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Sample records for msp63 complexes induce

  1. Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zifkin, Benjamin G; Inoue, Yushi

    2004-01-01

    Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli may be triggered by patterned and flashing displays that are now ubiquitous. The seizures may be clinically generalized, but unilateral and bilateral myoclonic attacks also may be triggered, especially in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and recently, clearly focal reflex occipital lobe seizures have been described. Some seizure-triggering properties of video displays can be identified, such as perceived brightness, pattern, flicker frequency, and color. Knowledge of these is useful in planning individual treatment and in designing regulations for screen content of television broadcasts or for other video displays. Some subjects will also be sensitive to cognitive or action-programming activation, especially when playing video games, and this can increase the chance of seizure triggering. Nonspecific factors such as sleep deprivation, prolonged exposure, and drug or alcohol use also may play a role in reflex seizure occurrence. PMID:14706042

  2. Photochemically induced transformations of transition complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.E.

    1993-05-17

    Photolysis of the dinuclear complex ((n5-C5H5)Fe(CO)2)2 in CHCl3 results in the formation of (n5-c5H5)Fe(CO)2Cl through intermediate 17-electron radicals of the form (n5-C5H5)Fe(CO)2. The photolyses of the related diphosphine-bridged compounds ((n5-C5H5)Fe(CO)2-u-DPPX, where DPPX=DPPM, DPPE and DPPP and therefore are (Ph2P)2CH2, (Ph2P)2C2H, and (Ph2P)2C3H6 respectively), are described. The synthesis and photolysis of the analogous ruthenium DPPM dimer is also described. In contrast to the behavior of the simple iron dinuclear species, the DPPM and DPPE phosphine bridged compounds undergo photolysis in CHCl3 to yield products containing formyl substituted cyclopentadienyl rings. Details of the reactions studied and product characterizations using multinuclear NMR, IR and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques are described. A possible mechanism for the formation of the formyl derivatives 5 is outlined. In the synthesis and purification of ((n5C5H5)Ru(CO))2-u-DPPM and the attempted synthesis of the ((n5-C5H5)Ru(CO))2-u-DPPE, two ruthenium monomers of the form (n5-C5H5)Ru(Cl)DPPX resulted. A possible reaction pathway for the synthesis of these two monomers as byproducts in the ruthenium phosphine dimer preparation is suggested. Full structural and spectral characterizations of the monomeric compounds are Included. Photosynthesis, Organometallics, Reimer-Tiemann.

  3. Hypnosedative-induced complex behaviours : incidence, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Dolder, Christian R; Nelson, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    A number of news items and case reports describing complex behaviours (e.g. sleep driving, sleep cooking, sleep eating, sleep conversations, sleep sex) associated with the use of hypnosedative medications have recently received considerable attention. Regulatory agencies examining these reports have subsequently issued warnings regarding the potential of hypnosedative agents to produce complex behaviours. Despite these warnings, little is known about the likelihood, presentation, treatment or prevention of hypnosedative-induced complex behaviours. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the published evidence regarding the clinical presentation, incidence, mechanism and management of sleep-related behaviours induced by nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists (NBRAs).Review of the literature identified ten published case reports of NBRA-induced complex behaviours involving 17 unique patients. Fifteen of the 17 patients described in the case reports had taken zolpidem, one had taken zaleplon and one had taken zopiclone. The complex behaviours most commonly reported were sleep eating, sleepwalking with object manipulation, sleep conversations, sleep driving, sleep sex and sleep shopping. Elevated serum concentrations resulting from increased medication dose or drug-drug interactions appeared to play a role in some but not all cases. Sex, age, previous medication exposure and concomitant disease states were not consistently found to be related to the risk of experiencing a medication-induced complex behaviour.From a pharmacological standpoint, enhancement of GABA activity at GABAA receptors (particularly alpha1-GABAA receptors) is a possible mechanism for hypnosedative complex behaviours and amnesia. Evidence suggests that complex behaviour risk may increase with both dose and binding affinity at alpha1-GABAA receptors. The amnesia that accompanies complex behaviours is possibly due to inhibition of consolidation of short- to long-term memory, suggesting that the risk

  4. Inducible cadmium binding complexes of cabbage and tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.J.; Trotter, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    Cadmium complexes with apparent molecular weights of 10,000 were observed in aqueous extracts of Cd-treated cabbage (Brassica capitata L., cv. red danish) and tobacco (hybrid of Nicotiana glauca and N. langsdorffii) plants. The amount of complex (as Cd) recovered was found to be dependent on the concentration of the metal in the growth medium and the total time of exposure of plants to the metal. Induction of the complex at moderate levels of /sup 112/Cd exposure was monitored after labeling the complex with /sup 109/Cd in vitro. The constitutive nature of the ligand of the complex in cabbage and tobacco leaves was suggested when control plant extracts were exposed to /sup 109/Cd. Such extracts contained /sup 109/Cd, which eluted froom Sephadex G-50 in the region of Cd complex. Simultaneous labeling with /sup 112/Cd and /sup 35/S or /sup 32/P indicated that the complex contained sulfur but probably not phosphorus. The amount of /sup 35/S which eluted coincident with /sup 112/Cd complex increased during complex induction. No evidence was found for the presence of 10,000 molecular weight Cd complex in stem exudates (vascular sap) of Cd-treated plants. The results obtained are consistent with the presence in these tissues of a ligand which is both inducible and consitutive and binds Cd in mercaptide bonds. All of these properties and oters reported earlier, are characteristic of Cd-metallothionein formed in animals.

  5. Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements Induced in Vivo by Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Ando, K.; Furusawa, G.; Obe, G.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the ratio complex/simple exchanges can be used as a biomarker of exposure to high-LET radiation. We tested this hypothesis in vivo, by considering data from several studies that measured complex exchanges in peripheral blood from humans exposed to mixed fields of low- and high-LET radiation. In particular, we studied data from astronauts involved in long-term missions in low-Earth-orbit, and uterus cancer patients treated with accelerated carbon ions. Data from two studies of chromosomal aberrations in astronauts used blood samples obtained before and after space flight, and a third study used blood samples from patients before and after radiotherapy course. Similar methods were used in each study, where lymphocytes were stimulated to grow in vitro, and collected after incubation in either colcemid or calyculin A. Slides were painted with whole-chromosome DNA fluorescent probes (FISH), and complex and simple chromosome exchanges in the painted genome were classified separately. Complex-type exchanges were observed at low frequencies in control subjects, and in our test subjects before the treatment. No statistically significant increase in the yield of complex-type exchanges was induced by the space flight. Radiation therapy induced a high fraction of complex exchanges, but no significant differences could be detected between patients treated with accelerated carbon ions or X-rays. Complex chromosomal rearrangements do not represent a practical biomarker of radiation quality in our test subjects. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Calculation of interaction-induced spectra using complex absorbing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Magnus; Antipov, Sergey V.

    2010-10-29

    A complex absorbing potential method is implemented for calculation of collision-induced spectra. The scheme provides a way to avoid the integration of the Schroedinger equation to very large separations of the collisional pair. The method is tested by reproducing a previously computed absorption spectrum for H-He at two different temperatures.

  7. Necroptosis-Inducing Rhenium(V) Oxo Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Awuah, Samuel G.; Bruno, Peter M.; Johnstone, Timothy C.; Wang, Fang; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Yao-Rong; Page, Julia E.; Hemann, Michael T.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Rhenium(V) oxo complexes of general formula [ReO(OMe)(N^N)Cl2], where N^N = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, 1, or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, 2, effectively kill cancer cells by triggering necroptsosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death. Both complexes evoke necrosome (RIP1-RIP3)-dependent intracellular ROS production and propidium iodide uptake. The complexes also induce mitochondrial membrane potential depletion, a possible downstream effect of ROS production. Apparently, 1 and 2 are the first rhenium complexes to evoke cellular events consistent with programmed necrosis in cancer cells. Furthermore, 1 and 2 display low acute toxicity in C57BL/6 mice and reasonable stability in fresh human blood. PMID:25698398

  8. Potassium Channel Complex Autoimmunity Induced by Inhaled Brain Tissue Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Meeusen, Jeffrey W.; Klein, Christopher J.; Pirko, Istvan; Haselkorn, Keegan E.; Kryzer, Thomas J.; Pittock, Sean J.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Dyck, P. James; Lennon, Vanda A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that autoimmunity induced by inhalation of aerosolized brain tissue caused outbreaks of sensory-predominant polyradiculoneuropathy among swine abattoir employees in Midwestern USA Methods Mice were exposed intranasally, 5 days weekly, to liquefied brain tissue. Serum from exposed mice, patients and unaffected abattoir employees were analyzed for clinically pertinent neural autoantibodies. Results Patients, coworkers and mice exposed to liquefied brain tissue had an autoantibody profile dominated by neural cation channel IgGs. The most compelling link between patients and exposed mice was MRI evidence of grossly swollen spinal nerve roots. Autoantibody responses in patients and mice were dose-dependent and declined after antigen exposure ceased. Autoantibodies detected most frequently, and at high levels, bound to detergent-solubilized macromolecular complexes containing neuronal voltage-gated potassium channels ligated with a high affinity Kv1 channel antagonist, 125I-α-dendrotoxin. Exposed mice exhibited a behavioral phenotype consistent with potassium channel dysfunction recognized in drosophila with mutant (“shaker”) channels: reduced sensitivity to isoflurane-induced anesthesia. Pathological and electrophysiological findings in patients supported peripheral nerve hyperexcitability over destructive axonal loss. The pain-predominant symptoms were consistent with sensory nerve hyperexcitability Interpretation Our observations establish that inhaled neural antigens readily induce neurological autoimmunity and identify voltage-gated potassium channel complexes as a major immunogen. PMID:22451206

  9. Polarization-induced resistive switching behaviors in complex oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Chao; Dong, Chunhui; Jia, Chenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Xue, Desheng

    2015-09-01

    Complex oxide heterostructures are fabricated by growing La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 films on ferroelectric 0.71Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.29PbTiO3 (011) single-crystal substrates. The nonvolatile or pulsed resistive switching behaviors induced by an electric field are achieved simultaneously. Further analyses indicate that the different resistive switching behaviors are resulted from co-control of piezostrain and polarization current effects. With decreasing in-plane read current from 0.1 mA to 0.001 mA, the polarization current effect gradually begins to play a more important role than the piezostrain effect. Consequently, the nonvolatile resistive switching behavior is converted to pulse resistive switching behavior. The results further enhance the application of complex oxides in multifunctional memory devices.

  10. Chelation-Induced Polymer Structural Hierarchy/Complexity in Water.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Zhou, Kaiyi; Zhu, Xuechao; Yu, Qiuping; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xinhua; Cai, Yuanli

    2016-08-01

    Understanding nanoscale structural hierarchy/complexity of hydrophilic flexible polymers is imperative because it can be viewed as an analogue to protein-alike superstructures. However, current understanding is still in infancy. Herein the first demonstration of nanoscale structural hierarchy/complexity via copper chelation-induced self-assembly (CCISA) is presented. Hierarchically-ordered colloidal networks and disks can be achieved by deliberate control of spacer length and solution pH. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy demonstrate that CCISA underwent supramolecular-to-supracolloidal stepwise-growth mechanism, and underline amazing prospects to the hierarchically-ordered superstructures of hydrophilic flexible polymers in water. PMID:27219860

  11. DEMONSTRATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES-INDUCED COMPLEXATION

    SciTech Connect

    Barry L. Burks

    2002-12-01

    The Project Team is submitting this Topical Report on the results of its bench-scale demonstration of ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) and in particular the Induced Complexation (ECRTs-IC) process for remediation of mercury contaminated soils at DOE Complex sites. ECRTs is an innovative, in-situ, geophysically based soil remediation technology with over 50 successful commercial site applications involving remediation of over two million metric tons of contaminated soils. ECRTs-IC has been successfully used to remediate 220 cu m of mercury-contaminated sediments in the Union Canal, Scotland. In that operation, ECRTs-IC reduced sediment total mercury levels from an average of 243 mg/kg to 6 mg/kg in 26 days of operation. The clean up objective was to achieve an average total mercury level in the sediment of 20 mg/kg.

  12. Complexity Induced Lifshitz Ordering with Multifractal Antiscreening/Screening (CILOMAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tom T. S.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that renormalization-group effects of scale-running propagator-coupling constants due to classical fluctuations can induce antiscreening/screening and multifractal symmetry breakings among various helical and other ordered states of generalized Lifshitz character leading to novel phase-transition associated complexities in condensed matter physics and gravitational evolution. Such phenomenon can exhibit the sporadic and localized appearance of virtual particles and in the context of cosmological evolution, the coarse-grained scale-running of the gravitational constant G due to classical fluctuations may provide a partial explanation to the dark matter mystery.

  13. Morphogenesis and propagation of complex cracks induced by thermal shocks.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Blaise; Marigo, Jean-Jacques; Maurini, Corrado; Sicsic, Paul

    2014-01-10

    We study the genesis and the selective propagation of complex crack networks induced by thermal shock or drying of brittle materials. We use a quasistatic gradient damage model to perform large-scale numerical simulations showing that the propagation of fully developed cracks follows Griffith criterion and depends only on the fracture toughness, while crack morphogenesis is driven by the material's internal length. Our numerical simulations feature networks of parallel cracks and selective arrest in two dimensions and hexagonal columnar joints in three dimensions, without any hypotheses on cracks geometry, and are in good agreement with available experimental results. PMID:24483901

  14. Numerical Simulation of Flow-Induced Structure in Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro

    2007-04-01

    It is important to investigate the flow-induced structure for the analysis of the mechanism of flow behavior of complex fluids. The present paper includes two topics in which the flow-induced structure is numerically investigated. The first topic treats the suspensions of disc-like particles under simple shear flows. Disc-like particles were modeled by oblate spheroid particles, and the Brownian dynamics simulation was performed for suspensions of the particles interacting via the Gay-Berne potential. This simulation confirmed that this model system was applicable to the analysis of flow of suspension of disc-like particles. The second one is the numerical simulation of the deformation behavior of a droplet in shear flows. The present simulation is the first step for the numerical simulation of the flow-induced structure in emulsions. This simulation can demonstrate the deformation behavior of droplet observed in experiments and predict effects of non-Newtonian property of fluids on the droplet deformation.

  15. Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marc; March, Francesca; Garrigó, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Español, Montserrat; Coll, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clarithromycin was considered the cornerstone for the treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infections. Genetic resistance mechanisms have been described and many experts propose amikacin as an alternative. Nevertheless, clarithromycin has several advantages; therefore, it is necessary to identify the non-functional erm(41) allele to determine the most suitable treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance in a collection of Mycobacterium abscessus complex isolates and to verify the relationship between these mechanisms and the antibiogram. Materials and Methods Clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex (n = 22) from 16 patients were identified using four housekeeping genes (rpoB, secA1, sodA and hsp65), and their genetic resistance was characterized by studying erm(41) and rrl genes. Nine strains were recovered from the clinical isolates and subjected to E-test and microdilution clarithromycin susceptibility tests, with readings at 3, 7 and 14 days. Results We classified 11/16 (68.8%) M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, 4/16 (25.0%) M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, and 1/16 (6.3%) M. abscessus subsp. massiliense. T28 erm(41) allele was observed in 8 Mycobacterium abscessus subps. abscessus and 3 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. One strain of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii had an erm(41) gene truncated and was susceptible to clarithromycin. No mutations were observed in rrl gene first isolates. In three patients, follow-up of initial rrl wild-type strains showed acquired resistance. Conclusions Most clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex had inducible resistance to clarithromycin and total absence of constitutive resistance. Our findings showed that the acquisition of resistance mutations in rrl gene was associated with functional and non-functional erm(41) gene. Caution is needed when using erm(41) sequencing alone to identify M. abscessus subspecies. This study reports an acquired

  16. Three-dimensional induced polarization data inversion for complex resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Commer, M.; Newman, G.A.; Williams, K.H.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2011-03-15

    The conductive and capacitive material properties of the subsurface can be quantified through the frequency-dependent complex resistivity. However, the routine three-dimensional (3D) interpretation of voluminous induced polarization (IP) data sets still poses a challenge due to large computational demands and solution nonuniqueness. We have developed a flexible methodology for 3D (spectral) IP data inversion. Our inversion algorithm is adapted from a frequency-domain electromagnetic (EM) inversion method primarily developed for large-scale hydrocarbon and geothermal energy exploration purposes. The method has proven to be efficient by implementing the nonlinear conjugate gradient method with hierarchical parallelism and by using an optimal finite-difference forward modeling mesh design scheme. The method allows for a large range of survey scales, providing a tool for both exploration and environmental applications. We experimented with an image focusing technique to improve the poor depth resolution of surface data sets with small survey spreads. The algorithm's underlying forward modeling operator properly accounts for EM coupling effects; thus, traditionally used EM coupling correction procedures are not needed. The methodology was applied to both synthetic and field data. We tested the benefit of directly inverting EM coupling contaminated data using a synthetic large-scale exploration data set. Afterward, we further tested the monitoring capability of our method by inverting time-lapse data from an environmental remediation experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Similar trends observed in both our solution and another 2D inversion were in accordance with previous findings about the IP effects due to subsurface microbial activity.

  17. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Gallagher, David C.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  18. Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions

    SciTech Connect

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Gallagher, David C.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2011-11-15

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

  19. Rhenium complexes with visible-light-induced anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Kastl, Anja; Dieckmann, Sandra; Wähler, Kathrin; Völker, Timo; Kastl, Lena; Merkel, Anna Lena; Vultur, Adina; Shannan, Batool; Harms, Klaus; Ocker, Matthias; Parak, Wolfgang J; Herlyn, Meenhard; Meggers, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Shedding light on the matter: Rhenium(I) indolato complexes with highly potent visible-light-triggered antiproliferative activity (complex 1: EC50 light=0.1 μM vs EC50 dark=100 μM) in 2D- and 3D-organized cancer cells are reported and can be traced back to an efficient generation of singlet oxygen, causing rapid morphological changes and an induction of apoptosis. PMID:23568508

  20. Statistics of complex eigenvalues in friction-induced vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobari, Amir; Ouyang, Huajiang; Bannister, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Self-excited vibrations appear in many mechanical systems with sliding contacts. There are several mechanisms whereby friction can cause the self-excited vibration to become unstable. Of these mechanisms, mode coupling is thought to be responsible for generating annoying high-frequency noise and vibration in brakes. Conventionally, in order to identify whether a system is stable or not, complex eigenvalue analysis is performed. However, what has recently received much attention of researchers is the variability and uncertainty of input variables in the stability analysis of self-excited vibrations. For this purpose, a second-order perturbation method is extended and employed in the current study. The moments of the output distribution along with its joint moment generating function are used for quantifying the statistics of the complex eigenvalues. Moreover, the eigen-derivatives required for the perturbation method are presented in a way that they can deal with the asymmetry of the stiffness matrix and non-proportional damping. Since the eigen-derivatives of such systems are complex-valued numbers, it is mathematically more informative and convenient to derive the statistics of the eigenvalues in a complex form, without decomposing them into two real-valued real and imaginary parts. Then, the variance and pseudo-variance of the complex eigenvalues are used for determining the statistics of the real and imaginary parts. The reliability and robustness of the system in terms of stability can also be quantified by the approximated output distribution.

  1. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  2. Unusually long-lived light-induced metastable state in a thermochromic copper(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Nakajima, Rie; Gu, Zhong-ze; Yoshiki, Hajime; Fujishima, Akira; Sato, Osamu

    2002-08-01

    We report the first observation of a color change from red to purple for a thermochromic complex, [Cu(dieten)2](BF4)2 (dieten = N,N-diethylethylenediamine), which is induced by illuminating with UV light. PMID:12170790

  3. Light uncages a copper complex to induce nonapoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kumbhar, Anupa A; Franks, Andrew T; Butcher, Raymond J; Franz, Katherine J

    2013-03-25

    Cu3G is a Cu(II) complex of a photoactive tetradentate ligand that is cleaved upon UV irradiation to release Cu. Here we show that the cytotoxicity of Cu3G increases in response to brief UV stimulation to result in extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization that is indicative of nonapoptotic cell death. PMID:23417227

  4. Collective chaos induced by structures of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huijie; Zhao, Fangcui; Wang, Binghong

    2006-05-01

    Mapping a complex network of N coupled identical oscillators to a quantum system, the nearest neighbor level spacing (NNLS) distribution is used to identify collective chaos in the corresponding classical dynamics on the complex network. The classical dynamics on an Erdos-Renyi network with the wiring probability pER⩽1/N is in the state of collective order, while that on an Erdos-Renyi network with pER>1/N in the state of collective chaos. The dynamics on a WS Small-world complex network evolves from collective order to collective chaos rapidly in the region of the rewiring probability pr∈[0.0,0.1], and then keeps chaotic up to pr=1.0. The dynamics on a Growing Random Network (GRN) is in a special state deviates from order significantly in a way opposite to that on WS small-world networks. Each network can be measured by a couple values of two parameters (β,η).

  5. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1998-08-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by {alpha}-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  6. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  7. Complex nanoprecipitate structures induced by irradiation in immiscible alloy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shipeng; Bellon, P.; Averback, R. S.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the fundamentals of compositional patterning induced by energetic particle irradiation in model A-B substitutional binary alloys using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The study focuses on a type of nanostructure that was recently observed in dilute Cu-Fe and Cu-V alloys, where precipitates form within precipitates, a morphology that we term “cherry-pit” structures. The simulations show that the domain of stability of these cherry-pit structures depends on the thermodynamic and kinetic asymmetry between the A and B elements. In particular, both lower solubilities and diffusivities of A in B compared to those of B in A favor the stabilization of these cherry-pit structures for A-rich average compositions. The simulation results are rationalized by extending the analytic model introduced by Frost and Russell for irradiation-induced compositional patterning so as to include the possible formation of pits within precipitates. The simulations indicate also that the pits are dynamical structures that undergo nearly periodic cycles of nucleation, growth, and absorption by the matrix.

  8. Complexation-induced supramolecular assembly drives metal-ion extraction.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J; Meridiano, Yannick; Muller, Julie; Berthon, Laurence; Guilbaud, Philippe; Zorz, Nicole; Antonio, Mark R; Demars, Thomas; Zemb, Thomas

    2014-09-26

    Combining experiment with theory reveals the role of self-assembly and complexation in metal-ion transfer through the water-oil interface. The coordinating metal salt Eu(NO3)3 was extracted from water into oil by a lipophilic neutral amphiphile. Molecular dynamics simulations were coupled to experimental spectroscopic and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate how local coordination interactions between the metal ion and ligands in the organic phase combine with long-range interactions to produce spontaneous changes in the solvent microstructure. Extraction of the Eu(3+)-3(NO3(-)) ion pairs involves incorporation of the "hard" metal complex into the core of "soft" aggregates. This seeds the formation of reverse micelles that draw the water and "free" amphiphile into nanoscale hydrophilic domains. The reverse micelles interact through attractive van der Waals interactions and coalesce into rod-shaped polynuclear Eu(III) -containing aggregates with metal centers bridged by nitrate. These preorganized hydrophilic domains, containing high densities of O-donor ligands and anions, provide improved Eu(III) solvation environments that help drive interfacial transfer, as is reflected by the increasing Eu(III) partitioning ratios (oil/aqueous) despite the organic phase approaching saturation. For the first time, this multiscale approach links metal-ion coordination with nanoscale structure to reveal the free-energy balance that drives the phase transfer of neutral metal salts. PMID:25169678

  9. Force-induced remodelling of proteins and their complexes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Radford, Sheena E; Brockwell, David J

    2015-01-01

    Force can drive conformational changes in proteins, as well as modulate their stability and the affinity of their complexes, allowing a mechanical input to be converted into a biochemical output. These properties have been utilised by nature and force is now recognised to be widely used at the cellular level. The effects of force on the biophysical properties of biological systems can be large and varied. As these effects are only apparent in the presence of force, studies on the same proteins using traditional ensemble biophysical methods can yield apparently conflicting results. Where appropriate, therefore, force measurements should be integrated with other experimental approaches to understand the physiological context of the system under study. PMID:25710390

  10. Complexity Induced Anisotropic Bimodal Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    The "physics of complexity" in space plasmas is the central theme of this exposition. It is demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from the plasma resonances can be the source for the coexistence of nonpropagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes. Non-Gaussian probability distribution functions of the intermittent fluctuations from direct numerical simulations are obtained and discussed. Power spectra and local intermittency measures using the wavelet analyses are presented to display the spottiness of the small-scale turbulent fluctuations and the non-uniformity of coarse-grained dissipation that can lead to magnetic topological reconfigurations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization group is applied to the study of the scaling properties of such type of multiscale fluctuations. Charged particle interactions with both the propagating and nonpropagating portions of the intermittent turbulence are also described.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, In Vitro Cytotoxicity, and Apoptosis-Inducing Properties of Ruthenium(II) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Zhong, Nan-Jing; Xie, Yang-Yin; Huang, Hong-Liang; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Two new Ru(II) complexes, [Ru(bpy)2(FAMP)](ClO4)2 1 and 2, are synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray mass spectrometry, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. The in vitro cytotoxicities and apoptosis-inducing properties of these complexes are extensively studied. Complexes 1 and 2 exhibit potent antiproliferative activities against a panel of human cancer cell lines. The cell cycle analysis shows that complexes 1 and 2 exhibit effective cell growth inhibition by triggering G0/G1 phase arrest and inducing apoptosis by mitochondrial dysfunction. The in vitro DNA binding properties of the two complexes are investigated by different spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. PMID:24804832

  12. RIP1 and RIP3 complex regulates radiation-induced programmed necrosis in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Das, Arabinda; McDonald, Daniel G; Dixon-Mah, Yaenette N; Jacqmin, Dustin J; Samant, Vikram N; Vandergrift, William A; Lindhorst, Scott M; Cachia, David; Varma, Abhay K; Vanek, Kenneth N; Banik, Naren L; Jenrette, Joseph M; Raizer, Jeffery J; Giglio, Pierre; Patel, Sunil J

    2016-06-01

    Radiation-induced necrosis (RN) is a relatively common side effect of radiation therapy for glioblastoma. However, the molecular mechanisms involved and the ways RN mechanisms differ from regulated cell death (apoptosis) are not well understood. Here, we compare the molecular mechanism of cell death (apoptosis or necrosis) of C6 glioma cells in both in vitro and in vivo (C6 othotopically allograft) models in response to low and high doses of X-ray radiation. Lower radiation doses were used to induce apoptosis, while high-dose levels were chosen to induce radiation necrosis. Our results demonstrate that active caspase-8 in this complex I induces apoptosis in response to low-dose radiation and inhibits necrosis by cleaving RIP1 and RI. When activation of caspase-8 was reduced at high doses of X-ray radiation, the RIP1/RIP3 necrosome complex II is formed. These complexes induce necrosis through the caspase-3-independent pathway mediated by calpain, cathepsin B/D, and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF has a dual role in apoptosis and necrosis. At high doses, AIF promotes chromatinolysis and necrosis by interacting with histone H2AX. In addition, NF-κB, STAT-3, and HIF-1 play a crucial role in radiation-induced inflammatory responses embedded in a complex inflammatory network. Analysis of inflammatory markers in matched plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolated from in vivo specimens demonstrated the upregulation of chemokines and cytokines during the necrosis phase. Using RIP1/RIP3 kinase specific inhibitors (Nec-1, GSK'872), we also establish that the RIP1-RIP3 complex regulates programmed necrosis after either high-dose radiation or TNF-α-induced necrosis requires RIP1 and RIP3 kinases. Overall, our data shed new light on the relationship between RIP1/RIP3-mediated programmed necrosis and AIF-mediated caspase-independent programmed necrosis in glioblastoma. PMID:26684801

  13. Vacancy complexes induce long-range ferromagnetism in GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Schwingenschlögl, Udo E-mail: Iman.Roqan@kaust.edu.sa; Roqan, Iman S. E-mail: Iman.Roqan@kaust.edu.sa

    2014-11-14

    By means of density functional theory, we argue that ferromagnetism in GaN can be induced by vacancy complexes. Spin polarization originates from the charge compensation between neutral N and Ga vacancies. Defect formation energy calculations predict that a vacancy complex of two positively charged N vacancies and one doubly negative Ga vacancy is likely to form. This defect complex induces a net moment of 1 μ{sub B}, which is localized around the negative Ga center and exhibits pronounced in-plane ferromagnetic coupling. In contrast to simple Ga vacancy induced ferromagnetism, the proposed picture is in line with the fact that N vacancies have a low formation energy. Formation energies indicate mutual stabilization of the intrinsic defects in GaN.

  14. Lac repressor: Crystallization of intact tetramer and its complexes with inducer and operator DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, H.C.; Lu, P. ); Lewis, M. Smith Kline and French Labs., King of Prussia, PA )

    1990-03-01

    The intact lac repressor tetramer, which regulates expression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli, has been crystallized in the native form, with an inducer, and in a ternary complex with operator DNA and an anti-inducer. The crystals without DNA diffract to better than 3.5 {angstrom}. They belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and have cell dimensions a = 164.7 {angstrom}, b = 75.6 {angstrom}, and c = 161.2 {angstrom}, with {alpha} = {gamma} = 90{degree} and {beta} = 125.5{degree}. Cocrystals have been obtained with a number of different lac operator-related DNA fragments. The complex with a blunt-ended 16-base-pair strand yielded tetragonal bipyramids that diffract to 6.5 {angstrom}. These protein-DNA cocrystals crack upon exposure to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl {beta}-D-thiogalactoside, suggesting a conformational change in the repressor-operator complex.

  15. Infrared spectroscopic studies on reaction induced conformational changes in the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Petra; Kriegel, Sébastien; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Redox-dependent conformational changes are currently discussed to be a crucial part of the reaction mechanism of the respiratory complex I. Specialized difference Fourier transform infrared techniques allow the detection of side-chain movements and minute secondary structure changes. For complex I, (1)H/(2)H exchange kinetics of the amide modes revealed a better accessibility of the backbone in the presence of NADH and quinone. Interestingly, the presence of phospholipids, that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the isolated enzyme complex, changes the overall conformation. When comparing complex I samples from different species, very similar electrochemically induced FTIR difference spectra and very similar rearrangements are reported. Finally, the information obtained with variants and from Zn(2+) inhibited samples for the conformational reorganization of complex I upon electron transfer are discussed in this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26702948

  16. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  17. Surface induced dissociation yields substructure of Methanosarcina thermophila 20S proteasome complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Loo, Joseph A.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2015-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) and surface induced dissociation (SID) have been applied to study the stoichiometry and quaternary structure of non-covalent protein complexes. In this study, Methanosarcina thermophila 20S proteasome, which consists of four stacked heptameric rings (α7β7β7α7 symmetry), has been selected to explore the SID dissociation pattern of a complicated stacked ring protein complex. SID produces both α and β subunits while collision induced dissociation (CID) produces only highly charged α subunit. In addition, the charge reduced 20S proteasome produces the α7β7 fragment, reflecting the stacked ring topology of the complex. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for the study of protein complex structure. PMID:26005366

  18. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  19. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  20. HMGB1-DNA Complex-induced Autophagy Limits AIM2 Inflammasome Activation through RAGE

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liying; Yang, Minghua; Kang, Rui; Yu, Yan; Dai, Yunpen; Gao, Fei; Wang, Hongmei; Sun, Xiaojun; Li, Xiuli; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Haichao; Cao, Lizhi; Tang, Daolin

    2014-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a prototype damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) that can induce inflammatory and immune responses alone as well as in combination with other molecules such as DNA. However, the intricate molecular mechanisms underlying HMGB1-DNA complex-mediated innate immune response remains largely elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that HMGB1-DNA complex initially induced absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2)-dependent inflammasome activation, and promoted rapid release of inflammasome-dependent early proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Subsequently, HMGB1-DNA complex stimulated an ATG5-dependent cellular degradation process, autophagy, which was paralleled by a cessation of AIM2 inflammasome activation and IL-1β release. These HMGB1-DNA complex-induced inflammasome activation and autophagy were both dependent on the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) that recognizes a wide array of ligands (including HMGB1 and DNA). Thus, autophagy may function as a negative counter-regulatory mechanism for HMGB1-DNA complex-induced inflammasome activation, and provide a checkpoint to limit the development of inflammation. PMID:24971542

  1. Geomorphology and failure history of the earthquake-induced Farmington Siding landslide complex, Davis County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, M.; Harty, K.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The Farmington Siding landslide complex covers an area of 19.5 km[sup 2] in central Davis County. First identified and mapped in the 1970s, the feature was classified by previous researchers as a liquefaction-induced lateral spread based on surface geomorphology and exposures on the landslide complex. This was the first landslide in Utah to be attributed to earthquake-induced liquefaction. Geomorphic and geologic evidence indicate that the Farmington Sliding landslide complex likely consists of liquefaction-induced landslides that failed by means of both flow failure and lateral spreading. The landslide complex is located in an area underlain primarily by fine-grained deposits of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville and Holocene Great Salt Lake. Geomorphic features of the landslide complex include main and minor scarps, hummocks, closed depressions, and transverse lineaments. The main scarp consists mostly of a series of arcuate scallops near the left flank of the landslide, but it is a relatively linear, single scarp near the right flank of the landslide. Hummocks and closed depressions are most common near the head region of the landslide complex. Failure of the Farmington Sliding landslide complex has occurred at least twice. The older, distal portion of the landslide complex is cut by the Gilbert shoreline of the Bonneville lake cycle, indicating that landsliding occurred more than 10,000 years ago. In the younger portion of the landslide complex, landsliding has disrupted the Gilbert shoreline. Radiocarbon age estimates from trenches on a hummock near the main scarp of the younger landslide indicate that slope failure occurred sometime between about 2,730 [+-] 370 cal. yr B.P. and 4,530 [+-] 300 cal. yr B.P., possibly during the penultimate or antepenultimate surface-faulting earthquake on the Weber segment of the Wasatch fault zone.

