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Sample records for mtrc terminal reductases

  1. Isolation of a High-Affinity Functional Protein Complex between OmcA and MtrC: Two Outer Membrane Decaheme c-type Cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Chen, Baowei; Wang, Zheming; Elias, Dwayne A.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Gorby, Yuri A.; Ni, Shuisong; Lower, Brian H.; Kennedy, David W.; Wunschel, David S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium that is capable of using insoluble oxidized metals, such as manganese [Mn(III, IV)] and iron [Fe(III)] oxides and oxyhydroxides, as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The ability of S. oneidensis MR-1 to reduce oxidized Mn and/or Fe has previously been linked to OmcA and MtrC: two decaheme c-type cytochromes that are localized to the outer membrane. To investigate how the electron transport proteins OmcA and MtrC are organized, we expressed and purified recombinant OmcA and MtrC from wild type S. oneidensis MR-1 as well as a mutant that lacked OmcA and MtrC (ΔomcA/mtrC). After purification to the nearly electrophoretic homogeneity from the ΔomcA/mtrC mutant, the recombinant OmcA and MtrC exhibited the characteristics of c-type cytochromes, and each of their polypeptides was confirmed to contain 10 hemes. When purified from wild type cells, endogenous MtrC or OmcA was always co-purified with recombinant OmcA or MtrC, respectively. Fluorescence polarization experiment showed that recombinant OmcA bound to the FlAsH-labeled MtrC with a dissociation constant of 7 ×10-7 M. The purified recombinant OmcA or MtrC alone displayed intrinsic ferric reductase activity with NADH used as an electron donor. Ferric reductase specific activity increased by 35 to 41% when nearly equimolar concentrations of OmcA and MtrC were assayed relative to the two proteins assayed independently. These results demonstrate that OmcA and MtrC directly interact with each other to form a stable complex with high ferric reductase activity.

  2. Extracellular Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Belchik, Sara M.; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Wu, Hong; Lin, Yuehe; Lu, H. Peter; Fredrickson, James K.; Shi, Liang

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the roles of cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Cr(VI) reduction, the effects of deleting the mtrC and/or omcA gene on Cr(VI) reduction and the cellular locations of reduced Cr(III) precipitates were investigated. Compared to the rate of reduction of Cr(VI) by the wild type (wt), the deletion of mtrC decreased the initial rate of Cr(VI) reduction by 43.5%, while the deletion of omcA or both mtrC and omcA lowered the rate by 53.4% and 68.9%, respectively. In wt cells, Cr(III) precipitates were detected by transmission electron microscopy in the extracellular matrix between the cells, in association with the outer membrane, and inside the cytoplasm. No extracellular matrix-associated Cr(III) precipitates, however, were found in the cytochrome mutant cell suspension. In mutant cells without either MtrC or OmcA, most Cr(III) precipitates were found in association with the outer membrane, while in mutant cells lacking both MtrC and OmcA, most Cr(III) precipitates were found inside the cytoplasm. Cr(III) precipitates were also detected by scanning election microscopy on the surfaces of the wt and mutants without MtrC or OmcA but not on the mutant cells lacking both MtrC and OmcA, demonstrating that the deletion of mtrC and omcA diminishes the extracellular formation of Cr(III) precipitates. Furthermore, purified MtrC and OmcA reduced Cr(VI) with apparent kcat values of 1.2 ± 0.2 (mean ± standard deviation) and 10.2 ± 1 s−1 and Km values of 34.1 ± 4.5 and 41.3 ± 7.9 μM, respectively. Together, these results consistently demonstrate that MtrC and OmcA are the terminal reductases used by S. oneidensis MR-1 for extracellular Cr(VI) reduction where OmcA is a predominant Cr(VI) reductase. PMID:21498755

  3. Targeted protein degradation of outer membrane decaheme cytochrome MtrC metal reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 measured using biarsenical probe CrAsH-EDT(2).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, James K; Bigelow, Diana J; Squier, Thomas C

    2011-11-15

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC (MtrC*) which is dependent on the presence of a functional type 2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC* undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 h(-1) that is insensitive to O(2) concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 h(-1)) that are

  4. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent

  5. Electrochemical interaction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and its outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC with hematite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Meitl, Leisa A.; Eggleston, Carrick M.; Colberg, Patricia J.; Khare, Nidhi; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang

    2009-09-15

    Bacterial metal reduction is an important biogeochemical process in anaerobic environments. An understanding of electron transfer pathways from dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) to solid phase metal (hydr)oxides is important for understanding metal redox cycling in soils and sediments, for utilizing DMRB in bioremedation, and for developing technologies such as microbial fuel cells. Here we hypothesize that the outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are the only terminal reductases capable of direct electron transfer to a hematite working electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to study electron transfer between hematite electrodes and protein films, S. oneidensis MR-1 wild-type cell suspensions, and cytochrome deletion mutants. After controlling for hematite electrode dissolution at negative potential, the midpoint potentials of adsorbed OmcA and MtrC were measured (-201 mV and -163 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively). Cell suspensions of wild-type MR-1, deletion mutants deficient in OmcA (ΔomcA), MtrC (ΔmtrC), and both OmcA and MtrC (ΔmtrC-ΔomcA) were also studied; voltammograms for ΔmtrC-ΔomcA were indistinguishable from the control. When the control was subtracted from the single deletion mutant voltammograms, redox peaks were consistent with the present cytochrome (i.e., ΔomcA consistent with MtrC and ΔmtrC consistent with OmcA). The results indicate that OmcA and MtrC are capable of direct electron exchange with hematite electrodes, consistent with a role as terminal reductases in the S. oneidensis MR-1 anaerobic respiratory pathway involving ferric minerals. There was no evidence for other terminal reductases operating under the conditions investigated. A Marcus-based approach to electron transfer kinetics indicated that the rate constant for electron transfer ket varies from 0.025 s-1 in the absence of a barrier to 63.5 s-1 with a 0.2 eV barrier.

  6. MTRC compensation in high-resolution ISAR imaging via improved polar format algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Hao; Li, Na; Xu, Shiyou; Chen, Zengping

    2014-10-01

    Migration through resolution cells (MTRC) is generated in high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. A MTRC compensation algorithm for high-resolution ISAR imaging based on improved polar format algorithm (PFA) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, in the situation that a rigid-body target stably flies, the initial value of the rotation angle and center of the target is obtained from the rotation of radar line of sight (RLOS) and high range resolution profile (HRRP). Then, the PFA is iteratively applied to the echo data to search the optimization solution based on minimum entropy criterion. The procedure starts with the estimated initial rotation angle and center, and terminated when the entropy of the compensated ISAR image is minimized. To reduce the computational load, the 2-D iterative search is divided into two 1-D search. One is carried along the rotation angle and the other one is carried along rotation center. Each of the 1-D searches is realized by using of the golden section search method. The accurate rotation angle and center can be obtained when the iterative search terminates. Finally, apply the PFA to compensate the MTRC by the use of the obtained optimized rotation angle and center. After MTRC compensation, the ISAR image can be best focused. Simulated and real data demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. Direct Involvement of Type II Secretion System in Extracellular Translocation of Shewanella Oneidensis Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Deng, Shuang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Hill, Eric A.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-08-01

    Outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are extracellular lipoproteins important for dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides during anaerobic respiration. To investigate the roles of type II secretion system (T2S) in translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane, we measured the effects of deleting two T2S genes, gspD and gspG, on the secretion of MtrC and OmcA when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. Deletion of gspD or gspG resulted in slightly yellowish supernatants, different from the pink supernatant of wild type (wt). Comparative proteomic analyses revealed that, although MtrC, OmcA and NrfA, a periplasmic nitrite reductase, were present the supernatants of wt and ΔgspD mutant, their peptides counts were much lower in ΔgspD than in wt. Subsequent analyses with heme-staining and Western blot not only confirmed that deletion of gspD or gspG reduced the abundances of MtrC and OmcA in the supernatants, but also revealed that the deletions consequently increased their abundances inside the cells. Complementation of ΔgspG mutant with functional GspG could reverse the effects of deleting gspG on the colors of the supernatants and the abundances of MtrC and OmcA. In contrast, Western results showed that the abundance of NrfA was reduced in the supernatant and the cells of ΔgspD mutant, suggesting that reduced NrfA in the periplasm, where MtrC and OmcA were accumulated, contributed to its reduction in the supernatant. Thus, our results demonstrate at the first time that T2S facilitates translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane.

  8. The C-terminal loop of aldehyde reductase determines the substrate and inhibitor specificity.

    PubMed

    Barski, O A; Gabbay, K H; Bohren, K M

    1996-11-12

    Human aldehyde reductase has a preference for carboxyl group-containing negatively charged substrates. It belongs to the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase superfamily whose members are in part distinguished by unique C-terminal loops. To probe the role of the C-terminal loops in determining substrate specificities in these enzymes, two arginine residues, Arg308 and Arg311, located in the C-terminal loop of aldehyde reductase, and not found in any other C-terminal loop, were replaced with alanine residues. The catalytic efficiency of the R311A mutant for aldehydes containing a carboxyl group is reduced 150-250-fold in comparison to that of the wild-type enzyme, while substrates not containing a negative charge are unaffected. The R311A mutant is also significantly less sensitive to inhibition by dicarboxylic acids, indicating that Arg311 interacts with one of the carboxyl groups. The inhibition pattern indicates that the other carboxyl group binds to the anion binding site formed by Tyr49, His112, and the nicotinamide moiety of NADP+. The correlation between inhibitor potency and the length of the dicarboxylic acid molecules suggests a distance of approximately 10 A between the amino group of Arg311 and the anion binding site in the aldehyde reductase molecule. The sensitivity of inhibition of the R311A mutant by several commercially available aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) was variable, with tolrestat and zopolrestat becoming more potent inhibitors (30- and 5-fold, respectively), while others remained the same or became less potent. The catalytic properties, substrate specificity, and susceptibility to inhibition of the R308A mutant remained similar to that of the wild-type enzyme. The data provide direct evidence for C-terminal loop participation in determining substrate and inhibitor specificity of aldo-keto reductases and specifically identifies Arg311 as the basis for the carboxyl-containing substrate preference of aldehyde reductase. PMID:8916913

  9. Characterization of Shewanella oneidensis MtrC: a cell-surface decaheme cytochrome involved in respiratory electron transport to extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, Robert S.; Jepson, Brian N.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Field, Sarah J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David

    2007-09-04

    Abstract MtrC is a decaheme c-type cytochrome associated with the outer cell membrane of Fe(III)-respiring species of the Shewanella genus. It is proposed to play a role in anaerobic respiration by mediating electron transfer to extracellular mineral oxides that can serve as terminal electron acceptors. The present work presents the first spectropotentiometric and voltammetric characterization of MtrC, using protein purified from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Potentiometric titrations, monitored by UV–vis absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, reveal that the hemes within MtrC titrate over a broad potential range spanning between approximately +100 and approximately *500 mV (vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). Across this potential window the UV– vis absorption spectra are characteristic of low-spin c-type hemes and the EPR spectra reveal broad, complex features that suggest the presence of magnetically spin-coupled lowspin c-hemes. Non-catalytic protein film voltammetry of MtrC demonstrates reversible electrochemistry over a potential window similar to that disclosed spectroscopically. The voltammetry also allows definition of kinetic properties of MtrC in direct electron exchange with a solid electrode surface and during reduction of a model Fe(III) substrate. Taken together, the data provide quantitative information on the potential domain in which MtrC can operate.

  10. The N-terminal region of mature mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase can direct cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase into mitochondria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, S; Azzariti, A; Marra, E; Quagliariello, E

    1994-06-30

    Two fused genes were constructed which encode for two chimeric proteins in which either 10 or 191 N-terminal amino acids of mature mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase had been attached to the entire polypeptide chain of cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase. The precursor and mature form of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, dihydrofolate reductase and both chimeric proteins were synthesized in vitro and their import into isolated mitochondria was studied. Both chimeric proteins were taken up by isolated organelles, where they became protease resistant, thus indicating the ability of the N-terminal portion of the mature moiety of the precursor of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to direct cytosolic dihydrofolate reductase into mitochondria. PMID:8024546

  11. The C-terminal extension of bacterial flavodoxin-reductases: involvement in the hydride transfer mechanism from the coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Ana; Sánchez-Azqueta, Ana; Maya, Celia M; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Hermoso, Juan A; Medina, Milagros; Cortez, Néstor

    2014-01-01

    To study the role of the mobile C-terminal extension present in bacterial class of plant type NADP(H):ferredoxin reductases during catalysis, we generated a series of mutants of the Rhodobacter capsulatus enzyme (RcFPR). Deletion of the six C-terminal amino acids beyond alanine 266 was combined with the replacement A266Y, emulating the structure present in plastidic versions of this flavoenzyme. Analysis of absorbance and fluorescence spectra suggests that deletion does not modify the general geometry of FAD itself, but increases exposure of the flavin to the solvent, prevents a productive geometry of FAD:NADP(H) complex and decreases the protein thermal stability. Although the replacement A266Y partially coats the isoalloxazine from solvent and slightly restores protein stability, this single change does not allow formation of active charge-transfer complexes commonly present in the wild-type FPR, probably due to restraints of C-terminus pliability. A proton exchange process is deduced from ITC measurements during coenzyme binding. All studied RcFPR variants display higher affinity for NADP(+) than wild-type, evidencing the contribution of the C-terminus in tempering a non-productive strong (rigid) interaction with the coenzyme. The decreased catalytic rate parameters confirm that the hydride transfer from NADPH to the flavin ring is considerably hampered in the mutants. Although the involvement of the C-terminal extension from bacterial FPRs in stabilizing overall folding and bent-FAD geometry has been stated, the most relevant contributions to catalysis are modulation of coenzyme entrance and affinity, promotion of the optimal geometry of an active complex and supply of a proton acceptor acting during coenzyme binding. PMID:24016470

  12. Truncation of N-terminal regions of Digitalis lanata progesterone 5β-reductase alters catalytic efficiency and substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Kristin; Bauer, Peter; Schmid, Benedikt; Mueller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    N-Terminal truncated forms of progesterone 5β-reductase (P5βR) were synthesized taking a full-length cDNA encoding for Digitalis lanata P5βR with a hexa-histidine tag attached at the C-terminus (rDlP5βRc) as the starting point. Four pETite-c-His/DlP5βR constructs coding for P5βR derivatives truncated in the N-terminal region, termed rDlP5βRcn-10, rDlP5βRcn-20, rDlP5βRcn-30, and rDlP5βRcn-40 were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The cDNAs coding for full-length rDlP5βRc, rDlP5βRcn-10 and rDlP5βRcn-20 were over-expressed in Escherichia coli and the respective enzymes were soluble and catalytically active (progesterone and 2-cyclohexen-1-one as substrates). GST-tagged recombinant DlP5βR (rDlP5βR-GST) and rDlP5βR-GSTr, with the GST-tag removed by protease treatment were produced as well and served as controls. The Km values and substrate preferences considerably differed between the various DlP5βR derivatives. As for the C-terminal His-tagged rDlP5βR the catalytic efficiency for progesterone was highest for the full-length rDlP5βRc whereas the N-terminal truncated forms preferred 2-cyclohexen-1-one as the substrate. Affinity tags and artifacts resulting from the cloning strategy used may alter substrate specificity. Therefore enzyme properties determined with recombinant proteins should not be used to infer in vivo scenarios and should be considered for each particular case. PMID:24370479

  13. C-Terminal Region of Sulfite Reductase Is Important to Localize to Chloroplast Nucleoids in Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Otani, Takuto; Ishibashi, Kota; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Nishimura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast (cp) DNA is compacted into cpDNA-protein complexes, called cp nucleoids. An abundant and extensively studied component of cp nucleoids is the bifunctional protein sulfite reductase (SiR). The preconceived role of SiR as the core cp nucleoid protein, however, is becoming less likely because of the recent findings that SiRs do not associate with cp nucleoids in some plant species, such as Zea mays and Arabidopsis thaliana To address this discrepancy, we have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of SiRs, which shows that cp nucleoid-type SiRs share conserved C-terminally encoded peptides (CEPs). The CEPs are likely to form a bacterial ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding motif, implying a potential role in attaching SiRs onto cp nucleoids. A proof-of-concept experiment was conducted by fusing the nonnucleoid-type SiR from A. thaliana (AtSiR) with the CEP from the cp nucleoid-type SiR of Phaseolus vulgaris The addition of the CEP drastically altered the intra-cp localization of AtSiR to cp nucleoids. Our analysis supports the possible functions of CEPs in determining the localization of SiRs to cp nucleoids and illuminates a possible evolutionary scenario for SiR as a cp nucleoid protein. PMID:27189994

