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Sample records for mt blanc france

  1. A two century record of strontium isotopes from an ice core drilled at Mt Blanc, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, G. R.; Rosman, K. J. R.; Van de Velde, K. P.; Boutron, C. F.

    2006-08-01

    New techniques which allow small amounts of Sr to be reliably analysed [G.R. Burton, V.I. Morgan, C.F. Boutron, K.J.R. Rosman, High-sensitivity measurements of strontium isotopes in polar ice, Anal. Chim. Acta 469 (2002) 225-233] by TIMS (Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry) have been used to measure the isotopic composition of Sr and the concentration of Rb and Sr at sub-nanogram per gram levels in a Mt Blanc snow and ice core. This two century time series of Sr isotopes is the first to be reported in an Alpine glacier. The Sr and Rb concentrations range from 3 ng/g to 20 pg/g and 1 ng/g to 10 pg/g, respectively, with higher concentrations evident in more recent times. This trend is consistent with that reported previously for other metals such as Cd, Cu and Zn [K. Van de Velde, C. Barbante, G. Cozzi, I. Moret, T. Bellomi, C. Ferrari, C. Boutron, Changes in the occurrence of silver, gold, platinum, palladium and rhodium in Mont Blanc ice and snow since the 18th century, Atmos. Environ. 34 (2000) 3117-3127; K. Van de Velde, C. Boutron, C. Ferrari, T. Bellomi, C. Barbante, S. Rudnev, M. Bolshov, Seasonal variations of heavy metals in the 1960s Alpine ice: sources versus meteorological factors, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 164 (1998) 521-533; K.J.R. Rosman, C. Ly, K. Van de Velde, C.F. Boutron, A two century record of lead isotopes in high altitude Alpine snow and ice, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 176 (2000) 413-424]. The 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios vary between 0.7020 and 0.7176 and display relatively larger variations in recent times which have been attributed to seasonal variations made evident by the increased sampling resolution available at shallower depths. No change with time is evident in this ratio which has a mean value of ˜ 0.712 and is similar to Glacial ice at Summit Greenland, suggesting that aerosols reaching Mt Blanc represent the same mixture of sources. Also, anthropogenic sources would appear to have the same isotopic ratio. The presence of Saharan dust in some

  2. Instability of a highly vulnerable high alpine rock ridge: the lower Arête des Cosmiques (Mont Blanc massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, L.; Deline, P.; Lambiel, C.; Vincent, C.

    2012-04-01

    Glacier retreat and permafrost degradation are actually more and more thought to explain the increasing instability of rock slopes and rock ridges in high mountain environments. Hot summers with numerous rockfalls we experienced over the last two decades in the Alps have indeed contributed to test/strengthen the hypothesis of a strong correlation between rockfalls and global warming through these two cryospheric factors. Rockfalls from recently deglaciated and/or thawing areas may have very important economic and social implications for high mountain infrastructures and be a fatal hazard for mountaineers. At high mountain sites characterized by infrastructures that can be affected by rockfalls, the monitoring of rock slopes, permafrost and glaciers is thus an essential element for the sustainability of the infrastructure and for the knowledge/management of risks. Our study focuses on a particularly active area of the Mont Blanc massif (France), the lower Arête des Cosmiques, on which is located the very popular Refuge des Cosmiques (3613 m a.s.l.). Since 1998, when a rockfall threatened a part of the refuge and forced to major stabilizing works, observations allowed to identify 10 detachments (20 m3 to > 1000 m3), especially on the SE face of the ridge. Since 2009, this face is yearly surveyed by terrestrial laser scanning to obtain high-resolution 3D models. Their diachronic comparison gives precise measurements of the evolution of the rock slope. Eight rock detachments have thus been documented (0.7 m3 to 256.2 m3). Rock temperature measurements at the ridge and the close Aiguille du Midi (3842 m a.s.l.), and observations of the evolution of the underlying Glacier du Géant have enable to better understand the origin of the strong dynamics of this highly vulnerable area: (i) rock temperature data suggest the presence of warm permafrost (i.e. close to 0°C) from the first meters to depth in the SE face, and cold permafrost in the NW face; (ii) as suggested by the

  3. Evolution of hut access facing glacier shrinkage in the Mer de Glace basin (Mont Blanc massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourey, Jacques; Ravanel, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    Given the evolution of high mountain environment due to global warming, mountaineering routes and huts accesses are more and more strongly affected by glacial shrinkage and concomitant gravity processes, but almost no studies have been conducted on this relationship. The aim of this research is to describe and explain the evolution over the last century of the access to the five alpine huts around the Mer de Glace glacier (Mont Blanc massif), the larger French glacier (length = 11.5 km, area = 30 km²), a major place for Alpine tourism since 1741 and the birthplace of mountaineering, by using several methods (comparing photographs, surveying, collecting historical documents). While most of the 20th century shows no marked changes, loss of ice thickness and associated erosion of lateral moraines generate numerous and significant changes since the 1990s. Boulder falls, rockfalls and landslides are the main geomorphological processes that affect the access, while the glacier surface lowering makes access much longer and more unstable. The danger is then greatly increased and the access must be relocated and/or equipped more and more frequently (e.g. a total of 520 m of ladders has been added). This questions the future accessibility to the huts, jeopardizing an important part of mountaineering and its linked economy in the Mer de Glace area.

  4. Kinematics and thermal conditions in the permafrost-affected rockwalls of the Aiguille du Midi (3842 m a.s.l., Mont Blanc massif, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Grangier, Germain; Weber, Samuel; Beutel, Jan; Magnin, Florence; Gruber, Stefan; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Processes that control climate-dependent rockfall from permafrost-affected rock slopes are still poorly understood. In this study, we present the results of a Wireless Sensor Network, integrated within the Swiss project PermaSense and developed in 2012, to measure rock temperature and geotechnical parameters in the steep rockwalls of the Aiguille du Midi (AdM, 3842 m a.s.l., Mont Blanc massif, France). Accessible year round by cable car, the AdM comprises two main peaks: (i) the Piton Nord with the cable car arrival station, where 4 crack-meters are placed on four major fractures, and (ii) the Piton Central with many touristic infrastructure, equipped with three 10-m-deep boreholes with 15 temperatures sensors since 2009, and where 2 crack-meters are installed along a major fracture. Three major kinematic regimes are observed: (i) opening of clefts when the rock temperature becomes positive, followed by closing during the cold period, (ii) summer opening continued by a winter opening, and (iii) closing during the warm period followed by opening in winter.

  5. Basal icequakes recorded beneath an Alpine glacier (Glacier d'Argentière, Mont Blanc, France): Evidence for stick-slip motion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmstetter, Agnès.; Nicolas, Barbara; Comon, Pierre; Gay, Michel

    2015-03-01

    While basal icequakes associated with glacier motion have been detected under Antarctica for several decades, there remains very little evidence of stick-slip motion for Alpine glaciers. Here we analyzed 2357 basal icequakes that were recorded at Glacier d'Argentière (Mont-Blanc Massif) between February and November of 2012 and that are likely to be associated with basal sliding. These events have been classified into 18 multiplets, based on their waveforms. The strong similarity of the waveforms within each multiplet suggests an isolated repeating source. Despite this similarity, the peak amplitude within each multiplet varies gradually in time, by up to a factor of 18. The distribution of these events in time is relatively complex. For long time scales, we observe progressive variations in the amplitudes of events within each multiplet. For intermediate time scales (hours), the events occur regularly in time, with typical return times of several minutes up to several hours. For short time scales (from 0.01 to 100 s), the largest multiplet shows clustering in time, with a power law distribution of the interevent times. The location of these events and their focal mechanisms are not well constrained, because most of these events were detected by a single seismometer. Nevertheless, the locations can be estimated with an accuracy of a few tens of meters using a polarization analysis. The estimated average depth of the basal events is 179 m, which is in good agreement with the estimated glacier thickness. The relative changes in distance between the source and the sensor can be measured accurately by correlating separately the P wave and S wave parts of the seismograms of each event with the template waveforms, which are obtained by averaging the signals within each multiplet. We observed small variations in the times between the P wave and the S wave of up to 0.6 ms over 50 days. These variations cannot be explained by displacement of the sensor with respect to the

  6. France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every July, the world's best cyclists race more than 3500 km around France, and sometimes the surrounding countries, in the Tour de France. This image from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows the varied terrain which challenges the riders. The race started in western France at Futuroscope, and headed toward Brittany. In these mostly flat 'stages' (as each day's race is called) sprinting specialists usually dash for the finish out of the main pack of riders. The race then moved to the Pyrenees mountains, in southern France along the border with Spain. Climbers and the overall favorites shine in the mountains, often gaining 10 minutes or more on their rivals. Only a few days after the Pyrenees climbs the race was again in the mountains. First Mont Ventoux, an extinct volcano in Provence, and then the massive Alps, with altitudes as high as 2,645 meters, challenged the racers. Finally the race headed toward Paris and a July 23rd finish in Paris. Go Lance! To learn more about MODIS, visit the MODIS web. Image by Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land group, NASA GSFC

  7. France.

    PubMed

    1987-09-01

    In 1986, France had a population of 55,493,000, with an annual growth rate of 0.4%. The infant mortality rate stood at 8.2/1000. Of the work force of 23.8 million, 8.3% were engaged in agriculture, 45.2% were in the industry and commerce sector, and 46.5% were engaged in services. The unemployment rate stood at 10.7%. The country's gross domestic product (GDP) was US$724 billion in 1986, with an average annual growth rate of 2.0%, and per capita income averaged $13,046. France has substantial agricultural resources, a diversified modern industrial system, and a highly skilled labor force. Following the return of a socialist majority in government in 1981, several large manufacturing firms were nationalized along with much of the commercial banking sector. Initial socialist policies were stimulative, relying partly on income redistribution and partly on increased government spending. However, the resultant increase in import demand was not offset by an increased demand French exports. In 1983, an economic stabilization plan of reductions in the budget deficit, involving spending cuts, increased taxes, and tighter monetary and credit policies, was successfully implemented. Although current economic policies should promote stronger growth over the medium to long term, trade competitiveness remains weak and high unemployment is a major social problem. PMID:12177959

  8. The scientific observatories on Mont Blanc.

    PubMed

    Richalet, J P

    2001-01-01

    Since the first ascent of Mont Blanc by Jacques Balmat and Dr. Michel-Gabriel Paccard in 1786, numerous scientific events have taken place on the highest peak of Europe. Horace Benédict de Saussure, since his first ascent in 1787, made numerous observations on barometric pressure, temperature, geology, and mountain sickness on Mont Blanc. Over the next 100 years, scientists and physicians climbed Mont Blanc and made many interesting although anecdotal reports. Science on Mont Blanc exploded at the end of the 19th century. A major player at that time was Joseph Vallot (1854-1925), who constructed an observatory in 1890 at 4,358 m on the Rochers des Bosses and then moved it in 1898 to a better location at 4,350 m. There Vallot and invited scientists made observations over more than 30 years: studies in geology, glaciology, astronomy, cartography, meteorology, botany, physiology and medicine were performed and published in the seven volumes of the Annales de l'Observatoire du Mont Blanc, between 1893 and 1917, and in the Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences. While Jules Janssen and Xaver Imfeld were preparing the construction of the new observatory on the top of Mont Blanc, Dr. Jacottet died in 1891 at the Observatoire Vallot from a disease that was clearly attributed by Dr. Egli-Sinclair to the effect of high altitude. This was probably the first case of high altitude pulmonary edema documented by an autopsy and suspected to be directly due to high altitude. Extensive studies on ventilation were made from 1886 to 1900. Increase in ventilation with altitude was documented, with the phenomenon of "ventilatory acclimatization." Paul Bert's theories on the role of oxygen in acute mountain sickness were confirmed in 1903 and 1904 by studying the effects of oxygen inhalation. In 1913, Vallot documented for the first time the decrease in physical performance at the top of Mont Blanc using squirrels. After that pioneering era, few studies were done until 1984, when a

  9. French Alps, Mont Blanc, French/Italian Border

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In this southeast looking view, Mont Blanc, on the French/Italian border, (48.0N, 4.5E) the highest mountain peak in all of Europe, is just below and right of center (below the end of the prominent valley of the Aosta River, in the center of the photo. The rivers flow out of the Alps into Italy toward Turin. Chamonix, the famous resort town and center of Alpine mountain climbing, lies in the valley just below Mont Blanc.

  10. Factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc.

    PubMed

    Tsianos, G; Woolrich-Burt, L; Aitchison, T; Peacock, A; Watt, M; Montgomery, H; Watt, I; Grant, S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the factors affecting a climber's ability to ascend Mont Blanc using a number of variables collected at the Gouter Hut (3,817 m) before and after an attempted ascent on the Mont Blanc summit. Subjects (n=285) were tested at 3,817 m prior to their ascent of Mont Blanc. Maximum height ascended in the last 14 days was recorded. End tidal CO2, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), heart rate and respiratory rate were measured using a Capnograph (Nellcor Patrick NPB75). Acute mountain sickness (AMS) was assessed using the Lake Louise scoring system. Summit information is available for 216 subjects. None of the subjects who attained 4,000 m in the previous 14 days failed to reach the summit (P=0.04). Previous recent exposure to an altitude of 4,000 m resulted in faster ascent times to the summit than those who had not been above 3,000 m in the previous 14 days (4.02+/-0.6 vs. 4.46+/-0.8 h, P=0.009), higher SaO2 on arrival at the Gouter Hut on day 1 (88.6+/-5 vs. 86.3+/-6%, P=0.004) and lower AMS scores upon arrival at the Gouter Hut after the attempted ascent to the summit 2.5+/-1.8 versus 4.7+/-2.5 U (P=0.001), respectively. It is concluded that recent exposure to 4,000 m confers an advantage to those who wish to ascend a 4,800 m peak. PMID:16235066

  11. Post-World War II uranium changes in dated Mont Blanc ice and snow.

    PubMed

    Barbante, C; Van De Velde, K; Cozzi, G; Capodaglio, G; Cescon, P; Planchon, F; Hong, S; Ferrari, C; Boutron, C

    2001-10-15

    Recent controversies concerning the possibility of environmental contamination due to the use of uranium in classical weaponry have led us to realize that there is a lack of time series for this metal from environmental archives. We have therefore performed analysis of a dated 140 m-long ice/snow core that was drilled in 1994 at a cold high altitude site (4250 m) near the summit of Mont Blanc in the French-Italian Alps. Ultraclean analytical procedures were employed in our analyses. Uranium concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry. In ice dating from before the 1940s, uranium concentrations are found to have remained fairly constant and can be explained simply by a crustal contribution. For the post-World War II layers, on the other hand, the data show large excesses above crustal contributions. These uranium excesses are attributed to tropospheric transport of dust emitted during extensive mining and milling operations which took place in the GDR and to a smaller extent in France at that time. There is no enhancement in uranium concentrations in the ice layer in which fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl accident was previously identified from a gross beta activity vs depth profile. PMID:11686362

  12. Monopole search with the Mont Blanc LSD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G. F.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.

    1986-04-01

    Preliminary results of a search for magnetic monopoles, made with the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) of the Mont Blanc Laboratory at the depth of 5200 hg/sq cm underground, are reported. The detection method and the sensitivity of the experiment to low-energy losses, as expected theoretically for monopoles with low velocity are discussed. Since no monopole has been detected an upper limit of their flux at earth for 0 events at the 90 percent confidence level, 6.6 x 10 to the -14th poles/sq cm s sr has been obtained after about 5 months of running time, given the large acceptance (S Omega = 235 sq m sr) of the LSD experiment.

  13. Influence of harvesting technique and maceration process on aroma and phenolic attributes of Sauvignon blanc wine.

    PubMed

    Olejar, Kenneth J; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Kilmartin, Paul A

    2015-09-15

    Sauvignon blanc wines are characterised by their varietal aromas and low phenolic content. Mechanical harvesting has been shown to increase several varietal aromas. Likewise, maceration techniques have produced increases in phenolic content and antioxidant activity, but these can also alter tactile attributes and sensory profiles. Mechanical harvesting and cryogenic maceration were used in combination to produce a Sauvignon blanc wine with increased phenolic content and antioxidant activity, while showing a similar sensory profile to control wines. Phenolic profiles of the wines showed differences between the harvesting and maceration techniques. Mechanical harvesting contributed to decreases in phenolics through reaction with oxidative radicals. Cryogenic maceration increased phenolics and antioxidant activity. Cryogenic maceration also increased the levels of several varietal aromas, for Sauvignon blanc wines made from both hand-picked and from machine-harvested fruit. Furthermore, cryogenic treatment of hand-picked fruit increased varietal thiols to levels similar to machine-harvested control wines. PMID:25863627

  14. France`s nuclear dilemmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Ignoring worldwide protests, France conducted the first of several scheduled nuclear tests in September. The controversy has overshadowed France`s more important nuclear challenges: maintaining a strong deterrent under a test ban, moving ahead with its proposals for {open_quotes}Europeanization{close_quotes} of that deterrent, and developing a consensus on how nuclear threats should be used in response to those who would brandish other weapons of mass destruction. 1 fig.

  15. Microbiological fingerprint of African dust deposition in alpine snow pack, Mont Blanc summit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvochina, Maria; Alekhina, Irina; Normand, Philippe; Petit, Jean-Robert; Bulat, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    The biogeochemical effect of African dust transport has been reported mostly with respect to nutrient budget change in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and global transport of microorganisms, including pathogens. However, its potential to seed or colonize the remote environments by transported microorganisms is poorly understood. This study has focused on bacterial content and diversity of Saharan dust deposition from 2006, 2008 and 2009 in snow pack of Mont Blanc (MtBl) glacier as well as recognition of bacteria which could be involved in establishing microbiota in this icy environment. Four snow samples recorded Saharan dust events from June 2006 (SDm06/2006 - 3,5 months aged), May and June 2008 (SDm05/2008 and SDm06/2008 - 1 month in between and 1 week aged each) and May 2009 (SDm05/2009 - 1 week aged) were collected at Col du Dome area (4250m a.s.l.). Bacterial community structure was assessed by ribotyping and subsequent sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. To exclude human-associated and laboratory contamination several controls were run in parallel updating our contaminant library. The obtained phylotypes were tested against this library keeping only those which successfully passed through this exam. Of 176 selected clones from four clone libraries 29.8% were met in our contaminant library. The ‘true' sequences were assigned to 57 phylotypes (>97.5% sequence similarity) originating mostly from soil. The prevalent phylotypes recovered were belonging to different bacterial divisions: Deinococcus-Thermus, Alpha-proteobacteria and CFB groups for SDm06/2006; Actinobacteria, Alpha-proteobacteria and CFB for SDm05/2008 and SDm06/2008; Actinobacteria and chloroplasts/plastids for SDm05/2009. Phylogenetic analysis of all phylotypes showed no shared species amongst all 4 dust layers in MtBl snow pack in 2006, 2008 and 2009. However, two phylotypes (Blastococcus saxobsidens sp. - 99%, Geodermatophilus obscurus sp. - 99%) were shared between 2008 and 2009

  16. Microbial communities established on Mont Blanc summit with Saharan dust deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvochina, M.; Alekhina, I.; Normand, P.; Petit, J. R.; Bulat, S.

    2009-04-01

    Dust originating from the Sahara desert can be uplifted during storms, transported across the Mediterranean towards the Alpine region and deposited during snowfalls. The microbes associated with dust particles can be involved in establishing microbiota in icy environments as well as affect ecosystem and human health. Our objective was to use a culture-free DNA-based approach to assess bacterial content and diversity and furthermore, to identify ‘icy' microbes which could be brought on the Mont Blanc (MtBl) summit with Saharan dust and became living in the snow. Saharan dust fallout on MtBl summit from one event (MB5, event June 2006) vs. control libraries and that from another event (May 2008) were collected in Grenoble (SD, 200 m a.s.l.) and at Col du Dome (MB-SD, 4250 m a.s.l.). Soil from Ksar Ghilane (SS, Saharan desert, Tunisia, March 2008) was taken for overall comparison as a possible source population. Fresh snow falling in Grenoble (85) was collected as example of diversity in this area. To assess the microbial diversity 16S rRNA gene libraries (v3-v5 region) were constructed for corresponding dust-snow samples (MB5, SS, SD, 85 and MB-SD) along with clear snow samples and several controls. For both MB5 and MB-SD samples full-gene technique was evoked in attempt to differentiate reproduced bacteria from damaged DNA. Before sequencing the clones were rybotyped. All clone libraries were distinct in community composition except for some single phylotypes (or closely related groups) overlap. Thus, clone libraries from two different events that were collected at Col du Dome area within 2 year interval (MB5 and MB-SD) were different in community composition except one of the abundant phylotype from MB-SD library (Geodermatophilus sp.) which was shared (98% sequence similarity) with single representative from MB-5 library. These bacteria are pigmented and radiation-resistant, so it could be an indicator of desert origin for our sequences. For MB5 library two

  17. Drug Use on Mont Blanc: A Study Using Automated Urine Collection

    PubMed Central

    Robach, Paul; Trebes, Gilles; Lasne, Françoise; Buisson, Corinne; Méchin, Nathalie; Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Roustit, Matthieu; Kérivel, Patricia; Botré, Francesco; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Mont Blanc, the summit of Western Europe, is a popular but demanding high-altitude ascent. Drug use is thought to be widespread among climbers attempting this summit, not only to prevent altitude illnesses, but also to boost physical and/or psychological capacities. This practice may be unsafe in this remote alpine environment. However, robust data on medication during the ascent of Mont Blanc are lacking. Individual urine samples from male climbers using urinals in mountain refuges on access routes to Mont Blanc (Goûter and Cosmiques mountain huts) were blindly and anonymously collected using a hidden automatic sampler. Urine samples were screened for a wide range of drugs, including diuretics, glucocorticoids, stimulants, hypnotics and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors. Out of 430 samples analyzed from both huts, 35.8% contained at least one drug. Diuretics (22.7%) and hypnotics (12.9%) were the most frequently detected drugs, while glucocorticoids (3.5%) and stimulants (3.1%) were less commonly detected. None of the samples contained PDE-5 inhibitors. Two substances were predominant: the diuretic acetazolamide (20.6%) and the hypnotic zolpidem (8.4%). Thirty three samples were found positive for at least two substances, the most frequent combination being acetazolamide and a hypnotic (2.1%). Based on a novel sampling technique, we demonstrate that about one third of the urine samples collected from a random sample of male climbers contained one or several drugs, suggesting frequent drug use amongst climbers ascending Mont Blanc. Our data suggest that medication primarily aims at mitigating the symptoms of altitude illnesses, rather than enhancing performance. In this hazardous environment, the relatively high prevalence of hypnotics must be highlighted, since these molecules may alter vigilance. PMID:27253728

  18. The 90 ton liquid scintillation detector in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badino, G.; Bologna, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Saavedra, O.; Dadykin, V. L.; Korchagin, V. B.; Korchagin, P. V.; Malgin, A. S.

    1984-12-01

    The authors discuss the results from calibrating liquid scintillation counters (1.5 m3 each) used in the large-volume neutrino experiment in the Mont Blanc Laboratory. The electronic and recording systems from the 72 counters of the detector are described, and the method to detect low-energy γ pulses from (n,p) reaction by using 252Cf as a neutron source is discussed.

  19. Drug Use on Mont Blanc: A Study Using Automated Urine Collection.

    PubMed

    Robach, Paul; Trebes, Gilles; Lasne, Françoise; Buisson, Corinne; Méchin, Nathalie; Mazzarino, Monica; de la Torre, Xavier; Roustit, Matthieu; Kérivel, Patricia; Botré, Francesco; Bouzat, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Mont Blanc, the summit of Western Europe, is a popular but demanding high-altitude ascent. Drug use is thought to be widespread among climbers attempting this summit, not only to prevent altitude illnesses, but also to boost physical and/or psychological capacities. This practice may be unsafe in this remote alpine environment. However, robust data on medication during the ascent of Mont Blanc are lacking. Individual urine samples from male climbers using urinals in mountain refuges on access routes to Mont Blanc (Goûter and Cosmiques mountain huts) were blindly and anonymously collected using a hidden automatic sampler. Urine samples were screened for a wide range of drugs, including diuretics, glucocorticoids, stimulants, hypnotics and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors. Out of 430 samples analyzed from both huts, 35.8% contained at least one drug. Diuretics (22.7%) and hypnotics (12.9%) were the most frequently detected drugs, while glucocorticoids (3.5%) and stimulants (3.1%) were less commonly detected. None of the samples contained PDE-5 inhibitors. Two substances were predominant: the diuretic acetazolamide (20.6%) and the hypnotic zolpidem (8.4%). Thirty three samples were found positive for at least two substances, the most frequent combination being acetazolamide and a hypnotic (2.1%). Based on a novel sampling technique, we demonstrate that about one third of the urine samples collected from a random sample of male climbers contained one or several drugs, suggesting frequent drug use amongst climbers ascending Mont Blanc. Our data suggest that medication primarily aims at mitigating the symptoms of altitude illnesses, rather than enhancing performance. In this hazardous environment, the relatively high prevalence of hypnotics must be highlighted, since these molecules may alter vigilance. PMID:27253728

  20. The research program of the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) in the Mont Blanc Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadykin, V. L.; Yakushev, V. F.; Korchagin, P. V.; Korchagin, V. B.; Malgin, A. S.; Ryassny, F. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Talochkin, V. P.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Badino, G.

    1985-01-01

    A massive (90 tons) liquid scintillation detector (LSD) has been running since October 1984 in the Mont Blanc Laboratory at a depth of 5,200 hg/sq cm of standard rock. The research program of the experiment covers a variety of topics in particle physics and astrophysics. The performance of the detector, the main fields of research are presented and the preliminary results are discussed.

  1. ALP-RISK, a smartphone app for collecting data on geomorphic phenomena at high altitude in the Mont Blanc region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip

    2014-05-01

    A network of observers (mountain guides, hut keepers and mountaineers) has been created from 2005 for the Mont Blanc massif in order to acquire data on rockfall in permafrost-affected rock walls. This network, fully operational since 2007, is based on observation sheets or oral communications and has documented nearly 350 events with volume between 100 and 45,000 m3. Their analysis confirmed and helped to better understand the role of the permafrost degradation as main triggering factor. To i) reinforce this network, ii) facilitate its observation work and iii) develop it as well in space (the whole Mont Blanc region, or eventually the whole western Alps) as in a thematic point of view (all glacial and periglacial brutal phenomena), the Alp-Risk app has been created in the framework of the Alcotra PrévRisk Mont-Blanc project. The latter (2011-13) has been developed to improve the prevention of individual and collective natural hazards around the Mont Blanc massif. The app was created for I-Phones and Androids in three languages (French, English and Italian) and allows, as intuitively and quickly as possible, transmitting data on natural hazards in high mountain (snow and ice avalanche, landslides and rockfalls, landslides, moraine destabilization, water pocket outburst flood, torrential flood, and others) to both practitioners (observations available directly on the app via an interface web), scientists, and possibly local managers. Alp-Risk thus constitutes a new step for participatory science in the Mont Blanc region.

  2. Present-day subglacial erosion efficiency inferred from sources and transport of glacial clasts in the North face of Mont Blanc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnier, J. L.; Godon, C.; Buoncristiani, J. F.; Paquette, J. L.; Trouvé, E.

    2012-04-01

    The efficiency of erosional processes is classically considered from detrital composition at the outlet of a shed that reflects the rocks eroded within the shed. We adapt fluvial detrital thermochronology (DeCelles et al., 2004) and lithology (Attal and Lavé, 2006) methods to the subglacial streams of the north face of the Mont Blanc. The lithology of this area is composed by a ~303 Ma old granite intruded within an older poly metamorphic complex (orthogneisses). In this study,we use macroscopic criteria (~10 000 clasts) and Ur/Pb dating of zircons (~500 datings of sand grains) to determine the provenance of the sediment transported by the glacier and by the sub-glacial streams. Samples come from sediments collected around the glacier (above, below or laterally), from different bedrocks sources according to the surface flow lines and glacier characteristics (above or below the ELA; temperate or cold), and from different subglacial streams. A comparison between the proportion of granite and orthogneisses in these samples indicates that: 1) the supra load follows the flow lines of the glacier deduced from SAR images correlation and the displacement pattern excludes supra load mixing of the different sources; 2) the transport by the glacier does not mix the clasts issued from the sub-glacial erosion with the clasts issued from supraglacial deposition, except in the lower tongue where supraglacial streams and moulins move the supraglacial load from top to bottom; 3) the erosion rate beneath the glacier is very small: null beneath the cold ice but also very weak beneath the greatest part of the temperate glacier; the erosion increases significantly beneath the tongue, where supraglacial load incorporated at the base favors abrasion; 4) the glacial erosion rate beneath the tongue remains at least five time smaller than the erosion rate coming from non-glacial area. According to our results, we demonstrate that the glaciers of the Mont-Blanc north face protect the top of

  3. Mt. St. Helens Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Len

    1992-01-01

    Provides a personal account of one science teacher's participation in a teacher workshop in which teachers learned about volcanic development, types of eruption, geomorphology, plate tectonics, volcano monitoring, and hazards created by volcanoes by examining Mt. St. Helens. Provides a graphic identifying volcanoes active since 1975. (MDH)

  4. A re-analysis of 533 rockfalls occurred since 2003 in the Mont Blanc massif for the study of their relationship with permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Magnin, Florence; Deline, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Rockfall is one of the main natural hazards in high mountain regions and its frequency is growing, especially since two decades. Collapses at high elevation are with an increasing certainty assumed to be a consequence of the climate change through the warming permafrost. In the Mont Blanc massif, data on present rockfalls (occurrence time when possible, accurate location, topographical and geological settings, volume, weather and snow conditions) were acquired for 2003 and for the period 2007-2014 thanks to a satellite image of the massif and a network of observers in the central part of the massif, respectively. The study of the 533 so-documented rockfalls shows a strong correlation at the year scale between air temperature and rockfall. Along with this data acquisition, a statistical model of the Mean Annual Rock Surface Temperature (MARST) for the 1961-1990 period has been implemented on a 4-m-resolution DEM of the Mont Blanc massif. The model runs with Potential Incoming Solar radiation (PISR) calculated with GIS tools and air temperature parameters computed from Chamonix Météo France records. We cross here the data on rockfalls with the permafrost distribution model to show that: (i) rockfall occurs mainly over modeled negative MARST (context of permafrost); (ii) simulated warm permafrost areas (> -2°C) are the most affected by instabilities; (iii) as the 1961-1990 period is supposed to be representative of the conditions at depth that are not affected by the climate warming during the two last decades, the latest results are mainly valuable for rockfalls related to pluri-decadal signal; and (iv) the higher (close to 0°C) the MARST, the deeper the detachment (possibly related to the deepening of the permafrost active layer). These results and field observations confirm that warming permafrost corresponds to the main required configuration for rockfall triggering at high elevation. In addition, we show that rockfalls for which ice observed in their scar

  5. New radiocarbon chronology of a late Holocene landslide event in the Mont Blanc massif, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdas, Irka; Sojc, Ursula; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Akçar, Naki; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Ferret valley Arp Nouva peat bog located in the Mont Blanc massif was critically evaluated since previously published radiocarbon dates have led to controversial conclusions on the formation of the swamp. Radiocarbon dating of roots from three pits of up to 1 m depth was applied to discuss the question whether the historical documented rock avalanche occurring in AD 1717 overran the peat bog or formed it at a later stage. Our results indicate that the rock avalanche formed the Arp Nouva peat bog by downstream blockage of the Bellecombe torrent. Furthermore, careful sample preparation with consequent separation of roots from the bulk peat sample provides possible explanation for the too old 14C ages of bulk peat samples dated previously (Deline and Kirkbride, 2009 and references therein). This work demonstrates that a combined geomorphological and geochronological approach is the most reliable way to reconstruct landscape evolution, especially in light of apparent chronological problems. The key to successful 14C dating is a careful sample selection and the identification of material that might be not ideal for chronological reconstructions. References Deline, Philip, and Martin P. Kirkbride. "Rock avalanches on a glacier and morainic complex in Haut Val Ferret (Mont Blanc Massif, Italy)".Geomorphology 103 (2009): 80-92.

  6. Inactive dry yeast application on grapes modify Sauvignon Blanc wine aroma.

    PubMed

    Šuklje, Katja; Antalick, Guillaume; Buica, Astrid; Coetzee, Zelmari A; Brand, Jeanne; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Vivier, Melané A

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the potential to improve wine aroma by applying two inactive dry yeast products (IDYs) at the onset of ripening on Sauvignon Blanc grapes. Both products led to increased reduced glutathione concentrations in the grape juice and corresponding wines, as well as differences in individual higher alcohol acetates (HAAs) and ethyl esters of straight chain fatty acids (EEFAs) at the end of fermentation. After two months of storage, a significantly slower decrease of EEFAs and to a lesser extent of HAAs was found for wines made from grapes with IDY applications. These wines also resulted in significantly slower synthesis of ethyl esters of branched acids, whereas varietal thiols were altered in a product-specific manner. The modifications in the wine chemical composition were also sensorially corroborated. This study showed that vineyard additions of IDY products directly on the grapes at the onset of ripening have a subsequent benefit to the production and preservation of aroma in wines. PMID:26675843

  7. Pre-fermentation fining effects on the aroma chemistry of Marlborough Sauvignon blanc press fractions.

    PubMed

    Parish, Katie J; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Bouda, Flo; Klaere, Steffen; Fedrizzi, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    In the wine industry, fining agents are commonly used with many choices now commercially available. Here the influence of pre-fermentation fining on wine aroma chemistry has been explored. Free run and press fraction Sauvignon blanc juices from two vineyards were fined using gelatin, activated carbon, polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) and a combination agent which included bentonite, PVPP and isinglass. Over thirty aroma compounds were quantified in the experimental wines. Results showed that activated carbon fining led to a significant (p<0.05) concentration decrease of hexan-1-ol and linalool in the experimental wines when compared to a control, consistent across all vineyard and fraction combinations. Other aroma compounds were also influenced by fining agent, even if vineyards and press fractions played a crucial role. This study confirmed that fining agents used pre-fermentation can influence wine aroma profiles and therefore needs specific tailoring addressing style and origin of grape. PMID:27132857

  8. Regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) to save water and improve Sauvignon Blanc quality?

    PubMed

    Greven, M; Green, S; Neal, S; Clothier, B; Neal, M; Dryden, G; Davidson, P

    2005-01-01

    With a fast change of land use in Marlborough from extensive pastoral farming to intensive irrigated viticulture, a need has risen to investigate the sustainable use of the available water. In 2001 a 5 ha irrigation research project was installed in a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc vineyard. Irrigation treatments installed were control (compensate 100% for crop evapotranspiration (ET(O)), 80%, 70% and 60% of ET(O). During the two years that the Regulated Deficit Irrigation (RDI) trial has run so far, very different climatic conditions created much greater differences in yield and vegetative growth, than up to 40% reduction in irrigation, none of which were significant. The use of sap flow in the vines has been fine-tuned and is now giving reliable results on which to base vine water need. PMID:15771094

  9. Grape cluster microclimate influences the aroma composition of Sauvignon blanc wine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Damian; Grose, Claire; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Stuart, Lily; Albright, Abby; McLachlan, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    New Zealand Sauvignon blanc (SB) wines are characterised by a distinctive combination of tropical-fruity and green-herbaceous aromatic compounds. The influence of sunlight exposure of grape clusters on juice and wine composition was investigated, with the aim of manipulating aromatic compounds in SB wine. In the absence of basal leaf removal SB clusters naturally exposed to sunlight were riper than shaded clusters, evidenced by higher total soluble solids (TSS) and proline, and lower malic acid, 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine (IBMP) and arginine. Volatile thiols in wines did not differ between shaded and exposed clusters. At equivalent TSS, cluster exposure had little or no effect on malic acid concentration. Conversely, wine from shaded clusters had almost double the IBMP concentration of wine from exposed clusters at equivalent TSS. The effects on SB juice and wine composition of natural variations in cluster microclimate are not comparable with the effects of cluster exposure created through leaf removal. PMID:27211692

  10. Heteromeric MT1/MT2 Melatonin Receptors Modulate Photoreceptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Kenkichi; Benleulmi-Chaachoua, Abla; Journé, Anne-Sophie; Kamal, Maud; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Dussaud, Sébastien; Gbahou, Florence; Yettou, Katia; Liu, Cuimei; Contreras-Alcantara, Susana; Jockers, Ralf; Tosini, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The formation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers elicits signaling diversification and holds great promise for improved drug selectivity. Most studies have been conducted in heterologous expression systems; however, in vivo validation is missing from most cases thus questioning the physiological significance of GPCR heteromerization. Melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors have been shown to exist as homo- and heteromers in vitro. We show here that the effect of melatonin on rod photoreceptor light sensitivity is mediated by melatonin MT1/MT2 receptor heteromers. This effect involves activation of the heteromer-specific PLC/PKC pathway and is abolished in MT1−/− and MT2−/− mice as well as in mice overexpressing a non-functional MT2 receptor mutant that competes with the formation of functional MT1/MT2 heteromers in photoreceptor cells. This study establishes the essential role of melatonin receptor heteromers in retinal function and supports the physiological importance of GPCR heteromerization. Finally, our work may have important therapeutic implications, as the heteromer complex may provide a unique pharmacological target to improve photoreceptor functioning and to extend the viability of photoreceptors during aging. PMID:24106342

  11. The use of ground based photogrammetry for the monitoring of seasonal movement of a glacier: the case study of Planpincieux Glacier, Grandes Jorasses massif, Mont Blanc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordan, Daniele; Dell'Anese, Federico; Allasia, Paolo; Vagliasindi, Marco; Motta, Elena

    2016-04-01

    In September 2013, an experimental low cost monitoring station has been installed on the top of Mt. de La Saxe (Val Ferret, Aosta Valley, NW of Italy) to monitor the Planpincieux Glacier, located on the Italian side of Mont Blanc Massif. This system is based on two commercial APS-C DSLR cameras equipped with a 297 mm and 120 mm optical zoom respectively. Every hour cameras automatically acquire pictures of the lower part of the glacier, which showed to be the most active. The available dataset is analyzed using both change-detection and pixel-offset techniques, to detect the main surface changes over time, as well as to retrieve quantitative measurements of the glacier displacements. The system is able to work throughout the year. The available dataset has been used to analyze the daily evolution of the lower part of the glacier over the May-November period (when the glacier is free from snow) both in 2014 and 2015. The pixel-offset approach allows to measure the displacement of different parts of the glacier and to describe its seasonal evolution. Furthermore, change detection algorithm allows highlighting sudden changes of the scene, usually due to icefalls. The available dataset shows that the displacement rate of the glacier increases during the warm season, that in 2014 it was higher than in 2015, and that it was distributed in a different way. Actually, in 2015, the maximum rate was reached in August, whereas in 2014 the measured summer velocity was lower but it lasted over the months of July, August and September. The results have been validated using different ground based SARs, both in 2014 and 2015. Here we present the results of a three years monitoring, demonstrating the efficiency of pixel-offset and change-detection techniques for contactless monitoring of unreachable glacier surfaces. Furthermore, we present cross-analysis, considering displacements vs. weather measurements, in order to understand glaciers dynamics.

  12. New structural field data on the timing and kinematics of deformation and exhumation of the Mont Blanc massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Daniel; Mancktelow, Neil

    2010-05-01

    The Mont Blanc massif is one of the external crystalline massifs, which represent the basement of the former European continental margin and therefore belong to the Helvetic domain. It mainly consists of polymetamorphic Late Proterozoic to Early Paleozoic gneisses intruded by the Variscan Mont Blanc granite (Von Raumer et al. 1993). The timing and kinematics of deformation and exhumation of the Mont Blanc massif is a controversial topic and various models have been proposed. Low-temperature thermochronology studies provide an extensive data set for estimating exhumation rates in Neogene times (e.g. Seward & Mancktelow 1994; Leloup et al. 2005; Glotzbach et al. 2008), but detailed structural studies to critically asses and constrain the proposed kinematic models are largely lacking. Glotzbach et al. (2008) show that the exhumation is episodic, with rates changing from relatively fast (~2.5 km/Ma before 6 Ma) to a slow phase (<0.5 km/Ma between 6 and 3.5 Ma), in turn followed by acceleration to ~1 km/Ma after 3 Ma. Our study presents new structural data from the south-eastern side of the Mont Blanc massif and the adjacent sediments and addresses the tectonic evolution and late stage exhumation history of the massif. The goal is to assess the importance of tectonics versus climate for controlling exhumation, as well as to establish the overall geometry of uplift (2D pop-up, 3D dextral transpressive model, large scale backfolding). A major back-thrust was proposed by previous authors ("Mont Blanc back-thrust", e.g. Leloup et al. 2005, Rolland et al. 2007), characterized as a relatively steeply north-west dipping thrust bringing the Mont Blanc basement back over the tectonostratigraphically higher Helvetic and Ultrahelvetic metasediments. 40Ar¬-39Ar dating of white micas interpreted to have grown during movement on the Mont Blanc back-thrust indicates an initiation of movement around 16 Ma (Rolland et al. 2007). Leloup et al. (2005) suggest a reactivation of this

  13. Mt. Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER image of Mt. Vesuvius Italy was acquired September 26, 2000, and covers an area of 36 by 45 km. Vesuvius overlooks the city of Naples and the Bay of Naples in central Italy. In 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted cataclysmically, burying all of the surrounding cites with up to 30 m of ash. The towns of Pompeii and Herculanaeum were rediscovered in the 18th century, and excavated in the 20th century. They provide a snapshot of Roman life from 2000 years ago: perfectly preserved are wooden objects, food items, and the casts of hundreds of victims. Vesuvius is intensively monitored for potential signs of unrest that could signal the beginning of another eruption. The image is centered at 40.8 degrees north latitude, 14.4 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Mt. St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Movie

    This 3-D anaglyph image of Mt. St. Helens volcano combines the nadir-looking and back-looking band 3 images of ASTER. To view the image in stereo, you will need blue-red glasses. Make sure to look through the red lens with your left eye. Figure 1: This ASTER image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The image is centered at 46.2 degrees north latitude, 122.2 degrees west longitude.

    Movie: The simulated fly-over was produced by draping ASTER visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's 3-D stereo bands. The color was computer enhanced to create a natural color image, where the vegetation appears green. The topography has been exaggerated 2 times to enhance the appearance of the relief.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  15. Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Sunday, November 3, 2002, Mt. Etna's ash-laden plume was imaged by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. The plume is seen blowing toward the south-southeast, over the city and airport of Catania, Sicily. The previous day, the plume was blowing toward the northwest, and posed no hazard to Catania. The current eruption of Mt. Etna, Europe's most active volcano, began on October 27. These sorts of observations from space may help civil defense authorities mitigate hazards from active eruptions. Space data may also help scientists evaluate the behavior and effects volcanic eruptions have on our global climate system.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science

  16. Chemical and sensory effects of storing sauvignon Blanc wine in colored bottles under artificial light.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Mella, Alejandro; Flores-Valdivia, Daniela; Laurie, V Felipe; López-Solís, Remigio; Peña-Neira, Álvaro

    2014-07-23

    The chemical and sensory effects of storing Sauvignon Blanc in colored bottles and exposing them to artificial light were examined. The colors of the bottles chosen were Dead Leaf Green, Antique Green, Amber, and Flint. The light was provided by fluorescent tubes with a regime of 16 h of exposure during 8 months of storage. The results indicated that the wine's chemical composition was affected by the type of bottle used. The Flint bottle presented the lowest concentration of total phenols. Yellow coloration was not dependent on the bottle color, as the wine in darker bottles (Amber, Antique Green, and Dead Leaf Green) had considerably more yellow color development than the wine in clear bottles. With regard to the sensory analyses performed, a trend showing an increase in color intensity and a decrease in overall aromas depending on the bottle color was observed. The wine's aromatic description changed significantly during its storage under artificial light conditions, demonstrating a decrease in vegetal aromas and an increase in citrus and tropical flavors that was dependent on the bottle color. PMID:24983902

  17. Mountaineering experience decreases the net oxygen cost of climbing Mont Blanc (4,808 m).

    PubMed

    Billat, Veronique L; Dupré, Maryse; Karp, Jason R; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mountaineering experience decreases the net oxygen cost of uphill walking (OCw) on steep mountain trails and in ice and snow conditions. OCw was measured during an ascent of Mont Blanc in eight experienced alpinists and eight non-alpinists who were matched for sex (4 + 4) and low-altitude aerobic power (V(O)(2)(max) 50-55 ml kg(-1) min(-1)). Subjects carried a breath-by-breath gas exchange analyzer and a GPS. V(O)(2)(max) at altitude was estimated from measured low-altitude V(O)(2)(max) using Bassett's equation to calculate fractional use of V(O)(2)(max) during the ascent (FV(O)(2)(max)). OCw was calculated as the difference between V(O)(2) while climbing minus resting V(O)(2). At all elevations, Alpinists exhibited a lower OCw (P < 0.01). In all subjects, OCw increased when encountering ice and snow conditions. FV(O)(2)(max) remained stable around 75% at all elevations independent of experience or sex. In conclusion, the OCw is lower in experienced mountaineers compared to non-experienced subjects, and increases when going from steep rocky mountain terrain to ice and snow conditions, independent of mountaineering experience or sex. PMID:20033703

  18. The effect of linoleic acid on the Sauvignon blanc fermentation by different wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Casu, Francesca; Pinu, Farhana R; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Greenwood, David R; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2016-08-01

    The level of linoleic acid in the Sauvignon blanc (SB) grape juice affects the development of different aroma compounds during fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118, including key varietal thiols such as 3-mercaptohexanol (3MH) and 3-mercaptohexyl acetate (3MHA). However, it is still unknown if linoleic acid would affect in a similar way other commonly used S. cerevisiae wine strains. Here we investigated the effect of grape juice linoleic acid on the development of aroma compounds and other metabolites of SB wines using different wine yeast strains: EC1118, AWRI796 and VIN13. Linoleic acid clearly affected the levels of acetylated aroma compounds, several amino acids, and antioxidant molecules, independent of yeast strain, but the production of 3MH was affected by linoleic acid in a strain-specific manner. Moreover, the supplementation of deuterium-labelled 3MH also affected the production of varietal thiols in a strain-specific way. Linoleic acid reduced the acetylation process probably by inhibiting an acetyltransferase, an effect that was independent of the yeast strain. However, regulation of the 3MH biosynthesis is strain-specific, which suggests a mindful consideration not only towards the wine yeast but also to the linoleic acid concentration in the grape juice in order to obtain the desired wine aroma characteristics. PMID:27364827

  19. Influence of grape-harvesting steps on varietal thiol aromas in Sauvignon blanc wines.

    PubMed

    Allen, Thomas; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Girault, Melanie; Butler, Paul; Logan, Gerard; Jouanneau, Sara; Nicolau, Laura; Kilmartin, Paul A

    2011-10-12

    The intense tropical fruit aroma of Sauvignon blanc wines has been associated with the varietal thiols 3-mercaptohexanol (3MH), derived from odorless precursors in the grape, and 3-mercaptohexyl acetate (3MHA), arising from 3MH during fermentation. Grapes and juice were sourced from five locations in Marlborough, New Zealand, taking hand-picked grapes and samples at four stages during the mechanical harvesting process and pressing, which were then fermented in replicated 750 mL bottles. With each set of juices, the highest concentrations of Cys-3MH and Glut-3MH were found in the juices pressed to 1 bar, but these juices produced wines with lower 3MH and 3MHA concentrations. With three of the juices, there was an increase in varietal thiol content for wines made from juices that had been machine harvested compared to the hand-picked samples, which matched earlier findings of lower 3MH and 3MHA levels in wines made from hand-picked grapes. Juices that were more oxidized, and which showed a higher absorbance at 420 nm, were found to produce wines with lower 3MH and 3MHA concentrations. PMID:21854044

  20. Mt. Trumbull and Mt. Logan wilderness management plan. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The plan provides management guidance for the Mt. Trumbull and Mt. Logan Wildernesses. Because these two areas have very similar resource characteristics and management issues, they are being managed under one plan. Throughout the development of this plan, the Arizona Wilderness Act of 1984 and the Wilderness Act of 1964 are used to guide the development of objectives, policies and the kind, type and method of management actions needed to maintain or enhance the wilderness resources and values.

  1. MT1 and MT2 Melatonin Receptors: A Therapeutic Perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiabei; Clough, Shannon J; Hutchinson, Anthony J; Adamah-Biassi, Ekue B; Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin, or 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is synthesized and released by the pineal gland and locally in the retina following a circadian rhythm, with low levels during the day and elevated levels at night. Melatonin activates two high-affinity G protein-coupled receptors, termed MT1 and MT2, to exert beneficial actions in sleep and circadian abnormality, mood disorders, learning and memory, neuroprotection, drug abuse, and cancer. Progress in understanding the role of melatonin receptors in the modulation of sleep and circadian rhythms has led to the discovery of a novel class of melatonin agonists for treating insomnia, circadian rhythms, mood disorders, and cancer. This review describes the pharmacological properties of a slow-release melatonin preparation (i.e., Circadin®) and synthetic ligands (i.e., agomelatine, ramelteon, tasimelteon), with emphasis on identifying specific therapeutic effects mediated through MT1 and MT2 receptor activation. Discovery of selective ligands targeting the MT1 or the MT2 melatonin receptors may promote the development of novel and more efficacious therapeutic agents. PMID:26514204

  2. Mt. Etna Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1: Vis/NIR Image CloseupFigure 2: Difference Image

    October 2002 Mt. Etna, a volcano on the island of Sicily, erupted on October 26, 2002. Preliminary analysis of data taken by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on October 28 shows the instrument can provide an excellent means to study the evolution and structure of the sulfur dioxide (SO2) plume emitted from volcanoes. These data also demonstrate that AIRS can be used to obtain the total mass of SO2 injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic event, information that may help us to better understand these dangerous natural occurrences in the future.

    This image was made from a sensor on the AIRS instrument that is sensitive to the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. The visible/near infrared data show the smoke plume from Mt. Etna. The view is of Europe and the central Mediterranean with Italy in the center. Since the visible/near infrared sensor on AIRS is sensitive to wavelengths that are different than the human eye, vegetated regions appear red (compare the red color of Europe with the tan desert of North Africa in the lower left). Figure 1 is a closer view of Sicily and shows a long, brownish smoke plume extending across the Mediterranean to Africa. This is consistent with the enhanced feature in the difference image in Figure 2 and helps validate the information inferred from that image.

    Figure 2 clearly shows the SO2 plume. This image was created by comparing data taken at two different frequencies, or channels, and creating one image that highlights the differences between these two channels. Both channels are sensitive to water vapor, but one of the channels is also sensitive to SO2. By subtracting out the common water vapor signal in both channels, the SO2 feature remains and shows up as an enhancement in the difference image.

    The

  3. Rates of high altitude rock wall erosion: four years of laserscanning in the Mont Blanc massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, L.; Deline, P.; Jaillet, S.

    2009-04-01

    Many rockfalls detach from steep high-Alpine rock walls, and were especially frequent during the hot summer of 2003 in the Alps. It is hypothesized that an observed increase of high mountain rock wall instability is related to permafrost changes. Nevertheless, because of a lack of systematic observations, magnitude and frequency of high mountain rock-slope instabilities remain poorly known up to now. As a part of the French-Italian PERMAdataROC project (2005-2008) and the EU-funded transalpine PermaNET project (2008-2011), we use the Terrestrial Laserscanning method for remote monitoring of geomorphological activity from the ground, focusing on seven steep high-Alpine rock walls (elevation: 3000-4500 m a.s.l.) affected by permafrost in the Mont-Blanc massif. Here we present the methodology to get high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) of rock walls surveyed annually by laserscanning and to make diachronic comparisons of those DEM. This work has been carried out using a ground-based LiDAR Optech ILRIS-3D, working up to 800 m in the best conditions of surface reflectivity. We present the key results of this first quantification of high altitude rock wall instability, based on the first four years of measurement at Les Drus, Aiguille du Midi, Grand Flambeau, Aiguille d'Entrèves, Tour Ronde, Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey and Piliers de Freiney - Grand Pilier d'Angle. The main instabilities affected the West Face of Les Drus (546 m3 of rock detached between October 2005 and October 2006), the Tour Ronde East Face (536 m3 between 2005 and 2006, and 266 m3 between 2007 and 2008) and the close Freshfield ridge (448 m3 between 2006 and 2007). The high resolution of the DEM also allows performing remote geomechanical characterization of the rock faces. First results about survey of fractures will be also present.

  4. Repeated Holocene rock avalanches onto the Brenva Glacier, Mont Blanc massif, Italy: A chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deline, Philip; Akçar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kubik, Peter W.