  2. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation. PMID:22634003

  3. Isoniazid-induced cell death is precipitated by underlying mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Zhang, Carmen; Schwall, Christine T; Alder, Nathan N; Pinkert, Carl A; Krueger, Winfried; Rasmussen, Theodore; Boelsterli, Urs A

    2013-12-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is an antituberculosis drug that has been associated with idiosyncratic liver injury in susceptible patients. The underlying mechanisms are still unclear, but there is growing evidence that INH and/or its major metabolite, hydrazine, may interfere with mitochondrial function. However, hepatic mitochondria have a large reserve capacity, and minor disruption of energy homeostasis does not necessarily induce cell death. We explored whether pharmacologic or genetic impairment of mitochondrial complex I may amplify mitochondrial dysfunction and precipitate INH-induced hepatocellular injury. We found that INH (≤ 3000 μM) did not induce cell injury in cultured mouse hepatocytes, although it decreased hepatocellular respiration and ATP levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, coexposure of hepatocytes to INH and nontoxic concentrations of the complex I inhibitors rotenone (3 μM) or piericidin A (30 nM) resulted in massive ATP depletion and cell death. Although both rotenone and piericidin A increased MitoSox-reactive fluorescence, Mito-TEMPO or N-acetylcysteine did not attenuate the extent of cytotoxicity. However, preincubation of cells with the acylamidase inhibitor bis-p-nitrophenol phosphate provided protection from hepatocyte injury induced by rotenone/INH (but not rotenone/hydrazine), suggesting that hydrazine was the cell-damaging species. Indeed, we found that hydrazine directly inhibited the activity of solubilized complex II. Hepatocytes isolated from mutant Ndufs4(+/-) mice, although featuring moderately lower protein expression levels of this complex I subunit in liver mitochondria, exhibited unchanged hepatic complex I activity and were therefore not sensitized to INH. These data indicate that underlying inhibition of complex I, which alone is not acutely toxic, can trigger INH-induced hepatocellular injury. PMID:23911619

  4. The mitochondrial TOM complex modulates bax-induced apoptosis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Colin, J; Garibal, J; Mignotte, B; Guénal, I

    2009-02-20

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family proteins involved in the release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria to the cytosol. Recently, it has been shown both in mammals and yeast that Bax insertion in the mitochondrial outer membrane involves at least two distinct mechanisms, one of which uses the TOM complex. Here, we show that in Drosophila, heterozygous loss of function mutations of Tom22 or Tom70, two receptors of the TOM complex, attenuates bax-induced phenotypes in vivo. These results argue that the TOM complex may be used as a mitochondrial Bax receptor in Drosophila. PMID:19138672

  5. Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) Complexes Induce Phase-separated Microdomains in Supported Lipid Bilayers*

    PubMed Central

    Boura, Evzen; Ivanov, Vassili; Carlson, Lars-Anders; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Hurley, James H.

    2012-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) system traffics ubiquitinated cargo to lysosomes via an unusual membrane budding reaction that is directed away from the cytosol. Here, we show that human ESCRT-II self-assembles into clusters of 10–100 molecules on supported lipid bilayers. The ESCRT-II clusters are functional in that they bind to ubiquitin and the ESCRT-III subunit VPS20 at nanomolar concentrations on membranes with the same stoichiometries observed in solution and in crystals. The clusters only form when cholesterol is included in the lipid mixture at >10 mol %. The clusters induce the formation of ordered membrane domains that exclude the dye 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindodicarbo-cyanine perchlorate. These results show that ESCRT complexes are capable of inducing lateral lipid phase separation under conditions where the lipids themselves do not spontaneously phase-separate. This property could facilitate ESCRT-mediated membrane budding. PMID:22718754

  6. Three-Dimensional Topological Field Theory Induced from Generalized Complex Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Noriaki

    We construct a three-dimensional topological sigma model which is induced from a generalized complex structure on a target generalized complex manifold. This model is constructed from maps from a three-dimensional manifold X to an arbitrary generalized complex manifold M. The theory is invariant under the diffeomorphism on the worldvolume and the b-transformation on the generalized complex structure. Moreover the model is manifestly invariant under the mirror symmetry. We derive from this model the Zucchini's two-dimensional topological sigma model with a generalized complex structure as a boundary action on ∂X. As a special case, we obtain three-dimensional realization of a WZ-Poisson manifold.

  7. Prothrombin complex concentrate for warfarin-induced bleeding in a patient with a mechanical aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Rahul; Abel, Erik; Burcham, Pamela; Firstenberg, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Reversal of anticoagulation-induced bleeding in the perioperative period can be challenging, particularly with an unstable patient with a mechanical valve. We present a case of life-threatening bleeding successfully managed with a prothrombin complex concentrate as an alternative to fresh frozen plasma. PMID:23667067

  8. ox-LDL induces endothelial dysfunction by promoting Arp2/3 complex expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Zhao, Jianting; Shen, Liming; Jin, Yiqi; Zhang, Zhixuan; Xu, Guoxiong; Huang, Xianchen

    2016-06-24

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) play a critical role in endothelial injury including cytoskeleton reorganization, which is closely related to actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Arp2/3 complex in ox-LDL-induced endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we found that Arp2 and Arp3 expression was increased under atherosclerotic conditions both in ApoE-/- mice and in ox-LDL-stimulated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Arp2/3 complex inhibitor CK666 significantly reduced ox-LDL-induced ROS generation and cytoskeleton reorganization, and increased NO release in HCAECs. Pretreatment with LOX-1- but not CD36-blocking antibody markedly decreased ox-LDL-induced Arp2 and Arp3 expression. Moreover, Rac-1 siRNA remarkably suppressed ox-LDL-stimulated Arp2 and Arp3 expression. Additionally, CK666 reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-/- mice. Collectively, ox-LDL induces endothelial dysfunction by activating LOX-1/Rac-1 signaling and upregulating Arp2/3 complex expression. PMID:27181356

  9. Near-infrared-induced electron transfer of an uranyl macrocyclic complex without energy transfer to dioxygen.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christina M; Ohkubo, Kei; Ho, I-Ting; Zhang, Zhan; Ishida, Masatoshi; Fang, Yuanyuan; Lynch, Vincent M; Kadish, Karl M; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-21

    Photoexcitation of dichloromethane solutions of an uranyl macrocyclic complex with cyclo[1]furan[1]pyridine[4]-pyrrole () at the near-infrared (NIR) band (1177 nm) in the presence of electron donors and acceptors resulted in NIR-induced electron transfer without producing singlet oxygen via energy transfer. PMID:25791126

  10. Solvent-induced reversible solid-state colour change of an intramolecular charge-transfer complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Maier, Josef M; Hwang, Jungwun; Smith, Mark D; Krause, Jeanette A; Mullis, Brian T; Strickland, Sharon M S; Shimizu, Ken D

    2015-10-11

    A dynamic intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) complex was designed that displayed reversible colour changes in the solid-state when treated with different organic solvents. The origins of the dichromatism were shown to be due to solvent-inclusion, which induced changes in the relative orientations of the donor pyrene and acceptor naphthalenediimide units. PMID:26299357

  11. Identifying the magnetoconductance responses by the induced charge transfer complex states in pentacene-based diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Shun; Lee, Tsung-Hsun; Guo, Tzung-Fang; Huang, J. C. A.; Wen, Ten-Chin

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the magnetoconductance (MC) responses in photocurrent, unipolar injection, and bipolar injection regimes in pentacene-based diodes. Both photocurrent and bipolar injection contributed MC responses show large difference in MC line shape, which are attributed to triplet-polaron interaction modulated by the magnetic field dependent singlet fission and the intersystem crossing of the polaron pair, respectively. By blending 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane into pentacene, all the MC responses are suppressed but the MC response at unipolar injection regime is enhanced, which is attributed to the induced charge transfer complex states (CT complex states). This work identify the MC responses between single carrier contributed MC and exciton related MC by the induced CT complex states.

  12. The inducible elongin A elongation activation domain: structure, function and interaction with the elongin BC complex.

    PubMed Central

    Aso, T; Haque, D; Barstead, R J; Conaway, R C; Conaway, J W

    1996-01-01

    The elongin (SIII) complex strongly stimulates the rate of elongation by RNA polymerase II by suppressing transient pausing by polymerase at many sites along the DNA. Elongin (SIII) is composed of a transcriptionally active A subunit and two small regulatory B and C subunits, which bind stably to each other to form a binary complex that interacts with elongin A and strongly induces its transcriptional activity. The elongin (SIII) complex is a potential target for negative regulation by the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein, which is capable of binding stably to the elongin BC complex and preventing it from activating elongin A. Here, we identify an elongin A domain sufficient for activation of elongation and demonstrate that it is a novel type of inducible activator that targets the RNA polymerase II elongation complex and is evolutionarily conserved in species as distantly related as Caenorhabditis elegans and man. In addition, we demonstrate that both the elongin A elongation activation domain and the VHL tumor suppressor protein interact with the elongin BC complex through a conserved elongin BC binding site motif that is essential for induction of elongin A activity by elongin BC and for tumor suppression by the VHL protein. Images PMID:8896449

  13. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  14. Light Induced Processes for the Synthesis of Polymers With Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmaz, Yasemin Y.; Tasdelen, M. Atilla; Aydogan, Binnur; Kahveci, Muhammet U.; Yagci, Yusuf

    Light induced reactions are based on the absorption of light that excites the electrons of a molecule and can, under favorable circumstances, lead to dissociation, isomerization, abstraction, electron or energy transfer, and bond formation. These reactions have been the subject of many studies in various fields including organic chemistry, molecular biology, electronics etc. Light induced reactions can advantageously be utilized in the field of polymer chemistry. Among them, light induced polymerization is of enormous commercial importance. Techniques such as curing of coatings on wood, metal and paper, adhesives, printing inks and photoresists are based on photopolymerization. There are some other interesting applications, including production of laser video discs and curing of acrylate dental fillings. In this chapter, general methods for the light induced polymerization processes involving radical and ionic reactions are described. Special emphasize is devoted to their application to more complex macromolecular structures such as block, graft and star copolymers, and polymer nanocomposites based on clay and metal.

  15. The L-Z complexity of exercise-induced muscle fatigue based on acoustic myographye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yijian, Min; Xinyuan, Liu; Tingting, Wang

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of exercise fatigue was investigated during exercise using L-Z complexity of non-linear analysis. Muscle fatigue was induced in the sitting position by lifting the heel under a load. An acoustic myogram of the gastrocnemius was obtained until exhaustion. The different modes of the speed responses were calculated using the L-Z complexity method, which analyzes muscle fibers participation, while the exercise is in progress. The L-Z complexity decreased incrementally with decreases in muscle strength, reaching a minimum value when the muscle was exhausted. Our data indicate that the L-Z complexity method is easy to use and effective at revealing the dynamic characteristics and variations of exercise fatigue. This method could be used to monitor sports training.

  16. Comparison of different substrates for laser-induced electron transfer desorption/ionization of metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnikov, A. A.; Georgieva, V. B.; Donkov, N.; Borodkov, A. S.; Pento, A. V.; Raicheva, Z. G.; Yordanov, Tc A.

    2016-03-01

    Four different substrates, namely, graphite, tungsten, amorphous silicon (α-Si) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) films, were compared in view of the laser-induced electron transfer desorption/ionization (LETDI) of metal coordination complexes. A rhenium complex with 8-mercaptoquinoline, a copper complex with diphenylthiocarbazone and chlorophyll A were studied as the test analytes. The dependencies of the ion yield and the surface temperature on the incident radiation fluence were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The temperature was estimated using the numerical solution of a one-dimensional heat conduction problem with a heat source distributed in time and space. It was found that at the same temperature, the ion yield from the different substrates varies in the range of three orders of magnitude. The direct comparison of all studied substrates revealed that LETDI from the TiO2 and α-Si films offer a better choice for producing molecular ions of metal coordination complexes.

  17. Chronic Repression of mTOR Complex 2 Induces Changes in the Gut Microbiota of Diet-induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota play a crucial role in host physiology and metabolism; however, the molecular pathways underlying these changes in diet-induced obesity are unclear. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, we examined whether changes in the regulation of mTOR signaling induced by diet (a high-fat diet [HFD] or normal-chow diet) and/or therapeutics (resveratrol [a specific inhibitor of mTOR complex 1] or rapamycin [an inhibitor of both mTOR complex 1 and 2]) altered the composition of the gut microbiota in mice. Oral administration of resveratrol prevented glucose intolerance and fat accumulation in HFD-fed mice, whereas rapamycin significantly impaired glucose tolerance and exacerbated intestinal inflammation. The abundance of Lactococcus, Clostridium XI, Oscillibacter, and Hydrogenoanaerobacterium increased under the HFD condition; however, the abundance of these species declined after resveratrol treatment. Conversely, the abundance of unclassified Marinilabiliaceae and Turicibacter decreased in response to a HFD or rapamycin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota induced by changes in mTOR activity correlate with obese and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:27471110

  18. Chronic Repression of mTOR Complex 2 Induces Changes in the Gut Microbiota of Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota play a crucial role in host physiology and metabolism; however, the molecular pathways underlying these changes in diet-induced obesity are unclear. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, we examined whether changes in the regulation of mTOR signaling induced by diet (a high-fat diet [HFD] or normal-chow diet) and/or therapeutics (resveratrol [a specific inhibitor of mTOR complex 1] or rapamycin [an inhibitor of both mTOR complex 1 and 2]) altered the composition of the gut microbiota in mice. Oral administration of resveratrol prevented glucose intolerance and fat accumulation in HFD-fed mice, whereas rapamycin significantly impaired glucose tolerance and exacerbated intestinal inflammation. The abundance of Lactococcus, Clostridium XI, Oscillibacter, and Hydrogenoanaerobacterium increased under the HFD condition; however, the abundance of these species declined after resveratrol treatment. Conversely, the abundance of unclassified Marinilabiliaceae and Turicibacter decreased in response to a HFD or rapamycin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota induced by changes in mTOR activity correlate with obese and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:27471110

  19. Role of oxidative stress in Geldanamycin-induced cytotoxicity and disruption of Hsp90 signaling complex

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christina B.; Rane, Madhavi J.; Mehdi, Delphine El; Miller, Cynthia J.; Sachleben, Leroy R.; Gozal, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a chaperone protein regulating PC-12 cell survival by binding and stabilizing Akt, Raf-1, and Cdc37. Hsp90 inhibitor Geldanamycin (GA) cytotoxicity has been attributed to disruption of Hsp90 binding, and the contribution of oxidative stress generated by its quinone group has not been studied in this context. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell survival were assessed in PC-12 cells exposed to GA or Menadione (MEN), and Akt, Raf-1, and Cdc37 expression and binding to Hsp90 were determined. GA disrupted Hsp90 binding and increased ROS production starting at 1h, and cell death occurred at 6h, inhibited by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) without preventing dissociation of proteins. At 24h, NAC prevented cytotoxicity and Hsp90 complex disruption. However MnTBAP antioxidant treatment failed to inhibit GA cytotoxicity, suggesting that NAC acts by restoring gluthathione. In contrast, 24h MEN induced cytotoxicity without disrupting Hsp90 binding. GA and MEN decreased Hsp90-binding proteins expression, and proteasomal inhibition prevented MEN, but not GA-induced degradation. In conclusion, while MEN cytotoxicity is mediated by ROS and proteasomal degradation, GA-induced cytotoxicity requires ROS but induces HSP90 complex dissociation and proteasome-independent protein degradation. These differences between MEN and GA-induced cytotoxicity, may allow more specific targeting of cancer cells. PMID:19703551

  20. Surface Induced Dissociation Yields Quaternary Substructure of Refractory Noncovalent Phosphorylase B and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2014-03-01

    Ion mobility (IM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with native MS are useful for studying noncovalent protein complexes. Collision induced dissociation (CID) is the most common MS/MS dissociation method. However, some protein complexes, including glycogen phosphorylase B kinase (PHB) and L-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) examined in this study, are resistant to dissociation by CID at the maximum collision energy available in the instrument. Surface induced dissociation (SID) was applied to dissociate the two refractory protein complexes. Different charge state precursor ions of the two complexes were examined by CID and SID. The PHB dimer was successfully dissociated to monomers and the GDH hexamer formed trimeric subcomplexes that are informative of its quaternary structure. The unfolding of the precursor and the percentages of the distinct products suggest that the dissociation pathways vary for different charge states. The precursors at lower charge states (+21 for PHB dimer and +27 for GDH hexamer) produce a higher percentage of folded fragments and dissociate more symmetrically than the precusors at higher charge states (+29 for PHB dimer and +39 for GDH hexamer). The precursors at lower charge state may be more native-like than the higher charge state because a higher percentage of folded fragments and a lower percentage of highly charged unfolded fragments are detected. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for quaternary structure analysis of refractory noncovalent protein complexes, as illustrated by the data for PHB dimer and GDH hexamer.

  1. Atomic description of the immune complex involved in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cai, Zheng; Yarovoi, Serge V.; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Rauova, Lubica; Hayes, Vincent; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Liu, Qun; Poncz, Mortimer; Arepally, Gowthami; Cines, Douglas B.; et al

    2015-09-22

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by immune complexes containing platelet factor 4 (PF4), antibodies to PF4 and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here we solve the crystal structures of the: (1) PF4 tetramer/fondaparinux complex, (2) PF4 tetramer/KKO-Fab complex (a murine monoclonal HIT-like antibody) and (3) PF4 monomer/RTO-Fab complex (a non-HIT anti-PF4 monoclonal antibody). Fondaparinux binds to the ‘closed’ end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation. This interaction in turn stabilizes the epitope for KKO on the ‘open’ end of the tetramer. Fondaparinux and KKO thereby collaborate to ‘stabilize’ the ternary pathogenic immune complex. Bindingmore » of RTO to PF4 monomers prevents PF4 tetramerization and inhibits KKO and human HIT IgG-induced platelet activation and platelet aggregation in vitro, and thrombus progression in vivo. Lastly, the atomic structures provide a basis to develop new diagnostics and non-anticoagulant therapeutics for HIT.« less

  2. Atomic description of the immune complex involved in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zheng; Yarovoi, Serge V.; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Rauova, Lubica; Hayes, Vincent; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Liu, Qun; Poncz, Mortimer; Arepally, Gowthami; Cines, Douglas B.; Greene, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by immune complexes containing platelet factor 4 (PF4), antibodies to PF4 and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here we solve the crystal structures of the: (1) PF4 tetramer/fondaparinux complex, (2) PF4 tetramer/KKO-Fab complex (a murine monoclonal HIT-like antibody) and (3) PF4 monomer/RTO-Fab complex (a non-HIT anti-PF4 monoclonal antibody). Fondaparinux binds to the ‘closed' end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation. This interaction in turn stabilizes the epitope for KKO on the ‘open' end of the tetramer. Fondaparinux and KKO thereby collaborate to ‘stabilize' the ternary pathogenic immune complex. Binding of RTO to PF4 monomers prevents PF4 tetramerization and inhibits KKO and human HIT IgG-induced platelet activation and platelet aggregation in vitro, and thrombus progression in vivo. The atomic structures provide a basis to develop new diagnostics and non-anticoagulant therapeutics for HIT. PMID:26391892

  3. Atomic description of the immune complex involved in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zheng; Yarovoi, Serge V.; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Rauova, Lubica; Hayes, Vincent; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Liu, Qun; Poncz, Mortimer; Arepally, Gowthami; Cines, Douglas B.; Greene, Mark I.

    2015-09-22

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by immune complexes containing platelet factor 4 (PF4), antibodies to PF4 and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here we solve the crystal structures of the: (1) PF4 tetramer/fondaparinux complex, (2) PF4 tetramer/KKO-Fab complex (a murine monoclonal HIT-like antibody) and (3) PF4 monomer/RTO-Fab complex (a non-HIT anti-PF4 monoclonal antibody). Fondaparinux binds to the ‘closed’ end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation. This interaction in turn stabilizes the epitope for KKO on the ‘open’ end of the tetramer. Fondaparinux and KKO thereby collaborate to ‘stabilize’ the ternary pathogenic immune complex. Binding of RTO to PF4 monomers prevents PF4 tetramerization and inhibits KKO and human HIT IgG-induced platelet activation and platelet aggregation in vitro, and thrombus progression in vivo. Lastly, the atomic structures provide a basis to develop new diagnostics and non-anticoagulant therapeutics for HIT.

  4. Atomic description of the immune complex involved in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zheng; Yarovoi, Serge V; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Rauova, Lubica; Hayes, Vincent; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Liu, Qun; Poncz, Mortimer; Arepally, Gowthami; Cines, Douglas B; Greene, Mark I

    2015-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an autoimmune thrombotic disorder caused by immune complexes containing platelet factor 4 (PF4), antibodies to PF4 and heparin or cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Here we solve the crystal structures of the: (1) PF4 tetramer/fondaparinux complex, (2) PF4 tetramer/KKO-Fab complex (a murine monoclonal HIT-like antibody) and (3) PF4 monomer/RTO-Fab complex (a non-HIT anti-PF4 monoclonal antibody). Fondaparinux binds to the 'closed' end of the PF4 tetramer and stabilizes its conformation. This interaction in turn stabilizes the epitope for KKO on the 'open' end of the tetramer. Fondaparinux and KKO thereby collaborate to 'stabilize' the ternary pathogenic immune complex. Binding of RTO to PF4 monomers prevents PF4 tetramerization and inhibits KKO and human HIT IgG-induced platelet activation and platelet aggregation in vitro, and thrombus progression in vivo. The atomic structures provide a basis to develop new diagnostics and non-anticoagulant therapeutics for HIT. PMID:26391892

  5. Induced circularly polarized luminescence arising from anion or protein binding to racemic emissive lanthanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Puckrin, Robert; McMahon, Brian K.; Pal, Robert; Parker, David; Pålsson, Lars-Olof

    2014-06-01

    A circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) spectrometer has been built and used to study the binding interaction of lactate and four different proteins with racemic EuIII and TbIII complexes in aqueous solution. Lactate binding gives rise to strong induced CPL spectra, and the observed emission dissymmetry factors vary linearly with enantiomeric composition. Particularly strong induced TbIII CPL also characterizes the binding interaction of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein with a dissociation constant, Kd, of 2.5 μM.

  6. Photocytotoxic oxovanadium(IV) complexes showing light-induced DNA and protein cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Pijus K; Saha, Sounik; Majumdar, Ritankar; Dighe, Rajan R; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2010-02-01

    Oxovanadium(IV) complexes [VO(L)(B)]Cl(2) (1-3), where L is bis(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine and B is 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq) or dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz), have been prepared, characterized, and their photo-induced DNA and protein cleavage activity studied. The photocytotoxicity of complex 3 has been studied using adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The phen complex 1, structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, shows the presence of a vanadyl group in six-coordinate VON(5) coordination geometry. The ligands L and phen display tridentate and bidentate N-donor chelating binding modes, respectively. The complexes exhibit a d-d band near 740 nm in 15% DMF-Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.2). The phen and dpq complexes display an irreversible cathodic cyclic voltammetric response near -0.8 V in 20% DMF-Tris-HCl buffer having 0.1 M KCl as supporting electrolyte. The dppz complex 3 exhibits a quasi-reversible voltammogram near -0.6 V (vs SCE) that is assignable to the V(IV)-V(III) couple. The complexes bind to calf thymus DNA giving binding constant values in the range of 6.6 x 10(4)-2.9 x 10(5) M(-1). The binding site size, thermal melting and viscosity binding data suggest DNA surface and/or groove binding nature of the complexes. The complexes show poor "chemical nuclease" activity in dark in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid or hydrogen peroxide. The dpq and dppz complexes are efficient photocleavers of plasmid DNA in UV-A light of 365 nm via a mechanistic pathway that involves formation of both singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals. The complexes show significant photocleavage of DNA in near-IR light (>750 nm) via hydroxyl radical pathway. Among the three complexes, the dppz complex 3 shows significant BSA and lysozyme protein cleavage activity in UV-A light of 365 nm via hydroxyl radical pathway. The dppz complex 3 also exhibits photocytotoxicity in non-small cell lung carcinoma/human lung

  7. ACF chromatin remodeling complex mediates stress–induced depressive–like behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sun, HaoSheng; Damez–Werno, Diane M.; Scobie, Kimberly N.; Shao, Ning–Yi; Dias, Caroline; Rabkin, Jacqui; Koo, Ja Wook; Korb, Erica; Bagot, Rosemary C.; Ahn, Francisca H.; Cahill, Michael E.; Labonté, Benoit; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Heller, Elizabeth A.; Cates, Hannah; Golden, Sam A; Gleason, Kelly; Russo, Scott J; Andrews, Simon; Neve, Rachael; Kennedy, Pamela J.; Maze, Ian; Dietz, David M.; Allis, C. David; Turecki, Gustavo; Varga–Weisz, Patrick; Tamminga, Carol; Shen, Li; Nestler, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Improved treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) remains elusive due to limited understanding of its underlying biological mechanisms. Stress–induced maladaptive transcriptional regulation within limbic neural circuits likely contributes to the development of MDD, possibly through epigenetic factors that regulate chromatin structure. We establish that persistent upregulation of the ACF ATP–dependent chromatin remodeling complex, occurring in the nucleus accumbens of stress–susceptible mice and depressed humans, is necessary for stress–induced depressive–like behaviors. Altered ACF binding after chronic stress is correlated with altered nucleosome positioning, particularly around the transcription start sites of affected genes. These alterations in ACF binding and nucleosome positioning are associated with repressed expression of genes implicated in susceptibility to stress. Together, we identify the ACF chromatin remodeling complex as a critical component in the development of susceptibility to depression and in regulating stress–related behaviors. PMID:26390241

  8. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  9. Successful treatment of pegaspargase-induced acute hepatotoxicity with vitamin B complex and L-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Karur, Vinit; Herrington, Jon D.; Walker, Mary G.

    2016-01-01

    Pegaspargase is a chemotherapy drug used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). One of the adverse effects of pegaspargase is hepatotoxicity, which can rapidly lead to liver failure and death. We report a patient with ALL who developed pegaspargase-induced severe hepatotoxicity that was rescued by treatment with vitamin B complex and L-carnitine. Our patient had a quicker response than prior reported cases, suggesting this treatment might be a better regimen. PMID:26722167

  10. A mouse model of mitochondrial complex III dysfunction induced by myxothiazol

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudi, Mina; Kallijärvi, Jukka; Marjavaara, Sanna; Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva; Levéen, Per; Fellman, Vineta

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Reversible chemical inhibition of complex III in wild type mouse. • Myxothiazol causes decreased complex III activity in mouse liver. • The model is useful for therapeutic trials to improve mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Myxothiazol is a respiratory chain complex III (CIII) inhibitor that binds to the ubiquinol oxidation site Qo of CIII. It blocks electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome b and thus inhibits CIII activity. It has been utilized as a tool in studies of respiratory chain function in in vitro and cell culture models. We developed a mouse model of biochemically induced and reversible CIII inhibition using myxothiazol. We administered myxothiazol intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.56 mg/kg to C57Bl/J6 mice every 24 h and assessed CIII activity, histology, lipid content, supercomplex formation, and gene expression in the livers of the mice. A reversible CIII activity decrease to 50% of control value occurred at 2 h post-injection. At 74 h only minor histological changes in the liver were found, supercomplex formation was preserved and no significant changes in the expression of genes indicating hepatotoxicity or inflammation were found. Thus, myxothiazol-induced CIII inhibition can be induced in mice for four days in a row without overt hepatotoxicity or lethality. This model could be utilized in further studies of respiratory chain function and pharmacological approaches to mitochondrial hepatopathies.

  11. Complexity of Multi-Dimensional Spontaneous EEG Decreases during Propofol Induced General Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Schartner, Michael; Seth, Anil; Noirhomme, Quentin; Boly, Melanie; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Laureys, Steven; Barrett, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Emerging neural theories of consciousness suggest a correlation between a specific type of neural dynamical complexity and the level of consciousness: When awake and aware, causal interactions between brain regions are both integrated (all regions are to a certain extent connected) and differentiated (there is inhomogeneity and variety in the interactions). In support of this, recent work by Casali et al (2013) has shown that Lempel-Ziv complexity correlates strongly with conscious level, when computed on the EEG response to transcranial magnetic stimulation. Here we investigated complexity of spontaneous high-density EEG data during propofol-induced general anaesthesia. We consider three distinct measures: (i) Lempel-Ziv complexity, which is derived from how compressible the data are; (ii) amplitude coalition entropy, which measures the variability in the constitution of the set of active channels; and (iii) the novel synchrony coalition entropy (SCE), which measures the variability in the constitution of the set of synchronous channels. After some simulations on Kuramoto oscillator models which demonstrate that these measures capture distinct ‘flavours’ of complexity, we show that there is a robustly measurable decrease in the complexity of spontaneous EEG during general anaesthesia. PMID:26252378

  12. Complexity of Multi-Dimensional Spontaneous EEG Decreases during Propofol Induced General Anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Schartner, Michael; Seth, Anil; Noirhomme, Quentin; Boly, Melanie; Bruno, Marie-Aurelie; Laureys, Steven; Barrett, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Emerging neural theories of consciousness suggest a correlation between a specific type of neural dynamical complexity and the level of consciousness: When awake and aware, causal interactions between brain regions are both integrated (all regions are to a certain extent connected) and differentiated (there is inhomogeneity and variety in the interactions). In support of this, recent work by Casali et al (2013) has shown that Lempel-Ziv complexity correlates strongly with conscious level, when computed on the EEG response to transcranial magnetic stimulation. Here we investigated complexity of spontaneous high-density EEG data during propofol-induced general anaesthesia. We consider three distinct measures: (i) Lempel-Ziv complexity, which is derived from how compressible the data are; (ii) amplitude coalition entropy, which measures the variability in the constitution of the set of active channels; and (iii) the novel synchrony coalition entropy (SCE), which measures the variability in the constitution of the set of synchronous channels. After some simulations on Kuramoto oscillator models which demonstrate that these measures capture distinct 'flavours' of complexity, we show that there is a robustly measurable decrease in the complexity of spontaneous EEG during general anaesthesia. PMID:26252378

  13. Insensitive dependence of delay-induced oscillation death on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Wei; Zheng, Xing; Zhan, Meng

    2011-06-01

    Oscillation death (also called amplitude death), a phenomenon of coupling induced stabilization of an unstable equilibrium, is studied for an arbitrary symmetric complex network with delay-coupled oscillators, and the critical conditions for its linear stability are explicitly obtained. All cases including one oscillator, a pair of oscillators, regular oscillator networks, and complex oscillator networks with delay feedback coupling, can be treated in a unified form. For an arbitrary symmetric network, we find that the corresponding smallest eigenvalue of the Laplacian λN (0 >λN ≥ -1) completely determines the death island, and as λN is located within the insensitive parameter region for nearly all complex networks, the death island keeps nearly the largest and does not sensitively depend on the complex network structures. This insensitivity effect has been tested for many typical complex networks including Watts-Strogatz (WS) and Newman-Watts (NW) small world networks, general scale-free (SF) networks, Erdos-Renyi (ER) random networks, geographical networks, and networks with community structures and is expected to be helpful for our understanding of dynamics on complex networks.

  14. Photo-induced reactions in the ion-molecule complex Mg+-OCNC2H5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ju-Long; Liu, Haichuan; Han, Ke-Li; Yang, Shihe

    2003-06-01

    Ion-molecule complexes of magnesium cation with ethyl isocyanate were produced in a laser-ablation supersonic expansion nozzle source. Photo-induced reactions in the 1:1 complexes have been studied in the spectral range of 230-410 nm. Photodissociation mass spectrometry revealed the persistent product Mg+ from nonreactive quenching throughout the entire wavelength range. As for the reactive channels, the photoproducts, Mg+OCN and C2H5+, were produced only in the blue absorption band of the complex with low yields. The action spectrum of Mg+(OCNC2H5) consists of two pronounced peaks on the red and blue sides of the Mg+ 32P←32S atomic transition. The ground state geometry of Mg+-OCNC2H5 was fully optimized at B3LYP/6-31+G** level by using GAUSSIAN 98 package. The calculated absorption spectrum of the complex using the optimized structure of its ground state agrees well with the observed action spectrum. Photofragment branching fractions of the products are almost independent of the photolysis photon energy for the 3Px,y,z excitations. The very low branching ratio of reactive products to nonreactive fragment suggests that evaporation is the main relaxation pathway in the photo-induced reactions of Mg+(OCNC2H5).

  15. Use of laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LIPAS) to determine equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hannink, N.J.; Hoffman, D.C.; Silva, R.J.; Russo, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Laser Induced PhotoAcoustic Spectroscopy (LIPAS) is a relatively new, photothermal technique to examine solutions. Studies in the past have shown it to be more sensitive than conventional absorption spectroscopy, while, yielding the same information thus allowing lower concentrations to be used. This study is using LIPAS to examine solutions to determine the equilibrium constants of cation-cation complexes. It has been found that actinyl(V) cations form cation-cation complexes with a variety of cations, including actinyl(VI) cations. The radioactive nature of the actinide elements requires special handling techniques and also require limits be placed on the amount of material that can be used. The sensitivity of some oxidation states of the actinides to oxygen also presents a problem. Preliminary results will be presented for actinyl(V)-actinyl(VI) cation-cation complexes that were studied using a remote LIPAS system incorporating fiber optics for transmission of laser signals.