  14. C-Terminal Region of Sulfite Reductase Is Important to Localize to Chloroplast Nucleoids in Land Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Otani, Takuto; Ishibashi, Kota; Shikanai, Toshiharu; Nishimura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast (cp) DNA is compacted into cpDNA-protein complexes, called cp nucleoids. An abundant and extensively studied component of cp nucleoids is the bifunctional protein sulfite reductase (SiR). The preconceived role of SiR as the core cp nucleoid protein, however, is becoming less likely because of the recent findings that SiRs do not associate with cp nucleoids in some plant species, such as Zea mays and Arabidopsis thaliana. To address this discrepancy, we have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of SiRs, which shows that cp nucleoid-type SiRs share conserved C-terminally encoded peptides (CEPs). The CEPs are likely to form a bacterial ribbon–helix–helix DNA-binding motif, implying a potential role in attaching SiRs onto cp nucleoids. A proof-of-concept experiment was conducted by fusing the nonnucleoid-type SiR from A. thaliana (AtSiR) with the CEP from the cp nucleoid-type SiR of Phaseolus vulgaris. The addition of the CEP drastically altered the intra-cp localization of AtSiR to cp nucleoids. Our analysis supports the possible functions of CEPs in determining the localization of SiRs to cp nucleoids and illuminates a possible evolutionary scenario for SiR as a cp nucleoid protein. PMID:27189994

  15. High-level expression of human dihydropteridine reductase (EC 1.6.99.7), without N-terminal amino acid protection, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Armarego, W L; Cotton, R G; Dahl, H H; Dixon, N E

    1989-01-01

    The cDNA coding for human dihydropteridine reductase [Dahl, Hutchinson, McAdam, Wake, Morgan & Cotton (1987) Nucleic Acids Res. 15, 1921-1936] was inserted downstream of tandem bacteriophage lambda PR and PL promoters in Escherichia coli vector pCE30. Since pCE30 also expresses the lambda c1857ts gene, transcription may be controlled by variation of temperature. The recombinant plasmid in an E. coli K12 strain grown at 30 degrees C, then at 45 degrees C, directed the synthesis of dihydropteridine reductase to very high levels. The protein was soluble, at least as active as the authentic human enzyme, and lacked the N-terminal amino acid protection. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:2673215

  16. Construction of prokaryotic expression plasmid of mtrC protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxiang; Tu, Yating; Lin, Nengxing; Huang, Changzheng

    2005-01-01

    In order to provide a rational research basis for detection of resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to antimicrobial hydrophobic agents and study on the resistant mechanism of multiple transferable resistance (mtr) efflux system, plasmid pET-28a(+) encoding mtrC gene was constructed and the related target protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) DE3. The fragments of mtrC gene of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the standard strains were amplified and cloned into prokaryotic expression plasmid pET-28a(+) with restriction endonuclease to construct recombinant pET-mtrC which was verified by restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. The recombinant was transformed into E. coli DE3 to express the protein mtrC induced by IPTG. The results showed mtrC DNA fragment was proved correct through restriction endonuclease and DNA sequencing. Its sequence was 99.5% homologus to that published on GeneBank (U14993). A 48.5 kD fusion protein which was induced by IPTG was detected by SDS-PAGE. It was concluded that the construction of prokaryotic expression plasmid of mtrC protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae was correct and the fusion protein was successively expressed in E. coli. PMID:16463681

  17. Analysis of Structural MtrC Models Based on Homology with the Crystal Structure of MtrF

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-12-01

    The outer-membrane decahaem cytochrome MtrC is part of the transmembrane MtrCAB complex required for mineral respiration by Shewanella oneidensis. MtrC has significant sequence similarity to the paralogous decahaem cytochrome MtrF, which has been structurally solved through X-ray crystallography. This now allows for homology-based models of MtrC to be generated. The structure of these MtrC homology models contain ten bis-histidine-co-ordinated c-type haems arranged in a staggered cross through a four-domain structure. This model is consistent with current spectroscopic data and shows that the areas around haem 5 and haem 10, at the termini of an octahaem chain, are likely to have functions similar to those of the corresponding haems in MtrF. The electrostatic surfaces around haem 7, close to the β-barrels, are different in MtrF and MtrC, indicating that these haems may have different potentials and interact with substrates differently.

  18. Enhancement of photophysical and photosensitizing properties of flavin adenine dinucleotide by mutagenesis of the C-terminal extension of a bacterial flavodoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Valle, Lorena; Abatedaga, Inés; Vieyra, Faustino E Morán; Bortolotti, Ana; Cortez, Néstor; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2015-03-16

    The role of the mobile C-terminal extension present in Rhodobacter capsulatus ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (RcFPR) was evaluated using steady-state and dynamic spectroscopies for both intrinsic Trp and FAD in a series of mutants in the absence of NADP(H). Deletion of the six C-terminal amino acids beyond Ala266 was combined with the replacement A266Y to emulate the structure of plastidic reductases. Our results show that these modifications of the wild-type RcFPR produce subtle global conformational changes, but strongly reduce the local rigidity of the FAD-binding pocket, exposing the isoalloxazine ring to the solvent. Thus, the ultrafast charge-transfer quenching of (1) FAD* by the conserved Tyr66 residue was absent in the mutant series, producing enhancement of the excited singlet- and triplet-state properties of FAD. This work highlights the delicate balance of the specific interactions between FAD and the surrounding amino acids, and how the functionality and/or photostability of redox flavoproteins can be modified. PMID:25641205

  19. Structural and functional characterization of the Geobacillus copper nitrite reductase: involvement of the unique N-terminal region in the interprotein electron transfer with its redox partner.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yohta; Koteishi, Hiroyasu; Yoneda, Ryohei; Tamada, Taro; Takami, Hideto; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Nojiri, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    The crystal structures of copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNiR) from the thermophilic Gram-positive bacterium Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 and the amino (N)-terminal 68 residue-deleted mutant were determined at resolutions of 1.3Å and 1.8Å, respectively. Both structures show a striking resemblance with the overall structure of the well-known CuNiRs composed of two Greek key β-barrel domains; however, a remarkable structural difference was found in the N-terminal region. The unique region has one β-strand and one α-helix extended to the northern surface of the type-1 copper site. The superposition of the Geobacillus CuNiR model on the electron-transfer complex structure of CuNiR with the redox partner cytochrome c551 in other denitrifier system led us to infer that this region contributes to the transient binding with the partner protein during the interprotein electron transfer reaction in the Geobacillus system. Furthermore, electron-transfer kinetics experiments using N-terminal residue-deleted mutant and the redox partner, Geobacillus cytochrome c551, were carried out. These structural and kinetics studies demonstrate that the region is directly involved in the specific partner recognition. PMID:24440558

  20. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-02-15

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  1. Multilocus Phylogenetic Study of the Scheffersomyces Yeast Clade and Characterization of the N-Terminal Region of Xylose Reductase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Urbina, Hector; Blackwell, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Many of the known xylose-fermenting (X-F) yeasts are placed in the Scheffersomyces clade, a group of ascomycete yeasts that have been isolated from plant tissues and in association with lignicolous insects. We formally recognize fourteen species in this clade based on a maximum likelihood (ML) phylogenetic analysis using a multilocus dataset. This clade is divided into three subclades, each of which exhibits the biochemical ability to ferment cellobiose or xylose. New combinations are made for seven species of Candida in the clade, and three X-F taxa associated with rotted hardwood are described: Scheffersomyces illinoinensis (type strain NRRL Y-48827T  =  CBS 12624), Scheffersomyces quercinus (type strain NRRL Y-48825T  =  CBS 12625), and Scheffersomyces virginianus (type strain NRRL Y-48822T  =  CBS 12626). The new X-F species are distinctive based on their position in the multilocus phylogenetic analysis and biochemical and morphological characters. The molecular characterization of xylose reductase (XR) indicates that the regions surrounding the conserved domain contain mutations that may enhance the performance of the enzyme in X-F yeasts. The phylogenetic reconstruction using XYL1 or RPB1 was identical to the multilocus analysis, and these loci have potential for rapid identification of cryptic species in this clade. PMID:22720049

  2. Conformational analysis of oxidized peptide fragments of the C-terminal redox center in thioredoxin reductases by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruggles, Erik L; Deker, P Bruce; Hondal, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    Vicinal disulfide rings (VDRs) occur when a disulfide bond forms between adjacent cysteine residues in a protein and results in a rare eight-membered ring structure. This eight-membered ring has been found to exist in four major conformations in solution, divided between cis and trans conformers. Some selenoenzymes use a special type of VDR in which selenium replaces sulfur, generating a vicinal selenosulfide ring (VSeSR). Here, we provide evidence that this substitution reduces ring strain, resulting in a strong preference for the trans conformation relative to cis in a VSeSR (cis:trans - 9:91). This was determined by using the 'γ-gauche effect', which makes use of both (1) H-NMR and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques for determining the amide bond conformeric ratio. The presence of selenium in a VSeSR also lowers the dihedral strain energy (DSE) of the selenosulfide bond relative to the disulfide bond of VDRs. While cis amide geometry decreases strain on the amide bond, it increases strain on the scissile disulfide bond of the VDR found in thioredoxin reductase from Drosophila melanogaster (DmTR). We hypothesize that the cis conformation of the VDR is the catalytically competent conformer for thiol/disulfide exchange. This hypothesis was investigated by computing the DSE of VDR and VSeSR conformers, the structure of which was determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy and energy minimization. The computed values of the VDR from DmTR are 16.5 kJ/mol DSE and 14.3 kJ/mol for the C+ and T- conformers, respectively, supporting the hypothesis that the enzyme uses the C+ conformer for thiol/disulfide exchange. PMID:24599608

  3. Structure of (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase, the terminal enzyme of the non-mevalonate pathway.

    PubMed

    Rekittke, Ingo; Wiesner, Jochen; Röhrich, Rene; Demmer, Ulrike; Warkentin, Eberhard; Xu, Weiya; Troschke, Kathrin; Hintz, Martin; No, Joo Hwan; Duin, Evert C; Oldfield, Eric; Jomaa, Hassan; Ermler, Ulrich

    2008-12-24

    Molecular evolution has evolved two metabolic routes for isoprenoid biosynthesis: the mevalonate and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The MEP pathway is used by most pathogenic bacteria and some parasitic protozoa (including the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum) as well as by plants, but is not present in animals. The terminal reaction of the MEP pathway is catalyzed by (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate (HMBPP) reductase (LytB), an enzyme that converts HMBPP into isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Here, we present the structure of Aquifex aeolicus LytB, at 1.65 A resolution. The protein adopts a cloverleaf or trefoil-like structure with each monomer in the dimer containing three alpha/beta domains surrounding a central [Fe3S4] cluster ligated to Cys13, Cys96, and Cys193. Two highly conserved His (His 42 and His 124) and a totally conserved Glu (Glu126) are located in the same central site and are proposed to be involved in ligand binding and catalysis. Substrate access is proposed to occur from the front-side face of the protein, with the HMBPP diphosphate binding to the two His and the 4OH of HMBPP binding to the fourth iron thought to be present in activated clusters, while Glu126 provides the protons required for IPP/DMAPP formation. PMID:19035630

  4. The amino-terminal conserved domain of 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase is critical for its function in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Wei-Yu; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2015-01-01

    4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (HDR), also known as isoprenoid synthesis H (IspH) or lysis-tolerant B (LytB), catalyzes the last step of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway to synthesize isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. The structure and reaction mechanism of IspH have been actively investigated in Escherichia coli but little is known in plants. Compared with the bacterial IspH, cyanobacterial and plant HDRs all contain an extra N-terminal conserved domain (NCD) that is essential for their function. Tyr72 in the NCD and several plant-specific residues around the central active site are critical for Arabidopsis HDR function. These results suggest that the structure and reaction mechanism of HDR/IspH may be different between plants and bacteria. The E. coli IspH is an iron-sulfur protein that is sensitive to oxygen. It is possible that the cyanobacterial HDR may independently evolve from the common ancestor of prokaryotes to obtain the NCD, which may protect the enzyme from high concentration of oxygen during photosynthesis. PMID:25723575

  5. Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2012-07-01

    Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

  6. The N-terminal Domain of Escherichia coli Assimilatory NADPH-Sulfite Reductase Hemoprotein Is an Oligomerization Domain That Mediates Holoenzyme Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Askenasy, Isabel; Pennington, Joseph M.; Tao, Yeqing; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Shang, Weifeng; Stroupe, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Assimilatory NADPH-sulfite reductase (SiR) from Escherichia coli is a structurally complex oxidoreductase that catalyzes the six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Two subunits, one a flavin-binding flavoprotein (SiRFP, the α subunit) and the other an iron-containing hemoprotein (SiRHP, the β subunit), assemble to make a holoenzyme of about 800 kDa. How the two subunits assemble is not known. The iron-rich cofactors in SiRHP are unique because they are a covalent arrangement of a Fe4S4 cluster attached through a cysteine ligand to an iron-containing porphyrinoid called siroheme. The link between cofactor biogenesis and SiR stability is also ill-defined. By use of hydrogen/deuterium exchange and biochemical analysis, we show that the α8β4 SiR holoenzyme assembles through the N terminus of SiRHP and the NADPH binding domain of SiRFP. By use of small angle x-ray scattering, we explore the structure of the SiRHP N-terminal oligomerization domain. We also report a novel form of the hemoprotein that occurs in the absence of its cofactors. Apo-SiRHP forms a homotetramer, also dependent on its N terminus, that is unable to assemble with SiRFP. From these results, we propose that homotetramerization of apo-SiRHP serves as a quality control mechanism to prevent formation of inactive holoenzyme in the case of limiting cellular siroheme. PMID:26088143

  7. Biophysical characterization of the MerP-like amino-terminal extension of the mercuric reductase from Ralstonia metallidurans CH34.

    PubMed

    Rossy, Emmanuel; Champier, Ludovic; Bersch, Beate; Brutscher, Bernhard; Blackledge, Martin; Covès, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The purified native mercuric reductase (MerA) from Ralstonia metallidurans CH34 contains an N-terminal sequence of 68 amino acids predicted to be homologous to MerP, the periplasmic mercury-binding protein. This MerP-like protein has now been expressed independently. The protein was named MerAa by homology with Ccc2a, the first soluble domain of the copper-transporting ATPase from yeast. Deltaa has been characterized using a set of biophysical techniques. The binding of mercury was followed using circular dichroism spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. The two cysteine residues contained in the consensus sequence GMTC XXC are involved in the binding of one mercury atom, with an apparent affinity comparable to that of MerP for the same metal. The metal-binding site is confirmed by NMR chemical shift changes observed between apo- and metal-bound MerAa in solution. NMR shift and NOE data also indicate that only minor structural changes occur upon metal binding. Further NMR investigation of the fold of MerAa using long-range methyl-methyl NOE and backbone residual dipolar coupling data confirm the expected close structural homology with MerP. (15)N relaxation data show that MerAa is a globally rigid molecule. An increased backbone mobility was observed for the loop region connecting the first beta-strand and the first alpha-helix and comprising the metal-binding domain. Although significantly reduced, this loop region keeps some conformational flexibility upon metal binding. Altogether, our data suggest a role of MerAa in mercury trafficking. PMID:14624351

  8. Role of Outer-Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the Biomineralization of Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Catherine L.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Kennedy, David W.; Saffarini, Daad; Arey, Bruce W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Moyles, Dianne M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer membrane cytochrome genes mtrC, omcA, or both, were characterized for the ability to reduce metal oxides using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemicalr techniques. The results indicate that neither MtrC nor OmcA are essential for the reduction of soluble, complexed Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-NTA; however, at least one of these outer membrane cytochromes is required for the reduction of Fe(III)- and Mn(III/IV)- oxides. In vitro analysis of purified, recombinant protein demonstrated that both cytochromes transfer electrons directly to metal-oxides; however, MtrC transfers electrons at a faster rate than OmcA. Immunolocalization of MtrC and OmcA reveal that both cytochromes are surface-exposed on the cell outer-membrane and co-localize with insoluble iron precipitates when respiring ferrihydrite or cultured aerobically with Fe(III)-citrate. Additionally, during prolonged incubation, wild-type cells promoted biotransformation of ferrihydrite to vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H2O] while the double cytochrome mutant was unable to form any secondary mineral phases. Collectively, our results support a role for direct electron transfer from OMCs to metal oxides by establishing their in vitro electron transfer activities, confirming the requirement of either MtrC or OmcA for in vivo reductive biomineralization of ferrihydrite, and localizing the cytochromes to the cell exterior where they can directly contact mineral substrates.