    2015-10-01

    Infrequent rock avalanches (volume ≥1 Mm3) are long-runout processes, especially when travelling onto a glacier, that may threaten populated mountain valleys. Rock avalanches also have strong implications are for relief generation and destruction though time. Both consequences make reconstruction and dating of past events crucial, but dense clusters of events documented in one basin that may improve our knowledge of rock-avalanche frequency and triggering are very rare. Here we propose a chronology of seven of the rock-ice avalanches that affected a steep glacier basin on the southeast side of the Mont Blanc during the late Holocene. A geomorphological study of the runout deposits on the valley floor and the opposite side was combined with the analysis of historical sources and the use of absolute and relative dating methods, especially surface exposure dating with cosmogenic nuclides of 18 granite boulders from two deposits. These rock-ice avalanches are dated AD 1997 and 1920, with a rock volume in the range 2.4-3.6 and 2 × 106 m3, respectively; AD 1767, with a slightly shorter runout; AD 1000-1200, with a longer runout; c. AD 500, the runout of which is uncertain; c. 2500 BP, the determination of which is indirect; and c. 3500 years, with the longest runout. There is no distinct relationship between climatic periods and occurrence of these rock avalanches. Even for the two best documented ones, modelling suggests that the 1997 scar was characterized by a permafrost close to 0 °C, whereas in contrast, the 1920 scar was on the contrary located in cold permafrost.

  5. Episodic exhumation and relief growth in the Mont Blanc massif, Western Alps from numerical modelling of thermochronology data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzbach, C.; van der Beek, P. A.; Spiegel, C.

    2011-04-01

    The Pliocene-Quaternary exhumational and topographic evolution of the European Alps and its potential climatic and tectonic controls remain a subject of controversy. Here, we apply inverse numerical thermal-kinematic modelling to a spatially dense thermochronological dataset (apatite fission-track and (U-Th)/He) of both tunnel and surface samples across the Mont Blanc massif in the Western Alps, complemented by new zircon fission-track data, in order to better quantify its Neogene exhumation and relief history. Age-elevation relationships and modelling results show that an episodic exhumation scenario best fits the data. Initiation of exhumation in the Mont Blanc massif at 22 ± 2 Ma with a rate of 0.8 ± 0.15 km/Myr is probably related to NW-directed thrusting during nappe emplacement. Exhumation rates decrease at 6 ± 2 Ma to values of 0.15 ± 0.65 km/Myr, which we interpret to be the result of a general decrease in convergence rates and/or extensive exposure of less erodible crystalline basement rocks from below more easily erodible Mesozoic sediments. Finally, local exhumation rates increase up to 2.0 ± 0.6 km/Myr at 1.7 ± 0.8 Ma. Modelling shows that this recent increase in local exhumation can be explained by valley incision and the associated increase in relief at 0.9 ± 0.8 Ma, leading to erosional unloading, isostatic rebound and additional rock uplift and exhumation. Given the lack of tectonic activity as evidenced by constant thermochronological ages along the tunnel transect, we suggest that the final increase in exhumation and relief in the Mont Blanc massif is the result of climate change, with the initiation of mid-Pleistocene glaciations leading to rapid valley incision and related local exhumation.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Sauvignon Blanc Grape Skin, Pulp and Seed and Relative Quantification of Pathogenesis-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Harrison, Roland; Morton, James; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) and chitinases are the main constituents of so-called protein hazes which can form in finished white wine and which is a great concern of winemakers. These soluble pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins are extracted from grape berries. However, their distribution in different grape tissues is not well documented. In this study, proteins were first separately extracted from the skin, pulp and seed of Sauvignon Blanc grapes, followed by trypsin digestion and analysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Proteins identified included 75 proteins from Sauvignon Blanc grape skin, 63 from grape pulp and 35 from grape seed, mostly functionally classified as associated with metabolism and energy. Some were present exclusively in specific grape tissues; for example, proteins involved in photosynthesis were only detected in grape skin and proteins found in alcoholic fermentation were only detected in grape pulp. Moreover, proteins identified in grape seed were less diverse than those identified in grape skin and pulp. TLPs and chitinases were identified in both Sauvignon Blanc grape skin and pulp, but not in the seed. To relatively quantify the PR proteins, the protein extracts of grape tissues were seperated by HPLC first and then analysed by SDS-PAGE. The results showed that the protein fractions eluted at 9.3 min and 19.2 min under the chromatographic conditions of this study confirmed that these corresponded to TLPs and chitinases seperately. Thus, the relative quantification of TLPs and chitinases in protein extracts was carried out by comparing the area of corresponding peaks against the area of a thamautin standard. The results presented in this study clearly demonstrated the distribution of haze-forming PR proteins in grape berries, and the relative quantification of TLPs and chitinases could be applied in fast tracking of changes in PR proteins during grape growth and determination of PR

  7. Effect of skin contact and pressure on the composition of Sauvignon Blanc must.

    PubMed

    Maggu, Manu; Winz, Robert; Kilmartin, Paul A; Trought, Michael C T; Nicolau, Laura

    2007-12-12

    Early white winemaking operations are known to affect the extraction of grape skin compounds into the juice fraction, which will dictate their concentration in the resulting wine. Grape skin contact and the amount of pressure applied during grape pressing affect the extraction of varietal aromas located in the skins. Compounds such as the polyphenols and glutathione, with antioxidant properties involved in juice oxidation processes and white wine stability, are also affected. The present study evaluates how grape skin contact and the amount of pressure applied during grape pressing affect the levels of S-(3-hexan-l-ol)cysteine (3MH-S-cys, a key grape-derived precursor to the volatile thiol 3-mercapto-hexanol (3MH), which is reminiscent of passion fruit aroma); 2-methoxy-3-isobutylpyrazine (IBMP, with a capsicum-like descriptor); phenolic compounds; and glutathione in Sauvignon Blanc juice. The study was conducted using grapes obtained from commercial Marlborough (New Zealand) vineyards, using both commercial and laboratory grape-processing procedures. Immobilized metal ion chromatography was used to isolate the 3MH- S-cys precursor from the juices. The isolated precursor was then volatilized by trimethylsilylation and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). IBMP was analyzed by GC/MS after solvent extraction, and a high-performance liquid chromatography method was used for the quantification of phenolic compounds and glutathione. 3MH- S-cys levels were seen to increase in juice fractions obtained from a winery press operating at higher pressures. The increase was attributed to the cumulative effect of longer skin contact time and the amount of pressure applied. The highly water-soluble IBMP was less affected by the amount of pressure applied during commercial grape pressing. Additional information was generated by the specific assessment of skin contact and applied pressure during grape pressing in a laboratory trial. In this trial, a long (32

  8. Mt. SAC Research Briefs, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mt. SAC Research Briefs, 2000

    2000-01-01

    These Research Briefs examine Mt. San Antonio College District's (MSAC's) (California) enrollment trends. Over the last few years, the district has drawn a large number of students from surrounding areas; however, there are concerns as to whether this fact will remain the same as new forms of educational techniques such as distance education and…

  9. Patterns in Seismicity at Mt St Helens and Mt Unzen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Oliver; De Angelis, Silvio; Lavallee, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Cyclic behaviour on a range of timescales is a well-documented feature of many dome-forming volcanoes. Previous work on Soufrière Hills volcano (Montserrat) and Volcán de Colima (Mexico) revealed broad-scale similarities in behaviour implying the potential to develop general physical models of sub-surface processes [1]. Using volcano-seismic data from Mt St Helens (USA) and Mt Unzen (Japan) this study explores parallels in long-term behaviour of seismicity at two dome-forming systems. Within the last twenty years both systems underwent extended dome-forming episodes accompanied by large Vulcanian explosions or dome collapses. This study uses a suite of quantitative and analytical techniques which can highlight differences or similarities in volcano seismic behaviour, and compare the behaviour to changes in activity during the eruptive episodes. Seismic events were automatically detected and characterized on a single short-period seismometer station located 1.5km from the 2004-2008 vent at Mt St Helens. A total of 714 826 individual events were identified from continuous recording of seismic data from 22 October 2004 to 28 February 2006 (average 60.2 events per hour) using a short-term/long-term average algorithm. An equivalent count will be produced from seismometer recordings over the later stages of the 1991-1995 eruption at MT Unzen. The event count time-series from Mt St Helens is then analysed using Multi-taper Method and the Short-Term Fourier Transform to explore temporal variations in activity. Preliminary analysis of seismicity from Mt St Helens suggests cyclic behaviour of subannual timescale, similar to that described at Volcán de Colima and Soufrière Hills volcano [1]. Frequency Index and waveform correlation tools will be implemented to analyse changes in the frequency content of the seismicity and to explore their relations to different phases of activity at the volcano. A single station approach is used to gain a fine-scale view of variations in

  10. Urban Sociology in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amiot, Michel

    1986-01-01

    Divides the history of urban sociology in France into three periods: (1) functionalism, which lasted from 1910 until the 1960s, (2) neo-Marxist socioeconomics lasting from 1968 until 1979, and (3) anthropological approach which is still dominant. Reviews theoretical perspectives and research characteristic of each period. (JDH)

  11. Industrial Psychology in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Montmollin, Maurice

    1977-01-01

    The current status of French industrial psychology is evaluated. Within the social and economic context of contemporary France, varying ideologies and scarce resources have created a gap between applied and academic industrial psychology. Personnel practices and systems and organizational research are noted. (Editor)

  12. Melanesian mtDNA Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Friedlaender, Jonathan S.; Friedlaender, Françoise R.; Hodgson, Jason A.; Stoltz, Matthew; Koki, George; Horvat, Gisele; Zhadanov, Sergey; Schurr, Theodore G.; Merriwether, D. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Melanesian populations are known for their diversity, but it has been hard to grasp the pattern of the variation or its underlying dynamic. Using 1,223 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from hypervariable regions 1 and 2 (HVR1 and HVR2) from 32 populations, we found the among-group variation is structured by island, island size, and also by language affiliation. The more isolated inland Papuan-speaking groups on the largest islands have the greatest distinctions, while shore dwelling populations are considerably less diverse (at the same time, within-group haplotype diversity is less in the most isolated groups). Persistent differences between shore and inland groups in effective population sizes and marital migration rates probably cause these differences. We also add 16 whole sequences to the Melanesian mtDNA phylogenies. We identify the likely origins of a number of the haplogroups and ancient branches in specific islands, point to some ancient mtDNA connections between Near Oceania and Australia, and show additional Holocene connections between Island Southeast Asia/Taiwan and Island Melanesia with branches of haplogroup E. Coalescence estimates based on synonymous transitions in the coding region suggest an initial settlement and expansion in the region at ∼30–50,000 years before present (YBP), and a second important expansion from Island Southeast Asia/Taiwan during the interval ∼3,500–8,000 YBP. However, there are some important variance components in molecular dating that have been overlooked, and the specific nature of ancestral (maternal) Austronesian influence in this region remains unresolved. PMID:17327912

  13. Onboard Photo of Mt. Everest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, Expedition Four flight engineer, was delighted in capturing this image of Mt. Everest in the Himalayan Range from aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The mountain is near frame center. Because the photo was taken close to orbital sunrise, the low sun angle gave tremendous relief to the mountains. Named for Sir George Everest, the British surveyor-general of India, Mount Everest is the tallest point on earth. Standing 29,028 feet tall, it is 5 1/2 miles above sea level. Mount Everest is located half in Nepal and half in Tibet.

  14. Vulnerability of settlements around Mt. Cameroon volcano, Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zogning, Appolinaire; Spinetti, Claudia; Ngouanet, Chretien; Tchoudam, David; Kouokam, Emmanuel; Thierry, Pierre; Bignami, Christian; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria; Ilaria Pannaccione Apa, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Located at the bottom of the Gulf of Guinea, Cameroon is exposed to a large variety of natural hazards, including volcanism. Most of the hazard are concentrated around the active volcano Mt. Cameroon which combines effusive and explosive types of activity. The threatened stakes are numerous and different exposed: people, settlements, industrial plantations, petrol refinery and many other factories and infrastructures. Until 2005, no risk management plans has been available. In 2006, the French Embassy in Cameroon, within the framework of a financial convention between Cameroon and France, put in place the GRINP (Management of Natural Risks and Civil Protection) project whose objective was to reinforce the capacity of Cameroon's civil protection department and thus, contribute to the improvement of the security of the population faced with catastrophes. The objective was to realize a Risk Prevention Plan at a local council scale, and taking into consideration the specific natural risks of each zone. The general objective of the RPP was to clearly draw land use maps for risks zones, showing the overlay of stakes with risk of different intensities. In 2008 European Commission funded the Mia-Vita project (Mitigating and Assessing Volcanic Impacts on Terrain and human Activities). The aim of the project is to improve the crisis management capabilities based on monitoring and early warning systems and secure communications; reduction of people's vulnerability and development of recovering capabilities after an event occurs for both local communities and ecological systems. Keyword: natural hazards, Mt. Cameroon, vulnerability, risk prevention plan

  15. Thermal and structural evolution of the external Western Alps: Insights from (U-Th-Sm)/He thermochronology and RSCM thermometry in the Aiguilles Rouges/Mont Blanc massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutoux, A.; Bellahsen, N.; Nanni, U.; Pik, R.; Verlaguet, A.; Rolland, Y.; Lacombe, O.

    2016-06-01

    In the Western Alps, the External Crystalline Massifs (ECM) are key places to investigate the kinematics and thermal structure of a collisional crustal wedge, as their paleo-brittle/ductile transition is now exhumed at the surface. New (U-Th-Sm)/He data on zircon and new Raman Spectroscopy on Carbonaceous Material (RSCM) data from the Aiguilles Rouges and the Mont Blanc massifs, coupled to HeFTy thermal modeling, constrain the thermal evolution and exhumation of the massifs. In the cover of the Aiguilles Rouges massif, we found that the maximal temperature was about 320 °C (+/- 25 °C), close to the maximal temperature reached in the cover of the Mont Blanc massif (~ 350 °C +/- 25 °C). We show that, after a fast heating period, the thermal peak lasted 10-15 Myrs in the Mont Blanc massif, and probably 5-10 Myrs in the Aiguilles Rouges massif. This thermal peak is synchronous with crustal shortening documented in the basement. (U-Th-Sm)/He data and thermal modeling point toward a coeval cooling of both massifs, like other ECM, at around 18 Ma +/- 1 Ma. This cooling was related to an exhumation due to the initiation of frontal crustal ramps below the ECM, quite synchronously along the Western Alps arc.

  16. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. PMID:26304179

  17. Pharmacy Education in France

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, Olivier; Ekeland, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    In France, to practice as a pharmacist, one needs a “diplome d'état de Docteur en Pharmacie” This degree is awarded after 6 or 9 years of pharmacy studies, depending on the option chosen by the student. The degree is offered only at universities and is recognized in France as well as throughout the European Union. Each university in France is divided into faculties called Unité de Formation et de Recherche (UFR). There are 24 faculties of pharmacy or UFRs de pharmacie. A national committee develops a pharmacy education program at the national level and each faculty adapts this program according to its specific features and means (eg, faculty, buildings). The number of students accepted in the second year is determined each year by a Government decree (numerus clausus). Successive placements, totalling 62 weeks, progressively familiarize the student with professional practice, and enable him/her to acquire the required competencies, such as drug monitoring and educating and counselling patients. Challenges facing community pharmacies in the next 10 years are patient education, home health care, and orthopaedics; in hospital pharmacies, empowering pharmacists to supervise and validate all prescriptions; and finally, research in pharmacy practice. PMID:19325952

  18. Incineration of municipal and assimilated wastes in France: assessment of latest energy and material recovery performances.

    PubMed

    Autret, Erwan; Berthier, Francine; Luszezanec, Audrey; Nicolas, Florence

    2007-01-31

    Incineration has an important place in waste management in France. In 2003, around 130 incineration plants have treated 12.6 Mt of non-dangerous waste, mainly composed of household waste (10.8 Mt), non-dangerous waste from industry, business, services (1.0 Mt), sewage sludge (0.2 Mt) or clinical waste (0.1 Mt). The incineration of these wastes generated 3.0 Mt of bottom ash of which 2.3 Mt were used for roads construction and 0.2 Mt of ferrous and non-ferrous metal were recycled. It also produced 2,900,000 MWh of electricity, of which 2,200,000 MWh were sold to Electricité de France (EDF) and 9,100,000 MWh of heat, of which 7,200,000 MWh were sold to private or public users. These French incinerators of non-hazardous waste are currently being thoroughly modernized, thus making possible the consolidation and the enhancement of their environmental and energy performance. This process is related to the implementation of the European Directive 2000/76/CE whose expiration date is 28 December 2005. Upon request of ADEME, the engineering company GIRUS has realised the first technical and economical evaluation of works necessary to bring incinerators into compliance. The financial estimations, carried out in 30 June 2003, show that the investments to be devoted could reach 750 million euros. This assessment shed new light on the situation of non-hazardous waste incinerators, including an identification and a rank ordering for each incinerator of the most frequent and the most complex non-conformities to be solved in term of cost and delay. At last, this assessment gives the solutions for each non-compliance. PMID:16707217

  19. The role of MT2-MMP in cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Emiko; Yana, Ikuo; Fujita, Chisato; Irifune, Aiko; Takeda, Maki; Madachi, Ayako; Mori, Seiji; Hamada, Yoshinosuke; Kawaguchi, Naomasa; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2010-03-05

    The role of MT2-MMP in cancer progression remains to be elucidated in spite of many reports on MT1-MMP. Using a human fibrosarcoma cell, HT1080 and a human gastric cancer cell, TMK-1, endogenous expression of MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP was suppressed by siRNA induction to examine the influence of cancer progression in vitro and in vivo. In HT1080 cells, positive both in MT1-MMP and MT2-MMP, the migration as well as the invasion was impaired by MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression. Also cell proliferation in three dimensional (3D) condition was inhibited by MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression and tumor growth in the nude mice transplanted with tumor cells were reduced either MT1-MMP or MT2-MMP suppression with a prolongation of survival time in vivo. MT2-MMP suppression induces more inhibitory effects on 3D proliferation and in vivo tumor growth than MT1-MMP. On the other hand, TMK-1 cells, negative in MT1-MMP and MMP-2 but positive in MT2-MMP, all the migratory, invasive, and 3D proliferative activities in TMK-1 are decreased only by MT2-MMP suppression. These results indicate MT2-MMP might be involved in the cancer progression more than or equal to MT1-MMP independently of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP.

  20. Yeast genes involved in sulfur and nitrogen metabolism affect the production of volatile thiols from Sauvignon Blanc musts.

    PubMed

    Harsch, Michael J; Gardner, Richard C

    2013-01-01

    Two volatile thiols, 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol (3MH), and 3-mercaptohexyl-acetate (3MHA), reminiscent of grapefruit and passion fruit respectively, are critical varietal aroma compounds in Sauvignon Blanc (SB) wines. These aromatic thiols are not present in the grape juice but are synthesized and released by the yeast during alcoholic fermentation. Single deletion mutants of 67 candidate genes in a laboratory strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were screened using gas chromatography mass spectrometry for their thiol production after fermentation of SB grape juice. None of the deletions abolished production of the two volatile thiols. However, deletion of 17 genes caused increases or decreases in production by as much as twofold. These 17 genes, mostly related to sulfur and nitrogen metabolism in yeast, may act by altering the regulation of the pathway(s) of thiol production or altering substrate supply. Deleting subsets of these genes in a wine yeast strain gave similar results to the laboratory strain for sulfur pathway genes but showed strain differences for genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. The addition of two nitrogen sources, urea and di-ammonium phosphate, as well as two sulfur compounds, cysteine and S-ethyl-L-cysteine, increased 3MH and 3MHA concentrations in the final wines. Collectively these results suggest that sulfur and nitrogen metabolism are important in regulating the synthesis of 3MH and 3MHA during yeast fermentation of grape juice. PMID:22684328

  1. Grapevine Plasticity in Response to an Altered Microclimate: Sauvignon Blanc Modulates Specific Metabolites in Response to Increased Berry Exposure.

    PubMed

    Young, Philip R; Eyeghe-Bickong, Hans A; du Plessis, Kari; Alexandersson, Erik; Jacobson, Dan A; Coetzee, Zelmari; Deloire, Alain; Vivier, Melané A

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the metabolic and physiological impacts of an altered microclimate on quality-associated primary and secondary metabolites in grape (Vitis vinifera) 'Sauvignon Blanc' berries was determined in a high-altitude vineyard. The leaf and lateral shoot removal in the bunch zones altered the microclimate by increasing the exposure of the berries. The physical parameters (berry diameter and weight), primary metabolites (sugars and organic acids), as well as bunch temperature and leaf water potential were predominantly not affected by the treatment. The increased exposure led to higher levels of specific carotenoids and volatile terpenoids in the exposed berries, with earlier berry stages reacting distinctly from the later developmental stages. Plastic/nonplastic metabolite responses could be further classified to identify metabolites that were developmentally controlled and/or responded to the treatment in a predictable fashion (assessed over two consecutive vintages). The study demonstrates that grapevine berries exhibit a degree of plasticity within their secondary metabolites and respond physiologically to the increased exposure by increasing metabolites with potential antioxidant activity. Taken together, the data provide evidence that the underlying physiological responses relate to the maintenance of stress pathways by modulating antioxidant molecules in the berries. PMID:26628747

  2. Effects on 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol precursor concentrations from prolonged storage of Sauvignon blanc grapes prior to crushing and pressing.

    PubMed

    Capone, Dimitra L; Black, Cory A; Jeffery, David W

    2012-04-01

    Formation of wine thiol precursors is a dynamic process, which can be influenced by vineyard and winery processing operations. With the aim of increasing thiol precursor concentrations, a study of the effects of storing machine-harvested Sauvignon blanc grapes prior to crushing and pressing was undertaken on a commercial scale. 3-Mercaptohexan-1-ol (3-MH) precursors, 2-S-glutathionylcaftaric acid (grape reaction product, GRP), glutathione (GSH) and a number of C6 compounds were assessed at several time points during the experiment. The concentration of the cysteine precursor to 3-MH doubled within 8 h and tripled after 30 h while the GSH and cysteinylglycine precursors increased in concentration roughly 1.5 times. (E)-2-Hexenal and GSH levels decreased as thiol precursors, GRP and C6 alcohols increased during storage. Principal component analysis revealed that precursors contributed to most of the variation within the samples over the storage period, with additional influence, primarily from GSH and GRP, as well as (E)-2-hexenal and (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol. Early storage time points were associated with higher concentrations of GSH and some unsaturated C6 compounds while longer storage times were most closely associated with higher thiol precursor and GRP concentrations. This study provides a detailed overview of interactions related to thiol precursor formation on a commercial scale and highlights the ability to manipulate precursor concentrations prior to grape crushing. PMID:22435800

  3. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. 'Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption,' said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption.

    In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16

  4. Petroleum statistics in France

    SciTech Connect

    De Saint Germain, H.; Lamiraux, C.

    1995-08-01

    33 oil companies, including Elf, Exxon, Agip, Conoco as well as Coparex, Enron, Hadson, Midland, Hunt, Canyon and Union Texas are present in oil and gas exploration and production in France. The production of oil and gas in France amounts to some 60,000 bopd of oil and 350 MMcfpd of marketed natural gas each year, which still accounts for 3.5% and 10% for French domestic needs, respectively. To date, 166 fields have been discovered, representing a total reserve of 3 billion bbl of crude oil and 13 trillion cf of raw gas. These fields are concentrated in two major onshore sedimentary basins of Mesozoic age, which are the Aquitaine basin and the Paris basin. The Aquitaine basin should be subdivided into two distinct domains: The Parentis basin where the largest field Parentis was discovered in 1954 with still production of about 3700 bopd of oil and where Les Arbouslers field, discovered at the end of 1991, is currently producing about 10,000 bopd of oil. The northern Pyrenees and their foreland, where the Lacq field, discovered in 1951, has produced about 7.7 tcf of gas since 1957, and is still producing 138 MMcfpd. In the Paris basin, the two large oil fields are Villeperclue discovered in 1982 by Triton and Total, and Chaunoy, discovered in 1983 by Essorep, which are still producing about 10,000 and 15,000 bopd, respectively. The last significantly sized discovery occurred in 1990 with Itteville by Elf Aquitaine which is currently producing 4,200 bopd. The poster shows statistical data related to the past 20 years of oil and gas exploration and production in France.

  5. European security and France

    SciTech Connect

    deRose, A.

    1985-01-01

    A French authority on security argues for new European initiatives in the face of the ''danger represented by Soviet military power deployed in support of an imperialistic ideology.'' His proposals, including the strengthening of conventional forces without abandoning the option of the first use of nuclear weapons, are meant to give substance to President Mitterrand's declaration in 1983: ''The European nations now need to realize that their defense is also their responsibility....'' A part of the increasingly important debate in France over defense policy in Europe.

  6. Breeder reactors in France

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, C.P.

    1980-04-11

    France relies on nuclear power as an important part of her energy program. Anticipating problems with the availability of natural uranium before the year 2020, the French have been pursuing a three-stage program of development of breeder reactors. The third reactor in this program, the near-commercial plant Super Phenix Mark I, is expected to reach power operation in 1983. Although there are still some uncertainties, particularly about the date when the breeder will become competitive with other energy sources, the outlook is considered favorable and preliminary designs for commercial plants are under way.

  7. Mt. Pinatubo, Phillippines - Perspective View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the June 15, 1991, eruption of Mt. Pinatubo continue to affect the lives of people living near the volcano on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The eruption produced a large amount of volcanic debris that was deposited on the flanks of the volcano as part of pyroclastic flows. This perspective view looking toward the east shows the western flank of the volcano where most of these pyroclastic flows were deposited.

    This debris consists of ash and boulders that mix with water after heavy rains to form volcanic mudflows called lahars. Lahars are moving rivers of concrete slurry that are highly erosive. They can sweep down existing river valleys, carving deep canyons where the slopes are steep, or depositing a mixture of fine ash and larger rocks on the gentler slopes. The deposits left from a lahar soon solidify into a material similar to concrete, but while they are moving, lahars are dynamic features, and in a single river valley the active channel may change locations within a few minutes or hours. These changes represent a significant natural hazard to local communities.

    The topographic data were collected by NASA's airborne imaging radar AIRSAR instrument on November 29, 1996. Colors are from the French SPOT satellite imaging data in both visible and infrared wavelengths collected in February 1996. Areas of vegetation appear red and areas without vegetation appear light blue. River valleys radiate out from the summit of the volcano (upper center). Since the eruption, lahars have stripped these valleys of any vegetation. The Pasig-Potrero River flows to the northeast off the summit in the upper right of the image.

    Scientists have been using airborne radar data collected by the AIRSAR instrument in their studies of the aftereffects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. AIRSAR collected imaging radar data over the volcano during a mission to the Pacific Rim region in late 1996 and on a follow-up mission to the area in late 2000. These data sets

  8. The ascent of Mt. Everest.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, DeWitt C

    2010-01-01

    Earlier this Spring, I reread the account of the 1924 attempt of Mallory and Irvine to summit the highest mountain in the world, Mt. Everest. Apart from the recurring mystery of whether the English climbers actually achieved their goal before disappearing on the upper reaches of the mountain, what emerged for me were the many failed attempts (including two earlier ones of their own) before the summit was finally conquered by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in 1953. This put me in mind of the current efforts to once more try to implement the concept of interprofessional education and teamwork in the solution to our many problems in delivering quality health care to all our citizens. The recurring calls in every recent report on health care by the Institute of Medicine and other national groups for greater implementation of collaborative practice models and interprofessional education (IPE) have reawakened the hope that this time, at last, we might succeed. But looming over the horizon, like the storm clouds constantly shrouding the summit of Everest, are the oft-dashed hopes that resurfaced throughout the last century; such that the course of IPE and IPP (interprofessional practice) often has been described as one of successive cycles of "boom and bust." PMID:21174038

  9. Legionnaires' disease in France.

    PubMed

    Campèse, C; Descours, G; Lepoutre, A; Beraud, L; Maine, C; Che, D; Jarraud, S

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this review was to describe the current knowledge of Legionnaires' disease (LD) illustrated by the epidemiological situation in France in 2013. LD is a severe pneumonia commonly caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. The diagnosis is usually based on the urinary antigen test. This rapid method reduces the delay between clinical suspicion and initiation of an appropriate treatment. However, the availability of a clinical strain is important to improve knowledge of circulating bacteria, to document case clusters, and to identify the sources of contamination. The source of contamination is unknown in most cases. The main contamination sources generating aerosols are water network systems and cooling towers. Thanks to the strengthening of clinical and environmental monitoring and to several guidelines, no epidemic has been reported in France since 2006. Despite these efforts, the number of LD cases has not decreased in recent years. It is essential that applied research continue to better understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of the disease and its characteristics (impact of environmental factors, sources of exposure, strains, host, etc.). Fundamental knowledge has been greatly improved (pathogenesis, immune mechanisms, etc.). The results of this research should help define new strategies for the diagnosis, prevention, and control to decrease the number of LD cases diagnosed every year. PMID:25722040

  10. Battle of France WWII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadhath, Arpitha Rao

    The purpose of this thesis is to build an interactive Geographical Information System (GIS) tool, relating to the series of events that occurred during the Battle of France World War II. The tool gives us an insight about the countries involved in the battle, their allies and their strategies. This tool was created to use it as a one stop source of information regarding all the important battles that took place, which lead to the fall of France. The tool brings together the maps of all the countries involved. Integrated with each map is the data relevant to that map. The data for each country includes the place of attack, the strategies used during the attack, and the kind of warfare. The tool also makes use of HTML files to give all the information, along with the images from the time of the war and a footage which explains everything about the particular battle. The tool was build using JAVA, along with the use of MOJO (Map Objects Java Objects) to develop Maps of each of the countries. MOJO is developed by ESRI (Environmental Science Research Institute) which makes it easier to add data to the maps. It also makes highlighting important information easier making use of pop-up windows, charts and infographics. HTML files were designed making use of the open-source template developed by Bootstrap. The tool is built in such a way that the interface is simple and easy for the user to use and understand.

  11. MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors: ligands, models, oligomers, and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, Darius P; Jockers, Ralf; Cecon, Erika; Rivara, Silvia; Witt-Enderby, Paula A

    2014-04-24

    Numerous physiological functions of the pineal gland hormone melatonin are mediated via activation of two G-protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2. The melatonergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and TIK-301, are high-affinity nonselective MT1/MT2 agonists. A great number of MT2-selective ligands and, more recently, several MT1-selective agents have been reported to date. Herein, we review recent advances in the field focusing on high-affinity agonists and antagonists and those displaying selectivity toward MT1 and MT2 receptors. Moreover, the existing models of MT1 and MT2 receptors as well as the current status in the emerging field of melatonin receptor oligomerization are critically discussed. In addition to the already existing indications, such as insomnia, circadian sleep disorders, and depression, new potential therapeutic applications of melatonergic ligands including cardiovascular regulation, appetite control, tumor growth inhibition, and neurodegenerative diseases are presented. PMID:24228714

  12. Women in physics in France

    SciTech Connect

    Pierron-Bohnes, Véronique

    2015-12-31

    We present six associations and entities working in France on issues of women in physics: the Women and Physics Commission, French Physical Society; Women in Nuclear (WiN) France; Women and Science Association; Mission for the Place of Women at CNRS; Parity, Diversity, and Women Network, CEA; and the Network of University Equality-Diversity Representatives.

  13. mtDNA analysis reveals a major late Paleolithic population expansion from southwestern to northeastern Europe.

    PubMed Central

    Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J; D'Urbano, L; Lahermo, P; Moral, P; Sellitto, D; Rengo, C; Forster, P; Savontaus, M L; Bonné-Tamir, B; Scozzari, R

    1998-01-01

    mtDNA sequence variation was studied in 419 individuals from nine Eurasian populations, by high-resolution RFLP analysis, and it was followed by sequencing of the control region of a subset of these mtDNAs and a detailed survey of previously published data from numerous other European populations. This analysis revealed that a major Paleolithic population expansion from the "Atlantic zone" (southwestern Europe) occurred 10,000-15,000 years ago, after the Last Glacial Maximum. As an mtDNA marker for this expansion we identified haplogroup V, an autochthonous European haplogroup, which most likely originated in the northern Iberian peninsula or southwestern France at about the time of the Younger Dryas. Its sister haplogroup, H, which is distributed throughout the entire range of Caucasoid populations and which originated in the Near East approximately 25,000-30,000 years ago, also took part in this expansion, thus rendering it by far the most frequent (40%-60%) haplogroup in western Europe. Subsequent migrations after the Younger Dryas eventually carried those "Atlantic" mtDNAs into central and northern Europe. This scenario, already implied by archaeological records, is given overwhelming support from both the distribution of the autochthonous European Y chromosome type 15, as detected by the probes 49a/f, and the synthetic maps of nuclear data. PMID:9545392

  14. From UVR8 to flavonol synthase: UV-B-induced gene expression in Sauvignon blanc grape berry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linlin; Gregan, Scott; Winefield, Chris; Jordan, Brian

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the effect of development and UV-B on flavonols and the regulation of gene activity in Vitis vinifera L. var. Sauvignon blanc grapes. Particular emphasis was placed on gene activity associated with the low and high fluence UV-B responses. Flavonols, particularly quercetin and kaempferol glycosides, increased substantially upon fruit exposure due to UV-B, with spatial analysis locating the changes to the berry skin. Of five VvFLS genes in grapes, two (VvFLS4 and 5) were found to be transcriptionally active, with VvFLS4 also being responsive to UV-B but VvFLS5 was not. Of the transcription factors known to regulate FLS (VvMYB12, VvMYCA1 and VvWDRs), only VvMYB12 was found to be responsive to UV-B. A number of candidate genes associated with the low and high UV-B fluence responses were also studied (VvUVR8, VvHY5, VvCOP1 and VvCHS; PR genes and VvMAPK3; respectively). The genes associated with the low fluence response exhibited transcriptional regulation in line with reports from other species, while the PR genes and VvMAPK3 only appeared to be responsive in a high UV-B fluence environment. Together, these data supports the view flavonol biosynthesis in grape is stimulated predominantly through the low fluence UV-B response pathway. PMID:24738597

  15. Forensic mass screening using mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Szibor, Reinhard; Plate, Ines; Schmitter, Herrmann; Wittig, Holger; Krause, Dieter

    2006-11-01

    At the forensic autopsy of a sexual murder victim, some trace hairs, possibly belonging to the perpetrator, were saved. Initially, the analysis of a pubic hair shaft only revealed the presence of the mitochondrial (mt) DNA haplotype profile consisting of the (CA)(6) allele and the complete hypervariable region 1 (HV1) and 2 (HV2) sequence. Later, typing of some further telogene trace hairs, which had been stored for several years, yielded a nuclear short tandem repeat (STR) profile. We used both the mtDNA haplotype and the STR profile to start a DNA mass screening project involving 2,335 male citizens of the relevant communities. MtDNA screening was carried out by using the CA repeat amplification in combination with an SNP typing procedure based on the restriction site analysis of amplified d-loop sequences. The aim of our paper is to put mass screening with mtDNA up for discussion. PMID:16583247

  16. Volcanic earthquake swarms at Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada; Ueki, Sadato; Juergen, Kienle

    1985-04-01

    Mount Erebus is an active volcano in Antarctica located on Ross Island. A convecting lava lake occupies the summit crater of Mt. Erebus. Since December 1980 the seismic activity of Mt. Erebus has been continuously monitored using a radio-telemetered network of six seismic stations. The seismic activity observed by the Ross Island network during the 1982-1983 field season shows that: (1)Strombolian eruptions occur frequently at the Erebus summit lava lake at rates of 2-5 per day; (2)centrally located earthquakes map out a nearly vertical, narrow conduit system beneath the lava lake; (3)there are other source regions of seismicity on Ross Island, well removed from Mt. Erebus proper. An intense earthquake swarm recorded in October 1982 near Abbott Peak, 10 km northwest of the summit of Mt. Erebus, and volcanic tremor accompanying the swarm, may have been associated with new dike emplacement at depth.

  17. [Measles in France].

    PubMed

    Antona, Denise; Baudon, Claire; Freymuth, François; Lamy, Mathieu; Maine, Catherine; Parent du Chatelet, Isabelle; Lévy-Bruhl, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    From January 2008 to May 2012, over 22,000 cases of measles were reported in France. The highest incidence rate was observed in children below one year of age. Over 50% of cases were reported in young adults. Almost 5,000 patients were hospitalised including 1,023 with severe pneumonia, 27 with encephalitis and/or myelitis : 10 died. This situation is linked to insufficient and heterogeneous vaccination coverage with pockets of susceptible people allowing virus circulation. Although the vaccine coverage in children has now improved for both doses, the issue of convincing young susceptible adults to catch up for measles vaccination remains critical, if the elimination target is to be met, and in order to protect the most vulnerable population unable to benefit from this vaccination (children below 1 year, immunodeficient people, pregnant women). PMID:23171908

  18. Distant Mt. Fuji, Island of Honshu Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This distant view of Mt. Fuji, on the main home island of Honshu, Japan (34.0N, 139.0E) was taken from about 450 miles to the south. Evan at that great distance, the majestic and inspiring Mt. Fuji is still plainly visible and easily recognized as a world renowned symbol of Japan. The snow capped extinct volcano lies just a few miles south of Tokyo.

  19. High morphogenic activity in the permafrost-affected rock walls of the Mont Blanc massif during the 2015 summer heat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Magnin, Florence; Deline, Philip

    2016-04-01

    In order to test the geomorphological hypothesis on the link between permafrost degradation and rock wall destabilisation, we survey all the rockfalls that occur in the central part of the Mont-Blanc massif using a network of observers since 2007. 511 rockfalls (100 < V < 45,000 m3) have been documented, year 2015 included. Between 2007 and 2014, the average number of destabilizations was 44 (from 17 in 2014 with a cold summer to 72 in 2009 with a relatively hot summer). In 2015, 160 events were recorded i.e. 4 times more than the annual average of the previous years. That makes the year 2015 similar to 2003 that was characterized by its summer heatwave triggering 152 rockfalls in the area currently covered by the network of observers, as shown by the analysis of a SPOT-5 image. Observations of 2015 are discussed and crossed with a statistical model of the Mean Annual Rock Surface Temperature (MARST) for the 1961-1990 period, implemented on a 4-m-resolution DEM of the Mont Blanc massif, and temperature measurements in three 10-m-deep boreholes at the Aiguille du Midi (3842 m a.s.l.), where the summer 2015 active layers have been the thickest since the start of measurements in 2009 (e.g. 3.6 m in the NE face against 2.9 m in average during the previous years). Before 2015, 90 % of the inventoried rockfalls occurred in areas where MARST is in the range -5 to 1°C, whereas only 50 % of the whole rock wall area above 2000 m a.s.l. covers this temperature range. With an air 0°C isotherm which sometimes exceeded the summit of Mont Blanc (4809 m a.s.l.) during the 2015 Summer, conditions were particularly unfavorable for mountaineering. Numerous rescues were carried out to climbers technically blocked by uncommon conditions or injured by rockfalls. On the normal route to the summit of Mont Blanc, two administrative closures of the Goûter hut (3835 m a.s.l.) were necessary to prevent climbers from the huge risk of rockfalls in the access couloir, known for its rockfall

  20. The Italian drilling project of the Mont Blanc road tunnel in the late fifties: an example of no geological care and lack of ethics in carrying out a big work.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosso, Guido; Croce, Giuseppe; Matteucci, Ruggero; Peppoloni, Silvia; Piacente, Sandra; Wasowski, Janusz

    2013-04-01

    In the first decade after the Second World War Italy was rushing to recover a positive role among European countries; basic needs as road communications with European neighbours became main priorities. The necessity of a rapid connection with South-eastern France, a subject already debated between the two nations over more than 50 years, appeared then on first line; the two countries convened on a joint investment for the construction of a tunnel across the international border of Mont Blanc, along the shortest track between Courmayeur and Chamonix. The political agreements were in favour of the quickest start of the drilling operations and such obligation imposed on the Italian side an impoverishment of the project content, specially concerning geological issues. No surveys were performed on fracture systems, cataclastic zones and faults, on the few rock ridges standing above the tunnel line and outcropping through thick talus cones, moraines, ice tongues and their related ice plateaus. Metasediments, migmatites and poorly foliated granites were to be drilled. Three Italian academics were allowed by the drilling company to track the working progress and collect rocks for comparison with other Alpine types; they mapped the lithology and the fault zonesall along the freshly excavated tunnel; the results of such survey appeared after the end of works. Geologists from Florence University published the surface granite faulting pattern 20 years after the road tunnel became operative. Such geological cares could have located the risky zones in time for the tunnel project, mitigating the catastrophic effects of sudden drainage of subglacial water from the Vallée Blanche ice plateau (Ghiacciaio del Gigante) at progression 3800m, that caused dramatic accidents and affected negatively the economy of the drilling. Also the wallrock temperature drops, measured during the drill, should have warned the company management on the location of dangerous fracture zones. Anxiety of

  1. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  2. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  3. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  4. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  5. 44 CFR 15.3 - Access to Mt. Weather.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to Mt. Weather. 15.3... HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL CONDUCT AT THE MT. WEATHER EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE CENTER AND AT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.3 Access to Mt. Weather. Mt. Weather contains classified material and...

  6. Methoxypyrazine Accumulation and O-Methyltransferase Gene Expression in Sauvignon blanc Grapes: The Role of Leaf Removal, Light Exposure, and Berry Development.

    PubMed

    Gregan, Scott M; Jordan, Brian

    2016-03-23

    Methoxypyrazines are present in the grapes of certain Vitis vinifera varieties including Sauvignon blanc and contribute herbaceous/green aromas to wine. Environmental factors such as light exposure and temperature can influence methoxypyrazine levels, and viticultural interventions such as canopy manipulation have the ability to reduce methoxypyrazine accumulation in grapes. We assessed methoxypyrazine levels and showed that leaf removal significantly reduces accumulation in Sauvignon blanc grapes. The main effect of reducing methoxypyrazines was preveraison, as postveraison treatments had no effect on concentrations at harvest. Methoxypyrazine concentrations in controls peaked preveraison and decreased through harvest. Dilution due to an increase in berry weight was found to be the major driver of decreasing concentrations, as methoxypyrazine levels on a per berry basis were found to increase through development in two of three seasons. In the one year of our study that showed contrasting results, analyses of weather data indicate that warmer than average temperatures appear to be the principal factor affecting the berries' ability to accumulate and retain methoxypyrazines. We also explored the expression of potential biosynthetic O-methyltransferase genes VvOMT1, VvOMT2, and VvOMT3; no significant differences were observed with respect to effect of leaf removal and light exposure. PMID:26923868

  7. New insights on 3-mercaptohexanol (3MH) biogenesis in Sauvignon Blanc wines: Cys-3MH and (E)-hexen-2-al are not the major precursors.

    PubMed

    Subileau, Maeva; Schneider, Rémy; Salmon, Jean-Michel; Degryse, Eric

    2008-10-01

    The molar conversion yield of Cys-3MH into 3MH, during alcoholic fermentation, was traced using a deuterated isotope of the precursor added to different Sauvignon Blanc musts. This yield is close to that found in synthetic media supplemented with synthetic Cys-3MH, that is, below 1%. Yet, this represents only 3-7% of the total 3MH production in wine. This clearly shows that Cys-3MH is a precursor of 3MH, but not the main one in the different musts tested. The contribution of ( E)-hex-2-enal, which has been suggested as another potential precursor of 3MH, was discarded as well, as shown using also a deuterated analogue. The third suggested precursor of 3MH is a glutathionyl-3MH (G-3MH), which upon proteolytic degradation could release Cys-3MH. The knockout of the OPT1 gene, which encodes the major glutathione transporter, reduces 3MH accumulation by a 2-fold factor in grape must as compared to the wild type strain. Consequently, it is deduced that major 3MH precursor(s) are transported into yeast via Opt1p, which is in favor of G-3MH being a 3MH precursor. This work opens the search for the major natural precursor(s) of 3MH in Sauvignon Blanc must. PMID:18788709

  8. Rockfalls on steep rock walls in the Mont Blanc massif: a statistical approach for the 2007 and 2008 events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanel, L.; Allignol, F.; Deline, P.; Ravello, M.

    2009-04-01

    It is hypothesized that climatic warming since 1980 increases rock wall instability in high mountains due to permafrost degradation. This is supported by the observation of ice in several rockfall scars. Due to a lack of systematic observations, magnitude and frequency of high mountain rock failures remain poorly known. As a part of the French-Italian PERMAdataROC project (2005-2008) and the EU-funded transalpine PermaNET project (2008-2011), we developed a present-day rockfall database. It contains information collected during systematic surveys carried out by local people (mountain guides, hut keepers, researchers). Although difficult to implement, this approach seems an efficient way to systematically record slope instability events of all sizes related to climate variations. The database compiles the characteristics (topography, volume, scar geometry, deposit) of the 44 and the 20 rockfalls observed in 2007 and 2008, respectively, in the Mont-Blanc massif (Swiss and Saint-Gervais sides excepted). For each event, scar elevation, slope angle and aspect of the affected slopes are issues from ArcGIS, using a 50 m digital elevation model (DEM) - enhanced to 10 m for affected areas - for the French side of the massif, and a 10 m DEM for the Italian side. Among the 64 documented rockfalls, 53 occurred at an altitude above 3000 m a.s.l (but none above 3900 m), on slopes with an angle mainly in the range 50-60°. Massive ice has been directly observed in 12 scars. The four largest rockfalls occurred on the steepest, Italian side at: Dent de Jetoula (at 2810 m a.s.l.; 15,000 m3) on August 2007, one of the lowest in altitude; Tour des Grandes Jorasses (at 3830 m; 10,000 m3) on September 2007; Aiguilles de Thoules (at 3450 m; 8,000 m3) on July 2008; and Tré-la-Tête (at 3470 m; 50,000 m3) on September 2008. Detailed results are presented, statistically analysed and normalized.

  9. 3D Detection, Quantification and Correlation of Slope Failures with Geologic Structure in the Mont Blanc massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Mark; Dunning, Stuart; Lim, Michael; Woodward, John

    2016-04-01

    A thorough understanding of supply from landslides and knowledge of their spatial distribution is of fundamental importance to high-mountain sediment budgets. Advances in 3D data acquisition techniques are heralding new opportunities to create high-resolution topographic models to aid our understanding of landscape change through time. In this study, we use a Structure-from-Motion Multi-View Stereo (SfM-MVS) approach to detect and quantify slope failures at selected sites in the Mont Blanc massif. Past and present glaciations along with its topographical characteristics have resulted in a high rate of geomorphological activity within the range. Data for SfM-MVS processing were captured across variable temporal scales to examine short-term (daily), seasonal and annual change from terrestrial, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and helicopter perspectives. Variable spatial scales were also examined ranging from small focussed slopes (~0.01 km2) to large valley-scale surveys (~3 km2). Alignment and registration were conducted using a series of Ground Control Points (GCPs) across the surveyed slope at various heights and slope aspects. GCPs were also used to optimise data and reduce non-linear distortions. 3D differencing was performed using a multiscale model-to-model comparison algorithm (M3C2) which uses variable thresholding across each slope based on local surface roughness and model alignment quality. Detected change was correlated with local slope structure and 3D discontinuity analysis was undertaken using a plane-detection and clustering approach (DSE). Computation of joint spacing was performed using the classified data and normal distances. Structural analysis allowed us to assign a Slope Mass Rating (SMR) and assess the stability of each slope relative to the detected change and determine likely failure modes. We demonstrate an entirely 3D workflow which preserves the complexity of alpine slope topography to compute volumetric loss using a variable threshold. A

  10. Human Gastroenteropancreatic Expression of Melatonin and Its Receptors MT1 and MT2

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Hellström, Per M.; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim The largest source of melatonin, according to animal studies, is the gastrointestinal (GI) tract but this is not yet thoroughly characterized in humans. This study aims to map the expression of melatonin and its two receptors in human GI tract and pancreas using microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry. Method Gene expression data from normal intestine and pancreas and inflamed colon tissue due to ulcerative colitis were analyzed for expression of enzymes relevant for serotonin and melatonin production and their receptors. Sections from paraffin-embedded normal tissue from 42 individuals, representing the different parts of the GI tract (n=39) and pancreas (n=3) were studied with immunohistochemistry using antibodies with specificity for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 receptors and serotonin. Results Enzymes needed for production of melatonin are expressed in both GI tract and pancreas tissue. Strong melatonin immunoreactivity (IR) was seen in enterochromaffin (EC) cells partially co-localized with serotonin IR. Melatonin IR was also seen in pancreas islets. MT1 and MT2 IR were both found in the intestinal epithelium, in the submucosal and myenteric plexus, and in vessels in the GI tract as well as in pancreatic islets. MT1 and MT2 IR was strongest in the epithelium of the large intestine. In the other cell types, both MT2 gene expression and IR were generally elevated compared to MT1. Strong MT2, IR was noted in EC cells but not MT1 IR. Changes in gene expression that may result in reduced levels of melatonin were seen in relation to inflammation. Conclusion Widespread gastroenteropancreatic expression of melatonin and its receptors in the GI tract and pancreas is in agreement with the multiple roles ascribed to melatonin, which include regulation of gastrointestinal motility, epithelial permeability as well as enteropancreatic cross-talk with plausible impact on metabolic control. PMID:25822611

  11. Earthworm Lumbricus rubellus MT-2: Metal Binding and Protein Folding of a True Cadmium-MT

    PubMed Central

    Kowald, Gregory R.; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R.; Blindauer, Claudia A.

    2016-01-01

    Earthworms express, as most animals, metallothioneins (MTs)—small, cysteine-rich proteins that bind d10 metal ions (Zn(II), Cd(II), or Cu(I)) in clusters. Three MT homologues are known for Lumbricus rubellus, the common red earthworm, one of which, wMT-2, is strongly induced by exposure of worms to cadmium. This study concerns composition, metal binding affinity and metal-dependent protein folding of wMT-2 expressed recombinantly and purified in the presence of Cd(II) and Zn(II). Crucially, whilst a single Cd7wMT-2 species was isolated from wMT-2-expressing E. coli cultures supplemented with Cd(II), expressions in the presence of Zn(II) yielded mixtures. The average affinities of wMT-2 determined for either Cd(II) or Zn(II) are both within normal ranges for MTs; hence, differential behaviour cannot be explained on the basis of overall affinity. Therefore, the protein folding properties of Cd- and Zn-wMT-2 were compared by 1H NMR spectroscopy. This comparison revealed that the protein fold is better defined in the presence of cadmium than in the presence of zinc. These differences in folding and dynamics may be at the root of the differential behaviour of the cadmium- and zinc-bound protein in vitro, and may ultimately also help in distinguishing zinc and cadmium in the earthworm in vivo. PMID:26742040

  12. 27 CFR 9.123 - Mt. Veeder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mt. Veeder. 9.123 Section 9.123 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.123...

  13. Beginning of viniculture in France.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Patrick E; Luley, Benjamin P; Rovira, Nuria; Mirzoian, Armen; Callahan, Michael P; Smith, Karen E; Hall, Gretchen R; Davidson, Theodore; Henkin, Joshua M

    2013-06-18

    Chemical analyses of ancient organic compounds absorbed into the pottery fabrics of imported Etruscan amphoras (ca. 500-475 B.C.) and into a limestone pressing platform (ca. 425-400 B.C.) at the ancient coastal port site of Lattara in southern France provide the earliest biomolecular archaeological evidence for grape wine and viniculture from this country, which is crucial to the later history of wine in Europe and the rest of the world. The data support the hypothesis that export of wine by ship from Etruria in central Italy to southern Mediterranean France fueled an ever-growing market and interest in wine there, which, in turn, as evidenced by the winepress, led to transplantation of the Eurasian grapevine and the beginning of a Celtic industry in France. Herbal and pine resin additives to the Etruscan wine point to the medicinal role of wine in antiquity, as well as a means of preserving it during marine transport. PMID:23733937

  14. Beginning of viniculture in France

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Patrick E.; Luley, Benjamin P.; Rovira, Nuria; Mirzoian, Armen; Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Hall, Gretchen R.; Davidson, Theodore; Henkin, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analyses of ancient organic compounds absorbed into the pottery fabrics of imported Etruscan amphoras (ca. 500–475 B.C.) and into a limestone pressing platform (ca. 425–400 B.C.) at the ancient coastal port site of Lattara in southern France provide the earliest biomolecular archaeological evidence for grape wine and viniculture from this country, which is crucial to the later history of wine in Europe and the rest of the world. The data support the hypothesis that export of wine by ship from Etruria in central Italy to southern Mediterranean France fueled an ever-growing market and interest in wine there, which, in turn, as evidenced by the winepress, led to transplantation of the Eurasian grapevine and the beginning of a Celtic industry in France. Herbal and pine resin additives to the Etruscan wine point to the medicinal role of wine in antiquity, as well as a means of preserving it during marine transport. PMID:23733937

  15. Beginning of Viniculture in France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGovern, Patrick E.; Luley, Benjamin P.; Rovira, Nuria; Mirzoian, Armen; Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen F.; Hall, Gretchen R.; Davidson, Theodore; Henkin, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical analyses of ancient organic compounds absorbed into the pottery fabrics of imported Etruscan amphoras (ca. 500-475 B.C.) and into a limestone pressing platform (ca. 425-400 B.C.) at the ancient coastal port site of Lattara in southern France provide the earliest biomolecular archaeological evidence for grape wine and viniculture from this country, which is crucial to the later history of wine in Europe and the rest of the world. The data support the hypothesis that export of wine by ship from Etruria in central Italy to southern Mediterranean France fueled an ever-growing market and interest in wine there, which, in turn, as evidenced by the winepress, led to transplantation of the Eurasian grapevine and the beginning of a Celtic industry in France. Herbal and pine resin additives to the Etruscan wine point to the medicinal role of wine in antiquity, as well as a means of preserving it during marine transport.