  16. Complex I and complex III inhibition specifically increase cytosolic hydrogen peroxide levels without inducing oxidative stress in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Forkink, Marleen; Basit, Farhan; Teixeira, José; Swarts, Herman G.; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Willems, Peter H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor studies with isolated mitochondria demonstrated that complex I (CI) and III (CIII) of the electron transport chain (ETC) can act as relevant sources of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we studied ROS generation and oxidative stress induction during chronic (24 h) inhibition of CI and CIII using rotenone (ROT) and antimycin A (AA), respectively, in intact HEK293 cells. Both inhibitors stimulated oxidation of the ROS sensor hydroethidine (HEt) and increased mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels without major effects on cell viability. Integrated analysis of cells stably expressing cytosolic- or mitochondria-targeted variants of the reporter molecules HyPer (H2O2-sensitive and pH-sensitive) and SypHer (H2O2-insensitive and pH-sensitive), revealed that CI- and CIII inhibition increased cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels. Total and mitochondria-specific lipid peroxidation was not increased in the inhibited cells as reported by the C11-BODIPY581/591 and MitoPerOx biosensors. Also expression of the superoxide-detoxifying enzymes CuZnSOD (cytosolic) and MnSOD (mitochondrial) was not affected. Oxyblot analysis revealed that protein carbonylation was not stimulated by CI and CIII inhibition. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of CI and CIII: (i) increases the levels of HEt-oxidizing ROS and (ii) specifically elevates cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels, (iii) does not induce oxidative stress or substantial cell death. We conclude that the increased ROS levels are below the stress-inducing level and might play a role in redox signaling. PMID:26516986

  17. In vitro activation of rat neutrophils and alveolar macrophages with IgA and IgG immune complexes. Implications for immune complex-induced lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J. S.; Kunkel, S. L.; Johnson, K. J.; Ward, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    In the rat, both IgG and IgA immune complexes induce oxygen radical mediated lung injury that is partially complement-dependent. In vivo studies have suggested that the chief sources of oxygen radicals in IgG and IgA immune complex-induced lung injury are neutrophils and tissue macrophages, respectively. The current studies have been designed to provide additional insights into these two models of tissue injury. Preformed monoclonal IgG and IgA immune complexes stimulated dose-dependent O2-. and H2O2 production by alveolar macrophages. In contrast, neutrophils exhibited O2-. production and lysosomal enzyme secretion in response to IgG immune complexes, but not in response to IgA complexes. There is evidence that C5a significantly amplifies these responses. Purified human C5a enhanced the O2-. responses of neutrophils activated with IgG immune complexes and alveolar macrophages activated with either IgG or IgA immune complexes. Addition of C5a alone to neutrophils or alveolar macrophages had no direct stimulatory effect as measured by O2-. production. The observation that O2-. responses of immune complex-activated alveolar macrophages can be significantly enhanced by the presence of C5a and that C5a can also enhance O-2. responses of IgG immune complex-stimulated neutrophils suggests a potential amplification mechanism through which complement may participate in both IgG and IgA immune complex-induced lung injury. The present data corroborate in vivo studies which suggest that IgG immune complex lung injury is primarily neutrophil-mediated, whereas IgA complex lung injury is predominantly macrophage-mediated. PMID:2827492

  18. Multi-therapeutic potential of autoantibodies induced by immune complexes trapped on follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin; Kmieciak, Maciej; Manjili, Masoud H; Szakal, Andras K; Pitzalis, Costantino; Tew, John G

    2013-01-01

    Induction of autoantibodies (autoAbs) targeting disease drivers / mediators is emerging as a potential immunotherapeutic strategy. Auto-immune complex (IC)-retaining follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) critically regulate pathogenic autoAb production in autoreactive germinal centers (GCs); however, their ability to induce potentially therapeutic autoAbs has not been explored. We hypothesized that deliberate display of clinically targeted antigens (Ags) in the form of ICs on FDC membranes induces target-specific autoreactive GCs and autoAbs that may be exploited therapeutically. To test our hypothesis, three therapeutically relevant Ags: TNF-α, HER2/neu and IgE, were investigated. Our results indicated that TNF-α-, HER2/neu- and IgE-specific autoAbs associated with strong GC reactions were induced by TNF-α-, HER2/neu- and IgE-IC retention on FDCs. Moreover, the induced anti-TNF-α autoAbs neutralized mouse and human TNF-α with half maximal Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) of 7.1 and 1.6 nM respectively. In addition, we demonstrated that FDC-induced Ab production could be non-specifically inhibited by the IgG-specific Endo-S that accessed the light zones of GCs and interfered with FDC-IC retention. In conclusion, the ability of FDCs to productively present autoAgs raises the potential for a novel immunotherapeutic platform targeting mediators of autoimmune disorders, allergic diseases, and Ab responsive cancers. PMID:23836278

  19. Consciousness and Complexity during Unresponsiveness Induced by Propofol, Xenon, and Ketamine.

    PubMed

    Sarasso, Simone; Boly, Melanie; Napolitani, Martino; Gosseries, Olivia; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Casarotto, Silvia; Rosanova, Mario; Casali, Adenauer Girardi; Brichant, Jean-Francois; Boveroux, Pierre; Rex, Steffen; Tononi, Giulio; Laureys, Steven; Massimini, Marcello

    2015-12-01

    A common endpoint of general anesthetics is behavioral unresponsiveness, which is commonly associated with loss of consciousness. However, subjects can become disconnected from the environment while still having conscious experiences, as demonstrated by sleep states associated with dreaming. Among anesthetics, ketamine is remarkable in that it induces profound unresponsiveness, but subjects often report "ketamine dreams" upon emergence from anesthesia. Here, we aimed at assessing consciousness during anesthesia with propofol, xenon, and ketamine, independent of behavioral responsiveness. To do so, in 18 healthy volunteers, we measured the complexity of the cortical response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)--an approach that has proven helpful in assessing objectively the level of consciousness irrespective of sensory processing and motor responses. In addition, upon emergence from anesthesia, we collected reports about conscious experiences during unresponsiveness. Both frontal and parietal TMS elicited a low-amplitude electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave corresponding to a local pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during propofol anesthesia, a high-amplitude EEG slow wave corresponding to a global, stereotypical pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during xenon anesthesia, and a wakefulness-like, complex spatiotemporal activation pattern during ketamine anesthesia. Crucially, participants reported no conscious experience after emergence from propofol and xenon anesthesia, whereas after ketamine they reported long, vivid dreams unrelated to the external environment. These results are relevant because they suggest that brain complexity may be sensitive to the presence of disconnected consciousness in subjects who are considered unconscious based on behavioral responses. PMID:26752078

  20. The TrxG Complex Mediates Cytokine Induced De Novo Enhancer Formation in Islets

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Peter; Dhillon, Jasmine; Gill, Amol; Whiting, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    To better understand how β-cells respond to proinflammatory cytokines we mapped the locations of histone 3 lysine 4 monomethylation (H3K4me1), a post-translational histone modification enriched at active and poised cis-regulatory regions, in IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα treated pancreatic islets. We identified 96,721 putative cis-regulatory loci, of which 3,590 were generated de novo, 3,204 had increased H3K4me1, and 5,354 had decreased H3K4me1 in IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposed islets. Roughly 10% of the de novo and increased regions were enriched for the repressive histone modification histone 3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in untreated cells, and these were frequently associated with chemokine genes. We show that IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposure overcomes this repression and induces chemokine gene activation in as little as three hours, and that this expression persists for days in absence of continued IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα exposure. We implicate trithorax group (TrxG) complexes as likely players in the conversion of these repressed loci to an active state. To block the activity of these complexes, we suppressed Wdr5, a core component of the TrxG complexes, and used the H3K27me3 demethylase inhibitor GSK-J4. We show that GSK-J4 is particularly effective in blunting IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα-induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells; however, it induced significant islet-cell apoptosis and β-cell dysfunction. Wdr5 suppression also reduced IFNγ, Il-1β, and TNFα induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells without affecting islet-cell survival or β-cell function after 48hrs, but did begin to increase islet-cell apoptosis and β-cell dysfunction after four days of treatment. Taken together these data suggest that the TrxG complex is potentially a viable target for preventing cytokine induced chemokine gene expression in β-cells. PMID:26505193

  1. Mining-induced seismicity prediction in the Khibiny mines by complex of precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Olga; Fedotova, Iuliia

    2013-04-01

    Problem of mining-induced seismicity is important now for many world regions with an advanced mining industry, including the Khibiny massif region (Kola Peninsula). Studying of seismic activity in rock mass and prediction of rockbursts and mining-induced earthquakes for exploited deposits is carried out using complex assessment method. The following precursors are considered to be rock seismicity characteristics: decreasing fractal dimension, b-value, concentration, and average length of fractures These precursors are analyzed by complex assessment method developed. Influence of determinative factors is taken into consideration as well: presence of discontinuous disturbances, stope zone limits and edge of falls of the hanging wall rocks. Changing of the complex assessment is considered in space and time. It has been determined that there are increases of complex assessment values and seismically active zone size before a strong seismic event or events series. Timely detection of the focal source forming is an important stage of the prediction. The program MIEPS was developed to automate the calculations. By this program we can analyze the seismicity in both real-time and retrospectively. One of successful prediction by complex assessment is detection of main fault forming and occurrence of roofing failure in the United Kirovsky mine, "Apatit" JSC. A precursor was detected 3 days before seismic events group occurrence (105-107J). In this time a complex assessment value changed from 0.49 to 0.54 (transfer of stable seismic zone to increasing seismic zone), and a seismic active zone increased in 1.5 times within 24 hours. Factors determining the region's seismicity are high horizontal stresses in the rock mass, long-term exploited deposits and seasonal rock watering. They result to blocks movements on faults. The blasting of blasthole rings in this part of the rock mass (23.05.2012) triggered growing of the main fault, accompanied by seismic events (energy < 2×107J

  2. Microbial metabolic networks in a complex electrogenic biofilm recovered from a stimulus-induced metatranscriptomics approach.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Shun'ichi; Suzuki, Shino; Tenney, Aaron; Norden-Krichmar, Trina M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Bretschger, Orianna

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms almost always exist as mixed communities in nature. While the significance of microbial community activities is well appreciated, a thorough understanding about how microbial communities respond to environmental perturbations has not yet been achieved. Here we have used a combination of metagenomic, genome binning, and stimulus-induced metatranscriptomic approaches to estimate the metabolic network and stimuli-induced metabolic switches existing in a complex microbial biofilm that was producing electrical current via extracellular electron transfer (EET) to a solid electrode surface. Two stimuli were employed: to increase EET and to stop EET. An analysis of cell activity marker genes after stimuli exposure revealed that only two strains within eleven binned genomes had strong transcriptional responses to increased EET rates, with one responding positively and the other responding negatively. Potential metabolic switches between eleven dominant members were mainly observed for acetate, hydrogen, and ethanol metabolisms. These results have enabled the estimation of a multi-species metabolic network and the associated short-term responses to EET stimuli that induce changes to metabolic flow and cooperative or competitive microbial interactions. This systematic meta-omics approach represents a next step towards understanding complex microbial roles within a community and how community members respond to specific environmental stimuli. PMID:26443302

  3. Microbial metabolic networks in a complex electrogenic biofilm recovered from a stimulus-induced metatranscriptomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shun’ichi; Suzuki, Shino; Tenney, Aaron; Norden-Krichmar, Trina M.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Bretschger, Orianna

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms almost always exist as mixed communities in nature. While the significance of microbial community activities is well appreciated, a thorough understanding about how microbial communities respond to environmental perturbations has not yet been achieved. Here we have used a combination of metagenomic, genome binning, and stimulus-induced metatranscriptomic approaches to estimate the metabolic network and stimuli-induced metabolic switches existing in a complex microbial biofilm that was producing electrical current via extracellular electron transfer (EET) to a solid electrode surface. Two stimuli were employed: to increase EET and to stop EET. An analysis of cell activity marker genes after stimuli exposure revealed that only two strains within eleven binned genomes had strong transcriptional responses to increased EET rates, with one responding positively and the other responding negatively. Potential metabolic switches between eleven dominant members were mainly observed for acetate, hydrogen, and ethanol metabolisms. These results have enabled the estimation of a multi-species metabolic network and the associated short-term responses to EET stimuli that induce changes to metabolic flow and cooperative or competitive microbial interactions. This systematic meta-omics approach represents a next step towards understanding complex microbial roles within a community and how community members respond to specific environmental stimuli. PMID:26443302

  4. Subcritical Water Induced Complexation of Soy Protein and Rutin: Improved Interfacial Properties and Emulsion Stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Qi, Jun-Ru; Hou, Jun-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Rutin is a common dietary flavonoid with important antioxidant and pharmacological activities. However, its application in the food industry is limited mainly because of its poor water solubility. The subcritical water (SW) treatment provides an efficient technique to solubilize and achieve the enrichment of rutin in soy protein isolate (SPI) by inducing their complexation. The physicochemical, interfacial, and emulsifying properties of the complex were investigated and compared to the mixtures. SW treatment had much enhanced rutin-combined capacity of SPI than that of conventional method, ascribing to the well-contacted for higher water solubility of rutin with stronger collision-induced hydrophobic interactions. Compared to the mixtures of rutin with proteins, the complex exhibited an excellent surface activity and improved the physical and oxidative stability of its stabilized emulsions. This improving effect could be attributed to the targeted accumulation of rutin at the oil-water interface accompanied by the adsorption of SPI resulting in the thicker interfacial layer, as evidenced by higher interfacial protein and rutin concentrations. This study provides a novel strategy for the design and enrichment of nanovehicle providing water-insoluble hydrophobic polyphenols for interfacial delivery in food emulsified systems. PMID:27467966

  5. Brefeldin A-induced ADP-ribosylation in the structure and function of the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Colanzi, A; Mironov, A; Weigert, R; Limina, C; Flati, S; Cericola, C; Di Tullio, G; Di Girolamo, M; Corda, D; De Matteis, M A; Luini, A

    1997-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA) is a fungal metabolite that exerts generally inhibitory actions on membrane transport and induces the disappearance of the Golgi complex. Previously we have shown that BFA stimulates the ADP-ribosylation of two cytosolic proteins of 38 and 50 KD. The BFA-binding components mediating the BFA-sensitive ADP-ribosylation (BAR) and the effect of BFA on ARF binding to Golgi membranes have similar specificities and affinities for BFA and its analogues, suggesting that BAR may have a role in the cellular effects of BFA. To investigate this we used the approach to impair BAR activity by the use of BAR inhibitors. A series of BAR inhibitors was developed and their effects were studied in RBL cells treated with BFA. In addition to the common ADP-ribosylation inhibitors (nicotinamide and aminobenzamide), compounds belonging to the cumarin (novobiocin, cumermycin, dicumarol) class were active BAR inhibitors. All BAR inhibitors were able to prevent the BFA-induced redistribution of a Golgi marker (Helix pomatia lectin) into the endoplasmic reticulum, as assessed in immunofluorescence experiments. At the ultrastructural level, BAR inhibitors prevented the tubular-vesicular transformation of the Golgi complex caused by BFA. The potencies of these compounds in preventing the BFA effects on the Golgi complex were similar to those at which they inhibited BAR. Altogether these data support the hypothesis that BAR mediates at least some of the effects of BFA on the Golgi structure and function. PMID:9193673

  6. Neisseria gonorrhoeae induced disruption of cell junction complexes in epithelial cells of the human genital tract.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Tirado, Carolina; Maisey, Kevin; Rodríguez, Felipe E; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Reyes-López, Felipe E; Imarai, Mónica

    2012-03-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, have developed mechanisms to alter epithelial barriers in order to reach subepithelial tissues for host colonization. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of gonococci on cell junction complexes of genital epithelial cells of women. Polarized Ishikawa cells, a cell line derived from endometrial epithelium, were used for experimental infection. Infected cells displayed a spindle-like shape with an irregular distribution, indicating potential alteration of cell-cell contacts. Accordingly, analysis by confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation revealed that gonococci induced redistribution of the adherens junction proteins E-cadherin and its adapter protein β-catenin from the membrane to a cytoplasmic pool, with no significant differences in protein levels. In contrast, gonococcal infection did not induce modification of either expression or distribution of the tight junction proteins Occludin and ZO-1. Similar results were observed for Fallopian tube epithelia. Interestingly, infected Ishikawa cells also showed an altered pattern of actin cytoskeleton, observed in the form of stress fibers across the cytoplasm, which in turn matched a strong alteration on the expression of fibronectin, an adhesive glycoprotein component of extracellular matrix. Interestingly, using western blotting, activation of the ERK pathway was detected after gonococcal infection while p38 pathway was not activated. All effects were pili and Opa independent. Altogether, results indicated that gonococcus, as a mechanism of pathogenesis, induced disruption of junction complexes with early detaching of E-cadherin and β-catenin from the adherens junction complex, followed by a redistribution and reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and fibronectin within the extracellular matrix. PMID:22146107

  7. Nitrosative modifications of the Ca2+ release complex and actin underlie arthritis-induced muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takashi; Fedotovskaya, Olga; Cheng, Arthur J; Cornachione, Anabelle S; Minozzo, Fabio C; Aulin, Cecilia; Fridén, Cecilia; Turesson, Carl; Andersson, Daniel C; Glenmark, Birgitta; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Rassier, Dilson E; Westerblad, Håkan; Lanner, Johanna T

    2015-01-01

    Objective Skeletal muscle weakness is a prominent clinical feature in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but the underlying mechanism(s) is unknown. Here we investigate the mechanisms behind arthritis-induced skeletal muscle weakness with special focus on the role of nitrosative stress on intracellular Ca2+ handling and specific force production. Methods Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, degree of nitrosative stress and composition of the major intracellular Ca2+ release channel (ryanodine receptor 1, RyR1) complex were measured in muscle. Changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and force production were assessed in single-muscle fibres and isolated myofibrils using atomic force cantilevers. Results The total neuronal NOS (nNOS) levels were increased in muscles both from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice and patients with RA. The nNOS associated with RyR1 was increased and accompanied by increased [Ca2+]i during contractions of muscles from CIA mice. A marker of peroxynitrite-derived nitrosative stress (3-nitrotyrosine, 3-NT) was increased on the RyR1 complex and on actin of muscles from CIA mice. Despite increased [Ca2+]i, individual CIA muscle fibres were weaker than in healthy controls, that is, force per cross-sectional area was decreased. Furthermore, force and kinetics were impaired in CIA myofibrils, hence actin and myosin showed decreased ability to interact, which could be a result of increased 3-NT content on actin. Conclusions Arthritis-induced muscle weakness is linked to nitrosative modifications of the RyR1 protein complex and actin, which are driven by increased nNOS associated with RyR1 and progressively increasing Ca2+ activation. PMID:24854355

  8. SWI/SNF complex prevents lineage reversion and induces temporal patterning in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Elif; Burkard, Thomas R; Jiang, Yanrui; Saini, Nidhi; Homem, Catarina C F; Reichert, Heinrich; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2014-03-13

    Members of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex are among the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer, but how they suppress tumorigenesis is currently unclear. Here, we use Drosophila neuroblasts to demonstrate that the SWI/SNF component Osa (ARID1) prevents tumorigenesis by ensuring correct lineage progression in stem cell lineages. We show that Osa induces a transcriptional program in the transit-amplifying population that initiates temporal patterning, limits self-renewal, and prevents dedifferentiation. We identify the Prdm protein Hamlet as a key component of this program. Hamlet is directly induced by Osa and regulates the progression of progenitors through distinct transcriptional states to limit the number of transit-amplifying divisions. Our data provide a mechanistic explanation for the widespread tumor suppressor activity of SWI/SNF. Because the Hamlet homologs Evi1 and Prdm16 are frequently mutated in cancer, this mechanism could well be conserved in human stem cell lineages. PAPERCLIP: PMID:24630726

  9. Heat-induced formation of myosin oligomer-soluble filament complex in high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masato; Takai, Eisuke; Ejima, Daisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-02-01

    Heat-induced aggregation of myosin into an elastic gel plays an important role in the water-holding capacity and texture of meat products. Here, we investigated thermal aggregation of porcine myosin in high-salt solution over a wide temperature range by dynamic light scattering experiments. The myosin samples were readily dissolved in 1.0 M NaCl at 25 °C followed by dilution into various salt concentrations. The diluted solutions consistently contained both myosin monomers and soluble filaments. The filament size decreased with increasing salt concentration and temperature. High temperatures above Tm led to at least partial dissociation of soluble filaments and thermal unfolding, resulting in the formation of soluble oligomers and binding to the persistently present soluble filaments. Such a complex formation between the oligomers and filaments has never been observed. Our results provide new insight into the heat-induced myosin gelation in high-salt solution. PMID:25445683

  10. Visible-Light-Induced Morphological Changes of Giant Vesicles by Photoisomerization of a Ruthenium Aqua Complex.

    PubMed

    Hirahara, Masanari; Tsukamoto, Akira; Goto, Hiroki; Tada, Shigeru; Yagi, Masayuki; Umemura, Yasushi

    2016-02-18

    Visible- and red-light responsive vesicles were prepared by incorporating a ruthenium aqua complex having two alkyl chains on tridentate and asymmetrical bidentate ligands (proximal-2: [Ru(C10 tpy)(C10 pyqu)OH2 ](2+) , C10 tpy=4'-decyloxy-2,2';6',2"-terpyridine, C10 pyqu=2-[2'-(6'-decyloxy)-pyridyl]quinoline). The ruthenium complex of proximal-2 with closed alkyl chain geometry and a cylinder-like molecular shape exhibited photoisomerization to distal-2 with an open alkyl chain geometry and a cone-like shape, both in an aqueous solution and in vesicle dispersions. We observed that light irradiation of giant vesicles containing proximal-2 induced diverse morphological changes. PMID:26711139

  11. Propagating self-sustained annealing of radiation-induced interstitial complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokov, P. M.; Selyshchev, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    A propagating self-sustained annealing of radiation induced defects as a result of thermal-concentration instability is studied. The defects that are considered in the model are complexes. Each of them consists of one atom of impunity and of one interstitial atom. Crystal with defects has extra energy which is transformed into heat during defect annealing. Simulation of the auto-wave of annealing has been performed. The front and the speed of the auto-wave have been obtained. It is shown that annealing occurs in a narrow region of time and space. There are two kinds of such annealing behaviour. In the first case the speed of the auto-wave oscillates near its constant mean value and the front of temperature oscillates in a complex way. In the second case the speed of propagation is constant and fronts of temperature and concentration look like sigmoid functions.

  12. Retrograde dilation of a complex radiation-induced esophageal stricture through percutaneous gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Eminler, A T; Uslan, M I; Köksal, A Ş; Guven, M; Parlak, E

    2015-06-01

    Upper esophageal strictures occur in approximately 3-4% of patients who receive radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. The standart initial treatment is dilation by using bougie or through-the-scope balloon dilators. Endoscopic treatment requires the passage of a guidewire through the stricture which cannot be accomplished in some of the patients with complex strictures. Retrograde dilation of esophageal strictures through a mature percutaneous gastrostomy tract have been reported in a limited number of cases and small case series up to date and can be considered as a rescue treatment before considering surgery in such patients. Herein we report retrograde dilatation of a radiation-induced complex esophageal stricture through the percutaneous gastrostomy tract in a patient with operated larynx cancer. PMID:26151697

  13. Defect-impurity complex induced long-range ferromagnetism in GaN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assa Aravindh, S.; Roqan, Iman S.

    2015-12-01

    Present work investigates the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Gd doped wurtzite GaN nanowires (NWs) oriented along the [0001] direction in presence of intrinsic defects by employing the GGA + U approximation. We find that Ga vacancy (VGa) exhibits lower formation energy compared to N vacancy. Further stabilization of point defects occurs due to the presence of Gd. The strength of ferromagnetism (FM) increases by additional positive charge induced by the VGa. Electronic structure analysis shows that VGa introduces defect levels in the band gap leading to ferromagnetic coupling due to the hybridization of the p states of the Ga and N atoms with the Gd d and f states. Ferromagnetic exchange coupling energy of 76.4 meV is obtained in presence of Gd-VGa complex; hence, the FM is largely determined by the cation vacancy-rare earth complex defects in GaN NWs.

  14. Molecular Components of the Sporothrix schenckii Complex that Induce Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; López-Romero, Everardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal disease caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex that includes species such as S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii sensu stricto, S. globosa, S. luriei, S. mexicana, and S. pallida, which exhibit different potentially antigenic molecular components. The immune response of susceptible hosts to control infection and disease caused by these fungi has been little studied. Besides, the fungus-host interaction induces the activation of different types of immune response. This mini-review analyzes and discusses existing reports on the identification and functional characterization of molecules from species of the S. schenckii complex with clinical relevance, and the mechanisms that mediate the type and magnitude of the immune response in experimental models in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge is expected to contribute to the development of protective and therapeutic strategies against sporotrichosis and other mycoses. PMID:27117164

  15. Touch induces ATP release in Arabidopsis roots that is modulated by the heterotrimeric G protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Weerasinghe, Ravisha R.; Swanson, Sarah J.; Okada, Seiko F.; Garrett, Michele B.; Kim, Sung-Yong; Stacey, Gary; Boucher, Richard C.; Gilroy, Simon; Jones, Alan M.

    2009-01-01

    Amongst the many stimuli orienting the growth of plant roots, of critical importance are the touch signals generated as roots explore the mechanically complex soil environment. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these sensory events remain poorly defined. We report an impaired obstacle-avoiding response of roots in Arabidopsis lacking a heterotrimeric G protein. Obstacle avoidance may utilize a touch-induced release of ATP to the extracellular space. While sequential touch stimulation revealed a strong refractory period for ATP release in response to mechanostimulation in wild-type plants, the refractory period in mutants was attenuated, resulting in extracellular ATP accumulation. We propose that ATP acts as an extracellular signal released by mechanostimulation and that the G-protein complex is needed for fine-tuning this response. PMID:19596005

  16. Rabies virus phosphoprotein interacts with mitochondrial Complex I and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kammouni, Wafa; Wood, Heidi; Saleh, Ali; Appolinario, Camila M; Fernyhough, Paul; Jackson, Alan C

    2015-08-01

    Our previous studies in an experimental model of rabies showed neuronal process degeneration in association with severe clinical disease. Cultured adult rodent dorsal root ganglion neurons infected with challenge virus standard (CVS)-11 strain of rabies virus (RABV) showed axonal swellings and reduced axonal growth with evidence of oxidative stress. We have shown that CVS infection alters a variety of mitochondrial parameters and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial Complex I activity vs. mock infection. We have hypothesized that a RABV protein targets mitochondria and triggers dysfunction. Mitochondrial extracts of mouse neuroblastoma cells were analyzed with a proteomics approach. We have identified peptides belonging to the RABV nucleocapsid protein (N), phosphoprotein (P), and glycoprotein (G), and our data indicate that the extract was most highly enriched with P. P was also detected by immunoblotting in RABV-infected purified mitochondrial extracts and also in Complex I immunoprecipitates from the extracts but not in mock-infected extracts. A plasmid expressing P in cells increased Complex I activity and increased ROS generation, whereas expression of other RABV proteins did not. We have analyzed recombinant plasmids encoding various P gene segments. Expression of a peptide from amino acid 139-172 increased Complex I activity and ROS generation similar to expression of the entire P protein, whereas peptides that did not contain this region did not increase Complex I activity or induce ROS generation. These results indicate that a region of the RABV P interacts with Complex I in mitochondria causing mitochondrial dysfunction, increased generation of ROS, and oxidative stress. PMID:25698500

  17. Characterization of lead induced metal-phytochelatin complexes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Christian; Sigg, Laura; Behra, Renata

    2011-11-01

    Accumulation of Pb and induction of phytochelatin synthesis were observed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii upon Pb(II) exposure. Our aim was to examine whether Pb(II) is bound by phytochelatins (PCs) in C. reinhardtii and to examine formed complexes for their stoichiometry and composition. Metal-phytochelatin (Me-PC) complexes induced by Pb were isolated by size-exclusion chromatography in 13 collected fractions, which were analyzed for their PC and metal content by high-performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. A recovery of more than 90% of Pb from standard Pb-PC₂ complexes within the total volume of the size-exclusion column indicated the adequacy of the method for Pb-PC(n) complex separation and characterization. Phytochelatins were detected mainly in a molecular weight ranging from 1,000 to 5,300 daltons (Da), indicating the formation of complexes with various stoichiometries. Approximately 72% of total PC₂ eluted in the range from 1,000 to 1,600 Da, and 80% of total PC₃ eluted in the molecular weight range from 1,600 to 2,300 Da. The distribution of Cu, Zn, and Pb showed that more than 70% of these metals were associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions. Copper, zinc, and lead were also observed in PC-containing fractions, suggesting the formation of various Me-PC complexes. The results of the present study indicate that the role of PCs in Pb detoxification is minor, because only 13% of total Pb was associated with PCs. PMID:21898554

  18. STAGE-SPECIFIC DAMAGE TO SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEXES AND METAPHASE CHROMOSOME INDUCED BY X RAYS IN MALE MOUSE GERM CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synaptonemal complexes (SCs) reveal mutagen-induced effects in germ cell meiotic chromosomes. his study was aimed at characterizing relationships between SC and metaphase I chromosome damage following radiation exposure at various stages of spermatogenesis. Male mice were irradia...

  19. Homochiral mononuclear Dy-Schiff base complexes showing field-induced double magnetic relaxation processes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Min; Xu, Zhong-Li; Wang, Ting-Ting; Bao, Song-Song; Zheng, Ze-Hua; Zhang, Zai-Chao; Zheng, Li-Min

    2016-01-14

    A pair of enantiopure mononuclear dysprosium/salen-type complexes (Et3NH)[Dy((R,R)/(S,S)-3-NO2salcy)2] (/), where 3-NO2salcyH2 represents N,N'-(1,2-cyclohexanediylethylene)bis(3-nitrosalicylideneiminato), are reported. The enantiomer contains two crystallographically independent dysprosium(iii) ions, each chelated by two enantiopure 3-NO2salcy(2-) ligands forming a [DyN4O4] core. Detailed magnetic studies on compound reveal a field-induced dual magnetic relaxation behavior, originating from single ion anisotropy and intermolecular interactions, respectively. PMID:26621766

  20. Efficient Charge Storage in Dual-Redox Electrochemical Capacitors through Reversible Counterion-Induced Solid Complexation.

    PubMed

    Evanko, Brian; Yoo, Seung Joon; Chun, Sang-Eun; Wang, Xingfeng; Ji, Xiulei; Boettcher, Shannon W; Stucky, Galen D

    2016-08-01

    The performance of redox-enhanced electrochemical capacitors (redox ECs) is substantially improved when oxidized catholyte (bromide) and reduced anolyte (viologen) are retained within the porous electrodes through reversible counterion-induced solid complexation. Investigation of the mechanism illustrates design principles and identifies pentyl viologen/bromide (PV/Br) as a new high-performance electrolyte. The symmetric PV/Br redox EC produces a specific energy of 48.5 W·h/kgdry at 0.5 A/gdry (0.44 kW/kgdry) with 99.7% Coulombic efficiency, maintains stability over 10 000 cycles, and functions identically when operated with reversed polarity. PMID:27442447

  1. Delivery of fullerene-containing complexes via microgel swelling and shear-induced release.

    PubMed

    Tarabukina, Elena; Zoolshoev, Zoolsho; Melenevskaya, Elena; Budtova, Tatiana

    2010-01-15

    The absorption and release of poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-fullerene C60 complexes (PVP/C60) from a model microgel is studied. A dry microgel based on a chemically cross-linked sodium polyacrylate was swollen in the aqueous solutions of complexes which were afterwards released under shear stress. First, gel swelling degree in static conditions in the excess of PVP/C60 solutions was studied: the degree of swelling decreases with the increase in PVP/C60 concentration. While pure PVP is homogeneously distributed between the gel and the surrounding solution, a slight concentration of complexes outside the gel was recorded. It was attributed to PVP/C60 hydrophobicity leading to the decrease in the thermodynamic quality of fullerene-containing solution being gel solvent. The release of PVP/C60 solutions induced by shear was studied with counter-rotating rheo-optical technique and compared with PVP solution release under the same conditions. The amount of solution released depends on polymer concentration and shear strain. Contrary to pure PVP solutions in which rate of release decreases with the increase in polymer concentration, PVP/C60 complexes are released faster when fullerene concentration inside the gel is higher. PMID:19766708

  2. Metal-induced gap states in ferroelectric capacitors and its relationship with complex band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junquera, Javier; Aguado-Puente, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    At metal-isulator interfaces, the metallic wave functions with an energy eigenvalue within the band gap decay exponentially inside the dielectric (metal-induced gap states, MIGS). These MIGS can be actually regarded as Bloch functions with an associated complex wave vector. Usually only real values of the wave vectors are discussed in text books, since infinite periodicity is assumed and, in that situation, wave functions growing exponentially in any direction would not be physically valid. However, localized wave functions with an exponential decay are indeed perfectly valid solution of the Schrodinger equation in the presence of defects, surfaces or interfaces. For this reason, properties of MIGS have been typically discussed in terms of the complex band structure of bulk materials. The probable dependence on the interface particulars has been rarely taken into account explicitly due to the difficulties to include them into the model or simulations. We aim to characterize from first-principles simulations the MIGS in realistic ferroelectric capacitors and their connection with the complex band structure of the ferroelectric material. We emphasize the influence of the real interface beyond the complex band structure of bulk materials. Financial support provided by MICINN Grant FIS2009-12721-C04-02, and by the European Union Grant No. CP-FP 228989-2 ``OxIDes''. Computer resources provided by the RES.

  3. Hedgehog induces formation of PKA-Smoothened complexes to promote Smoothened phosphorylation and pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Ma, Guoqiang; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a secreted glycoprotein that binds its receptor Patched to activate the G protein-coupled receptor-like protein Smoothened (Smo). In Drosophila, protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates and activates Smo in cells stimulated with Hh. In unstimulated cells, PKA phosphorylates and inhibits the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci). Here, we found that in cells exposed to Hh, the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) bound to the juxtamembrane region of the C terminus of Smo. PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Smo further enhanced its association with PKAc to form stable kinase-substrate complexes that promoted the PKA-mediated trans-phosphorylation of Smo dimers. We identified multiple basic residues in the C-terminus of Smo that were required for interaction with PKAc, Smo phosphorylation, and Hh pathway activation. Hh induced a switch from the association of PKAc with a cytosolic complex of Ci and the kinesin-like protein Costal2 (Cos2) to a membrane-bound Smo-Cos2 complex. Thus, our study uncovers a previously uncharacterized mechanism for regulation of PKA activity and demonstrates that the signal-regulated formation of kinase-substrate complexes plays a central role in Hh signal transduction. PMID:24985345

  4. Impaired retrograde transport by the Dynein/Dynactin complex contributes to Tau-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Butzlaff, Malte; Hannan, Shabab B; Karsten, Peter; Lenz, Sarah; Ng, Josephine; Voßfeldt, Hannes; Prüßing, Katja; Pflanz, Ralf; Schulz, Jörg B; Rasse, Tobias; Voigt, Aaron

    2015-07-01

    The gene mapt codes for the microtubule-associated protein Tau. The R406W amino acid substitution in Tau is associated with frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) characterized by Tau-positive filamentous inclusions. These filamentous Tau inclusions are present in a group of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To gain more insights into the pathomechanism of tauopathies, we performed an RNAi-based large-scale screen in Drosophila melanogaster to identify genetic modifiers of Tau[R406W]-induced toxicity. A collection of RNAi lines, putatively silencing more than 7000 genes, was screened for the ability to modify Tau[R406W]-induced toxicity in vivo. This collection covered more than 50% of all protein coding fly genes and more than 90% of all fly genes known to have a human ortholog. Hereby, we identified 62 genes that, when silenced by RNAi, modified Tau-induced toxicity specifically. Among these 62 modifiers were three subunits of the Dynein/Dynactin complex. Analysis on segmental nerves of fly larvae showed that pan neural Tau[R406W] expression and concomitant silencing of Dynein/Dynactin complex members synergistically caused strong pathological changes within the axonal compartment, but only minor changes at synapses. At the larval stage, these alterations did not cause locomotion deficits, but became evident in adult flies. Our data suggest that Tau-induced detrimental effects most likely originate from axonal rather than synaptic dysfunction and that impaired retrograde transport intensifies detrimental effects of Tau in axons. In conclusion, our findings contribute to the elucidation of disease mechanisms in tauopathies like FTDP-17 or AD. PMID:25794683

  5. Mechanisms of cell death pathway activation following drug-induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Naoki; Kwang Lee, Kang; Zhang, Carmen; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory complex I inhibition by drugs and other chemicals has been implicated as a frequent mode of mitochondria-mediated cell injury. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the activation of cell death pathways are incompletely understood. This study was designed to explore the relative contributions to cell injury of three distinct consequences of complex I inhibition, i.e., impairment of ATP biosynthesis, increased formation of superoxide and, hence, peroxynitrite, and inhibition of the mitochondrial protein deacetylase, Sirt3, due to imbalance of the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We used the antiviral drug efavirenz (EFV) to model drug-induced complex I inhibition. Exposure of cultured mouse hepatocytes to EFV resulted in a rapid onset of cell injury, featuring a no-effect level at 30 µM EFV and submaximal effects at 50 µM EFV. EFV caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cellular ATP levels. Furthermore, EFV resulted in increased formation of peroxynitrite and oxidation of mitochondrial protein thiols, including cyclophilin D (CypD). This was prevented by the superoxide scavenger, Fe-TCP, or the peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, Fe-TMPyP. Both ferroporphyrins completely protected from EFV-induced cell injury, suggesting that peroxynitrite contributed to the cell injury. Finally, EFV increased the NADH/NAD+ ratio, inhibited Sirt3 activity, and led to hyperacetylated lysine residues, including those in CypD. However, hepatocytes isolated from Sirt3-null mice were protected against 40 µM EFV as compared to their wild-type controls. In conclusion, these data are compatible with the concept that chemical inhibition of complex I activates multiple pathways leading to cell injury; among these, peroxynitrite formation may be the most critical. PMID:25625582

  6. Flow-induced Crystallization of Long Chain Aliphatic Polyamides under a Complex Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xia; Gao, Yunyun; Wang, Lili; Wang, Dujin

    The present work deals with the flow-induced multiple orientations and crystallization structure of polymer melts under a complex flow field. This complex flow field is characteristic of the consistent coupling of extensional ``pulse'' and closely followed shear flow in a narrow channel. Utilizing an ingenious combination of an advanced micro-injection device and long chain aliphatic polyamides, the flow-induced crystallization morphology was well preserved for ex-situ synchrotron micro-focused wide angle X-ray scattering as well as small angle X-ray scattering. The experimental results clearly indicate that the effect of extensional pulse on the polymer melt is restrained and further diminished due to either the transverse tumble of fountain flow or the rapid retraction of stretched high molecular weight tails. However, the residual shish-kebab structures in the core layer of the far-end of channel suggest that the effect of extensional pulse should be considered in the small-scaled geometries or under the high strain rate condition. The authors thank the financial support from MOST (2013BAE02B02, 2014CB643600) and NSFC(21574140).