  9. Specific bonds between an iron oxide surface and outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Lower, Brian H; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C; McCready, David E; Lower, Steven K

    2007-07-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration. A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe(2)O(3)) thin film, created with oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates. Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface. The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice that of the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC. Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite. The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected for an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. There is a strong correlation between the whole-cell and pure-protein force spectra, suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals. Finally, by comparing the magnitudes of binding force for the whole-cell versus pure-protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 by 0.5 microm) expresses approximately 10(4) cytochromes on its outer surface. PMID:17468239

  10. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; McCready, David E.; Lower, Steven K.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration. A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates. Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface. The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice that of the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC. Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite. The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected for an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. There is a strong correlation between the whole-cell and pure-protein force spectra, suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals. Finally, by comparing the magnitudes of binding force for the whole-cell versus pure-protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 by 0.5 μm) expresses ∼104 cytochromes on its outer surface. PMID:17468239

  11. A Conserved Acidic Motif in the N-Terminal Domain of Nitrate Reductase Is Necessary for the Inactivation of the Enzyme in the Dark by Phosphorylation and 14-3-3 Binding1

    PubMed Central

    Pigaglio, Emmanuelle; Durand, Nathalie; Meyer, Christian

    1999-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the N-terminal domain of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) nitrate reductase (NR) is involved in the inactivation of the enzyme by phosphorylation, which occurs in the dark (L. Nussaume, M. Vincentz, C. Meyer, J.P. Boutin, and M. Caboche [1995] Plant Cell 7: 611–621). The activity of a mutant NR protein lacking this N-terminal domain was no longer regulated by light-dark transitions. In this study smaller deletions were performed in the N-terminal domain of tobacco NR that removed protein motifs conserved among higher plant NRs. The resulting truncated NR-coding sequences were then fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and introduced in NR-deficient mutants of the closely related species Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. We found that the deletion of a conserved stretch of acidic residues led to an active NR protein that was more thermosensitive than the wild-type enzyme, but it was relatively insensitive to the inactivation by phosphorylation in the dark. Therefore, the removal of this acidic stretch seems to have the same effects on NR activation state as the deletion of the N-terminal domain. A hypothetical explanation for these observations is that a specific factor that impedes inactivation remains bound to the truncated enzyme. A synthetic peptide derived from this acidic protein motif was also found to be a good substrate for casein kinase II. PMID:9880364

  12. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; Mccready, David E.; Lower, Steven

    2007-07-31

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration.  A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates.  Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface.  The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice as strong as the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC.  Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite.  The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected between an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions.  There is a strong correlation between the whole cell and pure protein force spectra suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals.  Finally, by comparing the magnitude of binding force for the whole cell vs. pure protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 x 0.5 μm) expresses ~104 cytochromes on its outer surface. 

  13. Enhancement of Ganoderic Acid Accumulation by Overexpression of an N-Terminally Truncated 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Gene in the Basidiomycete Ganoderma lucidum

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Ganoderic acids produced by Ganoderma lucidum, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal mushroom, exhibit antitumor and antimetastasis activities. Genetic modification of G. lucidum is difficult but critical for the enhancement of cellular accumulation of ganoderic acids. In this study, a homologous genetic transformation system for G. lucidum was developed for the first time using mutated sdhB, encoding the iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase, as a selection marker. The truncated G. lucidum gene encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) was overexpressed by using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system. The results showed that the mutated sdhB successfully conferred carboxin resistance upon transformation. Most of the integrated transfer DNA (T-DNA) appeared as a single copy in the genome. Moreover, deregulated constitutive overexpression of the HMGR gene led to a 2-fold increase in ganoderic acid content. It also increased the accumulation of intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and the upregulation of downstream genes such as those of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and lanosterol synthase. This study demonstrates that transgenic basidiomycete G. lucidum is a promising system to achieve metabolic engineering of the ganoderic acid pathway. PMID:22941092

  14. Up-regulation of an N-terminal truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase enhances production of essential oils and sterols in transgenic Lavandula latifolia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Sales, Ester; Ros, Roc; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2007-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) essential oil is widely used in the perfume, cosmetic, flavouring and pharmaceutical industries. Thus, modifications of yield and composition of this essential oil by genetic engineering should have important scientific and commercial applications. We generated transgenic spike lavender plants expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana HMG1 cDNA, encoding the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR1S), a key enzyme of the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway. Transgenic T0 plants accumulated significantly more essential oil constituents as compared to controls (up to 2.1- and 1.8-fold in leaves and flowers, respectively). Enhanced expression of HMGR1S also increased the amount of the end-product sterols, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol (average differences of 1.8- and 1.9-fold, respectively), but did not affect the accumulation of carotenoids or chlorophylls. We also analysed T1 plants derived from self-pollinated seeds of T0 lines that flowered after growing for 2 years in the greenhouse. The increased levels of essential oil and sterols observed in the transgenic T0 plants were maintained in the progeny that inherited the HMG1 transgene. Our results demonstrate that genetic manipulation of the MVA pathway increases essential oil yield in spike lavender, suggesting a contribution for this cytosolic pathway to monoterpene and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in leaves and flowers of the species. PMID:17714440

  15. X-ray Structure of a Hg2+ Complex of Mercuric Reductase (MerA) and Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Study of Hg2+ Transfer between the C-Terminal and Buried Catalytic Site Cysteine Pairs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mercuric reductase, MerA, is a key enzyme in bacterial mercury resistance. This homodimeric enzyme captures and reduces toxic Hg2+ to Hg0, which is relatively unreactive and can exit the cell passively. Prior to reduction, the Hg2+ is transferred from a pair of cysteines (C558′ and C559′ using Tn501 numbering) at the C-terminus of one monomer to another pair of cysteines (C136 and C141) in the catalytic site of the other monomer. Here, we present the X-ray structure of the C-terminal Hg2+ complex of the C136A/C141A double mutant of the Tn501 MerA catalytic core and explore the molecular mechanism of this Hg transfer with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. The transfer is found to be nearly thermoneutral and to pass through a stable tricoordinated intermediate that is marginally less stable than the two end states. For the overall process, Hg2+ is always paired with at least two thiolates and thus is present at both the C-terminal and catalytic binding sites as a neutral complex. Prior to Hg2+ transfer, C141 is negatively charged. As Hg2+ is transferred into the catalytic site, a proton is transferred from C136 to C559′ while C558′ becomes negatively charged, resulting in the net transfer of a negative charge over a distance of ∼7.5 Å. Thus, the transport of this soft divalent cation is made energetically feasible by pairing a competition between multiple Cys thiols and/or thiolates for Hg2+ with a competition between the Hg2+ and protons for the thiolates. PMID:25343681

  16. Deletion of mtrC in Haemophilus ducreyi Increases Sensitivity to Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Activates the CpxRA Regulon ▿

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Sherri D.; Trombley, Michael P.; Gu, Xiaoping; Fortney, Kate R.; Bauer, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi resists killing by antimicrobial peptides encountered during human infection, including cathelicidin LL-37, α-defensins, and β-defensins. In this study, we examined the role of the proton motive force-dependent multiple transferable resistance (MTR) transporter in antimicrobial peptide resistance in H. ducreyi. We found a proton motive force-dependent effect on H. ducreyi's resistance to LL-37 and β-defensin HBD-3, but not α-defensin HNP-2. Deletion of the membrane fusion protein MtrC rendered H. ducreyi more sensitive to LL-37 and human β-defensins but had relatively little effect on α-defensin resistance. The mtrC mutant 35000HPmtrC exhibited phenotypic changes in outer membrane protein profiles, colony morphology, and serum sensitivity, which were restored to wild type by trans-complementation with mtrC. Similar phenotypes were reported in a cpxA mutant; activation of the two-component CpxRA regulator was confirmed by showing transcriptional effects on CpxRA-regulated genes in 35000HPmtrC. A cpxR mutant had wild-type levels of antimicrobial peptide resistance; a cpxA mutation had little effect on defensin resistance but led to increased sensitivity to LL-37. 35000HPmtrC was more sensitive than the cpxA mutant to LL-37, indicating that MTR contributed to LL-37 resistance independent of the CpxRA regulon. The CpxRA regulon did not affect proton motive force-dependent antimicrobial peptide resistance; however, 35000HPmtrC had lost proton motive force-dependent peptide resistance, suggesting that the MTR transporter promotes proton motive force-dependent resistance to LL-37 and human β-defensins. This is the first report of a β-defensin resistance mechanism in H. ducreyi and shows that LL-37 resistance in H. ducreyi is multifactorial. PMID:21444663

  17. COMPARISON OF THE METHYL REDUCTASE GENES AND GENE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA sequences encoding component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcr genes) in Methanothermus fervidus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanococcus vannielii, and Methanosarcina barkeri have been published. omparisons of transcription initiation and termination site...

  18. Role of outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell production, accumulation and detachment during respiration on hematite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to contribute to iron cycling over the long term by respiring on crystalline iron oxides such as hematite when poorly crystalline phases are depleted. The ability of outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC of MR-1 to bind to an...

  19. Dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, S G; Shaw, D C; Armarego, W L

    1988-01-01

    A dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a dimeric enzyme with identical subunits (Mr 27000) and a free N-terminal group. It can use NADH (Vmax./Km 3.36 s-1) and NADPH (Vmax./Km 1.07 s-1) when 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin is the second substrate, as well as quinonoid dihydro-(6H)-biopterin (Vmax./Km 0.69 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-neopterin (Vmax./Km 0.58 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-monapterin 0.66 s-1), 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin and cis-6,7-dimethyldihydro-(6H)-pterin (Vmax./Km 0.66 s-1) when NADH is the second substrate. The pure reductase has a yellow colour and contains bound FAD. The enzyme also has pterin-independent NADH and NADPH oxidoreductase activities when potassium ferricyanide is the electron acceptor. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3060113

  20. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  1. Reaction mechanism and regulation of mammalian thioredoxin/glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Su, Dan; Novoselov, Sergey V; Carlson, Bradley A; Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2005-11-01

    Thioredoxin/glutathione reductase (TGR) is a recently discovered member of the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase family in mammals. In contrast to two other mammalian thioredoxin reductases, it contains an N-terminal glutaredoxin domain and exhibits a wide spectrum of enzyme activities. To elucidate the reaction mechanism and regulation of TGR, we prepared a recombinant mouse TGR in the selenoprotein form as well as various mutants and individual domains of this enzyme. Using these proteins, we showed that the glutaredoxin and thioredoxin reductase domains of TGR could independently catalyze reactions normally associated with each domain. The glutaredoxin domain is a monothiol glutaredoxin containing a CxxS motif at the active site, which could receive electrons from either the thioredoxin reductase domain of TGR or thioredoxin reductase 1. We also found that the C-terminal penultimate selenocysteine was required for transfer of reducing equivalents from the thiol/disulfide active site of TGR to the glutaredoxin domain. Thus, the physiologically relevant NADPH-dependent activities of TGR were dependent on this residue. In addition, we examined the effects of selenium levels in the diet and perturbations in selenocysteine tRNA function on TGR biosynthesis and found that expression of this protein was regulated by both selenium and tRNA status in liver, but was more resistant to this regulation in testes. PMID:16262253

  2. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  3. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  4. Reduction of tetrathionate by mammalian thioredoxin reductase

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Kudva, Avinash K.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Tetrathionate, a polythionate oxidation product of microbial hydrogen sulfide and reactive oxygen species from immune cells in the gut, serves as a terminal electron acceptor to confer growth advantage for Salmonella and other enterobacteria. Here we show that the rat liver selenoen-zyme thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd1; TR1) efficiently reduces tetrathionate in vitro. Furthermore, lysates of selenium-supplemented murine macrophages also displayed activity towards tetrathionate, while cells lacking TR1 were unable to reduce tetrathionate. These studies suggest that upregulation of TR1 expression, via selenium supplementation, may modulate the gut microbiome, particularly during inflammation, by regulating the levels of tetrathionate. PMID:26252619

  5. Purification and partial characterization of an aldo-keto reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, A; van Zyl, C; van Tonder, A; Prior, B A

    1995-01-01

    A cytosolic aldo-keto reductase was purified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26602 to homogeneity by affinity chromatography, chromatofocusing, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. The relative molecular weights of the aldo-keto reductase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and size exclusion chromatography were 36,800 and 35,000, respectively, indicating that the enzyme is monomeric. Amino acid composition and N-terminal sequence analysis revealed that the enzyme is closely related to the aldose reductases of xylose-fermenting yeasts and mammalian tissues. The enzyme was apparently immunologically unrelated to the aldose reductases of other xylose-fermenting yeasts. The aldo-keto reductase is NADPH specific and catalyzes the reduction of a variety of aldehydes. The best substrate for the enzyme is the aromatic aldehyde p-nitrobenzaldehyde (Km = 46 microM; kcat/Km = 52,100 s-1 M-1), whereas among the aldoses, DL-glyceraldehyde was the preferred substrate (Km = 1.44 mM; kcat/Km = 1,790 s-1 M-1). The enzyme failed to catalyze the reduction of menadione and p-benzoquinone, substrates for carbonyl reductase. The enzyme was inhibited only slightly by 2 mM sodium valproate and was activated by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The optimum pH of the enzyme is 5. These data indicate that the S. cerevisiae aldo-keto reductase is a monomeric NADPH-specific reductase with strong similarities to the aldose reductases. PMID:7747971

  6. Human brain aldehyde reductases: relationship to succinic semialdehyde reductase and aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-08-01

    Human brain contains multiple forms of aldehyde-reducing enzymes. One major form (AR3), as previously shown, has properties that indicate its identity with NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase isolated from brain and other organs of various species; i.e., low molecular weight, use of NADPH as the preferred cofactor, and sensitivity to inhibition by barbiturates. A second form of aldehyde reductase ("SSA reductase") specifically reduces succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to produce gamma-hydroxybutyrate. This enzyme form has a higher molecular weight than AR3, and uses NADH as well as NADPH as cofactor. SSA reductase was not inhibited by pyrazole, oxalate, or barbiturates, and the only effective inhibitor found was the flavonoid quercetine. Although AR3 can also reduce SSA, the relative specificity of SSA reductase may enhance its in vivo role. A third form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, appears to be comparable to aldose reductases characterized in several species, on the basis of its activity pattern with various sugar aldehydes and its response to characteristic inhibitors and activators, as well as kinetic parameters. This enzyme is also the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of biogenic amines. These studies suggest that the various forms of human brain aldehyde reductases may have specific physiological functions. PMID:6778961

  7. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  8. Compensatory periplasmic nitrate reductase activity supports anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 in the absence of membrane nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Van Alst, Nadine E; Sherrill, Lani A; Iglewski, Barbara H; Haidaris, Constantine G

    2009-10-01

    Nitrate serves as a terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reduction of nitrate to nitrite generates a transmembrane proton motive force allowing ATP synthesis and anaerobic growth. The inner membrane-bound nitrate reductase NarGHI is encoded within the narK1K2GHJI operon, and the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapAB is encoded within the napEFDABC operon. The roles of the 2 dissimilatory nitrate reductases in anaerobic growth, and the regulation of their expressions, were examined by use of a set of deletion mutants in P. aeruginosa PAO1. NarGHI mutants were unable to grow anaerobically, but plate cultures remained viable up to 120 h. In contrast, the nitrate sensor-response regulator mutant DeltanarXL displayed growth arrest initially, but resumed growth after 72 h and reached the early stationary phase in liquid culture after 120 h. Genetic, transcriptional, and biochemical studies demonstrated that anaerobic growth recovery by the NarXL mutant was the result of NapAB periplasmic nitrate reductase expression. A novel transcriptional start site for napEFDABC expression was identified in the NarXL mutant grown anaerobically. Furthermore, mutagenesis of a consensus NarL-binding site monomer upstream of the novel transcriptional start site restored anaerobic growth recovery in the NarXL mutant. The data suggest that during anaerobic growth of wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1, the nitrate response regulator NarL directly represses expression of periplasmic nitrate reductase, while inducing maximal expression of membrane nitrate reductase. PMID:19935885

  9. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  10. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called steroid 5-alpha reductase 2. This enzyme is involved ... external genitalia. Mutations in the SRD5A2 gene prevent steroid 5-alpha reductase 2 from effectively converting testosterone ...