  16. Geomatics techniques applied to time series of aerial images for multitemporal geomorphological analysis of the Miage Glacier (Mont Blanc).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, Luigi; Carletti, Roberto; Giardino, Marco; Mortara, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The Miage glacier is the major one in the Italian side of the Mont Blanc Massif, the third by area and the first by longitudinal extent among Italian glaciers. It is a typical debris covered glacier, since the end of the L.I.A. The debris coverage reduces ablation, allowing a relative stability of the glacier terminus, which is characterized by a wide and articulated moraine apparatus. For its conservative landforms, the Miage Glacier has a great importance for the analysis of the geomorphological response to recent climatic changes. Thanks to an organized existing archive of multitemporal aerial images (1935 to present) a photogrammetric approach has been applied to detect recent geomorphological changes in the Miage glacial basin. The research team provided: a) to digitize all the available images (still in analogic form) through photogrammetric scanners (very low image distortions devices) taking care of correctly defining the resolution of the acquisition compared to the scale mapping images are suitable for; b) to import digitized images into an appropriate digital photogrammetry software environment; c) to manage images in order, where possible, to carried out the stereo models orientation necessary for 3D navigation and plotting of critical geometric features of the glacier. Recognized geometric feature, referring to different periods, can be transferred to vector layers and imported in a GIS for further comparisons and investigations; d) to produce multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models for glacier volume changes; e) to perform orthoprojection of such images to obtain multitemporal orthoimages useful for areal an planar terrain evaluation and thematic analysis; f) to evaluate both planimetric positioning and height determination accuracies reachable through the photogrammetric process. Users have to known reliability of the measures they can do over such products. This can drive them to define the applicable field of this approach and this can help them to

  17. Rock falls in high-alpine rock walls quantified by terrestrial lidar measurements: A case study in the Mont Blanc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabatel, Antoine; Deline, Philip; Jaillet, Stéphane; Ravanel, Ludovic

    2008-05-01

    The global warming observed in recent decades and its future increase may affect permafrost distribution on high-mountain faces with consequences for their stability. In this paper, we show that rock falls from high-alpine rock walls can be computed with a decimetre-resolution using lidar measurements. A laser scanner was used to create point clouds and triangulated irregular network models on the east face of the Tour Ronde at 3792 m asl (Mont Blanc massif). Comparison of the models realised from measurements of July 2005 and July 2006 enabled quantification of rock falls with reduced uncertainty. The volume of rock fall reached a total of 536 m3 in the scanned area, which matches an erosion rate of 8.4 mm yr-1. This rate slightly higher to the ones reported in former studies enable to assume that this rock fall may be the consequence of the permafrost degradation in this rock face.

  18. MT1-MMP dependent repression of the tumor suppressor SPRY4 contributes to MT1-MMP driven melanoma cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Shaverdashvili, Khvaramze; Zhang, Keman; Osman, Iman; Honda, Kord; Jobava, Rauli; Bedogni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the deadliest of all skin cancers. Despite progress in diagnostics and treatment of melanoma, the prognosis for metastatic patients remains poor. We previously showed that Membrane-type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is one of the drivers of melanoma metastasis. Classically, MT1-MMP regulates a verity of cellular functions including cell-to-cell interaction and cell-to-matrix communication. Recently, MT1-MMP has been found to also modulate gene expression. To specifically assess MT1-MMP dependent gene regulation in melanoma, microarray gene expression analysis was performed in a melanoma cell line whose metastatic properties depend on the activity of MT1-MMP. We identified the tumor suppressor gene SPRY4 as a new transcriptional target of MT1-MMP that is negatively regulated by the protease. Knockdown of MT1-MMP enhances SPRY4 expression at the mRNA and protein level. SPRY4 expression inversely correlates with that of MT1-MMP in melanoma samples and importantly, correlates with melanoma patient survival. SPRY4 modulates MT1-MMP dependent cell migration such that inhibition of SPRY4 rescues cell migration that has been impaired by MT1-MMP knock down. MT1-MMP decreases SPRY4 in part through an MMP2/RAC1 axis we previously show promotes cell motility downstream of MT1-MMP. These results identify the tumor suppressor SPRY4 as a novel molecular effector of MT1-MMP affecting melanoma cell motility. PMID:26392417

  19. Decadal region-wide and glacier-wide mass balances derived from multi-temporal ASTER satellite digital elevation models. Validation over the Mont-Blanc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, Etienne; Cabot, Vincent; Vincent, Christian; Six, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Since 2000, a vast archive of stereo-images has been built by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) satellite. Several studies already extracted glacier mass balances from multi-temporal ASTER digital elevation models (DEMs) but they lacked accurate independent data for validation. Here, we apply a linear regression to a time series of 3D-coregistered ASTER DEMs to estimate the rate of surface elevation changes (dh/dtASTER) and geodetic mass balances of Mont-Blanc glaciers (155 km²) between 2000 and 2014. Validation using field and spaceborne geodetic measurements reveals large errors at the individual pixel level (> 1 m a-1) and an accuracy of 0.2-0.3 m a-1 for dh/dtASTER averaged over areas larger than 1 km². For all Mont-Blanc glaciers, the ASTER region-wide mass balance (-1.05±0.37 m water equivalent (w.e.) a-1) agrees remarkably with the one measured using Spot5 and Pléiades DEMs (-1.06±0.23 m w.e. a-1) over their common 2003-2012 period. This multi-temporal ASTER DEM strategy leads to smaller errors than the simple differencing of two ASTER DEMs. By extrapolating dh/dtASTER to mid-February 2000, we infer a mean penetration depth of about 9±3 m for the C-band Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) radar signal, with a strong altitudinal dependency (range 0-12 m). This methodology thus reveals the regional pattern of glacier surface elevation changes and improves our knowledge of the penetration of the radar signal into snow and ice.

  20. Quantitation of selected terpenoids and mercaptans in the dual-purpose hop varieties Amarillo, Citra, Hallertau Blanc, Mosaic, and Sorachi Ace.

    PubMed

    Cibaka, Marie-Lucie Kankolongo; Gros, Jacques; Nizet, Sabrina; Collin, Sonia

    2015-03-25

    Free terpenoids and both free and bound polyfunctional thiols were investigated in five selected dual-purpose hop cultivars. Surprisingly, the dual-purpose Sorachi Ace variety was found to contain higher amounts of farnesene (2101 mg/kg) than aromatic hops such as Saaz but only traces of 3-methylbutylisobutyrate, a compound that usually distinguishes all bitter varieties. All five cultivars investigated here showed an exceptional citrus-like potential explained by either monoterpenic alcohols or polyfunctional thiols. Among the monoterpenic alcohols, β-citronellol at concentrations above 7 mg/kg distinguished Amarillo, Citra, Hallertau Blanc, Mosaic, and Sorachi Ace from Nelson Sauvin and Tomahawk, two previously investigated dual-purpose hops, while linalool (312 mg/kg) and geraniol (211 mg/kg) remained good discriminating compounds for Nelson Sauvin and Tomahawk, respectively. Regarding polyfunctional thiols, higher amounts of 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate (27 μg/kg) characterized the Citra variety. Free 4-sulfanyl-4-methylpentan-2-one proved discriminant for Sorachi Ace, while the bound form is predominant in Nelson Sauvin. On the other hand, an S-conjugate of 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol was found in Sorachi Ace at levels not far from those previously reported for Cascade, although the free form was undetected here. Both free and bound grapefruit-like 3-sulfanyl-4-methylpentan-1-ol (never evidenced before the present work) emerged as discriminating compounds for the Hallertau Blanc variety. The apotryptophanase assay also allowed us to evidence for the first time an S-conjugate of 2-sulfanylethan-1-ol. PMID:25780945

  1. Expanding Our Understanding of mtDNA Deletions.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; Vincent, Amy E; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-07-12

    Clonal expansion of mtDNA deletions compromises mitochondrial function in human disease and aging, but how deleterious mtDNA genomes propagate has remained unclear. In this issue (Gitschlag et al., 2016) and in a recent Nature publication, C. elegans studies implicate the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) and offer mechanistic insights into this process. PMID:27411002

  2. Enterococcus cecorum human infection, France.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, E; Abat, C; Rolain, J-M

    2015-09-01

    Enterococcus cecorum is a bacterium of the intestinal tract of many domestic animals that is rarely reported as human pathogen. Here we report the first case of incisional hernia plate infection and the first case of urinary tract colonization due to E. cecorum from patients in Marseille, France. PMID:26199733

  3. Field transplantation of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea along a polymetallic contamination gradient (River Lot, France): 2. Metallothionein response to metal exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Baudrimont, M.; Andres, S.; Metivaud, J.; Lapaquellerie, Y.; Ribeyre, F.; Maillet, N.; Latouche, C.; Boudou, A.

    1999-11-01

    Specimens of the Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea were transplanted from a clean lacustrine site to four stations along a polymetallic pollution gradient in the river Lot, France, downstream from an old Zn ore treatment facility (see Part 1). From April to September 1996, the authors studied Cd and Zn bioaccumulation and the metallothionein-like metal-binding protein (MT) concentrations by subsampling the ages at t = 0, 21, 49, 85, 120, and 150 d. Marked differences were observed among the four stations. At the most polluted station Riou-Mort, MT concentrations did not increase despite very rapid metal accumulation; all mollusks died between days 49 and 85, suggesting that the metal detoxification mechanisms were overwhelmed at this station. At the next station downstream, the final levels of bioaccumulated metal after 150 d were as high as those at the Riou-Mort station, but in this case the MT concentrations also increased progressively with positive correlations between MT and metal concentrations; no mortality was observed, but a significant growth inhibition was revealed in comparison to the reference site, with a lack of correlation between MT and reduced growth. Subcellular metal partitioning, as determined by size-exclusion chromatography, revealed that most of the Cd was sequestered by MT. In contrast, most of the Zn was bound to low molecular weight proteins, the MT fraction representing only 12% of cytosolic zn. These data show the marked role of MT toward Cd bioaccumulation and toxic effects on this freshwater bivalve species.

  4. Mt. St. Helens and Spirit Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    high resolution 1000 pixel-wide image Snow still covered the peaks of the Cascade Ranges in mid-June when the STS-111 crew photographed Mt. St. Helens from the Space Shuttle Endeavour. From their vantage point, the crew observed blast zone from the 1980 eruption of the volcano, the mud-choked North Fork of the Toutle River, and fallen timber that still floats in rafts of logs on Spirit Lake. Continued imagery of the region will document the slow regrowth of the forests. Today, the volcano and surrounding region comprise the Mt. St. Helens National Volcanic Monument which is dedicated to research, education and recreation. For more information visit: Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. Astronaut photograph STS111-371-3 was provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  5. Post Eruption Hazards at Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Our project focused on the investigation of the post-eruption hazards at Mt. Pinatubo (Philippines) using remote sensing data, and field observations of the 1991 eruption deposits. Through the use of multiple satellite images, field work, and the 1996/2000 PacRim data sets, we conducted studies of the co- and post-eruption hazards of the volcano due to erosion and re-deposition of the extensive pyroclastic flow deposits. A major part of this project was the assembly and analysis of a database of over 50 high resolution (1 - 50 m/pixel) images that will facilitate this study. We collected Ikonos, SPOT, SIR-C/X-SAR, Landsat, ERS, RADARSAT, and ASTER images of the area around Mt. Pinatubo. An example of the changes that could be seen in these data is shown. Our investigation focused on a retrospective analysis of the erosion, redeposition, and re-vegetation of the 1991 pyroclastic flow deposits of Mt. Pinatubo. The primary geologic goal of our work was the analysis of the spatial distribution and volume change of the sources and sinks of materials associated with mudflow ('lahar') events. This included the measurement of river valley gradients and cross-sections using TOPSAR digital elevation data, as we are participating in the PacRim 2000 deployment to the Philippines specifically so that we can collect a second set of TOPSAR data that can then be used to create a topographic difference image of the volcano. The main results from this multi-sensor study have been published as Torres et al.. A discussion of the methodology that we used to assemble an appropriate database was included in Mouginis-Mark and Domergue-Schmidt. As part of an educational outreach effort, we also helped the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) in the Philippines to use NASA data to study Mt. Pinatubo and other Filipino volcanoes.

  6. Graphs for Isotopes of 109-Mt (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 109-Mt (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109).

  7. Modeling the Geologic History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascuzzo, A.; Allen, C.

    2015-01-01

    Gale is an approximately 155 km diameter crater located on the martian dichotomy boundary (5 deg S 138 deg E). Gale is estimated to have formed 3.8 - 3.5 Gya, in the late Noachian or early Hesperian. Mt. Sharp, at the center of Gale Crater, is a crescent shaped sedimentary mound that rises 5.2 km above the crater floor. Gale is one of the few craters that has a peak reaching higher than the rim of the crater wall. The Curiosity rover is currently fighting to find its way across a dune field at the northwest base of the mound searching for evidence of habitability. This study used orbital images and topographic data to refine models for the geologic history of Mt. Sharp by analyzing its morphological features. In addition, it assessed the possibility of a peak ring in Gale. The presence of a peak ring can offer important information to how Mt. Sharp was formed and eroded early in Gale's history.

  8. MT1-MMP modulates the mechanosensitivity of osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Bakker, Astrid D; Gruber, Elisabeth V; Chae, Thomas D; Veldkamp, Joris B B; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Everts, Vincent

    2012-01-13

    Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MT1-MMP) is expressed by mechanosensitive osteocytes and affects bone mass. The extracellular domain of MT1-MMP is connected to extracellular matrix, while its intracellular domain is a strong modulator of cell signaling. In theory MT1-MMP could thus transduce mechanical stimuli into a chemical response. We hypothesized that MT1-MMP plays a role in the osteocyte response to mechanical stimuli. MT1-MMP-positive and knockdown (siRNA) MLO-Y4 osteocytes were mechanically stimulated with a pulsating fluid flow (PFF). Focal adhesions were visualized by paxillin immunostaining. Osteocyte number, number of empty lacunae, and osteocyte morphology were measured in long bones of MT1-MMP(+/+) and MT1-MMP(-/-) mice. PFF decreased MT1-MMP mRNA and protein expression in MLO-Y4 osteocytes, suggesting that mechanical loading may affect pericellular matrix remodeling by osteocytes. MT1-MMP knockdown enhanced NO production and c-jun and c-fos mRNA expression in response to PFF, concomitantly with an increased number and size of focal adhesions, indicating that MT1-MMP knockdown osteocytes have an increased sensitivity to mechanical loading. Osteocytes in MT1-MMP(-/-) bone were more elongated and followed the principle loading direction, suggesting that they might sense mechanical loading. This was supported by a lower number of empty lacunae in MT1-MMP(-/-) bone, as osteocytes lacking mechanical stimuli tend to undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, mechanical stimulation decreased MT1-MMP expression by MLO-Y4 osteocytes, and MT1-MMP knockdown increased the osteocyte response to mechanical stimulation, demonstrating a novel and unexpected role for MT1-MMP in mechanosensing. PMID:22202174

  9. METHYLATION OF ARSENIC BY RECOMBINANT HUMAN AS3MT/287M AND AS3MT/287T POLYMORPHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is the key enzyme in the pathway for methylation of inorganic arsenic (iAs). AS3MT polymorphism is, in part, responsible for interindividual differences in iAs metabolism. AS3MT/M287T polymorphism that is found in ~ 10% of C...

  10. MtDNA COI-COII marker and drone congregation area: an efficient method to establish and monitor honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) conservation centres.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Bénédicte; Alburaki, Mohamed; Legout, Hélène; Moulin, Sibyle; Mougel, Florence; Garnery, Lionel

    2015-05-01

    Honeybee subspecies have been affected by human activities in Europe over the past few decades. One such example is the importation of nonlocal subspecies of bees which has had an adverse impact on the geographical repartition and subsequently on the genetic diversity of the black honeybee Apis mellifera mellifera. To restore the original diversity of this local honeybee subspecies, different conservation centres were set up in Europe. In this study, we established a black honeybee conservation centre Conservatoire de l'Abeille Noire d'Ile de France (CANIF) in the region of Ile-de-France, France. CANIF's honeybee colonies were intensively studied over a 3-year period. This study included a drone congregation area (DCA) located in the conservation centre. MtDNA COI-COII marker was used to evaluate the genetic diversity of CANIF's honeybee populations and the drones found and collected from the DCA. The same marker (mtDNA) was used to estimate the interactions and the haplotype frequency between CANIF's honeybee populations and 10 surrounding honeybee apiaries located outside of the CANIF. Our results indicate that the colonies of the conservation centre and the drones of the DCA show similar stable profiles compared to the surrounding populations with lower level of introgression. The mtDNA marker used on both DCA and colonies of the conservation centre seems to be an efficient approach to monitor and maintain the genetic diversity of the protected honeybee populations. PMID:25335970

  11. Mt. Kilimanjaro expedition in earth science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Elena; Yoshikawa, Kenji; Narita, Kenji; Brettenny, Mark; Yule, Sheila; O'Toole, Michael; Brettenny, Rogeline

    2010-05-01

    Mt. Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest mountain is 5,895 meters above sea level and is located 330 km south of the equator in Tanzania. In 1976 glaciers covered most of Mt. Kilimanjaro's summit; however in 2000, an estimated eighty percent of the ice cap has disappeared since the last thorough survey done in 1912. There is increased scientific interest in Mt. Kilimanjaro with the increase in global and African average temperatures. A team of college and pre-college school students from Tanzania, South Africa and Kenya, teachers from South Africa and the United States, and scientists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in the United States and Akita University in Japan, climbed to the summit of Mt Kilimanjaro in October 2009. They were accompanied by guides, porters, two expedition guests, and a videographer. This expedition was part of the GLOBE Seasons and Biomes Earth System Science Project and the GLOBE Africa science education initiative, exploring and contributing to climate change studies. Students learned about earth science experientially by observing their physical and biological surroundings, making soil and air temperature measurements, participating in discussions, journaling their experience, and posing research questions. The international trekkers noted the change in the biomes as the altitude, temperature and conditions changed, from cultivated lands, to rain forest, heath zone, moorland, alpine desert, and summit. They also discovered permafrost, but not at the summit as expected. Rather, it was where the mountain was not covered by a glacier and thus more exposed to low extreme temperatures. This was the first report of permafrost on Mt. Kilimanjaro. Classrooms from all over the world participated in the expedition virtually. They followed the trek through the expedition website (http://www.xpeditiononline.com/) where pictures and journals were posted, and posed their own questions which were answered by the expedition and base camp team members

  12. Metallothionein (MT) -I and MT-II Expression Are Induced and Cause Zinc Sequestration in the Liver after Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pankhurst, Michael W.; Gell, David A.; Butler, Chris W.; Kirkcaldie, Matthew T. K.; West, Adrian K.; Chung, Roger S.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments with transgenic over-expressing, and null mutant mice have determined that metallothionein-I and -II (MT-I/II) are protective after brain injury. MT-I/II is primarily a zinc-binding protein and it is not known how it provides neuroprotection to the injured brain or where MT-I/II acts to have its effects. MT-I/II is often expressed in the liver under stressful conditions but to date, measurement of MT-I/II expression after brain injury has focused primarily on the injured brain itself. In the present study we measured MT-I/II expression in the liver of mice after cryolesion brain injury by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the UC1MT antibody. Displacement curves constructed using MT-I/II knockout (MT-I/II−/−) mouse tissues were used to validate the ELISA. Hepatic MT-I and MT-II mRNA levels were significantly increased within 24 hours of brain injury but hepatic MT-I/II protein levels were not significantly increased until 3 days post injury (DPI) and were maximal at the end of the experimental period, 7 DPI. Hepatic zinc content was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and was found to decrease at 1 and 3 DPI but returned to normal by 7DPI. Zinc in the livers of MT-I/II−/− mice did not show a return to normal at 7 DPI which suggests that after brain injury, MT-I/II is responsible for sequestering elevated levels of zinc to the liver. Conclusion: MT-I/II is up-regulated in the liver after brain injury and modulates the amount of zinc that is sequestered to the liver. PMID:22363575

  13. "Franklin: Science, Politics and France"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, James E., III

    2003-04-01

    This presentation traces Benjamin Franklin's career as a "civic scientist" in Old-Regime France. It outlines the initial - and not always positive - reception of Franklin's work on electricity by the community of French scientists in the 1750s. It sketches Franklin's subsequent elevation into the pantheon of French Enlightenment heros, and it details his work as a "civic scientist" while American envoy to France in the 1770s and 1780s, notably his service on the government-sponsored commissions that repudiated the scientific and medical claims of Franz Anton Mesmer. This presentation concludes by examining a few features of Franklin's career that are not completely congruent with our notion of what a "civic scientist" might be, a contrast that is intended to illuminate both Franklin and the concept of "civic scientist."

  14. Cardiac remote monitoring in France.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Nicolas; Perrotton, Fanny; Delage, Emilie; Gourraud, Jean-Baptiste; Lande, Gilles; Solnon, Aude; Probst, Vincent; Grimandi, Gael; Clouet, Johann

    2014-04-01

    The increase in number of implanted cardiac medical devices and the announced decrease in number of cardiologists have led to remote monitoring being considered as a pivotal tool for patient follow-up. For 10 years, remote monitoring has been the subject of multiple clinical studies. In these studies, reliability and clinical efficacy have been demonstrated, but the use of remote monitoring remains quite limited in France compared with other countries. To explain this delay in uptake, some organizational difficulties and the lack of reimbursement of remote monitoring are often mentioned. The results of medico-economic studies might provide answers about the value of remote monitoring and enable the supervisory authorities to define how its use will be financed. This review provides a global view of remote monitoring in France, and covers the principle, clinical efficacy, organizational and regulatory aspects, and medico-economic data. PMID:24709285

  15. 75 FR 43556 - TA-W-73,381, MT Rail Link, Inc., Missoula, MT; TA-W-73,381A, Billings, MT; TA-W-73,381B, Laurel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... in the Federal Register on July 7, 2010 (75 FR 39049). At the request of the State Agency, the... Employment and Training Administration TA-W-73,381, MT Rail Link, Inc., Missoula, MT; TA-W-73,381A, Billings, MT; TA-W-73,381B, Laurel, MT; TA-W-73,381C, Livingston, MT; TA-W-73,381D, Helena, MT;...

  16. Improving the Terrain-Based Parameter for the Assessment of Snow Redistribution in the Col du Lac Blanc Area and Comparisons with TLS Snow Depth Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, Peter; Prokop, Alexander; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Nishimura, Kouichi; Vionnet, Vincent; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2014-05-01

    Wind and the associated snow drift are dominating factors determining the snow distribution and accumulation in alpine areas, resulting in a high spatial variability of snow depth that is difficult to evaluate and quantify. The terrain-based parameter Sx characterizes the degree of shelter or exposure of a grid point provided by the upwind terrain, without the computational complexity of numerical wind field models. The parameter has shown to qualitatively predict snow redistribution with good reproduction of spatial patterns, but has failed to quantitatively describe the snow redistribution, and correlations with measured snow heights were poor. The objective of our research was to a) identify the sources of poor correlations between predicted and measured snow re-distribution and b) improve the parameters ability to qualitatively and quantitatively describe snow redistribution in our research area, the Col du Lac Blanc in the French Alps. The area is at an elevation of 2700 m and particularly suited for our study due to its constant wind direction and the availability of data from a meteorological station. Our work focused on areas with terrain edges of approximately 10 m height, and we worked with 1-2 m resolution digital terrain and snow surface data. We first compared the results of the terrain-based parameter calculations to measured snow-depths, obtained by high-accuracy terrestrial laser scan measurements. The results were similar to previous studies: The parameter was able to reproduce observed patterns in snow distribution, but regression analyses showed poor correlations between terrain-based parameter and measured snow-depths. We demonstrate how the correlations between measured and calculated snow heights improve if the parameter is calculated based on a snow surface model instead of a digital terrain model. We show how changing the parameter's search distance and how raster re-sampling and raster smoothing improve the results. To improve the parameter

  17. Two year study of CO2, CH4 and N2O dynamics and fluxes in four rivers in Belgium (Meuse, Ourthe, Geer and Blanc Gravier)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Alberto V.; Darchambeau, François; Beulen, Aurore

    2013-04-01

    Two rivers and two streams close to the city of Liège in Belgium (Meuse, Ourthe, Geer and Blanc Gravier) were sampled to describe the dynamics of CO2, CH4 and N2O (for the first time in Belgium for freshwaters). The four systems were chosen to cover a gradient of size (stream to river) and of human influence (mainly forested to mainly agricultural watersheds). The study covers the period from February 2011 to March 2013 with weekly sampling in surface waters. The variables were very contrasted in the four systems, the Geer showing a strong enrichment in nitrogen NH4+ et NO2-) and phosphorous in relation to the other three systems. The O2 concentrations were much lower, and the concentration of CH4, N2O and pCO2 were much higher in the Geer than in other three systems. The concentrations in CH4, N2O and pCO2 were higher in the Ourthe than in the Meuse and than in the Blanc Gravier. Marked seasonal variations were observed in the 4 systems. In general the concentration of CH4, N2O and pCO2 were higher in summer than in winter. This is related on one hand to the increase of temperature in summer that stimulates bacterial activity. Also in summer, the availability of organic matter for bacterial activity is higher after the spring phytoplankton blooms and also from allochthnous inputs from the watersheds. The increase of temperature and bacterial consumption of O2 in the water column leads to a lesser O2 penetration in the sediments that could stimulate benthic anaerobic processes among which methanogenesis and denitrification, leading to an increase of CH4 and N2O in the water column. Also, the production of N2O by denitrification strongly increases at low O2. During low water, the increase of residence time of the water mass and the decrease of current (decrease of degasing) allow an accumulation of CO2, CH4 and N2O in the water column. On the contrary during high water, dilution and increase of current (increase of degasing) lead to a decrease of concentrations

  18. Genetic Diversity of Talpa Europaea and Nova Hanta Virus (NVAV) in France

    PubMed Central

    Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Gu, Se Hun; Feliu, Carlos; Ventur, Jacint; Ribas, Alexis; Dormion, Jerôme; Yanagihara, Richard; Nicolas, Violaine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nova hantavirus (NVAV) was first identified in a single European mole (Talpa europaea), captured in Hungary. Analysis of lung tissues from 94 moles captured in France revealed NVAV in 50%. Based on the genetic diversity of the cytochrome b mtDNA, moles collected in Poitiers and Bordeaux were more closely related to the Iberian mole (T. occidentalis), a species previously assumed to be restricted to the Iberian Peninsula. Several hypotheses are discussed to explain these observations: 1) presence of hitherto unnoticed T. occidentalis in southwestern France; 2) existence of an ancient mitochondrial introgression phenomenon between the two Talpa species, producing a particular phenotype in some hybrids; 3) existence of a hybrid zone between the two species; and 4) existence of a new Talpa species. NVAV was not detected in the southwestern moles, which begs the question of the potential presence of a particular Hantavirus sp. in this population and/or in the Iberian moles. PMID:25530620

  19. Merging a Terrain-Based Parameter and Snow Particle Counter Data for the Assessment of Snow Redistribution in the Col du Lac Blanc Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, Peter; Prokop, Alexander; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Vionnet, Vincent; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert; Heiser, Micha; Nishimura, Kouichi

    2015-04-01

    Wind and the associated snow drift are dominating factors determining the snow distribution and accumulation in alpine areas, resulting in a high spatial variability of snow depth that is difficult to evaluate and quantify. The terrain-based parameter Sx characterizes the degree of shelter or exposure of a grid point provided by the upwind terrain, without the computational complexity of numerical wind field models. The parameter has shown to qualitatively predict snow redistribution with good reproduction of spatial patterns. It does not, however, provide a quantitative estimate of changes in snow depths. The objective of our research was to introduce a new parameter to quantify changes in snow depths in our research area, the Col du Lac Blanc in the French Alps. The area is at an elevation of 2700 m and particularly suited for our study due to its consistently bi-modal wind directions. Our work focused on two pronounced, approximately 10 m high terrain breaks, and we worked with 1 m resolution digital snow surface models (DSM). The DSM and measured changes in snow depths were obtained with high-accuracy terrestrial laser scan (TLS) measurements. First we calculated the terrain-based parameter Sx on a digital snow surface model and correlated Sx with measured changes in snow-depths (Δ SH). Results showed that Δ SH can be approximated by Δ SHestimated = α * Sx, where α is a newly introduced parameter. The parameter α has shown to be linked to the amount of snow deposited influenced by blowing snow flux. At the Col du Lac Blanc test side, blowing snow flux is recorded with snow particle counters (SPC). Snow flux is the number of drifting snow particles per time and area. Hence, the SPC provide data about the duration and intensity of drifting snow events, two important factors not accounted for by the terrain parameter Sx. We analyse how the SPC snow flux data can be used to estimate the magnitude of the new variable parameter α . To simulate the development

  20. Evolution of anorthoclase phonolite, Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.A.; Kyle, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Over the last 1 m.y. Mt. Erebus (3794 m) has erupted mainly anorthoclase phonolite (AP) and lesser trachyte, kaersutite phonolite and intermediate differentiates. An active convecting AP lava lake, identical in composition to the older lavas, existed from 1972 until late 1984. Most of the rocks define a strongly undersaturated continuous sodic differentiation series, composed of basanite, Ne-hawaiite, Ne-mugearite, Ne-benmoreite and AP. The main phenocryst phases and their ranges are: olivine (Fo 81-43), clinopyroxene (Wo 50-44, En 42-24, Fs 11-30), opaque oxides (Usp 52-79) and feldspar. Major, trace and REE analyses exhibit smooth trends on variation diagrams. REE are strongly LREE enriched and increase from La/sub N/=220 in the basanites to 400 in AP. There are no significant Eu anomalies. Published isotopic data show derivation of the basanite parental magmas from a depleted (/sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr=0.703) heterogeneous mantle source similar to that for oceanic island basalts. Crustal contamination is insignificant except in the trachytes. Evolution of the Erebus lineage by fractional crystallization of the above phases plus apatite is supported by mass balance models. Differentiation probably occurred in larger, hotter and lower P/sub H20/ magma chambers compared to the basanite to kaersutite phonolite DVDP lineage (Kyle, 1981) of the neighboring Hut Point Peninsula. Mt. Erebus may mark the site of a major mantle upwelling.

  1. Stereo Image of Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. This anaglyph stereo image is of Mt Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 15,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. A 3-D view can be obtained by looking through stereo glasses, with the blue film through your left eye and red film with your right eye at the same time. North is on your right hand side. For more information, see When Rivers of Rock Flow ASTER web page Image courtesy of MITI, ERSDAC, JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  2. The puzzle of Mt. Etna 2015 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, Giuseppe Giovanni; Caltabiano, Tommaso; Cannata, Andrea; Cannavo', Flavio; Currenti, Gilda; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; La Spina, Alessandro; Palano, Mimmo; Napoli, Rosalba; Sciotto, Mariangela; Spampinato, Letizia

    2016-04-01

    During 2015, Mt. Etna volcano activity consisted of a sequence of seismic and volcanic events indicative of a complex cause-effect relationship between volcanism and tectonics. Here we analyze in details all these events in order to figure out a possible and reliable causative mechanism able to explain the measured evidences by exploiting an extensive and multi-parametric dataset, including geochemical, volcanological, magnetic, seismic, and geodetic data. The integration of the different parameters allowed us to observe a long-lasting inflation episode abruptly interrupted by two vigorous short-term deflations and an intense dynamics of the northern sector of the volcano unstable flank. This last feature was characterized by two seismic swarms (Mmax = 3.6) occurring along the central sector of the Pernicana Fault and aseismic slip with intense deformation affecting the north-eastern edge of the unstable flank. This is not the first time in which the interaction between volcanism and tectonics has been observed at Mt. Etna although poorly constrained. In our case, the used multidisciplinary approach suggested us that in 2015 the eruptive activity was mainly triggered by the tectonic framework of the volcano unstable flank.

  3. Linear mtDNA fragments and unusual mtDNA rearrangements associated with pathological deficiency of MGME1 exonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Thomas J.; Zsurka, Gábor; Peeva, Viktoriya; Schöler, Susanne; Szczesny, Roman J.; Cysewski, Dominik; Reyes, Aurelio; Kornblum, Cornelia; Sciacco, Monica; Moggio, Maurizio; Dziembowski, Andrzej; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Minczuk, Michal

    2014-01-01

    MGME1, also known as Ddk1 or C20orf72, is a mitochondrial exonuclease found to be involved in the processing of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) during replication. Here, we present detailed insights on the role of MGME1 in mtDNA maintenance. Upon loss of MGME1, elongated 7S DNA species accumulate owing to incomplete processing of 5′ ends. Moreover, an 11-kb linear mtDNA fragment spanning the entire major arc of the mitochondrial genome is generated. In contrast to control cells, where linear mtDNA molecules are detectable only after nuclease S1 treatment, the 11-kb fragment persists in MGME1-deficient cells. In parallel, we observed characteristic mtDNA duplications in the absence of MGME1. The fact that the breakpoints of these mtDNA rearrangements do not correspond to either classical deletions or the ends of the linear 11-kb fragment points to a role of MGME1 in processing mtDNA ends, possibly enabling their repair by homologous recombination. In agreement with its functional involvement in mtDNA maintenance, we show that MGME1 interacts with the mitochondrial replicase PolgA, suggesting that it is a constituent of the mitochondrial replisome, to which it provides an additional exonuclease activity. Thus, our results support the viewpoint that MGME1-mediated mtDNA processing is essential for faithful mitochondrial genome replication and might be required for intramolecular recombination of mtDNA. PMID:24986917

  4. Keeping mtDNA in Shape between Generations

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2014-01-01

    Since the unexpected discovery that mitochondria contain their own distinct DNA molecules, studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have yielded many surprises. In animals, transmission of the mtDNA genome is explicitly non-Mendelian, with a very high number of genome copies being inherited from the mother after a drastic bottleneck. Recent work has begun to uncover the molecular details of this unusual mode of transmission. Many surprising variations in animal mitochondrial biology are known; however, a series of recent studies have identified a core of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms relating to mtDNA inheritance, e.g., mtDNA bottlenecks during germ cell development, selection against specific mtDNA mutation types during maternal transmission, and targeted destruction of sperm mitochondria. In this review, we outline recent literature on the transmission of mtDNA in animals and highlight the implications for human health and ageing. PMID:25299061

  5. CFB boiler at Gardanne (France)

    SciTech Connect

    Jaud, P.; Jacquet, L.; Delot, P.; Bayle, F.

    1995-06-01

    Among the new Clean Coal Technologies, {open_quotes}Circulating Fluidized Bed{close_quotes} is one of the most promising. Today, the largest project in commissioning`s the 250 MWe Provence CFB boiler, located near MARSEILLE in the south of France. At such a size, the CFB technique has now reached a capacity corresponding to thermal power plants operated by utilities. This new unit is a very important step towards larger size i.e. 400 MWe and greater. The SO{sub 2} emissions of this CFB boiler are guaranteed to be less than 400 mg / Nm{sup 3} at 6% O{sub 2} with the ratio of Ca/S lower than 3 while total sulfur in local coal used can reach 3.68 %. The purpose of the Provence project was to replace the existing pulverized coal boiler unit 4, commissioned in 1967, of the Provence power plant, with a new CFB boiler while reusing most of the existing equipment. The new boiler has been ordered from GEC ALSTHOM STEIN INDUSTREE (GASI) by Electricite de France (EDF) on behalf of the SOPROLIF consortium. Architect Engineering and construction management was performed by EDF jointly with Charbonnages de France (CdF: the French Coal Board). The 250 MWe CFB boiler is of the superheat-reheat type. The first firing of the boiler is due in April 1995. The poster session will describe the progress in the construction of the plant and provides technical details of the new boiler and auxiliaries.

  6. Home health care in France.

    PubMed

    Charles, B

    1990-02-23

    Home health care in France has a long tradition, but is limited in its development. Since 1970 hospitals are by law permitted to extend services at home. Apart from this, patient associations are a driving force in the organization of home health care. There is a trend to more home health care, but this is hampered by splitting of responsibilities of local, departmental or central authorities. The hospital pharmacist is recommended to focus on his scientific and technical competence. Improved relations between community pharmacists and hospital pharmacists are advocated. PMID:2314994

  7. Evolution of 3-mercaptohexanol, hydrogen sulfide, and methyl mercaptan during bottle storage of Sauvignon blanc wines. Effect of glutathione, copper, oxygen exposure, and closure-derived oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ugliano, Maurizio; Kwiatkowski, Mariola; Vidal, Stéphane; Capone, Dimitra; Siebert, Tracey; Dieval, Jean-Baptiste; Aagaard, Olav; Waters, Elizabeth J

    2011-03-23

    The effects of wine composition and postbottling oxygen exposure on 3-mercaptohexanol (3-MH), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methyl mercaptan (MeSH) were investigated. A Sauvignon blanc wine with initial copper concentration of 0.1 mg/L was treated with copper sulfate and/or glutathione (GSH) prior to bottling to give final concentrations of 0.3 and 20 mg/L, respectively. The wines were bottled with a synthetic closure previously stored in either ambient air or nitrogen to study the effect of the oxygen normally present in the closure. Bottled wines were stored for 6 months in either air or nitrogen to study the effect of oxygen ingress through the closure. Copper addition resulted in a rapid initial decrease in 3-MH. During storage, a further decrease of 3-MH was observed, which was lower with GSH addition and lowered oxygen exposure. H2S accumulated largely during the second 3 months of bottle storage, with the highest concentrations attained in the wines treated with GSH and copper. Lower oxygen from and through the closure promoted H2S accumulation. The concentration of MeSH was virtually not affected by the experimental variables at 6 months, although differences were observed after 3 months of storage. The implications for wine quality are discussed. PMID:21332202

  8. Odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc table wines and icewines by gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Amy J; Reynolds, Andrew G

    2012-03-21

    This study aimed to elucidate the odor potency of aroma compounds in Riesling and Vidal blanc (syn. Vidal) table wines and icewines from the Niagara Peninsula using stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography-olfactometry-mass spectrometry. Dilution analysis determined the most odor-potent compounds in Vidal and Riesling icewines (n = 2) and table wines (n = 2) from a commercial producer. The top 15 odor-potent compounds in each wine were identified and quantified, resulting in 23 and 24 compounds for Riesling and Vidal, respectively. The most odor-potent compounds were β-damascenone, decanal, 1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, 4-vinylguaiacol, ethyl hexanoate, and ethyl 3-methylbutyrate. In general, icewines had higher concentrations of most aroma compounds compared to table wines. Through computation of odor activity values, the compounds with the highest odor activity for the icewines were β-damascenone, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl octanoate, cis-rose oxide, and ethyl hexanoate. In table wines the highest odor activity values were found for ethyl octanoate, β-damascenone, ethyl hexanoate, cis-rose oxide, ethyl 3-methylbutyrate, and 4-vinylguaiacol. These findings provide a foundation to determine impact odorants in icewines and the effects of viticultural and enological practices on wine aroma volatile composition. PMID:22324474

  9. Identification of S-3-(hexanal)-glutathione and its bisulfite adduct in grape juice from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sauvignon blanc as new potential precursors of 3SH.

    PubMed

    Thibon, Cécile; Böcker, Caroline; Shinkaruk, Svitlana; Moine, Virginie; Darriet, Philippe; Dubourdieu, Denis

    2016-05-15

    Two main precursors (S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-cysteine and S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-glutathione) of 3-sulfanylhexanol (3SH, formerly named 3-mercaptohexanol) have been identified so far in grape juice but a correlation between precursor concentrations in grape juices and 3SH concentrations in wines is not always observed. This suggests that there may be other compounds associated with the aromatic potential. In this work, S-3-(hexanal)-glutathione (Glut-3SH-Al) and its bisulfite (Glut-3SH-SO3) adduct were identified in Sauvignon blanc grape juice by liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier transform mass spectrometry experiments. A partial purification of the compounds was carried out by Medium Pressure Liquid Chromatography (MPLC) on the reverse phase using 5L of grape juice. The addition of synthetized Glut-3SH-Al and Glut-3SH-SO3 in the synthetic medium induced a significant release of 3SH after fermentation. Moreover, we demonstrate that Glut-3SH-Al and its bisulfite adduct are present in grape juice and could be considered as new direct 3SH precursors with molar conversion yields close to 0.4%. PMID:26776028

  10. From flakes to grooves: a technical shift in antlerworking during the last glacial maximum in southwest France.

    PubMed

    Pétillon, Jean-Marc; Ducasse, Sylvain

    2012-04-01

    The evolution of antlerworking technology in Paleolithic and Mesolithic Europe, especially the production of splinters, is usually described as a cumulative process. A progressive increase in blank standardization and productivity was prompted by the application of a key technical process, the groove and splinter technique (GST). The Badegoulian, however, appears as an interruption in this continuum. According to the original definition of this post-Solutrean, pre-Magdalenian archeological culture, one of its distinctive features is the absence of the GST and the manufacture of antler blanks by knapping only. However, this conception has been recently questioned, leading to an alternative hypothesis suggesting that both GST and knapping were used during the Badegoulian. In this article, we present new evidence from several sites in southwest France, which sheds new light on the issue of Badegoulian antlerworking and the transition with the subsequent Lower Magdalenian. Our study is based on two complementary methods: the technological analysis of antler assemblages well-dated to the Badegoulian (Le Cuzoul de Vers) or to the Lower Magdalenian (La Grotte des Scilles, Saint-Germain-la-Rivière), and the direct (14)C dating of specific antler artifacts from mixed or problematic contexts (Cap-Blanc, Reverdit and Lassac). The results firmly establish that, in southwest France, knapping is the only method used for the production of antler splinters during the Badegoulian, before ca. 20,500 cal BP (calibrated years before present), and that it is rapidly replaced by the GST at the beginning of the Lower Magdalenian, after ca. 20,500 cal BP. This technical shift is not linked to an influx of new human populations, environmental change or the supposed economic advantages of the GST. Instead, it must be understood as one of the expressions of a broader reconfiguration of the technical world that starts to take shape in the middle of the Last Glacial Maximum. PMID:22386151

  11. WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

    2012-01-30

    The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montana’s vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQ’s wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the state’s university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

  12. [Dengue fever in mainland France].

    PubMed

    Paty, M-C

    2014-11-01

    Dengue fever is the most widespread distributed vector borne viral disease. It is transmitted through the bites of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. With the expansion of Aedes albopictus and increasing travel exchange, it is no longer limited to the tropical zone and transmission has been documented in temperate areas. In mainland France, where Aedes albopictus has been present and disseminating since 2004, 2 episodes of autochthonous transmission occurred in 2010 and in 2013. Control measures against dengue and chikungunya, which shares the same vector, are implemented every year since 2006, in the areas where the vector is present. They aim at preventing or limiting local transmission of these diseases. They are based on epidemiological and entomological surveillance and vector control measures. The diagnosis of dengue, and chikungunya should be considered in case of suggestive symptoms in patients returning from an area of virus circulation. It should also be considered for patients living or having stayed in areas of mainland France where Aedes albopictus is present, during its activity period from May 1 to November 30. The prevention and control system, including vector control measures and the notification of cases to the local health authority should be known, as the risk of autochthonous transmission increases every year. PMID:25080833

  13. The mutation rate of the human mtDNA deletion mtDNA{sup 4977}

    SciTech Connect

    Shenkar, R.; Navidi, W.; Tavare, S.

    1996-10-01

    The human mitochondrial mutation mtDNA{sup 4977} is a 4,977-bp deletion that originates between two 13-bp direct repeats. We grew 220 colonies of cells, each from a single human cell. For each colony, we counted the number of cells and amplified the DNA by PCR to test for the presence of a deletion. To estimate the mutation rate, we used a model that describes the relationship between the mutation rate and the probability that a colony of a given size will contain no mutants, taking into account such factors as possible mitochondrial turnover and mistyping due to PCR error. We estimate that the mutation rate for mtDNA{sup 4977} in cultured human cells is 5.95 x 10{sup {minus}8} per mitochondrial genome replication. This method can be applied to specific chromosomal, as well as mitochondrial, mutations. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Construct Validity of the MMPI-2 College Maladjustment (Mt) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barthlow, Deanna L.; Graham, John R.; Ben-Porath, Yossef S.; McNulty, John L

    2004-01-01

    The construct validity of the MMPI-2 (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2) College Maladjustment (Mt) Scale was examined using 376 student clients at a university psychological clinic. A principal components analysis and correlations of Mt scale scores with clients' and therapists' ratings of symptoms and functioning showed that the Mt…

  15. The structure of the shower disk observed at Mt. Norikura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, N.; Horiki, T.; Sasaki, H.; Nishioka, A.; Kusumose, M.; Nakatsuka, T.; Hatano, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the EAS shower disk, the arrival time distribution of charged particles at the core of the small or middle size shower, is measured at Mt. Norikura in Japan. Four fast scintillation counters with an area of 0.25 sq m and a fast trigger system are added to the Mt. Norikura EAS array for the study.

  16. 77 FR 55690 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Dillon, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ..., Dillon, MT (77 FR 15295). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... at Dillon Airport, Dillon, MT (77 FR 40834). Interested parties were invited to participate in this...) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February...

  17. An Evaluation Study of Community Services, Mt. San Antonio College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohr, Sue

    A study was conducted by the Community Services Department at Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) to evaluate participant satisfaction and suggestions for future direction for the department's comprehensive program of non-credit courses. A questionnaire was administered in class to 307 participants between April 1, and June 1, 1987, focusing on…

  18. 75 FR 41075 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace at Bozeman, MT (75 FR 20321). Interested parties were invited..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT AGENCY:...

  19. SignMT: An Alternative Language Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditcharoen, Nadh; Naruedomkul, Kanlaya; Cercone, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Learning a second language is very difficult, especially, for the disabled; the disability may be a barrier to learn and to utilize information written in text form. We present the SignMT, Thai sign to Thai machine translation system, which is able to translate from Thai sign language into Thai text. In the translation process, SignMT takes into…

  20. Melatonin inhibits cholangiocyte hyperplasia in cholestatic rats by interaction with MT1 but not MT2 melatonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Anastasia; Glaser, Shannon; Demorrow, Sharon; Mancinelli, Romina; Meng, Fanyin; Franchitto, Antonio; Venter, Julie; White, Mellanie; Francis, Heather; Han, Yuyan; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Carpino, Guido; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Onori, Paolo; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-10-01

    In bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats, large cholangiocytes proliferate by activation of cAMP-dependent signaling. Melatonin, which is secreted from pineal gland as well as extrapineal tissues, regulates cell mitosis by interacting with melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2) modulating cAMP and clock genes. In the liver, melatonin suppresses oxidative damage and ameliorates fibrosis. No information exists regarding the role of melatonin in the regulation of biliary hyperplasia. We evaluated the mechanisms of action by which melatonin regulates the growth of cholangiocytes. In normal and BDL rats, we determined the hepatic distribution of MT1, MT2, and the clock genes, CLOCK, BMAL1, CRY1, and PER1. Normal and BDL (immediately after BDL) rats were treated in vivo with melatonin before evaluating 1) serum levels of melatonin, bilirubin, and transaminases; 2) intrahepatic bile duct mass (IBDM) in liver sections; and 3) the expression of MT1 and MT2, clock genes, and PKA phosphorylation. In vitro, large cholangiocytes were stimulated with melatonin in the absence/presence of luzindole (MT1/MT2 antagonist) and 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (MT2 antagonist) before evaluating cell proliferation, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation. Cholangiocytes express MT1 and MT2, CLOCK, BMAL1, CRY1, and PER1 that were all upregulated following BDL. Administration of melatonin to BDL rats decreased IBDM, serum bilirubin and transaminases levels, the expression of all clock genes, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation in cholangiocytes. In vitro, melatonin decreased the proliferation, cAMP levels, and PKA phosphorylation, decreases that were blocked by luzindole. Melatonin may be important in the management of biliary hyperplasia in human cholangiopathies. PMID:21757639

  1. The Ancestry of Brazilian mtDNA Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Silva, Juliana; da Silva Santos, Magda; Guimarães, Pedro E. M.; Ferreira, Alessandro C. S.; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen; Pena, Sérgio D. J.; Prado, Vania Ferreira

    2000-01-01

    We have analyzed 247 Brazilian mtDNAs for hypervariable segment (HVS)–I and selected restriction fragment-length–polymorphism sites, to assess their ancestry in different continents. The total sample showed nearly equal amounts of Native American, African, and European matrilineal genetic contribution but with regional differences within Brazil. The mtDNA pool of present-day Brazilians clearly reflects the imprints of the early Portuguese colonization process (involving directional mating), as well as the recent immigrant waves (from Europe) of the last century. The subset of 99 mtDNAs from the southeastern region encompasses nearly all mtDNA haplogroups observed in the total Brazilian sample; for this regional subset, HVS-II was analyzed, providing, in particular, some novel details of the African mtDNA phylogeny. PMID:10873790

  2. Apprenticeship in France: Between Tradition and Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon-Zarca, Georgie

    1996-01-01

    A study was made of the state of apprenticeship in France, using data gathered through telephone interviews with apprentices. Of a targeted group of 6,000 young apprentices, 70% participated in the survey. The study found that, until recently, apprenticeships had generally been used in France to train students in manual trades. During the past 10…

  3. Napoli and Volcanism - Vesuvius and Mt. Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    For more than 240 million years the region now known as Italy has been the scene of episodic volcanic activity. East-southeast of Napoli (Naples) stands the imposing cone of Vesuvius, which erupted explosively in 79 A.D. to bury Pompeii and Herculaneum. More recently, when the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-104 captured this view, Mt. Etna (Sicily, not seen in this image, but photographed the day before) was spewing ash and gas thousands of meters into the air, some of which can be seen as a brownish smear over Isola d' Ischia and the Tyrrhenian Sea. The Appenine ranges extend from northern Italy, down the boot of the peninsula and westward into Sicily. This photograph of the Appenino Napoletano is part of an 18-frame stereophoto mapping strip that spans the entire mountain chain. The almost 1200-km-long belt of volcanoes and folded/faulted mountains is a result of the ongoing collision of Africa and Eurasia, accompanied by the progressive closing of the Mediterranean Sea. Using overlapping pairs of stereophotos, and a special viewer, scientists can get a three-dimensional perspective on the ranges that surpasses any image viewed alone. For more information, see another image of Mt. Vesuvius, taken by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). References: Behncke, Boris, 2000, Vesuvio - The eruption of A.D. 79: Italy's Volcanoes - The Cradle of Volcanology [http://www.geo.mtu.edu/boris/VESUVIO_79.html (accessed 10/18/01)] Doglioni, C., and Flores, G., 1997, Italy, in Moores, E. M., and Fairbridge, R. W., editors, Encyclopedia of European and Asian Regional Geology: London, Chapman and Hall, p. 414-435 Shuttle photograph STS104-710-60 was taken 23 July 2001 from the orbiter Atlantis using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. The entire mapping series (of frames numbered in sequence from 50 through 68) can also be downloaded from the

  4. The current evolution of complex high mountain debris-covered glacier systems and its relation with ground ice nature and distribution: the case of Rognes and Pierre Ronde area (Mont-Blanc range, France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosson, Jean-Baptiste; Lambiel, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    The current climate forcing, through negative glacier mass balance and rockfall intensification, is leading to the rapid burring of many small glacier systems. When the debris mantle exceeds some centimeters of thickness, the climate control on ice melt is mitigated and delayed. As well, debris-covered glaciers respond to climate forcing in a complex way. This situation is emphasised in high mountain environments, where topo-climatic conditions, such as cold temperatures, amount of solid precipitation, duration of snow cover, nebulosity or shadow effect of rockwalls, limit the influence of rising air temperatures in the ground. Beside, due to Holocene climate history, glacier-permafrost interactions are not rare within the periglacial belt. Glacier recurrence may have removed and assimilated former ice-cemented sediments, the negative mass balance may have led to the formation of ice-cored rock glaciers and neopermafrost may have formed recently under cold climate conditions. Hence, in addition to sedimentary ice, high mountain debris-covered glacier systems can contain interstitial magmatic ice. Especially because of their position at the top of alpine cascade systems and of the amount of water and (unconsolidated) sediment involved, it is important to understand and anticipate the evolution of these complex landforms. Due to the continuous and thick debris mantle and to the common existence of dead ice in deglaciated areas, the current extent of debris-covered glacier can be difficult to point out. Thus, the whole system, according to Little Ice Age (LIA) extent, has sometimes to be investigated to understand the current response of glacier systems to the climate warming. In this context, two neighbouring sites, Rognes and Pierre Ronde systems (45°51'38''N, 6°48'40''E; 2600-3100m a.s.l), have been studied since 2011. These sites are almost completely debris-covered and only few ice outcrops in the upper slopes still witness the existence of former glaciers. Electrical resistivity tomographies, kinematic data and ground surface temperature show that heterogeneous responses to climate forcing are occurring despites their small areas (> 0.3 km2). This complex situation is related to Holocene climate history and especially to glacier systems evolution since LIA. The current dynamics depend of ground ice nature and distribution. Five main behaviours can be highlighted: - Debris covered glacier areas are the most active. Their responses to climate forcing are relatively fast, especially through massive ice melt-out each summer. - Ice-cored rock glacier areas are quite active. The existence of massive glacier ice under few meters of debris explain the important surface lowering during the snow free period . - Ice-cemented rock glacier areas are characterised by winter and summer subhorizontal downslope creeping. - Moraine areas containing dead ice have heterogeneous activities (directions and values of detected movements) related to the ice vanishing. - Deglaciated moraine areas are almost inactive, except modest superficial paraglacial rebalancing.