  7. Crystal structure of the lactose operon repressor and its complexes with DNA and inducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Chang, G.; Horton, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor a product of the lacl gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-B-D-1thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21 base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and the repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quarternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites in the genomic DNA. 76 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Method and apparatus for enhanced sequencing of complex molecules using surface-induced dissociation in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis

    DOEpatents

    Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Futrell, Jean H [Richland, WA

    2008-04-29

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for enhanced sequencing of complex molecules using surface-induced dissociation (SID) in conjunction with mass spectrometric analysis. Results demonstrate formation of a wide distribution of structure-specific fragments having wide sequence coverage useful for sequencing and identifying the complex molecules.

  9. Mitochondrial complex I inhibition is not required for dopaminergic neuron death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Kruse, Shane E.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Xia, Zhengui

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I is one of the leading hypotheses for dopaminergic neuron death associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). To test this hypothesis genetically, we used a mouse strain lacking functional Ndufs4, a gene encoding a subunit required for complete assembly and function of complex I. Deletion of the Ndufs4 gene abolished complex I activity in midbrain mesencephalic neurons cultured from embryonic day (E) 14 mice, but did not affect the survival of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive than other neurons in these cultures to cell death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat treatments, the absence of complex I activity did not protect the dopaminergic neurons, as would be expected if these compounds act by inhibiting complex 1. In fact, the dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive to rotenone. These data suggest that dopaminergic neuron death induced by treatment with rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat is independent of complex I inhibition. PMID:18812510

  10. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S

    2015-02-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  11. Ligand-induced receptor-like kinase complex regulates floral organ abscission in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangzong; Zhou, Jinggeng; Tang, Jiao; Li, Bo; de Oliveira, Marcos V. V.; Chai, Jijie; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Abscission is a developmental process that enables plants to shed unwanted organs. In Arabidopsis, the floral organ abscission is regulated by a signaling pathway consisting of the peptide ligand IDA, the receptor-like kinases (RLKs) HAE and HSL2, and a downstream MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade. However, little is known about the molecular link between ligand-receptor pairs and intracellular signaling. Here, we report that the SERK family RLKs function redundantly in regulating floral organ abscission downstream of IDA and upstream of the MAPK cascade. IDA induces heterodimerization of HAE/HSL2 and SERKs, which transphosphorylate each other. The SERK3 residues mediating its interaction with the immune receptor FLS2 and the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 are also required for IDA-induced HAE/HSL2-SERK3 interaction, suggesting SERKs serve as co-receptors of HAE/HSL2 in perceiving IDA. Thus, our study reveals the signaling activation mechanism in floral organ abscission by IDA-induced HAE/HSL2-SERK complex formation accompanied by transphosphorylation. PMID:26854226

  12. Efficacy of prothrombin complex concentrates for the emergency reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Grottke, Oliver; Aisenberg, James; Bernstein, Richard; Goldstein, Patrick; Huisman, Menno V; Jamieson, Dara G; Levy, Jerrold H; Pollack, Charles V; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Steiner, Thorsten; Del Zoppo, Gregory J; Eikelboom, John

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran is effective in decreasing the risk of ischaemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, like all anticoagulants, it is associated with a risk of bleeding. In cases of trauma or emergency surgery, emergency reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation may be required. A specific reversal agent for dabigatran, idarucizumab, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Alternative reversal agents are available, such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) and activated PCCs (aPCCs). In this review we evaluate the role of PCCs and aPCCs in the reversal of dabigatran anticoagulation and consider which tests are appropriate for monitoring coagulation in this setting. Pre-clinical studies, small clinical studies and case reports indicate that PCCs and aPCCs may be able to reverse dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a dose-dependent manner. However, dosing based on coagulation parameters can be difficult because available assays may not provide adequate sensitivity and specificity for measuring anticoagulation induced by dabigatran or the countering effects of PCCs/aPCCs. In addition, PCCs or aPCCs can potentially provoke thromboembolic complications. Despite these limitations and the fact that PCCs and aPCCs are not yet licensed for dabigatran reversal, their use appears to be warranted in patients with life-threatening haemorrhage if idarucizumab is not available. PMID:27125504

  13. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  14. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    PubMed Central

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Woodcock, Steven R.; Chen, Chen-Shan; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval. PMID:26722838

  15. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II.

    PubMed

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R; Bonacci, Gustavo; Woodcock, Steven R; Chen, Chen-Shan; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2016-08-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H(+) and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval. PMID:26722838

  16. Transient and persistent pain induced connectivity alterations in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  17. Transient and Persistent Pain Induced Connectivity Alterations in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P. Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  18. Induced expression of neuronal membrane attack complex and cell death by Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y; Sullivan, T; Lee, C M; Meri, S; Shiosaki, K; Lin, C W

    1998-06-15

    beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) and complement-derived membrane attack complex (MAC) are co-localized in senile plaques of brains from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. But the relationship between A beta and complement activation is unclear. We have used human neurotypic cells, differentiated SH-SY5Y, as a model system to examine regulation of neuronal MAC expression and cell death by A beta. We demonstrated that mRNAs (C1q, C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, C8 and C9) and proteins (C1q, C3 and C9) for the major components of the classical complement cascade are present in the SH-SY5Y neurotypic cells, indicating that neuronal cells can synthesize the necessary proteins required for MAC formation. Furthermore, immunocytochemical studies showed the A beta-induced neuronal MAC expression on the SH-SY5Y cells after CD59 was removed by PIPLC or blocked by anti-CD59 antibody. Meanwhile, increased A beta-induced neuronal cell death was observed following treatment with anti-CD59. Taken together, these results suggest that A beta activates neuronal complement cascade to induce MAC, and a deficiency of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, e.g., CD59, may increase the vulnerability of neurons to complement-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:9689469

  19. 1,10-Phenanthroline promotes copper complexes into tumor cells and induces apoptosis by inhibiting the proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Bi, Caifeng; Schmitt, Sara M; Fan, Yuhua; Dong, Lili; Zuo, Jian; Dou, Q Ping

    2012-12-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid, two potent natural plant growth hormones, have attracted attention as promising prodrugs in cancer therapy. Copper is known to be a cofactor essential for tumor angiogenesis. We have previously reported that taurine, L-glutamine, and quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde Schiff base copper complexes inhibit cell proliferation and proteasome activity in human cancer cells. In the current study, we synthesized two types of copper complexes, dinuclear complexes and ternary complexes, to investigate whether a certain structure could easily carry copper into cancer cells and consequently inhibit tumor proteasome activity and induce apoptosis. We observed that ternary complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline are more potent proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers than dinuclear complexes in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the ternary complexes potently inhibit proteasome activity before induction of apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, but not in nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. Our results suggest that copper complexes binding with 1,10-phenanthroline as the third ligand could serve as potent, selective proteasome inhibitors and apoptosis inducers in tumor cells, and that the ternary complexes may be good potential anticancer drugs. PMID:23053530

  20. TULP1 Missense Mutations Induces the Endoplasmic Reticulum Unfolded Protein Response Stress Complex (ER-UPR).

    PubMed

    Lobo, Glenn P; Ebke, Lindsey A; Au, Adrian; Hagstrom, Stephanie A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the TULP1 gene are associated with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP); however, the molecular mechanisms related to the deleterious effects of TULP1 mutations remains unknown. Several studies have shown that misfolded proteins secondary to genetic mutations can accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) complex followed by cellular apoptosis. We hypothesize that TULP1 mutations produce misfolded protein products that accumulate in the ER and induce cellular apoptosis via the UPR. To test our hypothesis, we first performed three in-silico analyses of TULP1 missense mutations (I459K, R420P and F491L), which predicted misfolded protein products. Subsequently, the three mutant TULP1-GFP constructs and wild-type (wt) TULP1-GFP were transiently transfected into hTERT-RPE-1 cells. Staining of cells using ER tracker followed by confocal microscopy showed wt-TULP1 localized predominantly to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. In contrast, all three mutant TULP1 proteins revealed cytoplasmic punctate staining which co-localized with the ER. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cells expressing mutant TULP1 proteins revealed induction of downstream targets of the ER-UPR complex, including BiP/GPR-78, phosphorylated-PERK (Thr980) and CHOP. Our in-vitro analyses suggest that mutant TULP1 proteins are misfolded and accumulate within the ER leading to induction of the UPR stress response complex. PMID:26427415

  1. Polysaccharide/polynucleotide complexes. Part 6: complementary-strand-induced release of single-stranded DNA bound in the schizophyllan complex.

    PubMed

    Koumoto, Kazuya; Mizu, Masami; Sakurai, Kazuo; Kunitake, Toyoki; Shinkai, Seiji

    2004-03-01

    Spectroscopic properties of single-stranded DNA/schizophyllan ternary complexes (ss-DNA2s-SPG), induced by addition of either complementary or noncomplementary strands, have been investigated. The addition of the complementary strands to ss-DNA2s-SPG induced the quick release of the bound ss-DNA to the complementary strands (both DNA and RNA), whereas the ternary complex was unaffected upon addition of noncomplementary strands. Our experiments imply that SPG has complexation properties indispensable to the gene carriers. As far as we know, there is no report on exploitation of such nonviral gene carriers that can accomplish an intelligent release of the bound ss-DNA toward the complementary strands. We believe, therefore, that SPG, a natural and neutral polysaccharide, has a great potential to become a new ss-DNA carrier. PMID:17191866

  2. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity

    SciTech Connect

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2008-08-15

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC{sub 50} value of 13.8 {mu}M, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC{sub 50} 5.3 {mu}M). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells.

  3. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-zinc(II) and -copper(II) complexes induce apoptosis in tumor cells by inhibiting the proteasomal activity☆

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Chen, Di; Giovagnini, Lorena; Diez, Alejandro; Fregona, Dolores; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    Zinc and copper are trace elements essential for proper folding, stabilization and catalytic activity of many metalloenzymes in living organisms. However, disturbed zinc and copper homeostasis is reported in many types of cancer. We have previously demonstrated that copper complexes induced proteasome inhibition and apoptosis in cultured human cancer cells. In the current study we hypothesized that zinc complexes could also inhibit the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity responsible for subsequent apoptosis induction. We first showed that zinc(II) chloride was able to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of a purified 20S proteasome with an IC50 value of 13.8 μM, which was less potent than copper(II) chloride (IC50 5.3 μM). We then compared the potencies of a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PyDT)-zinc(II) complex and a PyDT-copper(II) complex to inhibit cellular proteasomal activity, suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis in various human breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Consistently, zinc complex was less potent than copper complex in inhibiting the proteasome and inducing apoptosis. Additionally, zinc and copper complexes appear to use somewhat different mechanisms to kill tumor cells. Zinc complexes were able to activate calpain-, but not caspase-3-dependent pathway, while copper complexes were able to induce activation of both proteases. Furthermore, the potencies of these PyDT-metal complexes depend on the nature of metals and also on the ratio of PyDT to the metal ion within the complex, which probably affects their stability and availability for interacting with and inhibiting the proteasome in tumor cells. PMID:18501397

  4. Influence of pore fluid chemistry on the complex conductivity and induced polarization responses of Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesmes, David P.; Frye, Kevin M.

    2001-01-01

    The spectral induced-polarization (IP) response of rocks and soils is a complex function of pore solution chemistry, sample microgeometry, and surface chemical properties. We measure the complex conductivity and the time domain IP responses of Berea sandstone as a function of pore fluid ionic strength and pH. Complex conductivity is measured over the frequency range 10-3 to 106 Hz, and chargeability is computed using a time window of 0.16 to 1.74 s. The field IP parameters: phase, percent frequency effect, and chargeability are functions of both the surface and bulk electrical properties of the sample and are observed to decrease with increasing solution conductivity. Dividing these parameters by the sample resistivity yields normalized IP parameters (quadrature conductivity, metal factor, normalized chargeability) that are proportional to the imaginary component of the complex surface conductivity. Normalized IP parameters increase with ionic strength up to concentrations of 10-1 M NaCl and show a reduced response at pH 3, the point of zero charge for quartz-dominated systems. For concentrations >10-1 M NaCl, the normalized parameters decrease with increasing concentration. This decrease in surface polarization may indicate a decrease in the effective mobility of polarizing charges at high solution concentration. Our data indicate that normalized IP parameters are directly related to the physiochemical parameters that control the surface conductivity responses of rocks and soils. Normalization of IP measurements in environmental investigations should increase the effectiveness of IP surveys, especially in high-conductivity environments.

  5. Detecting drug-induced prolongation of the QRS complex: New insights for cardiac safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cros, C.; Skinner, M.; Moors, J.; Lainee, P.; Valentin, J.P.

    2012-12-01

    Background: Drugs slowing the conduction of the cardiac action potential and prolonging QRS complex duration by blocking the sodium current (I{sub Na}) may carry pro-arrhythmic risks. Due to the frequency-dependent block of I{sub Na}, this study assesses whether activity-related spontaneous increases in heart rate (HR) occurring during standard dog telemetry studies can be used to optimise the detection of class I antiarrhythmic-induced QRS prolongation. Methods: Telemetered dogs were orally dosed with quinidine (class Ia), mexiletine (class Ib) or flecainide (class Ic). QRS duration was determined standardly (5 beats averaged at rest) but also prior to and at the plateau of each acute increase in HR (3 beats averaged at steady state), and averaged over 1 h period from 1 h pre-dose to 5 h post-dose. Results: Compared to time-matched vehicle, at rest, only quinidine and flecainide induced increases in QRS duration (E{sub max} 13% and 20% respectively, P < 0.01–0.001) whereas mexiletine had no effect. Importantly, the increase in QRS duration was enhanced at peak HR with an additional effect of + 0.7 ± 0.5 ms (quinidine, NS), + 1.8 ± 0.8 ms (mexiletine, P < 0.05) and + 2.8 ± 0.8 ms (flecainide, P < 0.01) (calculated as QRS at basal HR-QRS at high HR). Conclusion: Electrocardiogram recordings during elevated HR, not considered during routine analysis optimised for detecting QT prolongation, can be used to sensitise the detection of QRS prolongation. This could prove useful when borderline QRS effects are detected. Analysing during acute increases in HR could also be useful for detecting drug-induced effects on other aspects of cardiac function. -- Highlights: ► We aimed to improve detection of drug-induced QRS prolongation in safety screening. ► We used telemetered dogs to test class I antiarrhythmics at low and high heart rate. ► At low heart rate only quinidine and flecainide induced an increase in QRS duration. ► At high heart rate the effects of two

  6. Formation of impeller-like helical DNA–silica complexes by polyamines induced chiral packing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ben; Han, Lu; Che, Shunai

    2012-01-01

    The helicity of DNA and its long-range chiral packing are widespread phenomena; however, the packing mechanism remains poorly understood both in vivo and in vitro. Here, we report the extraordinary DNA chiral self-assembly by silica mineralization, together with circular dichroism measurements and electron microscopy studies on the structure and morphology of the products. Mg2+ ion and diethylenetriamine were found to induce right- and left-handed chiral DNA packing with two-dimensional-square p4mm mesostructures, respectively, to give corresponding enantiomeric impeller-like helical DNA–silica complexes. Moreover, formation of macroscopic impeller-like helical architectures depends on the types of polyamines and co-structure-directing agents and pH values of reaction solution. It has been suggested that interaction strength between negatively charged DNA phosphate strands and positively charged counterions may be the key factor for the induction of DNA packing handedness. PMID:24098845

  7. Stellate ganglion pulsed radiofrequency ablation for stretch induced complex regional pain syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Singh Rana, Shiv Pratap; Abraham, Mary; Gupta, Varun; Biswas, Shubhashish; Marda, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) following injury or nerve damage, as its name signifies, is a challenging entity, and its successful management requires a multidisciplinary approach. It not only manifests as severe pain, but also gives rise to functional disability, lack of sleep, lack of enjoyment of life and poor quality of life. Various pain interventional techniques have been described in the literature for the management of CRPS ranging from sympathetic blocks to spinal cord stimulator. A 34-year-old liver transplant donor, who developed position-induced right upper limb neuropathic pain suggestive of CRPS type II was managed initially with medications and later with stellate ganglion block under fluoroscopic guidance at cervical C7 position. Following an initial significant improvement in pain and allodynia, which was transient, a pulsed radiofrequency ablation of stellate ganglion was performed successfully to provide prolonged and sustained pain relief, which persisted up to 14 months of follow-up. PMID:26543471

  8. COMPLEX RESISTIVITY OF FAULT GOUGE AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE FOR EARTHQUAKE LIGHTS AND INDUCED POLARIZATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, David A.; Byerlee, James D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors measured complex resistivity of 2 water-saturated San Andreas fault gouges from 10** minus **3 to 10**6 Hz and confining pressures of 0. 2 to 200 MPa. Consistent with earlier observations of clays and common rocks, large low-frequency permittivities were observed in all cases. Comparisons were made to induced polarization (IP) measurements by inversion of the data into the time domain, where it was found that principal features of the IP response curves were due to these large low-frequency permittivities. The results also suggest that following large earthquakes, significant electrical charge could remain for many seconds and could result in a variety of reported electromagnetic effects. Refs.

  9. Complexity of lectin-mediated reactions in bacteria-induced histamine release.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C; Stahl Skov, P; Norn, S; Espersen, F; Bøg-Hansen, T C; Lihme, A

    1984-08-01

    We have earlier suggested that bacteria-induced histamine release is caused by different mechanisms, including allergic and non-immunological mechanisms, and that the latter probably depends on lectin-mediated reactions. Two possibilities of lectin-mediated reactions were examined in this study, bacterial surface lectins bind to sugars on the basophil cell membrane leading to histamine release, and the reverse reaction where bacterial aminosugars react with lectins on the basophil cell surface. In the bacterial histamine release caused by the Staph. aureus strain Wood 46 it was possible to demonstrate a reverse reaction, but not a bacterial lectin-mediated reaction. The reaction seems to be complex, as lower concentrations of sugars might potentiate the release of histamine by binding to the target cell or bacteria, while the release is inhibited by higher concentrations. PMID:6208803

  10. The DREAM complex mediates GIST cell quiescence and is a novel therapeutic target to enhance imatinib-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Boichuk, Sergei; Parry, Joshua A; Makielski, Kathleen R; Litovchick, Larisa; Baron, Julianne L; Zewe, James P; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Mehalek, Keith R; Korzeniewski, Nina; Seneviratne, Danushka S; Schöffski, Patrick; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; DeCaprio, James A; Duensing, Anette

    2013-08-15

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) can be successfully treated with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec); however, complete remissions are rare and patients frequently achieve disease stabilization in the presence of residual tumor masses. The clinical observation that discontinuation of treatment can lead to tumor progression suggests that residual tumor cells are, in fact, quiescent and, therefore, able to re-enter the cell-division cycle. In line with this notion, we have previously shown that imatinib induces GIST cell quiescence in vitro through the APC(CDH1)-SKP2-p27(Kip1) signaling axis. Here, we provide evidence that imatinib induces GIST cell quiescence in vivo and that this process also involves the DREAM complex, a multisubunit complex that has recently been identified as an additional key regulator of quiescence. Importantly, inhibition of DREAM complex formation by depletion of the DREAM regulatory kinase DYRK1A or its target LIN52 was found to enhance imatinib-induced cell death. Our results show that imatinib induces apoptosis in a fraction of GIST cells while, at the same time, a subset of cells undergoes quiescence involving the DREAM complex. Inhibition of this process enhances imatinib-induced apoptosis, which opens the opportunity for future therapeutic interventions to target the DREAM complex for more efficient imatinib responses. PMID:23786773

  11. Apoptosis induced by granzyme B-glycosaminoglycan complexes: implications for granule-mediated apoptosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Galvin, J P; Spaeny-Dekking, L H; Wang, B; Seth, P; Hack, C E; Froelich, C J

    1999-05-01

    Lymphocyte granule-mediated apoptosis occurs by perforin-mediated intracellular delivery of granule-associated serine proteases (granzymes). A granule-associated proteoglycan, namely serglycin, that contains chondroitin 4-sulfate (CS) glycosaminoglycans is present in the granules of cytotoxic cells. Serglycin acts as scaffold for packaging the positively charged granzymes and probably chaperones the proteases secreted extracellularly. To learn how the interaction of granzyme B (GrB) with serglycin might influence the apoptotic potential of this proteases, we have evaluated a model system where desalted CS is combined with isolated human granzyme. CS-GrB complexes were very stable, remaining undissociated in salt concentrations upwards to 500 mM (pH 7.4). On the basis of a capture enzyme immunoassay that accurately detects GrB, equivalent amounts of active free and CS-GrB, delivered by perforin or adenovirus, efficiently induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells and produced a similar time-dependent increase in caspase-3-like activity. CS-GrB processed isolated caspases-3 and -7 less efficiently than free granzyme. However, when added to cytosolic extracts, rates of processing were nearly equivalent for the two forms, suggesting cationic GrB may nonspecifically bind cytosolic proteins, leading to reduce proteolytic activity. Finally, GrB was found to be exocytosed from lymphocyte-activated killer cells as a neutral, high macromolecular weight complex, which possessed apoptotic activity. Collectively, the results indicate that neutral, high m.w. GrB has the capacity to induce cell death and will be useful to study the mechanism of cytotoxic cell-mediated apoptosis in vitro. PMID:10228010

  12. Soluble, Prefibrillar α-Synuclein Oligomers Promote Complex I-dependent, Ca2+-induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction*

    PubMed Central

    Luth, Eric S.; Stavrovskaya, Irina G.; Bartels, Tim; Kristal, Bruce S.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    α-Synuclein (αSyn) aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction both contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). Although recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial association of αSyn may disrupt mitochondrial function, it is unclear what aggregation state of αSyn is most damaging to mitochondria and what conditions promote or inhibit the effect of toxic αSyn species. Because the neuronal populations most vulnerable in PD are characterized by large cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that burden mitochondria, we examined mitochondrial Ca2+ stress in an in vitro system comprising isolated mitochondria and purified recombinant human αSyn in various aggregation states. Using fluorimetry to simultaneously measure four mitochondrial parameters, we observed that soluble, prefibrillar αSyn oligomers, but not monomeric or fibrillar αSyn, decreased the retention time of exogenously added Ca2+, promoted Ca2+-induced mitochondrial swelling and depolarization, and accelerated cytochrome c release. Inhibition of the permeability transition pore rescued these αSyn-induced changes in mitochondrial parameters. Interestingly, the mitotoxic effects of αSyn were specifically dependent upon both electron flow through complex I and mitochondrial uptake of exogenous Ca2+. Our results suggest that soluble prefibrillar αSyn oligomers recapitulate several mitochondrial phenotypes previously observed in animal and cell models of PD: complex I dysfunction, altered membrane potential, disrupted Ca2+ homeostasis, and enhanced cytochrome c release. These data reveal how the association of oligomeric αSyn with mitochondria can be detrimental to the function of cells with high Ca2+-handling requirements. PMID:24942732

  13. Inducer effect on the complex formation between rat liver nuclear proteins and cytochrome P450 2B gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Duzhak, T G; Schwartz, E I; Gulyaeva, L F; Lyakhovich, V V

    2002-09-01

    DNA gel retardation assay has been applied to the investigation of complexes between rat liver nuclear proteins and Barbie box positive regulatory element of cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) genes. The intensities of B1 and B2 bands detected in the absence of an inducer increased after 30 min protein incubation with phenobarbital (PB) or triphenyldioxane (TPD), but not with 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOPOB). In addition, a new complex (B3 band) was for the first time detected under induction by PB, TPD, and TCPOPOB. Increase in the incubation time up to 2 h facilitated the formation of other new complexes (B4 and B5 bands), which were detected only in the presence of TPD. The use of [3H]TPD in hybridization experiments revealed that this inducer, capable of binding to Barbie box DNA, is also present in B4 and B5 complexes. It is probable that the investigated compounds activate the same proteins at the initial induction steps, which correlates with the formation of B1, B2, and B3 complexes. The further induction step might be inducer-specific, as indicated by the formation of B4 and B5 complexes in the presence of TPD only. Thus, the present data suggest the possibility of specific gene activation signaling pathways that are dependent on a particular inducer. PMID:12387719

  14. Design of off-axis mirrors for the phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluzhnik, Eugene; Guyon, Olivier; Belikov, Ruslan; Bendek, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The phase-induced amplitude apodization complex mask coronagraph (PIAACMC) provides an efficient way to control diffraction propagation effects caused by the central obstruction/segmented mirrors of the telescope. PIAACMC can be optimized in a way that takes into account both chromatic diffraction effects caused by the telescope obstructed aperture and the tip-tilt sensitivity of the coronagraph. As a result, unlike classic phase-induced amplitude apodization (PIAA), the PIAACMC mirror shapes are often slightly asymmetric even for an on-axis configuration and require more care in calculating off-axis shapes when an off-axis configuration is preferred. A method to design off-axis PIAA mirror shapes given an on-axis mirror design is presented. The algorithm is based on geometrical ray tracing and is able to calculate off-axis PIAA mirror shapes for an arbitrary geometry of the input and output beams. The method is demonstrated using the third generation PIAACMC design for WFIRST-AFTA telescope. Geometrical optics design issues related to the off-axis diffraction propagation effects are also discussed.

  15. Light-Induced Infrared Difference Spectroscopy in the Investigation of Light Harvesting Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mezzetti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Light-induced infrared difference spectroscopy (IR-DS) has been used, especially in the last decade, to investigate early photophysics, energy transfer and photoprotection mechanisms in isolated and membrane-bound light harvesting complexes (LHCs). The technique has the definite advantage to give information on how the pigments and the other constituents of the biological system (proteins, membranes, etc.) evolve during a given photoreaction. Different static and time-resolved approaches have been used. Compared to the application of IR-DS to photosynthetic Reaction Centers (RCs), however, IR-DS applied to LHCs is still in an almost pioneering age: very often sophisticated techniques (step-scan FTIR, ultrafast IR) or data analysis strategies (global analysis, target analysis, multivariate curve resolution) are needed. In addition, band assignment is usually more complicated than in RCs. The results obtained on the studied systems (chromatophores and RC-LHC supercomplexes from purple bacteria; Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins from dinoflagellates; isolated LHCII from plants; thylakoids; Orange Carotenoid Protein from cyanobacteria) are summarized. A description of the different IR-DS techniques used is also provided, and the most stimulating perspectives are also described. Especially if used synergically with other biophysical techniques, light-induced IR-DS represents an important tool in the investigation of photophysical/photochemical reactions in LHCs and LHC-containing systems. PMID:26151118

  16. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  17. Bacteriophage T4 Mutants Hypersensitive to an Antitumor Agent That Induces Topoisomerase-DNA Cleavage Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, D. L.; Kreuzer, K. N.

    1996-01-01

    Many antitumor agents and antibiotics affect cells by interacting with type II topoisomerases, stabilizing a covalent enzyme-DNA complex. A pathway of recombination can apparently repair this DNA damage. In this study, transposon mutagenesis was used to identify possible components of the repair pathway in bacteriophage T4. Substantial increases in sensitivity to the antitumor agent m-AMSA [4'-(9-acridinyl-amino) methanesulfon-m-anisidide] were found with transposon insertion mutations that inactivate any of six T4-encoded proteins: UvsY (DNA synaptase accessory protein), UvsW (unknown function), Rnh (RNase H and 5' to 3' DNA exonuclease), α-gt (α-glucosyl transferase), gp47.1 (uncharacterized), and NrdB (β subunit of ribonucleotide reductase). The role of the rnh gene in drug sensitivity was further characterized. First, an in-frame rnh deletion mutation was constructed and analyzed, providing evidence that the absence of Rnh protein causes hypersensitivity to m-AMSA. Second, the m-AMSA sensitivity of the rnh-deletion mutant was shown to require a drug-sensitive T4 topoisomerase. Third, analysis of double mutants suggested that uvsW and rnh mutations impair a common step in the recombinational repair pathway for m-AMSA-induced damage. Finally, the rnh-deletion mutant was found to be hypersensitive to UV, implicating Rnh in recombinational repair of UV-induced damage. PMID:8807283

  18. Trophic Complexity and the Adaptive Value of Damage-Induced Plant Volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Indirect plant defenses are those facilitating the action of carnivores in ridding plants of their herbivorous consumers, as opposed to directly poisoning or repelling them. Of the numerous and diverse indirect defensive strategies employed by plants, inducible volatile production has garnered the most fascination among plant-insect ecologists. These volatile chemicals are emitted in response to feeding by herbivorous arthropods and serve to guide predators and parasitic wasps to their prey. Implicit in virtually all discussions of plant volatile-carnivore interactions is the premise that plants “call for help” to bodyguards that serve to boost plant fitness by limiting herbivore damage. This, by necessity, assumes a three-trophic level food chain where carnivores benefit plants, a theoretical framework that is conceptually tractable and convenient, but poorly depicts the complexity of food-web dynamics occurring in real communities. Recent work suggests that hyperparasitoids, top consumers acting from the fourth trophic level, exploit the same plant volatile cues used by third trophic level carnivores. Further, hyperparasitoids shift their foraging preferences, specifically cueing in to the odor profile of a plant being damaged by a parasitized herbivore that contains their host compared with damage from an unparasitized herbivore. If this outcome is broadly representative of plant-insect food webs at large, it suggests that damage-induced volatiles may not always be beneficial to plants with major implications for the evolution of anti-herbivore defense and manipulating plant traits to improve biological control in agricultural crops. PMID:23209381

  19. Decoherence induced by conical intersections: complexity constrained quantum dynamics of photoexcited pyrazine.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Till; Manthe, Uwe

    2012-12-14

    Decoherence effects induced by conical intersecting potential energy surfaces are studied employing the correlation-based von Neumann (CvN) entropy which provides a measure of the complexity of the underlying wavefunction. As a prototypical example, the S(0) → S(2) excitation in pyrazine is investigated. The 24-dimensional wavepacket dynamics calculations presented utilize the multi-layer extension of the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach. An efficient numerical scheme is introduced which facilitates CvN entropy constrained wavepacket propagation within the multi-layer MCTDH approach. In unconstrained multi-layer MCTDH calculations, the CvN-entropy is found to provide a valuable analytical tool for studying the decoherence phenomena present. Investigating the CvN entropy after the S(0) → S(2) excitation as a function of time, a clear separation of time scales is obtained. It can be related to the different dynamical phenomena present: the initial transfer from the upper (S(2)) to the lower (S(1)) adiabatic electronic states rapidly generates vast amounts of CvN-entropy, while the subsequent motion on the anharmonic lower adiabatic potential energy surface only yields a slow increase of the CvN-entropy. Employing CvN-entropy constrained calculations, the sensitivity of the autocorrelation function, the absorption spectrum, and the diabatic electronic population dynamics to complexity constraints is analyzed in detail. PMID:23249046

  20. Di-hydrogen contact induced lattice instabilities and structural dynamics in complex hydride perovskites.

    PubMed

    Schouwink, P; Hagemann, H; Embs, J P; D'Anna, V; Černý, R

    2015-07-01

    The structural phase transitions occurring in a series of perovskite-type complex hydrides based on the tetrahydroborate anion BH4(-) are investigated by means of in situ synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, thermal methods and ab initio calculations in the solid state. Structural dynamics of the BH4 anion are followed with quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We show that unexpected temperature-induced lattice instabilities in perovskite-type ACa(BH4)3 (A = K, Rb, Cs) have their origin in close hydridic di-hydrogen contacts. The rich lattice dynamics lead to coupling between internal B-H vibrations and phonons, resulting in distortions in the high-temperature polymorph that are identical in symmetry to well-known instabilities in oxide perovskites, generally condensing at lower temperatures. It is found that anion-substitution BH4(-) <-> (X = Halide) can relax distortions in ACa(BH4)3 by eliminating coulomb repulsive H(-)···H(-) effects. The interesting nature of phase transition in ACa(BH4)3 enters an unexplored field of weak interactions in ceramic-like host lattices and is the principal motivation for this study. Close di-hydrogen contacts suggest new concepts to tailor crystal symmetries in complex hydride perovskites in the future. PMID:26076047

  1. Capturing microRNA targets using an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-trap approach

    PubMed Central

    Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Shen, Rongkun; Auer, Paul L.; Goodman, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying targets is critical for understanding the biological effects of microRNA (miRNA) expression. The challenge lies in characterizing the cohort of targets for a specific miRNA, especially when targets are being actively down-regulated in miRNA– RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)–messengerRNA (mRNA) complexes. We have developed a robust and versatile strategy called RISCtrap to stabilize and purify targets from this transient interaction. Its utility was demonstrated by determining specific high-confidence target datasets for miR-124, miR-132, and miR-181 that contained known and previously unknown transcripts. Two previously unknown miR-132 targets identified with RISCtrap, adaptor protein CT10 regulator of kinase 1 (CRK1) and tight junction-associated protein 1 (TJAP1), were shown to be endogenously regulated by miR-132 in adult mouse forebrain. The datasets, moreover, differed in the number of targets and in the types and frequency of microRNA recognition element (MRE) motifs, thus revealing a previously underappreciated level of specificity in the target sets regulated by individual miRNAs. PMID:23184980

  2. Structural and thermodynamic basis of proline-induced transmembrane complex stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Thomas; Situ, Alan J.; Ulmer, Tobias S.