  12. Molecular evolution of nitrate reductase genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Kleinhofs, A

    1996-04-01

    To understand the evolutionary mechanisms and relationships of nitrate reductases (NRs), the nucleotide sequences encoding 19 nitrate reductase (NR) genes from 16 species of fungi, algae, and higher plants were analyzed. The NR genes examined show substantial sequence similarity, particularly within functional domains, and large variations in GC content at the third codon position and intron number. The intron positions were different between the fungi and plants, but conserved within these groups. The overall and nonsynonymous substitution rates among fungi, algae, and higher plants were estimated to be 4.33 x 10(-10) and 3.29 x 10(-10) substitutions per site per year. The three functional domains of NR genes evolved at about one-third of the rate of the N-terminal and the two hinge regions connecting the functional domains. Relative rate tests suggested that the nonsynonymous substitution rates were constant among different lineages, while the overall nucleotide substitution rates varied between some lineages. The phylogenetic trees based on NR genes correspond well with the phylogeny of the organisms determined from systematics and other molecular studies. Based on the nonsynonymous substitution rate, the divergence time of monocots and dicots was estimated to be about 340 Myr when the fungi-plant or algae-higher plant divergence times were used as reference points and 191 Myr when the rice-barley divergence time was used as a reference point. These two estimates are consistent with other estimates of divergence times based on these reference points. The lack of consistency between these two values appears to be due to the uncertainty of the reference times. PMID:8642612

  13. Termination Documentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Mike; Hill, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined 11 workplaces to determine how they handle termination documentation, an empirically unexplored area in technical communication and rhetoric. We found that the use of termination documentation is context dependent while following a basic pattern of infraction, investigation, intervention, and termination. Furthermore,…

  14. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases. PMID:12626517

  15. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils. PMID:24435070

  16. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  17. Crystal Structure of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae 3'-Phosphoadenosine-5'-Phosphosulfate Reductase Complexed With Adenosine 3',5'-Bisphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Lemongello, D.; Segel, I.H.; Fisher, A.J.

    2009-05-28

    Most assimilatory bacteria, fungi, and plants species reduce sulfate (in the activated form of APS or PAPS) to produce reduced sulfur. In yeast, PAPS reductase reduces PAPS to sulfite and PAP. Despite the difference in substrate specificity and catalytic cofactor, PAPS reductase is homologous to APS reductase in both sequence and structure, and they are suggested to share the same catalytic mechanism. Metazoans do not possess the sulfate reduction pathway, which makes APS/PAPS reductases potential drug targets for human pathogens. Here, we present the 2.05 A resolution crystal structure of the yeast PAPS reductase binary complex with product PAP bound. The N-terminal region mediates dimeric interactions resulting in a unique homodimer assembly not seen in previous APS/PAPS reductase structures. The 'pyrophosphate-binding' sequence (47)TTAFGLTG(54) defines the substrate 3'-phosphate binding pocket. In yeast, Gly54 replaces a conserved aspartate found in APS reductases vacating space and charge to accommodate the 3'-phosphate of PAPS, thus regulating substrate specificity. Also, for the first time, the complete C-terminal catalytic motif (244)ECGIH(248) is revealed in the active site. The catalytic residue Cys245 is ideally positioned for an in-line attack on the beta-sulfate of PAPS. In addition, the side chain of His248 is only 4.2 A from the Sgamma of Cys245 and may serve as a catalytic base to deprotonate the active site cysteine. A hydrophobic sequence (252)RFAQFL(257) at the end of the C-terminus may provide anchoring interactions preventing the tail from swinging away from the active site as seen in other APS/PAPS reductases.

  18. Bank Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, employees of the UAB Bank, Knoxville, Tennessee, are using Teller Transaction Terminals manufactured by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, an electronics firm which has worked on a number of space projects under contract with NASA. The terminals are part of an advanced, computerized financial transaction system that offers high efficiency in bank operations. The key to the system's efficiency is a "multiplexing" technique developed for NASA's Space Shuttle. Multiplexing is simultaneous transmission of large amounts of data over a single transmission link at very high rates of speed. In the banking application, a small multiplex "data bus" interconnects all the terminals and a central computer which stores information on clients' accounts. The data bus replaces the maze-of wiring that would be needed to connect each terminal separately and it affords greater speed in recording transactions. The SCI system offers banks real-time data management through constant updating of the central computer. For example, a check is immediately cancelled at the teller's terminal and the computer is simultaneously advised of the transaction; under other methods, the check would be cancelled and the transaction recorded at the close of business. Teller checkout at the end of the day, conventionally a time-consuming matter of processing paper, can be accomplished in minutes by calling up a summary of the day's transactions. SCI manufactures other types of terminals for use in the system, such as an administrative terminal that provides an immediate printout of a client's account, and another for printing and recording savings account deposits and withdrawals. SCI systems have been installed in several banks in Tennessee, Arizona, and Oregon and additional installations are scheduled this year.

  19. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  20. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-04-29

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities.

  1. Terminal structure

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frank; Allais, Arnaud; Mirebeau, Pierre; Ganhungu, Francois; Lallouet, Nicolas

    2009-10-20

    A terminal structure (2) for a superconducting cable (1) is described. It consists of a conductor (2a) and an insulator (2b) that surrounds the conductor (2a), wherein the superconducting cable (1) has a core with a superconducting conductor (5) and a layer of insulation that surrounds the conductor (5), and wherein the core is arranged in such a way that it can move longitudinally in a cryostat. The conductor (2a) of the terminal structure (2) is electrically connected with the superconducting conductor (5) or with a normal conductor (6) that is connected with the superconducting conductor (5) by means of a tubular part (7) made of an electrically conductive material, wherein the superconducting conductor (5) or the normal conductor (6) can slide in the part (7) in the direction of the superconductor.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... reductase enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (also known as ... is responsible for the last step in the production of tetrahydrobiopterin. Tetrahydrobiopterin helps process several building blocks ...

  3. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten; Willen, Dag; Roden, Mark; Tolbert, Jerry C.; Lindsay, David; Fisher, Paul W.; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann

    2016-05-03

    Cable end section comprises end-parts of N electrical phases/neutral, and a thermally-insulation envelope comprising cooling fluid. The end-parts each comprises a conductor and are arranged with phase 1 innermost, N outermost surrounded by the neutral, electrical insulation being between phases and N and neutral. The end-parts comprise contacting surfaces located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section. A termination unit has an insulating envelope connected to a cryostat, special parts at both ends comprising an adapter piece at the cable interface and a closing end-piece terminating the envelope in the end-section. The special parts houses an inlet and/or outlet for cooling fluid. The space between an inner wall of the envelope and a central opening of the cable is filled with cooling fluid. The special part at the end connecting to the cryostat houses an inlet or outlet, splitting cooling flow into cable annular flow and termination annular flow.

  4. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  5. Multiple aldehyde reductases of human brain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-01-01

    Human brain contains four forms of aldehyde reducing enzymes. One major activity, designated AR3, has properties indicating its identity with the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase, EC 1.1.1.2. The other major form of human brain enzyme, AR1, which is also NADPH-dependent, reduces both aldehyde and ketone-containing substrates, including vitamin K3 (menadione) and daunorubicin, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. This enzyme is very sensitive to inhibition by the flavonoids quercitrin and quercetine, and may be analogous to a daunorubicin reductase previously described in liver of other species. One minor form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, demonstrates substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity which suggest its similarity to aldose reductases found in lens and other tissues of many species. This enzyme, which can also use NADH as cofactor to some extent, is the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of the biogenic amines. The fourth human brain enzyme ("SSA reductase") differs from the other forms in its ability to use NADH as well as or better than NADPH as cofactor, and in its molecular weight, which is nearly twice that of the other forms. It is quite specific for succinic semialdehyde (SSA) as substrate, and was found to be significantly inhibited only by quercetine and quercitrin. AR3 can also reduce SSA, and both enzymes may contribute to the production of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in vivo. These results indicate that the human brain aldehyde reductases can play relatively specific physiologic roles. PMID:7424738

  6. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  7. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  8. Structural Basis of Free Reduced Flavin Generation by Flavin Reductase from Thermus thermophilus HB8*

    PubMed Central

    Imagawa, Takahito; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Sugimoto, Yasushi; Aki, Kenji; Ishidoh, Kazumi; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Tsuge, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Free reduced flavins are involved in a variety of biological functions. They are generated from NAD(P)H by flavin reductase via co-factor flavin bound to the enzyme. Although recent findings on the structure and function of flavin reductase provide new information about co-factor FAD and substrate NAD, there have been no reports on the substrate flavin binding site. Here we report the structure of TTHA0420 from Thermus thermophilus HB8, which belongs to flavin reductase, and describe the dual binding mode of the substrate and co-factor flavins. We also report that TTHA0420 has not only the flavin reductase motif GDH but also a specific motif YGG in C terminus as well as Phe-41 and Arg-11, which are conserved in its subclass. From the structure, these motifs are important for the substrate flavin binding. On the contrary, the C terminus is stacked on the NADH binding site, apparently to block NADH binding to the active site. To identify the function of the C-terminal region, we designed and expressed a mutant TTHA0420 enzyme in which the C-terminal five residues were deleted (TTHA0420-ΔC5). Notably, the activity of TTHA0420-ΔC5 was about 10 times higher than that of the wild-type enzyme at 20–40 °C. Our findings suggest that the C-terminal region of TTHA0420 may regulate the alternative binding of NADH and substrate flavin to the enzyme. PMID:22052907

  9. NMR structure of the flavin domain from soluble methane monooxygenase reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Chatwood, Lisa L; Müller, Jens; Gross, John D; Wagner, Gerhard; Lippard, Stephen J

    2004-09-28

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the hydroxylation of methane by dioxygen to methanol, the first step in carbon assimilation by methanotrophs. This multicomponent system transfers electrons from NADH through a reductase component to the non-heme diiron center in the hydroxylase where O(2) is activated. The reductase component comprises three distinct domains, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin domain along with FAD- and NADH-binding domains. We report the solution structure of the reduced 27.6 kDa FAD- and NADH-binding domains (MMOR-FAD) of the reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). The FAD-binding domain consists of a six-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel and one alpha-helix, with the first 10 N-terminal residues unstructured. In the interface between the two domains, the FAD cofactor is tightly bound in an unprecedented extended conformation. The NADH-binding domain consists of a five-stranded parallel beta-sheet with four alpha-helices packing closely around this sheet. MMOR-FAD is structurally homologous to other FAD-containing oxidoreductases, and we expect similar structures for the FAD/NADH-binding domains of reductases that occur in other multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:15379538

  10. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Tomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC, and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to MtrA either directly or indirectly through other periplasmic proteins. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). In addition to Fe(III) oxides, Mtr pathway is also involved in reduction of

  11. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  12. Molecular dissection of a putative iron reductase from Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Kim, David D; Nelson, Ornella D; Otwell, Anne E; Richardson, Ruth E; Callister, Stephen J; Lin, Hening

    2015-11-20

    Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 is a Firmicute strain capable of reducing a variety of heavy metal ions and has a great potential in heavy metal bioremediation. We recently identified Dred_2421 as a potential iron reductase through proteomic study of D. reducens. The current study examines its iron-reduction mechanism. Dred_2421, like its close homolog from Escherichia coli (2, 4-dienoyl-CoA reductase), has an FMN-binding N-terminal domain (NTD), an FAD-binding C-terminal domain (CTD), and a 4Fe-4S cluster between the two domains. To understand the mechanism of the iron-reduction activity and the role of each domain, we generated a series of variants for each domain and investigated their iron-reduction activity. Our results suggest that CTD is the main contributor of the iron-reduction activity, and that NTD and the 4Fe-4S cluster are not directly involved in such activity. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the iron-reductase activity of Dred_2421 and may also help to elucidate other physiological activities this enzyme may have. PMID:26454174

  13. Nitrogen and oxygen regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF encoding NADH-dependent nitrite reductase by TnrA and ResDE.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M M; Hoffmann, T; Zhu, Y; Jahn, D

    1998-10-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and catabolic nitrogen metabolism, respectively. However, as reported herein, a single NADH-dependent, soluble nitrite reductase encoded by the nasDE genes is required for both catabolic and anabolic processes. The nasDE genes, together with nasBC (encoding assimilatory nitrate reductase) and nasF (required for nitrite reductase siroheme cofactor formation), constitute the nas operon. Data presented show that transcription of nasDEF is driven not only by the previously characterized nas operon promoter but also from an internal promoter residing between the nasC and nasD genes. Transcription from both promoters is activated by nitrogen limitation during aerobic growth by the nitrogen regulator, TnrA. However, under conditions of oxygen limitation, nasDEF expression and nitrite reductase activity were significantly induced. Anaerobic induction of nasDEF required the ResDE two-component regulatory system and the presence of nitrite, indicating partial coregulation of NasDEF with the respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI during nitrate respiration. PMID:9765565

  14. Nitrogen and Oxygen Regulation of Bacillus subtilis nasDEF Encoding NADH-Dependent Nitrite Reductase by TnrA and ResDE

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Michiko M.; Hoffmann, Tamara; Zhu, Yi; Jahn, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    The nitrate and nitrite reductases of Bacillus subtilis have two different physiological functions. Under conditions of nitrogen limitation, these enzymes catalyze the reduction of nitrate via nitrite to ammonia for the anabolic incorporation of nitrogen into biomolecules. They also function catabolically in anaerobic respiration, which involves the use of nitrate and nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. Two distinct nitrate reductases, encoded by narGHI and nasBC, function in anabolic and catabolic nitrogen metabolism, respectively. However, as reported herein, a single NADH-dependent, soluble nitrite reductase encoded by the nasDE genes is required for both catabolic and anabolic processes. The nasDE genes, together with nasBC (encoding assimilatory nitrate reductase) and nasF (required for nitrite reductase siroheme cofactor formation), constitute the nas operon. Data presented show that transcription of nasDEF is driven not only by the previously characterized nas operon promoter but also from an internal promoter residing between the nasC and nasD genes. Transcription from both promoters is activated by nitrogen limitation during aerobic growth by the nitrogen regulator, TnrA. However, under conditions of oxygen limitation, nasDEF expression and nitrite reductase activity were significantly induced. Anaerobic induction of nasDEF required the ResDE two-component regulatory system and the presence of nitrite, indicating partial coregulation of NasDEF with the respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI during nitrate respiration. PMID:9765565

  15. A decahaem cytochrome as an electron conduit in protein-enzyme redox processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Reuillard, Bertrand; Sokol, Katarzyna P; Laftsoglou, Theodoros; Lockwood, Colin W J; Rowe, Sam F; Hwang, Ee Taek; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Jeuken, Lars J C; Butt, Julea N; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-05-31

    The decahaem cytochrome MtrC from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was employed as a protein electron conduit between a porous indium tin oxide electrode and redox enzymes. Using a hydrogenase and a fumarate reductase, MtrC was shown as a suitable and efficient diode to shuttle electrons to and from the electrode with the MtrC redox activity regulating the direction of the enzymatic reactions. PMID:27193068

  16. Phylogenomics of Mycobacterium Nitrate Reductase Operon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    NarGHJI operon encodes a nitrate reductase that can reduce nitrate to nitrite. This process enhances bacterial survival by nitrate respiration under anaerobic conditions. NarGHJI operon exists in many bacteria, especially saprophytic bacteria living in soil which play a key role in the nitrogen cycle. Most actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess NarGHJI operons. M. tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that expands in macrophages and has the ability to persist in a non-replicative form in granuloma lifelong. Nitrogen and nitrogen compounds play crucial roles in the struggle between M. tuberculosis and host. M. tuberculosis can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions to enhance its survival. In this article, we reviewed the mechanisms regulating nitrate reductase expression and affecting its activity. Potential genes involved in regulating the nitrate reductase expression in M. tuberculosis were identified. The conserved NarG might be an alternative mycobacterium taxonomic marker. PMID:25980349

  17. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  18. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 ; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  19. IN VITRO INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE BY ARSENOTRI-GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenotriglutathione, a product of the reduction of arsenate and the complexation of arsenite by glutathione, is a mixed type inhibitor of the reduction of glutathione disulfide by purified yeast glutathione reductase or the glutathione reductase activity in rabbit erythrocyte ly...

  20. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  1. Role of the Tat Transport System in Nitrous Oxide Reductase Translocation and Cytochrome cd1 Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas stutzeri

    PubMed Central

    Heikkilä, Mari P.; Honisch, Ulrike; Wunsch, Patrick; Zumft, Walter G.