  5. Mechanisms for the export of archaeal lipids down the water column in the upwelling area off Cape Blanc, North-West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebersbach, Friederike; Goldenstein, Nadine; Iversen, Morten; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Transport mechanisms of microbial membrane lipids from surface waters to the seafloor are poorly understood. In particular, pelagic archaeal glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) from planktonic archaea are frequently used for reconstruction of ancient sea surface temperatures (Schouten et al. 2013). Because planktonic archaea are too small and neutrally buoyant to sink independently, transport vehicles for efficient export of fossil archaeal biomarkers to the sediment are required. The surface ocean is coupled with the deep ocean through biogenic sinking particles, a process known as the biological pump (Volk and Hoffert 1985). Two different pathways for particle formation, mainly taking place in the mesopelagic zone, are distinguished: Direct aggregation of phytoplankton blooms or grazing, resulting in phyto-detrital aggregates or reprocessed faecal material, respectively. Grazing and packaging into sinking particles is a possible export mechanism for GDGTs (Huguet et al. 2006). Moreover, it is assumed that phyto-detrital aggregates also play an important role in transporting GDGTs to the deep (Mollenhauer et al. 2015), but processes behind this pathway remain unclear. However, there are only few studies that link GDGT signals in sinking particles to the composition of the exported particulate matter (e.g. Yamamoto et al., 2012; Mollenhauer et al. 2015). Here we investigate sinking particles and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from spring blooms in 2012 and 2013 in the upwelling region in the Atlantic Ocean off Cape Blanc, Mauritania. We compare for the first time material from free-floating sediment traps (100, 200 and 400 m; purely sinking particles) with sinking particles and SPM from size fractionated in-situ pump (ISP) filters (several depths between 40 and 2350 m). This setup allows to relate the signal from archaeal lipids to (i) the flux of particulate organic carbon and the particle assemblages as revealed by the characterisation of

  6. Time series of in-situ particle properties and sediment trap fluxes in the coastal upwelling filament off Cape Blanc, Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowald, N.; Iversen, M. H.; Fischer, G.; Ratmeyer, V.; Wefer, G.

    2015-09-01

    We compared particle data from a moored video camera system with sediment trap derived fluxes at ∼1100 m depth in the highly dynamic coastal upwelling system off Cape Blanc, Mauritania. Between spring 2008 and winter 2010 the trap collected settling particles in 9-day intervals, while the camera recorded in-situ particle abundance and size-distribution every third day. Particle fluxes were highly variable (40-1200 mg m-2 d-1) and followed distinct seasonal patterns with peaks during spring, summer and fall. The particle flux patterns from the sediment traps correlated to the total particle volume captured by the video camera, which ranged from1 to 22 mm3 l-1. The measured increase in total particle volume during periods of high mass flux appeared to be better related to increases in the particle concentrations, rather than to increased average particle size. We observed events that had similar particle fluxes, but showed clear differences in particle abundance and size-distribution, and vice versa. Such observations can only be explained by shifts in the composition of the settling material, with changes both in particle density and chemical composition. For example, the input of wind-blown dust from the Sahara during September 2009 led to the formation of high numbers of comparably small particles in the water column. This suggests that, besides seasonal changes, the composition of marine particles in one region underlies episodical changes. The time between the appearance of high dust concentrations in the atmosphere and the increase lithogenic flux in the 1100 m deep trap suggested an average settling rate of 200 m d-1, indicating a close and fast coupling between dust input and sedimentation of the material.

  7. A four-year record of UK‧37- and TEX86-derived sea surface temperature estimates from sinking particles in the filamentous upwelling region off Cape Blanc, Mauritania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollenhauer, Gesine; Basse, Andreas; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Fischer, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    Lipid biomarker records from sinking particles collected by sediment traps can be used to study the seasonality of biomarker production as well as processes of particle formation and settling, ultimately leading to the preservation of the biomarkers in sediments. Here we present records of the biomarker indices U37K ‧ based on alkenones and TEX86 based on isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), both used for the reconstruction of sea surface temperatures (SST). These records were obtained from sinking particles collected using a sediment trap moored in the filamentous upwelling zone off Cape Blanc, Mauritania, at approximately 1300 water depth during a four-year time interval between 2003 and 2007, and supplemented by U37K ‧ and TEX86 determined on suspended particulate matter collected from surface waters in the study area. Mass and lipid fluxes are highest during peak upwelling periods between October and June. The alkenone and GDGT records both display pronounced seasonal variability. Sinking velocities calculated from the time lag between measured SST maxima and minima and corresponding index maxima and minima in the trap samples are higher for particles containing alkenones (14-59 m d-1) than for GDGTs (9-17 m d-1). It is suggested that GDGTs are predominantly exported from shallow waters by incorporation in opal-rich particles. SST estimates based on the U37K ‧ index correspond to the amplitude observed fluctuations in SST during the study period. Temperature estimates based on TEX86 show smaller seasonal amplitudes, which can be explained by either predominant production of GDGTs during the warm season, or a contribution of GDGTs exported from deep waters, which are in this region known to carry GDGTs in a distribution that translates to a high TEX86 signal.

  8. Stable isotope and Ar/Ar evidence of prolonged multiscale fluid flow during exhumation of orogenic crust: Example from the Mont Blanc and Aar Massifs (NW Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M.; Rolland, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The spatial and temporal scales and the geometry of fluid pathways in a collisional orogen are investigated using stable isotope analysis (O, C, and H) and 40Ar/39Ar dating of vein minerals formed at circa 11-16 Ma in the Mont Blanc and the Aar External Crystalline Massifs. In both massifs 40Ar/39Ar dating of veins adularia provides evidence for progressive crystallization from 16 to 9 Ma, and mainly at 11-12 Ma following veins opening during shear zone activity. The fluid flow duration thus ranges from 4 to 5 Ma in the two massifs. The δ18O values of vein quartz and calcite are similar to those of undeformed crystalline and sedimentary host rocks, suggesting rock buffering, while carbon isotope ratios of vein calcites fall into three compositional groups. A-type veins have δ13C values that are buffered by the Helvetic metasediments, which suggests that these veins formed in a closed system from a locally derived CO2-rich fluid. The fluid in equilibrium with C-type veins has depleted δ13C values similar to mantle-CO2, while the intermediate δ13C values of B-type veins suggest mixing between the A-type and C-type fluids. These results are in agreement with crustal- to lithosphere-scale upward vertical fluid flow along vertical shear zones related to the strike-slip system bounding the Adriatic block since 16-20 Ma, connecting a deep-seated fluid to some downward flow in the sedimentary cover of External Crystalline Massifs.

  9. Tracking Holocene glacial and high-altitude alpine environments fluctuations from minerogenic and organic markers in proglacial lake sediments (Lake Blanc Huez, Western French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonneau, Anaëlle; Chapron, Emmanuel; Garçon, Marion; Winiarski, Thierry; Graz, Yann; Chauvel, Catherine; Debret, Maxime; Motelica-Heino, Mickaël; Desmet, Marc; Di Giovanni, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Holocene palaeoenvironmental evolution and glacial fluctuations at high-altitude in the western French Alps are reconstructed based on a multiproxy approach within Lake Blanc Huez (2550 m a.s.l.) drainage basin. The combination of seismic profiling (3.5 kHz), piston coring and radiocarbon dating in proglacial lacustrine sediments together with a detailed organic analysis of autochthonous and allochthonous supply allows documenting the evolution of glacier activity during the Holocene. Over the last 9700 years, the Holocene lake record has a bimodal pattern whose transition is progressive and occurring between 5400 and 4700 cal BP. During the Early Holocene, the organic lacustrine facies reflects reduced glacial activity in the catchment. This major glacial retreat seems to result from solar forcing and high summer insolation. After 5400 cal BP, lacustrine sedimentation is marked by the gradual increase both of minerogenic supply and soil erosion, suggesting a progressive transition to wetter climatic conditions. This climate change is synchronous both from the gradual decrease of summer insolation and the gradual reorganization of oceanic and atmospheric circulations, characterizing the beginning of the Neoglacial period. Both colder temperature and humid climate induced significant glacier advance, since 4700 cal BP. Over this global trend, three periods are particularly associated with higher runoff processes and higher soil erosion interpreted as wetter time intervals resulting from enhanced northern Westerlies regimes across the North Atlantic and Western Europe. They are dated from 8700 to 7000, 4700 to 2500 and 1200 to 200 cal BP. These wetter phases drastically contrast with periods of reduced glacial activities dated from the Early Bronze Age (ca 3870-3770 cal BP), the Iron Age (ca 2220-2150 cal BP), the Roman period (ca AD115-330) and the Medieval Warm Period (ca AD760-1160). In addition, these dryer periods are associated with mining activities at high-altitude.

  10. Surface and thickness variations of Brenva Glacier tongue (Mont Blanc, Italian Alps) in the second half of the 20th century by historical maps and aerial photogrammetry comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D Agata, C.; Zanutta, A.; Muzzu Martis, D.; Mancini, F.; Smiraglia, C.

    2003-04-01

    Aim of this contribution is the evaluation of volumetric and surface variations of Brenva Glacier (Mont Blanc, Italian Alps) during the second half of the 20th century, by GIS-based processing of maps and aerial photogrammetry technique. Brenva Glacier is a typical debris covered glacier, located in a valley on the S-E side of the Mont Blanc. The glacier covers a surface of 7 kmq and shows a length of 7,6 km at maximum. The glacier snout reaches 1415 m a.s.l., which is the lowest glacier terminus of the Italian Alps. To evaluate glacier variations different historical maps were used: 1) The 1959 Map, at the scale 1:5.000, by EIRA (Ente Italiano Rilievi Aerofotogrammetrici, Firenze), from terrestrial photogrammetric survey, published in the Bollettino del Comitato Glaciologico Italiano, 2, n. 19, 1971. 2) The 1971 Map, at the scale 1:5.000, from aerial photogrammetry (Alifoto, Torino) published in the Bollettino del Comitato Glaciologico Italiano, 2, n. 20, 1972. 3) The 1988 Map, at the scale 1:10.000, (Region Aosta Valley, Regional Technical Map) from 1983 aerial photogrammetric survey. 4) The 1999 Map, at the scale 1:10.000, (Region Aosta Valley, Regional Technical Map) from 1991 aerial photogrammetry survey. For the same purpose the following aereal photographs were used: 1) The 1975 image, CGR (Italian General Company aerial Surveys) flight RAVDA (Administrative Autonomous Region Aosta Valley), at the scale 1:17.000. 2) The 1991 image, CGR (Italian General Company aerial Surveys) flight RAVDA (Administrative Autonomous Region Aosta Valley), at the scale 1:17.000. Aerial imageries have been acquired over a long period from 1975 to 1991. The black and white images were scanned at suitable resolution if compared with the imagery scale and several models, representing the glacier tongue area, oriented using the inner and outer orientation parameters delivered with the images, were produced. The digital photogrammetric system, after orientation and matching, produces

  11. Developmental genetics of deleted mtDNA in mitochondrial oculomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Marzuki, S; Berkovic, S F; Saifuddin Noer, A; Kapsa, R M; Kalnins, R M; Byrne, E; Sasmono, T; Sudoyo, H

    1997-02-12

    Heteroplasmic populations of mtDNA, consisting of normal mtDNA and mtDNA with large deletions, are found in the skeletal muscle and other tissues of certain patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies, particularly in those with the CPEO (chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia) phenotype. To study the developmental genetics of this mitochondrial disorder, the distribution of the deleted mtDNA in a wide range of tissues of different embryonic origins (total 34 samples from 27 tissues obtained at autopsy) was investigated in a patient with the CPEO syndrome. Three species of partially deleted mtDNA were observed, with deletions of 2.3 kb, 5.0 kb and 6.4 kb. Their tissue distribution suggests that the mtDNA deletions have occurred very early during embryonic development, prior to the differentiation events that lead to the formation of the three primary embryonic germ layers, and that the partially deleted mtDNA species were segregated during development mainly to the skeletal muscle and to tissues of the central nervous system. PMID:9094043

  12. Extreme mtDNA divergences in a terrestrial slug (Gastropoda, Pulmonata, Arionidae): accelerated evolution, allopatric divergence and secondary contact.

    PubMed

    Pinceel, J; Jordaens, K; Backeljau, T

    2005-09-01

    Extremely high levels of intraspecific mtDNA differences in pulmonate gastropods have been reported repeatedly and several hypotheses to explain them have been postulated. We studied the phylogeny and phylogeography of 51 populations (n = 843) of the highly polymorphic terrestrial slug Arion subfuscus (Draparnaud, 1805) across its native distribution range in Western Europe. By combining the analysis of single stranded conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) and nucleotide sequencing, we obtained individual sequence data for a fragment of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA and a fragment of the nuclear ITS1. Additionally, five polymorphic allozyme loci were scored. Based on the 16S rDNA phylogeny, five monophyletic haplotype groups with sequence divergences of 9-21% were found. Despite this deep mitochondrial divergence, the haplotype groups were not monophyletic for the nuclear ITS1 fragment and haplotype group-specific allozyme alleles were not found. Although there is evidence for an accelerated mtDNA clock, the divergence among the haplotype groups is older than the Pleistocene and their current allopatric ranges probably reflect allopatric divergence and glacial survival in separate refugia from which different post-glacial colonization routes were established. A range-overlap of two mtDNA groups (S1 and S2, 21% sequence divergence) stretched from Central France and Belgium up to the North of the British Isles. The nuclear data suggest that this secondary contact resulted in hybridization between the allopatrically diverged groups. Therefore, it seems that, at least for two of the groups, the deep mtDNA divergence was only partially accompanied by the formation of reproductive isolation. PMID:16135122

  13. Comparison of Complementary Reactions in the Production of Mt

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Sarah; Gregorich, Kenneth; Dragojevic, Irena; Ellison, Paul; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Gates, Jacklyn; Stavsetra, Liv; Ali, Mazhar; Nitsche, Heino

    2009-01-21

    The new reaction 208Pb(59Co,n)266Mt was studied using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. A cross section of 7.7+5.2-3.3 pb was measured at a compound nucleus excitation energy of 14.9 MeV. The measured decay properties of 266Mt and its daughters correspond well with existing data. We compare this experimental result to transactinide compound nucleus formation model predictions, and the previously studied 209Bi(58Fe,n)266Mt reaction.

  14. Comparison of complementary reactions in the production of Mt

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. L.; Dragojevic, I.; Ellison, P. A.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nitsche, H.; Gregorich, K. E.; Dvorak, J.; Stavsetra, L.; Ali, M. N.

    2009-02-15

    The new reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 59}Co,n){sup 266}Mt was studied using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. A cross section of 7.7{sub -3.3}{sup +5.2} pb was measured at a compound nucleus excitation energy of 14.9 MeV. The measured decay properties of {sup 266}Mt and its daughters correspond well with existing data. We compare this experimental result to transactinide compound nucleus formation model predictions, and the previously studied {sup 209}Bi({sup 58}Fe,n){sup 266}Mt reaction.

  15. Viscosity controlled magma-carbonate interaction: a comparison of Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) and Mt. Merapi (Indonesia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, L. S.; Misiti, V.; Masotta, M.; Taddeucci, J.; Freda, C.; Troll, V. R.; Deegan, F. M.; Jolis, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    Magma-carbonate interaction is increasingly seen as a viable and extremely important cause of magma contamination, and the generation of a crustally sourced CO2 phase (Goff et al., 2001; Freda et al., 2010). Even though the process is well recognized at certain volcanoes e.g. Popocatépetl, (Mexico); Merapi, (Indonesia); and Colli Albani, (Italy) (Goff et al., 2001; Deegan et al., 2010; Freda et al., 2010), neither the kinetics of carbonate assimilation nor its consequences for controlling the explosivity of eruptions have been constrained. Here we show the results of magma-carbonate interaction experiments conducted at 1200 °C and 0.5 GPa for varying durations (0 s, 60 s, 90 s and 300 s) for the Mt. Merapi (Indonesia) and Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) volcanic systems. We performed experiments using glassy starting materials specific to each volcano (shoshonite for Mt. Vesuvius, basaltic-andesite for Mt. Merapi) with different degrees of hydration (anhydrous vs hydration with ~ 2 wt % water) and using carbonate fragments of local origin; see Deegan et al., (2010) and Jolis et al., (2011). Experimental products include a gas phase (CO2-rich) and two melt phases, one pristine (Ca-normal) and one contaminated (Ca-rich) separated by a 'contamination front' which propagates outwards from the carbonate clast. Vesicles appear to nucleate in the contaminated glass and then migrate into the pristine one. Both contamination front propagation and bubble migration away from the carbonate are slower in anhydrous basaltic-andesite (Merapi anhydrous series) than in hydrated basaltic-andesite and shoshonite (Merapi and Vesuvius hydrated series), suggesting that assimilation speed is strongly controlled by the degree of hydration and the SiO2 content, both of which influence melt viscosity and hence diffusivity. As the carbonate dissolution proceeds in our experiments, initially dissolved and eventually exsolved CO2 builds up in the contaminated Ca-rich melt phase. Once melt volatile

  16. Zinc metallothionein (MT) induction by parenteral iron and endotoxin: A temporal analysis of hepatic MT mRNA changes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, C.C. )

    1991-03-15

    The present study was undertaken to compare the temporal characteristics of iron-induced hepatic MT mRNA accumulation to that effected by endotoxin. Young chicks were given (ip) either endotoxin, ferrous gluconate or an equivalent volume of saline. At various times following injections, liver was obtained from 5 chicks per treatment for total RNA extraction. Equal amounts of total hepatic RNA from each chick were pooled and 10 {mu}g separated by denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis. Hepatic MT mRNA and albumin mRNA were analyzed by Northern blot analysis using synthetic oligonucleotides. The results indicated little temporal difference in the accumulation of hepatic MT mRNA as affected by either endotoxin or iron. In both treatments, MT mRNA was minimally affected at 3 hours post-injection. Maximum accumulation was achieved during a 6 h period from 6 to 12 hours post-injection. At 24 hours, MT mRNA was considerably higher in liver of endotoxin-injected chicks when compared to that of iron-injection chicks. Albumin expression appeared not to be substantially affected by either treatment. The results suggest that the induction of hepatic MT by iron injection is not substantially different than that observed following endotoxin administration. It would be speculative to suggest that the processes by which MT is induced under these conditions are also similar.

  17. Site testing telescope on Mt. Hopkins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromwell, R. H.; Haemmerle, V. R.; Woolf, N. J.

    1990-07-01

    A site testing telescope (STT) was placed for a period of 3 months outside the building, and for a period of 4 months inside the building of the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) located on Mt. Hopkins, and measurements of the astronomical seeing were carried out with both the STT and MMT. A comparison of the simultaneous and interleaved measurements with the two telescopes reveals a tight correlation and a well-defined relationship between the seeing image sizes determined with each telescope. The STT predicts very well the size of a long-exposure image obtained with the MMT. There exists for the MMT an optical blur component of about 0.47 arcsec that is revealed in image size data obtained with only the MMT and that is also revealed and must be accounted for in comparisons between the STT and MMT. Also discovered is a downward component of seeing that is caused by a trailing downwind plume of cold turbulent air that is shed off the radiatively cooled exterior building surfaces. The interior dome component of seeing is remarkably small (upper limit about 0.2 arcsec). The median site seeing is determined to be 0.55 arcsec at an effective wavelength of 7165 A for the MMT observations, or about 0.59 arcsec at 5000 A. The 10 percentile value is about 0.28 arcsec (0.30 arcsec at 5000 A). The median seeing observed with the MMT from one and a half years of data is 0.72 arcsec (0.75 arcsec at 5000 A), and is degraded from the site value virtually entirely by the optical blur component.

  18. [The occupational physician in France].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-10-01

    The French Labor law defines the role and its allocation criteria of the occupational physician (OP) the same as in Japan. In France, occupational medicine is one of the medical specialties. The OP resident must follow the 4 years clinical training before certification. After having finished their residency, they are entitled to work for the occupational health service office of a company or company association (in the case of small and medium sized companies). The most important characteristics of the French system is that they cover all workers regardless of company size. The main role of the OP is prevention of work related diseases and accidents. They are not allowed to do clinical services except for emergency cases. Their main activities are health examinations, health education, patrol and advice for better working condition. Formerly, it was rather difficult to attract the medical students for OP resident course because of its prevention oriented characteristics. A growing concern about the importance of health management at the work site, however, has changed the situation. Now, the number of candidates for OP resident course is increasing. Their task has expanded to cover mental health and other life style related diseases. The 2011 modification of law redefines the role of the OP as a director of an occupational health service office who has a total responsibility of multidisciplinary services. The French and Japanese occupational health systems have many of similarities. A comparative study by researchers of UOEH is expected to yield useful information. PMID:24107336

  19. Eudialyte-group minerals in rocks of Lovozero layered complex at Mt. Karnasurt and Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    Eudialyte-bearing interbeds within layers I-4 (Mt. Karnasurt) and II-4 (Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk) in the layered complex of the Lovozero Pluton are localized symmetrically relative to the loparite-bearing ijolite-malignite layer; the content of eudialyte decreases from underlying nepheline syenite to overlying foidolite. Eudialyte-group minerals fill the interstices between nepheline, sodalite, and microcline-perthite crystals in all rock types and are partially replaced with georgechaoite and minerals of the lovozerite group as a result of hydrothermal alteration. Variations in the chemical composition of the eudialyte-group minerals are mainly controlled by block substitution NaFeZrCl ↔ LnMn(Nb,Ti)S producing eudialyte proper, manganoeudialyte (sharply predominant), kentbrooksite, alluaivite, and a phase intermediate between manganoeudialyte and alluaivite. As the total Ln2O3 content increases, the relative amounts of Ce and La oxides increases linearly in the proportion Ce2O3: La2O3 = 2.5: 1. In the phases containing lower than 3 wt % La2O3, Nd becomes the next REE after Ce. It is very likely that (mangano)eudialyte was mostly formed after parakeldyshite and other anhydrous zirconium-silicate under effect of residual fluids enriched in Ca and Mn, which took part in fenitization of basalt, tuff, and tuffite of the Lovozero Formation.

  20. Loparite-(Ce) in rocks of the Lovozero layered complex at Mt. Karnasurt and Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomovsky, Ya. A.; Ivanyuk, G. Yu.; Yakovenchuk, V. N.

    2014-12-01

    Following from a mineralogical and petrographic study of loparite-bearing units I-4 at Mt. Karnasurt and II-4 at Mt. Kedykvyrpakhk, loparite-(Ce) is found to be concentrated in thin (10-40 cm) malignite-ijolite layers at the boundary between the underlying nepheline syenite and the overlying foidolite. Skeletal loparite-(Ce) metacrysts occur as inclusions in nepheline, sodalite, natrolite, aegirine, eudialyte, and lomonosovite or within the intergranular space between them. In turn, the characteristic segregations of skeletal loparite-(Ce) metacrysts contain inclusions of natrolite, lomonosovite, rhabdophane-(Ce), labuntsovite, and other relatively low-temperature minerals typical of pegmatites and hydrothermally altered rocks. The chemical composition of loparite-(Ce) varies within narrow limits (Lop59-70Per11-18Lue5-11Tsn4-7 due to an increase in Ca, Ln, Al, and Ti contents and a decrease in Na, Mn, Th, Sr, Fe, and Ta contents in the transitional zone between the underlying nepheline syenite, ore-bearing foidolite-malignite, and overlying ijoliteurtite. Variations in composition are also caused by the lateral isomorphic replacement of Na and Nb with Ln and Ti. The data obtained show that loparite mineralization is related to a pneumatolytic-hydrothermal alteration of foidolite and nepheline syenite along the contact between them.

  1. 4. AERIAL VIEW OF MT. VERNON TERMINUS, SOUTHERN TERMINUS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERIAL VIEW OF MT. VERNON TERMINUS, SOUTHERN TERMINUS OF GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL PARKWAY (GWMP), LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  2. Demoiselles and Drafts from Italy and France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picard, M. Dane

    1988-01-01

    Recounts the adventures of a journey taken through France and Italy. Makes an analogy of this trip to that of the one Charles Dickens took in 1844. Describes silicified horizons of the southern Paris Basin, moraines, outcrops, and "Hoodoos." (RT)

  3. Nuclear Energy - A Fateful Choice for France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Etienne; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In France the public is only moderately interested in technological problems, and so the question of energy choices has not seeped deeply into the political consciousness. The situation could change as the country strengthens its nuclear commitment. (BT)

  4. Women's Employment in France: Protection or Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devaud, Marcelle; Levy, Martine

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the origin and evolution of special protection laws in France for employed women, describes those measures that still exist, and explains what employers, unions, and the authorities think of them. Discusses pregnancy, family responsibilities, and technological progress. (CT)

  5. 75 FR 16839 - Sorbitol From France

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ..., 2009, the Commission established a schedule for the conduct of the review (74 FR 66992, December 17... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Sorbitol From France AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  6. MT1-MMP: Endosomal delivery drives breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Linder, Stefan

    2015-10-26

    The membrane-tethered membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) mediates proteolysis-based invasive tumor growth. In this issue, Marchesin et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506002) describe a tug-of-war mechanism regulating dynein and kinesin motors to drive endosome tubulation and MT1-MMP delivery to the surface of cancer cells, identifying a crucial regulatory axis for tumor metastasis. PMID:26504163

  7. MT1-MMP: Endosomal delivery drives breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The membrane-tethered membrane type 1–matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) mediates proteolysis-based invasive tumor growth. In this issue, Marchesin et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201506002) describe a tug-of-war mechanism regulating dynein and kinesin motors to drive endosome tubulation and MT1-MMP delivery to the surface of cancer cells, identifying a crucial regulatory axis for tumor metastasis. PMID:26504163

  8. The inheritance of mtDNA in lager brewing strains.

    PubMed

    Rainieri, Sandra; Kodama, Yukiko; Nakao, Yoshihiro; Pulvirenti, Andrea; Giudici, Paolo

    2008-06-01

    In this work, we compared the mtDNA of a number of interspecific Saccharomyces hybrids (Saccharomyces cerevisiae x Saccharomyces uvarum and S. cerevisiae x Saccharomyces bayanus) to the mtDNA of 22 lager brewing strains that are thought to be the result of a natural hybridization between S. cerevisiae and another Saccharomyces yeast, possibly belonging to the species S. bayanus. We detected that in hybrids constructed in vitro, the mtDNA could be inherited from either parental strain. Conversely, in the lager strains tested, the mtDNA was never of the S. cerevisiae type. Moreover, the nucleotide sequence of lager brewing strains COXII gene was identical to S. bayanus strain NBRC 1948 COXII gene. MtDNA restriction analysis carried out with three enzymes confirmed this finding. However, restriction analysis with a fourth enzyme (AvaI) provided restriction patterns for lager strains that differed from those of S. bayanus strain NBRC 1948. Our results raise the hypothesis that the human-driven selection carried out on existing lager yeasts has favored only those bearing optimal fermentation characteristics at low temperatures, which harbor the mtDNA of S. bayanus. PMID:18318709

  9. A 4-year sediment trap record of alkenones from the filamentous upwelling region off Cape Blanc, NW Africa and a comparison with distributions in underlying sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Peter J.; Fischer, Gerhard

    2001-08-01

    We analysed long-chain alkenones in sinking particles and surface sediments from the filamentous upwelling region off Cape Blanc, NW Africa, to evaluate the transfer of surface water signals into the geological record. Our study is based on time-series sediment trap records from 730 m (1990-1991) to 2195-3562 m depth (1988-1991). Alkenone fluxes showed considerable interannual variations and no consistent seasonality. The average flux of C 37 and C 38 alkenones to the deep traps was 1.9 μg m -2 d -1 from March 1988 to October 1990 and sevenfold higher in the subsequent year. Alkenone fluxes to the shallower traps were on average twice as high and showed similar temporal variations. The alkenone unsaturation indices UK' 37, UK38Me and UK38Et closely mirrored the seasonal variations in sea-surface temperature (weekly Reynolds SST). Time lags of 10-48 days between the SST and unsaturation maxima suggest particle sinking rates of about 80 and 280 m d -1 for the periods of low and high alkenone fluxes, respectively. The average flux-weighted UK' 37 temperature for the 4-year time series of the deeper traps was 22.1°C, in perfect agreement with the mean weekly SST for the same period. This and the comparison with seasonal temperature variations in the upper 100 m of the water column suggests that UK' 37 records principally the yearly average of the mixed-layer temperature in this region. A comparison between the average annual alkenone fluxes to the lower traps (2400 μg m -2 yr -1) and into the underlying sediments (4 μg m -2 yr -1) suggests that only about 0.2% of the alkenones reaching the deep ocean became preserved in the sediments. The flux-weighted alkenone concentrations also decreased considerably, from 2466 μg gC -1 in the water column to 62 μg gC -1 in the surface sediments. Such a low degree of alkenone preservation is typical for slowly accumulating oxygenated sediments. Despite these dramatic diagenetic alkenone losses, the UK' 37 ratio was not

  10. Calendar-dated glacier variations in the western European Alps during the Neoglacial: the Mer de Glace record, Mont Blanc massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Melaine; Nicolussi, Kurt; Deline, Philip; Astrade, Laurent; Edouard, Jean-Louis; Miramont, Cécile; Arnaud, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Holocene glacier records from the western European Alps are still sparse, although a number of sites are well suited to constraining pre- and early- Little Ice Age (LIA) glacier advances. The present study provides the first dendrochronologically-based and calendar-dated Neoglacial glacier chronology for the Mont Blanc massif, French Alps. It is based on the analysis of over 240 glacially buried Pinus cembra subfossil logs and wood remains found either embedded-in-till or as detrital material in the Mer de Glace right lateral moraine. Only a few of the samples were found to be 'formally in situ' but we show that some logs were 'virtually in situ' (not rooted but showing little or no evidence of reworking) and could be used to accurately reconstruct past glacier margin behavior in space and time. Uncertainties regarding the other samples may relate to original growth location and/or to outer wood decay. The resulting dates (followed by a '+') were therefore considered maximum-limiting ages for glacier advances. The main burial events - interpreted as glacier advances - occurred between ca 1655+ and 1544+ BC, between ca 1230+ and 1105+ BC, between ca 1013+ and 962+/937+ BC, at ca 802-777 BC, after 608+ BC, between 312 and 337 AD, between ca 485+ AD and 606+ AD, between 1120 and 1178 AD, between ca 1248 and 1278+/1296 AD, and after 1352+ AD. These advances predate the late LIA maxima known from historical sources. The magnitude of the advances gradually increased to culminate in three near-Neoglacial maxima during the 7th, 12th and 13th centuries AD, followed by a first LIA/Neoglacial maximum in the second half of the 14th century AD. The pattern of Neoglacial events described here is coherent with Central and Eastern Alpine glacier chronologies. This indicates marked synchronicity of late Holocene glacier variability and forcing at a regional scale, although occasional differences could be detected between 'Western' and 'Eastern' records. The Mer de Glace record also

  11. Kinetic evidence for different mechanisms of interaction of black mamba toxins MT alpha and MT beta with muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Jolkkonen, M; Oras, A; Toomela, T; Karlsson, E; Järv, J; Akerman, K E

    2001-01-01

    By studying the influence of two toxins from the black mamba Dendroaspis polylepis on the kinetics of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine binding to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors from rat cerebral cortex, it was revealed that these toxins, MT alpha and MT beta, interact with the receptors via kinetically distinct mechanisms. MT beta bound to receptors in a one-step, readily reversible process with the dissociation constant K(d)=5.3 microM. The binding mechanism of MTalpha was more complex, involving at least two consecutive steps. A fast receptor-toxin complex formation (K(T)=3.8 microM) was followed by a slow process of isomerisation of this complex (k(i)=1.8 x 10(-2) s(-1), half-time 39 s). A similar two-step interaction mechanism has been established for a related toxin, MT2 from the green mamba D. angusticeps (K(T)=1.4 microM, k(i)=8.3 x 10(-4) s(-1), half-time 840 s). The slow isomerisation process delays the effect of MT alpha and MT2, but increases their apparent potency compared to toxins unable to induce the isomerisation process. PMID:10978757

  12. Sunflower metallothionein family characterisation. Study of the Zn(II)- and Cd(II)-binding abilities of the HaMT1 and HaMT2 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Tomas, M; Pagani, M A; Andreo, C S; Capdevila, M; Atrian, S; Bofill, R

    2015-07-01

    Plant metallothioneins (MTs) constitute a family of small Cys-rich proteins capable of coordinating metal ions, significantly differing from microbial and animal MTs. They are divided into four subfamilies depending on the Cys pattern in their sequence. In this work, the MT system of the sunflower plant (Helianthus annuus) has been defined, with ten genes coding for MTs (HaMT) belonging to the four plant MT subfamilies; three HaMT1, four HaMT2, one HaMT3 and two HaMT4 isoforms. The gene expression pattern and capacity to confer metal resistance to yeast cells have been analysed for at least one member of each subfamily. The divalent metal ion-binding abilities of HaMT1-2 and HaMT2-1 (the isoforms encoded by the most abundantly expressed HaMT1 and HaMT2 isogenes) have been characterised, as HaMT3 and HaMT4 were previously studied. Those isoforms constitute an optimum material to study the effect of Cys number variability on their coordination abilities, as they exhibit additional Cys residues regarding the canonical Cys pattern of each subfamily. Our results show that the variation in the number of Cys does not drastically modify their M(II)-binding abilities, but instead modulates the degree of heterogeneity of the corresponding recombinant syntheses. Significantly, the Zn(II)-HaMT1 complexes were highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. The recombinant Cd-MT preparations of both isoforms exhibit significant acid-labile sulphide content-Cd6S8 or Cd7S7 species. Overall results suggest that HaMT2-1 is probably associated with Cd(II) detoxification, in contrast to HaMT1-2, which may be more related to physiological functions, such as metal ion transport and delivery. PMID:25770010

  13. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  14. Transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA in cyprinid fish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Peng, Liangyue; Hu, Xinjiang; Zhao, Yuling; Liu, Shaojun; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy signifies the existence of identical copies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is essential for normal development, as heteroplasmy causes abnormal development and diseases in human. Homoplasmy in many organisms is ensured by maternal mtDNA inheritance through either absence of paternal mtDNA delivery or early elimination of paternal mtDNA. However, whether paternal mtDNA is transcribed has remained unknown. Here we report that paternal mtDNA shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence in cyprinid fishes. Paternal mtDNA was present in zygotes but absent in larvae and adult organs of goldfish and blunt-snout bream, demonstrating paternal mtDNA delivery and elimination for maternal mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, paternal mtDNA remained detectable up to the heartbeat stage, suggesting its late elimination leading to embryonic heteroplasmy up to advanced embryogenesis. Most importantly, we never detected the cytb RNA of paternal mtDNA at all stages when paternal mtDNA was easily detectable, which reveals that paternal mtDNA is transcriptionally quiescent and thus excludes its effect on the development of heteroplasmic embryos. Therefore, paternal mtDNA in cyprinids shows late elimination and transcriptional quiescence. Clearly, transcriptional quiescence of paternal mtDNA represents a new mechanism for maternal mtDNA inheritance and provides implications for treating mitochondrion-associated diseases by mitochondrial transfer or replacement. PMID:27334806

  15. The Formation and Erosion History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Dapremont, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring 155 km diameter Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5 km high central mound (Fig. 1). This study addresses the formation and erosion history of Mt. Sharp. Gale lies on the topographic dichotomy between the southern highlands and the northern plains - a drop of over 2 km [1,2]. Altitude differences between the north and south rim reflect this regional slope, as do altitude differences between the deep annulus north of Mt. Sharp and the southern crater floor. Orbiter and rover images demonstrate that most exposed areas on Mt. Sharp consist of thin, sub-parallel units interpreted as sedimentary layers [3]. Gale is typical of the 50 large martian craters that have been totally or partially filled with such layers [4,5]. In many craters these sediments have been deeply eroded. Central Peak and Peak Ring: The highest point on Mt. Sharp, near the crater's center, is interpreted as a central peak [6]. The peak has a massive lower portion and a thin, smooth capping deposit (Fig. 2). Gale's size is transitional between martian craters with single central peaks and craters with peak rings approximately half the crater's diameter [2,6]. The boundaries of Mt. Sharp, as well as an arc of hills to the southeast of the mountain, closely match a circle approximately 80 km in diameter (Fig. 3). This morphology suggests that the Gale impact may have formed both a central peak and a partial peak ring, which is covered by the sediments of Mt. Sharp in the north and possibly exposed in the arc of eroded hills in the southeast quadrant (Figs. 3,4).

  16. Imaging the Alboran Domain from a marine MT survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, X.; Evans, R.; Elsenbeck, J.; Jegen, M.

    2012-04-01

    On the Western edge of the Mediterranean, the slow convergence of the Iberian and African plates is marked by very intricate tectonic activity, marked by a combination of small-scale subduction and sub-lithospheric downwelling. Delamination or convective instability has also been proposed to have occurred beneath this domain during the past 25 My. And different geodynamic models have been proposed to explain the lithospheric structure of the arc-shaped belt (Betic and Rif orogenies) and the opening of the Alboran Basin. As part of several international projects carried out in this area, magnetotelluric (MT) methods have been used to explore the crust and upper mantle. The measurements of mantle electrical conductivity are a well known complement to measurements of seismic velocity. Conductivity is sensitive to temperature, composition and hydration of the mantle, and therefore MT is widely used to provide constraints on mantle processes. We present results of electromagnetic studies in the Western Mediterranean, focusing specially in the recently work on the Alboran sea as part of a marine MT survey. Land MT studies have already imaged an area of low resistivity coincident with an area of low velocities without earthquake hypocenters, interpreted as asthenospheric material intruded by the lateral lithospheric tearing and breaking-off of the east-directed subducting Ligurian slab under the Alboran Domain. The marine data show complex MT response functions with strong distortion due to seafloor topography and coast effect, suggesting a fairly resistive lithosphere beneath the seafloor. The marine MT data also shows an anomalous conductive slab towards the Eastern Alboran basin, suggesting a possible hydration of mantle material from an Eastward subducting slab. Both the land and marine MT data suggest that the most likely scenario for the opening of the Alboran Basin is related to the westward rollback of the Ligurian subducting slab.

  17. Advanced MCT technologies in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destefanis, Gérard; Tribolet, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the very recent developments of the HgCdTe infrared detector technology developed by CEA-LETI and industrialized by Sofradir in France. Today Sofradir uses in production for more than 15years a very mature, reproducible, well mastered and fully understood, planar n on p ion implanted technology. This process that allows very high yields to be achieved in all infrared bands from SWIR to LWIR uses the very conventional approach of LPE growth of MCT on lattice-matched CdZnTe substrates. Progress in this field is continuous from 20years and has recently leaded to the fabrication of high performance VLWIR FPA (320x256 with cut off wavelengths as high as 20μm). Moreover, thanks to the design of the epitaxial structure and to the substrate removal step MCT FPAs present the unique features to have very high quantum efficiency (above 70%) from the cut off wavelength down to the UV. This effect, which opens new application fields, was recently demonstrated in SWIR 320x256 FPAs with cut off wavelength of 2.5μm. Very high quality FPAs (1280x1024) with pitches as small as 15μm have already been demonstrated last year using the MBE growth of MWIR MCT epilayers on 4 inches germanium substrates, n on p ion implanted photodiodes and the hot welding indium bump hybridization technique. At the same time, with the MBE growth, bicolor and dual band FPAs which uses more complex multi hetero-junctions architectures (both 4 layers npn and 'pseudo planar' structures and extrinsically doped MCT layers) were fabricated with formats of 320x256 and pitches as small as 25μm. A very new area of development concerns avalanche photodiodes (APD) made with MCT. This semiconductor presents a unique feature among all the over semiconductors. Extremely high avalanche gains can be obtained on n on p photodiodes without absolutely any noise excess (F(K)=1): MCT APDs act as perfect amplifiers. These results open new interesting fields of investigation for low

  18. The International Heliophysical Year in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.

    We are preparing in France the anniversary of IGY 50 We are gathering our efforts around few actions 1 We planned to follow the international campaigns with our solar Telescope THEMIS in Tenerife with the spacecrafts SOHO Cluster and the magnetometers of Superdarn A group is already formed with C Hanuise as responsible to understand some physical processes involved in these phenomena by using former data 2 On the initiative of CAWSES SCOSTEP program we plan to rehabilitate our heliograph in Meudon in order to be able to participate to the international network of flare survey The Japonese are leading this program Shibata and Kurokawa 3 We are developping lectures for students in different places in France We planned to work on the development of a DVD and video games in a IHY European context 4 We have also an outreach program which consists of an exhibition This exibition could be duplicated in France and for French speaking countries

  19. Indian-Asian Relationship: mtDNA Reveals More

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnabas, S.; Joshi, B.; Suresh, C. G.

    Recent studies on human mtDNA have identified continent-specific restriction enzyme sites and resultant haplogroups among populations from different regions of the world. Such studies have helped in elaborating the models for human migrations. We have studied Indian mtDNAs to identify the recognized world ethnic elements present in it. The results presented here are based on the study of DdeI 10394 site along with the associated Asian-specific AluI 10397 site in the mtDNA sequences of the Indian samples. On examining all the related haplogroups, this study suggests that the apparent affinities of Indians and East Asians (comprising Chinese, Japanese, Southeast Asians etc.) could be due to a proto-Asiatic element present in Indians.

  20. Gravity survey of the Mt. Toondina impact structure, South Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, J. B.; Shoemaker, E. M.; Shoemaker, C. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Mt. Toondina impact structure is located in northern South Australia, about 45 km south of the town of Oodnadatta. Only the central uplift is exposed. The outcrops at Mt. Toondina reveal a remarkable structural anomaly surrounded by a broad expanse of nearly flat-lying beds of the Bulldog Shale of Early Cretaceous age. A gravity survey was undertaken in 1989 to determine the diameter of the impact structure, define the form of the central uplift, and understand the local crustal structure. Data were collected along two orthogonal lines across the structure. In addition to the profiles, a significant number of measurements were made on and around the central uplift. The 1989 gravity data combined with 1963 gravity data and the seismic reflection data provide an excellent data base to interpret the subsurface structure of the Mt. Toondina feature.

  1. Syphilis surveillance in France, 2000-2003.

    PubMed

    Couturier, E; Michel, A; Janier, M; Dupin, N; Semaille, C

    2004-12-01

    This article describes syphilis trends, characteristics of patients from 2000 to 2003 in France and trends of the benzylpenicillin benzathine 2.4 million UI sales from 2001 to 2003. The ongoing surveillance system for syphilis case reporting since 2001 has been set up in volunteer settings, mostly public settings where STI treatment is offered. Clinical case reporting is complemented by sexual behavioural data based on a self-administered questionnaire. From 2000 to 2003, 1089 syphilis cases were reported in France, increasing from 37 cases in 2000 to 428 in 2003. Overall, 96% of syphilis cases were in men with a mean age of 36.5 years and 70% of whom were born in France. The proportion of syphilis cases with HIV co-infection decreased over time from 60% in 2000 to 33% in 2003. The most affected area by the syphilis epidemic is the Ile-de-France region, mainly the city of Paris. The greatest proportion of syphilis cases diagnosed in men who have sex with men (MSM) were in the Ile-de-France region, where they made up 87% of cases, compared with 75% in other regions. Among the patients who completed the self-administered questionnaire on sexual behaviour, 83% reported having casual sex partners in the 3 months prior to their syphilis diagnosis. Trends in the sales of benzylpenicillin benzathine 2.4 million UI in private pharmacies are similar to those observed in the surveillance system, and increased between 2001 and 2003. In conclusion, syphilis transmission is still ongoing in France in 2003 and the role of unprotected oral sex in the transmission of syphilis should be emphasised. PMID:15677855

  2. Rheology of Crystallizing Basalts from Mt. Nyiragongo and Mt. Nyamuragira D.R.C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. A.; Whittington, A. G.; Sehlke, A.

    2015-12-01

    Mt. Nyiragongo, located within the Virunga Volcanic Province on the western branch of the East African Rift, is known for its persistent lava lake activity as well as devastating eruptions in 1977 and 2002. The 2002 eruption caused a humanitarian crisis when channelized lava flows entered the nearby city of Goma killing 170 people and displacing ~350,000 others. These lavas have extremely low silica contents (39-42 wt.% SiO2) and are very fluid, allowing flows to move rapidly away from the source. We have measured the rheology of lavas from Nyiragongo using a concentric cylinder viscometer at temperatures of ~1220, 1205, 1190, 1175, 1165, and 1145°C. Each experiment starts with a liquid viscosity measurement at 1500˚C, followed by cooling to the desired experimental temperature. The lava spends 10-12 hours at this temperature, with constant stirring, before measurements begin. After measuring at a range of strain rates, the lava is quenched by immersion of the Pt crucible in a water bath. The viscosity is ~32 Pas at the liquidus temperature of ~1220°C, increasing gradually to ~142 Pas at 1165˚C. These viscosity measurements are much lower than most other basaltic compositions including Hawaiian lavas which have a crystal fraction of ~42% and apparent viscosity of ~2000 Pas at 1169°C. Over this temperature range, crystal fraction varies little (1-5% spinel crystals). Interpolating between measurements of the melt viscosity by concentric cylinder and parallel-plate viscometry suggests that at 1165˚C, the viscosity of the starting melt would be ~63 Pas. Consequently, the change in viscosity is due primarily to cooling rather than either the physical or chemical effects of crystallization. The data were collected at strain rates between ~1 and 46 s-1, and are well reproduced using a power-law model with exponents ~0.94 to 0.96. Below 1165˚C, crystal fraction and magma viscosity both increase rapidly. Further experiments at lower temperatures will quantify this

  3. The eruptive history of the Trous Blancs pit craters, La Réunion Island: The origin of a 24 km long lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Georg; Frese, Ingmar; Di Muro, Andrea; Kueppers, Ulrich; Michon, Laurent; Métrich, Nicole

    2015-04-01

    The assessment of volcanic hazards is strongly based on the past eruptive behaviour of volcanoes and its morphological parameters. Since past eruption characteristics and their frequency provide the best probabilities of such eruptions for the future, understanding the complete eruptive history of a volcano is one of the most powerful tools in assessing the potential hazards or eruptions. At Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) volcano (La Réunion, Indian Ocean), the most frequent style of activity is the effusion of lava flows, which pose the greatest hazard by invasion of inhabited areas and destruction of human property. Here we examined the eruptive history of a previously uninvestigated area, believed to be the origin of a 24 km long lava flow. The eruptions recurrence time of PdF is about one eruption every 9 months in the central caldera. Besides this central activity, eruptive vents have been built along three main rift zones cutting the edifice during the last 50 kyrs. In this study we focused on the largest rift zone of about 15 km width and 20 km length, which extends in a north westerly direction between PdF and the nearby Piton des Neiges volcanic complex. This rift zone is typified by deep seismicity (up to 30 km), emitting mostly primitive magmas, indicative of high fluid pressures (up to 5 kbar) and large volume eruptions. Our area of investigation focused on four consecutively aligned pit craters called the Trous Blancs. These have been identified [1] as the source area of one of the youngest (ca. 6 kyrs) and largest lava field, which extends for 24 km from a height of 1800m asl, passing Le Tampon and Saint Pierre city, until it reaches the coast. To gain insight into the development of this eruption and possible future similar activity, we collected new field data (including stratigraphic logs, a geological map of the area, C-14 dating and geochemical analyses of the eruptive products). Fieldwork revealed that the eruption initiated with intense

  4. Lack of mitochondrial topoisomerase I (TOP1mt) impairs liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Khiati, Salim; Baechler, Simone A.; Factor, Valentina M.; Zhang, Hongliang; Huang, Shar-yin N.; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Sourbier, Carole; Neckers, Leonard; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Pommier, Yves

    2015-01-01

    The liver has an exceptional replicative capacity following partial hepatectomy or chemical injuries. Cellular proliferation requires increased production of energy and essential metabolites, which critically depend on the mitochondria. To determine whether Top1mt, the vertebrate mitochondrial topoisomerase, is involved in this process, we studied liver regeneration after carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) administration. TOP1mt knockout (KO) mice showed a marked reduction in regeneration and hepatocyte proliferation. The hepatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) failed to increase during recovery from CCl4 exposure. Reduced glutathione was also depleted, indicating increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Steady-state levels of ATP, O2 consumption, mtDNA, and mitochondrial mass were also reduced in primary hepatocytes from CCl4-treated KO mice. To further test whether Top1mt acted by enabling mtDNA regeneration, we tested TOP1mt KO fibroblasts and human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells and measured mtDNA after 3-d treatment with ethidium bromide. Both types of TOP1mt knockout cells showed defective mtDNA regeneration following mtDNA depletion. Our study demonstrates that Top1mt is required for normal mtDNA homeostasis and for linking mtDNA expansion with hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:26305952

  5. Progress in industrial holography in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smigielski, Paul

    1992-01-01

    Industrial applications of holography in France are briefly reviewed. Particular attention is given to nondestructive testing of helicopter blades at Aerospatiale Central Laboratory, the use of holography at Renault for car-engine vibration study, vibration characterization of turbo-jet engine components at SNECMA, and vibration analysis of plates in an industrial hemodynamic tunnel.

  6. Haemovigilance and transfusion safety in France.

    PubMed

    Rouger, P; Noizat-Pirenne, F; Le Pennec, P Y

    2000-01-01

    The risks associated to red cell and platelet transfusions are essentially bound to the polymorphism of blood group antigens and to transfusion transmitted agents including virus, bacterias.... In France, the haemovigilance system and several investigations allowed to measure these different kinds of risks. We also developed analysis of failures in order to prevent errors and accidents to increase blood safety. PMID:10938971

  7. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  8. Competence: Conceptual Approach and Practice in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Deist, Francoise

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to analyse the conceptual approaches to competence and practice in competence management in France. Design/methodology/approach: Extensive literature review, discussion with academic experts in the French competence network of AGRH and interviews concerning developments following the 2003 national agreement…

  9. Career Development and Public Policy in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guichard, Jean

    Three conditions characterize employment in France today: (1) high unemployment; (2) the importance of degrees in employment; and (3) significant differences between the sexes. The differences between national government initiatives and regional issues also are of concern. The main strategic issues facing career development focus on reducing…

  10. The Occitan Movement in Southern France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Klaus

    The Occitan movement in Southern France should be studied in the light of a world-wide political reality of our days, the surfacing of ethnic minorities which are beginning to voice cultural and political demands in almost all large industrialized or developing countries. The first step for a minority group to come into existence is almost without…

  11. 75 FR 39277 - Sorbitol From France; Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... The Commission instituted this review on July 1, 2009 (74 FR 31762, July 2, 2009) and determined on... publishing the notice in the Federal Register on December 17, 2009 (74 FR 66992). The hearing was held in... COMMISSION Sorbitol From France; Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject...

