with four spider struts. To compare the mechanical performance and launching cost of the two kinds of supporting structure, both structural and thermal analysis model are established. The analysis results indicates that the three-tripod support is lighter, has better mechanical performance and needs less power compensation than the barrel support.

  15. Automated prediction of three-way junction topological families in RNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Lamiable, Alexis; Barth, Dominique; Denise, Alain; Quessette, Franck; Vial, Sandrine; Westhof, Eric

    2012-04-01

    We present an algorithm for automatically predicting the topological family of any RNA three-way junction, given only the information from the secondary structure: the sequence and the Watson-Crick pairings. The parameters of the algorithm have been determined on a data set of 33 three-way junctions whose 3D conformation is known. We applied the algorithm on 53 other junctions and compared the predictions to the real shape of those junctions. We show that the correct answer is selected out of nine possible configurations 64% of the time. Additionally, these results are noticeably improved if homology information is used. The resulting software, Cartaj, is available online and downloadable (with source) at: http://cartaj.lri.fr. PMID:22326420

  16. Innovative FT-IR imaging of protein film secondary structure before and after heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Bonwell, Emily S; Wetzel, David L

    2009-11-11

    Changes in the secondary structure of globular protein occur during thermal processing. An infrared reflecting mirrored optical substrate that is unaffected by heat allows recording infrared spectra of protein films in a reflection absorption mode on the stage of an FT-IR microspectrometer. Hydrated films of myoglobin protein cast from solution on the mirrored substrate are interrogated before and after thermal denaturation to allow a direct comparison. Focal plane array imaging of 280 protein films allowed selection of the same area in the image from which to extract spectra. After treatment, 110 of 140 spectra from multiple films showed a dramatic shift from the alpha-helix form (1650 +/- 5 cm(-1)) to aggregated forms on either side of the original band. Seventy maxima were near 1625 cm(-1), and 40 shifted in the direction of 1670 cm(-1). The method developed was applied to films cast from two other commercial animal and plant protein sources. PMID:19835374

  17. Secondary grain boundary dislocation structures in gold and silver (001) twist boundaries revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Babcock, S.E.; Balluffi, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    A search was made for the presence of localized secondary grain boundary dislocations (SGBD's) in selected (001) twist boundaries in gold and silver using transmission electron microscopy. Screw SGBD networks were detected in near-..sigma..5, -..sigma..13, -..sigma..17, -..sigma..25, and -..sigma..29 boundaries in gold and in near-..sigma..5 boundaries in silver. The ..sigma..25 and ..sigma..29 networks were observed for the first time and extend the range of SGBD structures observed in (001) twist boundaries in gold beyond that found in earlier work (Schober and Balluffi, 1970, Philos. Mag., 21, 109). The observation of ..sigma..5 SGBD's in silver contradicts the claim (Pareja, 1980, Phys. Stat. Sol. (a), 62, 305) that these SGBD's are delocalized in this metal. Extensive tests were carried out to verify that all of the observed SGBD images were indeed due to localized dislocations and were not Moire fringe patterns.

  18. Secondary structure of proteins analyzed ex vivo in vascular wall in diabetic animals using FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Majzner, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Tomasz P; Fedorowicz, Andrzej; Chlopicki, Stefan; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2013-11-12

    In recent years many methods for ex vivo tissue analysis or diagnosis of diseases have been applied, including infrared absorption spectroscopy. Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption microspectroscopy allows the simultaneous monitoring of the content of various chemical compounds in tissues with both high selectivity and resolution. Imaging of tissue samples in very short time can be performed using a spectrometer equipped with a Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector. Additionally, a detection of minor components or subtle changes associated with the functional status of a tissue sample is possible when advanced methods of data analysis, such as chemometric techniques, are applied. Monitoring of secondary structures of proteins has already proved to be useful in the analysis of animal tissues in disease states. The aim of this work was to build a mathematical model based on FT-IR measurements for the prediction of alterations in the content of secondary structures of proteins analyzed by FT-IR in the vascular wall of diabetic animals. For that purpose a spectral database of proteins of known crystallography and secondary structures was assembled. Thirty-seven proteins were measured by means of two FT-IR techniques: transflection and Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR). The obtained model was tested on cross-sections of rat tail, for which the content of proteins and their secondary structures was well characterized. Then, the model was applied for the detection of possible alterations in the secondary structures of proteins in the vascular wall of diabetic rats and mice. The obtained results suggest a prominent increase in E- and S-structures and a decrease in the content of H-structures in the vascular wall from diabetic mice and rats. FT-IR-based studies of secondary structures of proteins may be a novel approach to study complex processes ongoing in the vascular wall. The obtained results are satisfactory; however, the existing limitations of the method are also discussed. PMID:24179990

  19. Secondary-structure characterization by far-UV CD of highly purified uncoupling protein 1 expressed in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Douette, Pierre; Navet, Rachel; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Brans, Alain; Sluse-Goffart, Claudine; Matagne, André; Sluse, Francis E

    2004-01-01

    The rat UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1) is a mitochondrial inner-membrane carrier involved in energy dissipation and heat production. We expressed UCP1 carrying a His6 epitope at its C-terminus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria. The recombinant-tagged UCP1 was purified by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography to homogeneity (>95%). This made it suitable for subsequent biophysical characterization. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments showed that n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltoside-solubilized UCP1-His6 retained its PN (purine nucleotide)-binding capacity. The far-UV CD spectrum of the functional protein clearly indicated the predominance of alpha-helices in the UCP1 secondary structure. The UCP1 secondary structure exhibited an alpha-helical degree of approx. 68%, which is at least 25% higher than the previously reported estimations based on computational predictions. Moreover, the helical content remained unchanged in free and PN-loaded UCP1. A homology model of the first repeat of UCP1, built on the basis of X-ray-solved close parent, the ADP/ATP carrier, strengthened the CD experimental results. Our experimental and computational results indicate that (i) alpha-helices are the major component of UCP1 secondary structure; (ii) PN-binding mechanism does not involve significant secondary-structure rearrangement; and (iii) UCP1 shares similar secondary-structure characteristics with the ADP/ATP carrier, at least for the first repeat. PMID:14766012

  20. Effect of Secondary Cooling Conditions on Solidification Structure and Central Macrosegregation in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Rectangular Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing

    2015-10-01

    Solidification structures of high carbon rectangular billet with a size of 180 mm 240 mm in different secondary cooling conditions were simulated using cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) coupling model. The adequacy of the model was compared with the simulated and the actual macrostructures of 82B steel. Effects of the secondary cooling water intensity on solidification structures including the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness were discussed. It was shown that the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness changed in the opposite direction at different secondary cooling water intensities. Increasing the secondary cooling water intensity from 0.9 or 1.1 to 1.3 L/kg could improve the equiaxed grain compactness and decrease the equiaxed grain ratio. Besides, the industrial test was conducted to investigate the effect of different secondary cooling water intensities on the center carbon macrosegregation of 82B steel. The optimum secondary cooling water intensity was 0.9 L/kg, while the center carbon segregation degree was 1.10. The relationship between solidification structure and center carbon segregation was discussed based on the simulation results and the industrial test.

  1. [Compariative study of mitochondrial tRNA gene sequence and secondary structure among fifteen Predatory birds].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Sun, Yi; Yuan, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Min-Qian; Wang, Li; Yu, Ye-Fei; Li, Qing-Wei

    2004-04-01

    Three major clusters of mitochondrial tRNA genes (tRNA(Ile) -tRNA(Gln) -tRNA(Met), tRNA(Trp)- tRNA(Ala) -tRNA(Asn)- tRNA(CYs) -tRNA(Tyr) and tRNA(His) tRNA(Ser)(AGY) -tRNA(Leu)(CUN) from 13 species of Predatory birds were amplified and sequenced. The length of these tRNA clusters was similar among species (212 approximately 214 bp, 353 approximately 362 bp, 205 approximately 208 bp, respectively), and 47% of the sequences were variable, 67% of which were involved in the loop regions. The stem regions were relatively conserved, and the variable base pairs were under the restriction of compensatory changes or G-U wobble pairing which could be regarded as mechanisms for maintaining a stable secondary structure. Maximum-parsimony (MP) and Neighbor joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees were constructed using all the tRNA gene sequences or stein-forming nucleotides with Caprimulgus indicus as outgroup. We found that the bootstrap values for branches of trees using the tRNA sequences were commonly higher than the others, therefore the phylogenetic relationship of Predatory birds reflected by these data may be closer to the truth. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that Accipitridae was closer to Strigidae instead of Falconidae, and the classification of Tytonidae was different from the conclusion from the previously morphological and DNA-DNA hybridization studies. By comparing the secondary structure among taxa we found that the characters of nucleotide insertions and deletions in some tRNA genes have synapomorphies, suggesting that these characters may be useful for resolving the phylogenetic relationship of different families in Predatory birds with higher phylogenetic performance. PMID:15487512

  2. Prediction of the secondary structure of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor nontransmembrane regions.

    PubMed

    Ortells, M O

    1997-11-01

    A consensus prediction for the secondary structure of the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits) extracellular regions is presented. This protein is a member of the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily, which also encompasses the 5HT3, GABAA, and glycine receptors. The strategy used here is based on the application of six different prediction methods to an alignment of 118 sequences of this superfamily. A consensus prediction was finally produced for each of the four different subunits of the muscle nicotinic receptor nonmembrane regions. The predicted percentages, with respect to the total receptor length, and averaged for the four subunits are as follows: alpha-helix 29.7%, beta-sheet 24.9%, and turn + coil 21.7%. When adding to these values the estimations of the secondary structure reported for the transmembrane region only, the results are in agreement with those obtained experimentally by Yager et al. and Méthot et al. The deviations with respect to these experimental estimations are alpha-helix +2.8%, beta-sheet -4/-5% and turn + coil +3/+2%, respectively. Considering the predictions made for individual subunits, the best approximation was obtained for the alpha subunit, with deviations of -0.2% for alpha-helix, -2.5/-1.5% for beta-sheet, and +0.9/+1.9% for turn + coil. The prediction was used to infer the residues involved in forming three helices that presumably flank the ligand-binding pocket and to propose mechanism for transferring the information of the ligand binding to the ion channel. PMID:9365993

  3. Resolving detailed molecular structures in complex organic mixtures and modeling their secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman-Rendall, Kevin A. S.; Zhuang, Yang R.; Amirav, Aviv; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) remains an ongoing challenge towards developing detailed and accurate inputs for modeling secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Traditional techniques based on gas chromatography/electron impact-mass spectrometry induce excessive fragmentation, making it difficult to speciate and quantify isomers precisely. The goal of this study is to identify individual organic isomers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beam (SMB-GC/MS, also known as GC/MS with Cold EI) and to incorporate speciated isomers into an SOA model that accounts for the specific structures elucidated. Two samples containing atmospherically relevant UCMs are analyzed. The relative isomer distributions exhibit remarkably consistent trends across a wide range of carbon numbers. Constitutional isomers of different alkanes are speciated and individually quantified as linear, branched - for the first time by position of branching - multiply branched, or unsaturated - by degree of ring substitution and number of rings. Relative amounts of exact molecular structures are used as input parameters in an SOA box model to study the effects of molecular structures on SOA yields and volatility evolution. Highly substituted cyclic, mono-substituted cyclic, and linear species have the highest SOA yields while branched alkanes formed the least SOA. The rate of functionalization of a representative UCM is found to be in agreement with current volatility basis set (VBS) parameterizations based on detailed knowledge of composition and known oxidation mechanisms, confirming the validity of VBS parameters currently used in air quality models.

  4. Resonance assignments and secondary structure of a phytocystatin from Ananas comosus.

    PubMed

    Irene, Deli; Chen, Bo-Jiun; Lo, Si-Hung; Liu, Ting-Hang; Tzen, Jason T-C; Chyan, Chia-Lin

    2012-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin was cloned from pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) stem. This clone was constructed into an expression vector and expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneous. The recombinant pineapple cystatins (AcCYS) showed effectively inhibitory activity toward cysteine proteases including papain, bromelain, and cathepsin B. In order to unravel its inhibitory action from structural point of view, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques were used to characterize the structure of AcCYS. The full (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonance assignments of AcCYS were determined. The secondary structure of AcCYS was identified by using the assigned chemical shift of (1)H?, (13)C?, (13)C?, and (13)CO through the consensus chemical shift index (CSI). The results of CSI analysis suggest 5 ?-strands (residues 45-47, 84-91, 94-104, 106-117, and 123-130) and one ?-helix (residues 55-73). PMID:21814766

  5. Sterilization mechanism of nitrogen gas plasma: induction of secondary structural change in protein.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Higa, Masato; Maeda, Kojiro; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Shintani, Hideharu

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of action on biomolecules of N₂ gas plasma, a novel sterilization technique, remains unclear. Here, the effect of N₂ gas plasma on protein structure was investigated. BSA, which was used as the model protein, was exposed to N₂ gas plasma generated by short-time high voltage pulses from a static induction thyristor power supply. N₂ gas plasma-treated BSA at 1.5 kilo pulses per second showed evidence of degradation and modification when assessed by Coomassie brilliant blue staining and ultraviolet spectroscopy at 280 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis was used to determine the protein's secondary structure. When the amide I region was analyzed in the infrared spectra according to curve fitting and Fourier self-deconvolution, N₂ gas plasma-treated BSA showed increased α-helix and decreased β-turn content. Because heating decreased α-helix and increased β-sheet content, the structural changes induced by N₂ gas plasma-treatment of BSA were not caused by high temperatures. Thus, the present results suggest that conformational changes induced by N₂ gas plasma are mediated by mechanisms distinct from heat denaturation. PMID:23617321

  6. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolom, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-05-19