    2001-01-01

    By transforming N2O to N2, the multicopper enzyme nitrous oxide reductase provides a periplasmic electron sink for a respiratory chain that is part of denitrification. The signal sequence of the enzyme carries the heptameric twin-arginine consensus motif characteristic of the Tat pathway. We have identified tat genes of Pseudomonas stutzeri and functionally analyzed the unlinked tatC and tatE loci. A tatC mutant retained N2O reductase in the cytoplasm in the unprocessed form and lacking the metal cofactors. This is contrary to viewing the Tat system as specific only for fully assembled proteins. A C618V exchange in the electron transfer center CuA rendered the enzyme largely incompetent for transport. The location of the mutation in the C-terminal domain of N2O reductase implies that the Tat system acts on a completely synthesized protein and is sensitive to a late structural variation in folding. By generating a tatE mutant and a reductase-overproducing strain, we show a function for TatE in N2O reductase translocation. Further, we have found that the Tat and Sec pathways have to cooperate to produce a functional nitrite reductase system. The cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase was found in the periplasm of the tatC mutant, suggesting export by the Sec pathway; however, the enzyme lacked the heme D1 macrocycle. The NirD protein as part of a complex required for heme D1 synthesis or processing carries a putative Tat signal peptide. Since NO reduction was also inhibited in the tatC mutant, the Tat protein translocation system is necessary in multiple ways for establishing anaerobic nitrite denitrification. PMID:11160097

  2. Termination unit

    DOEpatents

    Traeholt, Chresten [Frederiksberg, DK; Willen, Dag [Klagshamn, SE; Roden, Mark [Newnan, GA; Tolbert, Jerry C [Carrollton, GA; Lindsay, David [Carrollton, GA; Fisher, Paul W [Heiskell, TN; Nielsen, Carsten Thidemann [Jaegerspris, DK

    2014-01-07

    This invention relates to a termination unit comprising an end-section of a cable. The end section of the cable defines a central longitudinal axis and comprising end-parts of N electrical phases, an end-part of a neutral conductor and a surrounding thermally insulation envelope adapted to comprising a cooling fluid. The end-parts of the N electrical phases and the end-part of the neutral conductor each comprising at least one electrical conductor and being arranged in the cable concentrically around a core former with a phase 1 located relatively innermost, and phase N relatively outermost in the cable, phase N being surrounded by the neutral conductor, electrical insulation being arrange between neighboring electrical phases and between phase N and the neutral conductor, and wherein the end-parts of the neutral conductor and the electrical phases each comprise a contacting surface electrically connected to at least one branch current lead to provide an electrical connection: The contacting surfaces each having a longitudinal extension, and being located sequentially along the longitudinal extension of the end-section of the cable. The branch current leads being individually insulated from said thermally insulation envelope by individual electrical insulators.

  3. The metabolism of nitrosothiols in the Mycobacteria: identification and characterization of S-nitrosomycothiol reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Ryan N; Steenkamp, Daniel J; Zheng, Renjian; Blanchard, John S

    2003-01-01

    When grown in culture Mycobacterium smegmatis metabolized S-nitrosoglutathione to oxidized glutathione and nitrate, which suggested a possible involvement of an S-nitrosothiol reductase and mycobacterial haemoglobin. The mycothiol-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase from M. smegmatis was purified by a combination of Ni2+-IMAC (immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography), hydrophobic interaction, anion-exchange and affinity chromatography. The enzyme had a subunit molecular mass of 38263 kDa. Steady-state kinetic studies indicated that the enzyme catalyses the NAD+-dependent conversion of S-hydroxymethylmycothiol into formic acid and mycothiol by a rapid-equilibrium ordered mechanism. The enzyme also catalysed an NADH-dependent decomposition of S-nitrosomycothiol (MSNO) by a sequential mechanism and with an equimolar stoichiometry of NADH:MSNO, which indicated that the enzyme reduces the nitroso group to the oxidation level of nitroxyl. Vmax for the MSNO reductase reaction indicated a turnover per subunit of approx. 116700 min(-1), which was 76-fold faster than the formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. A gene, Rv2259, annotated as a class III alcohol dehydrogenase in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome was cloned and expressed in M. smegmatis as the C-terminally His6-tagged product. The purified recombinant enzyme from M. tuberculosis also catalysed both activities. M. smegmatis S-nitrosomycothiol reductase converted MSNO into the N -hydroxysulphenamide, which readily rearranged to mycothiolsulphinamide. In the presence of MSNO reductase, M. tuberculosis HbN (haemoglobin N) was converted with low efficiency into metHbN [HbN(Fe3+)] and this conversion was dependent on turnover of MSNO reductase. These observations suggest a possible route in vivo for the dissimilation of S-nitrosoglutathione. PMID:12809551

  4. Enhanced seed phytosterol accumulation through expression of a modified HMG-CoA reductase.

    PubMed

    Hey, Sandra J; Powers, Stephen J; Beale, Michael H; Hawkins, Nathaniel D; Ward, Jane L; Halford, Nigel G

    2006-03-01

    The regulation of phytosterol biosynthesis in seeds is of interest to biotechnologists because of the efficacy of dietary phytosterols in reducing blood cholesterol in humans. Mevalonate synthesis via 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) is a key step in phytosterol biosynthesis. HMG-CoA reductase is inactivated by phosphorylation by SNF1-related protein kinase 1 (SnRK1). With the aim of increasing seed phytosterol levels, transgenic tobacco plants were produced expressing a full-length Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMG-CoA reductase gene (HMG1) coding sequence, a modified HMG1 sequence encoding a protein lacking the target serine residue for phosphorylation by SnRK1, or a chimaeric sequence encoding the N-terminal domain of the Arabidopsis HMG1 enzyme fused with the catalytic domain of yeast HMG-CoA reductase, which lacks an SnRK1 target site. All three transgenes (35S-AtHMG1, 35S-AtHMG1m and 35S-AtScHMG1) were under the control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter. Levels of seed phytosterols were up to 2.44-fold higher in plants transformed with the 35S-AtHMG1m gene than in the wild-type, and were significantly higher than in plants expressing 35S-AtHMG1 or 35S-AtScHMG1. In contrast, levels of phytosterols in leaves of plants transformed with the 35S-AtHMG1m gene were unchanged, suggesting that regulation of HMG-CoA reductase by SnRK1 is an important factor in seeds but not in leaves. A total of 11 independent transgenic lines expressing 35S-AtHMG1m or 35S-AtScHMG1 also showed an altered flower phenotype, comprising a compact floret, prolonged flowering, short, pale petals, a protruding style, short stamens, late anther development, little or no pollen production, premature flower abscission and poor seed set. Because of this phenotype, the modified HMG-CoA reductase gene would have to be expressed seed specifically if it were to be engineered into a crop plant for biotechnological purposes. PMID:17177798

  5. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  6. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, J S; Gaines, C G; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1982-01-01

    Reduction of the iron in ferriagrobactin by the cytoplasmic fraction of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strictly required NaDH as the reductant. Addition of flavin mononucleotide and anaerobic conditions were necessary for the reaction; when added with flavin mononucleotide, magnesium was stimulatory. This ferrisiderophore reductase activity may be a part of the iron assimilation process in A. tumefaciens. PMID:7056702

  7. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  8. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1-AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1-AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'. PMID:25500069

  9. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  10. Aging, Terminal Decline, and Terminal Drop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmore, Erdman; Cleveland, William

    1976-01-01

    Data from a 20-year longitudinal study of persons over 60 were analyzed by step-wise multiple regression to test for declines in function with age, for terminal decline (linear relationship to time before death), and for terminal drop (curvilinear relationship to time before death). There were no substantial terminal drop effects. (Author)

  11. Structural Insight into Dihydrodipicolinate Reductase from Corybebacterium glutamicum for Lysine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sagong, Hye-Young; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-02-28

    Dihydrodipicolinate reductase is an enzyme that converts dihydrodipicolinate to tetrahydrodipicolinate using an NAD(P)H cofactor in L-lysine biosynthesis. To increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of lysine biosynthesis, we determined the crystal structure of dihydrodipicolinate reductase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgDapB). CgDapB functions as a tetramer, and each protomer is composed of two domains, an Nterminal domain and a C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain mainly contributes to nucleotide binding, whereas the C-terminal domain is involved in substrate binding. We elucidated the mode of cofactor binding to CgDapB by determining the crystal structure of the enzyme in complex with NADP(+) and found that CgDapB utilizes both NADH and NADPH as cofactors. Moreover, we determined the substrate binding mode of the enzyme based on the coordination mode of two sulfate ions in our structure. Compared with Mycobacterium tuberculosis DapB in complex with its cofactor and inhibitor, we propose that the domain movement for active site constitution occurs when both cofactor and substrate bind to the enzyme. PMID:26502738

  12. Differential cytochrome content and reductase activity in Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolz, J.F.; Gugliuzza, T.; Switzer, Blum J.; Oremland, R.; Martinez, Murillo F.

    1997-01-01

    The protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity in the dissimilatory selenate-reducing bacterium Geospirillum barnesii strain SeS3, grown with thiosulfate, nitrate, selenate, or fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor, was investigated. Comparison of seven high-molecular-mass membrane proteins (105.3, 90.3, 82.6, 70.2, 67.4, 61.1, and 57.3 kDa) by SDS-PAGE showed that their detection was dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used. Membrane fractions from cells grown on thiosulfate contained a 70.2-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorbance maxima at 552, 522, and 421 nm. A 61.1-kDa c-type cytochrome with absorption maxima at 552, 523, and 423 nm was seen in membrane fractions from cells grown on nitrate. No c-type cytochromes were detected in membrane fractions of either selenate- or fumarate-grown cells. Difference spectra, however, revealed the presence of a cytochrome b554 (absorption maxima at 554, 523, and 422 nm) in membrane fractions from selenate-grown cells and a cytochrome b556 (absorption maxima at 556, 520, and 416 nm) in membrane fractions from fumarate-grown cells. Analysis of reductase activity in the different membrane fractions showed variability in substrate specificity. However, enzyme activity was greatest for the substrate on which the cells had been grown (e.g., membranes from nitrate-grown cells exhibited the greatest activity with nitrate). These results show that protein composition, cytochrome content, and reductase activity are dependent on the terminal electron acceptor used for growth.

  13. A structural account of substrate and inhibitor specificity differences between two Naphthol reductases

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.-I.; Thompson, J.E.; Fahnestock, S.; Valent, B.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-08

    Two short chain dehydrogenase/reductases mediate naphthol reduction reactions in fungal melanin biosynthesis. An X-ray structure of 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase (4HNR) complexed with NADPH and pyroquilon was determined for examining substrate and inhibitor specificities that differ from those of 1,3,8-trihydroxynaphthalene reductase (3HNR). The 1.5 {angstrom} resolution structure allows for comparisons with the 1.7 {angstrom} resolution structure of 3HNR complexed with the same ligands. The sequences of the two proteins are 46% identical, and they have the same fold. The 30-fold lower affinity of the 4HNR-NADPH complex for pyroquilon (a commercial fungicide that targets 3HNR) in comparison to that of the 3HNR-NADPH complex can be explained by unfavorable interactions between the anionic carboxyl group of the C-terminal Ile282 of 4HNR and CH and CH{sub 2} groups of the inhibitor that are countered by favorable inhibitor interactions with 3HNR. 1,3,8-Trihydroxynaphthalene (3HN) and 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene (4HN) were modeled onto the cyclic structure of pyroquilon in the 4HNR-NADPH-pyroquilon complex to examine the 300-fold preference of the enzyme for 4HN over 3HN. The models suggest that the C-terminal carboxyl group of Ile282 has a favorable hydrogen bonding interaction with the C6 hydroxyl group of 4HN and an unfavorable interaction with the C6 CH group of 3HN. Models of 3HN and 4HN in the 3HNR active site suggest a favorable interaction of the sulfur atom of the C-terminal Met283 with the C6 CH group of 3HN and an unfavorable one with the C6 hydroxyl group of 4HN, accounting for the 4-fold difference in substrate specificities. Thus, the C-terminal residues of the two naphthol reductase are determinants of inhibitor and substrate specificities.

  14. Production of a highly active, soluble form of the cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR A) from Candida tropicalis

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark

    2006-08-01

    The present invention provides soluble cytochrome p450 reductase (CPR) proteins from Candida sp. having an altered N-terminal region which results in reduced hydrophobicity of the N-terminal region. Also provided are host cells comprising the subject soluble CPR proteins. In addition, the present invention provides nucleotide and corresponding amino acid sequences for soluble CPR proteins and vectors comprising the nucleotide sequences. Methods for producing a soluble CPR, for increasing production of a dicarboxylic acid, and for detecting a cytochrome P450 are also provided.

  15. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: importance of early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fattal-Valevski, A; Bassan, H; Korman, S H; Lerman-Sagie, T; Gutman, A; Harel, S

    2000-08-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency is the most common inborn error of folate metabolism and should be suspected when homocystinuria is combined with hypomethioninemia. The main clinical findings are neurologic signs such as severe developmental delay, marked hypotonia, seizures, microcephaly, apnea, and coma. Most patients present in early life. The infantile form is severe, with rapid deterioration leading to death usually within 1 year. Treatment with betaine has been shown to be efficient in lowering homocysteine concentrations and returning methionine to normal, but the clinical response is variable. We report two brothers with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: the first was undiagnosed and died at 8 months of age from neurologic deterioration and apnea, while his brother, who was treated with betaine from the age of 4 months, is now 3 years old and has developmental delay. PMID:10961793

  16. Structure of aldose reductase from Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, M.; Abendroth, J.; Zhang, Y.; Sankaran, B.; Edwards, T. E.; Staker, B. L.; Van Voorhis, W. C.; Stewart, L. J.; Myler, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an anaerobic aerotolerant eukaryotic parasite of the intestines. It is believed to have diverged early from eukarya during evolution and is thus lacking in many of the typical eukaryotic organelles and biochemical pathways. Most conspicuously, mitochondria and the associated machinery of oxidative phosphorylation are absent; instead, energy is derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. Here, the 1.75 Å resolution crystal structure of G. lamblia aldose reductase heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli is reported. As in other oxidoreductases, G. lamblia aldose reductase adopts a TIM-barrel conformation with the NADP+-binding site located within the eight β-strands of the interior. PMID:21904059

  17. Nitrate, nitrite and nitric oxide reductases: from the last universal common ancestor to modern bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Torres, Andrés; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2016-02-01

    The electrochemical gradient that ensues from the enzymatic activity of cytochromes such as nitrate reductase, nitric oxide reductase, and quinol oxidase contributes to the bioenergetics of the bacterial cell. Reduction of nitrogen oxides by bacterial pathogens can, however, be uncoupled from proton translocation and biosynthesis of ATP or NH4(+), but still linked to quinol and NADH oxidation. Ancestral nitric oxide reductases, as well as cytochrome c oxidases and quinol bo oxidases evolved from the former, are capable of binding and detoxifying nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. The NO-metabolizing activity associated with these cytochromes can be a sizable source of antinitrosative defense in bacteria during their associations with host cells. Nitrosylation of terminal cytochromes arrests respiration, reprograms bacterial metabolism, stimulates antioxidant defenses and alters antibiotic cytotoxicity. Collectively, the bioenergetics and regulation of redox homeostasis that accompanies the utilization of nitrogen oxides and detoxification of nitric oxide by cytochromes of the electron transport chain increases fitness of many Gram-positive and -negative pathogens during their associations with invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. PMID:26426528

  18. Role of Campylobacter jejuni Respiratory Oxidases and Reductases in Host Colonization▿

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten, Rebecca A.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Olson, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of human food-borne bacterial gastroenteritis. The C. jejuni genome sequence predicts a branched electron transport chain capable of utilizing multiple electron acceptors. Mutants were constructed by disrupting the coding regions of the respiratory enzymes nitrate reductase (napA::Cm), nitrite reductase (nrfA::Cm), dimethyl sulfoxide, and trimethylamine N-oxide reductase (termed Cj0264::Cm) and the two terminal oxidases, a cyanide-insensitive oxidase (cydA::Cm) and cbb3-type oxidase (ccoN::Cm). Each strain was characterized for the loss of the associated enzymatic function in vitro. The strains were then inoculated into 1-week-old chicks, and the cecal contents were assayed for the presence of C. jejuni 2 weeks postinoculation. cydA::Cm and Cj0264c::Cm strains colonized as well as the wild type; napA::Cm and nrfA::Cm strains colonized at levels significantly lower than the wild type. The ccoN::Cm strain was unable to colonize the chicken; no colonies were recovered at the end of the experiment. While there appears to be a role for anaerobic respiration in host colonization, oxygen is the most important respiratory acceptor for C. jejuni in the chicken cecum. PMID:18192421

  19. Characterization of erythrose reductases from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Birgit; Mach, Robert L; Mach-Aigner, Astrid R

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with putative erythrose reductase activity have been identified in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium graminearum by in silico analysis. The proteins found in T. reesei and A. niger had earlier been characterized as glycerol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase, respectively. Corresponding genes from all three fungi were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Subsequently, they were used to establish optimal enzyme assay conditions. All three enzymes strictly require NADPH as cofactor, whereas with NADH no activity could be observed. The enzymatic characterization of the three enzymes using ten substrates revealed high substrate specificity and activity with D-erythrose and D-threose. The enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger herein showed comparable activities, whereas the one from F. graminearum reached only about a tenth of it for all tested substrates. In order to proof in vivo the proposed enzyme function, we overexpressed the erythrose reductase-encoding gene in T. reesei. An increased production of erythritol by the recombinant strain compared to the parental strain could be detected. PMID:23924507