  12. A Paradox in Physics Education in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smigiel, Eddie; Sonntag, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the nature and the level of difficulty of teaching and learning physics in the first year of undergraduate engineering schools in France. Our case study is based on a survey regarding a classic and basic question in applied physics, and which was conducted with a group of second-year students in a post-baccalaureate 1…

  13. [New conditions for organ donation in France].

    PubMed

    Antoine, Corinne; Maroudy, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The procurement of organs from donors after circulatory death is a reliable technique which gives satisfactory posttransplant results and also represents a potential source of additional organs. In order to meet the growing need for organ donations, the 'anticipated organ donation approach' procedure is currently receiving renewed interest with new conditions for its implementation in France. PMID:27596496

  14. Genetic analysis of the presumptive blood from Louis XVI, King of France.

    PubMed

    Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Gigli, Elena; Bini, Carla; Calafell, Francesc; Luiselli, Donata; Pelotti, Susi; Pettener, Davide

    2011-11-01

    A text on a pyrographically decorated gourd dated to 1793 explains that it contains a handkerchief dipped with the blood of Louis XVI, king of France, after his execution. Biochemical analyses confirmed that the material contained within the gourd was blood. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) and 2 (HVR2), the Y-chromosome STR profile, some autosomal STR markers and a SNP in HERC2 gene associated to blue eyes, were retrieved, and some results independently replicated in two different laboratories. The uncommon mtDNA sequence retrieved can be attributed to a N1b haplotype, while the novel Y-chromosome haplotype belongs to haplogroup G2a. The HERC2 gene showed that the subject analyzed was a heterozygote, which is compatible with a blue-eyed person, as king Louis XVI was. To confirm the identity of the subject, an analysis of the dried heart of his son, Louis XVII, could be undertaken. PMID:20940110

  15. 77 FR 38474 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Livingston, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... read as follows: Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959... proposed rulemaking to amend controlled airspace at Livingston, MT (77 FR 19953). Interested parties were... Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a regulatory...

  16. 76 FR 28308 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Poplar, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... proposed rulemaking to establish additional controlled airspace at Poplar, MT (76 FR 8921). Interested... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR... U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E. O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec....

  17. 77 FR 52219 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Lewistown, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ...) to modify controlled airspace at Lewistown, MT (77 FR 38226). Interested parties were invited to... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2....

  18. The Mt. Currie Indian Community School: Innovation and Endurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, June D.

    1985-01-01

    In the 1970s, the Mt. Currie school in British Columbia was transformed into a locally controlled Native Canadian Indian institution. Using interview data, this articles reviews changing role relationships of the school board and staff. Recommendations applicable to other community education ventures across North America are made. (Author/BS)

  19. Mt. St. Helens Seen Close Up on May 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Dorothy B.; Stoffel, Keith L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes eruption steps in Mt. St. Helens' top surface deformation: constant shaking of earthquakes, minor steaming from vents, and sudden catastrophic eruption. Explosions caused black projectile-laden ash clouds, vertical white steam clouds, and vertical gray ash-laden clouds. (SK)

  20. 76 FR 45644 - Montana Disaster Number MT-00063

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster Number MT-00063 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of Montana (FEMA-1996-DR), dated 06/17/2011. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Non-Profit organizations in the State of Montana, dated 06/17/2011, is hereby amended to include...

  1. The New Remote-Controlled Telescope at Mt. Suhora Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachowski, G.; Ogloza, W.; Drozdz, M.; Zakrzewski, B.

    2015-07-01

    We present technical details of the small, remote-controlled telescope we recently installed at Mt. Suhora Observatory, primarily for ground-based photometric follow-up observations of bright stars that are targets of the BRITE satellite mission, although other targets are also observed. A summary is also given of observations carried out so far.

  2. 75 FR 54419 - Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT AGENCY: Federal... notice to advise the public that an environmental impact statement will be prepared for a proposed... an environmental impact statement (EIS) on a proposal to construct a connection between Interstate...

  3. 76 FR 56967 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Glendive, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... rulemaking to amend controlled airspace at Glendive, MT (76 FR 41145). Interested parties were invited to... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034.... 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in...

  4. Mt. San Antonio College Matriculation Study: Fall 1986-Spring 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann; And Others

    In fall 1986, Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) began a five year longitudinal study of the effectiveness of its matriculation services, which include assessment, orientation, counseling/advisement, and follow-up of students by staff members. The study utilized a computerized tracking system to compare retention, grade point average (GPA),…

  5. Mt. San Antonio College Matriculation Research Update, 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann; And Others

    In fall 1986, Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) initiated a 5-year longitudinal study of the effectiveness of its matriculation services, including assessment, orientation, counseling/advisement, and follow-up. The academic performance and success of students participating in one or more of these services were compared to those of degree- and…

  6. 78 FR 67298 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Ennis, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... rulemaking (NPRM) to establish controlled airspace at Ennis, MT (78 FR 54415). Interested parties were... 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034...), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2....

  7. 78 FR 59807 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish controlled airspace at Glasgow, MT (78 FR 41337). Interested...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  8. 78 FR 67024 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... airspace at the Glasgow VOR/DME navigation aid, Glasgow, MT (78 FR 59807, September 30, 2013). The FAA... Federal Register of September 30, 2013 (78 FR 59807), Airspace Docket No. 13- ANM-17, FR Doc. 2013-23669... airspace at the Glasgow VHF Omni-Directional Radio Range/Distance Measuring Equipment (VOR/DME)...

  9. 77 FR 44120 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Roundup, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action establishes Class...

  10. 76 FR 53049 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Shelby, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Shelby, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies Class E airspace...

  11. 77 FR 32896 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Modification of Class E Airspace; Billings, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies Class E... received. Class E airspace designations are published in paragraph 6005, of FAA Order 7400.9V dated...

  12. 76 FR 35967 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies Class E airspace at... geographic coordinates for the Class D and E airspace areas, and updates the airport name. DATES:...

  13. 76 FR 27914 - Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT AGENCY: Federal Communications... review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). ] List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television....

  14. 76 FR 9991 - Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Kalispell, MT AGENCY: Federal Communications... CFR 1.415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television, Television broadcasting. For...

  15. Mt. San Antonio Community College Information Notebook; Volume Two, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    This databook contains some of the basic information to be used in decision making and planning in the Mt. San Antonio College (MSAC) District. Part I focuses on the demographic characteristics of the district population, feeder school districts, and data from other educational providers. Part II presents statewide data on potential enrollment by…

  16. 76 FR 47435 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Forsyth, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at Tillitt Field Airport..., MT (76 FR 32879). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of...

  17. 77 FR 41259 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Plentywood, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... aircraft using Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach... modify controlled airspace at Plentywood, MT (77 FR 24159). Interested parties were invited to... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44...

  18. 76 FR 45179 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... accommodate aircraft using Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E controlled airspace at Glasgow, MT (76 FR 30300). Interested parties...) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February...

  19. 76 FR 59479 - Montana Disaster Number MT-00062

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Montana Disaster Number MT-00062 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 2... Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera, Associate Administrator for...

  20. Southern Hemisphere Lidar Measurements of the Aerosol Clouds from Mt. Pinatubo and Mt. Hudson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Stuart A.; Manson, Peter J.; Patterson, Graeme R.

    1992-01-01

    On 19 Jul., 1991, during tests to determine the ability of the newly-modified CSIRO Ns:YAG lidar to measure signals from the stratosphere before the arrival of dust from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, a strongly scattering layer was detected at an altitude of 2 km. That evening, the spectacular sunset and twilight were typical of volcanically disturbed conditions. Lidar measurements at 532 nm were made between 1400 and 1500 EST (0400-0500 UT) on 19 Jul. through broken cloud. Approximately 3800 laser firings were averaged in 256 shot blocks. These and subsequent data have been analyzed to produce profiles of aerosol volume backscatter function and scattering ratio. Clouds again prevented a clear view of the twilights on the next two nights, although there was some evidence for an enhanced glow. The evidence suggested that the aerosol layer had disappeared. An explanation for this disappearance and the earlier than expected arrival of the layer over Melbourne was required. Nimbus 7 TOMS data for 23 Jun. showed that the SO2 from the eruption had extended at least 11000 km to the west and that the southern boundary of the cloud had reached 15 degrees S just 8 days after the climactic eruption. It can be assumed that this cloud also contained dust and sulphuric acid aerosol. It was proposed that a section had then been broken away from the main cloud and carried south by a large scale eddy between the low latitude easterlies and the strong mid-latitude westerlies which finally carried the aerosol cloud over southern Australia. Accompanying 30 mb wind data showed a counter clockwise circulation, responsible for the transport, located in the South Atlantic Ocean.

  1. Aging in France: Population Trends, Policy Issues, and Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beland, Daniel; Durandal, Jean-Philippe Viriot

    2013-01-01

    Like in other advanced industrial countries, in France, demographic aging has become a widely debated research and policy topic. This article offers a brief overview of major aging-related trends in France. The article describes France's demographics of aging, explores key policy matters, maps the institutional field of French social gerontology…

  2. Transformation of MT Resistivity Sections into Geologically Meaningful Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S. K.

    2004-05-01

    Earthscope offers an unprecedented opportunity for interdisciplinary studies of North America. In addition to a continent-wide seismic study, it includes the acquisition of magnetotelluric (MT) data at many of the Bigfoot array sites. Earthscope will thus provide a uniform 3-D MT survey over regional scales when completed. MT interpreters will be able to include 3-D regional effects in their models for the first time whether they are interpreting local studies. However, the full value of the interdisciplinary nature of Earthscope will be realized only if MT sections and maps are useful to other earth scientists. The standard final product from any 2-D or 3-D MT interpretation is a spatial distribution of electrical resistivity. Inference of the physicochemical state from bulk resistivity is complicated because a variety of factors influence the property including temperature, intrinsic conduction of silicates, and small amounts of interconnected conducting materials (e.g., graphite, metallic minerals, partial melt, fluid). Here, I use petrophysical measurements and a petrological model to transform a resistivity section into cross sections of temperature and partial melt fraction in the mantle beneath the Sierra Nevada. In this manner, I am able to separate the contributions of increasing temperature and melt fraction to the bulk resistivity. Predicted melt fractions match observations from xenoliths relatively well but temperatures are systematically 200C higher than those observed. A small amount of dissolved hydrogen (~70 ppm H/Si) lowers the predicted temperatures to match those from the xenoliths, however. I conclude that while this transformation is a simple first step based on many assumptions, initial results are promising.

  3. New geophysical views of Mt.Melbourne Volcano (East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armadillo, E.; Gambetta, M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Corr, H.; Bozzo, E.

    2009-05-01

    Mt. Melbourne volcano is located along the transition between the Transantarctic Mountains and the West Antarctic Rift System. Recent volcanic activity is suggested by the occurrence of blankets of pyroclastic pumice and scoria fall around the eastern and southern flanks of Mt Melbourne and by pyroclastic layers interbedded with the summit snows. Geothermal activity in the crater area of Mount Melbourne may be linked to the intrusion of dykes within the last 200 years. Geophysical networks suggest that Mount Melbourne is a quiescent volcano, possibly characterised by slow internal dynamics. During the 2002-2003 Italian Antarctic campaign a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was performed within the TIMM (Tectonics and Interior of Mt. Melbourne area) project. This helicopter-borne survey was flown at low-altitude and in drape-mode configuration (305 m above terrain) with a line separation less than 500 m. Our new high-resolution magnetic maps reveal the largely ice-covered magmatic and tectonic patters in the Mt. Melbourne volcano area. Additionally, in the frame of the UK-Italian ISODYN-WISE project (2005-06), an airborne ice-sounding radar survey was flown. We combine the sub-ice topography with images and models of the interior of Mt. Melbourne volcano, as derived from the high resolution aeromagnetic data and land gravity data. Our new geophysical maps and models also provide a new tool to study the regional setting of the volcano. In particular we re-assess whether there is geophysical evidence for coupling between strike-slip faulting, the Terror Rift, and Mount Melbourne volcano.

  4. Antinociceptive properties of selective MT(2) melatonin receptor partial agonists.

    PubMed

    López-Canul, Martha; Comai, Stefano; Domínguez-López, Sergio; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone involved in the regulation of both acute and chronic pain whose mechanism is still not completely understood. We have recently demonstrated that selective MT2 melatonin receptor partial agonists have antiallodynic properties in animal models of chronic neuropathic pain by modulating ON/OFF cells of the descending antinociceptive system. Here, we examined the antinociceptive properties of the selective MT2 melatonin receptor partial agonists N-{2-[(3-methoxyphenyl)phenylamino]ethyl}acetamide (UCM765) and N-{2-[(3-bromophenyl)-(4-fluorophenyl)amino]ethyl}acetamide (UCM924) in two animal models of acute and inflammatory pain: the hot-plate and formalin tests. UCM765 and UCM924 (5-40 mg/kg, s.c.) dose-dependently increased the temperature of the first hind paw lick in the hot-plate test, and decreased the total time spent licking the injected hind paw in the formalin test. Antinociceptive effects of UCM765 and UCM924 were maximal at the dose of 20mg/kg. At this dose, the effects of UCM765 and UCM924 were similar to those produced by 200 mg/kg acetaminophen in the hot-plate test, and by 3 mg/kg ketorolac or 150 mg/kg MLT in the formalin test. Notably, antinociceptive effects of the two MT2 partial agonists were blocked by the pre-treatment with the MT2 antagonist 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (4P-PDOT, 10 mg/kg) in both paradigms. These results demonstrate the antinociceptive properties of UCM765 and UCM924 in acute and inflammatory pain models and corroborate the concept that MT2 melatonin receptor may be a novel target for analgesic drug development. PMID:26162699

  5. Barley Metallothioneins: MT3 and MT4 Are Localized in the Grain Aleurone Layer and Show Differential Zinc Binding1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Schiller, Michaela; Kichey, Thomas; Hansen, Thomas Hesselhøj; Pedas, Pai; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod

    2012-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role in cytosolic zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) homeostasis. However, evidence for the functional properties of MTs has been hampered by methodological problems in the isolation and characterization of the proteins. Here, we document that barley (Hordeum vulgare) MT3 and MT4 proteins exist in planta and that they differ in tissue localization as well as in metal coordination chemistry. Combined transcriptional and histological analyses showed temporal and spatial correlations between transcript levels and protein abundance during grain development. MT3 was present in tissues of both maternal and filial origin throughout grain filling. In contrast, MT4 was confined to the embryo and aleurone layer, where it appeared during tissue specialization and remained until maturity. Using state-of-the-art speciation analysis by size-exclusion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on recombinant MT3 and MT4, their specificity and capacity for metal ion binding were quantified, showing a strong preferential Zn binding relative to Cu and cadmium (Cd) in MT4, which was not the case for MT3. When complementary DNAs from barley MTs were expressed in Cu- or Cd-sensitive yeast mutants, MT3 provided a much stronger complementation than did MT4. We conclude that MT3 may play a housekeeping role in metal homeostasis, while MT4 may function in Zn storage in developing and mature grains. The localization of MT4 and its discrimination against Cd make it an ideal candidate for future biofortification strategies directed toward increasing food and feed Zn concentrations. PMID:22582132

  6. Weak Lensing Calibrated M-T Scaling Relation of Galaxy Groups in the COSMOS Fieldsstarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettula, K.; Finoguenov, A.; Massey, R.; Rhodes, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Taylor, J. E.; Spinelli, P. F.; Tanaka, M.; Ilbert, O.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Koekemoer, A.

    2013-11-01

    The scaling between X-ray observables and mass for galaxy clusters and groups is instrumental for cluster-based cosmology and an important probe for the thermodynamics of the intracluster gas. We calibrate a scaling relation between the weak lensing mass and X-ray spectroscopic temperature for 10 galaxy groups in the COSMOS field, combined with 55 higher-mass clusters from the literature. The COSMOS data includes Hubble Space Telescope imaging and redshift measurements of 46 source galaxies per arcminute2, enabling us to perform unique weak lensing measurements of low-mass systems. Our sample extends the mass range of the lensing calibrated M-T relation an order of magnitude lower than any previous study, resulting in a power-law slope of 1.48^{+0.13}_{-0.09}. The slope is consistent with the self-similar model, predictions from simulations, and observations of clusters. However, X-ray observations relying on mass measurements derived under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium have indicated that masses at group scales are lower than expected. Both simulations and observations suggest that hydrostatic mass measurements can be biased low. Our external weak lensing masses provide the first observational support for hydrostatic mass bias at group level, showing an increasing bias with decreasing temperature and reaching a level of 30%-50% at 1 keV. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; the European Southern Observatory under Large Program 175.A-0839, Chile; Kitt Peak National Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which

  7. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of dual ligands for melatonin (MT1/MT2) and serotonin 5-HT2C receptor subtypes (II).

    PubMed

    Ettaoussi, Mohamed; Pérès, Basile; Errazani, Aïcha; Boutin, Jean A; Caignard, Daniel-Henri; Delagrange, Philippe; Melnyk, Patricia; Berthelot, Pascal; Yous, Saïd

    2015-01-27

    In this paper we report the investigation of C-3 and β-acetamide positions of agomelatine analogues. Concomitant insertion of a hydroxymethyl in the β-acetamide position and aliphatic groups in C-3 position produced a positive effect on both melatonin (MT1, MT2) and serotonin (5-HT2C) binding affinities. In particular, the allyl 6b and ethyl 15a represented the more interesting compounds of this series. Furthermore, the introduction of methyl cycloalkyl groups (compounds 11a, 12a) exhibited no change in both MT2 and 5-HT2C binding affinities while a decrease of MT1 binding affinity occurred leading to an MT2 selectivity. Finally, the acetamide modulation has led to methyl thiourea 11h, with a weak MT2 selectivity. PMID:25528336

  8. Contrahelicase activity of the mitochondrial transcription termination factor mtDBP

    PubMed Central

    Polosa, Paola Loguercio; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro

    2005-01-01

    The sea urchin mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) is a transcription termination factor that is able to arrest bidirectionally mitochondrial RNA chain elongation. The observation that the mtDBP binding site in the main non-coding region is located in correspondence of the 3′ end of the triplex structure, where the synthesis of heavy strand mitochondrial (mt) DNA is either prematurely terminated or allowed to continue, raised the question whether mtDBP could also regulate mtDNA replication. By using a helicase assay in the presence of the replicative helicase of SV40, we show that mtDBP is able to inhibit the enzyme thus acting as a contrahelicase. The impairing activity of mtDBP is bidirectional as it is independent of the orientation of the protein binding site. The inhibition is increased by the presence of the guanosine-rich sequence that flanks mtDBP binding site. Finally, a mechanism of abrogation of mtDBP contrahelicase activity is suggested that is based on the dissociation of mtDBP from DNA caused by the passage of the RNA polymerase through the protein–DNA complex. All these findings favour the view that mtDBP, besides serving as transcription termination factor, could also act as a negative regulator of mtDNA synthesis at the level of D-loop expansion. PMID:16006625

  9. Directions toward the Year 2000. Strategic Plan, Mt. San Antonio Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Community Coll. District, Walnut, CA.

    This booklet presents Mt. San Antonio College's (Mt. SAC's) long-range goals and specific action priorities in an effort to focus planning on the year 2000. Introductory comments discuss the purpose of strategic planning and Mt. SAC's planning orientation. The next sections list goals and objectives with respect to: (1) the improvement of existing…

  10. Screening programme for congenital toxoplasmosis in France.

    PubMed

    Thulliez, P

    1992-01-01

    The high prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in France led to the establishment of a national screening programme. Preventive measures were progressively introduced, and these became compulsory in 1978 with the result that the incidence of congenital toxoplasmosis is now markedly reduced. Further improvements may include more systematic sampling from women before pregnancy, better and adequate health education and centralized notification of both maternal and congenital cases of toxoplasmosis. PMID:1290073

  11. Minimally Invasive Forefoot Surgery in France.

    PubMed

    Meusnier, Tristan; Mukish, Prikesht

    2016-06-01

    Study groups have been formed in France to advance the use of minimally invasive surgery. These techniques are becoming more frequently used and the technique nuances are continuing to evolve. The objective of this article was to advance the awareness of the current trends in minimally invasive surgery for common diseases of the forefoot. The percutaneous surgery at the forefoot is less developed at this time, but also will be discussed. PMID:27261810

  12. Enterovirus Migration Patterns between France and Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ines; Mirand, Audrey; Slama, Ichrak; Mastouri, Maha; Peigue-Lafeuille, Hélène; Aouni, Mahjoub; Bailly, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The enterovirus (EV) types echovirus (E-) 5, E-9, and E-18, and coxsackievirus (CV-) A9 are infrequently reported in human diseases and their epidemiologic features are poorly defined. Virus transmission patterns between countries have been estimated with phylogenetic data derived from the 1D/VP1 and 3CD gene sequences of a sample of 74 strains obtained in France (2000–2012) and Tunisia (2011–2013) and from the publicly available sequences. The EV types (E-5, E-9, and E-18) exhibited a lower worldwide genetic diversity (respective number of genogroups: 4, 5, and 3) in comparison to CV-A9 (n = 10). The phylogenetic trees estimated with both 1D/VP1 and 3CD sequence data showed variations in the number of co-circulating lineages over the last 20 years among the four EV types. Despite the low number of genogroups in E-18, the virus exhibited the highest number of recombinant 3CD lineages (n = 10) versus 4 (E-5) to 8 (E-9). The phylogenies provided evidence of multiple transportation events between France and Tunisia involving E-5, E-9, E-18, and CV-A9 strains. Virus spread events between France and 17 other countries in five continents had high probabilities of occurrence as those between Tunisia and two European countries other than France. All transportation events were supported by BF values > 10. Inferring the source of virus transmission from phylogenetic data may provide insights into the patterns of sporadic and epidemic diseases caused by EVs. PMID:26709514

  13. A paradox in physics education in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smigiel, Eddie; Sonntag, Michel

    2013-07-01

    This paper deals with the nature and the level of difficulty of teaching and learning physics in the first year of undergraduate engineering schools in France. Our case study is based on a survey regarding a classic and basic question in applied physics, and which was conducted with a group of second-year students in a post-baccalaureateThe French baccalaureate (baccalauréat) is the examination students must pass to graduate from high school. undergraduate engineering school. The responses to the survey indicate that many students fall into a kind of mathematical ‘formalism’, which prevents them from understanding the actual physics behind the question. This leads us to believe that we must reconsider the way that physics is taught. An analysis of a physics teaching sequence in French and English undergraduate textbooks confirms the weight given to mathematical formalism in France. When approached from a purely mathematical angle, physics becomes a long and slow process of assimilation of the specific scientific culture that underlies the teaching model used in classes préparatoires, classes that are usually presented as a model of academic excellence. However, this model appears to be less suitable when teaching more ‘ordinary students’, who respond better when taken through a ‘detour’ of the ‘important roots’ of physics. This paper shows that in France historically rooted pedagogical traditions persist, ignoring the latest advances in research on science teaching.

  14. Populations at Risk for Alveolar Echinococcosis, France

    PubMed Central

    Piarroux, Martine; Piarroux, Renaud; Knapp, Jenny; Bardonnet, Karine; Dumortier, Jérôme; Watelet, Jérôme; Gerard, Alain; Beytout, Jean; Abergel, Armand; Bresson-Hadni, Solange

    2013-01-01

    During 1982–2007, alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was diagnosed in 407 patients in France, a country previously known to register half of all European patients. To better define high-risk groups in France, we conducted a national registry-based study to identify areas where persons were at risk and spatial clusters of cases. We interviewed 180 AE patients about their way of life and compared responses to those of 517 controls. We found that almost all AE patients lived in 22 départements in eastern and central France (relative risk 78.63, 95% CI 52.84–117.02). Classification and regression tree analysis showed that the main risk factor was living in AE-endemic areas. There, most at-risk populations lived in rural settings (odds ratio [OR] 66.67, 95% CI 6.21–464.51 for farmers and OR 6.98, 95% CI 2.88–18.25 for other persons) or gardened in nonrural settings (OR 4.30, 95% CI 1.82–10.91). These findings can help sensitization campaigns focus on specific groups. PMID:23647623

  15. Quasi MT Inversion of Short-Offset Transient Electromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-ying; Xue, Guo-qiang; Khan, Muhammad Younis

    2016-07-01

    The short-offset transient electromagnetic method (SOTEM) has been extensively used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration and hydrogeological investigations due to its ease of use and capability to generate diagnostic subsurface information. At present, the data processing methods of SOTEM are mainly focused on one dimensional inversion. To apply the proven inversion methods of frequency domain electromagnetic methods to SOTEM data, this paper presents a new transformation relation from time to frequency based on the similarity between SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) apparent resistivity. Results show that the transformation coefficients depend on the variation trend of SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity curves. Bostick inversion and conjugate gradient inversion techniques were applied to transformed SOTEM data and the results were validated by some simulated calculations and field measured data. This study provides a novel method to SOTEM data processing and a useful aid to join inversion with MT data.

  16. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kralik, M.; Solc, J.; Chvatil, D.; Krist, P.; Turek, K.; Granja, C.

    2012-08-15

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a {sup 10}B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space.

  17. Microtron MT 25 as a source of neutrons.

    PubMed

    Králík, M; Šolc, J; Chvátil, D; Krist, P; Turek, K; Granja, C

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to describe Microtron MT25 as a source of neutrons generated by bremsstrahlung induced photonuclear reactions in U and Pb targets. Bremsstrahlung photons were produced by electrons accelerated at energy 21.6 MeV. Spectral fluence of the generated neutrons was calculated with MCNPX code and then experimentally determined at two positions by means of a Bonner spheres spectrometer in which the detector of thermal neutrons was replaced by activation Mn tablets or track detectors CR-39 with a (10)B radiator. The measured neutron spectral fluence and the calculated anisotropy served for the estimation of neutron yield from the targets and for the determination of ambient dose equivalent rate at the place of measurement. Microtron MT25 is intended as one of the sources for testing neutron sensitive devices which will be sent into the space. PMID:22938289

  18. Quasi MT Inversion of Short-Offset Transient Electromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-ying; Xue, Guo-qiang; Khan, Muhammad Younis

    2016-03-01

    The short-offset transient electromagnetic method (SOTEM) has been extensively used for mineral and hydrocarbon exploration and hydrogeological investigations due to its ease of use and capability to generate diagnostic subsurface information. At present, the data processing methods of SOTEM are mainly focused on one dimensional inversion. To apply the proven inversion methods of frequency domain electromagnetic methods to SOTEM data, this paper presents a new transformation relation from time to frequency based on the similarity between SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity and magnetotelluric (MT) apparent resistivity. Results show that the transformation coefficients depend on the variation trend of SOTEM all-time apparent resistivity curves. Bostick inversion and conjugate gradient inversion techniques were applied to transformed SOTEM data and the results were validated by some simulated calculations and field measured data. This study provides a novel method to SOTEM data processing and a useful aid to join inversion with MT data.

  19. Volcanogenic origin of cenotes near Mt Gambier, southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, John A.; Grimes, Ken G.; Lewis, Ian D.

    2010-07-01

    The cenotes near Mt Gambier are circular, cliffed, collapse dolines containing water-table lakes up to 125 m deep, floored by large rubble cones. They lie in a flat, coastal plain composed of mid-Tertiary limestone. Most of the deepest cenotes are concentrated in two small areas located along trends sub-parallel to the main joint direction in the limestone. The cenotes do not connect to underwater phreatic passages, and water chemistry data confirm that they are not part of an interconnected karst network. They formed by collapse into large chambers (up to > 1 million m 3) that extended 125 m or more below the land surface. Several cenotes have actively growing stromatolites on the sub-vertical walls that started growing at ˜ 8000 years BP. The caves that collapsed to form the deep Mt Gambier cenotes are much larger than shallow and deep phreatic caves in the area, and do not connect into deep phreatic systems. They were not formed by freshwater/seawater mixing, responsible for many of the well-known Yucatan cenotes, because they are not associated with locations of the mixing zone during previous high sea levels, and are much larger than caves presently forming along the mixing zone near Mt Gambier. Instead dissolution was most likely due to a process whereby acidified groundwater containing large amounts of volcanogenic CO 2 ascended up fractures from the magma chambers that fed the Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic eruptions in the area; deep reservoirs of volcanogenic CO 2 occur nearby. Cave dissolution could have been due to release of CO 2 during the Mt Gambier eruption ˜ 28,000 years ago, followed by collapse to form cenotes during the low sea levels of the Last Glacial Maximum ˜ 20,000 years ago. The cenotes then flooded ˜ 8000 years ago as sea level rose, and stromatolites began to grow on the walls.

  20. An Analysis of the Mt. Meron Seismic Array

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Ryall, F

    2008-01-10

    We have performed a quick analysis of the Mt. Meron seismic array to monitor regional seismic events in the Middle East. The Meron array is the only current array in the Levant and Arabian Peninsula and, as such, might be useful in contributing to event location, identification, and other analysis. Here, we provide a brief description of the array and a review of the travel time and array analysis done to assess its performance.

  1. Chemical compositions of snow from Mt. Yulong, southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hewen; He, Yuanqing; Kang, Shichang; Lu, Xixi; Shi, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shijin

    2016-03-01

    The snow and ice in Mt. Yulong offer a unique opportunity to investigate changes in climate and large scale atmospheric circulations over Asia. During February and April 2012, surface snow samples were collected from the Baishui Glacier No. 1 at different altitudes along the eastern slope of Mt. Yulong. Two snowpits were also excavated from Mt. Yulong at altitudes of 4780 and 4730 m a.s.l. in February 2012. The concentrations of inorganic ions were higher at an elevation of 4506 m a.s.l. in the glacier with significant contribution of anthropogenic (mainly NH4+, SO4^{2-}, NO3-) and crustal (mainly Ca 2+) constituents. Concentration of HCOO - in surface snow exhibited large variability, ranging from 0.04 to 6.8 μeq L -1, attributed to dominant contribution from biomass burning emissions. Ion balance (ΔC) and Na +/Cl - calculations indicated an excess of cations (particularly higher Ca 2+ concentrations) and Cl - in snow, considering the sea-salt ratio, respectively. Monsoon season (June-September) ion concentrations in snowpit samples were generally two-fold lower than in other seasons. Principal component analysis was used to identify different sources of ions. Three main factors, accounting for more than 80% of the total variance, were related to different sources, including agricultural activities, biomass burning, and crustal aerosols.

  2. Evidences for higher nocturnal seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarella, Adriano; Scafetta, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We analyze hourly seismic data measured at the Osservatorio Vesuviano Ovest (OVO, 1972-2014) and at the Bunker Est (BKE, 1999-2014) stations on the Mt. Vesuvius. The OVO record is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 1.9. We demonstrate that before 1996 this record presents a daily oscillation that nearly vanishes afterwards. To determine whether a daily oscillation exists in the seismic activity of the Mt. Vesuvius, we use the higher quality BKE record that is complete for seismic events with magnitude M ≥ 0.2. We demonstrate that BKE confirms that the seismic activity at the Mt. Vesuvius is higher during nighttime than during daytime. The amplitude of the daily oscillation is enhanced during summer and damped during winter. We speculate possible links with the cooling/warming diurnal cycle of the volcanic edifice, with external geomagnetic field and with magnetostriction, which stress the rocks. We find that the amplitude of the seismic daily cycle changes in time and has been increasing since 2008. Finally, we propose a seismic activity index to monitor the 24-hour oscillation that could be used to complement other methodologies currently adopted to determine the seismic status of the volcano to prevent the relative hazard.

  3. Origin and Diffusion of mtDNA Haplogroup X

    PubMed Central

    Reidla, Maere; Kivisild, Toomas; Metspalu, Ene; Kaldma, Katrin; Tambets, Kristiina; Tolk, Helle-Viivi; Parik, Jüri; Loogväli, Eva-Liis; Derenko, Miroslava; Malyarchuk, Boris; Bermisheva, Marina; Zhadanov, Sergey; Pennarun, Erwan; Gubina, Marina; Golubenko, Maria; Damba, Larisa; Fedorova, Sardana; Gusar, Vladislava; Grechanina, Elena; Mikerezi, Ilia; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Chaventré, André; Khusnutdinova, Elsa; Osipova, Ludmila; Stepanov, Vadim; Voevoda, Mikhail; Achilli, Alessandro; Rengo, Chiara; Rickards, Olga; De Stefano, Gian Franco; Papiha, Surinder; Beckman, Lars; Janicijevic, Branka; Rudan, Pavao; Anagnou, Nicholas; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel; Koziel, Slawomir; Usanga, Esien; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn; Herrnstadt, Corinna; Howell, Neil; Torroni, Antonio; Villems, Richard

    2003-01-01

    A maximum parsimony tree of 21 complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences belonging to haplogroup X and the survey of the haplogroup-associated polymorphisms in 13,589 mtDNAs from Eurasia and Africa revealed that haplogroup X is subdivided into two major branches, here defined as “X1” and “X2.” The first is restricted to the populations of North and East Africa and the Near East, whereas X2 encompasses all X mtDNAs from Europe, western and Central Asia, Siberia, and the great majority of the Near East, as well as some North African samples. Subhaplogroup X1 diversity indicates an early coalescence time, whereas X2 has apparently undergone a more recent population expansion in Eurasia, most likely around or after the last glacial maximum. It is notable that X2 includes the two complete Native American X sequences that constitute the distinctive X2a clade, a clade that lacks close relatives in the entire Old World, including Siberia. The position of X2a in the phylogenetic tree suggests an early split from the other X2 clades, likely at the very beginning of their expansion and spread from the Near East. PMID:14574647

  4. The Making of the African mtDNA Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Antonio; Richards, Martin; De la Fe, Tomás; Lareu, María-Victoria; Sobrino, Beatriz; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Macaulay, Vincent; Carracedo, Ángel

    2002-01-01

    Africa presents the most complex genetic picture of any continent, with a time depth for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages >100,000 years. The most recent widespread demographic shift within the continent was most probably the Bantu dispersals, which archaeological and linguistic evidence suggest originated in West Africa 3,000–4,000 years ago, spreading both east and south. Here, we have carried out a thorough phylogeographic analysis of mtDNA variation in a total of 2,847 samples from throughout the continent, including 307 new sequences from southeast African Bantu speakers. The results suggest that the southeast Bantu speakers have a composite origin on the maternal line of descent, with ∼44% of lineages deriving from West Africa, ∼21% from either West or Central Africa, ∼30% from East Africa, and ∼5% from southern African Khoisan-speaking groups. The ages of the major founder types of both West and East African origin are consistent with the likely timing of Bantu dispersals, with those from the west somewhat predating those from the east. Despite this composite picture, the southeastern African Bantu groups are indistinguishable from each other with respect to their mtDNA, suggesting that they either had a common origin at the point of entry into southeastern Africa or have undergone very extensive gene flow since. PMID:12395296

  5. Study on new optimum parameters in MT repeated survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Ling; An, Hai-Jing; Jiang, Mei; Li, Zhi-Xiong; Si, Yu-Lan; Zhang, Wu-Si

    1994-11-01

    The first MT monitoring profile with initial shape both at home and abroad has been built in the northern margin of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Based on MT data observed before and after the eight earthquakes of M=5 7 from 1988 to 1992, a new parameter-mean resistivitybar ρ has been introduced. The results show thatbar ρ indicates not only the major feature of decreasing-increasing and recovering to normal value, but also synchronism of phase or the variation in a large area, “lead or delay” among different small areas and the amplitude decreasing with the increase of the distance from the epicenter. Two characters mentioned above might correspond to reginal field precursor of the tectonic generating earthquake and field precursor of the tectonic kinematics. This paper analyses the errors of observed data and the cause of ρ variation. The MT profile optimum parameter system consists of parameterbar ρ , apparent resistivity ρ, twisting degree and the principal-axis azimuth which might provide quantitative criterion for the physical proces of the great destructive earthquake and moderate and short-term earthquake prediction.

  6. Geothermal energy resource investigations at Mt. Spurr, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L.; Wescott, E.M.

    1986-12-01

    Spurr volcano is a composite Quaternary cone of largely andesitic composition located on the west side of Cook Inlet about 80 miles west of Anchorage and about 40 miles from the Beluga electrical transmission line. Geologic mapping (Plate 1-1) shows that the present summit depression was produced by a Mt. St. Helens-type sector collapse, rather than by a caldera collapse. Geochronologic and previous tephrachronologic studies show that there has been an active magmatic system at Spurr volcano during the late Pleistocene-to-Holocene time interval that is of critical interest for geothermal energy resource assessment. Major effort was devoted to geochemical and geophysical surveys of the accessible area south of Mt. Spurr, in addition to geologic mapping and geochronologic studies. Many coincident mercury and helium anomalies were found, suggesting the presence of geothermal systems at depth. Extremely large electrical self-potential anomalies were also found, together with extensive zones of low resistivity discovered by our controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey. The juxtaposition of all of these different types of anomalies at certain areas on the south slope of Crater Peak indicates the presence of a geothermal system which should be accessible by drilling to about 2000 ft depth. It is also evident that there is a strong volcanic hazard to be evaluated in considering any development on the south side of Mt. Spurr. This hazardous situation may require angle drilling of production wells from safer areas and placement of power generation facilities at a considerable distance from hazardous areas.

  7. Age-Related and Heteroplasmy-Related Variation in Human mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Madea, Burkhard; Stoneking, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genome is present in many copies in human cells, and intra-individual variation in mtDNA sequences is known as heteroplasmy. Recent studies found that heteroplasmies are highly tissue-specific, site-specific, and allele-specific, however the functional implications have not been explored. This study investigates variation in mtDNA copy numbers (mtCN) in 12 different tissues obtained at autopsy from 152 individuals (ranging in age from 3 days to 96 years). Three different methods to estimate mtCN were compared: shotgun sequencing (in 4 tissues), capture-enriched sequencing (in 12 tissues) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR, in 2 tissues). The highest precision in mtCN estimation was achieved using shotgun sequencing data. However, capture-enrichment data provide reliable estimates of relative (albeit not absolute) mtCNs. Comparisons of mtCN from different tissues of the same individual revealed that mtCNs in different tissues are, with few exceptions, uncorrelated. Hence, each tissue of an individual seems to regulate mtCN in a tissue-related rather than an individual-dependent manner. Skeletal muscle (SM) samples showed an age-related decrease in mtCN that was especially pronounced in males, while there was an age-related increase in mtCN for liver (LIV) samples. MtCN in SM samples was significantly negatively correlated with both the total number of heteroplasmic sites and with minor allele frequency (MAF) at two heteroplasmic sites, 408 and 16327. Heteroplasmies at both sites are highly specific for SM, accumulate with aging and are part of functional elements that regulate mtDNA replication. These data support the hypothesis that selection acting on these heteroplasmic sites is reducing mtCN in SM of older individuals. PMID:26978189

  8. Caveats for poly(methimazolyl)borate chemistry: the novel inorganic heterocycles [H2C(mt)2BR2]Cl (mt = methimazolyl; BR2 = BH2, BH(mt), 9-BBN).

    PubMed

    Crossley, Ian R; Hill, Anthony F; Humphrey, Elizabeth R; Smith, Matthew K; Tshabang, Never; Willis, Anthony C

    2004-08-21

    Whilst frequently used for reactions of poly(methimazolyl)borates, dichloromethane is not an innocent solvent, but rather slowly forms heterocyclic salts [H(2)C(mt)(2)BR(2)]Cl, three examples of which (BR(2) = BH(2), BH(mt), 9-borabicyclononyl) have been structurally characterised to confirm the unprecedented B(NCS)(2)C connectivity. PMID:15306929

  9. Evidence for a Fourteenth mtDNA-Encoded Protein in the Female-Transmitted mtDNA of Marine Mussels (Bivalvia: Mytilidae)

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Sophie; Ghiselli, Fabrizio; Passamonti, Marco; Milani, Liliana; Stewart, Donald T.; Hoeh, Walter R.

    2011-01-01

    Background A novel feature for animal mitochondrial genomes has been recently established: i.e., the presence of additional, lineage-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins with functional significance. This feature has been observed in freshwater mussels with doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA (DUI). The latter unique system of mtDNA transmission, which also exists in some marine mussels and marine clams, is characterized by one mt genome inherited from the female parent (F mtDNA) and one mt genome inherited from the male parent (M mtDNA). In freshwater mussels, the novel mtDNA-encoded proteins have been shown to be mt genome-specific (i.e., one novel protein for F genomes and one novel protein for M genomes). It has been hypothesized that these novel, F- and M-specific, mtDNA-encoded proteins (and/or other F- and/or M-specific mtDNA sequences) could be responsible for the different modes of mtDNA transmission in bivalves but this remains to be demonstrated. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated all complete (or nearly complete) female- and male-transmitted marine mussel mtDNAs previously sequenced for the presence of ORFs that could have functional importance in these bivalves. Our results confirm the presence of a novel F genome-specific mt ORF, of significant length (>100aa) and located in the control region, that most likely has functional significance in marine mussels. The identification of this ORF in five Mytilus species suggests that it has been maintained in the mytilid lineage (subfamily Mytilinae) for ∼13 million years. Furthermore, this ORF likely has a homologue in the F mt genome of Musculista senhousia, a DUI-containing mytilid species in the subfamily Crenellinae. We present evidence supporting the functionality of this F-specific ORF at the transcriptional, amino acid and nucleotide levels. Conclusions/Significance Our results offer support for the hypothesis that “novel F genome-specific mitochondrial genes” are involved in key

  10. Intracellular evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the tragedy of the cytoplasmic commons.

    PubMed

    Haig, David

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria exist in large numbers per cell. Therefore, the strength of natural selection on individual mtDNAs for their contribution to cellular fitness is weak whereas the strength of selection in favor of mtDNAs that increase their own replication without regard for cellular functions is strong. This problem has been solved for most mitochondrial genes by their transfer to the nucleus but a few critical genes remain encoded by mtDNA. Organisms manage the evolution of mtDNA to prevent mutational decay of essential services mitochondria provide to their hosts. Bottlenecks of mitochondrial numbers in female germlines increase the homogeneity of mtDNAs within cells and allow intraorganismal selection to eliminate cells with low quality mitochondria. Mechanisms of intracellular "quality control" allow direct selection on the competence of individual mtDNAs. These processes maintain the integrity of mtDNAs within the germline but are inadequate to indefinitely maintain mitochondrial function in somatic cells. PMID:27062292

  11. MT-4 Suppresses Resistant Ovarian Cancer Growth through Targeting Tubulin and HSP27

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Hui Chen; Kumar, Sunil; Shen, Chien-Chang; Liou, Jing Ping; Pan, Shiow Lin; Teng, Che Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, the anticancer mechanisms of MT-4 were examined in A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res human ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods To evaluate the activity of MT-4, we performed in vitro cell viability and cell cycle assays and in vivo xenograft assays. Immunoblotting analysis was carried out to evaluate the effect of MT-4 on ovarian cancer. Tubulin polymerization was determined using a tubulin binding assay. Results MT-4 (2-Methoxy-5-[2-(3,4,5-trimethoxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-phenol), a derivative of moscatilin, can inhibit both sensitive A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res cell growth and viability. MT-4 inhibited tubulin polymerization to induce G2/M arrest followed by caspase-mediated apoptosis. Further studies indicated that MT-4 is not a substrate of P-glycoprotein (p-gp). MT-4 also caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, accompanied by the upregulation of cyclin B, p-Thr161 Cdc2/p34, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora kinase B, and phospho-Ser10-histone H3 protein levels. In addition, we found that p38 MAPK pathway activation was involved in MT-4-induced apoptosis. Most importantly, MT-4 also decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and reduced its interaction with caspase-3, which inured cancer cells to chemotherapy resistance. Treatment of cells with SB203580 or overexpression of dominant negative (DN)-p38 or wild-type HSP27 reduced PARP cleavage caused by MT-4. MT-4 induced apoptosis through regulation of p38 and HSP27. Our xenograft models also show the in vivo efficacy of MT-4. MT-4 inhibited both A2780 and NCI-ADR/res cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion These findings indicate that MT-4 could be a potential lead compound for the treatment of multidrug-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25874627

  12. France. Country profile. [France's economy adjusts to a declining birth rate].

    PubMed

    Inserra, P

    1984-09-01

    This discussion of France focuses on regions and cities, age distribution, households and families, housing, labor force, consumption, education, and communications. France counted 54,334,871 citizens as of March 4, 1982. There were 250,000 more people than in 1975, yielding a 7-year growth rate of 3.3%. If present trends continue, there will be 56 million French by the end of the 1980s. Since 1975 when the last census was conducted, cities of more than 200,000 lost an average of 5% of their residents. For the 1st time in more than a century, urban areas of 20,000 or more did not gain population but merely held their own. France continues to experience the effects of the large-scale decimation of its male population during the 2 world wars. The World war i loss showed up March 1982 as a relatively smaller 60-74 group. Conversely the population aged 75 and over is growing, both in absolute numbers and as a percent of the population. There were 3.6 million aged 75 and over (6.6% of the population) in 1982 compared with 3 million (5.6%) in 1975. The 19 and under age group declined between 1975-85, from 31% (16.2 million) to 29% (15.6 million). The 20-59 year old group constitutes the largest segment of the population--about double the group aged 19 and under--and its growing. This group was 50% of the population in 1973 and 53% in 1982. The infant mortality rate has declined steadily in France, from 18.2 deaths/1000 births in 1970 to 13.6 in 1975 and 9.5 at present. The total fertility rate has continued to decline: 1.8 children/woman in the 1982 census a rate less than the number needed to replace the present French population. Between 1975-82 households grew 10.4% to a total of 19.6 million. The growth in the number of households is attributed to the increase in divorce and the tendency for French children to leave the parental home at an earlier age. France has nearly 23 million dwelling places. More than half of householders own their own homes. New housing starts

  13. Outlier detection for groundwater data in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valmy, Larissa; de Fouquet, Chantal; Bourgine, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Quality and quantity water in France are increasingly observed since the 70s. Moreover, in 2000, the EU Water Framework Directive established a framework for community action in the water policy field for the protection of inland surface waters (rivers and lakes), transitional waters (estuaries), coastal waters and groundwater. It will ensure that all aquatic ecosystems and, with regard to their water needs, terrestrial ecosystems and wetlands meet 'good status' by 2015. The Directive requires Member States to establish river basin districts and for each of these a river basin management plan. In France, monitoring programs for the water status were implemented in each basin since 2007. The data collected through these programs feed into an information system which contributes to check the compliance of water environmental legislation implementation, assess the status of water guide management actions (programs of measures) and evaluate their effectiveness, and inform the public. Our work consists in study quality and quantity groundwater data for some basins in France. We propose a specific mathematical approach in order to detect outliers and study trends in time series. In statistic, an outlier is an observation that lies outside the overall pattern of a distribution. Usually, the presence of an outlier indicates some sort of problem, thus, it is important to detect it in order to know the cause. In fact, techniques for temporal data analysis have been developed for several decades in parallel with geostatistical methods. However compared to standard statistical methods, geostatistical analysis allows incomplete or irregular time series analysis. Otherwise, tests carried out by the BRGM showed the potential contribution of geostatistical methods for characterization of environmental data time series. Our approach is to exploit this potential through the development of specific algorithms, tests and validation of methods. We will introduce and explain our method

  14. How Gaz de France optimizes LNG regasification

    SciTech Connect

    Colonna, J.L.; Lecomte, B.; Caudron, S.

    1986-05-05

    A regasification optimization program was implemented at Montoir-de-Bretagne in 1984, and rapidly accepted by the operators. It has been an important tool for decision-making in the optimizing operation of this liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage and regasification terminal. The models used are regularly and easily updated on the basis of equipment behavior: aging or fouling. The Montoir-de-Bretagne LNG terminal is in the port area of Nates-Saint Nazaire on the Atlantic coast. It was commissioned in 1982 by Gaz de France. This terminal is used for receiving, storing, and regasifying the Algerian LNG received under a contract between Gaz de France and Sonatrach, as well as the LNG imported by Belgium and temporarily routed through France. It is designed to receive 25,000 to 200,000 cu m LNG carriers and has three 120,000 cm m LNG storage tanks. The daily sendout ranges between 6.7 million cu m and 36 million cu m. Monitor terminal supplies mainly Brittany and the Paris area. Two identifical berths allow the simultaneous reception of two LNG carriers. LNG is carried to the storage tanks in 32-in. lines at a rate of 12,000 cu m/hr. Each storage tank is equipped with three submerged 450 cu m/hr pumps with which the LNG is sent from the tanks to the secondary pumps at 8 bar. The nine high-pressure (HP) secondary pumps, with a capacity of either 450 cu m/hr or 180 cu m/hr, raise the LNG pressure to a level at least equal to pipeline pressure prior to revaporization.

  15. Chapter 40: history of neurology in France.

    PubMed

    Clarac, François; Boller, François

    2010-01-01

    The history of neurology in France is characterized by the very high degree of centralization in that country where "everything seems to happen in Paris," and yet the considerable degree of autonomous diversity in the evolution of some other medical schools such as Montpellier and Strasbourg. It could be argued that France saw the birth of clinical neurology as a separate discipline since Jean Martin Charcot at the Salpêtrière Hospital obtained a chair of diseases of the nervous system in 1892, a first in the history of the academic world. The chapter shows, however, that the work of Charcot was preceded by a long evolution in medical thinking, which culminated with the introduction of experimental medicine developed by Claude Bernard and François Magendie, and by the study of aphasia by Paul Broca and its localization of language in a specific area of the brain. Many of the great neurologists of France like Duchenne de Boulogne, Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski and Pierre Marie gravitated around Charcot while others like Charles-Edward Brown-Sequard and Jules Dejerine developed their talents independently. The history of Sainte-Anne Hospital further illustrates this independence. It also shows the relation between neurology and psychiatry with Henri Ey, Jean Delay and Pierre Deniker, who collaborated with Henri Laborit in the clinical development of chlorpromazine. Sainte Anne also saw the birth of modern neuropsychology with Henry Hécaen. Jean Talairach and his group developed human stereotaxic neurosurgery and a 3-dimensional brain atlas that is used around the world. The chapter also mentions institutions (the CNRS and INSERM) that have contributed to developments partially independently from medical schools. It concludes with a presentation of schools located outside of Paris that have played a significant role in the development of neurology. Six of the most important ones are described: Montpellier, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Strasbourg, Lyon, and

  16. Transcriptional response of two metallothionein genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) and histological changes in Oxya chinensis (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) exposed to three trace metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoming; Wu, Haihua; Yu, Zhitao; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Jianzhen; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the transcriptional responses of two metallothionein (MT) genes (OcMT1 and OcMT2) in various tissues (brain, optic lobe, Malpighian tubules, fat bodies, foregut, gastric caeca, midgut and hindgut) of Oxya chinensis (Thunberg) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea) after exposed to the trace metals cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) for 48h. The study revealed that the exposure of O. chinensis to each of the three metals at the median lethal concentration (LC50) or lower concentration(s) up-regulated the transcriptions of both OcMT1 and OCMT2 in the eight tissues except for OcMT1 and OcMT2 with Cd in brain and gastric caeca, respectively, and OcMT2 with Cu in gastric caeca. These results suggested that the exposure of O. chinensis to the metals may enhance MT biosynthesis that protects tissues by binding these metals in various tissues. To examine possible histopathological effect of the metals, we examined the histological changes in the fat bodies after O. chinensis was exposed to each of these metals at LC50. The exposure of Cd significantly reduced the size and number of adipocytes as compared with the control. However, such an effect was not observed in O. chinensis exposed to either Cu or Zn. These results suggested that fat bodies might be either significantly affected by Cd or play a crucial role in detoxification of excessive trace metals. PMID:26159299

  17. Autochthonous case of dengue in France, October 2013.

    PubMed

    Marchand, E; Prat, C; Jeannin, C; Lafont, E; Bergmann, T; Flusin, O; Rizzi, J; Roux, N; Busso, V; Deniau, J; Noel, H; Vaillant, V; Leparc-Goffart, I; Six, C; Paty, M C

    2013-01-01

    In October 2013, autochthonous dengue fever was diagnosed in a laboratory technician in Bouches-du-Rhone, southern France, a department colonised by Aedes albopictus since 2010. After ruling out occupational contamination, we identified the likely chain of local vector-borne transmission from which the autochthonous case arose. Though limited, this second occurrence of autochthonous dengue transmission in France highlights that efforts should be continued to rapidly detect dengue virus introduction and prevent its further dissemination in France. PMID:24342514

  18. Frances E. Jensen's The Teenage Brain.

    PubMed

    Silveri, Marisa M

    2015-01-01

    The unpredictable and sometimes incomprehensible moods and behaviors of a teenager can be a head-scratching mystery-especially to parents. Hormones, boredom, social media, peer pressure, and drugs and alcohol are just a few of the factors to consider. Frances E. Jensen, M.D., professor and chair of neurology at the University of Pennsylvania and the mother of two sons who are now in their twenties (along with Washington Post health and science reporter and Pulitzer Prize winner Amy Ellis Nutt) look at the emerging science of the adolescent brain and provide advice based on Jensen's own research and experience as a single mother. PMID:27408670

  19. France: Thrust and parry over nuclear risks

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, M.