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of ?-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in ?-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  7. Linker histone partial phosphorylation: effects on secondary structure and chromatin condensation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rita; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert; Bartolomé, Salvador; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Linker histones are involved in chromatin higher-order structure and gene regulation. We have successfully achieved partial phosphorylation of linker histones in chicken erythrocyte soluble chromatin with CDK2, as indicated by HPCE, MALDI-TOF and Tandem MS. We have studied the effects of linker histone partial phosphorylation on secondary structure and chromatin condensation. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed a gradual increase of β-structure in the phosphorylated samples, concomitant to a decrease in α-helix/turns, with increasing linker histone phosphorylation. This conformational change could act as the first step in the phosphorylation-induced effects on chromatin condensation. A decrease of the sedimentation rate through sucrose gradients of the phosphorylated samples was observed, indicating a global relaxation of the 30-nm fiber following linker histone phosphorylation. Analysis of specific genes, combining nuclease digestion and qPCR, showed that phosphorylated samples were more accessible than unphosphorylated samples, suggesting local chromatin relaxation. Chromatin aggregation was induced by MgCl2 and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Phosphorylated chromatin had lower percentages in volume of aggregated molecules and the aggregates had smaller hydrodynamic diameter than unphosphorylated chromatin, indicating that linker histone phosphorylation impaired chromatin aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the effects of linker histone phosphorylation in chromatin condensation. PMID:25870416

  8. FPGA accelerator for protein secondary structure prediction based on the GOR algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Protein is an important molecule that performs a wide range of functions in biological systems. Recently, the protein folding attracts much more attention since the function of protein can be generally derived from its molecular structure. The GOR algorithm is one of the most successful computational methods and has been widely used as an efficient analysis tool to predict secondary structure from protein sequence. However, the execution time is still intolerable with the steep growth in protein database. Recently, FPGA chips have emerged as one promising application accelerator to accelerate bioinformatics algorithms by exploiting fine-grained custom design. Results In this paper, we propose a complete fine-grained parallel hardware implementation on FPGA to accelerate the GOR-IV package for 2D protein structure prediction. To improve computing efficiency, we partition the parameter table into small segments and access them in parallel. We aggressively exploit data reuse schemes to minimize the need for loading data from external memory. The whole computation structure is carefully pipelined to overlap the sequence loading, computing and back-writing operations as much as possible. We implemented a complete GOR desktop system based on an FPGA chip XC5VLX330. Conclusions The experimental results show a speedup factor of more than 430x over the original GOR-IV version and 110x speedup over the optimized version with multi-thread SIMD implementation running on a PC platform with AMD Phenom 9650 Quad CPU for 2D protein structure prediction. However, the power consumption is only about 30% of that of current general-propose CPUs. PMID:21342582

  9. How a Spatial Arrangement of Secondary Structure Elements Is Dispersed in the Universe of Protein Folds

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Shintaro; Sawada, Kengo; Chikenji, George

    2014-01-01

    It has been known that topologically different proteins of the same class sometimes share the same spatial arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSEs). However, the frequency by which topologically different structures share the same spatial arrangement of SSEs is unclear. It is important to estimate this frequency because it provides both a deeper understanding of the geometry of protein folds and a valuable suggestion for predicting protein structures with novel folds. Here we clarified the frequency with which protein folds share the same SSE packing arrangement with other folds, the types of spatial arrangement of SSEs that are frequently observed across different folds, and the diversity of protein folds that share the same spatial arrangement of SSEs with a given fold, using a protein structure alignment program MICAN, which we have been developing. By performing comprehensive structural comparison of SCOP fold representatives, we found that approximately 80% of protein folds share the same spatial arrangement of SSEs with other folds. We also observed that many protein pairs that share the same spatial arrangement of SSEs belong to the different classes, often with an opposing N- to C-terminal direction of the polypeptide chain. The most frequently observed spatial arrangement of SSEs was the 2-layer ?/? packing arrangement and it was dispersed among as many as 27% of SCOP fold representatives. These results suggest that the same spatial arrangements of SSEs are adopted by a wide variety of different folds and that the spatial arrangement of SSEs is highly robust against the N- to C-terminal direction of the polypeptide chain. PMID:25243952

  10. Transport and Localization Elements in Myelin Basic Protein mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ainger, Kevin; Avossa, Daniela; Diana, Amy S.; Barry, Christopher; Barbarese, Elisa; Carson, John H.

    1997-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA is localized to myelin produced by oligodendrocytes of the central nervous system. MBP mRNA microinjected into oligodendrocytes in primary culture is assembled into granules in the perikaryon, transported along the processes, and localized to the myelin compartment. In this work, microinjection of various deleted and chimeric RNAs was used to delineate regions in MBP mRNA that are required for transport and localization in oligodendrocytes. The results indicate that transport requires a 21-nucleotide sequence, termed the RNA transport signal (RTS), in the 3′ UTR of MBP mRNA. Homologous sequences are present in several other localized mRNAs, suggesting that the RTS represents a general transport signal in a variety of different cell types. Insertion of the RTS from MBP mRNA into nontransported mRNAs, causes the RNA to be transported to the oligodendrocyte processes. Localization of mRNA to the myelin compartment requires an additional element, termed the RNA localization region (RLR), contained between nucleotide 1,130 and 1,473 in the 3′ UTR of MBP mRNA. Computer analysis predicts that this region contains a stable secondary structure. If the coding region of the mRNA is deleted, the RLR is no longer required for localization, and the region between nucleotide 667 and 953, containing the RTS, is sufficient for both RNA transport and localization. Thus, localization of coding RNA is RLR dependent, and localization of noncoding RNA is RLR independent, suggesting that they are localized by different pathways. PMID:9281585

  11. An infrared sensor analysing label-free the secondary structure of the Abeta peptide in presence of complex fluids.

    PubMed

    Nabers, Andreas; Ollesch, Julian; Schartner, Jonas; Ktting, Carsten; Genius, Just; Haumann, Ute; Klafki, Hans; Wiltfang, Jens; Gerwert, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    The secondary structure change of the Abeta peptide to beta-sheet was proposed as an early event in Alzheimer's disease. The transition may be used for diagnostics of this disease in an early state. We present an Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) sensor modified with a specific antibody to extract minute amounts of Abeta peptide out of a complex fluid. Thereby, the Abeta peptide secondary structure was determined in its physiological aqueous environment by FTIR-difference-spectroscopy. The presented results open the door for label-free Alzheimer diagnostics in cerebrospinal fluid or blood. It can be extended to further neurodegenerative diseases. An immunologic ATR-FTIR sensor for Abeta peptide secondary structure analysis in complex fluids is presented. PMID:25808829

  12. Modulation of the activity of RNase E in vitro by RNA sequences and secondary structures 5' to cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Mackie, G A; Genereaux, J L; Masterman, S K

    1997-01-01

    The endoribonuclease RNase E is believed to initiate the degradation of many mRNAs in Escherichia coli, yet the mechanism by which it recognizes cleavage sites is poorly understood. We have prepared derivatives of the mRNA encoding ribosomal protein S20 which contain a single major RNase E cleavage site at residues 300/301 preceded by variable 5' extensions. Three of these RNAs are cleaved in vitro with significantly reduced efficiencies relative to the intact S20 mRNA by both crude RNase E and pure Rne protein (endonuclease component of RNase E). In all three substrates as well as in the full-length mRNA the major cleavage site itself remains single-stranded. One such substrate (t84D) contains a 5' stem-loop structure characterized by three noncanonical A-G pairs. Removal or denaturation of the stem restores efficient cleavage at the major RNase E site. The other two contain single-stranded 5'-termini but apparently lack cleavage sites near the termini. Our data show that sensitivity to RNase E can be influenced by distant structural motifs in the RNA and also suggest a model in which the initial recognition and cleavage of a substrate near its 5' end facilitates sequential cleavages at more distal sites. The model implies that RNase E contains at least a dimer of the Rne subunit and that the products of the first cleavage are retained by Rne prior to the second cleavage. PMID:8995304

  13. Improved prediction of RNA secondary structure by integrating the free energy model with restraints derived from experimental probing data.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Shi, Binbin; Ding, Xinqiang; Liu, Tong; Hu, Xihao; Yip, Kevin Y; Yang, Zheng Rong; Mathews, David H; Lu, Zhi John

    2015-09-01

    Recently, several experimental techniques have emerged for probing RNA structures based on high-throughput sequencing. However, most secondary structure prediction tools that incorporate probing data are designed and optimized for particular types of experiments. For example, RNAstructure-Fold is optimized for SHAPE data, while SeqFold is optimized for PARS data. Here, we report a new RNA secondary structure prediction method, restrained MaxExpect (RME), which can incorporate multiple types of experimental probing data and is based on a free energy model and an MEA (maximizing expected accuracy) algorithm. We first demonstrated that RME substantially improved secondary structure prediction with perfect restraints (base pair information of known structures). Next, we collected structure-probing data from diverse experiments (e.g. SHAPE, PARS and DMS-seq) and transformed them into a unified set of pairing probabilities with a posterior probabilistic model. By using the probability scores as restraints in RME, we compared its secondary structure prediction performance with two other well-known tools, RNAstructure-Fold (based on a free energy minimization algorithm) and SeqFold (based on a sampling algorithm). For SHAPE data, RME and RNAstructure-Fold performed better than SeqFold, because they markedly altered the energy model with the experimental restraints. For high-throughput data (e.g. PARS and DMS-seq) with lower probing efficiency, the secondary structure prediction performances of the tested tools were comparable, with performance improvements for only a portion of the tested RNAs. However, when the effects of tertiary structure and protein interactions were removed, RME showed the highest prediction accuracy in the DMS-accessible regions by incorporating in vivo DMS-seq data. PMID:26170232

  14. Improved prediction of RNA secondary structure by integrating the free energy model with restraints derived from experimental probing data

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Shi, Binbin; Ding, Xinqiang; Liu, Tong; Hu, Xihao; Yip, Kevin Y.; Yang, Zheng Rong; Mathews, David H.; Lu, Zhi John

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several experimental techniques have emerged for probing RNA structures based on high-throughput sequencing. However, most secondary structure prediction tools that incorporate probing data are designed and optimized for particular types of experiments. For example, RNAstructure-Fold is optimized for SHAPE data, while SeqFold is optimized for PARS data. Here, we report a new RNA secondary structure prediction method, restrained MaxExpect (RME), which can incorporate multiple types of experimental probing data and is based on a free energy model and an MEA (maximizing expected accuracy) algorithm. We first demonstrated that RME substantially improved secondary structure prediction with perfect restraints (base pair information of known structures). Next, we collected structure-probing data from diverse experiments (e.g. SHAPE, PARS and DMS-seq) and transformed them into a unified set of pairing probabilities with a posterior probabilistic model. By using the probability scores as restraints in RME, we compared its secondary structure prediction performance with two other well-known tools, RNAstructure-Fold (based on a free energy minimization algorithm) and SeqFold (based on a sampling algorithm). For SHAPE data, RME and RNAstructure-Fold performed better than SeqFold, because they markedly altered the energy model with the experimental restraints. For high-throughput data (e.g. PARS and DMS-seq) with lower probing efficiency, the secondary structure prediction performances of the tested tools were comparable, with performance improvements for only a portion of the tested RNAs. However, when the effects of tertiary structure and protein interactions were removed, RME showed the highest prediction accuracy in the DMS-accessible regions by incorporating in vivo DMS-seq data. PMID:26170232

  15. Investigations of primary and secondary impact structures on the moon and laboratory experiments to study the ejecta of secondary particles. Ph.D. Thesis - Ruprecht Karl Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, B.

    1977-01-01

    Young lunar impact structures were investigated by using lunar orbiter, Apollo Metric and panorama photographs. Measurements on particularly homogeneous areas low in secondary craters made possible an expansion of primary crater distribution to small diameters. This is now sure for a range between 20m or = D or = 20km and this indicates that the size and velocity distribution of the impacting bodies in the last 3 billion years has been constant. A numerical approximation in the form of a 7th degree polynomial was obtained for the distribution.

  16. Protein secondary structure prediction from circular dichroism spectra using a self-organizing map with concentration correction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Vincent; Sklepari, Meropi; Rodger, Alison

    2014-09-01

    Collecting circular dichroism (CD) spectra for protein solutions is a simple experiment, yet reliable extraction of secondary structure content is dependent on knowledge of the concentration of the protein--which is not always available with accuracy. We previously developed a self-organizing map (SOM), called Secondary Structure Neural Network (SSNN), to cluster a database of CD spectra and use that map to assign the secondary structure content of new proteins from CD spectra. The performance of SSNN is at least as good as other available protein CD structure-fitting algorithms. In this work we apply SSNN to a collection of spectra of experimental samples where there was suspicion that the nominal protein concentration was incorrect. We show that by plotting the normalized root mean square deviation of the SSNN predicted spectrum from the experimental one versus a concentration scaling-factor it is possible to improve the estimate of the protein concentration while providing an estimate of the secondary structure. For our implementation (51 data points 240-190?nm in nm increments) good fits and structure estimates were obtained if the NRMSD (normalized root mean square displacement, RMSE/data range) is <0.03; reasonable for NRMSD <0.05; and variable above this. We also augmented the reference database with 100% helical spectra and truly random coil spectra. PMID:24890763

  17. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking. PMID:26098304

  18. Investigating the secondary structures for long oligonucleotides using attenuated-total-reflection nanoplasmon-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, K.-C.; Yu, L.-Y.; Lin, C.-Y.; Chen, S.-J.

    2007-09-01

    This study utilizes a nanoplasmon-enhanced Raman scattering based on the attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) method to investigate the secondary structures of long oligonucleotides and their influence on the DNA hybridization. It is found that the ring-breathing modes of adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine in Raman fingerprint associated with three 60mer oligonucleotides with prominent secondary structures are lower than those observed for the two oligonucleotides with no obvious secondary structures. It is also determined that increasing the DNA hybridization temperature from 35 °C to 45 °C reduces secondary structure effects. The kinetics of biomolecular interaction analysis can be performed by using surface plasmons resonance biosensor, but the structural information of the oligonucleotides can not observed directly. The ATR-Raman spectrum can provide the structural information of the oligonucleotide monolayer on the sensing surface with the help of a silver patterned nanostructure film based on the finite-difference time-domain simulation and the e-beam lithography fabrication adapted as an ATR-Raman active substrate.