    2016-01-01

    In membrane proteins, proline-mediated helix kinks are indispensable for the tight packing of transmembrane (TM) helices. However, kinks invariably affect numerous interhelical interactions, questioning the acceptance of proline substitutions and evolutionary origin of kinks. Here, we present the structural and thermodynamic basis of proline-induced integrin αIIbβ3 TM complex stabilization to understand the introduction of proline kinks in membrane proteins. In phospholipid bicelles, the A711P substitution in the center of the β3 TM helix changes the direction of adjacent helix segments to form a 35 ± 2° angle and predominantly repacks the segment in the inner membrane leaflet due to a swivel movement. This swivel repacks hydrophobic and electrostatic interhelical contacts within intracellular lipids, resulting in an overall TM complex stabilization of −0.82 ± 0.01 kcal/mol. Thus, proline substitutions can directly stabilize membrane proteins and such substitutions are proposed to follow the structural template of integrin αIIbβ3(A711P). PMID:27436065

  3. Syncytial apoptosis signaling network induced by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex: an overview.

    PubMed

    Nardacci, R; Perfettini, J-L; Grieco, L; Thieffry, D; Kroemer, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is associated with a progressive decrease in CD4 T-cell numbers and the consequent collapse of host immune defenses. The major pathogenic mechanism of AIDS is the massive apoptotic destruction of the immunocompetent cells, including uninfected cells. The latter process, also known as by-stander killing, operates by various mechanisms one of which involves the formation of syncytia which undergo cell death by following a complex pathway. We present here a detailed and curated map of the syncytial apoptosis signaling network, aimed at simplifying the whole mechanism that we have characterized at the molecular level in the last 15 years. The map was created using Systems Biology Graphical Notation language with the help of CellDesigner software and encompasses 36 components (proteins/genes) and 54 interactions. The simplification of this complex network paves the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. Agents that induce the selective death of HIV-1-elicited syncytia might lead to the elimination of viral reservoirs and hence constitute an important complement to current antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26247731

  4. Regulatory effects of interleukin-6 in immunoglobulin G immune-complex-induced lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Shanley, T. P.; Foreback, J. L.; Remick, D. G.; Ulich, T. R.; Kunkel, S. L.; Ward, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine produced in response to a variety of inflammatory stimuli. Although IL-6 is often observed in increased amounts in acute respiratory distress syndrome, its role in the development of lung injury is unclear. The role of IL-6 was studied in the rat model of lung injury induced by the intra-alveolar deposition of IgG immune complexes. IL-6 induction, as determined by Northern blot analysis and bioactivity, was found as a function of time during the course of development of injury. Recombinant IL-6 instilled intratracheally at commencement of injury led to substantial reductions in lung vascular permeability, neutrophil accumulation, and levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Conversely, blocking of intrinsic IL-6 by a neutralizing antibody resulted in increases in lung vascular permeability, neutrophil content, and TNF-alpha levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Rat alveolar macrophages stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide in the presence of IL-6 showed a significant reduction in TNF-alpha expression. Together, these findings suggest that IL-6 acts as an intrinsic regulator of lung inflammatory injury after deposition of IgG immune complexes and that the protective effects of exogenously administered IL-6 may be in part linked to suppressed TNF-alpha production. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:9212745

  5. The Fine Structure of Experimentally Induced Connective Tissue Complexes in the Human

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, W. W.; Richter, K. M.; Schilling, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The growth, development and cellular activity of fibrocollagenous tissue complexes induced by the implantation of specially structured wire mesh cylinders in 22 human male volunteers were studied during the time course of fibroplasia utilizing light and electron microscopic techniques. The fibrocollagenous tissue complexes after 4 to 16 weeks of development demonstrated highly ordered lamellations made of zones consisting primarily of fibroblasts and zones consisting primarily of collagenous fibers. The development of the ordered lamellations is referable to specific fibrillogenic activities by the constituent fibroblasts. The initial role of the fibroblast in fibrillogenesis is indicative of an apocrine-like secretory process followed by a holocrine-like role which results in cytodestruction and concurrent formation of an avascular collagenic tissue referable to an organizing cicatrix in a healing wound. ImagesFigs. 1-3.Figs. 4-9.Fig. 10.Fig. 11.Fig. 12.Figs. 13, 14.Fig. 15.Fig. 16.Fig. 17.Fig. 18, 19.Figs. 20-22.Fig. 23.Fig. 24. PMID:4599224

  6. Syncytial apoptosis signaling network induced by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nardacci, R; Perfettini, J-L; Grieco, L; Thieffry, D; Kroemer, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is associated with a progressive decrease in CD4 T-cell numbers and the consequent collapse of host immune defenses. The major pathogenic mechanism of AIDS is the massive apoptotic destruction of the immunocompetent cells, including uninfected cells. The latter process, also known as by-stander killing, operates by various mechanisms one of which involves the formation of syncytia which undergo cell death by following a complex pathway. We present here a detailed and curated map of the syncytial apoptosis signaling network, aimed at simplifying the whole mechanism that we have characterized at the molecular level in the last 15 years. The map was created using Systems Biology Graphical Notation language with the help of CellDesigner software and encompasses 36 components (proteins/genes) and 54 interactions. The simplification of this complex network paves the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. Agents that induce the selective death of HIV-1-elicited syncytia might lead to the elimination of viral reservoirs and hence constitute an important complement to current antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26247731

  7. Modulation of flash-induced photosystem II fluorescence by events occurring at the water oxidizing complex.

    PubMed

    Putrenko, I I; Vasil'ev, S; Bruce, D

    1999-08-17

    The mechanism of flash-induced changes with a periodicity of four in photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence was investigated with the aim of further using fluorescence measurements as an approach to studying the structural and functional organization of the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). The decay of the flash-induced high fluorescence state of PSII was measured with pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry in thylakoids and PSII enriched membrane fragments. Calculated QA- decay was well described by three exponential decay components, reflecting QA- reoxidation with halftimes of 450 and 860 micros, 2 and 7.6 ms, and 111 and 135 ms in thylakoids and PSII membranes, respectively. The effect of modification of the PSII donor side by changing pH or by removal of the extrinsic 17 and 24 kDa proteins on period four oscillations in both maximum fluorescence yield and the relative contribution of QA- reoxidation reactions was compared to flash-induced oxygen yield. The four-step oxidation of the manganese cluster of the WOC was found to be necessary but not sufficient to produce modulation of PSII fluorescence. The capacity of the WOC to generate molecular oxygen was also required to observe a period four in the fluorescence; however, direct quenching by oxygen was not responsible for the modulation. Potential mechanisms responsible for the periodicity of four in both maximum fluorescence yield pattern and flash-dependent changes in proportion of centers with different QA- reoxidation rates are discussed with respect to intrinsic deprotonation events occurring at the WOC. PMID:10451357

  8. A Zn(II)-glycine complex suppresses UVB-induced melanin production by stimulating metallothionein expression.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Y; Kaburagi, S; Okano, Y; Masaki, H; Ichihashi, M; Funasaka, Y; Sakurai, H

    2008-04-01

    Oxidative stress caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the skin, induces the secretion of melanocyte growth and activating factors from keratinocytes, which results in the formation of cutaneous hyper-pigmentation. Thus, increasing the anti-oxidative ability of skin cells is expected to be a good strategy for skin-lightening cosmetics. Metallothionein (MT) is one of the stress-induced proteins and is known to exhibit a strong anti-oxidative property. We previously reported that a zinc(II) complex with glycine (Zn(II)(Gly)(2)) effectively induces MT expression in cultured human keratinocytes. To determine its potential as a new skin lightening active, we examined whether Zn(II)(Gly)(2) regulates the release of melanocyte-activating factors from UVB-irradiated keratinocytes and affects melanin production in a reconstructed human epidermal equivalent. Conditioned medium from UVB-irradiated keratinocytes accelerated melanocyte proliferation to 110%, and that increase could be prevented by pre-treatment with Zn(II)(Gly)(2). In addition, Zn(II)(Gly)(2) significantly reduced both the production of prostaglandin E(2) and proopiomelanocortin expression in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes. Zn(II)(Gly)(2) also decreased melanin production in a reconstructed human epidermal equivalent. These results indicate that MT-induction in the epidermis effectively up-regulates tolerance against oxidative stress and inhibits the secretion of melanocyte growth and activating factors from keratinocytes. Thus, Zn(II)(Gly)(2) is a good candidate as a new skin-lightening active. PMID:18377619

  9. Disruption of the ribosomal P complex leads to stress-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Artero-Castro, Ana; Perez-Alea, Mileidys; Feliciano, Andrea; Leal, Jose A; Genestar, Mónica; Castellvi, Josep; Peg, Vicente; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; LLeonart, Matilde E

    2015-01-01

    The human ribosomal P complex, which consists of the acidic ribosomal P proteins RPLP0, RPLP1, and RPLP2 (RPLP proteins), recruits translational factors, facilitating protein synthesis. Recently, we showed that overexpression of RPLP1 immortalizes primary cells and contributes to transformation. Moreover, RPLP proteins are overexpressed in human cancer, with the highest incidence in breast carcinomas. It is thought that disruption of the P complex would directly affect protein synthesis, causing cell growth arrest and eventually apoptosis. Here, we report a distinct mechanism by which cancer cells undergo cell cycle arrest and induced autophagy when RPLP proteins are downregulated. We found that absence of RPLP0, RPLP1, or RPLP2 resulted in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and MAPK1/ERK2 signaling pathway activation. Moreover, ROS generation led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that involved the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF2α-EIF2S2-EIF2S3-ATF4/ATF-4- and ATF6/ATF-6-dependent arms of the unfolded protein response (UPR). RPLP protein-deficient cells treated with autophagy inhibitors experienced apoptotic cell death as an alternative to autophagy. Strikingly, antioxidant treatment prevented UPR activation and autophagy while restoring the proliferative capacity of these cells. Our results indicate that ROS are a critical signal generated by disruption of the P complex that causes a cellular response that follows a sequential order: first ROS, then ER stress/UPR activation, and finally autophagy. Importantly, inhibition of the first step alone is able to restore the proliferative capacity of the cells, preventing UPR activation and autophagy. Overall, our results support a role for autophagy as a survival mechanism in response to stress due to RPLP protein deficiency. PMID:26176264

  10. Cytokinin delays dark-induced senescence in rice by maintaining the chlorophyll cycle and photosynthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Talla, Sai Krishna; Panigrahy, Madhusmita; Kappara, Saivishnupriya; Nirosha, P; Neelamraju, Sarla; Ramanan, Rajeshwari

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone cytokinin (CK) is known to delay senescence in plants. We studied the effect of a CK analog, 6-benzyl adenine (BA), on rice leaves to understand the possible mechanism by which CK delays senescence in a drought- and heat-tolerant rice cultivar Nagina22 (N22) using dark-induced senescence (DIS) as a surrogate for natural senescence of leaves. Leaves of N22-H-dgl162, a stay-green mutant of N22, and BA-treated N22 showed retention of chlorophyll (Chl) pigments, maintenance of the Chl a/b ratio, and delay in reduction of both photochemical efficiency and rate of oxygen evolution during DIS. HPLC analysis showed accumulation of 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll (HmChl) during DIS, and the kinetics of its accumulation correlated with progression of senescence. Transcriptome analysis revealed that several plastid-localized genes, specifically those associated with photosystem II (PSII), showed higher transcript levels in BA-treated N22 and the stay-green mutant leaves compared with naturally senescing N22 leaves. Real-time PCR analyses showed that genes coding for enzymes associated with Chl a/b interconversion and proteins associated with light-harvesting complexes maintained higher transcript levels up to 72h of DIS following BA treatment. The pigment-protein complexes analyzed by green gel remained intact in both N22-H-dgl162 and BA-treated N22 leaves even after 96h of DIS. Thus, CK delays senescence by accumulation of HmChl and up-regulating genes in the Chl cycle, thereby maintaining the Chl a/b ratio. Also, CK treatment retains higher transcript levels of PSII-related genes, resulting in the stability of photosynthetic pigment complexes and functional stay-greenness in rice. PMID:26826216

  11. Disruption of the ribosomal P complex leads to stress-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Artero-Castro, Ana; Perez-Alea, Mileidys; Feliciano, Andrea; Leal, Jose A; Genestar, Mónica; Castellvi, Josep; Peg, Vicente; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Lleonart, Matilde E L

    2015-01-01

    The human ribosomal P complex, which consists of the acidic ribosomal P proteins RPLP0, RPLP1, and RPLP2 (RPLP proteins), recruits translational factors, facilitating protein synthesis. Recently, we showed that overexpression of RPLP1 immortalizes primary cells and contributes to transformation. Moreover, RPLP proteins are overexpressed in human cancer, with the highest incidence in breast carcinomas. It is thought that disruption of the P complex would directly affect protein synthesis, causing cell growth arrest and eventually apoptosis. Here, we report a distinct mechanism by which cancer cells undergo cell cycle arrest and induced autophagy when RPLP proteins are downregulated. We found that absence of RPLP0, RPLP1, or RPLP2 resulted in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and MAPK1/ERK2 signaling pathway activation. Moreover, ROS generation led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that involved the EIF2AK3/PERK-EIF2S1/eIF2α-EIF2S2-EIF2S3-ATF4/ATF-4- and ATF6/ATF-6-dependent arms of the unfolded protein response (UPR). RPLP protein-deficient cells treated with autophagy inhibitors experienced apoptotic cell death as an alternative to autophagy. Strikingly, antioxidant treatment prevented UPR activation and autophagy while restoring the proliferative capacity of these cells. Our results indicate that ROS are a critical signal generated by disruption of the P complex that causes a cellular response that follows a sequential order: first ROS, then ER stress/UPR activation, and finally autophagy. Importantly, inhibition of the first step alone is able to restore the proliferative capacity of the cells, preventing UPR activation and autophagy. Overall, our results support a role for autophagy as a survival mechanism in response to stress due to RPLP protein deficiency. PMID:26176264

  12. Cytokinin delays dark-induced senescence in rice by maintaining the chlorophyll cycle and photosynthetic complexes

    PubMed Central

    Talla, Sai Krishna; Panigrahy, Madhusmita; Kappara, Saivishnupriya; Nirosha, P; Neelamraju, Sarla; Ramanan, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone cytokinin (CK) is known to delay senescence in plants. We studied the effect of a CK analog, 6-benzyl adenine (BA), on rice leaves to understand the possible mechanism by which CK delays senescence in a drought- and heat-tolerant rice cultivar Nagina22 (N22) using dark-induced senescence (DIS) as a surrogate for natural senescence of leaves. Leaves of N22-H-dgl162, a stay-green mutant of N22, and BA-treated N22 showed retention of chlorophyll (Chl) pigments, maintenance of the Chl a/b ratio, and delay in reduction of both photochemical efficiency and rate of oxygen evolution during DIS. HPLC analysis showed accumulation of 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll (HmChl) during DIS, and the kinetics of its accumulation correlated with progression of senescence. Transcriptome analysis revealed that several plastid-localized genes, specifically those associated with photosystem II (PSII), showed higher transcript levels in BA-treated N22 and the stay-green mutant leaves compared with naturally senescing N22 leaves. Real-time PCR analyses showed that genes coding for enzymes associated with Chl a/b interconversion and proteins associated with light-harvesting complexes maintained higher transcript levels up to 72h of DIS following BA treatment. The pigment–protein complexes analyzed by green gel remained intact in both N22-H-dgl162 and BA-treated N22 leaves even after 96h of DIS. Thus, CK delays senescence by accumulation of HmChl and up-regulating genes in the Chl cycle, thereby maintaining the Chl a/b ratio. Also, CK treatment retains higher transcript levels of PSII-related genes, resulting in the stability of photosynthetic pigment complexes and functional stay-greenness in rice. PMID:26826216

  13. Infrared laser induced conformational and structural changes of glycine and glycine·water complex in low-temperature matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussan, Stéphane; Tarczay, György

    2016-01-01

    Conformational and structural changes of matrix-isolated glycine and glycine·water complexes induced by the selective MIR excitation of the fundamental OH and NH stretching vibrational modes were studied. The observed spectral changes are consistent with the former assignments based on matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy combined with NIR laser irradiation. Since fewer conformational barriers can be reached by MIR than by NIR excitations, fewer processes are promoted effectively by MIR radiation. The comparison of spectral changes induced by selective MIR and NIR excitations can facilitate the conformational analysis of complex molecular systems and it can also yield information on the barrier heights.

  14. Inducible Repression of Nuclear-Encoded Subunits of the Cytochrome b6f Complex in Tobacco Reveals an Extraordinarily Long Lifetime of the Complex1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hojka, Marta; Thiele, Wolfram; Tóth, Szilvia Z.; Lein, Wolfgang; Bock, Ralph; Schöttler, Mark Aurel

    2014-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cytochrome b6f complex in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seems to be restricted to young leaves, suggesting a high lifetime of the complex. To directly determine its lifetime, we employed an ethanol-inducible RNA interference (RNAi) approach targeted against the essential nuclear-encoded Rieske protein (PetC) and the small M subunit (PetM), whose function in higher plants is unknown. Young expanding leaves of both PetM and PetC RNAi transformants bleached rapidly and developed necroses, while mature leaves, whose photosynthetic apparatus was fully assembled before RNAi induction, stayed green. In line with these phenotypes, cytochrome b6f complex accumulation and linear electron transport capacity were strongly repressed in young leaves of both RNAi transformants, showing that the M subunit is as essential for cytochrome b6f complex accumulation as the Rieske protein. In mature leaves, all photosynthetic parameters were indistinguishable from the wild type even after 14 d of induction. As RNAi repression of PetM and PetC was highly efficient in both young and mature leaves, these data indicate a lifetime of the cytochrome b6f complex of at least 1 week. The switch-off of cytochrome b6f complex biogenesis in mature leaves may represent part of the first dedicated step of the leaf senescence program. PMID:24963068

  15. The RNA Helicase DHX34 Activates NMD by Promoting a Transition from the Surveillance to the Decay-Inducing Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hug, Nele; Cáceres, Javier F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a surveillance mechanism that degrades aberrant mRNAs. A complex comprising SMG1, UPF1, and the translation termination factors eRF1 and eRF3 (SURF) is assembled in the vicinity of a premature termination codon. Subsequently, an interaction with UPF2, UPF3b, and the exon junction complex induces the formation of the decay-inducing complex (DECID) and triggers NMD. We previously identified the RNA helicase DHX34 as an NMD factor in C. elegans and in vertebrates. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which DHX34 activates NMD in human cells. We show that DHX34 is recruited to the SURF complex via its preferential interaction with hypophosphorylated UPF1. A series of molecular transitions induced by DHX34 include enhanced recruitment of UPF2, increased UPF1 phosphorylation, and dissociation of eRF3 from UPF1. Thus, DHX34 promotes mRNP remodeling and triggers the conversion from the SURF complex to the DECID complex resulting in NMD activation. PMID:25220460

  16. Daxx cooperates with the Axin/HIPK2/p53 complex to induce cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinxi; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Xiaoling; Rui, Yanning; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jifeng; Wang, Xinghao; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Ye, Zhiyun; Lin, Sheng-Cai

    2007-01-01

    Daxx, a death domain-associated protein, has been implicated in proapoptosis, antiapoptosis, and transcriptional regulation. Many factors known to play critically important roles in controlling apoptosis and gene transcription have been shown to associate with Daxx, including the Ser/Thr protein kinase HIPK2, promyelocytic leukemia protein, histone deacetylases, and the chromatin remodeling protein ATRX. Although it is clear that Daxx may exert multiple functions, the underlying mechanisms remain far from clear. Here, we show that Axin, originally identified for its scaffolding role to control beta-catenin levels in Wnt signaling, strongly associates with Daxx at endogenous levels. The Daxx/Axin complex formation is enhanced by UV irradiation. Axin tethers Daxx to the tumor suppressor p53, and cooperates with Daxx, but not DaxxDeltaAxin, which is unable to interact with Axin, to stimulate HIPK2-mediated Ser(46) phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of p53. Interestingly, Axin and Daxx seem to selectively activate p53 target genes, with strong activation of PUMA, but not p21 or Bax. Daxx-stimulated p53 transcriptional activity was significantly diminished by small interfering RNA against Axin; Daxx fails to inhibit colony formation in Axin(-/-) cells. Moreover, UV-induced cell death was attenuated by the knockdown of Axin and Daxx. All these results show that Daxx cooperates with Axin to stimulate p53, and implicate a direct role for Axin, HIPK2, and p53 in the proapoptotic function of Daxx. We have hence unraveled a novel aspect of p53 activation and shed new light on the ultimate understanding of the Daxx protein, perhaps most pertinently, in relation to stress-induced cell death. PMID:17210684

  17. On the origins of large interaction-induced first hyperpolarizabilities in hydrogen-bonded π-electronic complexes.

    PubMed

    Góra, Robert W; Błasiak, Bartosz

    2013-08-01

    In this article we elucidate the origins of interaction-induced linear and nonlinear electro-optic properties of model hydrogen-bonded π-electronic complexes. In particular we report on contributions due to various interaction energy terms to excess dipole moments (Δμ), electric dipole polarizabilities (Δα), and first hyperpolarizabilities (Δβ), focusing on the latter. The analysis of intermolecular interaction-induced electric properties is performed for selected model systems including quasi-linear dimers of urea, diformamide, 4-pyridone, 4-nitroaniline, and the complex of hydrogen fluoride with nitroacetylene. The nature of intermolecular interactions as well as of the Δμ and Δα is very similar in all studied complexes. However, partitioning of Δβ into physically well-defined components reveals that the origins of this term, the magnitude of which is often comparable to the hyperpolarizabilities of isolated monomers, are different in each case. Our results indicate that, even though hydrogen bonding usually diminishes the nonlinear response of interacting species, the first hyperpolarizability of complexes with the nitro group acting as a proton acceptor is substantially increased, essentially due to field-induced changes of electrostatic interactions between subsystems. However, in the remaining complexes the origins of Δβ are much more involved. Even though at large intermolecular separations the origins of interaction-induced electric properties are essentially due to the field-induced electrostatic and induction interactions, in the vicinity of van der Waals minimum the overlap effects cannot be neglected since they may substantially alter the predicted excess properties or even determine their magnitude and sign. On the other hand the Δβ contribution due to dispersion interactions is usually negligible. Interestingly, the values of interaction-induced first hyperpolarizability in some cases depend strongly on the intermolecular separation

  18. Changes of conductance and compressibility of bilayer lipid membranes induced by oligonucleotide-cationic polyene antibiotic complexes.

    PubMed

    Hianik, Tibor; Ostatnik, Lukas; Polohova, Vladimira; Bolard, Jacques

    2008-11-01

    The positively charged polyene molecule amphotericin B 3-dimethylaminopropylamide (AMA) is an efficient agent for the delivery of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODN) into target cells. In the present study, bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) conductance, elasticity modulus perpendicular to the membrane plane, surface potential and electrical capacitance were measured by conductance and electrostriction methods in the presence of AMA, pure or complexed to 20-mer single stranded ODN at different ratios. Pure AMA did not induce changes in conductance of cholesterol-containing BLM, but did induce an increase in elasticity modulus and surface potential. ODN/AMA complexes changed BLM properties depending on the charge ratio. The most pronounced effect on membrane conductance was observed for positively charged ODN/AMA complexes (charge ratio rho-/+=0.1), while for negatively charged complexes these changes were less marked/apparent, correlating to substantially lower binding constants. The effect of ODN/AMA complexes on elasticity modulus and charge potential was biphasic. After an increase in both values, a decrease was observed for higher incubation times and ODN/AMA concentrations. These results are interpreted as indicating that the membrane property changes result from the large AMA aggregates induced by the presence of the negatively charged ODN, which condensate on these aggregates. It is suggested that the decrease of elasticity modulus and surface potential in the presence of increasing incubation time and AMA concentration result from desorption of the complexes in the complex-free compartment of the BLM cell, or appearance of a non-linear conductance of the lipid bilayer. The first alternative would explain the AMA-induced transmembrane transfer of ODN. PMID:17904427

  19. Multiple Analogies for Complex Concepts: Antidotes for Analogy-Induced Misconception in Advanced Knowledge Acquisition. Technical Report No. 439.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Rand J.; And Others

    This report argues that there exists a pervasive tendency for analogies to contribute to the development of entrenched misconceptions in the form of reducing complex new knowledge to the core of a source analogy. The report presents a taxonomy of ways that simple analogy induces conceptual error and an alternative approach involving integrated…

  20. Genetic factors influence level of proteinuria in cationic antigen-induced immune complex glomerulonephritis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Thaiss, F; Oite, T; Günther, E; Batsford, S; Vogt, A

    1985-01-01

    The influence of genetic factors on the susceptibility of the rat to cationic antigen-induced in situ immune complex glomerulonephritis was investigated. The levels of proteinuria developing in 11 inbred strains of rats differing in MHC and in genetic background varied markedly. Susceptibility was not MHC associated but resided in the genetic background. PMID:3159528

  1. Videogame training strategy-induced change in brain function during a complex visuomotor task.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunkyu; Voss, Michelle W; Prakash, Ruchika Shaurya; Boot, Walter R; Vo, Loan T K; Basak, Chandramallika; Vanpatter, Matt; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica; Kramer, Arthur F

    2012-07-01

    Although changes in brain function induced by cognitive training have been examined, functional plasticity associated with specific training strategies is still relatively unexplored. In this study, we examined changes in brain function during a complex visuomotor task following training using the Space Fortress video game. To assess brain function, participants completed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after 30 h of training with one of two training regimens: Hybrid Variable-Priority Training (HVT), with a focus on improving specific skills and managing task priority, or Full Emphasis Training (FET), in which participants simply practiced the game to obtain the highest overall score. Control participants received only 6 h of FET. Compared to FET, HVT learners reached higher performance on the game and showed less brain activation in areas related to visuo-spatial attention and goal-directed movement after training. Compared to the control group, HVT exhibited less brain activation in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), coupled with greater performance improvement. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that the reduction in brain activation was correlated with improved performance on the task. This study sheds light on the neurobiological mechanisms of improved learning from directed training (HVT) over non-directed training (FET), which is related to visuo-spatial attention and goal-directed motor planning, while separating the practice-based benefit, which is related to executive control and rule management. PMID:22504276

  2. Turbulent secondary flows in high Reynolds number boundary layers induced by streamwise-elongated complex roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William; Barros, Julio; Christensen, Kenneth

    2014-11-01

    It has been reported that complex roughness with a predominant streamwise elongation induces secondary mean flow heterogeneities in the above turbulent boundary layer (Mejia-Alvarez and Christensen, Phys. Fluids 25, 115 (2013), MAC; Nugroho et al., Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 41, 90 (2013)). These mean secondary flows exist as transverse variations of mean streamwise velocity (so-called low- and high-momentum pathways, MAC) and are flanked by mean counter-rotating, boundary layer-scale circulations (Christensen and Barros, J. Fluid Mech. 748, R1 (2014)). In related work, we have used large-eddy simulation to model turbulent boundary layer flow over a suite of topographies composed of ``strips'' of high and low roughness length (drag imposed with the equilibrium logarithmic law); in all cases, we observe the formation of high- and low-momentum pathways (Willingham et al., Phys. Fluids 26, 025111 (2013)). Here, we investigate turbulence statistics from large-eddy simulation such as magnitudes and spatial gradients of Reynolds stresses and turbulence kinetic energy, to discern underlying physical processes responsible for the secondary flows. We demonstrate that elevated production of turbulence above ``high'' roughness necessitates the mean circulations by virtue of turbulent kinetic energy production-dissipation non-equilibrium. We propose that the mean flow is Prandtl's secondary flow of the second kind.

  3. In vitro assembly of plant RNA-induced silencing complexes facilitated by molecular chaperone HSP90.

    PubMed

    Iki, Taichiro; Yoshikawa, Manabu; Nishikiori, Masaki; Jaudal, Mauren C; Matsumoto-Yokoyama, Eiko; Mitsuhara, Ichiro; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2010-07-30

    RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) play central roles in posttranscriptional gene silencing. In plants, the mechanism of RISC assembly has remained elusive due to the lack of cell-free systems that recapitulate the process. In this report, we demonstrate that plant AGO1 protein synthesized by in vitro translation using an extract of evacuolated tobacco protoplasts incorporates synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) duplexes to form RISCs that sequester the single-stranded siRNA guide strand and miRNA strand, respectively. The formed RISCs were able to recognize and cleave the complementary target RNAs. In this system, the siRNA duplex was incorporated into HSP90-bound AGO1, and subsequent removal of the passenger strand was triggered by ATP hydrolysis by HSP90. Removal of the siRNA passenger strand required the ribonuclease activity of AGO1, while that of the miRNA star strand did not. Based on these results, the mechanism of plant RISC formation is discussed. PMID:20605502

  4. Laser-induced periodic surface structures of thin, complex multi-component films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, Juergen; Varlamova, Olga; Ratzke, Markus; Uhlig, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser-induced regular nanostructures are generated on a complex multilayer target, namely a piece of a commercial, used hard disk memory. It is shown that after single-shot 800-nm irradiation at 0.26 J/cm2 only the polymer cover layer and—in the center—a portion of the magnetic multilayer are ablated. A regular array of linearly aligned spherical 450-nm features at the uncovered interface between cover and magnetic layers appears not to be produced by the irradiation. Only after about 10 pulses on one spot, classical ripples perpendicular to the laser polarization with a period of ≈700 nm are observed, with a modulation between 40 nm above and 40 nm below the pristine surface and an ablation depth only slightly larger than the thickness of the multilayer magnetic film. Further increase of the pulse number does not result in deeper ablation. However, 770-nm ripples become parallel to the polarization and are swelling to more than 120 nm above zero, much more than the full multilayer film thickness. In the spot periphery, much shallower 300-nm ripples are perpendicular to the strong modulation and the laser polarization. Irradiation with 0.49-J/cm2 pulses from an ultrafast white-light continuum results—in the spot periphery—in the formation of 200-nm ripples, only swelling above zero after removal of the polymer cover, without digging into the magnetic film.

  5. An Interfacial Europium Complex on SiO2 Nanoparticles: Reduction-Induced Blue Emission System

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Miki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, Eu-coated SiO2 nanoparticles have been prepared, consisting of an interfacial complex of Eu and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) at the solid surfaces of the SiO2/Eu nanostructures. The as-prepared SiO2/Eu/phen nanoparticles exhibits sharp red emission via energy transfer from the phen to the EuIII. After sintering at 200 °C in air, the emission is tuned from red to blue. The blue emission is originated from EuII. This reduction-induced emissive phenomenon resulted from the electron-donating environment created by the surrounding phen and SiO2, which is the first reported fabrication of a stable EuII-based emissive material using mild conditions (reaction in air and at low temperature) and an organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructure. The existence of two different stable oxidation states with characteristic emissions, blue emissive EuII and red emissive EuIII, suggests significant potential applications as novel luminescent materials with inorganic-organic hybrid structures. PMID:26122318

  6. Ionic Charge Transfer Complex Induced Visible Light Harvesting and Photocharge Generation in Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz-Wai; Thachoth Chandran, Hrisheekesh; Chan, Chiu-Yee; Lo, Ming-Fai; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2015-09-16

    Organometal trihalide perovskite has recently emerged as a new class of promising material for high efficiency solar cells applications. While excess ions in perovskites are recently getting a great deal of attention, there is so far no clear understanding on both their formation and relating ions interaction to the photocharge generation in perovskite. Herein, we showed that tremendous ions indeed form during the initial stage of perovskite formation when the organic methylammonium halide (MAXa, Xa=Br and I) meets the inorganic PbXb2 (Xb=Cl, Br, I). The strong charge exchanges between the Pb2+ cations and Xa- anions result in formation of ionic charge transfer complexes (iCTC). MAXa parties induce empty valence electronic states within the forbidden bandgap of PbXb2. The strong surface dipole provide sufficient driving force for sub-bandgap electron transition with energy identical to the optical bandgap of forming perovskites. Evidences from XPS/UPS and photoluminescence studies showed that the light absorption, exciton dissociation, and photocharge generation of the perovskites are closely related to the strong ionic charge transfer interactions between Pb2+ and Xa- ions in the perovskite lattices. Our results shed light on mechanisms of light harvesting and subsequent free carrier generation in perovskites. PMID:26305717

  7. Depolarization-induced release of amino acids from the vestibular nuclear complex.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Sun, Yizhe; Frisch, Christopher; Godfrey, Matthew A; Rubin, Allan M

    2012-04-01

    There is evidence from immunohistochemistry, quantitative microchemistry, and pharmacology for several amino acids as neurotransmitters in the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC), including glutamate, γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), and glycine. However, evidence from measurements of release has been limited. The purpose of this study was to measure depolarization-stimulated calcium-dependent release of amino acids from the VNC in brain slices. Coronal slices containing predominantly the VNC were prepared from rats and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in an interface chamber. Fluid was collected from the chamber just downstream from the VNC using a microsiphon. Depolarization was induced by 50 mM potassium in either control calcium and magnesium concentrations or reduced calcium and elevated magnesium. Amino acid concentrations in effluent fluid were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Glutamate release increased fivefold during depolarization in control calcium concentration and twofold in low calcium/high magnesium. These same ratios were 6 and 1.5 for GABA, 2 and 1.3 for glycine, and 2 and 1.5 for aspartate. Differences between release in control and low calcium/high magnesium ACSF were statistically significant for glutamate, GABA, and glycine. Glutamine release decreased during and after depolarization, and taurine release slowly increased. No evidence for calcium-dependent release was found for serine, glutamine, alanine, threonine, arginine, taurine, or tyrosine. Our results support glutamate and GABA as major neurotransmitters in the VNC. They also support glycine as a neurotransmitter and some function for taurine. PMID:22147284

  8. An Interfacial Europium Complex on SiO2 Nanoparticles: Reduction-Induced Blue Emission System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ayumi; Hasegawa, Miki

    2015-06-01

    In this study, Eu-coated SiO2 nanoparticles have been prepared, consisting of an interfacial complex of Eu and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) at the solid surfaces of the SiO2/Eu nanostructures. The as-prepared SiO2/Eu/phen nanoparticles exhibits sharp red emission via energy transfer from the phen to the EuIII. After sintering at 200 °C in air, the emission is tuned from red to blue. The blue emission is originated from EuII. This reduction-induced emissive phenomenon resulted from the electron-donating environment created by the surrounding phen and SiO2, which is the first reported fabrication of a stable EuII-based emissive material using mild conditions (reaction in air and at low temperature) and an organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructure. The existence of two different stable oxidation states with characteristic emissions, blue emissive EuII and red emissive EuIII, suggests significant potential applications as novel luminescent materials with inorganic-organic hybrid structures.