  20. Terminals for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bork, Alfred M.

    The effectiveness of different types of computer terminals in programing learning is discussed with special reference to the experience of the Physics Computer Development Project. Experience with ten types of terminals including hardcopy terminals of several speeds, alphanumeric and graphic terminals is reviewed. Special consideration is given to…

  1. A Plasma Display Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, Jack

    A graphics terminal designed for use as a remote computer input/output terminal is described. Although the terminal is intended for use in teaching applications, it has several features which make it useful in many other computer terminal applications. These features include: a 10-inch square plasma display panel, permanent storage of information…

  2. Three spinach leaf nitrate reductase-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase kinases that are required by reversible phosphorylation and/or Ca2+ ions.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, P; Pigaglio, E; Ferrer, A; Halfords, N G; MacKintosh, C

    1997-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf extracts, three protein kinases (PKI, PKII and PKIII) were identified each of which phosphorylated spinach nitrate reductase on serine-543, and inactivated the enzyme in the presence of nitrate reductase inhibitor, 14-3-3. PKIII was also very active in phosphorylating and inactivating Arabidopsis (Landsberg erecta) 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 1 (HMGR1). PKI and PKII phosphorylated HMGR1 more slowly than PKIII, compared with their relative rates of phosphorylation of nitrate reductase. HMGR1 identical with those that are seen after phosphorylation of serine-577 by the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1)-like PK, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Co A reductase kinase A (HRK-A), from cauliflower [Dale, Arró, Becerra, Morrice, Boronat, Hardie and Ferrer (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 233, 506-513]. PKI was Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, and largely Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the presence of PP inhibitors (NaF and EGTA). The Ca2+-independent portion of PKI was inactivated by either PP2A or PP2C, while the Ca2+-dependent portion of PKI became increasingly activated during storage, which we presume was mimicking the effect of an unidentified PP. These findings indicate that PK1 is regulated by two functionally distinct phosphorylations. PKI had a molecular mass of 45 kDa on gel filtration and was active towards substrate peptides that terminated at the +2 residue from the phosphorylation site, whereas PKIII was inactive towards these peptides. PKII was Ca2+-stimulated under all conditions tested. PKIII was Ca2+-indepdented, inactivated by PP2A or PP2C, had a requirement for a hydrophobic residue in the +4 position of peptide substrates, had a molecular mass by gel filtration of approximately 140 kDa, and an antibody against the rye SNF1-related PK (RKIN1) recognized a 58 kDa subunit in fractions containing PKIII. These properties of PKIII are identical with those reported

  3. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  4. Diversity in Overall Activity Regulation of Ribonucleotide Reductase*

    PubMed Central

    Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Crona, Mikael; Rofougaran, Reza; Lundin, Daniel; Johansson, Samuel; Brännström, Kristoffer; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides, which are used as building blocks for DNA replication and repair. This process is tightly regulated via two allosteric sites, the specificity site (s-site) and the overall activity site (a-site). The a-site resides in an N-terminal ATP cone domain that binds dATP or ATP and functions as an on/off switch, whereas the composite s-site binds ATP, dATP, dTTP, or dGTP and determines which substrate to reduce. There are three classes of RNRs, and class I RNRs consist of different combinations of α and β subunits. In eukaryotic and Escherichia coli class I RNRs, dATP inhibits enzyme activity through the formation of inactive α6 and α4β4 complexes, respectively. Here we show that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR has a duplicated ATP cone domain and represents a third mechanism of overall activity regulation. Each α polypeptide binds three dATP molecules, and the N-terminal ATP cone is critical for binding two of the dATPs because a truncated protein lacking this cone could only bind dATP to its s-site. ATP activates the enzyme solely by preventing dATP from binding. The dATP-induced inactive form is an α4 complex, which can interact with β2 to form a non-productive α4β2 complex. Other allosteric effectors induce a mixture of α2 and α4 forms, with the former being able to interact with β2 to form active α2β2 complexes. The unique features of the P. aeruginosa RNR are interesting both from evolutionary and drug discovery perspectives. PMID:25971975

  5. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase: a candidate Helicobacter pylori vaccine.

    PubMed

    O'Riordan, Avril A; Morales, Veronica Athie; Mulligan, Linda; Faheem, Nazia; Windle, Henry J; Kelleher, Dermot P

    2012-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important etiological agent of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) and mannosylated AhpC (mAhpC) as candidate vaccines in the C57BL/6J mouse model of H. pylori infection. Recombinant AhpC was cloned, over-expressed and purified in an unmodified form and was also engineered to incorporate N and C-terminal mannose residues when expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mice were immunized systemically and mucosally with AhpC and systemically with mAhpC prior to challenge with H. pylori. Serum IgG responses to AhpC were determined and quantitative culture was used to determine the efficacy of vaccination strategies. Systemic prophylactic immunization with AhpC/alum and mAhpC/alum conferred protection against infection in 55% and 77.3% of mice, respectively. Mucosal immunization with AhpC/cholera toxin did not protect against infection and elicited low levels of serum IgG in comparison with systemic immunization. These data support the use of AhpC as a potential vaccine candidate against H. pylori infection. PMID:22512976

  6. Reductive activation of E. coli respiratory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, Pierre; Rendon, Julia; Léger, Christophe; Toci, René; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Magalon, Axel; Grimaldi, Stéphane; Fourmond, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Over the past decades, a number of authors have reported the presence of inactive species in as-prepared samples of members of the Mo/W-bisPGD enzyme family. This greatly complicated the spectroscopic studies of these enzymes, since it is impossible to discriminate between active and inactive species on the basis of the spectroscopic signatures alone. Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) is a member of the Mo/W-bisPGD family that allows anaerobic respiration using nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Here, using protein film voltammetry on NarGH films, we show that the enzyme is purified in a functionally heterogeneous form that contains between 20 and 40% of inactive species that activate the first time they are reduced. This activation proceeds in two steps: a non-redox reversible reaction followed by an irreversible reduction. By carefully correlating electrochemical and EPR spectroscopic data, we show that neither the two major Mo(V) signals nor those of the two FeS clusters that are the closest to the Mo center are associated with the two inactive species. We also conclusively exclude the possibility that the major "low-pH" and "high-pH" Mo(V) EPR signatures correspond to species in acid-base equilibrium. PMID:26073890

  7. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Horii, T; Inselburg, J

    1987-01-01

    Genomic DNA clones that coded for the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TS) (DHFR-TS) activities from a pyrimethamine-sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum were isolated and sequenced. The deduced DHFR-TS protein contained 608 amino acids (71,682 Da). The coding region for DHFR-TS contained no intervening sequences and had a high A + T content (75%). The DHFR domain, in the amino-terminal portion of the protein, was joined by a 94-amino acid junction sequence to the TS domain in the carboxyl-terminal portion of the protein. The TS domain was more conserved than the DHFR domain and both P. falciparum domains were more homologous to eukaryotic than to prokaryotic forms of the enzymes. Predicted secondary structures of the DHFR and TS domains were nearly identical to the structures identified in other DHFR and TS enzymes. PMID:2825189

  8. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Bzik, D J; Li, W B; Horii, T; Inselburg, J

    1987-12-01

    Genomic DNA clones that coded for the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TS) (DHFR-TS) activities from a pyrimethamine-sensitive strain of Plasmodium falciparum were isolated and sequenced. The deduced DHFR-TS protein contained 608 amino acids (71,682 Da). The coding region for DHFR-TS contained no intervening sequences and had a high A + T content (75%). The DHFR domain, in the amino-terminal portion of the protein, was joined by a 94-amino acid junction sequence to the TS domain in the carboxyl-terminal portion of the protein. The TS domain was more conserved than the DHFR domain and both P. falciparum domains were more homologous to eukaryotic than to prokaryotic forms of the enzymes. Predicted secondary structures of the DHFR and TS domains were nearly identical to the structures identified in other DHFR and TS enzymes. PMID:2825189

  9. Cloning, sequence determination, and regulation of the ribonucleotide reductase subunits from Plasmodium falciparum: a target for antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, H; Salem, J S; Li, L S; Yang, F D; Mama, S; Wang, Z M; Fisher, A; Hamann, C S; Cooperman, B S

    1993-01-01

    Malaria remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, accounting for more than one million deaths annually. We have focused on the reduction of ribonucleotides to 2'-deoxyribonucleotides, catalyzed by ribonucleotide reductase, which represents the rate-determining step in DNA replication as a target for antimalarial agents. We report the full-length DNA sequence corresponding to the large (PfR1) and small (PfR2) subunits of Plasmodium falciparum ribonucleotide reductase. The small subunit (PfR2) contains the major catalytic motif consisting of a tyrosyl radical and a dinuclear Fe site. Whereas PfR2 shares 59% amino acid identity with human R2, a striking sequence divergence between human R2 and PfR2 at the C terminus may provide a selective target for inhibition of the malarial enzyme. A synthetic oligopeptide corresponding to the C-terminal 7 residues of PfR2 inhibits mammalian ribonucleotide reductase at concentrations approximately 10-fold higher than that predicted to inhibit malarial R2. The gene encoding the large subunit (PfR1) contains a single intron. The cysteines thought to be involved in the reduction mechanism are conserved. In contrast to mammalian ribonucleotide reductase, the genes for PfR1 and PfR2 are located on the same chromosome and the accumulation of mRNAs for the two subunits follow different temporal patterns during the cell cycle. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8415692

  10. Nucleotide sequence of a chromosomal mercury resistance determinant from a Bacillus sp. with broad-spectrum mercury resistance. [Mercury reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Levinson, H.S.; Mahler, I. ); Moore, M.; Walsh, C. ); Silver, S. )

    1989-01-01

    A 13.5-kilobase HindIII fragment, bearing an intact mercury resistance (mer) operon, was isolated from chromosomal DNA of broad-spectrum mercury-resistant Bacillus sp. strain RC607 by using as a probe a clone containing the mercury reductase (merA) gene. The new clone, pYW33, expressed broad-spectrum mercury resistance both in Escherichia coli and in Bacillus subtilis, but only in B. subtilis was the mercuric reductase activity inducible. Sequencing of a 1.8-kilobase mercury hypersensitivity-producing fragment revealed four open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 may code for a regulatory protein (MerR). ORF2 and ORF4 were associated with cellular transport function and the hypersensitivity phenotype. DNA fragments encompassing the merA and the merB genes were sequenced. The predicted Bacillus sp. strain RC607 MerA (mercuric reductase) and MerB (organomercurial lyase) were similar to those predicted from Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 (67 and 73% amino acid identities, respectively); however, only 40% of the amino acid residues of RC607 MerA were identical to those of the mercuric reductase from gram-negative bacteria. A 69-kilodalton polypeptide was isolated and identified as the merA gene product by examination of its amino-terminal sequence.

  11. Molecular dissection of a putative iron reductase from Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi; Kim, David D.; Nelson, Ornella D.; Otwell, Annie E.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Callister, Stephen J.; Lin, Hening

    2015-10-08

    Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 is a Firmicute strain capable of reducing a variety of heavy metal ions and has a great potential in heavy metal bioremediation.We recently identified Dred_2421 as a potential iron reductase through proteomic study of D. reducens. The current study examines its iron-reduction mechanism. Dred_2421, like its close homolog from Escherichia coli (2, 4-dienoyl-CoA reductase), has an FMN-binding N-terminal domain (NTD), an FAD-binding C-terminal domain (CTD), and a 4Fee4S cluster between the two domains. To understand the mechanism of the iron-reduction activity and the role of each domain, we generated a series of variants for each domain and investigated their iron reduction activity. Our results suggest that CTD is the main contributor of the iron-reduction activity, and that NTD and the 4Fee4S cluster are not directly involved in such activity. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the ironereductase activity of Dred_2421 and may also help to elucidate other physiological activities this enzyme may have.

  12. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  13. Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass Spectrometry Results in Several Terminal Fe(III)-reducing Candidate Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Yang, Feng; Mottaz, Heather M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2007-02-01

    Identification of the proteins directly involved in microbial metal-reduction is important to understanding the biochemistry involved in heavy metal reduction/immobilization and the ultimate cleanup of DOE contaminated sites. Although previous strategies for the identification of these proteins have traditionally required laborious protein purification/characterization of metal-reducing capability, activity is often lost before the final purification step, thus creating a significant knowledge gap. In the current study, subcellular fractions of S. oneidensis MR-1 were enriched for Fe(III)-NTA reducing proteins in a single step using several orthogonal column matrices. The protein content of eluted fractions that demonstrated activity were determined by ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/ MS). A comparison of the proteins identified from active fractions in all separations produced 30 proteins that may act as the terminal electron-accepting protein for Fe(III)-reduction. These include MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA as well as a number of other proteins not previously associated with Fe(III)-reduction. This is the first report of such an approach where the laborious procedures for protein purification are not required for identification of metal-reducing proteins. Such work provides the basis for a similar approach with other cultured organisms as well as analysis of sediment and groundwater samples from biostimulation efforts at contaminated sites.

  14. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  15. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  16. CAI Terminal Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Peter

    The bewildering number of available terminals which are offered to CAI users presents a rather formidable problem of which one to choose. This article surveys what appear to be evolving standards for terminals. The usefulness of these terminals for CAI purposes is discussed, together with the best known prototype exhibiting the particular feature.…

  17. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  18. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  19. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  20. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  1. 49 CFR 1242.27 - Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine terminals, motor vehicle loading and distribution facilities, and... Structures § 1242.27 Coal marine terminals, ore marine terminals, TOFC/COFC terminals, other marine...

  2. Biliverdin reductase: a target for cancer therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Miralem, Tihomir; Maines, Mahin D.

    2015-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase (BVR) is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s) of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1, and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ, and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26089799

  3. Flavodiiron Oxygen Reductase from Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Vera L.; Vicente, João B.; Pinto, Liliana; Romão, Célia V.; Frazão, Carlos; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Teixeira, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) are a family of enzymes endowed with bona fide oxygen- and/or nitric-oxide reductase activity, although their substrate specificity determinants remain elusive. After a comprehensive comparison of available three-dimensional structures, particularly of FDPs with a clear preference toward either O2 or NO, two main differences were identified near the diiron active site, which led to the construction of site-directed mutants of Tyr271 and Lys53 in the oxygen reducing Entamoeba histolytica EhFdp1. The biochemical and biophysical properties of these mutants were studied by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies coupled to potentiometry. Their reactivity with O2 and NO was analyzed by stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy and amperometric methods. These mutations, whereas keeping the overall properties of the redox cofactors, resulted in increased NO reductase activity and faster inactivation of the enzyme in the reaction with O2, pointing to a role of the mutated residues in substrate selectivity. PMID:25151360

  4. Molecular analysis of the 5 alpha-steroid reductase type 2 gene in a family with deficiency of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Vilchis, F; Canto, P; Chávez, B; Ulloa-Aguirre, A; Méndez, J P

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the identification of a point mutation in the 5 alpha-reductase type 2 (5 alpha-SR2) gene from a family in which both sibs (6 and 3 years old) have steroid 5 alpha-reductase 2 deficiency. The five exons of the gene were individually amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analysed for single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) to detect mutations. Direct sequencing of the mutant PCR products demonstrated a single C-->T mutation, within exon 4, changing codon 227 from CGA (Arg) to TGA (premature termination signal). Both patients were homozygous for the mutation, but their parents were heterozygous. These results suggest that the mutation at codon 227 impairs normal 5 alpha-SR2 function, thus leading to the phenotypical expression of this rare enzymatic defect. PMID:9066886

  5. Amidoxime Reductase System Containing Cytochrome b5 Type B (CYB5B) and MOSC2 Is of Importance for Lipid Synthesis in Adipocyte Mitochondria*

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Etienne P. A.; Nordling, Åsa; Andersson, Tommy B.; Hellman, Ulf; Diczfalusy, Ulf; Johansson, Inger; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of hydroxylamines and amidoximes is important for drug activation and detoxification of aromatic and heterocyclic amines. Such a reductase system was previously found to be of high activity in adipose tissue and liver, and furthermore, in vitro studies using recombinant truncated and purified enzymes suggested the participation of cytochrome b5 reductase (CYB5R), cytochrome b5 (CYB5), and molybdenum cofactor sulfurase C-terminal containing 1 and 2 (MOSC1 and -2). Here, we show that purified rat liver outer mitochondrial membrane contains high amidoxime reductase activity and that MOSC2 is exclusively localized to these membranes. Moreover, using the same membrane fraction, we could show direct binding of a radiolabeled benzamidoxime substrate to MOSC2. Following differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells into mature adipocytes, the MOSC2 levels as well as the amidoxime reductase activity were increased, indicating that the enzyme is highly regulated under lipogenic conditions. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of MOSC2 and the mitochondrial form of cytochrome b5 type B (CYB5B) significantly inhibited the reductase activity in the differentiated adipocytes, whereas down-regulation of MOSC1, cytochrome b5 type A (CYB5A), CYB5R1, CYB5R2, or CYB5R3 had no effect. Down-regulation of MOSC2 caused impaired lipid synthesis. These results demonstrate for the first time the direct involvement of MOSC2 and CYB5B in the amidoxime reductase activity in an intact cell system. We postulate the presence of a novel reductive enzyme system of importance for lipid synthesis that is exclusively localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane and is composed of CYB5B, MOSC2, and a third unknown component (a CYB5B reductase). PMID:22203676