  19. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins behaved similarly on addition of the alkaline-surfactant cleaning solution, in that platinum and gold exhibited an increase, while tungsten, titanium, and stainless steel showed a decrease in weight. According to dissipation measurements with the QCM-D, the adsorbed layer for platinum and gold was rigid, while that for the tungsten, titanium, and stainless steel was much more flexible. The removal efficiency of adsorbed-protein by alkaline solution of SDS depended on the water content of the adsorbed layers for W, Ti, and SS, while for Pt and Au, it depended on secondary structural content. When protein adsorption was high (Pt, Au), protein-protein interactions and protein-surface interactions were dominant and the removal of protein layers was limited. Water content of the adsorbed protein layer was the determining factor for how efficiently the layer was removed by alkaline SDS when protein adsorption was low. Hence, protein-protein and protein-surface interactions were minimal and protein structure was less perturbed in comparison with those for high protein adsorption. Secondary structural content determined the efficient removal of adsorbed protein for high adsorbed amount. PMID:21182242

  20. UV resonance Raman examination of environmental effects on protein secondary structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtz, Janet Shan-Mei Wang

    1998-12-01

    This thesis discusses work which develops UV resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) as a method for examining protein secondary structure. We demonstrated the utility of a novel continuous-wave (CW) 206.5 rim krypton ion laser to probe protein secondary structure and examine CVD diamond material properties. We utilized 206.5 nm excitation to selectively enhance the amide vibrations, and to examine environmental. effects that induce a-helical formation in two amphiphilic peptides, bombolitin I (BI) and bombolitin III (BIII). The presence of a salt-bridge in BIII (Lys2-Asp5) stabilizes an alpha-helix turn at neutral pH. We demonstrate that reduction in the intra and/or intermolecular repulsions, along with less polar solvating environments induce alpha-helical formation in BI and BIII. Furthermore, we show that the amphiphilic alpha-helix formation, which results from increasing ionic strengths, is accompanied by self-association. We also demonstrate that an increase in the angiotensin II (AII) beta-turn structure in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) mainly derives from the binding of two SDS molecules to the positively charged AII N-terminus and the Arg2 residue. This AII-SDS complexation may also account for the slight higher Tyr (AII) solvent accessibility in SDS micelles compared to DPC micelles. We also examined the cis-trans isomerization dynamics of Glycylglycine (Gly-Gly) and Gly-Gly derivatives. Utilizing Li et al.'s three state model, we determined the Gibbs free energy differences between the ground states of trans and cis Gly-Gly at pH 3.0, 5.7, and 10.5 of 3.6 +/- 0.4, 3.0 +/- 0.5 and 4.4 +/- 0.7 kcal/mol, respectively. We also found that the cis to trans activation barrier for the cationic, zwitterionic and anionic Gly-Gly species are essentially identical ( 9.7 +/- 0.8 kcal/mol). Our results suggest only a modest impact of the Gly-Gly charge state on cis-trans energy differences and activation barriers for Gly-Gly derivatives.

  1. Determination of Endosperm Protein Secondary Structure in Hard Wheat Breeding Lines using Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bonwell,E.; Fisher, T.; Fritz, A.; Wetzel, D.

    2008-01-01

    One molecular aspect of mature hard wheat protein quality for breadmaking is the relative amount of endosperm protein in the a-helix form compared with that in other secondary structure forms including {beta}-sheet. Modeling of a-helix and {beta}-sheet absorption bands that contribute to the amide I band at 1650 cm-1 was applied to more than 1500 spectra in this study. The microscopic view of wheat endosperm is dominated by many large starch granules with protein in between. The spectrum produced from in situ microspectroscopy of this mixture is dominated by carbohydrate bands from the large starch granules that fill up the field. The high spatial resolution achievable with synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy enables revealing good in situ spectra of the protein located interstitially. Synchrotron infrared microspectroscopic mapping of 4 {mu}m thick frozen sections of endosperm in the subaleurone region provides spectra from a large number of pixels. Pixels with protein-dominated spectra are sorted out from among adjacent pixels to minimize the starch absorption and scattering contributions. Subsequent data treatment to extract information from the amide I band requires a high signal to noise ratio. Although spectral interference of the carbohydrate band on the amide band is not a problem, the scattering produced by the large starch granules diminishes the signal to noise ratio throughout the spectrum. High density mapping was done on beamlines U2B and U10B at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY. Mapping with a single masked spot size of 5.5 {mu}m diameter or confocal 5 {mu}m x 5 {mu}m spot size, respectively, on the two beamlines used produced spectra for new breeding lines under current consideration. Appropriate data treatment allows calculation of a numerical estimate of the a-helix population relative to other secondary protein structures from the position and shape of the amide I absorption band. Current breeding lines show a substantial variance in this feature and its determination allows the prediction of relative quality for breadmaking to be taken into consideration for subsequent steps in the wheat breeding process. Data treatments include deconvolution, modeling of the individual resulting bands that contribute to the amide I band to enable measurement of the relative amounts of both forms. Results with specimens representing multiple crop years of hard winter wheat breeding are reported. It is evident that a range is available for the breeder to choose from, that allows including this protein molecular structural attribute in the selection process.

  2. Determination of Endosperm Protein Secondary Structure in Hard Wheat Breeding Lines using Synchrotron Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Bonwell, E; Fritz, T; Fritz, A

    2008-01-01

    One molecular aspect of mature hard wheat protein quality for breadmaking is the relative amount of endosperm protein in the {alpha}-helix form compared with that in other secondary structure forms including {beta}-sheet. Modeling of {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet absorption bands that contribute to the amide I band at 1650 cm{sup -1} was applied to more than 1500 spectra in this study. The microscopic view of wheat endosperm is dominated by many large starch granules with protein in between. The spectrum produced from in situ microspectroscopy of this mixture is dominated by carbohydrate bands from the large starch granules that fill up the field. The high spatial resolution achievable with synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy enables revealing good in situ spectra of the protein located interstitially. Synchrotron infrared microspectroscopic mapping of 4 {mu}m thick frozen sections of endosperm in the subaleurone region provides spectra from a large number of pixels. Pixels with protein-dominated spectra are sorted out from among adjacent pixels to minimize the starch absorption and scattering contributions. Subsequent data treatment to extract information from the amide I band requires a high signal to noise ratio. Although spectral interference of the carbohydrate band on the amide band is not a problem, the scattering produced by the large starch granules diminishes the signal to noise ratio throughout the spectrum. High density mapping was done on beamlines U2B and U10B at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY. Mapping with a single masked spot size of 5.5 {mu}m diameter or confocal 5 {mu}mX5{mu}m spot size, respectively, on the two beamlines used produced spectra for new breeding lines under current consideration. Appropriate data treatment allows calculation of a numerical estimate of the {alpha}-helix population relative to other secondary protein structures from the position and shape of the amide I absorption band. Current breeding lines show a substantial variance in this feature and its determination allows the prediction of relative quality for breadmaking to be taken into consideration for subsequent steps in the wheat breeding process. Data treatments include deconvolution, modeling of the individual resulting bands that contribute to the amide I band to enable measurement of the relative amounts of both forms. Results with specimens representing multiple crop years of hard winter wheat breeding are reported. It is evident that a range is available for the breeder to choose from, that allows including this protein molecular structural attribute in the selection process.

  3. The Tn10-encoded tetracycline resistance mRNA contains a translational silencer in the 5' nontranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Flache, P; Baumeister, R; Hillen, W

    1992-01-01

    We performed a mutational analysis of the left half of Tn10-encoded tet operator O2, located in the 5' nontranslated region of the mRNA for the resistance protein TetA, and determined the importance of that region for translation efficiency and mRNA stability. Transcriptional fusions of 17 mutants to lacZ expressed the same amounts of beta-galactosidase, while translational fusions varied 35-fold in expression efficiency. The mRNA half-lives varied 24-fold, with 9.6 min for the most highly expressed mRNA and 0.4 min for the least efficiently expressed mRNA. Toeprint experiments were performed to distinguish whether these mutations define a determinant of mRNA stability or influence translation initiation. The highly expressed mRNA was 24-fold more efficient in forming the initiation complex in vitro than the low-expression mutant. It was concluded that this sequence, albeit located upstream of the ribosome-binding sequence, is an important determinant for efficient initiation of translation. Secondary-structure calculations of the mRNAs revealed no correlation of the potential to form double strands masking the ribosome-binding sequence with expression efficiency. Images PMID:1372890

  4. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  5. Duplex formation and secondary structure of ?-PNA observed by NMR and CD.

    PubMed

    Viville, J M P; Barluenga, S; Winssinger, N; Delsuc, M A

    2016-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are non-natural oligonucleotides mimics, wherein the phosphoribose backbone has been replaced by a peptidic moiety (N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine). This peptidic backbone lends itself to substitution and the ?-position has proven to yield oligomers with enhanced hybridization properties. In this study, we use Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Circular Dichroism (CD) to explore the properties of the supramolecular duplexes formed by these species. We show that standard Watson-Crick base pair as well as non-standard ones are formed in solution. The duplexes thus formed present marked melting transition temperatures substantially higher than their nucleic acid homologs. Moreover, the presence of a chiral group on the ?-peptidic backbone increases further this transition temperature, leading to very stable duplexes. PNA duplexes with a chiral backbone present a marked chiral secondary structure, observed by CD, and showing a common folding pattern for all studied structures. Nevertheless small differences are observed depending on the details of the nucleobase sequence. PMID:26493008

  6. High evolutionary conservation of the secondary structure and of certain nucleotide sequences of U5 RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Branlant, C; Krol, A; Lazar, E; Haendler, B; Jacob, M; Galego-Dias, L; Pousada, C

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of chicken, pheasant, duck and Tetrahymena pyriformis U5 RNAs as well as that of new mammalian variant U5 RNAs was determined and compared to that of rat and HeLa cells U5 RNAs. Primary structure conservation is about 95% between rat and human cells, 82% between mammals and birds and 57% between the Protozoan and mammals. The same model of secondary structure, a free single-stranded region flanked by two hairpins can be constructed from all RNAs and is identical to the model previously proposed for mammalian U5 RNA on an experimental basis (1). Thus, this model is confirmed and is likely to be that of an ancestor U5 RNA. The 3' region of the U5 RNA molecule constitutes domain A, and is common to U1, U2, U4 and U5 RNAs (2). The characteristic nucleotide sequences of domain A are highly conserved throughout the phylogenetic evolution of U5 RNA suggesting that they are important elements in the function of the four small RNAs. Another region of high evolutionary conservation is the top part of the 5' side hairpin whose conserved sequence is specific to U5 RNA. It might participate in the particular function of U5 RNA. PMID:6200827

  7. Fine-grained parallel RNAalifold algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction on FPGA

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Fei; Dou, Yong; Zhou, Xingming; Yang, Xuejun; Xu, Jiaqing; Zhang, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Background In the field of RNA secondary structure prediction, the RNAalifold algorithm is one of the most popular methods using free energy minimization. However, general-purpose computers including parallel computers or multi-core computers exhibit parallel efficiency of no more than 50%. Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) chips provide a new approach to accelerate RNAalifold by exploiting fine-grained custom design. Results RNAalifold shows complicated data dependences, in which the dependence distance is variable, and the dependence direction is also across two dimensions. We propose a systolic array structure including one master Processing Element (PE) and multiple slave PEs for fine grain hardware implementation on FPGA. We exploit data reuse schemes to reduce the need to load energy matrices from external memory. We also propose several methods to reduce energy table parameter size by 80%. Conclusion To our knowledge, our implementation with 16 PEs is the only FPGA accelerator implementing the complete RNAalifold algorithm. The experimental results show a factor of 12.2 speedup over the RNAalifold (ViennaPackage 1.6.5) software for a group of aligned RNA sequences with 2981-residue running on a Personal Computer (PC) platform with Pentium 4 2.6 GHz CPU. PMID:19208138

  8. Determination of the secondary structure of group II bulge loops using the fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine.