  9. Effects on mitochondria of mitochondria-induced nitric oxide release from a ruthenium nitrosyl complex.

    PubMed

    Pestana, Cezar R; Phelippin, Daniela P S; Polizello, Ana C M; Dorta, Daniel J; Uyemura, Sergio A; Santos, Antonio C; Doro, Fábio G; Rodrigues, Fernando P; Tfouni, Elia; Curti, Carlos

    2009-02-01

    The ruthenium nitrosyl complex trans-[Ru(NO)(NH(3))(4)(py)](PF(6))(3) (pyNO), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, was studied in regard to the release of NO and its impact both on isolated mitochondria and HepG2 cells. In isolated mitochondria, NO release from pyNO was concomitant with NAD(P)H oxidation and, in the 25-100 microM range, it resulted in dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibition of state 3 respiration, ATP depletion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In the presence of Ca(2+), mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), an unspecific membrane permeabilization involved in cell necrosis and some types of apoptosis, was elicited. As demonstrated by externalization of phosphatidylserine and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, pyNO (50-100 microM) induced HepG2 cell death, mainly by apoptosis. The combined action of the NO itself, the peroxynitrite yielded by NO in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the oxidative stress generated by the NAD(P)H oxidation is proposed to be involved in cell death by pyNO, both via respiratory chain inhibition and ROS levels increase, or even via MPT, if Ca(2+) is present. PMID:18950724

  10. Benzaldehyde Thiosemicarbazone Derived from Limonene Complexed with Copper Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Leishmania amazonensis

    PubMed Central

    Britta, Elizandra Aparecida; Barbosa Silva, Ana Paula; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; Silva, Cleuza Conceição; Sernaglia, Rosana Lázara; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmaniasis is a major health problem that affects more than 12 million people. Treatment presents several problems, including high toxicity and many adverse effects, leading to the discontinuation of treatment and emergence of resistant strains. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the in vitro antileishmanial activity of benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derived from limonene complexed with copper, termed BenzCo, against Leishmania amazonensis. BenzCo inhibited the growth of the promastigote and axenic amastigote forms, with IC50 concentrations of 3.8 and 9.5 µM, respectively, with 72 h of incubation. Intracellular amastigotes were inhibited by the compound, with an IC50 of 10.7 µM. BenzCo altered the shape, size, and ultrastructure of the parasites. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization was observed in protozoa treated with BenzCo but caused no alterations in the plasma membrane. Additionally, BenzCo induced lipoperoxidation and the production of mitochondrial superoxide anion radicals in promastigotes and axenic amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. Conclusion/Significance Our studies indicated that the antileishmania activity of BenzCo might be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage, leading to parasite death. PMID:22870222

  11. Fabrication and characterization of poly(L-lactic acid) gels induced by fibrous complex crystallization with solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Fukatsu, Akinobu; Wang, Yangyang; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Mays, Jimmy; Tasaka, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Complex crystal induced gelation of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) solutions was studied for a series of solvents, including N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). By cooling the solutions prepared at elevated temperatures, PLLA gels were produced in solvents that induced complex crystals ( -crystals) with PLLA. Fibrous structure of PLLA in the gel with DMF was observed by polarizing optical microscopy, field emission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Upon heating, the crystal form of PLLA in the DMF gel changed from -crystal to a-crystal, the major crystal form in common untreated PLLA films, but the morphology and high elastic modulus of the gel remained until the a-crystal dissolved at higher temperature. In addition, a solvent exchanging method was developed, which allowed PLLA gels to be prepared in other useful solvents that do not induce -crystals without losing the morphology and mechanical properties.

  12. A label-free kissing complexes-induced fluorescence aptasensor using DNA-templated silver nanoclusters as a signal transducer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ke; Zhu, Xue; Xie, Minhao

    2016-04-15

    Riboswitches are complex folded RNA domains that serve as receptors for specific metabolites which identified in prokaryotes. They are comprised of a biosensor that includes the binding site for a small ligand and they respond to association with this ligand by undergoing a conformational change. In the present study, we report on the integration of silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) and riboswitches for the development of a kissing complexes-induced aptasensor (KCIA). We specifically apply the tunable riboswitches properties of this strategy to demonstrate the multiplexes analysis of adenosine and adenosine deaminase (ADA). This strategy allows for simple tethering of the specific oligonucleotides stabilizing the AgNCs to the nucleic acid probes. This is a new concept for aptasensors, and opens an opportunity for design of more novel biosensors based on the kissing complexes-induced strategy. PMID:26606306

  13. Complex Interplay between HIV-1 Capsid and MX2-Independent Alpha Interferon-Induced Antiviral Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulli, Lorenzo; Apolonia, Luis; Kutzner, Juliane; Pollpeter, Darja; Goujon, Caroline; Herold, Nikolas; Schwarz, Sarah-Marie; Giernat, Yannick; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2016-01-01

    limit HIV-1 replication by inducing the expression of a set of antiviral genes that inhibit HIV-1 at multiple steps in its life cycle, including the postentry steps of reverse transcription and nuclear import. This is observed in cultured cell systems, as well as in clinical trials in HIV-1-infected patients. The identities of the cellular antiviral factors, their viral targets, and the underpinning mechanisms are largely unknown. We show here that the HIV-1 Capsid protein plays a central role in protecting the virus from IFN-induced inhibitors that block early postentry steps of infection. We further show that host cell cyclophilins play an important role in regulating these processes, thus highlighting the complex interplay between antiviral effector mechanisms and viral survival. PMID:27279606

  14. Association between GABAA Receptor Subunit Gene Cluster and Zolpidem-Induced Complex Sleep Behaviors in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Lin, Hung-Hsun; Cheng, Kuang-hung; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate and elucidate the role of GABAA receptor subunits, specifically the 2 genetic markers at the GABAA α1 and GABAA α6 receptors, in zolpidem-induced complex sleep behaviors (CSBs). Design: Genetic association study. Setting: Kaohsiung Medical University-affiliated hospitals, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Patients: 30 zolpidem-induced CSB subjects and 37 controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The χ2 test demonstrated an association between the A15G variant at the GABAA α1 receptor subunit gene and zolpidem-induced CSBs (P = 0.007). The adjusted odds ratio of the GABAA α1 receptor subunit genotype for the risk of zolpidem-induced CSBs was approximately 10 (OR = 9.99, 95% CI = 1.82, 74.87; P = 0.013). Conclusions: The finding reveals that the A15G variant at the GABAA α1 receptor subunit gene confers a high risk of zolpidem-induced CSBs and may be considered in clinical services. Citation: Tsai JH; Yang P; Lin HH; Cheng Kh; Yang YH; Wu MT; Chen CC. Association between GABAA receptor subunit gene cluster and zolpidem-induced complex sleep behaviors in Han Chinese. SLEEP 2013;36(2):197–202. PMID:23372267

  15. Zinc Induces Dimerization of the Class II Major Histocompatibility Complex Molecule That Leads to Cooperative Binding to a Superantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Li,H.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Z.; Eislele, L.; Mourad, W.

    2007-01-01

    Dimerization of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays an important role in the MHC biological function. Mycoplasma arthritidis-derived mitogen (MAM) is a superantigen that can activate large fractions of T cells bearing specific T cell receptor V{beta} elements. Here we have used structural, sedimentation, and surface plasmon resonance detection approaches to investigate the molecular interactions between MAM and the class II MHC molecule HLA-DR1 in the context of a hemagglutinin peptide-(306-318) (HA). Our results revealed that zinc ion can efficiently induce the dimerization of the HLA-DR1/HA complex. Because the crystal structure of the MAM/HLA-DR1/hemagglutinin complex in the presence of EDTA is nearly identical to the structure of the complex crystallized in the presence of zinc ion, Zn{sup 2+} is evidently not directly involved in the binding between MAM and HLA-DR1. Sedimentation and surface plasmon resonance studies further revealed that MAM binds the HLA-DR1/HA complex with high affinity in a 1:1 stoichiometry, in the absence of Zn{sup 2+}. However, in the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, a dimerized MAM/HLA-DR1/HA complex can arise through the Zn{sup 2+}-induced DR1 dimer. In the presence of Zn{sup 2+}, cooperative binding of MAM to the DR1 dimer was also observed.

  16. TD-DFT study of the light-induced spin crossover of Fe(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Saureu, Sergi; de Graaf, Coen

    2016-01-14

    Two light-induced spin-crossover Fe(III) compounds have been studied with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to investigate the deactivation mechanism and the role of the ligand-field states as intermediates in this process. The B3LYP* functional has previously shown its ability to accurately describe (light-induced) spin-crossover in Fe(II) complexes. Here, we establish its performance for Fe(III) systems using [Fe(qsal)2](+) (Hqsal = 2-[(8-quinolinylimino)methyl]phenol) and [Fe(pap)2](+) (Hpap = 2-(2-pyridylmethyleneamino)phenol) as test cases comparing the B3LYP* results to experimental information and to multiconfigurational wave function results. In addition to rather accurate high spin (HS) and low spin (LS) state geometries, B3LYP* also predicts ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states with large oscillator strength in the energy range where the UV-VIS spectrum shows an intense absorption band, whereas optically allowed π-π* excitations on the ligands were calculated at higher energy. Subsequently, we have generated a two-dimensional potential energy surface of the HS and LS states varying the Fe-N and Fe-O distances. LMCT and metal centered (MC) excited states were followed along the approximate minimal energy path that connects the minima of the HS and LS on this surface. The (2)LMCT state has a minimum in the same region as the initial LS state, where we also observe a crossing with the intermediate spin (IS) state. Upon the expansion of the coordination sphere of the Fe(III) ion, the IS state crosses with the HS state and further expansion of the coordination sphere leads to the excited spin state trapping as observed in experiment. The calculation of the intersystem crossing rates reveals that the deactivation from (2)LMCT → IS → HS competes with the (2)LMCT → IS → LS pathway, in line with the low efficiency encountered in experiments. PMID:26660866

  17. PET imaging of ischemia-induced impairment of mitochondrial complex I function in monkey brain

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, Hideo; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Shingo; Kanazawa, Masakatsu; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Harada, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    To assess the capability of 18F-2-tert-butyl-4-chloro-5-{6-[2-(2-fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy]-pyridin-3-ylmethoxy}-2H-pyridazin-3-one (18F-BCPP-EF), a novel positron emission tomography (PET) probe for mitochondrial complex I (MC-I) activity, as a specific marker of ischemia-induced neuronal death without being disturbed by inflammation, translational research was conducted using an animal PET in ischemic brains of Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Focal ischemia was induced by the right middle cerebral artery occlusion for 3 hours, then PET scans were conducted at Day-7 with 15O-gases for regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and regional cerebral metabolism of oxygen (rCMRO2), and 18F-BCPP-EF for MC-I with arterial blood sampling. On Day-8, the additional PET scans conducted with 11C-flumazenil (11C-FMZ) for central-type benzodiazepine receptors, 11C-PBR28 for translocator protein, and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) for regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglc). The total distribution volume (VT) values of 18F-BCPP-EF showed the significant reduction in MC-I activity in the damaged area at Day-7. When correlated with rCBF and rCMRO2, the VT values of 18F-BCPP-EF provided better correlation with rCMRO2 than with rCBF. In the inflammatory regions (region of interest, ROIPBR) of the ischemic hemisphere detected with 11C-PBR28, higher 18F-FDG uptake and lower VT of 18F-BCPP-EF, 11C-FMZ, and rCMRO2 than those in normal contralateral hemisphere were observed. These results strongly suggested that 18F-BCPP-EF could discriminate the neuronal damaged areas with neuroinflammation, where 18F-FDG could not owing to its high uptake into the activated microglia. PMID:24447952

  18. Design and characterization of a novel lipid-DNA complex that resists serum-induced destabilization.

    PubMed

    Lian, Tianshun; Ho, Rodney J Y

    2003-12-01

    Ineffectiveness of cationic lipids to enhance DNA transfection has been attributed to serum-mediated dissociation and perhaps complement activation of lipid-DNA complexes. To overcome these problems, we have developed a novel lipid-DNA complex that greatly reduces serum-mediated dissociation. The complexes were prepared by mixing cationic liposomes containing 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane and dioleoylphosphatidyl-ethanolamine and DNA in ethanolic (20% v/v ethanol) solution containing 5% sucrose followed by dehydration via rotating evaporation. Upon hydration in H(2)O, the lipid-DNA complexes [ethanol-dried lipid-DNA (EDL) complexes] were formed. The complexes exhibit a low positive zeta potential and enhanced transfection efficiency in contrast to the suppressed efficiency detected with admixed lipid-DNA complexes in the presence of serum across several cell lines. This result may be attributed to the inability of serum to dissociate DNA from lipids in EDL complexes. Using displacement of ethidium bromide intercalation analysis, we found that in serum, only 50% of DNA was exposed in the EDL complexes, compared with 100% in the admixed lipid-DNA complexes. The EDL complexes also showed increased resistance to DNase digestion in the presence of negatively charged lipid, while reducing complement activation in serum. The EDL complexes may improve the transfection activity of lipid-DNA complexes in serum and, perhaps, in vivo. PMID:14603483

  19. Light induced catalytic intramolecular hydrofunctionalization of allylphenols mediated by porphyrin rhodium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Zikuan; Fu, Xuefeng

    2016-09-14

    Catalytic intramolecular hydrofunctionalization of allylphenols to heterocyclic compounds mediated by rhodium(iii) porphyrin complexes was described. The Wacker-type intermediate β-heterocyclic alkyl rhodium complex was independently synthesized and crystallized. PMID:27482840

  20. Plant host and sugar alcohol induced exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in the Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Bartholdson, S Josefin; Brown, Alan R; Mewburn, Ben R; Clarke, David J; Fry, Stephen C; Campopiano, Dominic J; Govan, John R W

    2008-08-01

    The species that presently constitute the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have multiple roles; they include soil and water saprophytes, bioremediators, and plant, animal and human pathogens. Since the first description of pathogenicity in the Bcc was based on sour skin rot of onion bulbs, this study returned to this plant host to investigate the onion-associated phenotype of the Bcc. Many Bcc isolates, which were previously considered to be non-mucoid, produced copious amounts of exopolysaccharide (EPS) when onion tissue was provided as the sole nutrient. EPS production was not species-specific, was observed in isolates from both clinical and environmental sources, and did not correlate with the ability to cause maceration of onion tissue. Chemical analysis suggested that the onion components responsible for EPS induction were primarily the carbohydrates sucrose, fructose and fructans. Additional sugars were investigated, and all alcohol sugars tested were able to induce EPS production, in particular mannitol and glucitol. To investigate the molecular basis for EPS biosynthesis, we focused on the highly conserved bce gene cluster thought to be involved in cepacian biosynthesis. We demonstrated induction of the bce gene cluster by mannitol, and found a clear correlation between the inability of representatives of the Burkholderia cenocepacia ET12 lineage to produce EPS and the presence of an 11 bp deletion within the bceB gene, which encodes a glycosyltransferase. Insertional inactivation of bceB in Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD results in loss of EPS production on sugar alcohol media. These novel and surprising insights into EPS biosynthesis highlight the metabolic potential of the Bcc and show that a potential virulence factor may not be detected by routine laboratory culture. Our results also highlight a potential hazard in the use of inhaled mannitol as an osmolyte to improve mucociliary clearance in individuals with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18667584

  1. Increased RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) Activity Contributes to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byoung Kwon; Santhekadur, Prasanna K.; Gredler, Rachel; Chen, Dong; Emdad, Luni; Bhutia, Sujit; Pannell, Lewis; Fisher, Paul B.; Sarkar, Devanand

    2011-01-01

    There is virtually no effective treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and novel targets need to be identified to develop effective treatment. We recently documented that the oncogene Astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) plays a seminal role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Employing yeast two-hybrid assay and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry we identified Staphylococcal nuclease domain containing 1 (SND1), a nuclease in the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) facilitating RNAi-mediated gene silencing, as an AEG-1 interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies confirmed that AEG-1 is also a component of RISC and both AEG-1 and SND1 are required for optimum RISC activity facilitating siRNA and miRNA-mediated silencing of luciferase reporter gene. In 109 human HCC samples SND1 was overexpressed in ∼74% cases compared to normal liver. Correspondingly, significantly higher RISC activity was observed in human HCC cells compared to immortal normal hepatocytes. Increased RISC activity, conferred by AEG-1 or SND1, resulted in increased degradation of tumor suppressor mRNAs that are target of oncomiRs. Inhibition of enzymatic activity of SND1 significantly inhibited proliferation of human HCC cells. As a corollary, stable overexpression of SND1 augmented and siRNA-mediated inhibition of SND1 abrogated growth of human HCC cells in vitro and in vivo thus revealing a potential role of SND1 in hepatocarcinogenesis. Conclusion We unravel a novel mechanism that overexpression of AEG-1 and SND1 leading to increased RISC activity might contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis. Targeted inhibition of SND1 enzymatic activity might be developed as an effective therapy for HCC. PMID:21520169

  2. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  3. Light-induced excited spin state trapping and charge transfer in trigonal bipyramidal cyanide-bridged complexes.

    PubMed

    Funck, Kristen E; Prosvirin, Andrey V; Mathonière, Corine; Clérac, Rodolphe; Dunbar, Kim R

    2011-04-01

    Three members of the family of trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) complexes of general formula [M(tmphen)(2)](3)[M'(CN)(6)](2) (tmphen = 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) or [M(3)M'(2)], which are known to exhibit thermally induced spin crossover and charge transfer, have been investigated for optical and photomagnetic properties. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping (LIESST) effect found in classical spin crossover compounds, such as [Fe(phen)(2)(NCS)(2)], was explored for the [Fe(3)Fe(2)] and [Fe(3)Co(2)] compounds. Similarly, inspired by the light-induced charge-transfer properties of K(0.2)Co(1.4)[Fe(CN)(6)]·6.9H(2)O and related Prussian blue materials, the possibility of photo-induced magnetic changes was investigated for the [Co(3)Fe(2)] TBP complex. Optical reflectivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to evaluate the photoactivity of these compounds. A comparison of these data before and after light irradiation demonstrates that (i) the spin crossover of the Fe(II) centers in the [Fe(3)Fe(2)] and [Fe(3)Co(2)] analogues and the (ii) charge transfer events in the [Co(3)Fe(2)] complex occur with temperature and irradiation. In addition, photomagnetic behavior is exhibited by all three compounds. The photo-conversion efficiency has been estimated at 20% of photo-induced high spin Fe(II) centers in [Fe(3)Co(2)], 30% of paramagnetic Co(II)-Fe(III) pairs in [Co(3)Fe(2)], and less than 2% of photo-induced high spin Fe(II) centers in [Fe(3)Fe(2)]. PMID:21391549

  4. GSK3 inactivation is involved in mitochondrial complex IV defect in transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1-induced senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Jung, Hyun-Jung; Seo, Yong-Hak; Lee, Young-Kyoung; Hwang, Sung-Chul; Seong Hwang, Eun; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2012-09-10

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF {beta}1) induces Mv1Lu cell senescence by persistently producing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) through decreased complex IV activity. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of TGF {beta}1 on mitochondrial complex IV activity. TGF {beta}1 progressively phosphorylated the negative regulatory sites of both glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) {alpha} and {beta}, corresponding well to the intracellular ROS generation profile. Pre-treatment of N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, did not alter this GSK3 phosphorylation (inactivation), whereas pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 by SB415286 significantly increased mitochondrial ROS, implying that GSK3 phosphorylation is an upstream event of the ROS generation. GSK3 inhibition by SB415286 decreased complex IV activity and cellular O{sub 2} consumption rate and eventually induced senescence of Mv1Lu cell. Similar results were obtained with siRNA-mediated knockdown of GSK3. Moreover, we found that GSK3 not only exists in cytosol but also in mitochondria of Mv1Lu cell and the mitochondrial GSK3 binds complex IV subunit 6b which has no electron carrier and is topologically located in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Involvement of subunit 6b in controlling complex IV activity and overall respiration rate was proved with siRNA-mediated knockdown of subunit 6b. Finally, TGF {beta}1 treatment decreased the binding of the subunit 6b to GSK3 and subunit 6b phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that GSK3 inactivation is importantly involved in TGF {beta}1-induced complex IV defects through decreasing phosphorylation of the subunit 6b, thereby contributing to senescence-associated mitochondrial ROS generation.

  5. RNA editing of microRNA prevents RNA-induced silencing complex recognition of target mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yalei; Huang, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) integrate with Argonaut (Ago) to create the RNA-induced silencing complex, and regulate gene expression by silencing target mRNAs. RNA editing of miRNA may affect miRNA processing, assembly of the Ago complex and target mRNA binding. However, the function of edited miRNA, assembled within the Ago complex, has not been extensively investigated. In this study, sequence analysis of the Ago complex of Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp infected with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) revealed that host ADAR (adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) catalysed A-to-I RNA editing of a viral miRNA (WSSV-miR-N12) at the +16 site. This editing of the non-seed sequence did not affect association of the edited miRNA with the Ago protein, but inhibited interaction between the miRNA and its target gene (wsv399). The WSSV early gene wsv399 inhibited WSSV infection. As a result, the RNA editing of miRNA caused virus latency. Our results highlight a novel example of miRNA editing in the miRNA-induced silencing complex. PMID:26674414

  6. Complexin induces a conformational change at the membrane-proximal C-terminal end of the SNARE complex

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ucheor B; Zhao, Minglei; Zhang, Yunxiang; Lai, Ying; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-01-01

    Complexin regulates spontaneous and activates Ca2+-triggered neurotransmitter release, yet the molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Here we performed single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments and uncovered two conformations of complexin-1 bound to the ternary SNARE complex. In the cis conformation, complexin-1 induces a conformational change at the membrane-proximal C-terminal end of the ternary SNARE complex that specifically depends on the N-terminal, accessory, and central domains of complexin-1. The complexin-1 induced conformation of the ternary SNARE complex may be related to a conformation that is juxtaposing the synaptic vesicle and plasma membranes. In the trans conformation, complexin-1 can simultaneously interact with a ternary SNARE complex via the central domain and a binary SNARE complex consisting of syntaxin-1A and SNAP-25A via the accessory domain. The cis conformation may be involved in activation of synchronous neurotransmitter release, whereas both conformations may be involved in regulating spontaneous release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16886.001 PMID:27253060

  7. Complexin induces a conformational change at the membrane-proximal C-terminal end of the SNARE complex.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ucheor B; Zhao, Minglei; Zhang, Yunxiang; Lai, Ying; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-01-01

    Complexin regulates spontaneous and activates Ca(2+)-triggered neurotransmitter release, yet the molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Here we performed single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments and uncovered two conformations of complexin-1 bound to the ternary SNARE complex. In the cis conformation, complexin-1 induces a conformational change at the membrane-proximal C-terminal end of the ternary SNARE complex that specifically depends on the N-terminal, accessory, and central domains of complexin-1. The complexin-1 induced conformation of the ternary SNARE complex may be related to a conformation that is juxtaposing the synaptic vesicle and plasma membranes. In the trans conformation, complexin-1 can simultaneously interact with a ternary SNARE complex via the central domain and a binary SNARE complex consisting of syntaxin-1A and SNAP-25A via the accessory domain. The cis conformation may be involved in activation of synchronous neurotransmitter release, whereas both conformations may be involved in regulating spontaneous release. PMID:27253060

  8. Dexamethasone -induced apoptosis of human monocytes exposed to immune complexes. Intervention of CD95- and XIAP-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Bertolotto, M; Montecucco, F; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    2005-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages play a key role in the initiation and persistence of inflammatory reactions. The possibility to interfere with the survival of these cells, once recruited and activated at sites of inflammation, is an attractive therapeutic option. Although resting monocytes are susceptible to pharmacologically induced apoptosis, no data are available about the possibility to modulate the survival of activated monocytes. The present work was planned to investigate if dexamethasone is able to promote apoptosis of human monocytes activated by immune complexes. When monocytes were cultured with immune complexes, a dose-dependent inhibition of apoptosis was observed. Dexamethasone stimulated apoptosis of resting and activated monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Both the immune complex inhibitory activity and dexamethasone stimulatory properties depend on NF-kappaB/XIAP and Ras/MEK/ERK/CD95 pathways. In fact, the exposure of monocytes to immune complexes increased NF-kB activation and XIAP expression, which in turn were inhibited by dexamethasone. On the other hand, immune complex-stimulated monocytes displayed a reduced expression of CD95, which is prevented by dexamethasone, as well as by MEK inhibitor U0126. Furthermore, anti-CD95 ZB4 mAb prevented dexamethasone-induced apoptosis in immune complex stimulated monocytes. Similarly, ZB4 inhibited dexamethasone-mediated augmentation of caspase 3 activity. The present findings suggest that Fc triggering by insoluble immune complexes result in the activation of two intracellular pathways crucial for the survival of monocytes: 1. Ras/MEK/ERK pathway responsible for the down-regulation of CD95 expression; 2. NF-kappaB pathway governing the expression of XIAP. Both the pathways are susceptible to inhibition by monocyte treatment with pharmacologic concentrations of dexamethasone. PMID:16164824

  9. Methamphetamine-Induced Dopamine Transporter Complex Formation and Dopaminergic Deficits: The Role of D2 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, Gregory C.; Chu, Pei-Wen; Walters, Elliot T.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is a serious public health issue. Of particular concern are findings that repeated high-dose administrations of METH cause persistent dopaminergic deficits in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. Previous studies have also revealed that METH treatment causes alterations in the dopamine transporter (DAT), including the formation of higher molecular mass DAT-associated complexes. The current study extends these findings by examining mechanisms underlying DAT complex formation. The association among DAT complex formation and other METH-induced phenomena, including alterations in vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) immunoreactivity, astrocytic activation [as assessed by increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity], and persistent dopaminergic deficits was also explored. Results revealed that METH-induced DAT complex formation and reductions in VMAT2 immunoreactivity precede increases in GFAP immunoreactivity. Furthermore, and as reported previously for DAT complexes, pretreatment with the D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride [S-(−)-3-chloro-5-ethyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-6-hydroxy-2-methoxybenzamide hydrochloride] attenuated the decrease in VMAT2 immunoreactivity as assessed 24 h after METH treatment. DAT complexes distinct from those present 24 h after METH treatment, decreases in VMAT2 immunoreactivity, and increased GFAP immunoreactivity were present 48 to 72 h after METH treatment. Pretreatment with eticlopride attenuated each of these phenomena. Finally, DAT complexes were present 7 days after METH treatment, a time point at which VMAT2 and DAT monomer immunoreactivity were also reduced. Eticlopride pretreatment attenuated each of these phenomena. These findings provide novel insight into not only receptor-mediated mechanisms underlying the effects of METH but also the interaction among factors that probably are associated with the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by the stimulant. PMID

  10. A novel insulin mimetic vanadium-flavonol complex: synthesis, characterization and in vivo evaluation in STZ-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Subramanian Iyyam; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai; Kandaswamy, Muthusamy

    2013-05-01

    Since 1985, when Heyliger et al., first demonstrated a serendipitous discovery that oral administration of 0.8 mg/ml of sodium orthovanadate in drinking water to streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats resulted in normoglycemia, numerous extensive studies have been pursued on the anti-diabetic and insulinomimetic actions of vanadium. The acceptance of vanadium compounds as promising therapeutic antidiabetic agents has been slowed due to the concern for chronic toxicity associated with vanadium accumulation. In order to circumvent the toxic effects of vanadium, we have taken up a combinational approach wherein a novel vanadium-flavonol complex was synthesized, characterized and its toxic as well as insulin mimetic potential was evaluated in STZ-induced experimental diabetes in rats. The results indicate that the complex is non-toxic and possess anti-diabetic activity. PMID:23466606

  11. Proton exchange in acid-base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    We extend previous work on nitric acid-ammonia and nitric acid-alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid-strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are <400 cm-1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm-1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  12. Inhibition of carrageenin-induced rat paw oedema by crotapotin, a polypeptide complexed with phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    Landucci, E C; Antunes, E; Donato, J L; Faro, R; Hyslop, S; Marangoni, S; Oliveira, B; Cirino, G; de Nucci, G

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of purified crotapotin, a non-toxic non-enzymatic chaperon protein normally complexed to a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in South America rattlesnake venom, was studied in the acute inflammatory response induced by carrageenin (1 mg/paw), compound 48/80 (3 micrograms/paw) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) (3 micrograms/paw) in the rat hind-paw. The effects of crotapotin on platelet aggregation, mast cell degranulation and eicosanoid release from guinea-pig isolated lung were also investigated. 2. Subplantar co-injection of crotapotin (1 and 10 micrograms/paw) with carrageenin or injection of crotapotin (10 micrograms/paw) into the contralateral paw significantly inhibited the carrageenin-induced oedema. This inhibition was also observed when crotapotin (10-30 micrograms/paw) was administered either intraperitoneally or orally. Subplantar injection of heated crotapotin (15 min at 60 degrees C) failed to inhibit carrageenin-induced oedema. Subplantar injection of crotapotin (10 micrograms/paw) also significantly inhibited the rat paw oedema induced by compound 48/80, but it did not affect 5-HT-induced oedema. 3. In adrenalectomized animals, subplantar injection of crotapotin markedly inhibited the oedema induced by carrageenin. The inhibitory effect of crotapotin was also observed in rats depleted of histamine and 5-HT stores. 4. Crotapotin (30 micrograms/paw) had no effect on either the histamine release induced by compound 48/80 in vitro or on the platelet aggregation induced by both arachidonic acid (1 nM) and platelet activating factor (1 microM) in human platelet-rich plasma. The platelet aggregation and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) release induced by thrombin (100 mu ml-1) in washed human platelets were also not affected by crotapotin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7537590

  13. Investigating Storm-Induced Total Water Levels on Complex Barred Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, N.; Ruggiero, P.; Walstra, D.

    2013-12-01

    Water levels in coastal environments are not static, but rather vary from a range of factors including mean sea level, tides, storm surge, and wave runup. Cumulatively these superimposed factors determine the total water level (TWL), the extent of which has major implications for coastal erosion and inundation during periods of high energy. Storm-induced, super-elevated water levels pose a threat to low lying coastal regions, as clearly demonstrated by recent events such as Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina. For this reason, the ability to accurately predict the TWL is crucial for both emergency managers and coastal planners. While some components of TWL are well understood (e.g., tides) there is still significant uncertainty in predicting runup, a process that can be a major contributor to instantaneous TWLs. Traditionally, empirical relationships derived from observational field data have been used to estimate runup, including wave setup and both incident and infragravity swash (Stockdon et al., 2006). While these formulations have shown skill in predicting the runup extent on natural beaches, these equations consider only the most basic contributing factors - namely the mean foreshore beach slope, the offshore wave height, and offshore wave period. Not included in these empirical estimates is the role of nearshore morphology on TWLs. However, it has long been recognized that nearshore sandbars act as natural barriers to coastal erosion during storm events by dissipating wave energy far from the beach face. Nonetheless, the influence of nearshore morphology on inner surf zone processes, including wave runup, is poorly understood. Recent pioneering studies (eg., Soldini et al., 2013 and Stephens et al., 2011) have explored the role of simple nearshore features (single Gaussian bars) on swash processes. Many locations in the world, however, are characterized by more complex morphologies such as multiple barred systems. Further, in many such places, including Columbia

  14. Specific Genetic Immunotherapy Induced by Recombinant Vaccine Alpha-Fetoprotein-Heat Shock Protein 70 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Lin, Huanping; Wang, Qiaoxia

    Purposes: To construct a recombinant vaccine alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-heat shock protein (HSP70) complex, and study its ability to induce specific CTL response and its protective effect against AFP-producing tumor. Material/Methods: A recombinant vaccine was constructed by conjugating mouse alpha-fetoprotein to heat shock protein 70. By way of intracutaneous injection, mice were primed and boosted with recombinant vaccine mAFP/HSP70, whereas single mAFP or HSP70 injection as controls. The ELISPOT and ELISA were used to measure the frequency of cells producing the cytokine IFN-γ in splenocytes and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum from immunized mice respectively. In vivo tumor challenge were carried out to assess the immune effect of the recombinant vaccine. Results: By recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine immunization, the results of ELISPOT and ELISA showed that the number of splenic cells producing IFN-γ and the level of anti-AFP antibody of serum were significantly higher in mAFP/HSP70 group than those in mAFP and HSP70 groups (108.50±11.70 IFN-γ spots/106 cells vs 41.60±10.40 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, 7.32±3.14 IFN-γ spots/106 cells, P<0.01; 156.32±10.42 μg/mL vs 66.52±7.35 μg/mL, 5.73±2.89 μg/mL, P<0.01). The tumor volume in mAFP/HSP70 group was significantly smaller than that in mAFP and HSP70 groups (42.44±7.14 mm3 vs 392.23±12.46 mm3, 838.63±13.84 mm3, P<0.01). Conclusions: The study further confirmed the function of heat shock protein 70's immune adjuvant. Sequential immunization with recombinant mAFP/HSP70 vaccine could generate effective antitumor immunity on AFP-producing tumor. The recombined mAFP/HSP70 vaccine may be suitable for serving as an immunotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Trauma-Induced Coagulopathy Is Associated with a Complex Inflammatory Response in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Daniel N; Gonzales, Mary D; Craig, Teresa; Dubick, Michael A; Cap, Andrew P; Schwacha, Martin G

    2015-08-01

    Severe trauma can lead to a coagulopathy in patients, which is associated with increased mortality. We developed a rat polytrauma model that demonstrates a similar progression of coagulopathy. Because coagulation is influenced by changes in inflammation, and this interrelationship is poorly understood, we have studied the progression of inflammation, and its correlation with coagulation, in this rat model of severe polytrauma. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with isoflurane. Polytrauma was induced by damaging 10 cm of small intestines, right and medial liver lobes, right leg skeletal muscle, femur fracture, and hemorrhaging 40% of blood volume. No resuscitation was given. Polytrauma and hemorrhage resulted in a significant decrease in the number of lymphocytes and an increase in monocytes and granulocytes. There was an increase in plasma proinflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor α (40×), interleukin (IL)-6 (20×), IL-1β (16×), IL-17 (15×), interferon γ (10×), IL-1α (8×) and IL-12p70 (5×); anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-10 (100×), IL-13 (16×), and IL-4 (5×); chemokines: growth-regulated protein/keratinocyte chemoattractant (30×), macrophage inflammatory protein 3α (10×), regulated and normal T-cell expressed and secreted (3×); and growth factors: vascular endothelial growth factor (5×), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (6×), macrophage colony-stimulating factor (3×), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (2×), and IL-5 (3×). There was a strong and significant correlation between prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, and fibrin monomer concentration, and many cytokines. Polytrauma with hemorrhage is associated with a coagulopathy and a complex inflammatory response consisting of a concurrent rise in both proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The rise in plasma concentrations of chemokines and growth factors likely contribute to the mobilization of monocytes and granulocytes

  16. Atypical behavior in the electron capture induced dissociation of biologically relevant transition metal ion complexes of the peptide hormone oxytocin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinnijenhuis, Anne J.; Mihalca, Romulus; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2006-07-01

    Doubly protonated ions of the disulfide bond containing nonapeptide hormone oxytocin and oxytocin complexes with different transition metal ions, that have biological relevance under physiological conditions, were subjected to electron capture dissociation (ECD) to probe their structural features in the gas phase. Although, all the ECD spectra were strikingly different, typical ECD behavior was observed for complexes of the nonapeptide hormone oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+, i.e., abundant c/z' and a'/y backbone cleavages and ECD characteristic S-S and S-C bond cleavages were observed. We propose that, although in the oxytocin-transition metal ion complexes the metal ions serve as the main initial capture site, the captured electron is transferred to other sites in the complex to form a hydrogen radical, which drives the subsequent typical ECD fragmentations. The complex of oxytocin with Cu2+ displayed noticeably different ECD behavior. The fragment ions were similar to fragment ions typically observed with low-energy collision induced dissociation (CID). We propose that the electrons captured by the oxytocin-Cu2+ complex might be favorably involved in reducing the Cu2+ metal ion to Cu+. Subsequent energy redistribution would explain the observed low-energy CID-type fragmentations. Electron capture resulted also in quite different specific cleavage sites for the complexes of oxytocin with Ni2+, Co2+ and Zn2+. This is an indication for structural differences in these complexes possibly linked to their significantly different biological effects on oxytocin-receptor binding, and suggests that ECD may be used to study subtle structural differences in transition metal ion-peptide complexes.