    1997-01-31

    Claims about the health risks posed by nuclear-power installations are always controversial, but nowhere more so than in France, where some 75% of the nation`s electricity is generated from nuclear energy. So, it was no surprise that publication of a study by two French epidemiologists earlier this month claiming to show a link between cases of childhood leukemia and the nuclear-waste reprocessing plant at La Hague on the Normandy coast sparked fireworks in the French press. Several French epidemiologists sharply criticized the study`s methodology and conclusions. Their attacks have now drawn an unusual response from the British Medical Journal (BMJ), in which the paper appeared.

  20. Mt. Elgon, Africa, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The striking contrast of geologic structures in Africa is shown in this shaded relief image of Mt. Elgon on the left and a section of the Great Rift Valley on the right.

    Mt. Elgon is a solitary extinct volcano straddling the border between Uganda and Kenya, and at 4,321 meters (14,178 feet) tall is the eighth highest mountain in Africa. It is positioned on the Pre-Cambriam bedrock of the Trans Nzoia Plateau, and is similar to other such volcanoes in East Africa in that it is associated with the formation of the Rift Valley. However one thing that sets Mt. Elgon apart is its age.

    Although there is no verifiable evidence of its earliest volcanic activity, Mt. Elgon is estimated to be at least 24 million years old, making it the oldest extinct volcano in East Africa. This presents a striking comparison to Mt. Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa at 5,895 meters (19,341 feet), which is just over one million years old. Judging by the diameter of its base, it is a common belief among geological experts that Mt. Elgon was once the highest mountains in Africa, however erosion has played a significant role in reducing the height to its present value.

    Juxtaposed with this impressive mountain is a section of the Great Rift Valley, a geological fault system that extends for about 4,830 kilometers (2,995 miles) from Syria to central Mozambique. Erosion has concealed some sections, but in some sections like that shown here, there are sheer cliffs several thousand feet high. The present configuration of the valley, which dates from the mid-Pleistocene epoch, results from a rifting process associated with thermal currents in the Earth's mantle.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly

  1. DNA Barcoding the Medusozoa using mtCOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortman, Brian D.; Bucklin, Ann; Pagès, Francesc; Youngbluth, Marsh

    2010-12-01

    The Medusozoa are a clade within the Cnidaria comprising the classes Hydrozoa, Scyphozoa, and Cubozoa. Identification of medusozoan species is challenging, even for taxonomic experts, due to their fragile forms and complex, morphologically-distinct life history stages. In this study 231 sequences for a portion of the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I (mtCOI) gene were obtained from 95 species of Medusozoans including; 84 hydrozoans (61 siphonophores, eight anthomedusae, four leptomedusae, seven trachymedusae, and four narcomedusae), 10 scyphozoans (three coronatae, four semaeostomae, two rhizostomae, and one stauromedusae), and one cubozoan. This region of mtCOI has been used as a DNA barcode (i.e., a molecular character for species recognition and discrimination) for a diverse array of taxa, including some Cnidaria. Kimura 2-parameter (K2P) genetic distances between sequence variants within species ranged from 0 to 0.057 (mean 0.013). Within the 13 genera for which multiple species were available, K2P distance between congeneric species ranged from 0.056 to 0.381. A cluster diagram generated by Neighbor Joining (NJ) using K2P distances reliably clustered all barcodes of the same species with ≥99% bootstrap support, ensuring accurate identification of species. Intra- and inter-specific variation of the mtCOI gene for the Medusozoa are appropriate for this gene to be used as a DNA barcode for species-level identification, but not for phylogenetic analysis or taxonomic classification of unknown sequences at higher taxonomic levels. This study provides a set of molecular tools that can be used to address questions of speciation, biodiversity, life-history, and population boundaries in the Medusozoa.

  2. Multi-task guiding system of the Mt. Suhora Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzesinski, J.; Wojcik, K.

    1993-12-01

    A short description of the computer controlled guiding system using images from a sensitive TV camera is presented. The system works with a 0.6/7.5 m telescope of Mt. Suhora Observatory and can accept input from any standard video camera. The IBM 286-486 or compatible personal computer equipped with a SVGA graphic card and framegrabber card is used as a control unit. The program works under a DOS operating system. An effect of guiding on the classic photoelectric photometry and CCD image quality is discussed.

  3. A VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST TOWARD MT. SAN ANTONIO FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A VIEW TO THE SOUTHWEST TOWARD MT. SAN ANTONIO FROM THE UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD TRACK NEAR CAJON PASS. VISIBLE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT ARE THE SANDSTONE OUTCROPS AT SULLIVAN’S CURVE IN THE FAR LEFT DISTANCE; BNSF RAILROAD MAIN TRACK 2 CURVING THROUGH THE HILLS IN THE LEFT DISTANCE; HILL 58.2 AT CENTER, MARKED BY AN ISOLATED STAND OF TREES; BNSF RAILROAD MAIN TRACK 1, RUNNING STRAIGHT THROUGH THE CENTER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH; AND THE UNION PACIFIC TRACK AT THE FAR RIGHT. 123 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. Spine growth mechanisms: friction and seismicity at Mt. Unzen, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, Adrian; Kendrick, Jackie; Hirose, Takehiro; Henton De Angelis, Sarah; De Angelis, Silvio; Umakoshi, Kodo; Miwa, Takahiro; Wadsworth, Fabian; Dingwell, Don; Lavallee, Yan

    2014-05-01

    The final episode of dome growth during the 1991-1995 eruption of Mt. Unzen was characterised by spine extrusion accompanied by repetitive seismicity. This type of cyclic activity has been observed at several dome-building volcanoes and recent work suggests a source mechanism of brittle failure of magma in the conduit. Spine growth may proceed by densification and closure of permeable pathways within the uppermost conduit magma, leading to sealing of the dome and inflation of the edifice. Amplified stresses on the wall rock and plug cause brittle failure near the conduit wall once static friction forces are overcome, and during spine growth these fractures may propagate to the dome surface. The preservation of these features is rare, and the conduit is typically inaccessible; therefore spines, the extruded manifestation of upper conduit material, provide the opportunity to study direct evidence of brittle processes in the conduit. At Mt. Unzen the spine retains evidence for brittle deformation and slip, however mechanical constraints on the formation of these features and their potential impact on eruption dynamics have not been well constrained. Here, we conduct an investigation into the process of episodic spine growth using high velocity friction apparatus at variable shear slip rate (0.4-1.5 m.s-1) and normal stress (0.4-3.5 MPa) on dome rock from Mt. Unzen, generating frictional melt at velocity >0.4 m.s-1 and normal stress >0.7 MPa. Our results show that the presence of frictional melt causes a deviation from Byerlee's frictional rule for rock friction. Melt generation is a disequilibrium process: initial amphibole breakdown leads to melt formation, followed by chemical homogenization of the melt layer. Ultimately, the experimentally generated frictional melts have a similar final chemistry, thickness and comminuted clast size distribution, thereby facilitating the extrapolation of a single viscoelastic model to describe melt-lubricated slip events at Mt

  5. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design for 13 MT Case

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.D.

    2001-01-31

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading conceptual design for the 13 Metric Ton (MT) PIP throughput case. This report includes a process block diagram, process description, and preliminary equipment specifications and documents the changes to the original can loading concept documented in previous reports.

  6. A miniature VGA SWIR camera using MT6415CA ROIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eminoglu, Selim; Yilmaz, S. Gokhan; Kocak, Serhat

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a new miniature VGA SWIR camera called NanoCAM-6415, which is developed to demonstrate the key features of the MT6415CA ROIC such as high integration level, low-noise, and low-power in a small volume. The NanoCAM-6415 uses an InGaAs Focal Plane Array (FPA) with a format of 640 × 512 and pixel pitch of 15 μm built using MT6415CA ROIC. MT6415CA is a low-noise CTIA ROIC, which has a system-on-chip architecture, allows generation of all the required timing and biases on-chip in the ROIC without requiring any external components or inputs, thus enabling the development of compact and low-noise SWIR cameras, with reduced size, weight, and power (SWaP). NanoCAM-6415 camera supports snapshot operation using Integrate-Then-Read (ITR) and Integrate-While-Read (IWR) modes. The camera has three gain settings enabled by the ROIC through programmable Full-Well-Capacity (FWC) values of 10.000 e-, 20.000 e-, and 350.000 e- in the very high gain (VHG), high-gain (HG), and low-gain (LG) modes, respectively. The camera has an input referred noise level of 10 e- rms in the VHG mode at 1 ms integration time, suitable for low-noise SWIR imaging applications. In order to reduce the size and power of the camera, only 2 outputs out of 8 of the ROIC are connected to the external Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs) in the camera electronics, providing a maximum frame rate of 50 fps through a 26-pin SDR type Camera Link connector. NanoCAM-6415 SWIR camera without the optics measures 32 mm × 32 mm × 35 mm, weighs 45gr, and dissipates less than 1.8 W using a 5 V supply. These results show that MT6415CA ROIC can successfully be used to develop cameras for SWIR imaging applications where SWaP is a concern. Mikro-Tasarim has also developed new imaging software to demonstrate the functionality of this miniature VGA camera. Mikro-Tasarim provides tested ROIC wafers and also offers compact and easy-to-use test electronics, demo cameras, and hardware

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-351 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-351 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 351).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-356 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-356 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 356).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-355 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-355 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 355).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-325 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-325 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 325).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-293 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-293 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 293).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-271 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-271 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 271).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-347 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-347 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 347).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-284 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-284 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 284).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-331 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-331 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 331).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-313 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-313 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 313).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-359 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-359 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 359).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-295 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-295 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 295).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-348 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-348 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 348).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-341 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-341 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 341).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-275 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-275 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 275).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-317 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-317 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 317).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-333 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-333 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 333).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-326 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-326 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 326).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-307 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-307 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 307).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-336 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-336 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 336).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-290 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-290 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 290).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-327 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-327 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 327).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-337 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-337 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 337).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-303 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-303 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 303).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-267 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-267 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 267).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-320 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-320 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 320).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-283 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-283 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 283).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-316 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-316 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 316).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-346 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-346 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 346).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-323 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-323 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 323).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-339 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-339 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 339).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-279 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-279 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 279).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-296 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-296 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 296).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-335 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-335 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 335).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-276 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-276 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 276).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-330 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-330 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 330).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-299 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-299 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 299).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-294 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-294 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 294).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-312 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-312 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 312).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-322 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-322 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 322).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-266 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-266 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 266).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-288 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-288 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 288).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-270 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-270 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 270).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-315 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-315 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 315).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-282 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-282 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 282).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-291 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-291 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 291).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-319 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-319 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 319).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-309 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-309 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 309).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-358 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-358 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 358).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-314 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-314 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 314).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-321 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-321 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 321).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-278 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-278 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 278).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-306 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-306 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 306).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-344 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-344 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 344).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-349 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-349 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 349).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-332 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-332 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 332).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-318 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-318 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 318).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-277 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-277 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 277).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-300 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-300 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 300).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-328 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-328 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 328).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-334 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-334 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 334).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-281 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-281 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 281).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-285 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-285 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 285).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-264 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-264 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 264).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-292 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-292 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 292).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-340 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-340 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 340).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-305 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-305 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 305).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-297 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-297 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 297).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-354 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-354 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 354).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-280 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-280 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 280).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-301 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-301 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 301).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-304 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-304 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 304).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-342 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-342 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 342).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-274 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-274 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 274).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-357 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-357 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 357).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-289 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-289 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 289).

  3. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-302 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-302 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 302).

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-286 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-286 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 286).

  5. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-338 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-338 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 338).

  6. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-352 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-352 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 352).

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-343 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-343 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 343).

  8. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-329 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-329 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 329).

  9. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-272 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-272 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 272).

  10. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-269 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-269 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 269).

  11. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-308 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-308 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 308).

  12. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-311 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-311 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 311).

  13. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-273 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-273 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 273).

  14. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-324 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-324 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 324).

  15. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-287 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-287 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 287).

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-268 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-268 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 268).

  17. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-310 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-310 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 310).

  18. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-345 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-345 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 345).

  19. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-265 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-265 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 265).

  20. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-353 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-353 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 353).

  1. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-298 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-298 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 298).

  2. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Mt-350 (Meitnerium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Mt-350 (Meitnerium, atomic number Z = 109, mass number A = 350).

  3. Infrared site testing of Mt. Lemmon and Catalina Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuiper, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    The operation and problems involved with two sky noise meters installed in the Catalina Mountains near Tucson, Arizona are discussed. The instruments were installed at two different locations on Mt. Lemon. It was found that when photometric conditions prevailed, a positive correlation existed between the outputs of the two instruments. In particular, the strongdiurnal effect, in which the sky noise increases abruptly at sunrise and falls markedly after sunset, was reproduced by both instruments. Discrepancies in data recorded by the two instruments are analyzed and possible causes for the discrepancies are proposed.

  4. Diffuse CO2 Degassing From Devils Kitchen, Mt. Hood, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfeld, D.; Howle, J. F.; Schmidt, M. E.

    2003-12-01

    Research to quantify diffuse CO2 emissions from volcanoes is a useful component of a monitoring program as increases in diffuse CO2 emissions have been linked to volcanic unrest. The Devils Kitchen (DK) at Mt. Hood, OR is a > 5000 m2 area of steaming ground, located near the summit of the volcano at the terminus of Coalman glacier. Numerous small, sub-boiling gas vents are scattered across the area and soil temperatures at the interior are typically elevated above background. Much of the host rock has been hydrothermally altered to clay, creating a hard packed moist surface of low permeability. At present, there are no fumaroles at DK, however many large fumaroles vent from the nearby Steel Cliffs and Crater Rock. During August 2003, we constructed a grid of 75 sites at DK using 10-m spacing, covering ≈ 5,000 m2. CO2 fluxes were measured using the accumulation chamber method. Soil temperatures were measured at 10-cm depth adjacent to each flux site. Fluxes and temperatures ranged from less than 8 to over 11,000 g m-2 d-1 and 5 to 88° C, respectively. The average flux at DK was 190 g m-2 d-1. Applying this average across the sampled area yields total CO2 emissions of 0.9 +/- 0.1 t d-1. Based on our field mapping after a snowfall, we estimate at least 37,000 m2 of thermal ground is present on Mt. Hood. If the flux over these areas is similar to the flux at DK this would indicate diffuse CO2 emissions on Mt. Hood are about 7 t d-1. This estimate may be conservative as fluxes at several sites at the edge of a large area of steaming ground above Crater Rock were much greater than the maximum flux at DK. Compared to reports of total diffuse CO2 emissions on similar volcanoes, our estimate for Mt. Hood is low and may indicate that most of the CO2 is emitted from the fumaroles.

  5. Climbing Mt. Sharp: Maximizing Curiosity's Science Over Traversable Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraeman, A. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bellutta, P.; Sletten, R. S.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    As Curiosity transitions from the plains of Gale Crater to the flanks of Mt. Sharp, the rover will begin to encounter material and terrains that could present greater mobility challenges. These challenges include the presence of significantly steeper slopes and large dunes that have the potential to embed the vehicle. Strategic path planning during this phase of the mission will therefore require carefully selecting a traversable route that is both time-efficient and that will provide access to the most scientifically rewarding targets. We consider possible solutions to this optimization problem by examining multiple orbital data sets in order to locate likely mobility hazards and to select potential science waypoints for future in situ investigation. High resolution HiRISE monochromatic images and digital elevation models show filled craters, rock fields, areas with slopes too steep for the rover to traverse, and other possible mobility obstacles on the northwest flank of Mt. Sharp. Using this context, we review accessibility to scientific targets on Mt. Sharp that have been previously discussed in landing site workshop presentations and peer-reviewed publications. Additionally, we identify new targets using detailed geologic maps combined with oversampled CRISM observations that provide mineralogical information at unprecedented high spatial resolutions (up to 6 m/pixel). For example, the spatially sharpened CRISM spectral data show a localized hematite deposit that is associated with the upper-most stratum of a ridge which is located ~3km from the rover's entry point to Mt. Sharp. This deposit may represent a previously habitable environment and is therefore a high priority target for in situ investigation. In order to study the hematite and also to eventually access the phyllosilicate-bearing trough that is located directly behind the ridge, Curiosity will have to cross this ridge, but the ridge edges are often defined by regions with slopes that are too steep

  6. pT7MT, a metallothionein 2A-tagged novel prokaryotic fusion expression vector.

    PubMed

    Marikar, Faiz M M T; Fang, Lei; Jiang, Shu-Han; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2007-05-01

    In the present article, a novel fusion expression vector for Escherichia coli was developed based on the pTORG plasmid, a derivative of pET32a. This vector, named pT7MT (GenBank Accession No DQ504436), carries a T7 promoter and it drives the downstream gene encoding Metallothionein 2A (MT2A). There are in-framed multiple cloning sites (MCS) downstream of the MT2A gene. A target gene can be cloned into the MCS and fused to the C-terminal of the MT2A gene in a compatible open reading frame (ORF) to achieve fusion expression. The metal-binding capability of MT2A allows the purification of fusion proteins by metal chelating affinity chromatogralhy, known as Ni2+-affinity chromatography. Using this expression vector, we successfully got the stable and high-yield expression of MT2A-GST and MT2A-Troponin I fusion proteins. These two proteins were easily purified from the supernatant of cell lysates by one-step Ni2+ -affinity chromatography. The final yields of MT2A-GST and MT2A-Troponin I were 30 mg/l and 28 mg/l in LB culture, respectively. Taken together, our data suggest that pT7MT can be applied as a useful expression vector for stable and high-yield production of fusion proteins. PMID:18051292

  7. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA in leucocytes harbouring the 3243A→G mtDNA mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Angela; Taylor, Robert W; Durham, Steve E; Deschauer, Marcus; Schaefer, Andrew M; Samuels, David C; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2007-01-01

    Background The 3243A→G MTTL1 mutation is the most common heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation associated with disease. Previous studies have shown that the percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases in blood as patients get older, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Objectives and method To understand the dynamics of the process and the underlying mechanisms, an accurate fluorescent assay was established for 3243A→G heteroplasmy and the amount of mtDNA in blood with real‐time polymerase chain reaction was determined. The amount of mutated and wild‐type mtDNA was measured at two time points in 11 subjects. Results The percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases exponentially during life, and peripheral blood leucocytes in patients harbouring 3243A→G are profoundly depleted of mtDNA. Conclusions A similar decrease in mtDNA has been seen in other mitochondrial disorders, and in 3243A→G cell lines in culture, indicating that depletion of mtDNA may be a common secondary phenomenon in several mitochondrial diseases. Depletion of mtDNA is not always due to mutation of a nuclear gene involved in mtDNA maintenance. PMID:16950816

  8. Medication sales and syndromic surveillance, France.

    PubMed

    Vergu, Elisabeta; Grais, Rebecca F; Sarter, Hélène; Fagot, Jean-Paul; Lambert, Bruno; Valleron, Alain-Jaques; Flahault, Antoine

    2006-03-01

    Although syndromic surveillance systems using nonclinical data have been implemented in the United States, the approach has yet to be tested in France. We present the results of the first model based on drug sales that detects the onset of influenza season and forecasts its trend. Using weekly lagged sales of a selected set of medications, we forecast influenzalike illness (ILI) incidence at the national and regional level for 3 epidemic seasons (2000-01, 2001-02, and 2002-03) and validate the model with real-time updating on the fourth (2003-04). For national forecasts 1-3 weeks ahead, the correlation between observed ILI incidence and forecast was 0.85-0.96, an improvement over the current surveillance method in France. Our findings indicate that drug sales are a useful additional tool to syndromic surveillance, a complementary and independent source of information, and a potential improvement for early warning systems for both epidemic and pandemic planning. PMID:16704778

  9. [Territorial and social healthcare inequalities in France].

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Geographic analyses of health-related issues have a long tradition in France, and have often consisted of observational studies conducted by practitioners themselves. Such geographic approaches were gradually abandoned during the 20th century as the pace of clinical progress increased. The few healthcare studies conducted by geographers have had little impact among the medical community. However, our studies show that geographic inequalities in health still persist. During the last 10 years or so, the social and economic crisis has dangerously accentuated health inequalities at every level In France, where equality is supposed to be the watchword of the entire healthcare system, this situation is particularly regrettable. Access to care decreases with distance from medical services. With the increasing urban and suburban concentration of the population, public healthcare policy must focus on finding solutions for people living in remote areas or too poor to access medical care. Geographic analyses of healthcare organization can help to make medical care available for all, especially those who need it most. PMID:23550454

  10. Effects of Grapevine Leafroll associated Virus 3 (GLRaV-3) and duration of infection on fruit composition and wine chemical profile of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sauvignon blanc.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Mundy, D; Albright, A; Grose, C; Trought, M C T; Cohen, D; Chooi, K M; MacDiarmid, R; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-04-15

    In order to determine the effects of Grapevine Leafroll associated Virus 3 (GLRaV-3) on fruit composition and chemical profile of juice and wine from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Sauvignon blanc grown in New Zealand, composition variables were measured on fruit from vines either infected with GLRaV-3 (established or recent infections) or uninfected vines. Physiological ripeness (20.4°Brix) was the criterion established to determine the harvest date for each of the three treatments. Date of grape ripeness was strongly affected by virus infection. In juice and wine, GLRaV-3 infection prior to 2008 reduced titratable acidity compared with the uninfected control. Differences observed in amino acids from the three infection status groups did not modify basic wine chemical properties. In conclusion, GLRaV-3 infection slowed grape ripening, but at equivalent ripeness to result in minimal effects on the juice and wine chemistry. Time of infection produced differences in specific plant physiological variables. PMID:26675855

  11. The role of regional tectonics, magma pressure and gravitational spreading in earthquakes of the eastern sector of Mt. Etna volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patanè, G.; Montalto, A.; Imposa, S.; Menza, S.

    1994-07-01

    Data concerning M ⩾ 3.3 earthquakes that occurred in the eastern sector of Mt. Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy) in the period 1984-1989 are here presented and discussed. Only events with reliable focal mechanisms and detailed macroseismic investigations have been considered. Instrumental information come from local seismic networks, both permanent and temporary, run by the University of Catania (UCT), the Seismological Observatory of Acireale (SOACR), the CNRS (Grenoble, France) and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPG, France). Observations regarding the macroseismic effects have been collected by means of field recognitions mainly carried out by the authors. All available data are analyzed in light of the more recent interpretations on the kinematic behaviour of the shallowest structures of Etna, with particular reference to its eastern flank which, according to Borgia et al. (1992), is likely affected by a seaward gravitational migration, driven by the sliding of this sector of the volcanic apparatus over its clay-rich substratum. The results obtained support the hypothesis that the shallow seismicity of the eastern flank of Mt. Etna is related to a complex stress field due to the combined effects of: (a) the tectonics associated with the interaction between the African and Eurasian plates; (b) the rise of magma into the crust; and (c) the gravitative seaward sliding of the eastern sector of the volcano. In particular, we hypothesize that: (1) tectonic forces caused the end of the 1984 eruption, by means of a "locking mechanism"; (2) the increment of magma pressure at depth is periodically responsible for local re-orientation of the stress field acting on the volcano, which also produces earthquakes of high intensity; (3) shallow earthquakes ( z < = 5 km), showing eastward compression mechanism, could be related to the gravitational sliding of unbuttressed sectors of the volcanic body accompanying the emplacement of intrusive dykes.

  12. Regulation of anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthesis by Medicago truncatula bHLH transcription factor MtTT8.

    PubMed

    Li, Penghui; Chen, Beibei; Zhang, Gaoyang; Chen, Longxiang; Dong, Qiang; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Zhao, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The MYB- basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-WD40 complexes regulating anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in plants are not fully understood. Here Medicago truncatula bHLH MtTT8 was characterized as a central component of these ternary complexes that control anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis. Mttt8 mutant seeds have a transparent testa phenotype with reduced PAs and anthocyanins. MtTT8 restores PA and anthocyanin productions in Arabidopsis tt8 mutant. Ectopic expression of MtTT8 restores anthocyanins and PAs in mttt8 plant and hairy roots and further enhances both productions in wild-type hairy roots. Transcriptomic analyses and metabolite profiling of mttt8 mutant seeds and M. truncatula hairy roots (mttt8 mutant, mttt8 mutant complemented with MtTT8, or MtTT8 overexpression lines) indicate that MtTT8 regulates a subset of genes involved in PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis. MtTT8 is genetically regulated by MtLAP1, MtPAR and MtWD40-1. Combinations of MtPAR, MtLAP1, MtTT8 and MtWD40-1 activate MtTT8 promoter in yeast assay. MtTT8 interacts with these transcription factors to form regulatory complexes. MtTT8, MtWD40-1 and an MYB factor, MtPAR or MtLAP1, interacted and activated promoters of anthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin synthase to regulate PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis, respectively. Our results provide new insights into the complex regulation of PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis in M. truncatula. PMID:26725247

  13. The novel high-performance 3-D MT inverse solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglyakov, Mikhail; Geraskin, Alexey; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We present novel, robust, scalable, and fast 3-D magnetotelluric (MT) inverse solver. The solver is written in multi-language paradigm to make it as efficient, readable and maintainable as possible. Separation of concerns and single responsibility concepts go through implementation of the solver. As a forward modelling engine a modern scalable solver extrEMe, based on contracting integral equation approach, is used. Iterative gradient-type (quasi-Newton) optimization scheme is invoked to search for (regularized) inverse problem solution, and adjoint source approach is used to calculate efficiently the gradient of the misfit. The inverse solver is able to deal with highly detailed and contrasting models, allows for working (separately or jointly) with any type of MT responses, and supports massive parallelization. Moreover, different parallelization strategies implemented in the code allow optimal usage of available computational resources for a given problem statement. To parameterize an inverse domain the so-called mask parameterization is implemented, which means that one can merge any subset of forward modelling cells in order to account for (usually) irregular distribution of observation sites. We report results of 3-D numerical experiments aimed at analysing the robustness, performance and scalability of the code. In particular, our computational experiments carried out at different platforms ranging from modern laptops to HPC Piz Daint (6th supercomputer in the world) demonstrate practically linear scalability of the code up to thousands of nodes.

  14. Hypocentral Relocations of the 2008 Mt. Carmel, Illinois Aftershock Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, K.; Hamburger, M. W.; Pavlis, G. L.; Horton, S. P.; Withers, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    On April 18, 2008, a moderate sized earthquake (Mw 5.2, hypocentral depth of 16 km) occurred near the Indiana-Illinois state border within 3 km of the Mt. Carmel-New Harmony fault at the northern termination of the Wabash Valley Fault System. A total of 257 aftershocks were recorded over the next month by a fourteen-station temporary network deployed by Indiana University and University of Memphis/Center of Earthquake Research and Information (CERI). The number of recorded aftershocks is greater than aftershocks recorded from previous earthquakes in the WVFS of similar magnitude within the last 50 years. The number and density of local stations allowed the generation of precise hypocentral relocations with the combination of waveform cross-correlation and joint hypocentral techniques. The relocated hypocenters indicate a well-defined near-vertical fault plane striking east-west. The fault orientation is consistent with the focal mechanism of the main shock and nearly orthogonal with respect to the trace of the neighboring Mt. Carmel-New Harmony fault. The interpreted ruptured fault orientation suggests the aftershock sequence occurred on a transfer structure at the fault termination. The structure may be related to the change in deformation styles suggested by the transition from the northeast-trending WVFS to the northwest-trending La Salle anticlinorium.

  15. Geochemical characteristics of acid fluids in Mt Pinatubo, Philipines

    SciTech Connect

    Buenviaje, Marinela M.

    1991-01-01

    The surface geochemical characteristics of Mt Pinatubo indicate widespread deep acid fluids as shown by the following: presence of solfataras or sulfur-depositing fumaroles near or at the summit, and recent or active volcanism; discharge of mixed fluids with significant chloride at middle elevations; significant amounts of sulfate found in spring discharges at almost all levels (except at lowest levels or near sea level); springs with neutral pH and have high amounts of chloride and significant amounts of magnesium and boron; low Cl/Mg values accompanied by significant amounts of Mg observed at various elevations; higher proportions of gases, especially CO{sub 2} and significant N{sub 2}; widespread occurrence of iron hydroxide deposits at almost all elevations; and all springs discharge immature waters. A new mixing model is proposed, the Cl-B-Mg ternary diagram, to differentiate the effects on well and spring water chemistry of the following processes: seawater mixing, groundwater dilution and magmatic input. Seawater mixing is not indicated for Mt Pinatubo springs as shown by crossplots of chloride versus other chemical constituents and the Cl-B-Mg ternary diagram. Neutral alkali chloride waters are present in the area. This is supported by the chemical crossplots, and the Cl-B-Mg plots. In the Cl-B-Mg plot, springs that discharge low pH waters are shown to be manifestations of acid fluids that are localized within a shallow or deep fault zone.

  16. Barometric pressures at extreme altitudes on Mt. Everest: physiological significance.

    PubMed

    West, J B; Lahiri, S; Maret, K H; Peters, R M; Pizzo, C J

    1983-05-01

    Barometric pressures were measured on Mt. Everest from altitudes of 5,400 (base camp) to 8,848 m (summit) during the American Medical Research Expedition to Everest. Measurements at 5,400 m were made with a mercury barometer, and above this most of the pressures were obtained with an accurate crystal-sensor barometer. The mean daily pressures were 400.4 +/- 2.7 (SD) Torr (n = 35) at 5,400 m, 351.0 +/- 1.0 Torr (n = 16) at 6,300 m, 283.6 +/- 1.5 Torr (n = 6) at 8,050 m, and 253.0 Torr (n = 1) at 8,848 m. All these pressures are considerably higher than those predicted from the ICAO Standard Atmosphere. The chief reason is that pressures at altitudes between 2 and 16 km are latitude dependent, being higher near the equator because of the large mass of cold air in the stratosphere of that region. Data from weather balloons show that the pressure at the altitude of the summit of Mt. Everest varies considerably with season, being about 11.5 Torr higher in midsummer than in midwinter. Although the mountain has been climbed without supplementary O2, the very low O2 partial pressure at the summit means that it is at the limit of man's tolerance, and even day-by-day variations in barometric pressure apparently affect maximal O2 uptake. PMID:6863078

  17. Formation of superconducting junctions in MT-YBCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhna, T. A.; Gawalek, W.; Novikov, N. V.; Moshchil, V. E.; Sverdun, V. B.; Sergienko, N. V.; Surzhenko, A. B.; Uspenskaya, L. S.; Viznichenko, R.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Litzkendorf, D.; Habisreuther, T.; Krachunovska, S.; Vlasenko, A. V.

    2005-02-01

    The formation of superconducting junctions between MT-YBCO using TmBa2Cu3O7-δ powder as a solder has been studied. The method proposed excludes the step of a very slow cooling (at a rate of several degrees per hour) during seam formation. The heating and cooling rate for joining parts produced from single-domain material without visible cracks (macrocracks) can be rather high (500-1000 K h-1) and a holding time at the highest temperature (1010 °C) of several minutes (0.05 h) is enough to form a reliable junction. Reasonable rates of heating and cooling are however around 100 K h-1 if crack propagation is to be avoided in joined blocks used for practical application. Modelling experiments on rings and studies of the ring properties by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), field mapping with a Hall probe and magneto-optical microscopy have shown that superconducting properties of the junction were not lower than that of the joined material (jc of about 30 kA cm-2 was observed in zero field at 77 K) and that the proposed process of joining did not adversely affect the properties of the material. The structure of the resulting junction was in good agreement with the structure of MT-YBCO.

  18. mtDNA microevolution in Southern Chile's archipelagos.

    PubMed

    García, Federico; Moraga, Mauricio; Vera, Soledad; Henríquez, Hugo; Llop, Elena; Aspillaga, Eugenio; Rothhammer, Francisco

    2006-03-01

    The genetic variability of four predominantly Indian populations of southern Chile's archipelagos was examined by determining the frequencies of four mitochondrial DNA haplogroups that characterize the American Indian populations. Over 90% of the individuals analyzed presented Native American mtDNA haplogroups. By means of an unweighted group pair method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) dendrogram, a principal component analysis (PCA) derived from a distance matrix of mtDNA, and the exact test of population differentiation, we are able to prove the existence of a North-South cline. The populations in the northern part of the archipelagos are genetically similar to the Huilliche tribe, while the groups from the South are most closely related to the Fueguino tribe from the extreme South of Chile, and secondarily to the Pehuenche and Mapuche, who are found to the North and East of Chiloé archipelago. These results are consistent with a colonization of the southern archipelagos from Tierra del Fuego. We evaluate the evolutionary relationships of the population of the Chiloé area to groups from other geographic areas of Chile, using analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Three Amerindian clusters are identified: one formed by the Aymará and Atacameño, a second by the Huilliche, and a third including the Mapuche, Pehuenche, and Fueguino tribes, and the population inhabiting the South of the Chiloé arcipelago. These groups exhibit a North-South gradient in the frequency of haplogroup B, confirmed by F(ST) tests. PMID:16323203

  19. The setting of the Mt. Carmel caves reassessed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vita-Finzi, Claudio; Stringer, Chris

    2007-02-01

    Four caves on the SW flank of Mt. Carmel, es Skhul, el Wad, el Jaml and et Tabun, were first excavated in the 1930s by a team led by Dorothy Garrod. They yielded human remains whose age and evolutionary status remain controversial partly because the complexity of the cave deposits invites conflicting interpretations. The abrasion of artefacts and pebbles in el Wad and es Skhul, which was originally ascribed to spring flow within the caves, is explained here by wave action, with the implication that during part of the Middle Palaeolithic the caves were on the shoreline rather than being separated from it—as they now are—by several kilometres of coastal plain and a height difference of some 45 m. U-series, thermoluminescence (TL) and electron spin resonance (ESR) dating suggests that this occurred about 120,000 years ago, when sea level in the eastern Mediterranean stood 5-6 m above its present position. It follows that Mt. Carmel has subsequently undergone some 40 m of uplift. During the period of maximum submergence, the coastal route between Africa and the northern Mediterranean would have been partly blocked, but the loss of the coastal plain for transit and as a source of animal food was offset by easier access from the caves to marine resources.

  20. Single-cell analysis of intercellular heteroplasmy of mtDNA in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Sharpe, H.; Brown, N.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have investigated the distribution of mutant mtDNA molecules in single cells from a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a maternally inherited disease that is characterized by a sudden-onset bilateral loss of central vision, which typically occurs in early adulthood. More than 50% of all LHON patients carry an mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 11778. This nucleotide change converts a highly conserved arginine residue to histidine at codon 340 in the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4) gene of mtDNA. In the present study, the authors used PCR amplification of mtDNA from lymphocytes to investigate mtDNA heteroplasmy at the single-cell level in a LHON patient. They found that most cells were either homoplasmic normal or homoplasmic mutant at nucleotide position 11778. Some (16%) cells contained both mutant and normal mtDNA.

  1. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria. PMID:27418514

  2. A method for mutagenesis of mouse mtDNA and a resource of mouse mtDNA mutations for modeling human pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fayzulin, Rafik Z.; Perez, Michael; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Spadafora, Domenico; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease and have been associated with neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, diabetes and aging. Yet our progress toward delineating the precise contributions of mtDNA mutations to these conditions is impeded by the limited availability of faithful transmitochondrial animal models. Here, we report a method for the isolation of mutations in mouse mtDNA and its implementation for the generation of a collection of over 150 cell lines suitable for the production of transmitochondrial mice. This method is based on the limited mutagenesis of mtDNA by proofreading-deficient DNA-polymerase γ followed by segregation of the resulting highly heteroplasmic mtDNA population by means of intracellular cloning. Among generated cell lines, we identify nine which carry mutations affecting the same amino acid or nucleotide positions as in human disease, including a mutation in the ND4 gene responsible for 70% of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathies (LHON). Similar to their human counterparts, cybrids carrying the homoplasmic mouse LHON mutation demonstrated reduced respiration, reduced ATP content and elevated production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). The generated resource of mouse mtDNA mutants will be useful both in modeling human mitochondrial disease and in understanding the mechanisms of ROS production mediated by mutations in mtDNA. PMID:25820427

  3. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  4. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  5. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  6. The Definition of Vocational Diplomas in Germany and France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobus, Martine; Verdier, Eric

    1997-01-01

    In both France and Germany, the government, employers' organizations, and unions all participate in defining vocational diplomas based on a national framework of procedures of elaborating and standardizing titles. Important differences between the diploma definition processes in France and Germany may be identified. In Germany, the issue is…

  7. Social Representation of Gifted Children: A Preliminary Study in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavani, Jean Louis; Zenasni, Franck; Pereira-Fradin, Maria

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing recognition of giftedness in France and the need for identification. Social Representations (SR) of gifted children have never been examined in France with an appropriate methodology, yet it is important to do so as the information obtained may help ensure the insertion and inclusion of these children in school and society. The…

  8. 78 FR 38821 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of...-071-AD; Amendment 39-17482; AD 2013-12-04] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... new airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter France Model EC 155B, EC155B1, SA-366G1, SA-365N,...

  9. 78 FR 76984 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For...-084-AD; Amendment 39-17696; AD 2013-24-19] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... new airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter France (Eurocopter) Model AS332C, AS332L,...

  10. 78 FR 25367 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... information that is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). For...-021-AD; Amendment 39-17282; AD 2012-25-01] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France... new airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter France Model AS350B, AS350BA, AS350B1,...

  11. 78 FR 16200 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Eurocopter France...

  12. 78 FR 23686 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain Eurocopter France...

  13. 77 FR 36216 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter France Model...

  14. 78 FR 63429 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Eurocopter France Model AS332C,...

  15. 77 FR 58973 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for the Eurocopter France...

  16. 77 FR 20319 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Eurocopter France (EC) Model...

  17. 77 FR 36220 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France Helicopters

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter France...). SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Eurocopter France...

  18. Dutch/Flemish in the North of France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryckeboer, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Dutch in the Northern France, specifically the historical retreat of Dutch from Pas-de-Calais, historical evolution of the language situation in the Department du Nord, reactions to official language policy and language loss, characteristics of Flemish in France, alienation from other Dutch dialects by communicative isolation, linguistic…

  19. France: The Move toward Distance Education in the University Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    France is one of the most modern countries in the world and is a leading force in Europe. A highly literate and well-educated society, France's education statistics for 2003 show 12.1 million French children in primary and secondary education and 2.2 million students in tertiary education. The concept of education as a market commodity--long since…

  20. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  1. 47 CFR 3.46 - Use of gold francs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of gold francs. 3.46 Section 3.46... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Settlement Operations § 3.46 Use of gold francs. An accounting authority must accept accounts presented to it from foreign administrations in...

  2. Teachers' Organizations and Educational Policy: The Case of France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanner, Raymond E.

    1978-01-01

    Characterizes membership and policy-making role of the largest teachers' organization in France, the Federation de l'Education Nationale. It represents 44 specialized educational unions. It supports the socialist party but has identified itself with the traditional way of administering education in France. (Author/AV)

  3. A Primer for Accompanying Secondary Student Groups to France. [Revised].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Jim

    Many of the factors that can help ensure a successful and positive learning experience for teachers, leaders, chaperons, and students who travel and/or study in France are addressed in this publication. Although it is geared toward France, many of the ideas, especially the section on pre-departure orientation, can be applied to any travel group.…

  4. International Reports on Literacy Research: France and Argentina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Jacquelynn A., Comp.; Botzakis, Stergios, Comp.

    2006-01-01

    This is a compilation of two separate reports on international literacy research from France and Argentina. In the reports from France, research correspondent Jacques Fijalkow detailed three research projects that included the following: (1) A description of adult literacy skills; (2) An investigation of how study-abroad students were integrated…

  5. Overexpression of MtCAS31 enhances drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis by reducing stomatal density.

    PubMed

    Xie, Can; Zhang, Rongxue; Qu, Yueting; Miao, Zhenyan; Zhang, Yunqin; Shen, Xiaoye; Wang, Tao; Dong, Jiangli

    2012-07-01

    • Dehydrins are a type of late embryogenesis abundant protein. Some dehydrins are involved in the response to various abiotic stresses. Accumulation of dehydrins enhances the drought, cold and salt tolerances of transgenic plants, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. MtCAS31 (Medicago Truncatula cold-acclimation specific protein 31) is a Y(2)K(4)-type dehydrin that was isolated from Medicago truncatula. • We analyzed the subcellular and histochemical localization of MtCAS31, and the expression patterns of MtCAS31 under different stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis that overexpressed MtCAS31 was used to determine the function of MtCAS31. A yeast two-hybrid assay was used to screen potential proteins that could interact with MtCAS31. The interaction was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. • After a 3-h drought treatment, the expression of MtCAS31 significantly increased 600-fold. MtCAS31 overexpression dramatically reduced stomatal density and markedly enhanced the drought tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis. MtCAS31 could interact with AtICE1 (inducer of CBF expression 1) and the AtICE1 homologous protein Mt7g083900.1, which was identified from Medicago truncatula both in vitro and in vivo. • Our findings demonstrate that a dehydrin induces decreased stomatal density. Most importantly, the interaction of MtCAS31 with AtICE1 plays a role in stomatal development. We hypothesize that the interaction of MtCAS31 and AtICE1 caused the decrease in stomatal density to enhance the drought resistance of transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:22510066

  6. Estimates of Continental Ancestry Vary Widely among Individuals with the Same mtDNA Haplogroup

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Leslie S.; Magnaye, Kevin M.; Bigham, Abigail W.; Akey, Joshua M.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The association between a geographical region and an mtDNA haplogroup(s) has provided the basis for using mtDNA haplogroups to infer an individual’s place of origin and genetic ancestry. Although it is well known that ancestry inferences using mtDNA haplogroups and those using genome-wide markers are frequently discrepant, little empirical information exists on the magnitude and scope of such discrepancies between multiple mtDNA haplogroups and worldwide populations. We compared genetic-ancestry inferences made by mtDNA-haplogroup membership to those made by autosomal SNPs in ∼940 samples of the Human Genome Diversity Panel and recently admixed populations from the 1000 Genomes Project. Continental-ancestry proportions often varied widely among individuals sharing the same mtDNA haplogroup. For only half of mtDNA haplogroups did the highest average continental-ancestry proportion match the highest continental-ancestry proportion of a majority of individuals with that haplogroup. Prediction of an individual’s mtDNA haplogroup from his or her continental-ancestry proportions was often incorrect. Collectively, these results indicate that for most individuals in the worldwide populations sampled, mtDNA-haplogroup membership provides limited information about either continental ancestry or continental region of origin. PMID:25620206

  7. REM sleep deprivation promotes a dopaminergic influence in the striatal MT2 anxiolytic-like effects

    PubMed Central

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D.; Targa, Adriano D.S.; Rodrigues, Lais S.; Aurich, Mariana F.; Lima, Marcelo M.S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anxiolytic-like effects of striatal MT2 activation, and its counteraction induced by the selective blockade of this receptor. Furthermore, we analyzed this condition under the paradigm of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) and the animal model of Parkinson’s disease (PD) induced by rotenone. Male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12 μg/μL), and 7 days later were subjected to 24 h of REMSD. Afterwards the rats underwent striatal micro-infusions of selective melatonin MT2 receptor agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10 μg/μL) or selective melatonin MT2 receptor antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5 μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, the animals were tested in the open-field (OP) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Results indicated that the activation of MT2 receptors produced anxiolytic-like effects. In opposite, the MT2 blockade did not show an anxiogenic-like effect. Besides, REMSD induced anxiolytic-like effects similar to 8-M-PDOT. MT2 activation generated a prevalent locomotor increase compared to MT2 blockade in the context of REMSD. Together, these results suggest a striatal MT2 modulation associated to the REMSD-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity causing a possible dopaminergic influence in the MT2 anxiolytic-like effects in the intranigral rotenone model of PD. PMID:27226821

  8. Type 1 Metallothionein (ZjMT) Is Responsible for Heavy Metal Tolerance in Ziziphus jujuba.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-Song; Meng, Yu-Ping; Cao, Qiu-Fen; Yang, Yong-Zhen; Wang, Fan; Jia, Hu-Sheng; Wu, Shu-Biao; Liu, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, metal-binding proteins that are able to make cells to uptake heavy metals from the environment. Molecular and functional characterization of this gene family improves understanding of the mechanisms underlying heavy metal tolerance in higher organisms. In this study, a cDNA clone, encoding 74-a.a. metallothionein type 1 protein (ZjMT), was isolated from the cDNA library of Ziziphus jujuba. At the N- and C-terminals of the deduced amino acid sequence of ZjMT, six cysteine residues were arranged in a CXCXXXCXCXXXCXC and CXCXXXCXCXXCXC structure, respectively, indicating that ZjMT is a type 1 MT. Quantitative PCR analysis of plants subjected to cadmium stress showed enhanced expression of ZjMT gene in Z. jujuba within 24 h upon Cd exposure. Escherichia coli cells expressing ZjMT exhibited enhanced metal tolerance and higher accumulation of metal ions compared with control cells. The results indicate that ZjMT contributes to the detoxification of metal ions and provides marked tolerance against metal stresses. Therefore, ZjMT may be a potential candidate for tolerance enhancement in vulnerable plants to heavy metal stress and E. coli cells containing the ZjMT gene may be applied to adsorb heavy metals in polluted wastewater. PMID:27301284

  9. REM sleep deprivation promotes a dopaminergic influence in the striatal MT2 anxiolytic-like effects.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Lais S; Aurich, Mariana F; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anxiolytic-like effects of striatal MT2 activation, and its counteraction induced by the selective blockade of this receptor. Furthermore, we analyzed this condition under the paradigm of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) and the animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by rotenone. Male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12 μg/μL), and 7 days later were subjected to 24 h of REMSD. Afterwards the rats underwent striatal micro-infusions of selective melatonin MT2 receptor agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10 μg/μL) or selective melatonin MT2 receptor antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5 μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, the animals were tested in the open-field (OP) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Results indicated that the activation of MT2 receptors produced anxiolytic-like effects. In opposite, the MT2 blockade did not show an anxiogenic-like effect. Besides, REMSD induced anxiolytic-like effects similar to 8-M-PDOT. MT2 activation generated a prevalent locomotor increase compared to MT2 blockade in the context of REMSD. Together, these results suggest a striatal MT2 modulation associated to the REMSD-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity causing a possible dopaminergic influence in the MT2 anxiolytic-like effects in the intranigral rotenone model of PD. PMID:27226821

  10. MT5-MMP, just a new APP processing proteinase in Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Baranger, Kévin; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Rivera, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) membrane-type 5-MMP (MT5-MMP) as a new player in Alzheimer's pathogenesis, which displays pro-amyloidogenic features and proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Another group has reported that MT5-MMP processing of APP may release a novel neurotoxic APP fragment. Although MT5-MMP-mediated APP processing appears to be a key pathogenic step, we hypothesize that MT5-MMP may also contribute to AD pathogenesis through complementary mechanisms that involve the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways and/or APP trafficking. PMID:27349644

  11. Distinguishing Features of Atmospheric River Storms Linked to Debris Flow Initiation on Mt. Hood, Oregon and Mt. Rainier, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrochers, J.; Nolin, A. W.

    2011-12-01

    Strong eastern Pacific storms characterized by tropical-sourced moisture and heat are often referred to as Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) and are associated with the triggering of debris flows in the Cascade Mountain Range, USA primarily in the fall season. These storms typically feature freezing levels above 3000 m and heavy precipitation that can saturate slopes and rapidly melt shallow early season snowpack. In a study of periglacial debris flows on Mt. Hood, Oregon and Mt. Rainier, Washington, this combination of factors is proposed to initiate slope failure and subsequent debris flows. However, not all ARs trigger debris flows and other storms not associated with ARs may also lead to debris flows. The presence of these non-triggering storms has led to the question: what features distinguish the storms that trigger debris flows, and do these conditions differ between ARs and other storms? ACARS soundings are used to develop temporally detailed information about freezing levels and storm structure. Supplemental data from the SNOTEL network and NWS WSR-88D radar sites allow for better delineation of storm features and their impact on the ground. Antecedent snowpack, atmospheric temperature profiles, precipitation, and oragraphic enhancement are examined for storms associated with debris flows and those that failed to trigger events to determine what characteristics best differentiate the storms from one another. Specific features within the triggering storms, such as the presence of temperature inversions, are also examined for links to the elevation and geomorphic character of these periglacial debris flow initiation sites.

  12. Early detection of eruptive dykes revealed by normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) on Mt. Etna and Mt. Nyiragongo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, N.; Komorowski, J. C.; de Michele, M.; Kasereka, M.; Ciraba, H.

    2006-06-01

    Flank-fissure eruptions involve lateral injection and propagation of magma in a volcanic edifice along pre-existing fractures in the direction of the rift zones where magma intrusion and lava flow production are concentrated over time. Thus, the identification and mapping of active fractures and faults is a fundamental aspect of studies of active volcanic systems. However, gradual dyke wedge emplacement at depth in well-fractured zones on volcano flanks and in volcanic rift zones does not necessarily trigger large amplitude deformation signals susceptible to be recorded months or even years before the actual eruption. Here we show that active and potentially eruptive areas can be detected up to 2 yrs before the arrival to the surface of the final eruptive dyke and venting of lava flows by processing satellite images applying a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) algorithm. A posteriori analysis of satellite images indeed reveals that the surficial effects of dyke wedge injection and ascent on plant growth were apparent for Mt. Etna from 2000 to 2002 and for Mt. Nyiragongo in 2001, thus months to years before they erupted.

  13. The death of Henry II of France.

    PubMed

    Faria, M A

    1992-12-01

    On June 30, 1559, King Henry II of France (1519-1559), against the advice of his court ministers, participated in a fateful joust. The wooden lance of his younger opponent pierced the King's headgear, shattered into fragments, and penetrated his right orbit and temple. The King survived for 11 days following the mortal wound and was treated by two of the most distinguished physicians of the Renaissance: Ambroise Paré (1510-1590), the master surgeon, and Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), the great anatomist. The unfortunate event, the nature of the injury, and the medical consultation between these eminent physicians should all be of interest to neurosurgeons. The historical consequences of this event are briefly reviewed. PMID:1432144

  14. [Epidemiology of autochthonous leishmaniases in France].

    PubMed

    Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Carme, Bernard; Desbois, Nicole; Bourdoiseau, Gilles; Lachaud, Laurence; Pratlong, Francine

    2013-11-01

    Leishmania infantum is the only species occurring in metropolitan France; located in the Mediterranean part of the country, it is responsible for a highly enzootic canine disease, while the human endemicity is low, with about 23 cases yearly reported to the National Reference Centre of Leishmaniases, mainly visceral forms. In French Guyana, five Leishmania species occur in the Amazonian forest, of which L. guyanensis is the predominant species, and L. braziliensis is responsible for the most critical forms. The most frequent clinical feature is cutaneous leishmaniasis, with a mean annual incidence reaching 2 p. 1000, with some inter-annual fluctuations. In Martinique Island, recent studies have confirmed the presence of an ancestral Leishmania species, responsible for small cutaneous lesions, of mild evolution; the life cycle of this species remains unknown. In Guadeloupe Island, a few autochthonous visceral leishmaniasis cases have been reported, needing a prospective study. PMID:23886932

  15. The LUNEX5 project in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couprie, M. E.; Benabderrahmane, C.; Betinelli, P.; Bouvet, F.; Buteau, A.; Cassinari, L.; Daillant, J.; Denard, J. C.; Eymard, P.; Gagey, B.; Herbeaux, C.; Labat, M.; Lagarde, B.; Lestrade, A.; Loulergue, A.; Marchand, P.; Marlats, J. L.; Miron, C.; Morin, P.; Nadji, A.; Polack, F.; Pruvost, J. B.; Ribeiro, F.; Ricaud, J. P.; Roy, P.; Tanikawa, T.; Roux, R.; Bielawski, S.; Evain, C.; Szwaj, C.; Lambert, G.; Lifschitz, A.; Malka, V.; Lehe, R.; Rousse, A.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Thaury, C.; Devanz, G.; Luong, M.; Carré, B.; LeBec, G.; Farvacque, L.; Dubois, A.; Lüning, J.