    PubMed

    Dishler, Abigael L; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Serra, Martin J

    2015-05-01

    Eleven RNA hairpins containing 2-aminopurine (2-AP) in either base-paired or single nucleotide bulge loop positions were optically melted in 1 M NaCl; and, the thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔS°, ΔG°37, and TM for each hairpin were determined. Substitution of 2-AP for an A (adenosine) at a bulge position (where either the 2-AP or A is the bulge) in the stem of a hairpin, does not affect the stability of the hairpin. For group II bulge loops such as AA/U, where there is ambiguity as to which of the A residues is paired with the U, hairpins with 2-AP substituted for either the 5' or 3' position in the hairpin stem have similar stability. Fluorescent melts were performed to monitor the environment of the 2-AP. When the 2-AP was located distal to the hairpin loop on either the 5' or 3' side of the hairpin stem, the change in fluorescent intensity upon heating was indicative of an unpaired nucleotide. A database of phylogenetically determined RNA secondary structures was examined to explore the presence of naturally occurring bulge loops embedded within a hairpin stem. The distribution of bulge loops is discussed and related to the stability of hairpin structures. PMID:25805856

  9. A DFT-GGA based thermodynamic analysis of the secondary structure of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismer, Lars; Neugebauer, Jrg

    2005-03-01

    Studies of the thermodynamic stability of the secondary structure of proteins are important for understanding the protein folding process. We have therefore estimated the free energy change to fold a fully extended structure (FES) into the ?-helical conformation for isolated infinite poly-glycine (Gly) and -alanine (Ala) chains. The calculations have been performed employing DFT-GGA, a plane-wave pseudo-potential approach and the harmonic approximation. Our results reveal [1], that this approach leads to a significantly improved description of thermodynamic data with respect to previous studies based on empirical force fields. Further we find, that the enthalpy to transform an ?-helix into an FES strongly reduces with increasing temperature: at room temperature the free energy difference for Gly is close to zero within the numerical error bar (0.5 kcal/mol), whereas for Ala the ?-helix is by 1.0 kcal/mol more stable. We conclude, without recoursing to any empirical input parameters, that an isolated Ala-FES will even at room temperature spontaneously fold into an ?-helix.1. L. Ismer, J. Ireta, S. Boeck and J. Neugebauer submitted to Phys. Rev. E

  10. The influence of viral RNA secondary structure on interactions with innate host cell defences

    PubMed Central

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Blundell, Richard; Maarleveld, Joris J.; McFadden, Nora; Evans, David J.; Simmonds, Peter

    2014-01-01

    RNA viruses infecting vertebrates differ fundamentally in their ability to establish persistent infections with markedly different patterns of transmission, disease mechanisms and evolutionary relationships with their hosts. Although interactions with host innate and adaptive responses are complex and persistence mechanisms likely multi-factorial, we previously observed associations between bioinformatically predicted RNA secondary formation in genomes of positive-stranded RNA viruses with their in vivo fitness and persistence. To analyse this interactions functionally, we transfected fibroblasts with non-replicating, non-translated RNA transcripts from RNA viral genomes with differing degrees of genome-scale ordered RNA structure (GORS). Single-stranded RNA transcripts induced interferon-? mediated though RIG-I and PKR activation, the latter associated with rapid induction of antiviral stress granules. A striking inverse correlation was observed between induction of both cellular responses with transcript RNA structure formation that was independent of both nucleotide composition and sequence length. The consistent inability of cells to recognize RNA transcripts possessing GORS extended to downstream differences from unstructured transcripts in expression of TNF-?, other interferon-stimulated genes and induction of apoptosis. This functional association provides novel insights into interactions between virus and host early after infection and provides evidence for a novel mechanism for evading intrinsic and innate immune responses. PMID:24335283

  11. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission at low gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Irina; Langendorf, Samuel J.; Keidar, Michael; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2014-10-01

    Previously the experiments demonstrated that the growth of the electron temperature with power in the Hall thruster is restricted by plasma-wall interaction if the wall has an enhanced secondary electron emission (SEE) yield. It is known that the plasma and wall is separated by the sheath potential drop to provide the condition of zero-current on the surface with floating potential. The rearrangement of the sheath structure near the plate with enhanced SEE is the subject of our experimental and theoretical study. The experiment was carried out in multidipole plasma device, where plasma is maintained by the negatively-biased emissive filament. The plate with sapphire surface is placed 50 cm apart from the filament. The plasma parameters were measured for different negative biases Ub and discharge currents J at P = 10-4 Torr. In our PIC simulations the plasma was calculated for the experimental conditions. We solved self-consistently the Boltzmann equations for the electron and ion distribution functions and Poisson equation for electrical field. Both in the experiment and simulation we found non-monotonic change in sheath structure near the plate depending on Ub and J. The kinetic simulations allowed us to describe the sheath rearrangement in terms of the electron energy distribution function.

  12. Enzyme stability, thermodynamics and secondary structures of ?-amylase as probed by the CD spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kikani, B A; Singh, S P

    2015-11-01

    An amylase of a thermophilic bacterium, Bacillus sp. TSSC-3 (GenBank Number, EU710557) isolated from the Tulsi Shyam hot spring reservoir (Gujarat, India) was purified to the homogeneity in a single step on phenyl sepharose 6FF. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 25kD, while the temperature and pH optima for the enzyme catalysis were 80C and 7, respectively. The purified enzyme was highly thermostable with broad pH stability and displayed remarkable resistance against surfactants, chelators, urea, guanidine HCl and various solvents as well. The stability and changes in the secondary structure of the enzyme under various extreme conditions were determined by the circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The stability trends and the changes in the ?-helices and ?-sheets were analyzed by Mean Residual Ellipticity (MRE) and K2D3. The CD data confirmed the structural stability of the enzyme under various harsh conditions, yet it indicated reduced ?-helix content and increased ?-sheets upon denaturation. The thermodynamic parameters; deactivation rate constant, half-life, changes in entropy, enthalpy, activation energy and Gibb's free energy indicated that the enzyme-substrate reactions were highly stable. The overall profile of the enzyme: high thermostability, alkalitolerance, calcium independent nature, dextrose equivalent values and resistance against chemical denaturants, solvents and surfactants suggest its commercial applications. PMID:26297306

  13. [Spatial structural characteristics of natural Populus davidiana - Betula platyphylla secondary forest].

    PubMed

    Shao, Fang-Li; Yu, Xin-Xiao; Song, Si-Ming; Zhao, Yang

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyzed the spatial structural characteristics of natural Populus davidiana - Betula platyphylla secondary forest in a 4 hm2 plot of Mulan Paddock, based on the diameter distribution and the spatial structure parameters mingling degree, neighborhood comparison, and angle index. In the forest, the diameter distribution of the stands presented as an inverse 'J' curve, the average mingling degree was 0.4, with the individuals at weak and zero mingling degree reached 51.6%, and the average mingling degree of P. davidiana and B. platyphylla was 0.25 and 0.39, respectively. The neighborhood comparison based on the diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height was almost the same, suggesting that the P. davidiana and B. platyphylla were in the transition state from subdominant to middle. The horizontal distribution pattern had a close relation to the minimum measured DBH, being clustered when the DBH was > or = 1 cm and < 6 cm, and random when the DBH was > or = 6 cm. PMID:22303652

  14. Formation of secondary structures in heat-resistant steels under sliding friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lad'yanov, V. I.; Goncharov, O. Yu.; Malenko, P. I.; Nikonova, R. M.; Gilmutdinov, F. Z.; Mokrushina, M. I.; Tereshkina, S. A.; Leonov, A. Yu.; Relmasira, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of secondary structures in nicotrated layers on surfaces of complex-alloy heatresistant 25Kh3M3NBTsA and 30KhN2MFA structural steels under the effect of sliding friction with resource lubrication has been studied using metallography, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermodynamic modeling. It has been found that, under friction, the nicotrated layer on the steels oxidizes to produce iron oxides, which is substantially less pronounced for 25Kh3M3NBTsA steel than for 30KhN2MFA steel. It has been shown using thermodynamic modeling that, under equilibrium conditions, the heating of both steels to a temperature of ~300C leads to the formation of an internal-oxidation layer, which consists of FeO with MoO2, Cr2O3, and carbon impurities, a Fe3O4 interlayer with MoO2 and Cr2O3 impurities, and a top layer of Fe2O3 with Cr2O3 impurity. The heating of steels to a temperature of ~700C leads to the formation of an internal-oxidation layer, which consists of FeO with MoO2 and carbon impurities, a Fe3O4 interlayer with MoO2 impurity, and a top layer of Cr2O3 with Fe2MnO4 and SiO2 impurities.

  15. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasites sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  16. Telomerase RNAs of different ciliates have a common secondary structure and a permuted template.

    PubMed

    Lingner, J; Hendrick, L L; Cech, T R

    1994-08-15

    Telomerase is composed of protein and RNA. The RNA serves as a template for telomere DNA synthesis and may also be important for enzyme structure or catalysis. We have used the presence of conserved sequence elements in the promoter and template regions to amplify by PCR the telomerase RNA genes from six different hypotrichous ciliates: Oxytricha nova, Oxytricha trifallax, Stylonychia mytilis, Stylonychia lemnae, Euplotes aediculatus, and Euplotes eurystomus. RNaseH cleavage of the O. nova RNA in extracts by use of a complementary oligonucleotide leads to loss of telomerase activity, supporting the identification. Primary sequence and biochemical experiments suggest that the templates of Oxytricha and Stylonychia are circularly permuted relative to that of E. aediculatus. On the basis of the pause sites, the former two add G4T4 during a single primer elongation cycle, whereas E. aediculatus adds G3T4G. The only primary sequence element outside the template that is conserved between these phylogenetically distant telomerase RNAs is the sequence 5'-(C)UGUCA-3', which precedes the template regions by exactly two bases. We propose a common secondary structure model that is based on nucleotide covariations, a model which resembles that proposed previously for tetrahymenine telomerase RNAs. PMID:7958872

  17. A Deep Learning Network Approach to ab initio Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Matt; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio protein secondary structure (SS) predictions are utilized to generate tertiary structure predictions, which are increasingly demanded due to the rapid discovery of proteins. Although recent developments have slightly exceeded previous methods of SS prediction, accuracy has stagnated around 80% and many wonder if prediction cannot be advanced beyond this ceiling. Disciplines that have traditionally employed neural networks are experimenting with novel deep learning techniques in attempts to stimulate progress. Since neural networks have historically played an important role in SS prediction, we wanted to determine whether deep learning could contribute to the advancement of this field as well. We developed an SS predictor that makes use of the position-specific scoring matrix generated by PSI-BLAST and deep learning network architectures, which we call DNSS. Graphical processing units and CUDA software optimize the deep network architecture and efficiently train the deep networks. Optimal parameters for the training process were determined, and a workflow comprising three separately trained deep networks was constructed in order to make refined predictions. This deep learning network approach was used to predict SS for a fully independent test data set of 198 proteins, achieving a Q3 accuracy of 80.7% and a Sov accuracy of 74.2%. PMID:25750595

  18. Residual Structure of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm following Complete Disinfection Favors Secondary Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Re-Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Takenaka, Shoji; Wakamatsu, Rika; Sakaue, Yuuki; Narisawa, Naoki; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Ohshima, Hayato; Terao, Yutaka; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion. PMID:25635770

  19. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    PubMed

    Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Takenaka, Shoji; Wakamatsu, Rika; Sakaue, Yuuki; Narisawa, Naoki; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Ohshima, Hayato; Terao, Yutaka; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion. PMID:25635770

  20. Understanding the effect of secondary structure on molecular interactions of poly-L-lysine with different substrates by SFA.

    PubMed

    Binazadeh, Mojtaba; Faghihnejad, Ali; Unsworth, Larry D; Zeng, Hongbo

    2013-10-14

    Nonspecific adsorption of proteins on biomaterial surfaces challenges the widespread application of engineered materials, and understanding the impact of secondary structure of proteins and peptides on their adsorption process is of both fundamental and practical importance in bioengineering. In this work, poly-L-lysine (PLL)-based ?-helices and ?-sheets were chosen as a model system to investigate the effect of secondary structure on peptide interactions with substrates of various surface chemistries. Circular dichroism (CD) was used to confirm the presence of both ?-helix and ?-sheet structured PLL in aqueous solutions and upon adsorption to quartz, where these secondary structures seemed to be preserved. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging showed different surface patterns for adsorbed ?-helix and ?-sheet PLL. Interactions between PLL of different secondary structures and various substrates (i.e., PLL, Au, mica, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)) were directly measured using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). It was found that ?-sheet PLL films showed higher adsorbed layer thicknesses in general. Adhesion energies of ?-sheet versus Au and ?-sheet versus ?-sheet were considerably higher than that of ?-helix versus Au and ?-helix versus ?-helix systems, respectively. Au and ?-sheet PLL interactions seemed to be more dependent on the salt concentration than that of ?-helix, while the presence of a grafted PEG layer greatly diminished any attraction with either PLL structure. The molecular interaction mechanism of peptide in different secondary structures is discussed in terms of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, Alexander-de Gennes (AdG) steric model and hydrogen bonding, which provides important insight into the fundamental understanding of the interaction mechanism between proteins and biomaterials. PMID:24032485

  1. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic studies on avidin secondary structure and complexation with biotin and biotin-lipid assemblies.

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, M J; Heimburg, T; Marsh, D

    1996-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared studies have been carried out to investigate the secondary structure and thermal stability of hen egg white avidin and its complexes with biotin and with a biotinylated lipid derivative, N-biotinyl dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DMBPE) in aqueous dispersion. Analysis of the amide I stretching band of avidin yielded a secondary structural content composed of approximately 66% beta-sheet and extended structures, with the remainder being attributed to disordered structure and beta-turns. Binding of biotin or specific association with the biotinylated lipid DMBPE did not result in any appreciable changes in the secondary structure content of the protein, but a change in hydrogen bond stability of the beta-sheet or extended chain regions was indicated. The latter effect was enhanced by surface interactions in the case of the biotin-lipid assemblies, as was demonstrated by electrostatic binding to a nonspecific negatively charged lipid. Difference spectra of the bound biotin implicated a direct involvement of the ureido moiety in the ligand interaction that was consistent with hydrogen bonding to amino acid residues in the avidin protein. It was found that complexation with avidin leads to a decrease in bond length of the biotin ureido carbonyl group that is consistent with a reduction of sp3 character of the C-O bond when it is hydrogen bonded to the protein. Studies of the temperature dependence of the spectra revealed that for avidin alone the secondary structure was unaltered up to approximately 75 degrees C, above which the protein undergoes a highly cooperative transition to an unfolded state with concomitant loss of ordered secondary structure. The complexes of avidin with both biotin and membrane-bound DMBPE lipid assemblies display a large increase in thermal stability compared with the native protein. PMID:8842222

  2. Regulation of mRNA transport, localization and translation in the nervous system of mammals (Review).

    PubMed

    Di Liegro, Carlo Maria; Schiera, Gabriella; Di Liegro, Italia

    2014-04-01

    Post-transcriptional control of mRNA trafficking and metabolism plays a critical role in the actualization and fine tuning of the genetic program of cells, both in development and in differentiated tissues. Cis-acting signals, responsible for post-transcriptional regulation, reside in the RNA message itself, usually in untranslated regions, 5' or 3' to the coding sequence, and are recognized by trans-acting factors: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and/or non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). ncRNAs bind short mRNA sequences usually present in the 3'-untranslated (3'-UTR) region of their target messages. RBPs recognize specific nucleotide sequences and/or secondary/tertiary structures. Most RBPs assemble on mRNA at the moment of transcription and shepherd it to its destination, somehow determining its final fate. Regulation of mRNA localization and metabolism has a particularly important role in the nervous system where local translation of pre-localized mRNAs has been implicated in developing axon and dendrite pathfinding, and in synapse formation. Moreover, activity-dependent mRNA trafficking and local translation may underlie long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy, responsible for learning and memory. This review focuses on the role of RBPs in neuronal development and plasticity, as well as possible connections between ncRNAs and RBPs. PMID:24452120