  6. Amidoxime reductase system containing cytochrome b5 type B (CYB5B) and MOSC2 is of importance for lipid synthesis in adipocyte mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Neve, Etienne P A; Nordling, Asa; Andersson, Tommy B; Hellman, Ulf; Diczfalusy, Ulf; Johansson, Inger; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2012-02-24

    Reduction of hydroxylamines and amidoximes is important for drug activation and detoxification of aromatic and heterocyclic amines. Such a reductase system was previously found to be of high activity in adipose tissue and liver, and furthermore, in vitro studies using recombinant truncated and purified enzymes suggested the participation of cytochrome b(5) reductase (CYB5R), cytochrome b(5) (CYB5), and molybdenum cofactor sulfurase C-terminal containing 1 and 2 (MOSC1 and -2). Here, we show that purified rat liver outer mitochondrial membrane contains high amidoxime reductase activity and that MOSC2 is exclusively localized to these membranes. Moreover, using the same membrane fraction, we could show direct binding of a radiolabeled benzamidoxime substrate to MOSC2. Following differentiation of murine 3T3-L1 cells into mature adipocytes, the MOSC2 levels as well as the amidoxime reductase activity were increased, indicating that the enzyme is highly regulated under lipogenic conditions. siRNA-mediated down-regulation of MOSC2 and the mitochondrial form of cytochrome b(5) type B (CYB5B) significantly inhibited the reductase activity in the differentiated adipocytes, whereas down-regulation of MOSC1, cytochrome b(5) type A (CYB5A), CYB5R1, CYB5R2, or CYB5R3 had no effect. Down-regulation of MOSC2 caused impaired lipid synthesis. These results demonstrate for the first time the direct involvement of MOSC2 and CYB5B in the amidoxime reductase activity in an intact cell system. We postulate the presence of a novel reductive enzyme system of importance for lipid synthesis that is exclusively localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane and is composed of CYB5B, MOSC2, and a third unknown component (a CYB5B reductase). PMID:22203676

  7. Characterization of a New Type of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase Present in Thermodesulfobacterium commune

    PubMed Central

    Hatchikian, E. C.; Zeikus, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A new type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase, desulfofuscidin, was isolated from the nonsporeforming thermophilic sulfate-reducing microorganism Thermodesulfobacterium commune. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated at 167,000 by sedimentation equilibrium, and the protein was pure by both disc electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. The bisulfite reductase was a tetramer and had two types of subunits with an α2β2 structure and an individual molecular weight of 47,000. The enzyme exhibited absorption maxima at 576, 389, and 279 nm, with a weak band at 693 nm. Upon the addition of dithionite, the absorption maxima at 576 and 693 nm were weakened, and a new band appeared at 605 nm. The protein reacted with CO in the presence of dithionite to give a complex with absorption peaks at 593, 548, and 395 nm. The extinction coefficients of the purified enzyme at 576, 389, and 279 nm were 89,000, 310,000, and 663,000 M−1 cm−1, respectively. Siroheme was detected as the prosthetic group. The protein contains 20 to 21 nonheme iron atoms and 16 to 17 acid-labile sulfur groups per molecule. The data suggest the presence of four sirohemes and probably four (4Fe-4S) centers per molecule by comparison with desulfoviridin, the dissimilatory sulfite reductase from Desulfovibrio species. The protein contains 36 cysteine residues and is high in acidic and aromatic amino acids. The N-terminal amino acids of the α and β subunits were threonine and serine, respectively. With reduced methyl viologen as electron donor, the major product of sulfite reduction was trithionate, and the pH optimum for activity was 6.0. The enzyme was stable to 70°C and denatured rapidly above this temperature. The dependence of T. commune bisulfite reductase activity on temperature was linear between 35 and 65°C, and the Q10 values observed were above 3. The presence of this new type of dissimilatory bisulfite reductase in T. commune is discussed in terms of taxonomic significance. PMID

  8. Two Structures of a Thiazolinyl Imine Reductase from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp3) Provide Insight for Catalysis and Binding to the Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module of HMWP1

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Kathleen M.; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2012-01-01

    The thiazolinyl imine reductase from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp3) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of a thiazoline ring in an intermediate for the formation of the siderophore yersiniabactin. Two structures of Irp3 were determined in the apo- (1.85 Å) and NADP+-bound (2.31 Å) forms. Irp3 shows structural homology to sugar oxidoreductases such as glucose-fructose oxidoreductase and 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose reductase, as well as to biliverdin reductase. A homology model of the thiazolinyl imine reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchG) was generated. Extensive loop insertions are observed in the C-terminal domain that are unique to Irp3 and PchG and not found in the structural homologs that recognize small molecular substrates. These loops are hypothesized to be important for binding of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase modules (found in HMWP1 and PchF, respectively) to which the substrate of the reductase is covalently attached. A catalytic mechanism of proton donation from a general acid (either histidine-101 or tyrosine-128) and hydride donation from C4 of nicotinamide of the NADPH cofactor is proposed for reduction of the carbon-nitrogen double bond of the thiazoline. PMID:23066849

  9. A high-throughput assay format for determination of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, N.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Choudary, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a microplate-based high-throughput procedure for rapid assay of the enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, using extremely small volumes of reagents. The new procedure offers the advantages of rapidity, small sample size-nanoliter volumes, low cost, and a dramatic increase in the throughput sample number that can be analyzed simultaneously. Additional advantages can be accessed by using microplate reader application software packages that permit assigning a group type to the wells, recording of the data on exportable data files and exercising the option of using the kinetic or endpoint reading modes. The assay can also be used independently for detecting nitrite residues/contamination in environmental/food samples. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  11. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  12. Chaperone properties of Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Renée; Malki, Abderrahim; Holmgren, Arne; Richarme, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase and NADPH form the thioredoxin system and are the major cellular protein disulphide reductase. We report here that Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase interact with unfolded and denatured proteins, in a manner similar to that of molecular chaperones that are involved in protein folding and protein renaturation after stress. Thioredoxin and/or thioredoxin reductase promote the functional folding of citrate synthase and alpha-glucosidase after urea denaturation. They also promote the functional folding of the bacterial galactose receptor, a protein without any cysteines. Furthermore, redox cycling of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase in the presence of NADPH and cystine stimulates the renaturation of the galactose receptor, suggesting that the thioredoxin system functions like a redox-powered chaperone machine. Thioredoxin reductase prevents the aggregation of citrate synthase under heat-shock conditions. It forms complexes that are more stable than those formed by thioredoxin with several unfolded proteins such as reduced carboxymethyl alpha-lactalbumin and unfolded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. These results suggest that the thioredoxin system, in addition to its protein disulphide isomerase activity possesses chaperone-like properties, and that its thioredoxin reductase component plays a major role in this function. PMID:12549977

  13. Ribonucleotide reductase metallocofactor: assembly, maintenance and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Caiguo; LIU, Guoqi; HUANG, Mingxia

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) supplies cellular deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTP) pools by converting ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxy forms using radical-based chemistry. Eukaryotic RNR comprises α and β subunits: α contains the catalytic and allosteric sites; β houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical cofactor (FeIII2-Y•) that is required to initiates nucleotide reduction in α. Cells have evolved multi-layered mechanisms to regulate RNR level and activity in order to maintain the adequate sizes and ratios of their dNTP pools to ensure high-fidelity DNA replication and repair. The central role of RNR in nucleotide metabolism also makes it a proven target of chemotherapeutics. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of eukaryotic RNRs, with a focus on studies revealing the cellular machineries involved in RNR metallocofactor biosynthesis and its implication in RNR-targeting therapeutics. PMID:24899886

  14. Dynamics of trimethoprim bound to dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, M.S.; Forster, M.J.; Birdsall, B.; Roberts, G.C.K.; Feeney, J.; Cheung, H.T.A.; Kompis, I.; Geddes, A.J. )

    1988-06-01

    The conformation of a small molecule in its binding site on a protein is a major factor in the specificity of the interaction between them. In this paper, the authors report the use of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy to study the fluctuations in conformation of the anti-bacterial drug trimethoprim when it is bound to its target, dihydrofolate reductase. {sup 13}C relaxation measurements reveal dihedral angle changes of {plus minus}25{degree} to {plus minus}35{degree} on the subnanosecond time scale, while {sup 13}C line-shape analysis demonstrates dihedral angle changes of at least {plus minus}65{degree} on the millisecond time scale. {sup 1}H NMR shows that a specific hydrogen bond between the inhibitor and enzyme, which is believed to make an important contribution to binding, makes and breaks rapidly at room temperature.

  15. Nitrite Reductase Activity in Engineered Azurin Variants.

    PubMed

    Berry, Steven M; Strange, Jacob N; Bladholm, Erika L; Khatiwada, Balabhadra; Hedstrom, Christine G; Sauer, Alexandra M

    2016-05-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) activity was examined in a series of dicopper P.a. azurin variants in which a surface binding copper site was added through site-directed mutagenesis. Four variants were synthesized with copper binding motifs inspired by the catalytic type 2 copper binding sites found in the native noncoupled dinuclear copper enzymes nitrite reductase and peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase. The four azurin variants, denoted Az-NiR, Az-NiR3His, Az-PHM, and Az-PHM3His, maintained the azurin electron transfer copper center, with the second designed copper site located over 13 Å away and consisting of mutations Asn10His,Gln14Asp,Asn16His-azurin, Asn10His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, Gln8Met,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, and Gln8His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, respectively. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry of the sites demonstrate copper binding as well as interaction with small exogenous ligands. The nitrite reduction activity of the variants was determined, including the catalytic Michaelis-Menten parameters. The variants showed activity (0.34-0.59 min(-1)) that was slower than that of native NiRs but comparable to that of other model systems. There were small variations in activity of the four variants that correlated with the number of histidines in the added copper site. Catalysis was found to be reversible, with nitrite produced from NO. Reactions starting with reduced azurin variants demonstrated that electrons from both copper centers were used to reduce nitrite, although steady-state catalysis required the T2 copper center and did not require the T1 center. Finally, experiments separating rates of enzyme reduction from rates of reoxidation by nitrite demonstrated that the reaction with nitrite was rate limiting during catalysis. PMID:27055058

  16. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  17. Terminal automation system maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Coffelt, D.; Hewitt, J.

    1997-01-01

    Nothing has improved petroleum product loading in recent years more than terminal automation systems. The presence of terminal automation systems (TAS) at loading racks has increased operational efficiency and safety and enhanced their accounting and management capabilities. However, like all finite systems, they occasionally malfunction or fail. Proper servicing and maintenance can minimize this. And in the unlikely event a TAS breakdown does occur, prompt and effective troubleshooting can reduce its impact on terminal productivity. To accommodate around-the-clock loading at racks, increasingly unattended by terminal personnel, TAS maintenance, servicing and troubleshooting has become increasingly demanding. It has also become increasingly important. After 15 years of trial and error at petroleum and petrochemical storage and transfer terminals, a number of successful troubleshooting programs have been developed. These include 24-hour {open_quotes}help hotlines,{close_quotes} internal (terminal company) and external (supplier) support staff, and {open_quotes}layered{close_quotes} support. These programs are described.

  18. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiering, N.; Kabsch, W.; Moore, M. J.; Distefano, M. D.; Walsh, C. T.; Pai, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    SEVERAL hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere1. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase2 and mercuric ion reductase (MerA) 3-5. The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases6, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II) --> NADP+ + H+Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase7,8 serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure9 and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), pI258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved10,11. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn5Ol and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon11. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency3. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  19. Detoxification of hexavalent chromium by Leucobacter sp. uses a reductase with specificity for dihydrolipoamide.

    PubMed

    Sarangi, Abhipsa; Krishnan, Chandraraj

    2016-02-01

    Leucobacter sp. belongs to the metal stressed community and possesses higher tolerance to metals including chromium and can detoxify toxic hexavalent chromium by reduction to less toxic trivalent chromium. But, the mechanism of reduction of hexavalent chromium by Leucobacter sp. has not been studied. Understanding the enzyme catalyzing reduction of chromium is important to improve the species for application in bioremediation. Hence, a soluble reductase catalyzing the reduction of hexavalent chromium was purified from a Leucobacter sp. and characterized. The pure chromate reductase was obtained from the cell-free extract through hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration column chromatographic methods. It was a monomeric enzyme and showed similar molecular weights in both gel filtration (∼68 KDa) and SDS-PAGE (64 KDa). It reduced Cr(VI) using both NADH and NADPH as the electron donor, but exhibited higher activity with NADH. The optimal activity was found at pH 5.5 and 30 °C. The K(m) and V(max) for Cr(VI) reduction with NADH were 46.57 μM and 0.37 μmol min(-1) (mg protein) (-1), respectively. The activity was inhibited by p-hydroxy mercury benzoate, Ag(2+) and Hg(2+) indicating the role of thiol groups in the catalysis. The spectrophotometric analysis of the purified enzyme showed the absence of bound flavin in the enzyme. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and LC/MS analysis of trypsin digested purified enzyme showed similarity to dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase. The purified enzyme had dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase activity with dihydrolipoamide as the substrate, which suggested that Leucobacter sp. uses reductase with multiple substrate specificity for reduction of Cr(VI) detoxification. PMID:26377775

  20. Carboxylation mechanism and stereochemistry of crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, a carboxylating enoyl-thioester reductase

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Brecht, Volker; Fuchs, Georg; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemo- and stereoselective reductions are important reactions in chemistry and biology, and reductases from biological sources are increasingly applied in organic synthesis. In contrast, carboxylases are used only sporadically. We recently described crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA but also the reductive carboxylation of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to ethylmalonyl-CoA. In this study, the complete stereochemical course of both reactions was investigated in detail. The pro-(4R) hydrogen of NADPH is transferred in both reactions to the re face of the C3 position of crotonyl-CoA. In the course of the carboxylation reaction, carbon dioxide is incorporated in anti fashion at the C2 atom of crotonyl-CoA. For the reduction reaction that yields butyryl-CoA, a solvent proton is added in anti fashion instead of the CO2. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase is a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and shares the same phylogenetic origin. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from NAD(P)H within this superfamily is highly conserved, although the substrates and reduction reactions catalyzed by its individual representatives differ quite considerably. Our findings led to a reassessment of the stereospecificity of enoyl(-thioester) reductases and related enzymes with respect to their amino acid sequence, revealing a general pattern of stereospecificity that allows the prediction of the stereochemistry of the hydride transfer for enoyl reductases of unknown specificity. Further considerations on the reaction mechanism indicated that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase may have evolved from enoyl-CoA reductases. This may be useful for protein engineering of enoyl reductases and their application in biocatalysis. PMID:19458256

  1. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  2. Structural features of the ribonucleotide reductase of Aujeszky's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, A V; Boldogköi, Z; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    A gene construct of the Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) genome was prepared and the DNA fragment encoding the ribonucleotide reductase was structurally characterized. We determined the entire DNA sequence of two adjacent open reading frames of the ribonucleotide reductase genes with the intergenic sequence of nine base pairs. From the sequence analysis we predict that Aujeszky's disease virus encodes a ribonucleotide reductase which comprises two polypeptides--large and small subunits, with sizes of 835 and 303 amino acids, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the large and small subunits of the Aujeszky's disease virus ribonucleotide reductase have been compared with that of other herpesviruses, and structural features of both proteins have been characterized. PMID:7810419

  3. Superconducting Cable Termination

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Uday K.; Tolbert, Jerry

    2005-08-30

    Disclosed is a termination that connects high temperature superconducting (HTS) cable immersed in pressurized liquid nitrogen to high voltage and neutral (shield) external bushings at ambient temperature and pressure. The termination consists of a splice between the HTS power (inner) and shield (outer) conductors and concentric copper pipes which are the conductors in the termination. There is also a transition from the dielectric tape insulator used in the HTS cable to the insulators used between and around the copper pipe conductors in the termination. At the warm end of the termination the copper pipes are connected via copper braided straps to the conventional warm external bushings which have low thermal stresses. This termination allows for a natural temperature gradient in the copper pipe conductors inside the termination which enables the controlled flashing of the pressurized liquid coolant (nitrogen) to the gaseous state. Thus the entire termination is near the coolant supply pressure and the high voltage and shield cold bushings, a highly stressed component used in most HTS cables, are eliminated. A sliding seal allows for cable contraction as it is cooled from room temperature to ˜72-82 K. Seals, static vacuum, and multi-layer superinsulation minimize radial heat leak to the environment.