    2013-03-01

    The LUNEX5 (free electron Laser Using a New accelerator for the Exploitation of X-ray radiation of 5th generation) in France aims at investigating the generation of short, intense, and coherent pulses in the soft x-ray region (with two particular targeted wavelengths of 20 and 13 nm). It consists in a single Free Electron Laser (FEL) line with cryo-ready in-vacuum undulators using a Conventional Linear Accelerator (CLA) using the superconducting technology of 400 MeV or a Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA) ranging from 0.4 to 1 GeV with multi-TW or PW lasers. The FEL line can be operated in the seeded (High order Harmonic in Gas seeding) and Echo Enable Harmonic Generation configurations, which performances will be compared. Two pilot user experiments for time-resolved studies of isolated species and magnetization dynamics will take benefit of LUNEX5 FEL radiation.

  16. Estimation of sulphite in food in France.

    PubMed

    Mareschi, J P; François-Collange, M; Suschetet, M

    1992-01-01

    Estimates have been made of the consumption levels of sulphites in foods in France using two methods, a global and a segmented protocol. The global method gave an estimated average intake of 20 mg SO2/day/capita; the segmented method gave estimates of 1.96 mg/day/capita for non-consumers of alcoholic beverages and 31.5 mg/day/capita for average consumers of cider, beer and wine. The risk of exceeding the Acceptable Daily Intake concerns only regular consumers (40-75 years old) of alcoholic beverages, particularly wine, the main vector. The global approach appears to be a simple and useful method for estimating intakes. PMID:1298660

  17. African human mtDNA phylogeography at-a-glance.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Alexandra; Brehem, António

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genetic system has long proven to be useful for studying the demographic history of our species, since their proposed Southeast/East African origin 200 kya. Despite the weak archaeological and anthropologic records, which render a difficult understanding of early intra- continental migrations, the phylogenetic L0-L1'6 split at about 140-160 kya is thought to represent also an early sub-structuring of small and isolated communities in South and East Africa. Regional variation accumulated over the following millennia, with L2 and L3 lineages arising in Central and East Africa 100-75 kya. Their sub-Saharan dispersal not later than 60 kya, largely overwhelmed the L0'1 distribution, nowadays limited to South African Khoisan and Central African Pygmies. Cyclic expansions and retractions of the equatorial forest between 40 kya and the "Last Glacial Aridity Maximum" were able to reduce the genetic diversity of modern humans. Surviving regional-specific lineages have emerged from the Sahelian refuge areas, repopulating the region and contributing to the overall West African genetic similarity. Particular L1- L3 lineages mirror the substantial population growth made possible by moister and warmer conditions of the Sahara's Wet Phase and the adoption of agriculture and iron smelting techniques. The diffusion of the farming expertise from a Central African source towards South Africa was mediated by the Bantu people 3 kya. The strong impact of their gene flow almost erased the pre-existent maternal pool. Non-L mtDNAs testify for Eurasian lineages that have enriched the African maternal pool at different timeframes: i) Near and Middle Eastern influences in Upper Palaeolithic, probably link to the spread of Afro-Asiatic languages; ii) particular lineages from West Eurasia around or after the glacial period; iii) post-glacial mtDNA signatures from the Franco-Cantabrian refugia, that have crossed the Strait of Gibraltar and iv) Eurasian lineages

  18. Mt. Pinatubo SO2 Column Measurements From Mauna Loa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Blatherwick, R. D.; David, S. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption features of the nu(sub 1) band of SO2 have been identified in high resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, on July 9 and 12, 1991, shortly after the arrival of the first eruption plume from the Mt. Pinatubo volcano in the Phillipines. A total SO2 vertical column amount of (5.1 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 16) molecules/sq cm on July 9 has been retrieved based on nonlinear least- squares spectral fittings of 9 selected SO2 absorption features with an updated set of SO2 spectral parameters. A SO2 total column upper limit of 0.9 x 10(esp 16) molecules/sq cm deduced from measurements on September 20-24, 1991, is consistent with the dispersion of the SO2 cloud and the rapid conversion of the SO2 vapor into volcanic aerosol particles.

  19. Demographic history of India and mtDNA-sequence diversity.

    PubMed Central

    Mountain, J L; Hebert, J M; Bhattacharyya, S; Underhill, P A; Ottolenghi, C; Gadgil, M; Cavalli-Sforza, L L

    1995-01-01

    The demographic history of India was examined by comparing mtDNA sequences obtained from members of three culturally divergent Indian subpopulations (endogamous caste groups). While an inferred tree revealed some clustering according to caste affiliation, there was no clear separation into three genetically distinct groups along caste lines. Comparison of pairwise nucleotide difference distributions, however, did indicate a difference in growth patterns between two of the castes. The Brahmin population appears to have undergone either a rapid expansion or steady growth. The low-ranking Mukri caste, however, may have either maintained a roughly constant population size or undergone multiple bottlenecks during that period. Comparison of the Indian sequences to those obtained from other populations, using a tree, revealed that the Indian sequences, along with all other non-African samples, form a starlike cluster. This cluster may represent a major expansion, possibly originating in southern Asia, taking place at some point after modern humans initially left Africa. PMID:7717409

  20. The Multi-Stage History of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C.; Dapremont, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's 5-km high central mound. We are investigating the history of alteration and erosion of Mt. Sharp using orbital imagery, spectroscopy and rover observations. Our results suggest a significant time gap between emplacement of the upper and lower sections of the mound. Crater counts show that the lower mound was formed soon after Gale itself, and that it contains distinct units ranging in altitude from approximately -4,500 to -1,800 m. Spectral data suggest that many units contain phyllosilicates. We found that these clay-bearing rocks occur in distinct layers concentrated below -2,900 m. Parts of the lower mound exhibit a transition from clays to sulfates with increasing altitude. The lower mound shows evidence of flowing water, including canyons and inverted channels. Wind erosion produced km-scale yardangs and scalloped cliffs. Our mapping shows that many yardangs in the lower mound are clay-bearing, with a predominant orientation of around N-S. Curiosity's ground-level images show myriad fine-scale, mainly horizontal layers in the lower mound. The rover has found stream beds and conglomerates, indicating that water once flowed on the crater floor. Drilling near the deepest point in Gale produced abundant clay, providing additional evidence of aqueous alteration. Upper mound units range in altitude from -2,100 m to +500 m, and mantle the lower mound above an angular unconformity. Most upper mound units are composed of layers. The formation age of the upper mound is unknown, since few craters are preserved. Clay-bearing layers are detectable in several locations, mainly at altitudes near -2,000 m. There is no evidence of water flow, but wind erosion has scalloped the surfaces and edges of layers, and fine-scale yardangs are common. Correlations between yardangs and clay spectra are apparent only in the lowermost units of the upper mound. Yardang orientations vary, and include N-S, NW-SE, and NE

  1. Dynamic evolution of the Mt. Cameroon volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfod, Dan N.; Njome, Manga S.; Suh, Cheo E.; Godfrey Fitton, J.

    2014-05-01

    The growth and destruction of a volcanic edifice reflects dynamic processes that shape the Earth, including transport of mass and heat in a cooling planet versus the mechanical and chemical degradation of igneous material driving toward equilibrium. Central to understanding the nature of volcanoes are determinations of the rates of change in the volumes of these features. Through a quantitative temporal framework it is possible to elucidate the relative importance of competing processes that govern growth and destruction of volcanoes, e.g., magma production versus mass wasting. As the energetics of constructive and destructive processes are directly linked to the hazards that they pose to human populations and because volcanoes are stochastic systems, the only means of long-term forecast is via comprehensive understanding of volcanic history. Mount Cameroon is one of Africa's largest volcanoes and is currently the only active centre on the Cameroon line. The edifice is 4 km high with a volume of at least 1200 km3. Seventeen eruptions have been reported since 1800 and a time-averaged eruption volume of 6 x 106 m3/year is calculated from 7 eruptions over the past 91 years. Eight new Ar/Ar ages have been determined for basaltic rocks distributed across Mt. Cameroon; plateau ages are 4139±19 ka, 195±2 ka, 187±5 ka, 161±2 ka, 82±4, 68±3, 14±4 and 2±4 ka (1σ). The upper age from this set defines the oldest age yet measured for the Mt. Cameroon system. The data demonstrate activity through the mid to upper Pleistocene, continuing through to modern activity. Using recent estimates for basin-wide erosion of ca. 0.05 mm/a on a similar edifice (Kauai, Hawaii, Gayer et al 2008) and extrapolating over the Mt. Cameroon edifice yields an erosion rate of 5x104 m3/a, a factor of 30 times lower than the modern magma production rate. Considering these two fluxes implies that approximately 700 ka is required to construct an edifice of 1200 km3 (the current volume of Mt

  2. Cadmium-resistance mechanism in the bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Saba; Rehman, Abdul; Qazi, Mahmood Hussain

    2014-08-01

    Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 were used as cadmium (Cd)-resistant and -sensitive bacteria, respectively, to study Cd uptake, sorption, intracellular accumulation, metallothionein (MT) induction, and bioremediation potential of both isolates. According to this research work, Cd had a stimulatory effect on the growth of CH34 cells (OD578 = 1.43) compared with mt2 cells (OD578 = 0.8). Addition of N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) along with Cd resulted in more cell growth in mt2 (OD578 = 0.71) compared with CH34 (OD578 = 0.34). DCCD and DNP inhibited this active uptake only in CH34 but not in mt2. Greater Cd interaction with the cell surface was observed in mt2 cells compared with CH34 cells. Intracellular Cd accumulation was interrupted by DCCD and DNP in CH34 (only 1.81 ± 0.04 μg L(-1) at 5 h) but not in mt2 (24.41 ± 0.01 μg L(-1) at 5 h). Intracellular Cd uptake was observed in even killed mt2 cells (7.11 ± 0.05 μg L(-1) at 5 h) compared with CH34 cells (2.50 ± 0.08 μg L(-1) at 5 h). This result showed that the Cd accumulation mechanism in CH34 is ATPase-dependent, whereas in mt2 uptake mechanism is not ATPase-dependent because mt2 ATPase was not inhibited by DCCD and DNP. CH34 removed 93 mg L(-1) of Cd after 8 days from original industrial effluent, which was more than Cd removal by CH34 from distilled water (i.e. 90 mg L(-1) after 8 days). mt2 was able to remove 80 mg L(-1) of Cd after 8 days from original industrial effluent, which was more than Cd removal by mt2 from distilled water (i.e. 77 mg L(-1) after 8 days). Cd did not induce any MT in CH34, but it did so in mt2 (14 kDa), which was thought to be a Cd-resistance mechanism operative in mt2. PMID:24595738

  3. Mitochondrial comparative genomics and phylogenetic signal assessment of mtDNA among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Nadimi, Maryam; Daubois, Laurence; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) genes, such as cytochrome C oxidase genes (cox), have been widely used for barcoding in many groups of organisms, although this approach has been less powerful in the fungal kingdom due to the rapid evolution of their mt genomes. The use of mt genes in phylogenetic studies of Dikarya has been met with success, while early diverging fungal lineages remain less studied, particularly the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Advances in next-generation sequencing have substantially increased the number of publically available mtDNA sequences for the Glomeromycota. As a result, comparison of mtDNA across key AMF taxa can now be applied to assess the phylogenetic signal of individual mt coding genes, as well as concatenated subsets of coding genes. Here we show comparative analyses of publically available mt genomes of Glomeromycota, augmented with two mtDNA genomes that were newly sequenced for this study (Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM240159 and Glomus aggregatum DAOM240163), resulting in 16 complete mtDNA datasets. R. irregularis isolate DAOM240159 and G. aggregatum isolate DAOM240163 showed mt genomes measuring 72,293bp and 69,505bp with G+C contents of 37.1% and 37.3%, respectively. We assessed the phylogenies inferred from single mt genes and complete sets of coding genes, which are referred to as "supergenes" (16 concatenated coding genes), using Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests, in order to identify genes that best described AMF phylogeny. We found that rnl, nad5, cox1, and nad2 genes, as well as concatenated subset of these genes, provided phylogenies that were similar to the supergene set. This mitochondrial genomic analysis was also combined with principal coordinate and partitioning analyses, which helped to unravel certain evolutionary relationships in the Rhizophagus genus and for G. aggregatum within the Glomeromycota. We showed evidence to support the position of G. aggregatum within the R. irregularis 'species complex'. PMID:26868331

  4. MT1-MMP Inhibits the Activity of Bst-2 via Their Cytoplasmic Domains Dependent Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Long; Liu, Li; Zhu, Cuicui; Zhu, Qingyi; Lu, Shan; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Bst-2 (bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2) is a type II membrane protein, and it acts as a tetherin to inhibit virion releasing from infectious cells. Membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a protease. It plays a pivotal role in cellular growth and migration by activating proMMP-2 into active MMP2. Our results here elaborate that MT1-MMP inhibits the tetherin activity of Bst-2 by interacting with Bst-2, and the cytoplasmic domains of both Bst-2 and MT1-MMP play critical roles within this interaction. Based on our experimental data, the assays for virion release and co-immunoprecipitation have clearly demonstrated that the activity of Bst-2 is markedly inhibited by MT1-MMP via their interaction; and both the N-terminal domain of Bst-2 and the C-terminal domain of MT1-MMP are important in the interaction. Immunostaining and Confocal Microscopy assay shows that MT1-MMP interacts with Bst-2 to form granular particles trafficking into cytoplasm from membrane and, finally, results in Bst-2 and MT1-MMP both being inhibited. In addition, mutant experiments elucidate that the N-terminal domain of Bst-2 is not only important in relating to the activity of Bst-2 itself, but is important for inhibiting the MT1-MMP/proMMP2/MMP2 pathway. These findings suggest that MT1-MMP is a novel inhibitor of Bst-2 in MT1-MMP expressed cell lines and also indicate that both the N-terminal domain of Bst-2 and the C-terminal domain of MT1-MMP are crucial in down-regulation. PMID:27240342

  5. Remote Observing with Robotic Telescopes on Mt. Hopkins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, G. W.

    1994-12-01

    Tennessee State University conducts remote, automatic observing with four robotic telescopes located at the Fairborn Observatory site on Mt. Hopkins, 30 miles south of Tucson. These telescopes run completely unattended; a site control computer monitors the time of day and weather conditions, opens the roof at the beginning of the night, informs each telescope's control computer when observations can begin, and shuts down the site when morning twilight or bad weather intervenes. The Automatic Telescope Instruction Set (ATIS) allows us to program the telescopes and to retrieve data via ASCII file transfers over the Internet. ATIS also includes a set of target selection rules that allow the telescopes to operate autonomously for many weeks or months without our intervention. Over the past several years, Tennessee State University has collaborated with Fairborn to develop precision photometers, software, observing techniques and quality control procedures that have culminated in the automatic acquisition and reduction of high volumes of data with millimagnitude precision. The telescopes are being used for a variety long-term monitoring programs that would be difficult or impossible (and prohibitively expensive) to conduct by traditional manual methods. A 10-inch telescope is dedicated to observations of semi-regular variable stars to uncover their multiple periods. A 16-inch telescope is dedicated to long-term observations of chromospherically active (single and binary) stars to search for activity cycles. Solar-type stars are being monitored by 30-inch and 32-inch telescopes to measure the subtle luminosity variations of these stars associated with their long-term magnetic variations as measured by the HK Project at Mt. Wilson Observatory. An additional project in collaboration with the NASA Ames Research Center seeks to apply artificial intelligence techniques to improve the scheduling of the observations on these telescopes and to develop a software package to

  6. Spine growth and seismogenic faulting at Mt. Unzen, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lamb, Oliver D.; Hirose, Takehiro; De Angelis, Silvio; Aulock, Felix W.; Umakoshi, Kodo; Miwa, Takahiro; Henton De Angelis, Sarah; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.; Lavallée, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The concluding episode of activity during the recent eruption of Mt. Unzen (October 1994 to February 1995) was characterized by incremental spine extrusion, accompanied by seismicity. Analysis of the seismic record reveals the occurrence of two dominant long-period event families associated with a repeating, nondestructive source mechanism, which we attribute to magma failure and fault-controlled ascent. We obtain constraints on the slip rate and distance of faulting events within these families. That analysis is complemented by an experimental thermomechanical investigation of fault friction in Mt. Unzen dacitic dome rock using a rotary-shear apparatus at variable slip rates and normal stresses. A power density threshold is found at 0.3 MW m-2, above which frictional melt forms and controls the shear resistance to slip, inducing a deviation from Byerlee's frictional law. Homogenized experimentally generated pseudotachylytes have a similar final chemistry, thickness, and crystal content, facilitating the construction of a rheological model for particle suspensions. This is compared to the viscosity constrained from the experimental data, to assess the viscous control on fault dynamics. The onset of frictional melt formation during spine growth is constrained to depths below 300 m for an average slip event. This combination of experimental data, viscosity modeling, and seismic analysis offers a new description of material response during conduit plug flow and spine growth, showing that volcanic pseudotachylyte may commonly form and modify fault friction during faulting of dome rock. This model furthers our understanding of faulting and seismicity during lava dome formation and is applicable to other eruption modes.

  7. The control of lava flows at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberi, Franco; Carapezza, Maria Luisa

    Because of intense urbanization, many of the historic lava flows of Mt. Etna, fed by flank eruptions, have caused significant damage to cities, villages and lifelines. The fear of legal consequences for centuries has prevented any intervention on lava flows to reduce damage until 1983, when a lava flow was dangerously approaching a village and authorization was given. In 1983, for the first time in the world, an attempt was made to stop the flow front by diverting the lava out of its natural channel, through a breach opened by blasting the levee. The technique adopted proved very complex and thermally perturbed the lava causing overflows that prevented completion of the initial plan. Only a short partial diversion was obtained, but the desired result was however achieved as most of the lava outflowed, because of the obstruction of a nearby lava tube. The technique was improved in 1992 and a total diversion of the flow was obtained. The construction of oblique earthen barriers to divert the flows towards less damaging paths was successfully employed in 1983 and 2001. In 1992 a large earthen barrier, built orthogonally to the flow direction delayed the flow advance for nearly one month. A positive experience has been therefore acquired at Mt. Etna to protect settlements from lava flows, but some legal questions have not been yet fully solved. From the Civil Protection viewpoint, it is essential that volcanologists improve their capability of reliably assessing the distance that a lava flow may travel and whether the eruption will continue long enough for lava to reach sites of relevant socioeconomic interest.

  8. Lava flows during the continuing eruption of Mt. Etna, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The current eruption of Mt. Etna started on July 17, and has continued to the present. This ASTER image was acquired on Sunday, July 29 and shows advancing lava flows on the southern flank of Mt. Etna above the town of Nicolosi, which is potentially threatened if the eruption increases in magnitude. Also visible are glowing summit craters above the main lava flows, and a small fissure eruption. The bright puffy clouds were formed from water vapor released during the eruption. The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km.

    The image is centered at 37.7 degrees north latitude, 15 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Examples of applications include monitoring glacial advances and retreats, potentially active volcanoes, thermal pollution, and coral reef degradation; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; evaluating wetlands; mapping surface temperature of soils

  9. Ethnobotany of the Samburu of Mt. Nyiru, South Turkana, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Rainer W

    2006-01-01

    Traditional plant use is of extremely high importance in many societies, and prevalent in African communities. This knowledge is however dwindling rapidly due to changes towards a more Western lifestyle. The influence of modern tourism cannot be neglected in this context. This paper examines the plant use of the Samburu of the Mt. Nyiru area in Northern Kenya. The Samburu pastoralists of Kenya are still amongst the most traditional communities of the country and have retained most of their knowledge about the use of a large part of the plants in their environment for a wide variety of purposes. The results indicate that the local population has a very high knowledge of the plants in their surroundings, and attributes a purpose to a large percentage of the plants found. 448 plant species were collected, identified and their Samburu names and traditional uses recorded. 199 species were reported as of "no use". The high proportion of 249 plant species however had some traditional use: The highest number (180 species) was used as fodder, followed by 80 species that had medicinal use. Firewood (59 species), construction (42 species), tools (31 species), food (29 species) and ceremonial use (19 species) ranked far behind. Traditionally the Samburu attribute most illnesses to the effect of pollutants that block or inhibit digestion. This can include "polluted" food, contagion through sick people as well as witchcraft. In most cases the treatment of illness involves herbal purgatives to cleanse the patient. There are however frequent indications of plant use for common problems like wounds, parasites, body aches and burns. The change from a nomadic to a more sedentary lifestyle, often observed in other areas of the country, has affected the Samburu of remote Mt. Nyiru to a much lesser extent and did so far not lead to a major loss of traditional plant knowledge. However, overgrazing and over-exploitation of plant resources have already led to a decline of the plant

  10. Ethnobotany of the Samburu of Mt. Nyiru, South Turkana, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Bussmann, Rainer W

    2006-01-01

    Traditional plant use is of extremely high importance in many societies, and prevalent in African communities. This knowledge is however dwindling rapidly due to changes towards a more Western lifestyle. The influence of modern tourism cannot be neglected in this context. This paper examines the plant use of the Samburu of the Mt. Nyiru area in Northern Kenya. The Samburu pastoralists of Kenya are still amongst the most traditional communities of the country and have retained most of their knowledge about the use of a large part of the plants in their environment for a wide variety of purposes. The results indicate that the local population has a very high knowledge of the plants in their surroundings, and attributes a purpose to a large percentage of the plants found. 448 plant species were collected, identified and their Samburu names and traditional uses recorded. 199 species were reported as of "no use". The high proportion of 249 plant species however had some traditional use: The highest number (180 species) was used as fodder, followed by 80 species that had medicinal use. Firewood (59 species), construction (42 species), tools (31 species), food (29 species) and ceremonial use (19 species) ranked far behind. Traditionally the Samburu attribute most illnesses to the effect of pollutants that block or inhibit digestion. This can include "polluted" food, contagion through sick people as well as witchcraft. In most cases the treatment of illness involves herbal purgatives to cleanse the patient. There are however frequent indications of plant use for common problems like wounds, parasites, body aches and burns. The change from a nomadic to a more sedentary lifestyle, often observed in other areas of the country, has affected the Samburu of remote Mt. Nyiru to a much lesser extent and did so far not lead to a major loss of traditional plant knowledge. However, overgrazing and over-exploitation of plant resources have already led to a decline of the plant

  11. Multiparametric Experiment at Mt. Etna: Investigation on Both Degassing and Eruptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannata, A.; Privitera, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the framework of the MED-SUV project, a multi-parametric experiment to investigate degassing, explosive and effusive dynamics was performed at Mt. Etna volcano in July 2014. The experiment has involved the so-called "Scientific Team of NEC multi-parametric experiment" composed of researchers/technicians from different institutions in Italy, Germany and France: D. Andronico, T. Barnie, A. Boselli, M. Burton, T. Caltabiano, A. Cannata, D. Carbone, A. Chiarugi, F. Ciancitto, D. Contrafatto, S. Corradini, F. D'Amato, E. Del Bello, F. Donnadieu, F. Ferrari, A. Ferro, S. Gambino, F. Greco, A. Harris, U. Kueppers, A. La Spina, P. Labazuy, G. Leto, L. Lodato, R. Maugeri, L. Merucci, S. Moune, R. Paris, J.J. Pena Fernandez, E. Privitera, M. Queisser, T. Ricci, G. Salerno, R. Z. Sanchez, P. Scarlato, M. Sciotto, S. Scollo, L. Scuderi, J. Sesterhenn, L. Spampinato, L. Spina, J. Taddeucci, X. Wang, L. Zuccarello. The aim was two-fold: first, to study degassing processes at Etna's NE Crater (NEC); second, to investigate the activity at the eruptive fissure (EF) that opened at the base of the NEC in early-July 2014. Indeed, NEC is the main contributor to Etna's gas release, and continuously generates infrasonic events: a result of its impulsive degassing regime. Moreover, the opening of the EF offered a unique opportunity to investigate the partitioning of energy and geophysical signals between degassing, explosive and effusive sources. The field campaign involved coupled deployment of seismometers, microphones, thermopiles, a mini-UV scanner, FTIR spectrometer, SO2 camera systems, high-speed video cameras, thermal and visible cameras, gravimeters, tiltmeters, drones, laser HCl sensor, Lidar and satellite data. Moreover, this experiment gave the opportunity to test the prototype of a DIAL for volcanic CO2 sensing the first time in a volcanic environment. Gathered information were integrated with data simultaneously recorded by the permanent networks run by Istituto Nazionale

  12. MT4-(MMP17) and MT6-MMP (MMP25), A unique set of membrane-anchored matrix metalloproteinases: properties and expression in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Anjum; Sun, Qing; Zhao, Huiren; Bernardo, M. Margarida; Cho, Jin-Ah

    2014-01-01

    The process of cancer progression involves the action of multiple proteolytic systems, among which the family of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a pivotal role. The MMPs evolved to accomplish their proteolytic tasks in multiple cellular and tissue microenvironments including lipid rafts by incorporation and deletions of specific structural domains. The membrane type-MMPs (MT-MMPs) incorporated membrane anchoring domains that display these proteases at the cell surface, and thus they are optimal pericellular proteolytic machines. Two members of the MT-MMP subfamily, MMP-17 (MT4-MMP) and MMP-25 (MT6-MMP), are anchored to the plasma membrane via a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor, which confers these enzymes a unique set of regulatory and functional mechanisms that separates them from the rest of the MMP family. Discovered almost a decade ago, the body of work on GPI-MT-MMPs today is still surprisingly limited when compared to other MT-MMPs. However, new evidence shows that the GPI-MT-MMPs are highly expressed in human cancer, where they are associated with progression. Accumulating biochemical and functional evidence also highlights their distinct properties. In this review, we summarize the structural, biochemical, and biological properties of GPI-MT-MMPs and present an overview of their expression and role in cancer. We further discuss the potential implications of GPI-anchoring for enzyme function. Finally, we comment on the new scientific challenges that lie ahead to better understand the function and role in cancer of these intriguing but yet unique MMPs. PMID:18286233

  13. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Biogenesis: Visualization and Duel Incorporation of BrdU and EdU Into Newly Synthesized mtDNA In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, Stephen I.; Edwards, James L.; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L.; Haines, Kristine M.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse–chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 58:207–218, 2010) PMID:19875847

  14. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biogenesis: visualization and duel incorporation of BrdU and EdU into newly synthesized mtDNA in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Stephen I; Edwards, James L; Backus, Carey; McLean, Lisa L; Haines, Kristine M; Feldman, Eva L

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondria are key regulators of cellular energy and are the focus of a large number of studies examining the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and biogenesis in healthy and diseased conditions. One approach to monitoring mitochondrial biogenesis is to measure the rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. We developed a sensitive technique to visualize newly synthesized mtDNA in individual cells to study mtDNA replication within subcellular compartments of neurons. The technique combines the incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and/or 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into mtDNA, together with a tyramide signal amplification protocol. Employing this technique, we visualized and measured mtDNA biogenesis in individual cells. The labeling procedure for EdU allows for more comprehensive results by allowing the comparison of its incorporation with other intracellular markers, because it does not require the harsh acid or enzyme digests necessary to recover the BrdU epitope. In addition, the utilization of both BrdU and EdU permits sequential pulse-chase experiments to follow the intracellular localization of mtDNA replication. The ability to quantify mitochondrial biogenesis provides an essential tool for investigating the alterations in mitochondrial dynamics involved in the pathogenesis of multiple cellular disorders, including neuropathies and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19875847

  15. Increased negative supercoiling of mtDNA in TOP1mt knockout mice and presence of topoisomerases IIα and IIβ in vertebrate mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Khiati, Salim; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerases are critical for replication, DNA packing and repair, as well as for transcription by allowing changes in DNA topology. Cellular DNA is present both in nuclei and mitochondria, and mitochondrial topoisomerase I (Top1mt) is the only DNA topoisomerase specific for mitochondria in vertebrates. Here, we report in detail the generation of TOP1mt knockout mice, and demonstrate that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) displays increased negative supercoiling in TOP1mt knockout cells and murine tissues. This finding suggested imbalanced topoisomerase activity in the absence of Top1mt and the activity of other topoisomerases in mitochondria. Accordingly, we found that both Top2α and Top2β are present and active in mouse and human mitochondria. The presence of Top2α-DNA complexes in the mtDNA D-loop region, at the sites where both ends of 7S DNA are positioned, suggests a structural role for Top2 in addition to its classical topoisomerase activities. PMID:24803675

  16. Stable isotope and Ar/Ar evidence of prolonged multi-scale fluid flow during exhumation of orogenic crust: example from the Mont Blanc and Aar massifs (NW Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolland, Yann; Rossi, Magali

    2015-04-01

    The spatial and temporal scales and the geometry of fluid pathways in a collisional orogen are investigated using stable isotope analysis (O, C, H) and 40Ar/39Ar dating of vein minerals formed at c. 11-16 Ma in the Mont Blanc and the Aar External Crystalline Massifs. In both massifs 40Ar/39Ar dating of veins adularia provides evidence for progressive crystallization from 16 to 9 Ma, and mainly at 11-12 Ma following veins opening during shear zone activity. The fluid flow duration thus ranges from 4 to 5 Ma in the two massifs. The δ18O values of vein quartz and calcite are similar to those of undeformed crystalline and sedimentary host-rocks, suggesting rock buffering, while carbon isotope ratios of vein calcites fall into three compositional groups. A-type veins have δ13C values that are buffered by the Helvetic metasediments, which suggests that these veins formed in a closed-system from a locally-derived CO2-rich fluid. The fluid in equilibrium with C-type veins has depleted δ13C values similar to mantle-CO2, while the intermediate δ13C values of B-type veins suggest mixing between the A-type and C-type fluids. These results are in agreement with crustal- to lithosphere-scale upward vertical fluid flow along vertical shear zones related to the strike-slip system bounding the Adriatic block since 16-20 Ma, connecting a deep-seated fluid to some downward flow in the sedimentary cover of External Crystalline Massifs.

  17. Comparative description of tornadoes in France and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessens, Jean; Snow, John T.

    In comparison with the Great Plains of the United States, severe tornadoes are rare in France. Statistics based on significant (strong (F-2 and F-3) and violent (F-4 and F-5) [see Hales, 1988]) tornadoes that have occurred in France in the past three decades, however, show that this country averages two such tornadoes a year. By combining these observations with information from the scientific literature about events that occurred before the modern period, it has been possible to establish a tornado climatology for France based on 107 significant tornadoes. The main data of this climatology, recently published by Dessens and Snow [1989], are summarized here and compared with American tornadoes.

  18. Organization of amplified metallothionein (MT) genes in cadmium-resistant Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, C.; Grady, D.; Meincke, L.; Clark, L.; Qui, X.; Fehrenbach, S.; Brown, N.; Jones, M.; Longmire, J.; Moyzis, R.

    1987-05-01

    In the parental, cadmium-sensitive, CHO cells, two MT genes (MT-I and II) have been cloned and shown to encompass approx.9 Kb of DNA. Both genes demonstrate the canonical intron-exon organization observed for other mammalian MT genes. Chromosome walking has been employed to study the organization of the MT genes in amplified cell lines. Using DNA from a highly-amplified cell line, Cd/sup r/ 200 T1, a genomic library was constructed in lambda Ch35 by standard procedures. Recombinants containing sequences complementary to a MT-II cDNA probe were isolated and characterized. Restriction enzyme analyses of these recombinants have extended the map of the MT-I and II gene region to encompass approx.35 Kb of DNA and indicate stability of the amplified genome over this region. A single SacII restriction site has been identified at the extreme 3' end of the cloned region. Since SacII is an infrequently-cutting restriction enzyme, accelerated long-range restriction mapping of the amplified MT gene region will be possible by combining chromosome walking in the MT gene region with large fragment separation using field-in-version gel electrophoresis.

  19. 77 FR 38226 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Lewistown, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ...This action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Lewistown Municipal Airport, Lewistown, MT. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate aircraft using Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at Lewistown Municipal Airport, Lewistown, MT. The FAA is proposing this action to enhance the safety and management of aircraft operations at......

  20. Fungi of Mt. Babia Gora. 2: Indicative value of macromycetes in forest associations. A: Initial considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bujakiewicz, A.

    1984-01-01

    The role and value of fungi in forest associations of Mt. Babia Gora massif were determined. The general physiographic characteristics of the research terrain, the distribution of the fungi sites, a list of the 618 taxons noted in the subalpine forests of Mt. Babia Gora, and the initial characteristics of the forest mycoflora of this massif are presented.

  1. Hypervariable Region Polymorphism of mtDNA of Recurrent Oral Ulceration in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guang-Ying; Wu, Dan; Wang, Guo-Xia; Wu, Yuanming

    2012-01-01

    Background MtDNA haplogroups could have important implication for understanding of the relationship between the mutations of the mitochondrial genome and diseases. Distribution of a variety of diseases among these haplogroups showed that some of the mitochondrial haplogroups are predisposed to disease. To examine the susceptibility of mtDNA haplogroups to ROU, we sequenced the mtDNA HV1, HV2 and HV3 in Chinese ROU. Methodology/Principal Findings MtDNA haplogroups were analyzed in the 249 cases of ROU patients and the 237 cases of healthy controls respectively by means of primer extension analysis and DNA sequencing. Haplogroups G1 and H were found significantly more abundant in ROU patients than in healthy persons, while haplogroups D5 and R showed a trend toward a higher frequency in control as compared to those in patients. The distribution of C-stretch sequences polymorphism in mtDNA HV1, HV2 and HV3 regions was found in diversity. Conclusions/Significance For the first time, the relationship of mtDNA haplogroups and ROU in Chinese was investigated. Our results indicated that mtDNA haplogroups G1 and H might constitute a risk factor for ROU, which possibly increasing the susceptibility of ROU. Meanwhile, haplogroups D5 and R were indicated as protective factors for ROU. The polymorphisms of C-stretch sequences might being unstable and influence the mtDNA replication fidelity. PMID:23028959

  2. Ethidium bromide as a marker of mtDNA replication in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Anna Maria; Fusi, Paola; Pastori, Valentina; Amicarelli, Giulia; Pozzi, Chiara; Adlerstein, Daniel; Doglia, Silvia Maria

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in tumor cells was found to play an important role in maintaining the malignant phenotype. Using laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy (LSCFM) in a recent work, we reported a variable fluorescence intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in mitochondria nucleoids of living carcinoma cells. Since when EB is bound to nucleic acids its fluorescence is intensified; a higher EB fluorescence intensity could reflect a higher DNA accessibility to EB, suggesting a higher mtDNA replication activity. To prove this hypothesis, in the present work we studied, by LSCFM, the EB fluorescence in mitochondria nucleoids of living neuroblastoma cells, a model system in which differentiation affects the level of mtDNA replication. A drastic decrease of fluorescence was observed after differentiation. To correlate EB fluorescence intensity to the mtDNA replication state, we evaluated the mtDNA nascent strands content by ligation-mediated real-time PCR, and we found a halved amount of replicating mtDNA molecules in differentiating cells. A similar result was obtained by BrdU incorporation. These results indicate that the low EB fluorescence of nucleoids in differentiated cells is correlated to a low content of replicating mtDNA, suggesting that EB may be used as a marker of mtDNA replication in living cells.

  3. 75 FR 38129 - TRW Automotive, Kelsey-Hayes Company, NABS Division, Mt. Vernon, OH; Amended Certification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ..., applicable to workers of TRW Automotive, NABS Division, Mt. Vernon, Ohio. The notice was published in the Federal Register on November 5, 2009 (74 FR 57340). At the request of the State agency, the Department... Employment and Training Administration TRW Automotive, Kelsey-Hayes Company, NABS Division, Mt. Vernon,...

  4. A Retrospective Study of Mt. San Antonio College Learning Assistance Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Barbara Ann

    A study was conducted at California's Mt. San Antonio College (Mt. SAC) to determine whether remedial classes had assisted students in reaching their educational goals. The study sample included all students (N=425) enrolled in Fall 1980 Learning Assistance classes which included: Reading Skills Review, Writing Skills Review, or Math Skills…

  5. The expression characteristics of mt-ND2 gene in chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Hou, Lingling; Wang, Ting; Lu, Weiwei; Tao, Yafei; Chen, Wen; Du, Xiaohui; Huang, Yanqun

    2016-09-01

    Subunit 2 of NADH dehydrogenase (ND2) is encoded by the mt-ND2 gene and plays a critical role in controlling the production of the mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Our study focused on exploring the mt-ND2 tissue expression patterns and the effects of energy restriction and dietary fat (linseed oil, corn oil, sesame oil or lard) level (2.5% and 5%) on its expression in chicken. The results showed that mt-ND2 gene was expressed in the 15 tissues of hybrid chickens with the highest level in heart and lowest level in pancreas tissue; 30% energy restriction did not significantly affect mt-ND2 mRNA level in chicken liver tissue. Both the mt-ND2 mRNA levels in chicken pectoralis (p < 0.05) and hepatic tissues (p < 0.05) at 42 d-old were affected by the type of dietary fats in 5% level, while not in abdominal fat tissues. The expression of mt-ND2 in hepatic tissues was down-regulated with chicken age (p < 0.01). The interactive effect of dietary fat types with chicken age (p < 0.05) was significant on mt-ND2 mRNA level. The study demonstrated that mt-ND2 gene was extensively expressed in tissues, and the expression was affected by dietary fat types and chicken age. PMID:26332376

  6. Heteroplasmy of Mouse mtDNA Is Genetically Unstable and Results in Altered Behavior and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; McManus, Meagan; Crimi, Marco; Waymire, Katrina; Lin, Chun Shi; Masubuchi, Satoru; Friend, Nicole; Koike, Maya; Chalkia, Dimitra; MacGregor, Grant; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Maternal inheritance of mtDNA is the rule in most animals, but the reasons for this pattern remain unclear. To investigate the consequence of overriding uniparental inheritance, we generated mice containing an admixture (heteroplasmy) of NZB and 129S6 mtDNAs in the presence of a congenic C57BL/6J nuclear background. Analysis of the segregation of the two mtDNAs across subsequent maternal generations revealed that proportion of NZB mtDNA was preferentially reduced. Ultimately, this segregation process produced NZB-129 heteroplasmic mice and their NZB or 129 mtDNA homo-plasmic counterparts. Phenotypic comparison of these three mtDNA lines demonstrated that the NZB-129 heteroplasmic mice, but neither homoplasmic counterpart, had reduced activity, food intake, respiratory exchange ratio; accentuated stress response; and cognitive impairment. Therefore, admixture of two normal but different mouse mtDNAs can be genetically unstable and can produce adverse physiological effects, factors that may explain the advantage of uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. PMID:23063123

  7. Pronatalist policies in Eastern Europe and France.

    PubMed

    Girard, A

    1983-08-01

    Western European fertility rates dropped markedly during the 1930s, and several governments established pronatalist policies. The policies were shortlived as fertility began to rise again after World War 2 and government intervention no longer appeared warranted. In contrast the countries of Eastern Europe retained their relatively high birthrates until measures in the 1950s gave individuals, especially women, greater freedom of choice in childbearing. Divorce laws were liberalized following World War 2, and women's participation in the labor force became widespread. Most European governments, following the example of the Soviet Union, liberalized abortion laws as well, making safe, medical abortion available for social, economic, and medical reasons. Whether or not as a direct result of this legislation, the Eastern European nations experienced such a rapid decline in birthrates that governments, fearing further ramifications, decided to intervene. In 1966, for example, Romania decreed abortion to be illegal except for medical reasons or in the case of rape. Eastern European governments justified their actions by emphasizing their concern about longterm effects. They wanted to avoid the "aging" of their population and the risk of future decrease in total population size. The abortion restrictions were accompanied by widespread efforts to encourage contraception through education, information programs, and postnatal consultations. Incentives were also adopted, and there were adjustments in working conditions for women including longer maternity leave and the opportunity for young mothers to have extended leave. The government's goal is to encourage 2 child families with enough 3 or 4 child families to compensate for 1 child or childless households. Eastern Europe is not alone in its pronatalist policy. France has set similar policies into motion. If this is exceptional among Western countries, it is because French fertility declined about a century before other

  8. [Difficulties with conducting clinical trials in France].

    PubMed

    Zannad, F; Plétan, Y

    2001-01-01

    France ranks third among European countries as regards the level of investment in clinical R&D and, overall, accounts for a contributive effort proportional to the size of its population and pharmaceutical market respectively. However, there is a trend for phase II and III studies to become proportionally fewer than in the past, while the number of phase IV studies is increasing. In a growing proportion of the mega-trials, which are instrumental for establishing evidence-based practice, French experts, investigators and, even more seriously, French patients, are insufficiently represented. Though studies in France are initiated relatively fast due to a clear regulatory framework and perform equally well as far as quantitative and qualitative factors are concerned, compared with most European countries involved in clinical research the costs incurred per completed patient are higher than those recorded in the other countries. Academic research shares most of these constraints and suffers from a lack of financial and human resources, while it faces additional delays in implementing studies because of longer administrative processes. Given the stakes in play, specific solutions should be implemented to maintain and further develop French competitiveness in clinical R&D. At the patient level, positive perception and awareness of the usefulness and safety of participating in clinical trials need to be emphasized. Education at the school level and using the lay media should be developed. Intervention of institutional and government officials is much needed. Direct patient recruitment should be developed through advertisement and the Internet, as well as within doctors' offices and through collaboration with patients' organizations. Patient information and consent forms should be made much simpler than those imposed within the framework of global studies because of FDA requirements. The French health system discourages the recruitment of patients by investigators who are

  9. A κ Model for Mainland France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, John; Gehl, Pierre; Bonilla, Luis Fabian; Gélis, Céline

    2010-11-01

    An important parameter for the characterization of strong ground motion at high-frequencies (>1 Hz) is kappa, κ, which models a linear decay of the acceleration spectrum, a( f), in log-linear space (i.e. a( f) = A 0 exp(- π κ f) for f > f E where f is frequency, f E is a low frequency limit and A 0 controls the amplitude of the spectrum). κ is a key input parameter in the stochastic method for the simulation of strong ground motion, which is particularly useful for areas with insufficient strong-motion data to enable the derivation of robust empirical ground motion prediction equations, such as mainland France. Numerous studies using strong-motion data from western North America (WNA) (an active tectonic region where surface rock is predominantly soft) and eastern North America (ENA) (a stable continental region where surface rock is predominantly very hard) have demonstrated that κ varies with region and surface geology, with WNA rock sites having a κ of about 0.04 s and ENA rock sites having a κ of about 0.006 s. Lower κs are one reason why high-frequency strong ground motions in stable regions are generally higher than in active regions for the same magnitude and distance. Few, if any, estimates of κs for French sites have been published. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to estimate κ using data recorded by the French national strong-motion network (RAP) for various sites in different regions of mainland France. For each record, a value of κ is estimated by following the procedure developed by Anderson and Hough (Bull Seismol Soc Am 74:1969-1993, 1984): this method is based on the analysis of the S-wave spectrum, which has to be performed manually, thus leading to some uncertainties. For the three French regions where most records are available (the Pyrenees, the Alps and the Côtes-d’Azur), a regional κ model is developed using weighted regression on the local geology (soil or rock) and source-to-site distance. It is found that the studied

  10. The melatonin-MT1 receptor axis modulates mutant huntingtin-mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Sirianni, Ana; Pei, Zhijuan; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Jiang, Jiying; Zhou, Shuanhu; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Rong; Yano, Hiroko; Kim, Jeong Eun; Li, Wei; Kristal, Bruce S.; Ferrante, Robert J.; Friedlander, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin mediates neuroprotection in several experimental models of neurodegeneration. It is not yet known, however, whether melatonin provides neuroprotection in genetic models of Huntington’s disease (HD). We report that melatonin delays disease onset and mortality in a transgenic mouse model of HD. Moreover, mutant huntingtin (htt)-mediated toxicity in cells, mice, and humans is associated with loss of the type 1 melatonin receptor (MT1). We observe high levels of MT1 receptor in mitochondria from the brains of wild-type mice but much less in brains from HD mice. Moreover, we demonstrate that melatonin inhibits mutant htt-induced caspase activation and preserves MT1 receptor expression. This observation is critical, since melatonin-mediated protection is dependent upon the presence and activation of the MT1 receptor. In summary, we delineate a pathologic process whereby mutant htt-induced loss of the mitochondrial MT1 receptor enhances neuronal vulnerability and potentially accelerates the neurodegenerative process. PMID:21994366

  11. The Use of Mitochondria-Targeted Endonucleases to Manipulate mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Bacman, Sandra R.; Williams, Sion L.; Pinto, Milena; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2014-01-01

    For more than a decade, mitochondria-targeted nucleases have been used to promote double-strand breaks in the mitochondrial genome. This was done in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) homoplasmic systems, where all mtDNA molecules can be affected, to create models of mitochondrial deficiencies. Alternatively, they were also used in a heteroplasmic model, where only a subset of the mtDNA molecules were substrates for cleavage. The latter approach showed that mitochondrial-targeted nucleases can reduce mtDNA haplotype loads in affected tissues, with clear implications for the treatment of patients with mitochondrial diseases. In the last few years, designer nucleases, such as ZFN and TALEN, have been adapted to cleave mtDNA, greatly expanding the potential therapeutic use. This chapter describes the techniques and approaches used to test these designer enzymes. PMID:25416366

  12. RABGTPases in MT1-MMP trafficking and cell invasion: Physiology versus pathology

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Stefan; Scita, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinase MT1-MMP is a central regulator of cell invasion in both physiological and pathological settings, such as tissue surveillance by immune cells and cancer cell metastasis. MT1-MMP cleaves a plethora of intra- and extracellular proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, matrix receptors, and also other MMPs, and thus enables modification of both the cell surface proteome and the pericellular environment. Despite its importance for cell invasion, the pathways regulating MT1-MMP exposure on the cell surface are largely unknown. Recently, our groups discovered that a specific subset of RABGTPases, most notably RAB5a, is critical for MT1-MMP trafficking in primary human macrophages and carcinoma cells. Here, we discuss and contrast our findings for both cell types, pointing out common features and differences in the RABGTPase-dependent trafficking of MT1-MMP in health and disease. PMID:26107110

  13. mtDNA mutation C1494T, haplogroup A, and hearing loss in Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chengye; Kong Qingpeng; Yao Yonggang . E-mail: ygyaozh@yahoo.com; Zhang Yaping

    2006-09-22

    Mutation C1494T in mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene was recently reported in two large Chinese families with aminoglycoside-induced and nonsyndromic hearing loss (AINHL) and was claimed to be pathogenic. This mutation, however, was first reported in a sample from central China in our previous study that was aimed to reconstruct East Asian mtDNA phylogeny. All these three mtDNAs formed a subclade defined by mutation C1494T in mtDNA haplogroup A. It thus seems that mutation C1494T is a haplogroup A-associated mutation and this matrilineal background may contribute a high risk for the penetrance of mutation C1494T in Chinese with AINHL. To test this hypothesis, we first genotyped mutation C1494T in 553 unrelated individuals from three regional Chinese populations and performed an extensive search for published complete or near-complete mtDNA data sets (>3000 mtDNAs), we then screened the C1494T mutation in 111 mtDNAs with haplogroup A status that were identified from 1823 subjects across China. The search for published mtDNA data sets revealed no other mtDNA besides the above-mentioned three carrying mutation C1494T. None of the 553 randomly selected individuals and the 111 haplogroup A mtDNAs was found to bear this mutation. Therefore, our results suggest that C1494T is a very rare event. The mtDNA haplogroup A background in general is unlikely to play an active role in the penetrance of mutation C1494T in AINHL.

  14. Characterization of the Dimerization Interface of Membrane Type 4 (MT4)-Matrix Metalloproteinase*

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Anjum; Marco, Marta; Zhao, Huiren; Shi, Qicun; Merriman, Scott; Mobashery, Shahriar; Fridman, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    MT4-MMP (MMP17) belongs to a unique subset of membrane type-matrix metalloproteinases that are anchored to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol moiety. However, little is known about its biochemical properties. Here, we report that MT4-MMP is displayed on the cell surface as a mixed population of monomeric, dimeric, and oligomeric forms. Sucrose gradient fractionation demonstrated that these forms of MT4-MMP are all present in lipid rafts. Mutational and computational analyses revealed that Cys564, which is present within the stem region, mediates MT4-MMP homodimerization by forming a disulfide bond. Substitution of Cys564 results in a more rapid MT4-MMP turnover, when compared with the wild-type enzyme, consistent with a role for dimerization in protein stability. Expression of MT4-MMP in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells enhanced cell migration and invasion of Matrigel, a process that requires catalytic activity. However, a serine substitution at Cys564 did not reduce MT4-MMP-stimulated cell invasion of Matrigel suggesting that homodimerization is not required for this process. Deglycosylation studies showed that MT4-MMP is modified by N-glycosylation. Moreover, inhibition of N-glycosylation by tunicamycin diminished the extent of MT4-MMP dimerization suggesting that N-glycans may confer stability to the dimeric form. Taken together, the data presented here provide a new insight into the characteristics of MT4-MMP and highlight the common and distinct properties of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane type-matrix metalloproteinases. PMID:21828052

  15. Evaluation of next generation mtGenome sequencing using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM).

    PubMed

    Parson, Walther; Strobl, Christina; Huber, Gabriela; Zimmermann, Bettina; Gomes, Sibylle M; Souto, Luis; Fendt, Liane; Delport, Rhena; Langit, Reina; Wootton, Sharon; Lagacé, Robert; Irwin, Jodi

    2013-09-01

    Insights into the human mitochondrial phylogeny have been primarily achieved by sequencing full mitochondrial genomes (mtGenomes). In forensic genetics (partial) mtGenome information can be used to assign haplotypes to their phylogenetic backgrounds, which may, in turn, have characteristic geographic distributions that would offer useful information in a forensic case. In addition and perhaps even more relevant in the forensic context, haplogroup-specific patterns of mutations form the basis for quality control of mtDNA sequences. The current method for establishing (partial) mtDNA haplotypes is Sanger-type sequencing (STS), which is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. With the emergence of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies, the body of available mtDNA data can potentially be extended much more quickly and cost-efficiently. Customized chemistries, laboratory workflows and data analysis packages could support the community and increase the utility of mtDNA analysis in forensics. We have evaluated the performance of mtGenome sequencing using the Personal Genome Machine (PGM) and compared the resulting haplotypes directly with conventional Sanger-type sequencing. A total of 64mtGenomes (>1 million bases) were established that yielded high concordance with the corresponding STS haplotypes (<0.02% differences). About two-thirds of the differences were observed in or around homopolymeric sequence stretches. In addition, the sequence alignment algorithm employed to align NGS reads played a significant role in the analysis of the data and the resulting mtDNA haplotypes. Further development of alignment software would be desirable to facilitate the application of NGS in mtDNA forensic genetics. PMID:23948325

  16. The Quaternary coversands of southwest France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitzia, Luca; Bertran, Pascal; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Bateman, Mark D.; Hernandez, Marion; Garon, Henri; de Lafontaine, Guillaume; Mercier, Norbert; Leroyer, Chantal; Queffelec, Alain; Voinchet, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Detailed stratigraphic analysis and numerical dating (OSL, IRSL, ESR, 14C) of Pleistocene coversands in southwest France enable the construction of a renewed chronostratigraphic framework for sand deposition. The chronological data obtained from sandsheet units testify to the development of transgressive dunefields since at least the Middle Pleistocene (MIS 10). Three main phases of accumulation occurred during the Last Glacial. The oldest one (64-42 ka) is associated with wet sandsheet facies, histic horizons and zibar-type dune fields, which reflect deposition in a context strongly influenced by the groundwater table. The Late Pleniglacial (24-14 ka) corresponds to the main phase of coversand extension in a drier context. Silty gley horizons suggest, however, local interruptions of sand drifting during GS 2.1. Lateglacial stabilization of the coversands may not have occurred before GI-1c (Allerød), which was typified by the development of cumulic arenosols. These were covered by parabolic dunes during the Younger Dryas. The variations in extent of the emerged continental shelf during the glacial-interglacial cycles may explain the uneven geographical distribution of sand deposition through time. Because of coastline retreat up to 100 km north of 45°N during the LGM lowstand, the coversands were unable to reach the northern part of the basin. Comparison with other European regions highlights stronger affinities of the French record with Portugal than with the Netherlands and Great Britain, probably because of reduced influence of permafrost.