  3. Regulation of mRNA transport, localization and translation in the nervous system of mammals (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DI LIEGRO, CARLO MARIA; SCHIERA, GABRIELLA; DI LIEGRO, ITALIA

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control of mRNA trafficking and metabolism plays a critical role in the actualization and fine tuning of the genetic program of cells, both in development and in differentiated tissues. Cis-acting signals, responsible for post-transcriptional regulation, reside in the RNA message itself, usually in untranslated regions, 5′ or 3′ to the coding sequence, and are recognized by trans-acting factors: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and/or non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). ncRNAs bind short mRNA sequences usually present in the 3′-untranslated (3′-UTR) region of their target messages. RBPs recognize specific nucleotide sequences and/or secondary/tertiary structures. Most RBPs assemble on mRNA at the moment of transcription and shepherd it to its destination, somehow determining its final fate. Regulation of mRNA localization and metabolism has a particularly important role in the nervous system where local translation of pre-localized mRNAs has been implicated in developing axon and dendrite pathfinding, and in synapse formation. Moreover, activity-dependent mRNA trafficking and local translation may underlie long-lasting changes in synaptic efficacy, responsible for learning and memory. This review focuses on the role of RBPs in neuronal development and plasticity, as well as possible connections between ncRNAs and RBPs. PMID:24452120

  4. Mapping in Solution Shows the Peach Latent Mosaic Viroid To Possess a New Pseudoknot in a Complex, Branched Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Bussire, F.; Ouellet, J.; Ct, F.; Lvesque, D.; Perreault, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the secondary structure of peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) in solution, and we present here the first description of the structure of a branched viroid in solution. Different PLMVd transcripts of plus polarity were produced by using the circularly permuted RNA method and the exploitation of RNA internal secondary structure to position the 5? and 3? termini and studied by nuclease mapping and binding shift assays using DNA and RNA oligonucleotides. We show that PLMVd folds into a complex, branched secondary structure. In general, this structure is similar to that reported previously, which was based on sequence comparison and computer modelling. The structural microheterogeneity is apparently limited to only some small domains. More importantly, this structure includes a novel pseudoknot that is conserved in all PLMVd isolates and seems to allow folding into a very compact form. This pseudoknot is also found in chrysanthemum chlorotic mottle viroid, suggesting that it is a unique feature of the viroid members of the PLMVd subgroup. PMID:10684279

  5. Effect of Programmed Instruction on Students' Attitude towards Structure of the Atom and the Periodic Table among Kenyan Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wangila, M. J.; Martin, W.; Ronald, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of Programmed Instruction on students' attitude towards Structure of the Atom and the Periodic Table (SAPT) among mixed (co-educational) secondary schools of Butere district, Kakamega county, Kenya. The quasi-experimental research design was adopted, using the nonrandomized Solomon four-group as a model. The sample…

  6. Loop cost in RNA secondary structures and the long-range cooperativity between RNA-binding proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    The interactions between RNAs and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are significant in post-transcriptional regulation, and thus ensure that messenger RNAs can perform appropriate biological functions. Typically, in post-transcriptional regulation a single RNA is bound by multiple RBPs, which are likely to work together, resulting in ``cooperativity.'' This cooperativity can be a consequence of a mechanism mediated by RNA secondary structures, without assuming any direct interaction between the RBPs. The basic idea is that a bound RBP prohibits the nucleobases in its footprint from forming base pair bonds with other bases, thus changing the ensemble of RNA secondary structures, resulting in a shift on the binding probability of the other RBPs on the same RNA. We focus on the simplest RNA-protein complex: one RNA with two RBP binding sites. We study this effect analytically in the simplest model of RNA secondary structure formation, the molten RNA model. We measure the cooperativity as the correlation function between the RBPs and demonstrate that an algebraic correlation function occurs, implying that the cooperativity is long-range, and that a free energy cost for loop formation in the RNA secondary structures is the crucial ingredient that generates this cooperativity. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1105458.

  7. DNA secondary structure of the released strand stimulates WRN helicase action on forked duplexes without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byungchan; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} In this study, we investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities. {yields} We found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. {yields} These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently. -- Abstract: Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive premature aging disorder characterized by aging-related phenotypes and genomic instability. WS is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a nuclear protein, Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ helicase family, that interestingly possesses both helicase and exonuclease activities. Previous studies have shown that the two activities act in concert on a single substrate. We investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities and found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently, and we propose that the uncoordinated action may be relevant to the in vivo activity of WRN.

  8. Decentralization and Structural Change in Secondary Education in Argentina: The Case of the Province of Buenos Aires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acedo, Clementina; Gorostiaga, Jorge M.; Senen-Gonzalez, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, Argentina created and implemented a compulsory lower-secondary education level, within an ambitious educational reform programme. This article addresses the reform at the national level, diverse provincial responses, and the particular way that the powerful province of Buenos Aires appropriated the structural change. The

  9. Decentralization and Structural Change in Secondary Education in Argentina: The Case of the Province of Buenos Aires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acedo, Clementina; Gorostiaga, Jorge M.; Senen-Gonzalez, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, Argentina created and implemented a compulsory lower-secondary education level, within an ambitious educational reform programme. This article addresses the reform at the national level, diverse provincial responses, and the particular way that the powerful province of Buenos Aires appropriated the structural change. The…

  10. Observed Lesson Structure during the First Year of Secondary Education: Exploration of Change and Link with Academic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Stroet, Kim; Bosker, Roel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether lesson structure (LS) matters and which components are important for academic engagement during the first grade of secondary education. Data from videoed lessons of 10 Dutch and 12 Indonesian teachers analyzed using an observation protocol show that six LS components are found, that between class and over

  11. Determination of protein folding kinetic types using sequence and predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Tuo; Gao, Jianzhao; Ruan, Jishou; Shen, Shiyi; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2012-01-01

    Proteins fold through a two-state (TS), with no visible intermediates, or a multi-state (MS), via at least one intermediate, process. We analyze sequence-derived factors that determine folding types by introducing a novel sequence-based folding type predictor called FOKIT. This method implements a logistic regression model with six input features which hybridize information concerning amino acid composition and predicted secondary structure and solvent accessibility. FOKIT provides predictions with average Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) between 0.58 and 0.91 measured using out-of-sample tests on four benchmark datasets. These results are shown to be competitive or better than results of four modern predictors. We also show that FOKIT outperforms these methods when predicting chains that share low similarity with the chains used to build the model, which is an important advantage given the limited number of annotated chains. We demonstrate that inclusion of solvent accessibility helps in discrimination of the folding kinetic types and that three of the features constitute statistically significant markers that differentiate TS and MS folders. We found that the increased content of exposed Trp and buried Leu are indicative of the MS folding, which implies that the exposure/burial of certain hydrophobic residues may play important role in the formation of the folding intermediates. Our conclusions are supported by two case studies. PMID:21082205

  12. A New Criterion to Evaluate Water Vapor Interference in Protein Secondary Structural Analysis by FTIR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Ye; Ma, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Second derivative and Fourier self-deconvolution (FSD) are two commonly used techniques to resolve the overlapped component peaks from the often featureless amide I band in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) curve-fitting approach for protein secondary structural analysis. Yet, the reliability of these two techniques is greatly affected by the omnipresent water vapor in the atmosphere. Several criteria are currently in use as quality controls to ensure the protein absorption spectrum is negligibly affected by water vapor interference. In this study, through a second derivative study of liquid water, we first argue that the previously established criteria cannot guarantee a reliable evaluation of water vapor interference due to a phenomenon that we refer to as samples absorbance-dependent water vapor interference. Then, through a comparative study of protein and liquid water, we show that a protein absorption spectrum can still be significantly affected by water vapor interference even though it satisfies the established criteria. At last, we propose to use the comparison between the second derivative spectra of protein and liquid water as a new criterion to better evaluate water vapor interference for more reliable second derivative and FSD treatments on the protein amide I band. PMID:24901531

  13. Fine-grained parallelism accelerating for RNA secondary structure prediction with pseudoknots based on FPGA.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Jin, Guoqing

    2014-06-01

    PKNOTS is a most famous benchmark program and has been widely used to predict RNA secondary structure including pseudoknots. It adopts the standard four-dimensional (4D) dynamic programming (DP) method and is the basis of many variants and improved algorithms. Unfortunately, the O(N(6)) computing requirements and complicated data dependency greatly limits the usefulness of PKNOTS package with the explosion in gene database size. In this paper, we present a fine-grained parallel PKNOTS package and prototype system for accelerating RNA folding application based on FPGA chip. We adopted a series of storage optimization strategies to resolve the "Memory Wall" problem. We aggressively exploit parallel computing strategies to improve computational efficiency. We also propose several methods that collectively reduce the storage requirements for FPGA on-chip memory. To the best of our knowledge, our design is the first FPGA implementation for accelerating 4D DP problem for RNA folding application including pseudoknots. The experimental results show a factor of more than 50x average speedup over the PKNOTS-1.08 software running on a PC platform with Intel Core2 Q9400 Quad CPU for input RNA sequences. However, the power consumption of our FPGA accelerator is only about 50% of the general-purpose micro-processors. PMID:24969746

  14. Comparative Genome Structure, Secondary Metabolite, and Effector Coding Capacity across Cochliobolus Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Bushley, Kathryn E.; Ohm, Robin A.; Otillar, Robert; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Grimwood, Jane; MohdZainudin, NurAinIzzati; Xue, Chunsheng; Wang, Rui; Manning, Viola A.; Dhillon, Braham; Tu, Zheng Jin; Steffenson, Brian J.; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lowry, Steve; LaButti, Kurt; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Schmutz, Jeremy; Baker, Scott E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Zhong, Shaobin; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2013-01-01

    The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five percent of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25 higher than those between inbred lines and 50 lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSPencoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence. PMID:23357949

  15. Comparative Genome Structure, Secondary Metabolite, and Effector Coding Capacity across Cochliobolus Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, Bradford J.; Leng, Yueqiang; Wu, Dongliang; Bushley, Kathryn E.; Ohm, Robin A.; Otillar, Robert; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Grimwood, Jane; MohdZainudin, NurAinlzzati; Xue, Chunsheng; Wang, Rui; Manning, Viola A.; Dhillon, Braham; Tu, Zheng Jin; Steffenson, Brian J.; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lowry, Steve; LaButti, Kurt; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Schmutz, Jeremy; Baker, Scott E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Zhong, Shaobin; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2013-01-24

    The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25 higher than those between inbred lines and 50 lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSP encoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence.

  16. Inclusion of persistence length-based secondary structure in replica field theoretic models of heteropolymer freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2013-09-01

    The protein folding problem has long represented a "holy grail" in statistical physics due to its physical complexity and its relevance to many human diseases. While past theoretical work has yielded apt descriptions of protein folding landscapes, recent large-scale simulations have provided insights into protein folding that were impractical to obtain from early theories. In particular, the role that non-native contacts play in protein folding, and their relation to the existence of misfolded, ?-sheet rich trap states on folding landscapes, has emerged as a topic of interest in the field. In this paper, we present a modified model of heteropolymer freezing that includes explicit secondary structural characteristics which allow observations of "intramolecular amyloid" states to be probed from a theoretical perspective. We introduce a variable persistence length-based energy penalty to a model Hamiltonian, and we illustrate how this modification alters the phase transitions present in the theory. We find, in particular, that inclusion of this variable persistence length increases both generic freezing and folding temperatures in the model, allowing both folding and glass transitions to occur in a more highly optimized fashion. We go on to discuss how these changes might relate to protein evolution, misfolding, and the emergence of intramolecular amyloid states.