  17. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  18. The Dictyostelium prestalk inducer differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) triggers unexpectedly complex global phosphorylation changes

    PubMed Central

    Sugden, Chris; Urbaniak, Michael D.; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Williams, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) is a polyketide that induces Dictyostelium amoebae to differentiate as prestalk cells. We performed a global quantitative screen for phosphorylation changes that occur within the first minutes after addition of DIF-1, using a triple-label SILAC approach. This revealed a new world of DIF-1–controlled signaling, with changes in components of the MAPK and protein kinase B signaling pathways, components of the actinomyosin cytoskeletal signaling networks, and a broad range of small GTPases and their regulators. The results also provide evidence that the Ca2+/calmodulin–dependent phosphatase calcineurin plays a role in DIF-1 signaling to the DimB prestalk transcription factor. At the global level, DIF-1 causes a major shift in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation equilibrium toward net dephosphorylation. Of interest, many of the sites that are dephosphorylated in response to DIF-1 are phosphorylated in response to extracellular cAMP signaling. This accords with studies that suggest an antagonism between the two inducers and also with the rapid dephosphorylation of the cAMP receptor that we observe in response to DIF-1 and with the known inhibitory effect of DIF-1 on chemotaxis to cAMP. All MS data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001555. PMID:25518940

  19. Zinc(II)-Thiosemicarbazone Complexes Are Localized to the Lysosomal Compartment Where They Transmetallate with Copper Ions to Induce Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Alexandra E; Palanimuthu, Duraippandi; Bernhardt, Paul V; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Jansson, Patric J; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-26

    As the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazone (DpT) and 2-acetylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (ApT) series show potent antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo, we synthesized their fluorescent zinc(II) complexes to assess their intracellular distribution. The Zn(II) complexes generally showed significantly greater cytotoxicity than the thiosemicarbazones alone in several tumor cell-types. Notably, specific structure-activity relationships demonstrated the importance of the di-2-pyridyl pharmacophore in their activity. Confocal fluorescence imaging and live cell microscopy showed that the Zn(II) complex of our lead compound, di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (DpC), which is scheduled to enter clinical trials, was localized to lysosomes. Under lysosomal conditions, the Zn(II) complexes were shown to transmetallate with copper ions, leading to redox-active copper complexes that induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cytotoxicity. This is the first study to demonstrate direct lysosomal targeting of our novel Zn(II)-thiosemicarbazone complexes that mediate their activity via transmetalation with copper ions and LMP. PMID:27023111

  20. Discovery of a dual-targeting organometallic ruthenium complex with high activity inducing early stage apoptosis of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Jun; Zhang, Erlong; Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Lin, Yu; Wang, Zhaoying; Luo, Qun; Wu, Kui; Wang, Fuyi

    2015-12-01

    Ruthenium based complexes are promising antitumour candidates due to their lower toxicity and better water-solubility compared to the platinum antitumour complexes. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been found to be overexpressed in a large set of tumour cells. In this work, a series of organoruthenium complexes containing EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazoline pharmacophores were synthesised and characterised. These complexes exhibited excellent inhibitory activity against EGFR and high affinity to interact with DNA via minor groove binding, featuring dual-targeting properties. In vitro screening demonstrated that the as-prepared ruthenium complexes are anti-proliferating towards a series of cancer cell lines, in particular the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line A549. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the most active complex 3 induced much more early-stage cell apoptosis than its cytotoxic arene ruthenium analogue and the EGFR-inhibiting 4-anilinoquinazolines, verifying the synergetic effect of the two mono-functional pharmacophores. PMID:26446567

  1. Characterisation of senescence-induced changes in light harvesting complex II and photosystem I complex of thylakoids of Cucumis sativus cotyledons: age induced association of LHCII with photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Jogadhenu Syama Sundara; Baig, Masroor A; Bhagwat, Anil S; Mohanty, Prasanna

    2003-02-01

    Structure and function of chloroplasts are known to after during senescence. The senescence-induced specific changes in light harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII) and photosystem I (PSI) were investigated in Cucumis cotyledons. Purified light harvesting complex II (LHCII) and photosystem I complex were isolated from 6-day non-senescing and 27-day senescing Cucumis cotyledons. The chlorophyll a/b ratio of LHCII obtained from 6-day-old control cotyledons and their absorption, chlorophyll a fluorescence emission and the circular dichroism (CD) spectral properties were comparable to the LHCII preparations from other plants such as pea and spinach. The purified LHCII obtained from 27-day senescing cotyledons had a Chl a/b ratio of 1.25 instead of 1.2 as with 6-day LHCII and also exhibited significant changes in the visible CD spectrum compared to that of 6-day LHCII, indicating some specific alterations in the organisation of chlorophylls of LHCII. The light harvesting antenna of photosystems are likely to be altered due to aging. The room temperature absorption spectrum of LHCII obtained from 27-day senescing cotyledons showed changes in the peak positions. Similarly, comparison of 77K chlorophyll a fluorescence emission characteristics of LHCII preparation from senescing cotyledons with that of control showed a small shift in the peak position and the alteration in the emission profile, which is suggestive of possible changes in energy transfer within LHCII chlorophylls. Further, the salt induced aggregation of LHCII samples was lower, resulting in lower yields of LHCII from 27-day cotyledons than from normal cotyledons. Moreover, the PSI preparations of 6-day cotyledons showed Chl a/b ratios of 5 to 5.5, where as the PSI sample of 27-day cotyledons had a Chl a/b ratio of 2.9 suggesting LHCII association with PSI. The absorption, fluorescence emission and visible CD spectral measurements as well as the polypeptide profiles of 27-day cotyledon-PSI complexes

  2. Zolpidem Induced Sleep-related Eating and Complex Behaviors in a Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Min; Shin, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Zolpidem-induced sleep-related complex behaviors (SRCB) with anterograde amnesia have been reported. We describe herein a case in which the development of zolpidem-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) and SRCB was strongly suspected. A 71-year-old Korean male was admitted to the Department of Psychiatry due to his repetitive SRED and SRCB with anterograde amnesia, which he reported as having occurred since taking zolpidem. The patient also had restless legs syndrome (RLS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). His baseline serum iron level was low at admission. Zolpidem discontinuation resulted in the immediate disappearance of his SRED, but did not affect his RLS symptoms. These symptoms rapidly improved after adding a single i.v. iron injection once daily, and so he was discharged to day-clinic treatment. These findings indicate that zolpidem can induce SRCB. Although the pathophysiology of zolpidem-induced SRED and other SRCB remains unclear, clinicians should carefully monitor for the potential induction of complex behaviors associated with zolpidem in patients with comorbid RLS or OSA. PMID:27489385

  3. Zolpidem Induced Sleep-related Eating and Complex Behaviors in a Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Min; Shin, Hyun-Woo

    2016-08-31

    Zolpidem-induced sleep-related complex behaviors (SRCB) with anterograde amnesia have been reported. We describe herein a case in which the development of zolpidem-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) and SRCB was strongly suspected. A 71-year-old Korean male was admitted to the Department of Psychiatry due to his repetitive SRED and SRCB with anterograde amnesia, which he reported as having occurred since taking zolpidem. The patient also had restless legs syndrome (RLS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). His baseline serum iron level was low at admission. Zolpidem discontinuation resulted in the immediate disappearance of his SRED, but did not affect his RLS symptoms. These symptoms rapidly improved after adding a single i.v. iron injection once daily, and so he was discharged to day-clinic treatment. These findings indicate that zolpidem can induce SRCB. Although the pathophysiology of zolpidem-induced SRED and other SRCB remains unclear, clinicians should carefully monitor for the potential induction of complex behaviors associated with zolpidem in patients with comorbid RLS or OSA. PMID:27489385

  4. IL-15 complexes induce NK- and T-cell responses independent of type I IFN signaling during rhinovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, A; Jackson, D J; Message, S D; Pearson, R M; Aniscenko, J; Caramori, G; Mallia, P; Papi, A; Shamji, B; Edwards, M; Westwick, J; Hansel, T; Stanciu, L A; Johnston, S L; Bartlett, N W

    2014-09-01

    Rhinoviruses are among the most common viruses to infect man, causing a range of serious respiratory diseases including exacerbations of asthma and COPD. Type I IFN and IL-15 are thought to be required for antiviral immunity; however, their function during rhinovirus infection in vivo is undefined. In RV-infected human volunteers, IL-15 protein expression in fluid from the nasal mucosa and in bronchial biopsies was increased. In mice, RV induced type I IFN-dependent expressions of IL-15 and IL-15Rα, which in turn were required for NK- and CD8(+) T-cell responses. Treatment with IL-15-IL-15Rα complexes (IL-15c) boosted RV-induced expression of IL-15, IL-15Rα, IFN-γ, CXCL9, and CXCL10 followed by recruitment of activated, IFN-γ-expressing NK, CD8(+), and CD4(+) T cells. Treating infected IFNAR1(-/-) mice with IL-15c similarly increased IL-15, IL-15Rα, IFN-γ, and CXCL9 (but not CXCL10) expression also followed by NK-, CD8(+)-, and CD4(+)-T-cell recruitment and activation. We have demonstrated that type I IFN-induced IFN-γ and cellular immunity to RV was mediated by IL-15 and IL-15Rα. Importantly, we also show that IL-15 could be induced via a type I IFN-independent mechanism by IL-15 complex treatment, which in turn was sufficient to drive IFN-γ expression and lymphocyte responses. PMID:24472849

  5. Two field-induced slow magnetic relaxation processes in a mononuclear Co(ii) complex with a distorted octahedral geometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Han, Yuan; Cao, Fan; Wei, Rong-Min; Zhang, Yi-Quan; Song, You

    2016-05-31

    A distorted octahedral Co(II) complex is reported with homoscorpionate ligands. This complex comprised a field-induced single-molecule magnet, showing two slow relaxation processes under a low dc field (<800 Oe) and only one process under a high dc field (≥800 Oe), which was an unusually discovery for 3d metal ions. On the basis of the ac magnetic data, we show for the first time that one of the slow relaxation processes in the low dc field originates from intermolecular dipolar interactions. Interestingly, the Raman process is predominant in the spin reversal relaxation process. The origin of the behaviours of the complex was elucidated by ab initio calculations. PMID:27180637

  6. Fear induced complexity loss in the electrocardiogram of flight phobics: a multiscale entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Bornas, Xavier; Llabrés, Jordi; Noguera, Miquel; López, Ana M A; Gelabert, Joan Miquel; Vila, Irene

    2006-10-01

    In this study we explored the changes in the variability and complexity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) of flight phobics (N=61) and a matched non-phobic control group (N=58) when they performed a paced breathing task and were exposed to flight related stimuli. Lower complexity/entropy values were expected in phobics as compared to controls. The phobic system complexity as well as the heart rate variability (HRV) were expected to be reduced by the exposure to fearful stimuli. The multiscale entropy (MSE) analysis revealed lower entropy values in phobics during paced breathing and exposure, and a complexity loss was observed in phobics during exposure to threatening situations. The expected HRV decreases were not found in this study. The discussion is focused on the distinction between variability and complexity measures of the cardiac output, and on the usefulness of the MSE analysis in the field of anxiety disorders. PMID:16839658

  7. HINT1 peptide/Hsp70 complex induces NK-cell-dependent immunoregulation in a model of autoimmune demyelination.

    PubMed

    Galazka, Grazyna; Jurewicz, Anna; Domowicz, Malgorzata; Cannella, Barbara; Raine, Cedric S; Selmaj, Krzysztof

    2014-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) interact with the immune system and have been shown to contribute to immunoregulation. As efficient chaperones, Hsps bind many peptides and these complexes have many yet-to-be-clarified functions. We have shown that Hsp70 is complexed within the mouse CNS with peptide CLAFHDISPQAPTHFLVIPK derived from histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein-1 (HINT1₃₈₋₅₇/Hsp70). Only this complex, in contrast to other peptides complexed with Hsp70, was able to prevent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) by induction of immunoregulatory mechanisms dependent on NK cells. Pretreatment of proteolipid protein peptide ₁₃₉₋₁₅₁(PLP₁₃₉₋₁₅₁) sensitized SJL/J mice with HINT1₃₈₋₅₇/Hsp70 prevented the development of EAE, suppressed PLP₁₃₉₋₁₅₁-induced T-cell proliferation, and blocked secretion of IL-17. HINT1₃₈₋₅₇ /Hsp70 stimulation of NK cells depended on synergistic activation of two NK-cell receptors, CD94 and NKG2D. NK cells with depleted CD94 or with blocked NKG2D did not inhibit PLP₁₃₉₋₁₅₁-induced spleen cell (SC) proliferation. The HINT1₃₈₋₅₇/Hsp70 complex enhanced surface expression of the NKG2D ligand-H60. Downstream signaling of CD94 and NKG2D converged at the adaptor proteins DAP10 and DAP12, and in response to HINT1₃₈₋₅₇ /Hsp70 stimulation, expression of DAP10 and DAP12 was significantly increased in NK cells. Thus, we have shown that the HINT1₃₈₋₅₇ /Hsp70 complex affects NK-cell function by enhancing NK-cell-dependent immunoregulation in the EAE model of autoimmune demyelination. PMID:25092109

  8. Transformation of Tetracycline Antibiotics and Fe(II) and Fe(III) Species Induced by Their Complexation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Yao, Hong; Sun, Peizhe; Li, Desheng; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) are frequently detected micropollutants and are known to have a strong tendency to complex with metal ions such as Fe(II) and Fe(III) in aquatic environments. Experiments with Fe(II) and TCs showed that the complexation of Fe(II) with tetracycline (TTC), oxytetracycline (OTC), or chlorotetracycline (CTC) could lead to the accelerated oxidation of Fe(II) and the promoted degradation of TCs simultaneously. The reaction started with complexation of Fe(II) with TC followed by oxidation of the Fe(II)-TC complex by dissolved oxygen to generate a Fe(III)-TC complex and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS (primarily ·OH) then degraded TC. The oxidation rate constants of Fe(II) in the Fe(II)-H2L and Fe(II)-HL complexes were 0.269 and 1.511 min(-1), respectively, at ambient conditions (pH 7, 22 °C, and PO2 of 0.21 atm), which were about 60 and 350 times of the oxidation rate of uncomplexed Fe(II). Humic acids (HA) compete with TCs for Fe(II), but the effect was negligible at moderate HA concentrations (≤10 mg·L(-1)). Experiments with Fe(III) and TCs showed that the complexation of Fe(III) with TC could generate oxidized TC and Fe(II) without the need of oxygen at a relatively slower rate compared to the reaction involving Fe(II), O2, and TCs. These findings indicate the mutually influenced environmental transformation of TCs and Fe(II) and Fe(III) induced by their complexation. These newly identified reactions could play an important role in affecting the environmental fate of TCs and cycling of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in TCs-contaminated water and soil systems. PMID:26618388

  9. Chemical Swarming: Depending on Concentration, an Amphiphilic Ruthenium Polypyridyl Complex Induces Cell Death via Two Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Siewert, Bianka; van Rixel, Vincent H S; van Rooden, Eva J; Hopkins, Samantha L; Moester, Miriam J B; Ariese, Freek; Siegler, Maxime A; Bonnet, Sylvestre

    2016-07-25

    The crystal structure and in vitro cytotoxicity of the amphiphilic ruthenium complex [3](PF6 )2 are reported. Complex [3](PF6 )2 contains a Ru-S bond that is stable in the dark in cell-growing medium, but is photosensitive. Upon blue-light irradiation, complex [3](PF6 )2 releases the cholesterol-thioether ligand 2 and an aqua ruthenium complex [1](PF6 )2 . Although ligand 2 and complex [1](PF6 )2 are by themselves not cytotoxic, complex [3](PF6 )2 was unexpectedly found to be as cytotoxic as cisplatin in the dark, that is, with micromolar effective concentrations (EC50 ), against six human cancer cell lines (A375, A431, A549, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and U87MG). Blue-light irradiation (λ=450 nm, 6.3 J cm(-2) ) had little influence on the cytotoxicity of [3](PF6 )2 after 6 h of incubation time, but it increased the cytotoxicity of the complex by a factor 2 after longer (24 h) incubation. Exploring the unexpected biological activity of [3](PF6 )2 in the dark elucidated an as-yet unknown bifaceted mode of action that depended on concentration, and thus, on the aggregation state of the compound. At low concentration, it acts as a monomer, inserts into the membrane, and can deliver [1](2+) inside the cell upon blue-light activation. At higher concentrations (>3-5 μm), complex [3](PF6 )2 forms supramolecular aggregates that induce non-apoptotic cell death by permeabilizing cell membranes and extracting lipids and membrane proteins. PMID:27373895

  10. Wnt signalling induces accumulation of phosphorylated β-catenin in two distinct cytosolic complexes.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Jan P; Emmink, Benjamin L; Nojima, Hisashi; Kranenburg, Onno; Maurice, Madelon M

    2014-11-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling controls development and adult tissue homeostasis and causes cancer when inappropriately activated. In unstimulated cells, an Axin1-centred multi-protein complex phosphorylates the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin, marking it for degradation. Wnt signalling antagonizes β-catenin proteolysis, leading to its accumulation and target gene expression. How Wnt stimulation alters the size distribution, composition and activity of endogenous Axin1 complexes remains poorly understood. Here, we employed two-dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE to analyse endogenous Axin1 and β-catenin complexes during Wnt signalling. We show that the size range of Axin1 complexes is conserved between species and remains largely unaffected by Wnt stimulation. We detect a striking Wnt-dependent, cytosolic accumulation of both non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated β-catenin within a 450 kDa Axin1-based complex and in a distinct, Axin1-free complex of 200 kDa. These results argue that during Wnt stimulation, phosphorylated β-catenin is released from the Axin1 complex but fails to undergo immediate degradation. Importantly, in APC-mutant cancer cells, the distribution of Axin1 and β-catenin complexes strongly resembles that of Wnt-stimulated cells. Our findings argue that Wnt signals and APC mutations interfere with the turnover of phosphorylated β-catenin. Furthermore, our results suggest that the accumulation of small-sized β-catenin complexes may serve as an indicator of Wnt pathway activity in primary cancer cells. PMID:25392450

  11. Theoretical calculation of light-induced forces and torques on complex microrotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxiang; Zhu, Anding; Huang, Wenhao

    2004-12-01

    In this letter, we propose the new theoretical investigation on the optical forces and torques on complex microrotors. On the basis of R. C. Gauthier"s hybrid ray-wave model, the optical forces and toques on two complex asymmetric micro-objects, the conical microrotor and the helical microrotor, are analyzed. The viscous drag torque is estimated by Stokes flow to obtain the rotational speed. The results of our computation agree well with the previously published experimental results, which indicates that our approach of the optical torque calculation is suitable for other complex microrotors and that the theoretical calculation is very helpful to optimum design of light-driven microrotors.

  12. Immobilized immune complexes induce neutrophil extracellular trap release by human neutrophil granulocytes via FcγRIIIB and Mac-1.

    PubMed

    Behnen, Martina; Leschczyk, Christoph; Möller, Sonja; Batel, Tobit; Klinger, Matthias; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás

    2014-08-15

    Canonical neutrophil antimicrobial effector mechanisms, such as degranulation, production of reactive oxygen species, and release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), can result in severe pathology. Activation of neutrophils through immune complexes (ICs) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune inflammatory diseases. In this study, we report that immobilized ICs (iICs), which are hallmarks of several autoimmune diseases, induce the release of NETs from primary human neutrophils. The iIC-induced NET formation was found to require production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase and to be mediated by FcγRIIIb. Blocking of the β2 integrin macrophage-1 Ag but not lymphocyte function-associated Ag-1 abolished iIC-induced NET formation. This suggests that FcγRIIIb signals in association with macrophage-1 Ag. As intracellular signaling pathways involved in iIC-induced NET formation we identified the tyrosine kinase Src/Syk pathway, which downstream regulates the PI3K/Akt, p38 MAPK, and ERK1/2 pathways. To our knowledge, the present study shows for the first time that iICs induce NET formation. Thus, we conclude that NETs contribute to pathology in autoimmune inflammatory disorders associated with surface-bound ICs. PMID:25024378

  13. Chrysin-organogermanium (IV) complex induced Colo205 cell apoptosis-associated mitochondrial function and anti-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fen; Gong, Longcai; Jin, Hua; Pi, Jiang; Bai, Haihua; Wang, Hong; Cai, Huaihong; Yang, Peihui; Cai, Jiye

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, a kind of malignant cancer, has more than 1 million new patients and results in 0.5 million deaths every year globally based on the estimation of Globocan in 2008. One of the most important issues against colon cancer is tumor metastasis. Anti-angiogenesis, a form of targeted therapy uses drugs or other substances to prevent the new blood vessel formation, which is critical for tumor metastasis. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated a simple method to synthesize Chry-Ge complex through the reaction between chrysin and triphenylgermanium bromide. In this work, we investigated the mechanism of Chry-Ge induced Colo205 cell apoptosis. We found that Chry-Ge could induce apoptosis in Colo205 cells in mitochondrial-dependent pathway, cause the reorganization of cytoskeleton and induce the damage of nucleus in Colo205 cells. Besides, Chry-Ge was also found to induce membrane ultrastructural changes in Colo205 cells by AFM. Further, we found that Chry-Ge can inhibit tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cell in vitro. Chry-Ge was also tested in vivo in the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and found to inhibit bFGF-treated CAMs development. These results suggested that Chry-Ge could induce Colo205 cell apoptosis by mitochondrial pathway and anti-angiogenesis, highlighting the use of organic germanium agents for the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:25914235

  14. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol. PMID:26453927

  15. Oxidation of 2-propanol ligands during collision-induced dissociation of a gas-phase uranyl complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Chien, Winnie; Anbalagan, Victor; Gresham, Garold L.; Groenewold, Gary S.

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrate, by way of multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry and extensive deuterium labeling, that 2-propanol is converted to acetone, and 2-propoxide to acetaldehyde, when monopositive 2-propanol-coordinated uranyl-ligand cations are subjected to collision-induced dissociation in the gas-phase environment of an ion trap mass spectrometer. A species with formula [(UO2OCH(CH3)2)(HOCH(CH3)2)]+, derived from dissociation of the gas-phase precursor [(UO2NO3)(HOCH(CH3)2)3]+ eliminates two H atoms and CH3 in consecutive stages to generate a monopositive complex composed of the U(V) species UO2+ coordinated by acetone and acetaldehyde, i.e. [UO2+(OC(CH3)2)(OC(H)CH3)]. Dissociation of this latter ion resulted in elimination of the two coordinating carbonyl ligands in two consecutive dissociation stages to leave UO2+. Analogous reactions were not observed for uranyl complexes containing 1-propanol or 2-methyl-2-propanol, or for cationic complexes with divalent metals such as Ni2+, Co2+, Pb2+ and Ca2+. One explanation for these reactions is bond insertion by the metal center in the bis-ligated uranyl complex, which would be expected to have an LUMO consisting of unoccupied 6d-orbitals that would confer transition metal-like behavior on the complex.

  16. Investigating anthropically induced effects in streamflow dynamics by using permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, Tatijana; Telesca, Luciano; de Souza Ferreira, Diego Vicente; Stosic, Borko

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we investigated the influence of the construction of Sobradinho dam on daily streamflow of São Francisco river, Brazil, using permutation entropy method. We analyzed a long daily streamflow time series recorded during the period 1929-2010 encompassing the construction of Sobradinho dam between 1973 and 1979. We found that the original and deseasonalized streamflow time series are characterized by clear different complexity and entropy patterns before the construction of the dam; while, after it, their degree of randomness and complexity are nearly identical. Furthermore, investigating the oscillatory behavior of the entropy and complexity time variation, the periodicity of 3.67 years was identified, identical to one of the main periodicities revealed in the Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI). Such finding confirms the close relationship between streamflow dynamics and ENSO phenomenon. After the construction of the dam, the time variation of entropy and complexity changes almost abruptly toward stochastic regime characterized by higher entropy and lower complexity. Although the dam operations could be considered responsible for such abrupt dynamical change in the streamflow, we cannot exclude the presence of a co-induced ENSO effect; in fact, the analysis of MEI shows a strikingly similar and concomitant change in the long-term trend, identified by using the singular spectrum analysis.

  17. A chiral 6-membered N-heterocyclic carbene copper(I) complex that induces high stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Kyoon; Lackey, Hershel H; Rexford, Matthew D; Kovnir, Kirill; Shatruk, Michael; McQuade, D Tyler

    2010-11-01

    A chiral 6-membered annulated N-heterocyclic (6-NHC) copper complex that catalyzes β-borylations with high yield and enantioselectivity was developed. The chiral 6-NHC copper complex is easy to prepare on the gram scale and is very active, showing 10,000 turnovers at 0.01 mol % of catalyst without significant decrease of enantioselectivity and with useful reaction rates. PMID:20919706

  18. Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Collisional Complexes in Dense Hydrogen-Helium Gas Mixtures at Thousands of Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2011-06-01

    The interaction-induced absorption by collisional pairs of H{_2} molecules is an important opacity source in the atmospheres of the outer planets and cool stars. The emission spectra of cool white dwarf stars differ significantly in the infrared from the expected blackbody spectra of their cores, which is largely due to absorption by collisional H{_2}-H{_2}, H{_2}-He, and H{_2}-H complexes in the stellar atmospheres. Using quantum-chemical methods we compute the atmospheric absorption from hundreds to thousands of kelvin. Laboratory measurements of interaction-induced absorption spectra by H{_2} pairs exist only at room temperature and below. We show that our results reproduce these measurements closely, so that our computational data permit reliable modeling of stellar atmosphere opacities even for the higher temperatures. L. Frommhold, Collision-Induced Absorption in Gases, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, New York, 1993 and 2006 Xiaoping Li, Katharine L. C. Hunt, Fei Wang, Martin Abel, and Lothar Frommhold, "Collision-Induced Infrared Absorption by Molecular Hydrogen Pairs at Thousands of Kelvin", International Journal of Spectroscopy, vol. 2010, Article ID 371201, 11 pages, 2010. doi: 10.1155/2010/371201 M. Abel, L. Frommhold, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Collision-induced absorption by H{_2} pairs: From hundreds to thousands of Kelvin," J. Phys. Chem. A, published online, DOI: 10.1021/jp109441f L. Frommhold, M. Abel, F. Wang, M. Gustafsson, X. Li, and K. L. C. Hunt, "Infrared atmospheric emission and absorption by simple molecular complexes, from first principles", Mol. Phys. 108, 2265, 2010

  19. Experimental elucidation of vacancy complexes associated with hydrogen ion-induced splitting of bulk GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Moutanabbir, O.; Scholz, R.; Goesele, U.; Guittoum, A.; Jungmann, M.; Butterling, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Anwand, W.; Egger, W.; Sperr, P.

    2010-03-15

    We present a detailed study of the thermal evolution of H ion-induced vacancy related complexes and voids in bulk GaN implanted under ion-cut conditions. By using transmission electron microscopy, we found that the damage band in as-implanted GaN is decorated with a high density of nanobubbles of approx1-2 nm in diameter. Variable energy Doppler broadening spectroscopy showed that this band contains vacancy clusters and voids. In addition to vacancy clusters, the presence of V{sub Ga}, V{sub Ga}-H{sub 2}, and V{sub Ga}V{sub N} complexes was evidenced by pulsed low-energy positron lifetime spectroscopy. Subtle changes upon annealing in these vacancy complexes were also investigated. As a general trend, a growth in open-volume defects is detected in parallel to an increase in both size and density of nanobubbles. The observed vacancy complexes appear to be stable during annealing. However, for temperatures above 450 deg. C, unusually large lifetimes were measured. These lifetimes are attributed to the formation of positronium in GaN. Since the formation of positronium is not possible in a dense semiconductor, our finding demonstrates the presence of sufficiently large open-volume defects in this temperature range. Based on the Tao-Eldrup model, the average lattice opening during thermal annealing was quantified. We found that a void diameter of 0.4 nm is induced by annealing at 600 deg. C. The role of these complexes in the subsurface microcracking is discussed.

  20. The diadinoxanthin diatoxanthin cycle induces structural rearrangements of the isolated FCP antenna complexes of the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Schaller-Laudel, Susann; Volke, Daniela; Redlich, Matthias; Kansy, Marcel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Wilhelm, Christian; Goss, Reimund

    2015-11-01

    The study investigated the influence of the xanthophyll cycle pigments diadinoxanthin (DD) and diatoxanthin (Dt) on the spectroscopic characteristics, structure and protein composition of isolated fucoxanthin chlorophyll protein (FCP) complexes of the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. 77 K fluorescence emission spectra revealed that Dt-containing FCP complexes showed a characteristic long wavelength fluorescence emission at 700 nm at a pH-value of 5 whereas DD-enriched FCPs retained the typical 680 nm fluorescence emission maximum of isolated FCPs. The 700 nm emission in Dt-containing FCPs indicates an aggregation of antenna complexes and is a typical feature of the quenching site Q1 in recent models for non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ). A comparable long-wavelength fluorescence emission was found in FCP complexes prepared with either triton X-100 or n-dodecyl β-D-maltoside as detergent. A treatment of the FCP complexes at low pH-values in the presence of a high concentration of Mg(2+) ions showed that the extent of FCP aggregation which leads to the 700 nm fluorescence emission is different from the macro-aggregation of antenna complexes in higher plants. Protein analyses by mass spectrometry showed that the protein composition of the DD- and Dt-enriched FCP complexes was comparable. However, the Lhcf6 and Lhcr1 polypeptides were only found in Dt-enriched FCPs isolated with dodecyl maltoside whereas the Lhcf17 protein was only detected in DD-enriched FCPs prepared with triton. With respect to low pH-induced antenna aggregation it is important that the Lhcx1 protein was found in both DD- and Dt-enriched FCPs, albeit with only two peptides with confident scores. PMID:26368016

  1. Protein adsorption induced bridging flocculation: the dominant entropic pathway for nano-bio complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, Necla Mine; Narsimhan, Ganesan; Campanella, Osvaldo H.