  17. Laboratory medicine in France. A jeopardized situation.

    PubMed

    Valdiguié, P M; de Graeve, J S; Guerre, J P

    1997-11-01

    The expenses for health care in France have risen considerably during the present decade, ranking third after USA and Canada in the Western world. In spite of the very low cost of laboratory medicine (2.4% of the total expenditure in 1995), clinical laboratories have undergone a severe squeeze, due to two limiting factors; a decrease in the ordering of laboratory tests from private physicians and a reduction in the total expenses for laboratory services from the Social Security. Consequently, there has been unemployment of technical and secretarial staff and severe restriction in investment for buying new equipment. However, hospital laboratories will manage to assume their challenge in developing robotics, automation, molecular pathology techniques and expert systems. Private laboratories, in spite of their efforts to follow the technological advances in automation, will survive thanks to consolidation of regional networks that operate in a cooperative rather than competitive mode. Therefore, the challenge will be not in the adaptation of clinical laboratories, but in the limitation of overspending at the national level and in modification of the behaviour of irresponsible citizens accustomed to spending freely on health care services. PMID:9469244

  18. Identifying barriers to Muslim integration in France

    PubMed Central

    Adida, Claire L.; Laitin, David D.; Valfort, Marie-Anne

    2010-01-01

    Is there a Muslim disadvantage in economic integration for second-generation immigrants to Europe? Previous research has failed to isolate the effect that religion may have on an immigrant family's labor market opportunities because other factors, such as country of origin or race, confound the result. This paper uses a correspondence test in the French labor market to identify and measure this religious effect. The results confirm that in the French labor market, anti-Muslim discrimination exists: a Muslim candidate is 2.5 times less likely to receive a job interview callback than is his or her Christian counterpart. A high-n survey reveals, consistent with expectations from the correspondence test, that second-generation Muslim households in France have lower income compared with matched Christian households. The paper thereby contributes to both substantive debates on the Muslim experience in Europe and methodological debates on how to measure discrimination. Following the National Academy of Sciences’ 2001 recommendations on combining a variety of methodologies and applying them to real-world situations, this research identifies, measures, and infers consequences of discrimination based on religious affiliation, controlling for potentially confounding factors, such as race and country of origin. PMID:21098283

  19. Briquet and Briquet's syndrome viewed from France.

    PubMed

    Dongier, M

    1983-10-01

    Briquet's contributions to the description of hysteria have been almost completely forgotten in France. One may wonder how he, as well as contemporary French psychiatrists, would react to the approach to hysteria introduced and officialized by DSM III. In particular, its fragmentation into syndromes without apparent link to each other (psychogenic amnesia, conversion disorders, histrionic personality disorder, etc.) and its psychological causation, unbalanced by the consideration of organic factors in etiology, may raise questions. The correlation of conversion disorders with hysterical personality remains a feature of the WHO classification (ICD 9), as well as a feature of French contemporary texts, although it is no longer viewed as a regular association by American psychiatry. It may be that cultural factors lead, as suggested by Brisset, to a repression of conversion phenomena and of hyperexpressivity of affects replaced by more psychosomatic disorders in many contemporary societies. Finally, one may question whether the choice of the term "Briquet Syndrome" is appropriate, as many of the patients described by him did not have the chronic and malignant course described by Guze: It tends to limit hysteria to one end (the most severe one) of a spectrum of disorders. PMID:6357422

  20. Chemical composition of rainwater in Eastern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanusi, Astrid; Wortham, Henri; Millet, Maurice; Mirabel, Philippe

    Rainwater sampled weekly at nine sites in eastern France from October 1991 to March 1992 has been analysed for major ions (Cl -, NO 3-, SO s2-, NH 4+, Na +, K +, Mg 2+ and Ca 2+), pH and conductivity. The major elements are SO 42- and Cl - for the anions and NH 4+ and Ca 2+ for the cations. The major ion concentrations are higher in urban areas, especially at Colmar (no.2), where rainfall amounts are low. Surprisingly, the acidity is higher at the sites in rural areas [i.e. mean pH of 4.4 for Ban sur Meurthe (no. 7)] and lower in the urban areas [mean pH of 5.0 for Strasbourg (no. 1) and pH of 5.7 for Colmar (no. 2)]. This is probably due to the presence of CaCO 3 in the "loess", which is the major constituent of soils in the upper Rhine valley. The relationship between the chemical composition of rain andair-mass trajectories for four humid weeks which presented only one rain event are also examined.

  1. Charles Thibault and assisted reproduction in France.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Charles Thibault was liked by French gynaecologists. There was not a year that Charles Thibault did not attend clinician gynaecology conferences. He made great strides in research on in vitro fertilisation, being the first to perform in vitro fertilised (IVF) oocyte transfers in rabbits. Later, in 1978 the first human pregnancy following IVF was achieved in the UK when Louise Brown was born. In 1980, two French teams,one at the Sèvres hospital and the other at the Clamart University Teaching Hospital, carried out egg retrievals in patients with natural cycles, after determination of the urinary LH peak, under general anaesthesia and by laparoscopy. The Clamart team developed LH SIR, which enabled a more accurate determination of the ideal time for egg collection. In 1983, the same team reported the first ambulatory oocyte retrievals by ultrasound, under local anaesthesia. This new technique did not require general anaesthesia. Finally, in 1983, the rate of births, per transfer, for the Sèvres team rose to 5.31%. 1984 showed considerable improvement: 13.83%. The first step in establishing IVF in France was completed with the Carghese symposium, in September 1984, where Charles Thibault pleaded for animal experimentation before human clinical trials. It was only later that ART developed significantly, necessitating a legislative framework and organisations such as GEFF and FIVNAT. PMID:15982455

  2. Revisiting the Rochechouart impact structure, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapers, Haley M.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Banerjee, Neil R.; FerrièRe, Ludovic; Lambert, Philippe; Izawa, Matthew R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Rochechouart impact structure, south-central France (45o50'N, 0o46'E), is a partly eroded, approximately 200 Myr, complex impact structure. The impactite suite at Rochechouart provides an excellent example of gradational boundaries and transitional lithologies that have been historically difficult to classify with standard impactite nomenclature. Here, we present the first detailed scanning electron microscopy-based description of the Rochechouart impactites integrated with hand-sample and petrographic observations with the goal of understanding the clast-matrix relationships of transitional lithologies. Three main impact-generated hydrothermal alteration assemblages are also recognized: (1) argillic-like, (2) carbonate, and (3) oxide. Our results support the existence of a continuum between clast-rich impact melt rocks and glass-rich clastic breccias (suevites) that must be represented in universal classification schemes. This suite of impactites from the Rochechouart impact structure is used as a test case for a recently published classification scheme based on the nature of the groundmass setting a precedent for classification of impactites with limited to no geological context such as deeply eroded terrestrial impact structures and future sample return missions. The re-evaluation of the melt-bearing Rochechouart impactites questions the currently accepted size of the crater, suggesting a much larger original crater diameter.

  3. Deep-level magma ascent rates at Mt. Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Perinelli, C.; Putirka, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-level ascent rates are related to the triggering mechanisms of volcanic eruptions. Recent models and experimental studies have focused on the very shallow parts of magma plumbing systems, mostly the upper few km, and have thus far emphasized that volatile contents and volatile exsolution, are key to understanding eruption dynamics and its fingerprint in the rock texture. Massive volatile loss induces a dramatic change in the liquidus temperature, thus producing observable effects on the rates of nucleation and growth of minerals . Volatile saturation, however, may well occur at greater depths, which means that initial stages of magma ascent may be triggered by events taking place at much greater depths than those recorded by melt inclusions, likely captured at shallow levels. We present a method to evaluate ascent rates deep in a volcano plumbing system, discussing the implications for magma dehydration and using Mt. Etna as case a study. We investigate the deeper levels of magma transport by presenting detailed P-T paths for Etnean magmas, and combining these with Crystal Size Distribution (CSD)-derived cooling rates. The key to this analysis is the recognition that the slope of a P-T path, as determined from mineral-melt thermobarometry, is a result of magma cooling rate, which is in turn a function of magma ascent via the effect of pressure on volatile solubility. We also rely on a thermodynamic treatment of exsolution of non-ideal H2O-CO2 mixtures, based on the Kerric & Jacobs (1981) model, and the simplified solubility model of CO2 (Spera & Bergman, 1980) and H2O (Nicholls, 1980), recalibrated with experimental and melt inclusions data from Mt. Etna. Our modeling is able to decipher magma ascent velocity, v (dH/dt; H = depth, t = time), from ascent rate (dP/dt), and rate of cooling (dT/dt), where ρ is magma density, P is pressure, T is temperature and g is the acceleration of gravity. This equation for v provides a key to investigating the relationships

  4. Chirac of France: A new leader of the west?

    SciTech Connect

    Moiesi, D.

    1995-11-01

    In foreign and security policy the issues for France are contradictory nature of Chirac`s goals or in the incompatibility of the means to those ends. Chirac`s modernized Gaullist formula for independent French action to meet the exigencies of the post-Cold War world may be irreconcilable with the constraints and demands of the European unification process. The goal of independence may not mesh with the retention of influence. An immediate, concrete example is the apparent contradiction between France`s European and world ambitions and its resumption of nuclear testing. Four foreign policy themes have dominated the initial months of Chirac`s presidency: the war in Bosnia, nuclear testing, European relations, and the conflict in Algeria and its repercussions in France. These themes are examined in more detail.

  5. The impact of international recruitment on healthcare delivery in France.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Ioana; Planck, Ashlee

    2010-01-01

    Mobility of Health Professionals (MoHProf), the European Commission-sponsored collaborative project, examines current trends in the mobility of health professionals to, from and within the European Union (EU). The French national level project studies the relevance of international recruitment in France by studying migratory flows and the "pull" and "preventive" factors influencing immigration of foreign health professionals to France. Using the results of the study, in this article, firstly, we quantify the phenomenon of health professional immigration and secondly, we discuss the 'pull' and 'preventive' factors. We argue that diploma and professional recognition is a variable that acts both as a 'pull' and 'preventive' factor at once and has one of the most significant impacts on international recruitment in France. We, therefore, analyze its impact on the recruitment of health professionals having obtained their diploma and qualifications abroad and the possible consequences on healthcare delivery in France. PMID:21155427

  6. Autonomy and Mismanagement of Institutions of Higher Education in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapointe, Serge

    1982-01-01

    The report of an OECD IMHE Programme working group on institutional management in France is presented, focusing on four main themes: staff, diplomas and degrees, institutional administration, and relations with the central government. (Author/MSE)

  7. A short account of forensic dentistry in France.

    PubMed

    Riaud, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The earliest records and more recent cases where forensic dentistry has been used to identify bodies in France are described. The establishment of the French Society of Forensic Odontology is detailed. PMID:26930882

  8. Development of forensic-quality full mtGenome haplotypes: success rates with low template specimens.

    PubMed

    Just, Rebecca S; Scheible, Melissa K; Fast, Spence A; Sturk-Andreaggi, Kimberly; Higginbotham, Jennifer L; Lyons, Elizabeth A; Bush, Jocelyn M; Peck, Michelle A; Ring, Joseph D; Diegoli, Toni M; Röck, Alexander W; Huber, Gabriela E; Nagl, Simone; Strobl, Christina; Zimmermann, Bettina; Parson, Walther; Irwin, Jodi A

    2014-05-01

    Forensic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) testing requires appropriate, high quality reference population data for estimating the rarity of questioned haplotypes and, in turn, the strength of the mtDNA evidence. Available reference databases (SWGDAM, EMPOP) currently include information from the mtDNA control region; however, novel methods that quickly and easily recover mtDNA coding region data are becoming increasingly available. Though these assays promise to both facilitate the acquisition of mitochondrial genome (mtGenome) data and maximize the general utility of mtDNA testing in forensics, the appropriate reference data and database tools required for their routine application in forensic casework are lacking. To address this deficiency, we have undertaken an effort to: (1) increase the large-scale availability of high-quality entire mtGenome reference population data, and (2) improve the information technology infrastructure required to access/search mtGenome data and employ them in forensic casework. Here, we describe the application of a data generation and analysis workflow to the development of more than 400 complete, forensic-quality mtGenomes from low DNA quantity blood serum specimens as part of a U.S. National Institute of Justice funded reference population databasing initiative. We discuss the minor modifications made to a published mtGenome Sanger sequencing protocol to maintain a high rate of throughput while minimizing manual reprocessing with these low template samples. The successful use of this semi-automated strategy on forensic-like samples provides practical insight into the feasibility of producing complete mtGenome data in a routine casework environment, and demonstrates that large (>2kb) mtDNA fragments can regularly be recovered from high quality but very low DNA quantity specimens. Further, the detailed empirical data we provide on the amplification success rates across a range of DNA input quantities will be useful moving forward as PCR

  9. Multiple essential MT1-MMP functions in tooth root formation, dentinogenesis, and tooth eruption.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Snider, T N; Wimer, H F; Yamada, S S; Yang, T; Holmbeck, K; Foster, B L

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MT1-MMP) is a transmembrane zinc-endopeptidase that breaks down extracellular matrix components, including several collagens, during tissue development and physiological remodeling. MT1-MMP-deficient mice (MT1-MMP(-/-)) feature severe defects in connective tissues, such as impaired growth, osteopenia, fibrosis, and conspicuous loss of molar tooth eruption and root formation. In order to define the functions of MT1-MMP during root formation and tooth eruption, we analyzed the development of teeth and surrounding tissues in the absence of MT1-MMP. In situ hybridization showed that MT1-MMP was widely expressed in cells associated with teeth and surrounding connective tissues during development. Multiple defects in dentoalveolar tissues were associated with loss of MT1-MMP. Root formation was inhibited by defective structure and function of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, no defect was found in creation of the eruption pathway, suggesting that tooth eruption was hampered by lack of alveolar bone modeling/remodeling coincident with reduced periodontal ligament (PDL) formation and integration with the alveolar bone. Additionally, we identified a significant defect in dentin formation and mineralization associated with the loss of MT1-MMP. To segregate these multiple defects and trace their cellular origin, conditional ablation of MT1-MMP was performed in epithelia and mesenchyme. Mice featuring selective loss of MT1-MMP activity in the epithelium were indistinguishable from wild type mice, and importantly, featured a normal HERS structure and molar eruption. In contrast, selective knock-out of MT1-MMP in Osterix-expressing mesenchymal cells, including osteoblasts and odontoblasts, recapitulated major defects from the global knock-out including altered HERS structure, short roots, defective dentin formation and mineralization, and reduced alveolar bone formation, although molars were able to erupt. These data

  10. Radiology in forensic identification: the Mt Erebus disaster.

    PubMed

    Alexander, C J; Foote, G A

    1998-11-01

    Although radiology has exceptional discriminatory power in the identification of individuals, it is not often used for this purpose. This under-utilization stems in part from insufficient appreciation of its potential, and in part from a lack of agreed operational protocols. Descriptions of criteria used for radiological identification are scattered in individual reports and have not been collated. The circumstances in which identification is required are various and pose different problems for which guidelines have not been established. The areas in which radiology has a high capacity for identification of age, sex or identity are reviewed and their strengths and limitations are discussed. A survey of the literature identified three different circumstances in which cadaver identification is needed, and a protocol is suggested to meet the differing requirements of these three situations. The use of these protocols and techniques in the identification of bodies recovered from the Mt Erebus disaster is described. Postmortem radiographs established the identity of 11 bodies not identified by other techniques. There is a need for greater awareness in police and forensic circles of the identifying power of radiology. PMID:9833369

  11. Structural controls on CO2 degassing at Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M.; La Spina, A.; Salerno, G. G.

    2009-12-01

    Recent OP-FTIR studies of volcanic plume composition, together with mini-DOAS measurements of SO2 flux, have allowed CO2 gas fluxes from individual craters of Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy) to be determined with unprecedented detail. These studies reveal systematic differences in the amount of CO2 released from each crater, with the northeast crater (NEC) plume being impoverished in CO2, whilst the central crater (CC) is enriched with this volatile species. Here we present a quantitative model for degassing via a branched conduit system, in which gas and magma rise to a branch point where different proportions of gas and magma enter each conduit. The model has therefore only three free parameters; branch pressure, proportion of gas entering the NEC conduit and proportion of magma entering the NEC conduit. We use a model of degassing based on melt-inclusion studies, volcanic glass measurements and VolatileCalc to determine equilibrium gas compositions. Notwithstanding wide variations within the gas compositions and fluxes emitted from each crater we find a well-constrained branch pressure that successfully reproduces the observations. Relatively minor variations in the relative amounts of gas and magma entering each conduit can profoundly change the gas flux and composition from each crater. These results suggest that large variations in individual crater's gas emissions may be induced for reasons independent of global variations in magma supply rate, and therefore aid in our ability to interpret volcanic CO2 emissions.

  12. The Hercules Échelle Spectrograph at Mt. John

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearnshaw, J. B.; Barnes, S. I.; Kershaw, G. M.; Frost, N.; Graham, G.; Ritchie, R.; Nankivell, G. R.

    2002-03-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Canterbury University Large Échelle Spectrograph (HERCULES) a fibre-fed échelle spectrograph that was designed and built at the University of Canterbury and has been in operation at Mt. John University Observatory since April 2001.HERCULES receives light from the f/13.5 Cassegrain focus of the 1 m McLellan telescope. Resolving powers of R = 41 000, 70 000 and 82 000 are available. An R2 200 × 400 mm échelle grating provides dispersion and cross-dispersion uses a large BK7 prism in double pass. The wavelength coverage is designed to be 380-880 nm in a single exposure. The maximum detective quantum efficiency of the fibre, spectrograph and detector system is about 18% in 2 arc second seeing. High wavelength stability (to better than 10 ms-1 in radial velocity) is achieved by installing the whole instrument in a large vacuum tank at 2-4 torr and by there being no moving parts. The tank is in a thermally isolated and insulated environment. The paper describes the design philosophy of HERCULES and its performance during the first year of operation.

  13. Polarimetric radar measurements of a forested area near Mt. Shasta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Klein, Jeffrey D.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the results of an experiment using the NASA/JPL DC-8 AIRSAR (aircraft synthetic-aperture radar) over a coniferous forest near Mt. Shasta (California) in 1989. Calibration devices were deployed in clearings and under the forest canopy and passes at 20, 40, and 55 deg incidence angles were made with the AIRSAR. A total of eight images at differing incidence angles have been processed and calibrated. The multipolarization, multifrequency data were examined, and it was found that the C-band cross section averaged over like and cross polarizations is the best parameter for distinguishing between two stands with differing forest biomass. The average cross section at P- and L-bands is useful only for smaller incidence angles. Parameters describing the polarization behavior of the scattering were primarily useful in identifying the dominant scattering mechanisms for forest backscatter. It was found that both branch scattering and ground/tree interactions are important at P-band. At L-band and C-bands, the return is primarily from the canopy. Comparison with model calculations verified this conclusion.

  14. Geographical structuring in the mtDNA of Italians.

    PubMed Central

    Barbujani, G; Bertorelle, G; Capitani, G; Scozzari, R

    1995-01-01

    Geographical patterns of mtDNA variation were studied in 12 Italian samples (1072 individuals) by two different spatial autocorrelation methods. Separate analyses of the frequencies of 12 restriction morphs show North-South clines, differences between Sardinia and the mainland populations, and the effects of isolation by distance. A recently developed autocorrelation statistic summarizing molecular similarity at all sites (AIDA; autocorrelation index for DNA analysis) confirms the presence of a clinical pattern; differences between random pairs of haplotypes tend to increase with their geographical distance. The partition of gene diversity, however, reveals that most variability occurs within populations, whereas differences between populations are minor (GST = 0.057). When the data from the 12 samples are pooled, two descriptors of genetic variability (number of polymorphic sites and average sequence difference between pairs of individuals) do not behave as expected under neutrality. The presence of clinal patterns, Tajima's tests, and a simulation experiment agree in suggesting that population sizes increased rapidly in Italy and Sicily but not necessarily so in Sardinia. The distribution of pairwise sequence differences in the Italian peninsula (excluding Sardinia) permits a tentative location of the demographic increase between 8000 and 20,500 years ago. These dates are consistent with archaeological estimates of two distinct expansion processes, occurring, respectively, in the Neolithic and after the last glacial maximum in the Paleolithic. Conversely, there is no genetic evidence that such processes have had a major impact on the Sardinian population. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568095

  15. Urania in the Marketplace: The Selling of Mt. Palomar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumstay, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    The 200-inch Hale telescope atop Mt. Palomar is one of the most iconic scientific facilities ever constructed. The world's largest optical telescope for over a quarter-century, it served as a symbol of hope for America during the Great Depression and in the post-war years. In 2016 we celebrate the eightieth anniversaries of the completion of the mirror blank, the start of construction of the dome and mounting, and the beginning of astronomical research at Palomar Observatory by Fritz Zwicky (with the 18-inch Schmidt camera).During its construction, and for many years after "first light" in 1949, the Hale telescope was prominently featured in numerous magazine advertisements. Most of these represented companies directly involved in its construction, notably Corning Glass Works, which was justly proud of its magnificent accomplishment. But companies only vaguely linked to the project, or not at all, also co-opted the mystique of "the World's Largest Eye" to promote their goods or services. Surprisingly, in light of the fact that it bore responsibility for fabricating the complex and innovative mounting, the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company appears to have run only a single advertisement (in The National Geographic Magazine) touting its contribution to the project.Examples of magazine advertisements spanning the period 1936 to 1959 are presented.This work was supported by a faculty scholarship grant from Valdosta State University.

  16. Analysis of Shublik Formation rocks from Mt. Michelson quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Detterman, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Analysis of 88 samples from the Shublik formation on Fire Creek, Mt. Michelson Quadrangle, Alaska, are presented in tabular form. The results include the determination of elements by semiquantitative spectrographic analysis, phosphate by X-ray fluorescence, carbon dioxide by acid decomposable carbonate, total carbon by induction furnace, carbonate carbon by conversion using the conversion factor of 0.2727 for amount of carbon in carbon dioxide, and organic carbon by difference. A seven- cycle semilogarithmic chart presents the data graphically and illustrates the range, mode, and mean for some of the elements. The chart shows, also, the approximate concentration of the same elements in rocks similar to the black shale and limestone of the Shublik Formation. Each sample represents 5 feet of section and is composed of rock chips taken at 1 - foot intervals. The samples are keyed into a stratigraphic column of the formation. Rocks of the Shublik Formation contain anomalously high concentrations of some of the elements. These same elements might be expected to be high in some of the petroleum from northern Alaska if the Shublik Formation is a source for this petroleum. Several of the stratigraphic intervals may represent, also, a low-grade phosphate deposit.

  17. Impaired osmoregulation at high altitude. Studies on Mt Everest.

    PubMed

    Blume, F D; Boyer, S J; Braverman, L E; Cohen, A; Dirkse, J; Mordes, J P

    1984-07-27

    Osmoregulation was studied in 13 mountaineers who had experienced long-term exposure to high altitude on Mt Everest. Serum osmolality rose from 290 +/- 1 mOsm/kg to 295 +/- 2 mOsm/kg at 5,400 m and finally to 302 +/- 4 mOsm/kg at 6,300 m after a mean of 26.5 days above 5,400 m. Despite this degree of osmoconcentration, plasma arginine-vasopressin concentration remained unchanged: 1.1 +/-0.1 microU/mL at sea level, 0.8 +/- 0.1 microU/mL at 5,400 m, and 0.9 +/- 0.1 microU/mL at 6,300 m. Urinary vasopressin excretion was also similar at all three altitudes. We conclude that prolonged exposure to high altitude may result in persistent impairment of osmoregulation, caused in part by an inappropriate arginine-vasopressin response to hyperosmolality. PMID:6429358

  18. Doublets and wavelets: anisotropic changes measured at Mt. Vesuvius.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, F.; Gargiulo, G.; Zaccarelli, L.; Del Pezzo, E.

    2009-04-01

    Shear-wave splitting is the elastic-equivalent of the well known phenomenon of optical birefringence. A shear wave propagating through an anisotropic solid splits into two S-waves that travel with different velocities and with different directions of polarization, generating two observables: TD that is the time delay between the two split S waves, and LSPD that is the polarization direction of the faster S wave. In the upper crust this phenomenon has been interpreted to occur in zones of fluid-filled cracks, microcracks or preferentially oriented pore spaces. The time evolution of anisotropic distribution of microcracks due to a differential stress, according to the nonlinear anisotropic poroelasticity (APE ) model, is explained by the fluid migration along pressure gradients between neighbouring microcracks and pores. In this framework the shear wave splitting parameters are indicators of the state of stress in the upper crust. We obtained shear wave splitting measurements for local earthquakes occurred before the largest earthquake (M= 3.6 occurred October 9th, 1999 ) recorded at MT. Vesuvius after the last eruption ( March 1944). The arrival times of split shear waves and the polarization directions were detected by using the wavelet transform of a three-component signal. In order to avoid any spatial effects on the time behaviour of the parameters, we perfomed the analysis for a selected a dataset of doublets. Short term (of the order of the days) variation of both TD and LSPD parameters are retrieved before the occurence of the M=3. 6 event.

  19. Bioindication of volcanic mercury (Hg) deposition around Mt Etna (Sicily)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R.; Witt, M. L.; Sawyer, G. M.; Watt, S.; Bagnato, E.; Calabrese, S.; Aiuppa, A.; Delmelle, P.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mt. Etna is a major natural source of Hg to the Mediterranean region. Total mercury concentrations, [Hg]tot, in Castanea sativa (sweet chestnut) leaves sampled 7-13 km from Etna's vents (during six campaigns in 2005-2011) were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. [Hg]tot in C. sativa was greatest on Etna's SE flank reflecting Hg deposition from the typically overhead volcanic plume. When adjusted for leaf age, [Hg]tot in C. sativa also increased with recent eruptive activity. [Hg]tot in C. sativa was not controlled by [Hg]tot in soils, which instead was greatest on the (upwind) NW flank and correlated strongly with soil organic matter (% Org). Our results suggest that at least ~1% of Hg emitted from Etna is deposited proximally, supporting recent measurement and model results which indicate that GEM (Hg0; the dominant form of Hg in high temperature magmatic gases) is oxidised rapidly to RGM and Hgp in ambient temperature volcanic plumes. Samples of C. sativa and soils were also collected in July and September 2012 alongside SO2 and acid gas diffusion tube samples. These new samples will enable us to investigate Hg accumulation over a single growth season with reference to the exposure of vegetation to volcanic gases and particles.

  20. Testing atmospheric and tidal earthquake triggering at Mt. Hochstaufen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, S.; Ben-Zion, Y.; Cattania, C.; Wassermann, J.

    2013-10-01

    Seismicity closely related to hydrological impacts has been observed in several locations worldwide, particularly in intraplate areas where tectonic stressing rates are small. The triggering mechanism is usually explained by a poroelastic response of the seismogenic crust to surface water flux, leading to pore pressure changes at depth. To explain the earthquake triggering in response of those small stress changes, however, the crust has to be near a critical state in which other transient processes might be significant. One of the prominent examples is at Mt. Hochstaufen in SE Germany, where seismicity is known to vary seasonally. A previous analysis showed that the seismicity in 2002 was highly correlated with model forecasts based on fluid diffusion and rate- and state-dependent frictional nucleation. Here we revisit this case by accounting additionally for poroelastic effects, as well as for thermoelastic and tidal stresses. We also test whether the model can explain the observations of the subsequent 8 years between 2003 and 2010. Our analysis confirms that rainfall is the dominant driving force in this region. The model not only fits the year 2002 activity very well but also provides with the same parameters a reasonable fit to the subsequent period, with a probability gain of about 4 per event in comparison to a time-independent Poisson model.

  1. France, Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This image of France was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). For this broad view the resolution of the data was reduced to 6 arcseconds (about 185 meters north-south and 127 meters east-west), resampled to a Mercator projection, and the French border outlined. Even at this decreased resolution the variety of landforms comprising the country is readily apparent.

    The upper central part of this scene is dominated by the Paris Basin, which consists of a layered sequence of sedimentary rocks. Fertile soils over much of the area make good agricultural land. The Normandie coast to the upper left is characterized by high, chalk cliffs, while the Brittany coast (the peninsula to the left) is highly indented where deep valleys were drowned by the sea, and the Biscay coast to the southwest is marked by flat, sandy beaches.

    To the south, the Pyrenees form a natural border between France and Spain, and the south-central part of the country is dominated by the ancient Massif Central. Subject to volcanism that has only subsided in the last 10,000 years, these central mountains are separated from the Alps by the north-south trending Rhone River Basin.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce the image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to

  2. History of infrared optronics in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouilloy, J. P.; Siriex, Michel B.

    1995-09-01

    In France, the real start of work on the applications of infrared radiations occurred around 1947 - 1948. During many years, technological research was performed in the field of detectors, optical material, modulation techniques, and a lot of measurements were made in order to acquire a better knowledge of the propagation medium and radiation of IR sources, namely those of jet engines. The birth of industrial infrared activities in France started with the Franco-German missile guidance programs: Milan, HOT, Roland and the French air to air missile seeker programs: R530, MAGIC. At these early stages of IR technologies development, it was a great technical adventure for both the governmental agencies and industry to develop: detector technology with PbS and InSb, detector cooling for 3 - 5 micrometer wavelength range, optical material transparent in the infrared, opto mechanical design, signal processing and related electronic technologies. Etablissement Jean Turck and SAT were the pioneers associated with Aerospatiale, Matra and under contracts from the French Ministry of Defence (DGA). In the 60s, the need arose to enhance night vision capability of equipment in service with the French Army. TRT was chosen by DGA to develop the first thermal imagers: LUTHER 1, 2, and 3 with an increasing number of detectors and image frequency rate. This period was also the era in which the SAT detector made rapid advance. After basic work done in the CNRS and with the support of DGA, SAT became the world leader of MCT photovoltaic detector working in the 8 to 12 micron waveband. From 1979, TRT and SAT were given the responsibility for the joint development and production of the first generation French thermal imaging modular system so-called SMT. Now, THOMSON TTD Optronique takes over the opto-electronics activities of TRT. Laser based systems were also studied for military application using YAG type laser and CO2 laser: Laboratoire de Marcousis, CILAS, THOMSON CSF and SAT have

  3. Magmatic and phreatomagmatic volcanic activity at Mt. Takahe, West Antarctica, based on tephra layers in the Byrd ice core and field observations at Mt. Takahe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palais, Julie M.; Kyle, Philip R.; McIntosh, William C.; Seward, Diane

    1988-12-01

    The morphology, grain size characteristics and composition of ash particles in 30 ka to 150 ka tephra layers from the Byrd ice core were examined to characterize the eruptions which produced them and to test the suggestion that they were erupted from Mt. Takahe, a shield volcano in Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica. Volcanic deposits at Mt. Takahe were examined for evidence of recent activity which could correlate with the tephra layers in the ice core. Coarse- and fine-ash layers have been recognized in the Byrd ice core. The coarse-ash layers have a higher mass concentration than the fine-ash layers and are characterized by fresh glass shards > 50 μm diameter, many containing elongate pipe vesicles. The fine-ash layers have a lower mass concentration and contain a greater variety of particles, typically < 20 μm diameter. Many of these particles are aggregate grains composed of glass and crystal fragments showing S and Cl surface alteration. The grain-size distributions of the coarse and fine-ash layers overlap, in part because of the aggregate nature of grains in the fine-ash layers. The coarse-ash layers are interpreted as having formed by magmatic eruption whereas the fine-ash layers are believed to be hydrovolcanic in origin. Mt. Takahe is the favored source for the tephra because: (a) chemical analyses of samples from the volcano are distinctive, being peralkaline trachyte, and similar in composition to the analyzed tephra; (b) Mt. Takahe is a young volcano (< 0.3 Ma); (c) pyroclastic deposits on Mt. Takahe indicate styles of eruption similar to that inferred for the ice core tephra; and (d) Mt. Takahe is only about 350 km from the calculated site of tephra deposition. A speculative eruptive history for Mt. Takahe is established by combining observations from Mt. Takahe and the Byrd ice core tephra. Initial eruptions at Mt. Takahe were subglacial and then graded into alternating subaerial and subglacial activity. The tephra suggest alternating subaerial

  4. Prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis in France: 2001

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, F; Saraux, A; Guggenbuhl, P; Roux, C; Fardellone, P; Le Bihan, E; Cantagrel, A; Chary-Valckenaere, I; Euller-Ziegler, L; Flipo, R; Juvin, R; Behier, J; Fautrel, B; Masson, C; Coste, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Prevalence estimates of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) vary across Europe. Recent estimates in southern European countries showed a lower prevalence than in northern countries. Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of RA in France in a multiregional representative sample in the year 2001. Methods: A two stage random sample was constituted in seven areas (20 counties) from the national telephone directory of households and by the next birthday method in each household. Patient-interviewers, member of self help groups, were trained to administer telephone surveys using a validated questionnaire for case detection of inflammatory rheumatism, and conducted the survey under quality control. All suspected cases of RA were confirmed by their rheumatologist or by clinical examination. Prevalence estimates after probability sampling correction were standardised for age and sex (national census 1999). Results: An average response rate of 64.7% (two stages combined) led to a total of 9395 respondents. Standardised prevalence was 0.31% (95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.48) for RA, 0.51% in women and 0.09% in men, with a higher age-specific prevalence in the 65–74 year age band. A geographical analysis of county clustering showed significant variation across the country. Conclusion: This national multiregional cooperative study demonstrates the usefulness of working in association with patients of self help groups. It showed a similar prevalence of RA to that of the spondyloarthropathies estimated concomitantly during the survey. It provides a reliable basis for definition of population targets for healthcare delivery and drug treatments. PMID:15800010

  5. The Spatial Distribution of Mustelidae in France

    PubMed Central

    Calenge, Clément; Chadoeuf, Joël; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Julliard, Romain; Monestiez, Pascal; Piffady, Jérémy; Pinaud, David; Ruette, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the spatial distribution of 6 Mustelidae species in France using the data collected by the French national hunting and wildlife agency under the “small carnivorous species logbooks” program. The 1500 national wildlife protection officers working for this agency spend 80% of their working time traveling in the spatial area in which they have authority. During their travels, they occasionally detect dead or living small and medium size carnivorous animals. Between 2002 and 2005, each car operated by this agency was equipped with a logbook in which officers recorded information about the detected animals (species, location, dead or alive, date). Thus, more than 30000 dead or living animals were detected during the study period. Because a large number of detected animals in a region could have been the result of a high sampling pressure there, we modeled the number of detected animals as a function of the sampling effort to allow for unbiased estimation of the species density. For dead animals -- mostly roadkill -- we supposed that the effort in a given region was proportional to the distance traveled by the officers. For living animals, we had no way to measure the sampling effort. We demonstrated that it was possible to use the whole dataset (dead and living animals) to estimate the following: (i) the relative density -- i.e., the density multiplied by an unknown constant -- of each species of interest across the different French agricultural regions, (ii) the sampling effort for living animals for each region, and (iii) the relative detection probability for various species of interest. PMID:25811456

  6. Epidemiological surveillance of infectious diseases in France.

    PubMed

    Dufour, B; La Vieille, S

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiological surveillance, namely the continuous monitoring of diseases and health determinants in a population, has developed over the past fifteen years, in the sphere of human health as well as in animal health. All epidemiological surveillance networks include the following four stages: data collection, data transmission, data processing and dissemination of information. However, despite this basic similarity, the very many networks existing in France are extremely varied in nature. At the national level, the bodies involved in epidemiological surveillance for infectious animal diseases are the Direction générale de l'alimentation, the Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des aliments and, to a lesser degree, the Institut français de recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer. In the field, the networks rely on the Direction des services vétérinaires, veterinary practitioners, laboratories in each département, and livestock producers' groups (especially animal health protection groups). Some twenty French networks currently in operation are presented in this article according to a classification based on published criteria. In the case of human infectious diseases, epidemiological surveillance is carried out almost entirely by the Direction générale de la santé and the Directions départementales d'action sanitaire et sociale, the Institut de veille sanitaire and the various Centres nationaux de référence (CNRs). Most human infectious diseases are monitored by one or more of the following broad categories of networks: reporting of notifiable diseases, the CNRs, the network of sentinel doctors, the network of hospital laboratories and departments, and medical causes of death. An example where surveillance is covered by several networks is also presented, namely surveillance for salmonellosis and Salmonella. Lastly, methods for evaluating networks are discussed. PMID:10779198

  7. The spatial distribution of Mustelidae in France.

    PubMed

    Calenge, Clément; Chadoeuf, Joël; Giraud, Christophe; Huet, Sylvie; Julliard, Romain; Monestiez, Pascal; Piffady, Jérémy; Pinaud, David; Ruette, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the spatial distribution of 6 Mustelidae species in France using the data collected by the French national hunting and wildlife agency under the "small carnivorous species logbooks" program. The 1500 national wildlife protection officers working for this agency spend 80% of their working time traveling in the spatial area in which they have authority. During their travels, they occasionally detect dead or living small and medium size carnivorous animals. Between 2002 and 2005, each car operated by this agency was equipped with a logbook in which officers recorded information about the detected animals (species, location, dead or alive, date). Thus, more than 30000 dead or living animals were detected during the study period. Because a large number of detected animals in a region could have been the result of a high sampling pressure there, we modeled the number of detected animals as a function of the sampling effort to allow for unbiased estimation of the species density. For dead animals -- mostly roadkill -- we supposed that the effort in a given region was proportional to the distance traveled by the officers. For living animals, we had no way to measure the sampling effort. We demonstrated that it was possible to use the whole dataset (dead and living animals) to estimate the following: (i) the relative density -- i.e., the density multiplied by an unknown constant -- of each species of interest across the different French agricultural regions, (ii) the sampling effort for living animals for each region, and (iii) the relative detection probability for various species of interest. PMID:25811456

  8. mtDNA Mutations and Their Role in Aging, Diseases and Forensic Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Zapico, Sara C.; Ubelaker, Douglas H.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are independent organelles with their own DNA. As a primary function, mitochondria produce the energy for the cell through Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in the Electron Transport Chain (ETC). One of the toxic products of this process is Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), which can induce oxidative damage in macromolecules like lipids, proteins and DNA. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is less protected and has fewer reparation mechanisms than nuclear DNA (nDNA), and as such is more exposed to oxidative, mutation-inducing damage. This review analyzes the causes and consequences of mtDNA mutations and their relationship with the aging process. Neurodegenerative diseases, related with the aging, are consequences of mtDNA mutations resulting in a decrease in mitochondrial function. Also described are “mitochondrial diseases”, pathologies produced by mtDNA mutations and whose symptoms are related with mitochondrial dysfunction. Finally, mtDNA haplogroups are defined in this review; these groups are important for determination of geographical origin of an individual. Additionally, different haplogroups exhibit variably longevity and risk of certain diseases. mtDNA mutations in aging and haplogroups are of special interest to forensic science research. Therefore this review will help to clarify the key role of mtDNA mutations in these processes and support further research in this area. PMID:24307969

  9. The fate of MtBE during Fenton-like treatments through laboratory scale column tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscitelli, Daniela; Zingaretti, Daniela; Verginelli, Iason; Gavasci, Renato; Baciocchi, Renato

    2015-12-01

    In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) based on the Fenton's process is a proven technology for the treatment of groundwater contaminated by organic compounds. Nevertheless, the application of this treatment process to methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) is questioned, as there are concerns about its capacity to achieve complete mineralization. Many existing studies have focused on water contaminated by MtBE and are thus not representative of in situ treatments since they do not consider the presence of soil. In this work, the effectiveness of a Fenton-like process for MtBE treatment was proven in soil column tests performed at operating conditions (i.e., oxidant and contaminant concentration and flow rates) resembling those typically used for in situ applications. No MtBE by-products were detected in any of the tested conditions, thus suggesting that the tert-butyl group of MtBE was completely degraded. A mass balance based on the CO2 produced was used as evidence that most of the MtBE removed was actually mineralized. Finally, the obtained results show that preconditioning of soil with a chelating agent (EDTA) significantly enhanced MtBE oxidation.

  10. The fate of MtBE during Fenton-like treatments through laboratory scale column tests.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Daniela; Zingaretti, Daniela; Verginelli, Iason; Gavasci, Renato; Baciocchi, Renato

    2015-12-01

    In Situ Chemical Oxidation (ISCO) based on the Fenton's process is a proven technology for the treatment of groundwater contaminated by organic compounds. Nevertheless, the application of this treatment process to methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) is questioned, as there are concerns about its capacity to achieve complete mineralization. Many existing studies have focused on water contaminated by MtBE and are thus not representative of in situ treatments since they do not consider the presence of soil. In this work, the effectiveness of a Fenton-like process for MtBE treatment was proven in soil column tests performed at operating conditions (i.e., oxidant and contaminant concentration and flow rates) resembling those typically used for in situ applications. No MtBE by-products were detected in any of the tested conditions, thus suggesting that the tert-butyl group of MtBE was completely degraded. A mass balance based on the CO2 produced was used as evidence that most of the MtBE removed was actually mineralized. Finally, the obtained results show that preconditioning of soil with a chelating agent (EDTA) significantly enhanced MtBE oxidation. PMID:26544517

  11. mtDNA variation of aboriginal Siberians reveals distinct genetic affinities with Native Americans

    SciTech Connect

    Torroni, A.; Schurr, T.G.; Cabell, M.F.; Wallace, D.C. ); Sukernik, R.I.; Starikovskaya, Y.B. ); Crawford, M.H.; Comuzzie, A.G. )

    1993-09-01

    The mtDNA variation of 411 individuals from 10 aboriginal Siberian populations was analyzed in an effort to delineate the relationships between Siberian and Native American populations. All mtDNAs were characterized by PCR amplification and restriction analysis, and a subset of them was characterized by control region sequencing. The resulting data were then compiled with previous mtDNA data from Native Americans and Asians and were used for phylogenetic analysis and sequence divergence estimations. Aboriginal Siberian populations exhibited mtDNAs from three (A, C, and D) of the four haplogroups observed in Native Americans. However, none of the Siberian populations showed mtDNAs from the fourth haplogroup, group B. The presence of group B deletion haplotypes in East Asian and Native American populations but their absence in Siberians raises the possibility that haplogroup B could represent a migratory event distinct from the one(s) which brought group A, C, and D mtDNAs to the Americas. These findings support the hypothesis that the first humans to move from Siberia to the Americas carried with them a limited number of founding mtDNAs and that the initial migration occurred between 17,000-34,000 years before present. 61 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Digital PCR methods improve detection sensitivity and measurement precision of low abundance mtDNA deletions

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Frances R.; Martin, James L.; Frescura, Kristin; Damas, Joana; Pereira, Filipe; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Kaufman, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are a common cause of primary mitochondrial disorders, and have also been implicated in a broad collection of conditions, including aging, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Prevalent among these pathogenic variants are mtDNA deletions, which show a strong bias for the loss of sequence in the major arc between, but not including, the heavy and light strand origins of replication. Because individual mtDNA deletions can accumulate focally, occur with multiple mixed breakpoints, and in the presence of normal mtDNA sequences, methods that detect broad-spectrum mutations with enhanced sensitivity and limited costs have both research and clinical applications. In this study, we evaluated semi-quantitative and digital PCR-based methods of mtDNA deletion detection using double-stranded reference templates or biological samples. Our aim was to describe key experimental assay parameters that will enable the analysis of low levels or small differences in mtDNA deletion load during disease progression, with limited false-positive detection. We determined that the digital PCR method significantly improved mtDNA deletion detection sensitivity through absolute quantitation, improved precision and reduced assay standard error. PMID:27122135

  13. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. PMID:27053724

  14. Distilling Artificial Recombinants from Large Sets of Complete mtDNA Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qing-Peng; Salas, Antonio; Sun, Chang; Fuku, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Zhong, Li; Wang, Cheng-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Background Large-scale genome sequencing poses enormous problems to the logistics of laboratory work and data handling. When numerous fragments of different genomes are PCR amplified and sequenced in a laboratory, there is a high immanent risk of sample confusion. For genetic markers, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which are free of natural recombination, single instances of sample mix-up involving different branches of the mtDNA phylogeny would give rise to reticulate patterns and should therefore be detectable. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed a strategy for comparing new complete mtDNA genomes, one by one, to a current skeleton of the worldwide mtDNA phylogeny. The mutations distinguishing the reference sequence from a putative recombinant sequence can then be allocated to two or more different branches of this phylogenetic skeleton. Thus, one would search for two (or three) near-matches in the total mtDNA database that together best explain the variation seen in the recombinants. The evolutionary pathway from the mtDNA tree connecting this pair together with the recombinant then generate a grid-like median network, from which one can read off the exchanged segments. Conclusions We have applied this procedure to a large collection of complete human mtDNA sequences, where several recombinants could be distilled by our method. All these recombinant sequences were subsequently corrected by de novo experiments – fully concordant with the predictions from our data-analytical approach. PMID:18714389

  15. Somatic mtDNA variation is an important component of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Coxhead, Jonathan; Kurzawa-Akanbi, Marzena; Hussain, Rafiqul; Pyle, Angela; Chinnery, Patrick; Hudson, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction, mediated either through inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation or mitochondrial proteomic deficit, to Parkinson's disease (PD). Yet, despite this, the role of somatic mtDNA point mutations and specifically point-mutational burden in PD is poorly understood. Here, we take advantage of recent technical and methodological advances to examine the role of age-related and acquired mtDNA mutation in the largest study of mtDNA in postmortem PD tissue to date. Our data show that PD patients suffer an increase in mtDNA mutational burden in, but no limited to, the substantia nigra pars compacta when compared to matched controls. This mutational burden appears increased in genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase, supportive of previous protein studies of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. Accepting experimental limitations, our study confirms the important role of age-related mtDNA point mutation in the etiology of PD, moreover, by analyzing 2 distinct brain regions, we are able to show that PD patient brains are more vulnerable to mtDNA mutation overall. PMID:26639157

  16. LIMK Regulates Tumor-Cell Invasion and Matrix Degradation Through Tyrosine Phosphorylation of MT1-MMP

    PubMed Central

    Lagoutte, Emilie; Villeneuve, Clémentine; Lafanechère, Laurence; Wells, Claire M.; Jones, Gareth E.; Chavrier, Philippe; Rossé, Carine

    2016-01-01

    During their metastatic spread, cancer cells need to remodel the extracellular matrix in order to migrate through stromal compartments adjacent to the primary tumor. Dissemination of breast carcinoma cells is mediated by membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP14), the main invadopodial matrix degradative component. Here, we identify MT1-MMP as a novel interacting partner of dual-specificity LIM Kinase-1 and -2 (LIMK1/2), and provide several evidence for phosphorylation of tyrosine Y573 in the cytoplasmic domain of MT1-MMP by LIMK. Phosphorylation of Y573 influences association of F-actin binding protein cortactin to MT1-MMP-positive endosomes and invadopodia formation and matrix degradation. Moreover, we show that LIMK1 regulates cortactin association to MT1-MMP-positive endosomes, while LIMK2 controls invadopodia-associated cortactin. In turn, LIMK1 and LIMK2 are required for MT1-MMP-dependent matrix degradation and cell invasion in a three-dimensional type I collagen environment. This novel link between LIMK1/2 and MT1-MMP may have important consequences for therapeutic control of breast cancer cell invasion. PMID:27116935

  17. Subspace mapping of the three-dimensional spectral receptive field of macaque MT neurons.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Mikio; Sasaki, Kota S; Hashimoto, Hajime; Ohzawa, Izumi

    2016-08-01

    Neurons in the middle temporal (MT) visual area are thought to represent the velocity (direction and speed) of motion. Previous studies suggest the importance of both excitation and suppression for creating velocity representation in MT; however, details of the organization of excitation and suppression at the MT stage are not understood fully. In this article, we examine how excitatory and suppressive inputs are pooled in individual MT neurons by measuring their receptive fields in a three-dimensional (3-D) spatiotemporal frequency domain. We recorded the activity of single MT neurons from anesthetized macaque monkeys. To achieve both quality and resolution of the receptive field estimations, we applied a subspace reverse correlation technique in which a stimulus sequence of superimposed multiple drifting gratings was cross-correlated with the spiking activity of neurons. Excitatory responses tended to be organized in a manner representing a specific velocity independent of the spatial pattern of the stimuli. Conversely, suppressive responses tended to be distributed broadly over the 3-D frequency domain, supporting a hypothesis of response normalization. Despite the nonspecific distributed profile, the total summed strength of suppression was comparable to that of excitation in many MT neurons. Furthermore, suppressive responses reduced the bandwidth of velocity tuning, indicating that suppression improves the reliability of velocity representation. Our results suggest that both well-organized excitatory inputs and broad suppressive inputs contribute significantly to the invariant and reliable representation of velocity in MT. PMID:27193321

  18. Extensive paternal mtDNA leakage in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Maria D S; Dolezal, Marlies; Schlötterer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Strict maternal inheritance is considered a hallmark of animal mtDNA. Although recent reports suggest that paternal leakage occurs in a broad range of species, it is still considered an exceptionally rare event. To evaluate the impact of paternal leakage on the evolution of mtDNA, it is essential to reliably estimate the frequency of paternal leakage in natural populations. Using allele-specific real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we show that heteroplasmy is common in natural populations with at least 14% of the individuals carrying multiple mitochondrial haplotypes. However, the average frequency of the minor mtDNA haplotype is low (0.8%), which suggests that this pervasive heteroplasmy has not been noticed before due to a lack of power in sequencing surveys. Based on the distribution of mtDNA haplotypes in the offspring of heteroplasmic mothers, we found no evidence for strong selection against one of the haplotypes. We estimated that the rate of paternal leakage is 6% and that at least 100 generations are required for complete sorting of mtDNA haplotypes. Despite the high proportion of heteroplasmic individuals in natural populations, we found no evidence for recombination between mtDNA molecules, suggesting that either recombination is rare or recombinant haplotypes are counter-selected. Our results indicate that evolutionary studies using mtDNA as a marker might be biased by paternal leakage in this species. PMID:23452233

  19. MEMBRANE TYPE 1-MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE (MT1-MMP) IDENTIFIED AS A MULTIFUNCTIONAL REGULATOR OF VASCULAR RESPONSES.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2015-01-01

    Membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) functions as a signaling molecules in addition to a transmembrane metalloprotease, which degrades interstitial collagens and extracellular matrix components. This review focuses on the multifunctional roles of MT1-MMP as a signaling molecule in vascular responses to pro-atherosclerotic stimuli in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. First, the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1)-MT1-MMP signaling axis contributes to endothelial dysfunction, which is mediated via small GTP-binding protein RhoA and Rac1 activation. Second, MT1-MMP plays a crucial role in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through the activation of receptor for advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in smooth muscle cells, indicating that MT1-MMP may be a therapeutic target for diabetic vascular complications. Third, MT1-MMP is involved in RhoA/Rac1 activation and Ca(2+) signaling in the mechanism of thrombin-stimulated endothelial dysfunction and oxidant stress. Fourth, the inhibition of the MT1-MMP/Akt signaling pathway may be an attractive strategy for treating endothelial disordered hemostasis in the development of vascular diseases linked to TNF-α-induced inflammation. Fifth, MT1-MMP through RAGE induced RhoA/Rac1 activation and tissue factor protein upregulation through NF-κB phosphorylation in endothelial cells stimulated by high-mobility group box-1, which plays a key role in the systemic inflammation. These findings suggest that the MT1-MMP-mediated signaling axis may be a promising target for treating atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26370683

  20. Reservoir uncertainty, Precambrian topography, and carbon sequestration in the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Illinois Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leetaru, H.E.; McBride, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Sequestration sites are evaluated by studying the local geological structure and confirming the presence of both a reservoir facies and an impermeable seal not breached by significant faulting. The Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone is a blanket sandstone that underlies large parts of Midwest United States and is this region's most significant carbon sequestration reservoir. An assessment of the geological structure of any Mt. Simon sequestration site must also include knowledge of the paleotopography prior to deposition. Understanding Precambrian paleotopography is critical in estimating reservoir thickness and quality. Regional outcrop and borehole mapping of the Mt. Simon in conjunction with mapping seismic reflection data can facilitate the prediction of basement highs. Any potential site must, at the minimum, have seismic reflection data, calibrated with drill-hole information, to evaluate the presence of Precambrian topography and alleviate some of the uncertainty surrounding the thickness or possible absence of the Mt. Simon at a particular sequestration site. The Mt. Simon is thought to commonly overlie Precambrian basement granitic or rhyolitic rocks. In places, at least about 549 m (1800 ft) of topographic relief on the top of the basement surface prior to Mt. Simon deposition was observed. The Mt. Simon reservoir sandstone is thin or not present where basement is topographically high, whereas the low areas can have thick Mt. Simon. The paleotopography on the basement and its correlation to Mt. Simon thickness have been observed at both outcrops and in the subsurface from the states of Illinois, Ohio, Wisconsin, and Missouri. ?? 2009. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.