  17. Inclusion of persistence length-based secondary structure in replica field theoretic models of heteropolymer freezing

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2013-01-01

    The protein folding problem has long represented a holy grail in statistical physics due to its physical complexity and its relevance to many human diseases. While past theoretical work has yielded apt descriptions of protein folding landscapes, recent large-scale simulations have provided insights into protein folding that were impractical to obtain from early theories. In particular, the role that non-native contacts play in protein folding, and their relation to the existence of misfolded, ?-sheet rich trap states on folding landscapes, has emerged as a topic of interest in the field. In this paper, we present a modified model of heteropolymer freezing that includes explicit secondary structural characteristics which allow observations of intramolecular amyloid states to be probed from a theoretical perspective. We introduce a variable persistence length-based energy penalty to a model Hamiltonian, and we illustrate how this modification alters the phase transitions present in the theory. We find, in particular, that inclusion of this variable persistence length increases both generic freezing and folding temperatures in the model, allowing both folding and glass transitions to occur in a more highly optimized fashion. We go on to discuss how these changes might relate to protein evolution, misfolding, and the emergence of intramolecular amyloid states. PMID:24089729

  18. Spontaneous deposition of polylysine on surfaces: role of the secondary structure to optimize noncovalent coating strategies.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, Alessandro; Mirabella, Francesca; D'Urso, Alessandro; Randazzo, Rosalba; Purrello, Roberto; Fragal, Maria Elena

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the factors that governs spontaneous molecular transfer from solution to solid surface is fundamental to control noncovalent surface functionalization strategies, both in term of robustness and reproducibility. The comprehension of the nature of interaction involved in the mechanism of spontaneous adsorption will allow for a fine modulation of the deposition process. Herein, we provide experimental evidences to demonstrate that poly-lysine secondary structure represents a crucial factor profoundly influencing the outcome of its spontaneous deposition on quartz surfaces. In particular, random coil to ?-helix transition is required to drive an effective transfer of the poly-l-lysine at the liquid-solid interface. ?-sheet deposition requires longer times to be accomplished, while random-coil deposition is highly unfavored. Accordingly, polylysine deposition on quartz and silicon is effective when ?-helix is formed in solution (pH>10). This surface noncovalent functionalization represents a simple strategy to fabricate hybrid organic-inorganic or biocompatible materials. In fact, the proposed methodology is proven robust and repeatable and compatible for combination with solution or vapor phases (i.e. MOCVD) nanomaterial deposition approaches. PMID:25441360

  19. Spatial structure of neuronal receptive field in awake monkey secondary visual cortex (V2).

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Chen, Ming; Liu, Tianyi; Lu, Haidong D; Dan, Yang; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2016-02-16

    Visual processing depends critically on the receptive field (RF) properties of visual neurons. However, comprehensive characterization of RFs beyond the primary visual cortex (V1) remains a challenge. Here we report fine RF structures in secondary visual cortex (V2) of awake macaque monkeys, identified through a projection pursuit regression analysis of neuronal responses to natural images. We found that V2 RFs could be broadly classified as V1-like (typical Gabor-shaped subunits), ultralong (subunits with high aspect ratios), or complex-shaped (subunits with multiple oriented components). Furthermore, single-unit recordings from functional domains identified by intrinsic optical imaging showed that neurons with ultralong RFs were primarily localized within pale stripes, whereas neurons with complex-shaped RFs were more concentrated in thin stripes. Thus, by combining single-unit recording with optical imaging and a computational approach, we identified RF subunits underlying spatial feature selectivity of V2 neurons and demonstrated the functional organization of these RF properties. PMID:26839410

  20. Ribosomal ITS sequences allow resolution of freshwater sponge phylogeny with alignments guided by secondary structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Itskovich, Valeria; Gontcharov, Andrey; Masuda, Yoshiki; Nohno, Tsutomu; Belikov, Sergey; Efremova, Sofia; Meixner, Martin; Janussen, Dorte

    2008-12-01

    Freshwater sponges include six extant families which belong to the suborder Spongillina (Porifera). The taxonomy of freshwater sponges is problematic and their phylogeny and evolution are not well understood. Sequences of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) of 11 species from the family Lubomirskiidae, 13 species from the family Spongillidae, and 1 species from the family Potamolepidae were obtained to study the phylogenetic relationships between endemic and cosmopolitan freshwater sponges and the evolution of sponges in Lake Baikal. The present study is the first one where ITS1 sequences were successfully aligned using verified secondary structure models and, in combination with ITS2, used to infer relationships between the freshwater sponges. Phylogenetic trees inferred using maximum likelihood, neighbor-joining, and parsimony methods and Bayesian inference revealed that the endemic family Lubomirskiidae was monophyletic. Our results do not support the monophyly of Spongillidae because Lubomirskiidae formed a robust clade with E. muelleri, and Trochospongilla latouchiana formed a robust clade with the outgroup Echinospongilla brichardi (Potamolepidae). Within the cosmopolitan family Spongillidae the genera Radiospongilla and Eunapius were found to be monophyletic, while Ephydatia muelleri was basal to the family Lubomirskiidae. The genetic distances between Lubomirskiidae species being much lower than those between Spongillidae species are indicative of their relatively recent radiation from a common ancestor. These results indicated that rDNA spacers sequences can be useful in the study of phylogenetic relationships of and the identification of species of freshwater sponges. PMID:19009316

  1. Secondary dislocation structures in a Ni-TiN system from the GMS and O-lattice theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiru; Dai, Fuzhi; Gu, Xinfu; Wang, Zhongchang; Zhang, Wenzheng

    2016-03-01

    The preferred state in an interface is the key to evaluating misfit strain, especially for the interphase interfaces in secondary preferred state. The structure of good matching site (GMS) in a GMS clusters offers a guidance for the preferred state, especially for identifying the coincidence site lattice in two dimension for secondary preferred state and the Burgers vectors in a large misfit system. Here, we combine the GMS with O-lattice theory to calculate the secondary dislocation structure in the habit planes of the type II and III TiN precipitates in a Ni-TiN system. We find that under a slight elastic strain, the type III habit plane contains a single set of secondary dislocations, consistent with the experimental observation. The type II habit plane contains three sets of secondary dislocations, two of which can be relaxed to be nearly parallel and another of which may be invisible in diffraction contrast due to its short Burgers vector. The present study provides a reasonable interpretation to the observed interfacial dislocations, and also suggests Burgers vectors for the dislocations that are not determined experimentally.

  2. Polymorphism, population structure, and multivariate relationships among secondary traits in open-pollinated corn heterotic groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant, ear and kernel traits directly or indirectly associated with grain yield in corn (Zea mays) were suggested as "secondary" traits to select for larger grain yield, especially in open-pollinated corn varieties (OPVs) and their hybrids (OPVhs). Thirty-four secondary traits, besides grain yield, ...

  3. Ligand-induced conformational transitions and secondary-structure composition of chicken liver pyruvate carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    McGurk, Karen S.; Spivey, H. Olin

    1979-01-01

    Apparent conformational transitions induced in chicken liver pyruvate carboxylase by substrates, KHCO3 and MgATP, and the allosteric effector, acetyl-CoA, were studied by using the fluorescent probe, 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid and c.d. Fluorescence measurements were made with both conventional and stopped-flow spectrophotometers. Additions of acetyl-CoA and/or ATP to the enzyme-probe solutions quenched fluorescence of the probe by the following cumulative amounts regardless of the sequence of additions: acetyl-CoA, 1013%; ATP, 2124%; acetyl-CoA plus ATP, about 35%. Additions of KHCO3 had no effect on the fluorescence. The rates of quenching by acetyl-CoA and MgATP (in the presence of acetyl-CoA) were too rapid to measure by stopped-flow kinetic methods, but kinetics of the MgATP effect (in the absence of acetyl-CoA) indicate three unimolecular transitions after the association step. The negligible effect of the probe on enzyme catalytic activity, a preservation of the near-u.v. c.d. effect of MgATP and acetyl-CoA in the presence of the probe and no observable unimolecular transitions after binding of the probe to the enzyme indicate that the probe had no deleterious effect on the enzyme. In contrast with results with 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonic acid, fluorescence of the ?-derivative of acetyl-CoA or ATP [fluorescent analogues; Secrist, Barrio, Leonard & Weber (1972) Biochemistry 11, 34993506] was not changed when either one was added to the enzyme. Secondary-structure composition of chicken liver pyruvate carboxylase estimated from the far-u.v. c.d. spectrum of the enzyme is 27% helix, 7% ?-pleated sheet and 66% other structural types. PMID:435260

  4. Ebola Virus RNA Editing Depends on the Primary Editing Site Sequence and an Upstream Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Hoenen, Thomas; Robertson, Shelly; Ricklefs, Stacy; Dolan, Michael A.; Taylor, Travis; Falzarano, Darryl; Ebihara, Hideki; Porcella, Stephen F.; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Ebolavirus (EBOV), the causative agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever and a biosafety level 4 pathogen, increases its genome coding capacity by producing multiple transcripts encoding for structural and nonstructural glycoproteins from a single gene. This is achieved through RNA editing, during which non-template adenosine residues are incorporated into the EBOV mRNAs at an editing site encoding for 7 adenosine residues. However, the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing is currently not understood. In this study, we report for the first time that minigenomes containing the glycoprotein gene editing site can undergo RNA editing, thereby eliminating the requirement for a biosafety level 4 laboratory to study EBOV RNA editing. Using a newly developed dual-reporter minigenome, we have characterized the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing, and have identified cis-acting sequences that are required for editing, located between 9 nt upstream and 9 nt downstream of the editing site. Moreover, we show that a secondary structure in the upstream cis-acting sequence plays an important role in RNA editing. EBOV RNA editing is glycoprotein gene-specific, as a stretch encoding for 7 adenosine residues located in the viral polymerase gene did not serve as an editing site, most likely due to an absence of the necessary cis-acting sequences. Finally, the EBOV protein VP30 was identified as a trans-acting factor for RNA editing, constituting a novel function for this protein. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the RNA editing mechanism of EBOV, further understanding of which might result in novel intervention strategies against this viral pathogen. PMID:24146620

  5. Structural and kinetic characterization of lithium intercalation into carbon anodes for secondary lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Norio; Satoh, Asako; Hara, Michikazu; Ohsaki, Takahisa

    1995-02-01

    Electrochemical intercalation of lithium into carbons has been studied using mesophase-pitch-based carbon fibers with different heat-treatment temperatures, coke, and graphites as anodes for secondary lithium batteries. The variations in the average layer spacing and the voltage profile for the carbons with intercalating depend on the degree of graphitization. The intercalation into a more disordered carbon fiber heated at 900 C has been characterized as intercalation into the layer structure for 0 < x < 0.5 in Li{sub x}C{sub 6}, but additional lithium insertion into an unorganized carbon loses the layer structure. The polarization resistance (R{sub p}) estimated from the impedance spectrum decreased by increasing degree of graphitization. The variation in R{sub p} with intercalation revealed the intercalation processes in various disordered carbons to be single-phase reactions with different stoichiometries of lithium intercalation. The chemical diffusion coefficient D{sub Li} of lithium ions in carbons decreased by increasing the composition x in Li{sub x}C{sub 6} up to x = 0.5. The chemical diffusion coefficient was considerably affected by the texture and the degree of graphitization of the carbons. The graphitized carbon fiber heated at 3,000 C for 0.1 < x < 0.5 in Li{sub x}C{sub 6} exhibited one order magnitude larger values of D{sub Li} than those of graphites. The rapid diffusion in the graphitized carbon fiber has been attributed to the radial texture in the cross section. It has been found that the activation energy for the diffusion process decreased by increasing the degree of graphitization.

  6. Application of the local regression method interval partial least-squares to the elucidation of protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Navea, Susana; Tauler, Romà; de Juan, Anna

    2005-01-15

    The infrared amide bands are sensitive to the conformation of the polypeptide backbone of proteins. Since the backbone of proteins folds in complex spatial arrangements, the amide bands of these proteins result from the superimposition of vibration modes corresponding to the different types of structural motifs (alpha helices, beta sheets, etc.). Initially, band deconvolution techniques were applied to determine the secondary structure of proteins, i.e., the abundance of each structural motif in the polypeptide chain was directly related to the area of the suitable deconvolved vibration modes under the amide I band (1700-1600 cm(-1)). Recently, several multivariate regression methods have been used to predict the secondary structure of proteins as an alternative to the previous methods. They are based on establishing a relationship between a matrix of infrared protein spectra and another that includes their secondary structure, expressed as the fractions of the different structural motifs, determined from X-ray analysis. In this study, we investigated the use of the local regression method interval partial least-squares (iPLS) to seek improvements to the full-spectrum PLS and other regression methods. The local character of iPLS avoids the use of spectral regions that can introduce noise or that can be irrelevant for prediction and focuses on finding specific spectral ranges related to each secondary structure motif in all the proteins. This study has been applied to a representative protein data set with infrared spectra covering a large wavenumber range, including amides I-III bands (1700-1200 cm(-1)). iPLS has revealed new structural mode assignments related to less explored amide bands and has offered a satisfactory predictive ability using a small amount of selected specific spectral information. PMID:15620888

  7. RNase footprinting of protein binding sites on an mRNA target of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi; Soper, Toby J; Woodson, Sarah A

    2012-01-01

    Endoribonuclease footprinting is an important technique for probing RNA-protein interactions with single nucleotide resolution. The susceptibility of RNA residues to enzymatic digestion gives information about the RNA secondary structure, the location of protein binding sites, and the effects of protein binding on the RNA structure. Here we present a detailed protocol for using RNase T2, which cleaves single stranded RNA with a preference for A nucleotides, to footprint the protein Hfq on the rpoS mRNA leader. This protocol covers how to form the RNP complex, determine the correct dose of enzyme, footprint the protein, and analyze the cleavage pattern using primer extension. PMID:22736006

  8. Acute Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Independent Unconventional Splicing of XBP1 mRNA in the Nucleus of Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Xing, Pan; Cui, Wenjing; Wang, Wenwen; Cui, Yanfen; Ying, Guoguang; Wang, Xin; Li, Binghui

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of expression of X-box-binding protein-1 (XBP1), a transcriptional factor, involves an unconventional mRNA splicing that removes the 26 nucleotides intron. In contrast to the conventional splicing that exclusively takes place in the nucleus, determining the location of unconventional splicing still remains controversial. This study was designed to examine whether the unconventional spicing of XBP1 mRNA could occur in the nucleus and its possible biological relevance. We use RT-PCR reverse transcription system and the expand high fidelity PCR system to detect spliced XBP1 mRNA, and fraction cells to determine the location of the unconventional splicing of XBP1 mRNA. We employ reporter constructs to show the presence of unconventional splicing machinery in mammal cells independently of acute endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Our results reveal the presence of basal unconventional splicing of XBP1 mRNA in the nucleus that also requires inositol-requiring transmembrane kinase and endonuclease 1? (IRE1?) and can occur independently of acute ER stress. Furthermore, we confirm that acute ER stress induces the splicing of XBP1 mRNA predominantly occurring in the cytoplasm, but it also promotes the splicing in the nucleus. The deletion of 5?-nucleotides in XBP1 mRNA significantly increases its basal unconventional splicing, suggesting that the secondary structure of XBP1 mRNA may determine the location of unconventional splicing. These results suggest that the unconventional splicing of XBP1 mRNA can take place in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm, which possibly depends on the elaborate regulation. The acute ER stress-independent unconventional splicing in the nucleus is most likely required for the maintaining of day-to-day folding protein homeostasis. PMID:26068456

  9. [Immune reactivity of human lens structures in norm, age-related cortical and secondary opacification].