    2016-02-01

    Lysozyme-silica interactions and the resulting complexation were investigated through adsorption isotherms, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, circular dichroism (CD), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). A thermodynamic analysis of ITC data revealed the existence of two binding modes during protein-nanoparticle complexation. Both binding modes are driven by the cooperation of a favorable enthalpy in the presence of a dominating entropy gain. The first binding mode has a higher binding affinity, a lower equilibrium stoichiometry and is driven by a higher entropic contribution compared to the second type. The observed favorable enthalpy gain in both modes is attributed to non-covalent complexation whereas the entropy gain is associated with the re-organization of the silica surface including not only the solvent and counter ion release, but also the protein's conformational changes. Possible mechanisms are proposed to explain non-covalent complexations for each binding mode by relating the changes in the zeta potential and hydrodynamic radius to the obtained adsorption isotherms and calorimetry profile. Based on all these findings, it is proposed that lysozyme adsorption on nano-silica is the result of protein-nanoparticle and protein-protein interactions that further leads to spontaneous, non-directional and random complexation of silica through bridging flocculation.Lysozyme-silica interactions and the resulting complexation were investigated through adsorption isotherms, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, circular dichroism (CD), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). A thermodynamic analysis of ITC data revealed the existence of two binding modes during protein-nanoparticle complexation. Both binding modes are driven by the cooperation of a favorable enthalpy in the presence of a dominating entropy gain. The first binding mode has a higher binding affinity, a lower equilibrium stoichiometry and is driven by a higher entropic

  2. Up-Regulation of Human Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by p300 Transcriptional Complex.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhong; Zheng, Liang; Liao, Xinghua; Geller, David

    2016-01-01

    p300, a ubiquitous transcription coactivator, plays an important role in gene activation. Our previous work demonstrated that human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) expression can be highly induced with the cytokine mixture (CM) of TNF-α + IL-1β + IFN-γ. In this study, we investigated the functional role of p300 in the regulation of hiNOS gene expression. Our initial data showed that overexpression of p300 significantly increased the basal and cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activities in A549 cells. Interestingly, p300 activated cytokine-induced hiNOS transcriptional activity was completely abrogated by deleting the upstream hiNOS enhancer at -5 kb to -6 kb in the promoter. Furthermore, p300 over-expression increased cytokine-induced transcriptional activity on a heterologous minimal TK promoter with the same hiNOS enhancer. Site-directed mutagenesis of the hiNOS AP-1 motifs revealed that an intact upstream (-5.3 kb) AP-1 binding site was critical for p300 mediated cytokine-induced hiNOS transcription. Furthermore, our ChIP analysis demonstrated that p300 was binding to Jun D and Fra-2 proteins at -5.3 kb AP-1 binding site in vivo. Lastly, our 3C assay was able to detect a long DNA loop between the hiNOS enhancer and core promoter site, and ChIP loop assay confirmed that p300 binds to AP-1 and RNA pol II proteins. Overall, our results suggest that coactivator p300 mediates cytokine-induced hiNOS transactivation by forming a distant DNA loop between its enhancer and core promoter region. PMID:26751080

  3. Deoxynivanelol and Fumonisin, Alone or in Combination, Induce Changes on Intestinal Junction Complexes and in E-Cadherin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Karina; Gomes, Fernando; Loureiro Bracarense, Ana Paula

    2013-01-01

    Fusariotoxins such as fumonisin B1 (FB1) and deoxynivalenol (DON) cause deleterious effects on the intestine of pigs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these mycotoxins, alone and in combination, on jejunal explants from piglets, using histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural assays. Five 24-day old pigs were used for sampling the explants. Forty-eight explants were sampled from each animal. Explants were incubated for 4 hours in culture medium and medium containing FB1 (100 µM), DON (10 µM) and both mycotoxins (100 µM FB1 plus 10 µM DON). Exposure to all treatments induced a significant decrease in the normal intestinal morphology and in the number of goblet cells, which were more severe in explants exposed to DON and both mycotoxins. A significant reduction in villus height occurred in groups treated with DON and with co-contamination. Expression of E-cadherin was significantly reduced in explants exposed to FB1 (40%), DON (93%) and FB1 plus DON (100%). The ultrastructural assay showed increased intercellular spaces and no junction complexes on enterocytes exposed to mycotoxins. The present data indicate that FB1 and DON induce changes in cell junction complexes that could contribute to increase paracellular permeability. The ex vivo model was adequate for assessing intestinal toxicity induced by exposure of isolated or associated concentrations of 100 µM of FB1 and 10 µM of DON. PMID:24287571

  4. A UV–Induced Genetic Network Links the RSC Complex to Nucleotide Excision Repair and Shows Dose-Dependent Rewiring

    PubMed Central

    Srivas, Rohith; Costelloe, Thomas; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Sarkar, Sovan; Malta, Erik; Sun, Su Ming; Pool, Marijke; Licon, Katherine; van Welsem, Tibor; van Leeuwen, Fred; McHugh, Peter J.; van Attikum, Haico; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Efficient repair of UV-induced DNA damage requires the precise coordination of nucleotide excision repair (NER) with numerous other biological processes. To map this crosstalk, we generated a differential genetic interaction map centered on quantitative growth measurements of >45,000 double mutants before and after different doses of UV radiation. Integration of genetic data with physical interaction networks identified a global map of 89 UV-induced functional interactions amongst 62 protein complexes, including a number of links between the RSC complex and several NER factors. We show that RSC is recruited to both silenced and transcribed loci following UV damage where it facilitates efficient repair by promoting nucleosome remodeling. Finally, a comparison of the response to high versus low levels of UV shows that the degree of genetic rewiring correlates with dose of UV and reveals a network of dose-specific interactions. This study makes available a large resource of UV-induced interactions, and it illustrates a methodology for identifying dose-dependent interactions based on quantitative shifts in genetic networks. PMID:24360959

  5. A conserved virus-induced cytoplasmic TRAMP-like complex recruits the exosome to target viral RNA for degradation.

    PubMed

    Molleston, Jerome M; Sabin, Leah R; Moy, Ryan H; Menghani, Sanjay V; Rausch, Keiko; Gordesky-Gold, Beth; Hopkins, Kaycie C; Zhou, Rui; Jensen, Torben Heick; Wilusz, Jeremy E; Cherry, Sara

    2016-07-15

    RNA degradation is tightly regulated to selectively target aberrant RNAs, including viral RNA, but this regulation is incompletely understood. Through RNAi screening in Drosophila cells, we identified the 3'-to-5' RNA exosome and two components of the exosome cofactor TRAMP (Trf4/5-Air1/2-Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex, dMtr4 and dZcchc7, as antiviral against a panel of RNA viruses. We extended our studies to human orthologs and found that the exosome as well as TRAMP components hMTR4 and hZCCHC7 are antiviral. While hMTR4 and hZCCHC7 are normally nuclear, infection by cytoplasmic RNA viruses induces their export, forming a cytoplasmic complex that specifically recognizes and induces degradation of viral mRNAs. Furthermore, the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of bunyaviral mRNA is sufficient to confer virus-induced exosomal degradation. Altogether, our results reveal that signals from viral infection repurpose TRAMP components to a cytoplasmic surveillance role where they selectively engage viral RNAs for degradation to restrict a broad range of viruses. PMID:27474443

  6. The biphosphinic paladacycle complex induces melanoma cell death through lysosomal-mitochondrial axis modulation and impaired autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gigli, Rafael; Pereira, Gustavo J S; Antunes, Fernanda; Bechara, Alexandre; Garcia, Daniel M; Spindola, Daniel G; Jasiulionis, Mirian G; Caires, Antonio C F; Smaili, Soraya S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Recently, palladium complexes have been extensively studied as cyclization of these complexes by cyclometallation reactions increased their stability making them promising antitumor compounds. In this study, we have investigated apoptosis induced by the Biphosphinic Paladacycle Complex (BPC11) and possible cross talk between apoptosis and autophagy in cell line models of metastatic (Tm5) and non-metastatic (4C11-) melanoma. The BPC11-induced cell death in melanoma involved the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis, which is characterized by LMP, CatB activation and increased Bax protein levels following its translocation to mitochondria. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization, followed by membrane potential dissipation and cleavage of caspase-3, also resulted in cell death after 24 h of incubation. We also found that BPC11-mediated LC3II formation and increased p62 protein levels, suggesting blocked autophagy, probably due to LMP. Interestingly, the treatment of Tm5 and 4C11(-) cells with 3-methyladenine (3-MA), an inhibitor of the initial stage of autophagy, potentiated the effects of BPC11. We conclude that BPC11 is an anti-melanoma agent and that autophagy may be acting as a mechanism of melanoma cells resistance. Also, these data highlight the importance of studies involving autophagy and apoptosis during pre-clinical studies of new drugs with anticancer properties. PMID:26599531

  7. TOM-independent complex formation of Bax and Bak in mammalian mitochondria during TNFalpha-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, K; Rudel, T; Kozjak-Pavlovic, V

    2009-05-01

    The Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak are activated in response to many apoptotic stimuli. As a consequence of activation, Bax and Bak oligomerize and permeabilize the outer mitochondrial membrane to permit the release of apoptosis-inducing factors. It still remains unclear whether these proteins require components of the mitochondrial protein import machinery for their function at the mitochondria. Here, we addressed this question by using inducible RNA interference for the study of protein import in mammalian mitochondria. After induction of apoptosis, we could not detect any impact of the absence of Tom22, Tom70, Tom40, Sam50 or metaxins on the translocation of Bax and formation of Bax and Bak complexes in mitochondria. In in vitro import studies, loss of these import and assembly proteins had no or only slight effect on the formation of complexes by radiolabeled Bax and Bak. We conclude that the import and assembly machineries of mammalian mitochondria have no impact on the translocation and complex assembly of Bax and Bak upon apoptosis induction. PMID:19165229

  8. Protein adsorption induced bridging flocculation: the dominant entropic pathway for nano-bio complexation.

    PubMed

    Eren, Necla Mine; Narsimhan, Ganesan; Campanella, Osvaldo H

    2016-02-14

    Lysozyme-silica interactions and the resulting complexation were investigated through adsorption isotherms, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering, circular dichroism (CD), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). A thermodynamic analysis of ITC data revealed the existence of two binding modes during protein-nanoparticle complexation. Both binding modes are driven by the cooperation of a favorable enthalpy in the presence of a dominating entropy gain. The first binding mode has a higher binding affinity, a lower equilibrium stoichiometry and is driven by a higher entropic contribution compared to the second type. The observed favorable enthalpy gain in both modes is attributed to non-covalent complexation whereas the entropy gain is associated with the re-organization of the silica surface including not only the solvent and counter ion release, but also the protein's conformational changes. Possible mechanisms are proposed to explain non-covalent complexations for each binding mode by relating the changes in the zeta potential and hydrodynamic radius to the obtained adsorption isotherms and calorimetry profile. Based on all these findings, it is proposed that lysozyme adsorption on nano-silica is the result of protein-nanoparticle and protein-protein interactions that further leads to spontaneous, non-directional and random complexation of silica through bridging flocculation. PMID:26725375

  9. Cytotoxic hydrogen bridged ruthenium quinaldamide complexes showing induced cancer cell death by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lord, Rianne M; Allison, Simon J; Rafferty, Karen; Ghandhi, Laura; Pask, Christopher M; McGowan, Patrick C

    2016-08-16

    This report presents the first known p-cymene ruthenium quinaldamide complexes which are stabilised by a hydrogen-bridging atom, [{(p-cym)Ru(II)X(N,N)}{H(+)}{(N,N)XRu(II)(p-cym)}][PF6] (N,N = functionalised quinaldamide and X = Cl or Br). These complexes are formed by a reaction of [p-cymRu(μ-X)2]2 with a functionalised quinaldamide ligand. When filtered over NH4PF6, and under aerobic conditions the equilibrium of NH4PF6 ⇔ NH3 + HPF6 enables incorporation of HPF6 and the stabilisation of two monomeric ruthenium complexes by a bridging H(+), which are counter-balanced by a PF6 counterion. X-ray crystallographic analysis is presented for six new structures with OO distances of 2.420(4)-2.448(15) Å, which is significant for strong hydrogen bonds. Chemosensitivity studies against HCT116, A2780 and cisplatin-resistant A2780cis human cancer cells showed the ruthenium complexes with a bromide ancillary ligand to be more potent than those with a chloride ligand. The 4'-fluoro compounds show a reduction in potency for both chloride and bromide complexes against all cell lines, but an increase in selectivity towards cancer cells compared to non-cancer ARPE-19 cells, with a selectivity index >1. Mechanistic studies showed a clear correlation between IC50 values and induction of cell death by apoptosis. PMID:27417660

  10. A Zinc Morpholine Complex Prevents HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcers in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Salama, Suzy M; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; AlRashdi, Ahmed S; Khalifa, Shaden A M; Abdulla, Mahmood A; Ali, Hapipah M; El-Seedi, Hesham R

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is a naturally occurring element with roles in wound healing and rescuing tissue integrity, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, where it can be detected in the mucosal and submucosal layers. Zinc chelates are known to have beneficial effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa and in cases of gastric ulcer. We synthesized complexes of zinc featuring a heterocyclic amine binding amino acids then investigated their ability to enhance the gastric self-repair. Zinc-morpholine complex, Zn(L)SCN, namely showed strong free-radical scavenging, promotion of the DNA and RNA polymerases reconstruction and suppression of cell damage. The complex's mode of action is proposed to involve hydrogen bond formation via its bis(thiocyanato-k)zinc moiety. Zn(L)SCN complex had potent effects on gastric enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. The complex disrupted the ulcerative process as demonstrated by changes in the intermediate metabolites of the oxidative pathway - specifically, reduction in the MDA levels and elevation of reduced glutathione together with an attenuation of oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, Zn(L)SCN restored the gastric mucosa, inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF and the caspases), and preserved the gastric mucous balance. Zn(L)SCN thus exhibited anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities, all of which have cytoprotective effects on the gastric lining. PMID:27460157

  11. Spectroscopic study of stripe pattern formation induced by current injection in a charge-transfer complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okimoto, Y.; Kumai, R.; Saitoh, E.; Izumi, M.; Horiuchi, S.; Tokura, Y.

    2004-09-01

    A stripe pattern with a spacing of a few micrometers is observed to show up on the crystal surface of a potassium 7,7’,8,8’-tetracyanoquinodimethane (K-TCNQ) upon the current-induced local insulator-metal transition. The spatially resolved reflectivity and Raman spectroscopies have shown that the stripe is a consequence of periodic phase separation with alternate dimerized and less-dimerized domains in the TCNQ stacks. The periodic modulation of the electronic state is generated in order to minimize the energy of the lattice strain, arising from the current-induced relaxation of the Peierls distortion.

  12. Theoretical evidence of photo-induced charge transfer from DNA to intercalated ruthenium (II) organometallic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantzis, Agisilaos; Very, Thibaut; Daniel, Chantal; Monari, Antonio; Assfeld, Xavier

    2013-07-01

    The absorption spectrum of two ruthenium (II) organometallic complexes intercalated into DNA is studied at the quantum mechanic/molecular mechanic level. The macromolecular environment is taken into account as to include geometric, electrostatic and polarization effects that can alter the excitation energy and oscillator strength. The inclusion of DNA base pairs into the quantum mechanic partition allows us for the first time to clearly evidence the presence of charge transfer excited states involving an electron withdraw from DNA base pairs to the organometallic complex.

  13. Geometrically induced complex tunnelings for ultracold atoms carrying orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polo, J.; Mompart, J.; Ahufinger, V.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of angular momentum states for a single ultracold atom trapped in two-dimensional systems of sided coupled ring potentials. The symmetries of the system show that tunneling amplitudes between different ring states with variation of the winding number are complex. In particular, we demonstrate that in a triangular ring configuration the complex nature of the cross-couplings can be used to geometrically engineer spatial dark states to manipulate the transport of orbital angular momentum states via quantum interference.

  14. Path induced coherent energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes in purple bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kewei; Ye, Jun; Zhao, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Features of path dependent energy transfer in a dual-ring light-harvesting (LH2) complexes (B850) system have been examined in detail systematically. The Frenkel-Dirac time dependent variational method with the Davydov D1 Ansatz is employed with detailed evolution of polaron dynamics in real space readily obtained. It is found that the phase of the transmission amplitude through the LH2 complexes plays an important role in constructing the coherent excitonic energy transfer. It is also found that the symmetry breaking caused by the dimerization of bacteriochlorophylls and coherence or correlation between two rings will be conducive in enhancing the exciton transfer efficiency.

  15. Path induced coherent energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes in purple bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kewei; Ye, Jun; Zhao, Yang

    2014-09-28

    Features of path dependent energy transfer in a dual-ring light-harvesting (LH2) complexes (B850) system have been examined in detail systematically. The Frenkel-Dirac time dependent variational method with the Davydov D1 Ansatz is employed with detailed evolution of polaron dynamics in real space readily obtained. It is found that the phase of the transmission amplitude through the LH2 complexes plays an important role in constructing the coherent excitonic energy transfer. It is also found that the symmetry breaking caused by the dimerization of bacteriochlorophylls and coherence or correlation between two rings will be conducive in enhancing the exciton transfer efficiency. PMID:25273408

  16. Altered stability of etoposide-induced topoisomerase II-DNA complexes in resistant human leukaemia K562 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ritke, M. K.; Roberts, D.; Allan, W. P.; Raymond, J.; Bergoltz, V. V.; Yalowich, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    K562 leukaemia cells were selected for resistance using 0.5 microM etoposide (VP-16). Cloned K/VP.5 cells were 30-fold resistant to growth inhibition by VP-16 and 5- to 13-fold resistant to m-AMSA, adriamycin and mitoxantrone. K/VP.5 cells did not overexpress P-glycoprotein; VP-16 accumulation was similar to that in K562 cells. VP-16-induced DNA damage was reduced in cells and nuclei from K/VP.5 cells compared with K562 cells. Topoisomerase II protein was reduced 3- to 7-fold and topoisomerase II alpha and topoisomerase II beta mRNAs were each reduced 3-fold in resistant cells. After drug removal, VP-16-induced DNA damage disappeared 1.7 times more rapidly and VP-16-induced DNA-topoisomerase II adducts dissociated 1.5 times more rapidly in K/VP.5 cells than in K562 cells. ATP (1 mM) was more effective in enhancing VP-16-induced DNA damage in nuclei isolated from sensitive cells than in nuclei from resistant cells. In addition, ATP (0.3-5 mM) stimulated VP-16-induced DNA-topoisomerase II adducts to a greater extent in K562 nuclei than in K/VP.5 nuclei. Taken together, these results indicate that resistance to VP-16 in a K562 subline is associated with a quantitative reduction in topoisomerase II protein and, in addition, a distinct qualitative alteration in topoisomerase II affecting the stability of drug-induced DNA-topoisomerase II complexes. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8142256

  17. Chiral mononuclear lanthanide complexes and the field-induced single-ion magnet behaviour of a Dy analogue.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuang-Yan; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Lang; Wu, Jianfeng; Tang, Jinkui

    2015-01-01

    Three pairs of homochiral mononuclear lanthanide complexes, with the general formula [LnH4LRRRRRR/SSSSSS(SCN)2](SCN)2·xCH3OH·yH2O(Ln = Dy (R/S-Dy1), Ho (R/S-Ho1) and Er (R/S-Er1)), have been obtained via self-assembly between chiral macrocyclic ligands and the respective thiocyanates, all of which show a saddle-type conformation with seven-coordinated metal ions. Magnetic measurements revealed that the Dy complex shows field-induced single-ion magnet behaviour, which is rarely reported in a seven-coordinated lanthanide-based SIM encapsulated in a macrocyclic ligand. The absolute configuration of all enantiomers was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography and confirmed by electronic CD and VCD spectra. PMID:25369972

  18. Ultrasound-induced emission enhancement based on structure-dependent homo- and heterochiral aggregations of chiral binuclear platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Komiya, Naruyoshi; Muraoka, Takako; Iida, Masayuki; Miyanaga, Maiko; Takahashi, Koichi; Naota, Takeshi

    2011-10-12

    Instant and precise control of phosphorescent emission can be performed by ultrasound-induced gelation of organic liquids with chiral, clothespin-shaped trans-bis(salicylaldiminato)Pt(II) complexes, anti-1. Nonemissive solutions of racemic, short-linked anti-1a (n = 5) and optically pure, long-linked anti-1c (n = 7) in organic liquids are transformed immediately into stable phosphorescent gels upon brief irradiation of low-power ultrasound. Emission from the gels can be controlled by sonication time, linker length, and optical activity of the complexes. Several experimental results indicated that structure-dependent homo- and heterochiral aggregations and ultrasound-control of the aggregate morphology are key factors for emission enhancement. PMID:21894951

  19. Mass Spectrometry Profiles Superoxide-Induced Intra-molecular Disulfide in the FMN-binding Subunit of Mitochondrial Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwen; Xu, Hua; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Green-Church, Kari B.; Freitas, Michael A.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2008-01-01

    Protein thiols with regulatory functions play a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of the redox state in mitochondria. One major host of regulatory cysteines in mitochondria is complex I, with the thiols primarily located on its 51 kDa FMN-binding subunit. In response to oxidative stress, these thiols are expected to form intra-molecular disulfide bridges as one of their oxidative post-translational modifications. Here, to test this hypothesis and gain insights into the molecular pattern of disulfide in complex I, the isolated bovine complex I was prepared. Superoxide (O2•−) is generated by complex I under the conditions of enzyme turnover. O2•−-induced intra-molecular disulfide formation at the 51 kDa subunit was determined by tandem mass spectrometry and database searching, with the latter accomplished by adaptation of the in-house developed database search engine, MassMatrix [Xu H., et. al J. Proteome Res. (2008) 7, 138–44]. LC/MS/MS analysis of tryptic/chymotryptic digests of the 51 kDa subunit from alkylated complex I revealed that four specific cysteines (C125, C142, C187, and C206) of the 51 kDa subunit were involved in the formation of mixed intra-molecular disulfide linkages. In all, three cysteine pairs were observed: C125/C142, C187/C206, and C142/C206. The formation of disulfide bond was subsequently inhibited by superoxide dismutase, indicating the involvement of O2•−. These results elucidated by mass spectrometry indicates that the residues of C125, C142, C187, and C206 are the specific regulatory cysteines of complex I, and they participate in the oxidative modification with disulfide formation under the physiological or pathophysiological conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18789718

  20. Delivery of rhBMP-2 Plasmid DNA Complexes via a PLLA/Collagen Electrospun Scaffold Induces Ectopic Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Komatsu, David E; Hadjiargyrou, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The development of effective strategies for gene delivery is a critical goal in DNA-based tissue engineering. Previously, our laboratory utilized the process of electrospinning to fabricate plasmid DNA-based polymeric scaffolds. Although there lease of DNA was robust, the in vitro transfection efficiency was low. In order to optimize these results, we recently modified our approach and utilized a strategy to adsorb plasmid DNA transfection complexes onto a PLLA/Collagen I electrospun scaffold for the delivery of recombinant human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2). BMP-2 was selected since it is currently clinically used to stimulate osteogenesis. Initially, we tested this approach using β-gal plasmid DNA complexes adsorbed onto PLLA/Collagen I scaffolds and obtained a transfection efficiency of 41% of that of the positive control (over 90%, DNA complexes in solution). Next, we utilized the same approach using the rhBMP-2 plasmid DNA complexes with the pre-osteoblastic. cell line, MC3T3, and detected robust (13-fold) expression of rhBMP-2 mRNA following transfection. Lastly, a mouse muscle pouch model was used to evaluate in vivo gene delivery efficacy and ectopic bone inducing capability of the scaffold adsorbed rhBMP-2 transfection complexes. Results showed that both rhBMP-2mRNA and protein were expressed and stimulated some ectopic bone formation. As such, adsorption of plasmid DNA complexes can be an effective strategy for tissue engineering in vivo, but further research is required to optimize our approach and obtain a clinically meaningful tissue response. PMID:27319221

  1. Light-induced dissociation of antenna complexes in the symbionts of scleractinian corals correlates with sensitivity to coral bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R.; Larkum, A. W. D.; Prášil, O.; Kramer, D. M.; Szabó, M.; Kumar, V.; Ralph, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Elevated temperatures in combination with moderate to high irradiance are known to cause bleaching events in scleractinian corals, characterised by damage to photosystem II (PSII). Photoprotective mechanisms of the symbiont can reduce the excitation pressure impinging upon PSII. In the bleaching sensitive species, Acropora millepora and Pocillopora damicornis, high light alone induced photoprotection through the xanthophyll cycle, increased content of the antioxidant carotenoid, β-carotene, as well as the dissociation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll complexes. The evidence is compatible with either the membrane-bound chlorophyll a-chlorophyll c 2-peridinin-protein (acpPC) complex or the peripheral peridinin-chlorophyll-protein complex, or both, disconnecting from PSII under high light. The acpPC complex potentially showed a state transition response with redistribution towards photosystem I to reduce PSII over-excitation. This apparent acpPC dissociation/reassociation was promoted by the addition of the xanthophyll cycle inhibitor, dithiothreitol, under high irradiance. Exposure to thermal stress as well as high light promoted xanthophyll de-epoxidation and increased β-carotene content, although it did not influence light-harvesting chlorophyll complex (LHC) dissociation, indicating light, rather than temperature, controls LHC dissociation. Photoinhibition was avoided in the bleaching tolerant species, Pavona decussata, suggesting xanthophyll cycling along with LHC dissociation may have been sufficient to prevent photodamage to PSII. Symbionts of P. decussata also displayed the greatest detachment of antenna complexes, while the more thermally sensitive species, Pocillopora damicornis and A. millepora, showed less LHC dissociation, suggesting antenna movement influences bleaching susceptibility.

  2. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Electrosprayed Protein Complexes: An All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Model with Mobile Protons.

    PubMed

    Popa, Vlad; Trecroce, Danielle A; McAllister, Robert G; Konermann, Lars

    2016-06-16

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become an indispensable technique for examining noncovalent protein complexes. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of these multiply protonated gaseous ions usually culminates in ejection of a single subunit with a disproportionately large amount of charge. Experiments suggest that this process involves subunit unfolding prior to separation from the residual complex, as well as H(+) migration onto the unravelling chain. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are a promising avenue for gaining detailed insights into these CID events. Unfortunately, typical MD algorithms do not allow for mobile protons. Here we address this limitation by implementing a strategy that combines atomistic force fields (such as OPLS/AA and CHARMM36) with a proton hopping algorithm, focusing on the tetrameric complexes transthyretin and streptavidin. Protons are redistributed over all acidic and basic sites in 20 ps intervals, subject to an energy function that reflects electrostatic interactions and proton affinities. Our simulations predict that nativelike conformers at the onset of collisional heating contain multiple salt bridges. Collisional heating initially causes subtle structural changes that lead to a gradual decline of these zwitterionic patterns. Many of the MD runs show gradual unfolding of a single subunit in conjunction with H(+) migration, culminating in subunit separation from the complex. However, there are also instances where two or more chains start to unfold simultaneously, giving rise to charge competition. The scission point where the "winning" subunit separates from the complex can be attained for different degrees of unfolding, giving rise to product ions in various charge states. The simulated product ion distributions are in close agreement with experimental CID data. Proton enrichment in the departing subunit is driven by charge-charge repulsion, but the combination of salt bridge depletion, charge migration

  3. Effects of compositional complexity on the ion-irradiation induced swelling and hardening in Ni-containing equiatomic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jin, K.; Lu, C.; Wang, L. M.; Qu, J.; Weber, W. J.; Zhang, Y.; Bei, H.

    2016-04-14

    The impact of compositional complexity on the ion-irradiation induced swelling and hardening is studied in Ni and six Ni-containing equiatomic alloys with face-centered cubic structure. The irradiation resistance at the temperature of 500 °C is improved by controlling the number and, especially, the type of alloying elements. Alloying with Fe and Mn has a stronger influence on swelling reduction than does alloying with Co and Cr. Lastly, the quinary alloy NiCoFeCrMn, with known excellent mechanical properties, has shown 40 times higher swelling tolerance than nickel.

  4. Induced Circular Dichroism in Phosphine Gold(I) Aryl Acetylide Urea Complexes through Hydrogen-Bonded Chiral Co-Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Dubarle-Offner, Julien; Moussa, Jamal; Amouri, Hani; Jouvelet, Benjamin; Bouteiller, Laurent; Raynal, Matthieu

    2016-03-14

    Phosphine gold(I) aryl acetylide complexes equipped with a central bis(urea) moiety form 1D hydrogen-bonded polymeric assemblies in solution that do not display any optical activity. Chiral co-assemblies are formed by simple addition of an enantiopure (metal-free) complementary monomer. Although exhibiting an intrinsically achiral linear geometry, the gold(I) aryl acetylide fragment is located in the chiral environment displayed by the hydrogen-bonded co-assemblies, as demonstrated by induced circular dichroism (ICD). PMID:26780877

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy of topotecan-DNA complexes: Binding to DNA induces topotecan dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, K. E.; Strel'Tsov, S. A.; Ermishov, M. A.; Grokhovskii, S. L.; Zhuze, A. L.; Ustinova, O. A.; Sukhanova, A. V.; Nabiev, I. R.; Oleinikov, V. A.

    2002-09-01

    The interaction of topotecan (TPT), antitumor inhibitor of human DNA topoisomerase I, with calf thymus DNA was studied by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The SERS spectra of TPT are found to depend on its concentration in solution, which is associated with the dimerization of TPT. The spectral signatures of dimerization are identified. It is shown that binding to DNA induces the formation of TPT dimers. The formation of DNA-TPT-TPT-DNA complexes is considered as one of the possible mechanisms of human DNA topoisomerase I inhibition.

  6. Distribution of Chlorophyll-Protein Complexes during Chilling in the Light Compared with Heat-Induced Modifications 1

    PubMed Central

    Ovaska, Jari; Mäenpää, Pirkko; Nurmi, Arja; Aro, Eva-Mari

    1990-01-01

    The effects of chilling in the light (4 days at 5°C and 100-200 micromoles of photons per square meter per second) on the distribution of chlorophyll (Chl) protein complexes between appressed and nonappressed thylakoid regions of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L.) chloroplasts were studied and compared with the changes occurring during in vitro heat treatment (5 minutes at 40°C) of isolated thylakoids. Both treatments induced an increase (18 and 65%, respectively) in the relative amount of the antenna Chl a protein complexes (CP47 + CP43) of photosystem II (PSII) in stroma lamellae vesicles. Freeze-fracture replicas of light-chilled material revealed an increase in the particle density on the exoplasmic fracture face of unstacked membrane regions. These two treatments differed markedly, however, in respect to comigration of the light-harvesting Chl a/b protein complex (LHCII) of PSII. The LHCII/PSII ratio in stroma lamellae vesicles remained fairly constant during chilling in the light, whereas it dropped during the heat treatment. Moreover, it was a minor light-harvesting Chl a/b protein complex of PSII, CP29, that increased most in stroma lamellae vesicles during light-chilling. Changes in the organization of LHCII during chilling were suggested by a shift to particles of smaller sizes on the protoplasmic fracture face of stacked membrane regions and a decrease in the amount of trans-Δ3-hexadecenoic acid in the phosphatidyldiacylglycerol fraction. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667464

  7. Photo-induced DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity of a ruthenium(II) arene anticancer complex.

    PubMed

    Brabec, Viktor; Pracharova, Jitka; Stepankova, Jana; Sadler, Peter J; Kasparkova, Jana

    2016-07-01

    We report DNA cleavage by ruthenium(II) arene anticancer complex [(η(6)-p-terp)Ru(II)(en)Cl](+) (p-terp=para-terphenyl, en=1,2-diaminoethane, complex 1) after its photoactivation by UVA and visible light, and the toxic effects of photoactivated 1 in cancer cells. It was shown in our previous work (T. Bugarcic et al., J. Med. Chem. 51 (2008) 5310-5319) that this complex exhibits promising toxic effects in several human tumor cell lines and concomitantly its DNA binding mode involves combined intercalative and monofunctional (coordination) binding modes. We demonstrate in the present work that when photoactivated by UVA or visible light, 1 efficiently photocleaves DNA, also in hypoxic media. Studies of the mechanism underlying DNA cleavage by photoactivated 1 reveal that the photocleavage reaction does not involve generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), although contribution of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) to the DNA photocleavage process cannot be entirely excluded. Notably, the mechanism of DNA photocleavage by 1 appears to involve a direct modification of mainly those guanine residues to which 1 is coordinatively bound. As some tumors are oxygen-deficient and cytotoxic effects of photoactivated ruthenium compounds containing {Ru(η(6)-arene)}(2+) do not require the presence of oxygen, this class of ruthenium complexes may be considered potential candidate agents for improved photodynamic anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:26778426

  8. Binuclear bromide complex of Bi(III): Thermally induced changes in optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adonin, Sergey A.; Sokolov, Maxim N.; Rakhmanova, Marianna E.; Smolentsev, Anton I.; Pishchur, Denis P.; Korolkov, Ilya V.; Kozlova, Svetlana G.; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2016-05-01

    Binuclear bromobismuthate complex (H2bipy)2[Bi2Br10] (1) displays the optical properties: 1) thermochromism, 2) disappearance/appearance of luminescence at 298/77 K. To investigate this feature, a combination of X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and quantum chemical calculations has been used.

  9. Solvent induced helical aggregation in the self-assembly of cholesterol tailed platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yueyuan; Liu, Keyin; Meng, Luyan; Chen, Liang; Chen, Liming; Yi, Tao

    2014-10-14

    Three alkynylplatinum(ii) bipyridyl complexes in which two cholesterol groups are combined with a bipyridyl group via alkyl chains and amido bonds were designed and synthesized. The complexes have different lengths of ethylene glycol chains at the para-position of 1-phenylethyne. All three complexes can self-assemble to gel networks in DMSO, while only the morphology of 1a without an ether chain shows a well-defined right-handed helical structure in layer packing mode. However, 1c with long ethylene glycol chains forms perfect regular left-handed helical structures in aqueous ethanol solution while the volume percentage of water is less than 5% (v/v). As the ratio of water increases, the chirality changes from a left-handed helix to a right-handed helix and the packing mode alters from a monolayer structure to a hexagonal structure. As the ratio of water further increases to greater than 50% (v/v), the structure of the assembly finally transforms into bilayer vesicles. The process of the morphology transition is traced by circular dichroism spectra, powder X-ray diffraction, SEM and TEM images. The result indicates that a polar solvent (water) acts as a trigger to change the self-assembly of the chiral structures of the complex due to the strong hydrophobic interaction between cholesterol groups and the balance of the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of the solvent environment. PMID:25131259

  10. A Zinc Morpholine Complex Prevents HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcers in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Suzy M.; Gwaram, Nura Suleiman; AlRashdi, Ahmed S.; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; Abdulla, Mahmood A.; Ali, Hapipah M.; El-Seedi, Hesham R.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is a naturally occurring element with roles in wound healing and rescuing tissue integrity, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, where it can be detected in the mucosal and submucosal layers. Zinc chelates are known to have beneficial effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa and in cases of gastric ulcer. We synthesized complexes of zinc featuring a heterocyclic amine binding amino acids then investigated their ability to enhance the gastric self-repair. Zinc-morpholine complex, Zn(L)SCN, namely showed strong free-radical scavenging, promotion of the DNA and RNA polymerases reconstruction and suppression of cell damage. The complex’s mode of action is proposed to involve hydrogen bond formation via its bis(thiocyanato-k)zinc moiety. Zn(L)SCN complex had potent effects on gastric enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. The complex disrupted the ulcerative process as demonstrated by changes in the intermediate metabolites of the oxidative pathway – specifically, reduction in the MDA levels and elevation of reduced glutathione together with an attenuation of oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, Zn(L)SCN restored the gastric mucosa, inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF and the caspases), and preserved the gastric mucous balance. Zn(L)SCN thus exhibited anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities, all of which have cytoprotective effects on the gastric lining. PMID:27460157