    PubMed

    Korsakova, N V; Luzikova, E M; Shatskikh, O A; Hikiforova, A V; Larionova, N I

    2013-01-01

    Using immunohistochemical methods, the immune reactivity of human lens epithelium and fibers to NSE, S-100 protein, Vim, alpha-SMA and EMA was studied in 10 normal persons and in 25 patients with its age-related cortical and secondary cataract. It was demonstrated that in age-related cortical and secondary cataract lens epithelium and fibers became more reactive to antibodies against NSE, S-100 protein and Vim, but showed no immunopositivity to alpha-SMA and EMA. Thus, the data obtained suggest some common pathogenetic mechanisms of age-related cortical and secondary cataract development with the formation of Adamyuk-Elschnig pearls. PMID:23805611

  10. Crystal Structure of a Bacterial Topoisomerase IB in Complex with DNA Reveals a Secondary DNA Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Asmita; Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragn, Alfonso

    2010-10-22

    Type IB DNA topoisomerases (TopIB) are monomeric enzymes that relax supercoils by cleaving and resealing one strand of duplex DNA within a protein clamp that embraces a {approx}21 DNA segment. A longstanding conundrum concerns the capacity of TopIB enzymes to stabilize intramolecular duplex DNA crossovers and form protein-DNA synaptic filaments. Here we report a structure of Deinococcus radiodurans TopIB in complex with a 12 bp duplex DNA that demonstrates a secondary DNA binding site located on the surface of the C-terminal domain. It comprises a distinctive interface with one strand of the DNA duplex and is conserved in all TopIB enzymes. Modeling of a TopIB with both DNA sites suggests that the secondary site could account for DNA crossover binding, nucleation of DNA synapsis, and generation of a filamentous plectoneme. Mutations of the secondary site eliminate synaptic plectoneme formation without affecting DNA cleavage or supercoil relaxation.

  11. Two-dimensional sup 1 H NMR studies on HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus: Complete sequential assignments and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbitzer, H.R.; Neidig, K.P. ); Hengstenberg, W. )

    1991-11-19

    Complete sequence-specific assignments of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of HPr protein from Staphylococcus aureus were obtained by two-dimensional NMR methods. Important secondary structure elements that can be derived from the observed nuclear Overhauser effects are a large antiparallel {beta}-pleated sheet consisting of four strands, A, B, C, D, a segment S{sub AB} consisting of an extended region around the active-center histidine (His-15) and an {alpha}-helix, a half-turn between strands B and C, a segment S{sub CD} which shows no typical secondary structure, and the {alpha}-helical, C-terminal segment S{sub term}. These general structural features are similar to those found earlier in HPr proteins from different microorganisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Streptococcus faecalis.

  12. MCR-ALS analysis of two-way UV resonance Raman spectra to resolve discrete protein secondary structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Simpson, John V; Balakrishnan, Gurusamy; Jiji, Renee D

    2009-01-01

    The ability of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to monitor a host of structurally sensitive protein vibrational modes, the amide I, II, III and S regions, makes it a potentially powerful tool for the visualization of equilibrium and non-equilibrium secondary structure changes in even the most difficult peptide samples. However, it is difficult to unambiguously resolve discrete secondary structure-derived UVRR spectral signatures independently of one another as each contributes an unknown profile to each of the spectrally congested vibrational modes. This limitation is compounded by the presence of aromatic side chains, which introduce additional overlapping vibrational modes. To address this, we have exploited an often overlooked tool for alleviating this spectral overlap by utilizing the differential excitability of the vibrational modes associated with alpha-helices and coil moieties, in the deep UV. The differences in the resonance enhancements of the various structurally associated vibrational modes yields an added dimensionality in the spectral data sets making them multi-way in nature. Through a 'chemically relevant' shape-constrained multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) analysis, we were able to deconvolute the complex amide regions in the multi-excitation UVRR spectrum of the protein myoglobin, giving us potentially useful 'pure' secondary structure-derived contributions to these individual vibrational profiles. PMID:19082186

  13. Structural integrity of the PCI domain of eIF3a/TIF32 is required for mRNA recruitment to the 43S pre-initiation complexes

    PubMed Central

    Khoshnevis, Sohail; Guniov, Stanislava; Vl?kov, Vladislava; Kouba, Tom; Neumann, Piotr; Beznoskov, Petra; Ficner, Ralf; Valek, Leo Shivaya

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of genetic information from genes into proteins is mediated by messenger RNA (mRNA) that must be first recruited to ribosomal pre-initiation complexes (PICs) by a mechanism that is still poorly understood. Recent studies showed that besides eIF4F and poly(A)-binding protein, eIF3 also plays a critical role in this process, yet the molecular mechanism of its action is unknown. We showed previously that the PCI domain of the eIF3c/NIP1 subunit of yeast eIF3 is involved in RNA binding. To assess the role of the second PCI domain of eIF3 present in eIF3a/TIF32, we performed its mutational analysis and identified a 10-Ala-substitution (Box37) that severely reduces amounts of model mRNA in the 4348S PICs in vivo as the major, if not the only, detectable defect. Crystal structure analysis of the a/TIF32-PCI domain at 2.65- resolution showed that it is required for integrity of the eIF3 core and, similarly to the c/NIP1-PCI, is capable of RNA binding. The putative RNA-binding surface defined by positively charged areas contains two Box37 residues, R363 and K364. Their substitutions with alanines severely impair the mRNA recruitment step in vivo suggesting that a/TIF32-PCI represents one of the key domains ensuring stable and efficient mRNA delivery to the PICs. PMID:24423867

  14. Aggregation and Secondary Loop Structure of Oligonucleotides do not Determine Their Ability to Inhibit TLR9

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, Robert F.; Goeken, J. Adam; Lenert, Petar S.

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is an endosomal DNA sensor that warns us of the presence of infectious danger and triggers a rapid pro-inflammatory response in dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells. The consequences of uncontrolled TLR9 activation can be detrimental for the host, contributing to the pathogenesis of bacterial septic shock or autoimmune diseases, such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Therefore, we need to develop TLR9 antagonists. We and others have created inhibitory oligonucleotides (INH-ODN) that are capable of sequence-dependent inhibition of TLR9-induced activation in both human and mouse cells. But it is not clear whether marked differences in INH-ODN activity related to base sequence derived from polymerization of INH-ODNs, or their ability to complex with stimulatory CpG-oligonucleotides (ST-ODN). Furthermore, the 5? end of INH-ODNs may assume a particular loop configuration that may be needed for binding to a critical site on TLR9. Here we show that: 1) G-tetrads required for ODN stacking were compatible with INH-ODN activity, but were not necessary; 2) There was no relationship between activity and self-association at endosomal pH; 3) There was no evidence for direct binding between ST-ODNs and INH-ODNs; 4) When a 3 G sequence was disrupted, despite a preserved stem-loop formation, INH-ODN activity was abolished. These results support the conclusion that certain features of the primary linear sequence are critical for TLR9 inhibition, but changes in secondary structure or in ODN aggregation are irrelevant. PMID:21376154

  15. Chemical probing of adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Rairkar, A.; Rubino, H.M.; Lockard, R.E.

    1988-01-26

    The location of unpaired adenine residues within the secondary structure of rabbit /sup 18/S ribosomal RNA was determined by chemical probing. Naked /sup 18/S rRNA was first prepared by digestion of purified 40S subunits with matrix-bound proteinase K in sodium dodecyl sulfate, thereby omitting the use of nucleic acid denaturants. Adenines within naked /sup 18/S rRNA were chemically probed by using either diethyl pyrocarbonate or dimethyl sulfate, which specifically react with unpaired nucleotides. Adenine modification sites were identified by polyacrylamide sequencing gel electrophoresis either upon aniline-induced strand scission of /sup 32/P-end-labeled intact and fragmented rRNA or by primer extension using sequence-specific DNA oligomers with reverse transcriptase. The data indicate good agreement between the general pattern of adenine reactivity and the location of unpaired regions in /sup 18/S rRNA determined by comparative sequence analysis. The overall reactivity of adenine residues toward single-strand-specific chemical probes was, also, similar for both rabbit and Escherichia coli small rRNA. The number of strongly reactive adenines appearing within phylogenetically determined helical segments, however, was greater in rabbit /sup 18/S rRNA than for E. coli /sup 16/S rRNA. Some of these adenines were found clustered in specific helices. Such differences suggest a greater irregularity of many of the helical elements within mammalian /sup 18/S rRNA, as compared with prokaryotic /sup 16/S rRNA. These helical irregularities could be important for protein association and also may represent biologically relevant flexible regions of the molecule.

  16. Graph-distance distribution of the Boltzmann ensemble of RNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Large RNA molecules are often composed of multiple functional domains whose spatial arrangement strongly influences their function. Pre-mRNA splicing, for instance, relies on the spatial proximity of the splice junctions that can be separated by very long introns. Similar effects appear in the processing of RNA virus genomes. Albeit a crude measure, the distribution of spatial distances in thermodynamic equilibrium harbors useful information on the shape of the molecule that in turn can give insights into the interplay of its functional domains. Result Spatial distance can be approximated by the graph-distance in RNA secondary structure. We show here that the equilibrium distribution of graph-distances between a fixed pair of nucleotides can be computed in polynomial time by means of dynamic programming. While a nave implementation would yield recursions with a very high time complexity of O(n6D5) for sequence length n and D distinct distance values, it is possible to reduce this to O(n4) for practical applications in which predominantly small distances are of of interest. Further reductions, however, seem to be difficult. Therefore, we introduced sampling approaches that are much easier to implement. They are also theoretically favorable for several real-life applications, in particular since these primarily concern long-range interactions in very large RNA molecules. Conclusions The graph-distance distribution can be computed using a dynamic programming approach. Although a crude approximation of reality, our initial results indicate that the graph-distance can be related to the smFRET data. The additional file and the software of our paper are available from http://www.rna.uni-jena.de/RNAgraphdist.html. PMID:25285153

  17. Structure and spectra of irradiated secondaries in close binaries. A model calculation of the pre-cataclysmic variable UU Sagittae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyn, A. C.; Barman, T. S.; Gnther, H. M.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Exter, K. M.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The standard stellar model atmosphere ignores the influence of external radiation. This assumption, while sufficient for most stars, fails for many short-period binaries. Aims: In setting up combined model atmospheres for close binaries, we want to constrain the parameters of both components, especially in the case of a hot primary component strongly influencing its cool secondary companion. This situation can be found after common envelope evolution (CEE). The status of both components today allows one to retrace the CEE itself. Methods: We used our stellar atmosphere code PHOENIX, which includes the effect of irradiation in its radiation transport equation, to investigate the close binary star UU Sge. We combined our calculated spectra of both components, weighted by their visible size, and adjusted the input parameters until reasonable agreement with observations is reached. Results: We derive a range of 80 000-85 000 K for the effective temperature of the primary (Teff, p) and give a rough estimate for the primary's abundances, particularly the nitrogen enrichment. The heated day-side of the secondary has an apparent effective or equilibrium temperature of 24 000-26 000 K, nearly independent of its intrinsic luminosity. It shows an enhancement in nitrogen and carbon. Conclusions: The evolution of the primary and secondary stars were strongly influenced by the other's presence. Radiation from the primary on the secondary's day-side is still an important factor in understanding the secondary's atmospheric structure.

  18. Hybrid host-guest complexes: directing the supramolecular structure through secondary host-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Streb, Carsten; McGlone, Thomas; Brcher, Oliver; Long, De-Liang; Cronin, Leroy

    2008-01-01

    A set of four hybrid host-guest complexes based on the inorganic crown ether analogue [H12W36O120]12- ({W36}) have been isolated and characterised. The cluster anion features a central rigid binding site made up of six terminal oxygen ligands and this motif allows the selective binding of a range of alkali and alkali-earth-metal cations. Here, the binding site was utilised to functionalise the metal oxide-based cavity by complexing a range of protonated primary amines within the recognition site. As a result, a set of four hybrid organic-inorganic host-guest complexes were obtained whereby the interactions are highly directed specifically within this cavity. The guest cations in these molecular assemblies range from the aromatic 2-phenethylamine (1) and 4-phenylbutylamine (2) to the bifunctional aromatic p-xylylene diamine (3) and the aliphatic, bifunctional 1,6-diaminohexane (4). Compounds 1-4 were structurally characterised by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, flame atomic absorption spectroscopy, FTIR and bond valence sum calculations. This comparative study focuses on the supramolecular effects of the amine guest cations and investigates their structure-directing effects on the framework arrangement arising by locking the protonated amines within the cavity of the {W36} cluster. It was shown that parts of the organic guest cation protrude from the central binding cavity and the nature of this protruding organic "tail" directs the solid-state arrangement of compounds 1-4. Guest cations with a hydrophobic phenyl tail result in an antiparallel assembly of {W36} complexes arranged in a series of pillared layers. As a consequence, no direct supramolecular interactions between {W36} clusters are observed. In contrast, bifunctional guest cations with a secondary amino binding site act as molecular connectors and directly link two cluster units thus locking the supramolecular assembly in a tilted arrangement. This direct linking of {W36} anions results in the formation of an infinite supramolecular scaffold. PMID:18780383

  19. Fabrication of sub-20 nm nano-gap structures through the elastomeric nano-stamp assisted secondary sputtering phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Lee, Eun Hyung; Yoo, Hae-Wook; Kim, Kyoung Hwan; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2014-06-01

    We describe a highly efficient method for fabricating controllable and reliable sub-20 nm scale nano-gap structures through an elastomeric nano-stamp with an embedded ultra-thin pattern. The stamp consists of ultrahigh resolution (approximately 10 nm) and high aspect ratio (ca. 15) metal nano-structures, which are obtained by secondary sputtering lithography (SSL). The nano-gap structures fabricated in this fashion achieve a high resolution and meet the requirements of minimal cost, high reliability, controllability, reproducibility, and applicability to different materials. Further, we demonstrate that this method enables the fabrication of SERS substrates for detection at the single-molecule level. PMID:24770563

  20. Tunable loading of oligonucleotides with secondary structure on gold nanoparticles through a pH-driven method.

    PubMed

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Lee, Hyojin; Lee, Raymond C; Kim, Ki Hun; Kelleher, Neil L; Odom, Teri W

    2015-02-18

    This paper describes how pH can be used to control covalent attachment of oligonucleotides with secondary structure on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The highest loading of thiolated nucleic acids occurred at low pH (pH = 1.7) due to reduced repulsion between the negatively charged oligonucleotides and the AuNP surface. The packing of oligonucleotides at low pH decreased (single-stranded ? duplex > quadruplex) as the spatial footprint of secondary structure increased. As the pH increased, a decrease in the number of DNA strands grafted to the AuNPs was observed. Notably, the loading density depended on the flexibility and spatial organization of the secondary structures at all pH conditions. At the lowest pH tested, circular dichroism analysis revealed that G-quadruplex aptamers underwent a structural change (from parallel to antiparallel or vice versa), although the biological activity of the aptamer-loaded AuNPs was still maintained. We anticipate that pH-tuning can result in quantitative loading of oligonucleotides on various types of AuNPs with different shapes and surface capping layers. PMID:25564799

  1. Characterizing the secondary protein structure of black widow dragline silk using solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Janelle E; Sampath, Sujatha; Butler, Emily; Kim, Jihyun; Henning, Robert W; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-10-14

    This study provides a detailed secondary structural characterization of major ampullate dragline silk from Latrodectus hesperus (black widow) spiders. X-ray diffraction results show that the structure of black widow major ampullate silk fibers is comprised of stacked ?-sheet nanocrystallites oriented parallel to the fiber axis and an amorphous region with oriented (anisotropic) and isotropic components. The combination of two-dimensional (2D) (13)C-(13)C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments provide chemical shifts that are used to determine detailed information about the amino acid motif secondary structure in black widow spider dragline silk. Individual amino acids are incorporated into different repetitive motifs that make up the majority of this protein-based biopolymer. From the solid-state NMR measurements, we assign distinct secondary conformations to each repetitive amino acid motif and, hence, to the amino acids that make up the motifs. Specifically, alanine is incorporated in ?-sheet (poly(Alan) and poly(Gly-Ala)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Xaa), and ?-helix (poly(Gln-Gln-Ala-Tyr)) components. Glycine is determined to be in ?-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala)) and 3(1)-helical (poly(Gly-Gly-X(aa))) regions, while serine is present in ?-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala-Ser)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Ser)), and ?-turn (poly(Gly-Pro-Ser)) structures. These various motif-specific secondary structural elements are quantitatively correlated to the primary amino acid sequence of major ampullate spidroin 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and MaSp2) and are shown to form a self-consistent model for black widow dragline silk. PMID:24024617

  2. Secondary amenorrhea

    MedlinePLUS

    Amenorrhea - secondary; No periods - secondary; Absent periods - secondary; Absent menses - secondary; Absence of periods - secondary ... of amenorrhea. Many of the conditions that cause secondary amenorrhea will respond to treatment.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition of silk protein: Effect of photosensitized-ablation on the secondary structure in thin deposited films

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Goto, Masaharu; Itaya, Akira

    2001-06-15

    Silk fibroin is a simple protein expected to have functional applications in medicine and bioelectronics. The primary structure of this protein is quite simple, and the main secondary structures are {beta}-sheet crystals and amorphous random coils. In the present study, we investigated pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of fibroin with the {beta}-sheet structures as targets. The primary and secondary structures in films deposited were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy. Normal laser deposition at 351 nm using neat fibroin targets produced thin films of fibroin with a random coiled structure. Ablation was triggered by two-photonic excitation of the peptide chains, which resulted in the destruction of {beta}-sheet structure in PLD. In order to avoid the two-photonic excitation, we adopted a PLD method utilizing anthracene (5{endash}0.1 wt%) in a photosensitized reaction involving doped fibroin targets. Laser light (351 or 355 nm) was absorbed only by anthracene, which plays an important role converting photon energy to thermal energy with great ablation efficiency. Thin fibroin films deposited by this method had both random coil and {beta}-sheet structures. As the dopant concentration and laser fluence decreased, the ratio of {beta}-sheet domain to random coil increased in thin deposited films. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of silk protein: Effect of photosensitized-ablation on the secondary structure in thin deposited films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Goto, Masaharu; Itaya, Akira

    2001-06-01

    Silk fibroin is a simple protein expected to have functional applications in medicine and bioelectronics. The primary structure of this protein is quite simple, and the main secondary structures are ?-sheet crystals and amorphous random coils. In the present study, we investigated pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of fibroin with the ?-sheet structures as targets. The primary and secondary structures in films deposited were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy. Normal laser deposition at 351 nm using neat fibroin targets produced thin films of fibroin with a random coiled structure. Ablation was triggered by two-photonic excitation of the peptide chains, which resulted in the destruction of ?-sheet structure in PLD. In order to avoid the two-photonic excitation, we adopted a PLD method utilizing anthracene (5-0.1 wt %) in a photosensitized reaction involving doped fibroin targets. Laser light (351 or 355 nm) was absorbed only by anthracene, which plays an important role converting photon energy to thermal energy with great ablation efficiency. Thin fibroin films deposited by this method had both random coil and ?-sheet structures. As the dopant concentration and laser fluence decreased, the ratio of ?-sheet domain to random coil increased in thin deposited films.

  5. Comparison between coacervation property and secondary structure of synthetic peptides, Ile-containing elastin-derived pentapeptide repeats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Iori; Taniguchi, Suguru; Ebina, Junko; Watanabe, Noriko; Hattori, Takao; Nose, Takeru

    2013-08-01

    A series of Ile-containing elastin-derived peptide-analogs, (Ile-Pro-Gly-Val-Gly)n (n = 7-10) possessing remarkable and reversible coacervation property were newly synthesized. In comparison with the known elastin-derived peptide-analogs, which were so-called polypeptides, the obtained 35 to 50 mer peptides, (IPGVG)n (n = 7-10) were significantly low molecular sized-polypeptides. However, they clearly exhibited coacervation property as same as the polypeptides did. Because of their low molecular size, spectrographic analyses of (IPGVG)n (n = 7-10) became feasible to carry out. As results of secondary structural analyses by CD and FT-IR, it was found that the coacervation property of the peptides is clearly attributed to the ordered secondary-structures, mainly, type II ?-turn. PMID:23409853

  6. Interactions between MUR10/CesA7-Dependent Secondary Cellulose Biosynthesis and Primary Cell Wall Structure1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Bosca, Sonia; Barton, Christopher J.; Taylor, Neil G.; Ryden, Peter; Neumetzler, Lutz; Pauly, Markus; Roberts, Keith; Seifert, Georg J.

    2006-01-01

    Primary cell walls are deposited and remodeled during cell division and expansion. Secondary cell walls are deposited in specialized cells after the expansion phase. It is presently unknown whether and how these processes are interrelated. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MUR10 gene is required for normal primary cell wall carbohydrate composition in mature leaves as well as for normal plant growth, hypocotyl strength, and fertility. The overall sugar composition of young mur10 seedlings is not significantly altered; however, the relative proportion of pectin side chains is shifted toward an increase in 1 ? 5-?-arabinan relative to 1 ? 4-?-galactan. mur10 seedlings display reduced fucogalactosylation of tightly cell wall-bound xyloglucan. Expression levels of genes encoding either nucleotide sugar interconversion enzymes or glycosyl transferases, known to be involved in primary and secondary cell wall biosynthesis, are generally unaffected; however, the CesA7 transcript is specifically suppressed in the mur10-1 allele. The MUR10 locus is identical with the CesA7 gene, which encodes a cellulose catalytic subunit previously thought to be specifically involved in secondary cell wall formation. The xylem vessels in young mur10 hypocotyls are collapsed and their birefringence is lost. Moreover, a fucogalactosylated xyloglucan epitope is reduced and a 1 ? 5-?-arabinan epitope increased in every cell type in mur10 hypocotyls, including cells that do not deposit secondary walls. mur10 also displays altered distribution of an arabinogalactan-protein epitope previously associated with xylem differentiation and secondary wall thickening. This work indicates the existence of a mechanism that senses secondary cell wall integrity and controls biosynthesis or structural remodeling of primary cell walls and cellular differentiation. PMID:17041031

  7. Intrusive growth of primary and secondary phloem fibres in hemp stem determines fibre-bundle formation and structure.

    PubMed

    Snegireva, Anastasia; Chernova, Tatyana; Ageeva, Marina; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Gorshkova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibres-cells with important mechanical functions and a widely used raw material-are usually identified in microscopic sections only after reaching a significant length or after developing a thickened cell wall. We characterized the early developmental stages of hemp (Cannabis sativa) stem phloem fibres, both primary (originating from the procambium) and secondary (originating in the cambium), when they still had only a primary cell wall. We gave a major emphasis to the role of intrusive elongation, the specific type of plant cell growth by which fibres commonly attain large cell length. We could identify primary phloem fibres at a distance of only 1.2-1.5 mm from the shoot apical meristem when they grew symplastically with the surrounding tissues. Half a millimeter further downwards along the stem, fibres began their intrusive elongation, which led to a sharp increase in fibre numbers visible within the stem cross-sections. The intrusive elongation of primary phloem fibres was completed within the several distal centimetres of the growing stem, before the onset of their secondary cell wall formation. The formation of secondary phloem fibres started long after the beginning of secondary xylem formation. Our data indicate that only a small portion of the fusiform cambial initials (<10 %) give rise directly or via their derivatives to secondary phloem fibres. The key determinant of final bundle structure, both for primary and secondary phloem fibres, is intrusive growth. Through bi-directional elongation, fibres join other fibres initiated individually in other stem levels, thus forming the bundles. Our results provide the specific developmental basis for further biochemical and molecular-genetic studies of phloem fibre development in hemp, but may be applied to many other species. PMID:26019229

  8. Intrusive growth of primary and secondary phloem fibres in hemp stem determines fibre-bundle formation and structure

    PubMed Central

    Snegireva, Anastasia; Chernova, Tatyana; Ageeva, Marina; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Gorshkova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibrescells with important mechanical functions and a widely used raw materialare usually identified in microscopic sections only after reaching a significant length or after developing a thickened cell wall. We characterized the early developmental stages of hemp (Cannabis sativa) stem phloem fibres, both primary (originating from the procambium) and secondary (originating in the cambium), when they still had only a primary cell wall. We gave a major emphasis to the role of intrusive elongation, the specific type of plant cell growth by which fibres commonly attain large cell length. We could identify primary phloem fibres at a distance of only 1.21.5 mm from the shoot apical meristem when they grew symplastically with the surrounding tissues. Half a millimeter further downwards along the stem, fibres began their intrusive elongation, which led to a sharp increase in fibre numbers visible within the stem cross-sections. The intrusive elongation of primary phloem fibres was completed within the several distal centimetres of the growing stem, before the onset of their secondary cell wall formation. The formation of secondary phloem fibres started long after the beginning of secondary xylem formation. Our data indicate that only a small portion of the fusiform cambial initials (<10 %) give rise directly or via their derivatives to secondary phloem fibres. The key determinant of final bundle structure, both for primary and secondary phloem fibres, is intrusive growth. Through bi-directional elongation, fibres join other fibres initiated individually in other stem levels, thus forming the bundles. Our results provide the specific developmental basis for further biochemical and molecular-genetic studies of phloem fibre development in hemp, but may be applied to many other species. PMID:26019229

  9. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of an IgG-binding domain from protein G

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, L.Y.; Yang, J.C.; Derrick, J.P.; Sutcliffe, M.J.; Roberts, G.C.K. ); Murphy, J.P.; Goward, C.R.; Atkinson, T. )

    1991-06-04

    Protein G is a member of a class of cell surface bacterial proteins from Streptococcus that bind IgG with high affinity. A fragment of molecular mass 6,988, which retains IgG-binding activity, has been generated by proteolytic digestion and analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR. Two-dimenstional DQF-COSY, TOCSY, and NOESY spectra have been employed to assign the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the peptide. Elements of regular secondary structure have been identified by using nuclear Overhauser enhancement, coupling constant, and amide proton exchange data. The secondary structure consists of a central {alpha}-helix (Ala28-Val44), flanked by two portions of {beta}-sheet (Val5-Val26 and Asp45-Lys62). This is a fundamentally different arrangement of secondary structure from that of protein A, which is made up of three consecutive {alpha}-helics in free solution. The authors conclude that the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of protein A and protein G with IgG are different.

  10. High-Resolution NMR Reveals Secondary Structure and Folding of Amino Acid Transporter from Outer Chloroplast Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zook, James D.; Molugu, Trivikram R.; Jacobsen, Neil E.; Lin, Guangxin; Soll, Jürgen; Cherry, Brian R.; Brown, Michael F.; Fromme, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Solving high-resolution structures for membrane proteins continues to be a daunting challenge in the structural biology community. In this study we report our high-resolution NMR results for a transmembrane protein, outer envelope protein of molar mass 16 kDa (OEP16), an amino acid transporter from the outer membrane of chloroplasts. Three-dimensional, high-resolution NMR experiments on the 13C, 15N, 2H-triply-labeled protein were used to assign protein backbone resonances and to obtain secondary structure information. The results yield over 95% assignment of N, HN, CO, Cα, and Cβ chemical shifts, which is essential for obtaining a high resolution structure from NMR data. Chemical shift analysis from the assignment data reveals experimental evidence for the first time on the location of the secondary structure elements on a per residue basis. In addition T1Z and T2 relaxation experiments were performed in order to better understand the protein dynamics. Arginine titration experiments yield an insight into the amino acid residues responsible for protein transporter function. The results provide the necessary basis for high-resolution structural determination of this important plant membrane protein. PMID:24205117

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Tubbs, Jason D; Kennedy, Scott D; Lopez, Michael J; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2015-11-17

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure-function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5' to 3' directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5' to 3' directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure. PMID:26451676

  12. Fabrication of sub-20 nm nano-gap structures through the elastomeric nano-stamp assisted secondary s