  4. Terminal Air Flow Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) will be the basis for air traffic planning and control in the terminal area. The system accepts arriving traffic within an extended terminal area and optimizes the flow based on current traffic and airport conditions. The operational use of CTAS will be presented together with results from current operations.

  5. Expression of bacterial mercuric ion reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, C; Kües, U; Stahl, U; Nies, D H; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    The gene merA coding for bacterial mercuric ion reductase was cloned under the control of the yeast promoter for alcohol dehydrogenase I in the yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle plasmid pADH040-2 and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH22. The resulting transformant harbored stable copies of the merA-containing hybrid plasmid, displayed a fivefold increase in the MIC of mercuric chloride, and synthesized mercuric ion reductase activity. Images PMID:1735719

  6. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems. PMID:8694757

  7. Arabidopsis glutathione reductase 1 is dually targeted to peroxisomes and the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Kataya, Amr R.A

    2010-01-01

    We recently established a proteome methodology for Arabidopsis leaf peroxisomes and identified more than 90 putative novel proteins of the organelle. These proteins included glutathione reductase isoform 1 (GR1), a major enzyme of the antioxidative defense system that was previously reported to be cytosolic. In this follow-up study, we validated the proteome data by analyzing the in vivo subcellular targeting of GR1 and the function of its C-terminal tripeptide, TNL>, as a putative novel peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1). The full-length protein was targeted to peroxisomes in onion epidermal cells when fused N-terminally with the reporter protein. The efficiency of peroxisome targeting, however, was weak upon expression from a strong promoter, consistent with the idea that the enzyme is dually targeted to peroxisomes and the cytosol in vivo. The reporter protein that was extended C-terminally by 10 amino acid residues of GR1 was directed to peroxisomes, characterizing TNL> as a novel PTS1. The data thus identify plant peroxisomal GR at the molecular level in the first plant species and complete the plant peroxisomal ascorbate-glutathione cycle. Moreover, GR1 is the first plant protein that is dually targeted to peroxisomes and the cytosol. The evolutionary origin and regulatory mechanisms of dual targeting are discussed. PMID:20038819

  8. Ice crystal terminal velocities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1972-01-01

    Terminal velocities of different ice crystal forms were calculated, using the most recent ice crystal drag coefficients, aspect ratios, and densities. The equations derived were primarily for use in calculating precipitation rates by sampling particles with an aircraft in cirrus clouds, and determining particle size in cirrus clouds by Doppler radar. However, the equations are sufficiently general for determining particle terminal velocity at any altitude, and almost any crystal type. Two sets of equations were derived. The 'general' equations provide a good estimate of terminal velocities at any altitude. The 'specific' equations are a set of equations for ice crystal terminal velocities at 1000 mb. The calculations are in good agreement with terminal velocity measurements. The results from the present study were also compared to prior calculations by others and seem to give more reasonable results, particularly at higher altitudes.

  9. Large and small subunits of the Aujeszky's disease virus ribonucleotide reductase: nucleotide sequence and putative structure.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, A V; Boldogköi, Z; Fodor, I

    1994-09-13

    We determined the entire DNA sequence of two adjacent open reading frames of Aujeszky's disease virus encoding ribonucleotide reductase genes with the intergenic sequence of 9 bp. From the sequence analysis we deduce that ORFs encode large and small subunits, with sizes of 835 and 303 amino acids, respectively. Amino acid sequence comparison of ADV RR2 with that of equine herpesvirus type 1, bovine herpesvirus type 1, HSV-1 and varicella zoster virus revealed that 48% of amino acids represent clusters of residues conserved in all compared sequences. In the N-terminal part ADV RR1 shows low homology to the RR1 of other herpesviruses. Rest of the RR1 protein contains highly conserved amino acid sequences divided by blocks of low homology. PMID:8086454

  10. Low apparent aldose reductase activity produced by monosaccharide autoxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, S P; Crabbe, M J

    1985-01-01

    Low apparent aldose reductase activity, as measured by NADPH oxidation, can be produced by the spontaneous autoxidation of monosaccharides. NADPH is oxidized to metabolically active NADP+ in a solution of autoxidizing DL-glyceraldehyde at rates of up to 15 X 10(-4) A340/min. The close parallelism between the effects of buffer salt type and concentration, monosaccharide structure and temperature activation on autoxidation and NADPH oxidation imply that autoxidation is a prerequisite for the NADPH oxidation, probably via the hydroperoxy radical. Nucleotide-binding proteins enhanced NADPH oxidation induced by DL-glyceraldehyde, up to 10.6-fold with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Glutathione reductase-catalysed NADPH oxidation in the presence of autoxidizing monosaccharide showed many characteristics of the aldose reductase reaction. Aldose reductase inhibitors acted as antioxidants in inhibiting this NADPH oxidation. These results indicate that low apparent aldose reductase activities may be due to artifacts of monosaccharide autoxidation, and could provide an explanation for the non-linear steady-state kinetics observed with DL-glyceraldehyde and aldose reductase. PMID:2985042

  11. Effects of thioredoxin reductase-1 deletion on embryogenesis and transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Bondareva, Alla A.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Iverson, Sonya V.; Li, Yan; Lopez, Nathan I.; Lucas, Olivier; Merrill, Gary F.; Prigge, Justin R.; Siders, Ashley M.; Wakamiya, Maki; Wallin, Stephanie L.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductases (Txnrd)1 maintain intracellular redox homeostasis in most organisms. Metazoans Txnrds also participate in signal transduction. Mouse embryos homozygous for a targeted null mutation of the txnrd1 gene, encoding the cytosolic thioredoxin reductase, were viable at embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) but not at E9.5. Histology revealed that txnrd1−/− cells were capable of proliferation and differentiation; however, mutant embryos were smaller than wild-type littermates and failed to gastrulate. In situ marker gene analyses indicated primitive streak mesoderm did not form. Microarray analyses on E7.5 txnrd−/− and txnrd+/+ littermates showed similar mRNA levels for peroxiredoxins, glutathione reductases, mitochondrial Txnrd2, and most markers of cell proliferation. Conversely, mRNAs encoding sulfiredoxin, IGF-binding protein 1, carbonyl reductase 3, glutamate cysteine ligase, glutathione S-transferases, and metallothioneins were more abundant in mutants. Many gene expression responses mirrored those in thioredoxin reductase 1-null yeast; however mice exhibited a novel response within the peroxiredoxin catalytic cycle. Thus, whereas yeast induce peroxiredoxin mRNAs in response to thioredoxin reductase disruption, mice induced sulfiredoxin mRNA. In summary, Txnrd1 was required for correct patterning of the early embryo and progression to later development. Conserved responses to Txnrd1 disruption likely allowed proliferation and limited differentiation of the mutant embryo cells. PMID:17697936

  12. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  13. Regulation of the Neurospora crassa assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, P A; Zeeb, D D; Owens, M S

    1977-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-nitrate reductase from Neurospora crassa was purified and found to be stimulated by certain amino acids, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Stimulation by citrate and the amino acids was dependent upon the prior removal of EDTA from the enzyme preparations, since low quantities of EDTA resulted in maximal stimulation. Removal of EDTA from enzyme preparations by dialysis against Chelex-containing buffer resulted in a loss of nitrate reductase activity. Addition of alanine, arginine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, histidine, tryptophan, and citrate restored and stimulated nitrate reductase activity from 29- to 46-fold. The amino acids tested altered the Km of NADPH-nitrate reductase for NADPH but did not significantly change that for nitrate. The Km of nitrate reductase for NADPH increased with increasing concentrations of histidine but decreased with increasing concentrations of glutamine. Amino acid modulation of NADPH-nitrate reductase activity is discussed in relation to the conservation of energy (NADPH) by Neurospora when nitrate is the nitrogen source. PMID:19423

  14. Terminal Supraparticle Assemblies from Similarly Charged Protein Molecules and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jai Il; Nguyen, Trung Dac; de Queirós Silveira, Gleiciani; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Gongpu; Zhang, Peijun; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and inorganic nanoparticles into terminal assemblies makes possible a large family of uniformly sized hybrid colloids. These particles can be compared in terms of utility, versatility and multifunctionality to other known types of terminal assemblies. They are simple to make and offer theoretical tools for designing their structure and function. To demonstrate such assemblies, we combine cadmium telluride nanoparticles with cytochrome C protein and observe spontaneous formation of spherical supraparticles with a narrow size distribution. Such self-limiting behaviour originates from the competition between electrostatic repulsion and non-covalent attractive interactions. Experimental variation of supraparticle diameters for several assembly conditions matches predictions obtained in simulations. Similar to micelles, supraparticles can incorporate other biological components as exemplified by incorporation of nitrate reductase. Tight packing of nanoscale components enables effective charge and exciton transport in supraparticles as demonstrated by enzymatic nitrate reduction initiated by light absorption in the nanoparticle. PMID:24845400

  15. Terminal supraparticle assemblies from similarly charged protein molecules and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jai Il; Nguyen, Trung Dac; de Queirós Silveira, Gleiciani; Bahng, Joong Hwan; Srivastava, Sudhanshu; Zhao, Gongpu; Sun, Kai; Zhang, Peijun; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and inorganic nanoparticles into terminal assemblies makes possible a large family of uniformly sized hybrid colloids. These particles can be compared in terms of utility, versatility and multifunctionality to other known types of terminal assemblies. They are simple to make and offer theoretical tools for designing their structure and function. To demonstrate such assemblies, we combine cadmium telluride nanoparticles with cytochrome C protein and observe spontaneous formation of spherical supraparticles with a narrow size distribution. Such self-limiting behaviour originates from the competition between electrostatic repulsion and non-covalent attractive interactions. Experimental variation of supraparticle diameters for several assembly conditions matches predictions obtained in simulations. Similar to micelles, supraparticles can incorporate other biological components as exemplified by incorporation of nitrate reductase. Tight packing of nanoscale components enables effective charge and exciton transport in supraparticles and bionic combination of properties as demonstrated by enzymatic nitrate reduction initiated by light absorption in the nanoparticle.

  16. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  17. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress, and diabetic mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  18. Aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Xanthium strumarium.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ha Na; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-09-01

    As part of our ongoing search for natural sources of therapeutic and preventive agents for diabetic complications, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of components of the fruit of Xanthium strumarium (X. strumarium) on aldose reductase (AR) and galactitol formation in rat lenses with high levels of glucose. To identify the bioactive components of X. strumarium, 7 caffeoylquinic acids and 3 phenolic compounds were isolated and their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with published data. The abilities of 10 X. strumarium-derived components to counteract diabetic complications were investigated by means of inhibitory assays with rat lens AR (rAR) and recombinant human AR (rhAR). From the 10 isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed the most potent inhibition, with IC₅₀ values of 0.30 and 0.67 μM for rAR and rhAR, respectively. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed competitive inhibition of rhAR. Furthermore, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate inhibited galactitol formation in the rat lens and in erythrocytes incubated with a high concentration of glucose, indicating that this compound may be effective in preventing diabetic complications. PMID:23604720

  19. Precorrin-6x reductase from Pseudomonas denitrificans: purification and characterization of the enzyme and identification of the structural gene.

    PubMed Central

    Blanche, F; Thibaut, D; Famechon, A; Debussche, L; Cameron, B; Crouzet, J

    1992-01-01

    Precorrin-6x reductase, which catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of precorrin-6x to a dihydro derivative named precorrin-6y, was purified 14,300-fold to homogeneity with an 8% yield from extracts of a recombinant strain of Pseudomonas denitrificans. Precorrin-6y was identified by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. It was converted in high yield (90%) to hydrogenobyrinic acid by cell-free protein preparations from P. denitrificans. For the purification and characterization of precorrin-6x reductase, a coupled-enzyme radioenzymatic assay was developed in which precorrin-6y was methylated in situ by the cobL gene product (F. Blanche, A. Famechon, D. Thibaut, L. Debussche, B. Cameron, J. Crouzet, J. Bacteriol. 174:1050-1052, 1992) in the presence of [methyl-3H]S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Molecular weights of precorrin-6x reductase obtained by gel filtration (Mr congruent to 27,000) and by analytical sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Mr congruent to 31,000) were consistent with the enzyme being a monomer. Km values of 3.6 +/- 0.2 microM for precorrin-6x and 23.5 +/- 3.5 microM for NADPH and a Vmax value of 17,000 U mg-1 were obtained at pH 7.7. The N-terminal sequence (six amino acids) and three internal sequences obtained after tryptic digestion of the enzyme were determined by microsequencing and established that precorrin-6x reductase is encoded by the cobK gene, located on a previously described 8.7-kb EcoRI fragment (J. Crouzet, B. Cameron, L. Cauchois, S. Rigault, M.-C. Rouyez, F. Blanche, D. Thibaut, and L. Debussche, J. Bacteriol. 172:5980-5990, 1990). However, the coding sequence was shown to be on the strand complementary to the one previously proposed as the coding strand. Images PMID:1732193

  20. Production of (R)-Ethyl-4-Chloro-3-Hydroxybutanoate Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae YOL151W Reductase Immobilized onto Magnetic Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyung Kwoun

    2015-11-28

    For the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals, chiral alcohols are useful intermediates. Among them, (R)-ethyl-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate ((R)-ECHB) is an important building block for the synthesis of L-carnitine. (R)-ECHB is produced from ethyl-4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate (ECOB) by a reductase-mediated, enantioselective reduction reaction. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YOL151W reductase that is expressed in Escherichia coli cells exhibited an enantioselective reduction reaction toward ECOB. By virtue of the C-terminal His-tag, the YOL151W reductase was purified from the cell-free extract using Ni(2+)-NTA column chromatography and immobilized onto Ni(2+)-magnetic microparticles. The physical properties of the immobilized reductase (Imm-Red) were measured using electron microscopy, a magnetic property measurement system, and a zeta potential system; the average size of the particles was approximately 1 μm and the saturated magnetic value was 31.76 emu/g. A neodymium magnet was used to recover the immobilized enzyme within 2 min. The Imm-Red showed an optimum temperature at 45°C and an optimum pH at 6.0. In addition, Bacillus megaterium glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was produced in the E. coli cells and was used in the coupling reaction to regenerate the NADPH cofactor. The reduction/oxidation coupling reaction composed of the Imm-Red and GDH converted 20 mM ECOB exclusively into (R)- ECHB with an e.e.p value of 98%. PMID:26239012

  1. Phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Four phenylethynyl amine compounds - 3 and 4-aminophenoxy-4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, and 3 and 4-amino-4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone - were readily prepared and were used to endcap imide oligomers. Phenylethynyl-terminated amide acid oligomers and phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers with various molecular weights and compositions were prepared and characterized. These oligomers were cured at 300 to 400 C to provide crosslinked polyimides with excellent solvent resistance, high strength and modulus, and good high temperature properties. Adhesive panels, composites, films, and moldings from these phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers gave excellent mechanical performance.

  2. Nonleaking battery terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snider, W. E.; Nagle, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Three different terminals were designed for usage in a 40 ampere/hour silver zinc battery which has a 45 percent KOH by weight electrolyte in a plastic battery case. Life tests, including thermal cycling, electrical charge and discharge for up to three years duration, were conducted on these three different terminal designs. Tests for creep rate and tensile strength were conducted on the polyphenylene oxide (PPO) plastic battery cases. Some cases were unused and others containing KOH electrolyte were placed on life tests. The design and testing of nonleaking battery terminals for use with a potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte in a plastic case are discussed.

  3. Lamin B receptor (LBR) regulates the growth and maturation of myeloid progenitors via its sterol reductase domain: Implications for cholesterol biosynthesis in regulating myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Chaudhury, Pulkit; Malu, Krishnakumar; Fowler, Samantha; Manmode, Rahul; Gotur, Deepali; Zwerger, Monika; Ryan, David; Roberti, Rita; Gaines, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is a bifunctional nuclear membrane protein with N-terminal lamin B and chromatin binding domains plus a C-terminal sterol Δ14 reductase domain. LBR expression increases during neutrophil differentiation and deficient expression disrupts neutrophil nuclear lobulation characteristic of Pelger-Huët anomaly. Thus LBR plays a critical role in regulating myeloid differentiation, but how the two functional domains of LBR support this role is currently unclear. We previously identified abnormal proliferation and deficient functional maturation of promyelocytes (EPRO cells) derived from EML-ic/ic cells, a myeloid model of ichthyosis (ic) bone marrow that lacks Lbr expression. Here we provide new evidence that cholesterol biosynthesis is important to myeloid cell growth and is supported by the sterol reductase domain of Lbr. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors caused growth inhibition of EML cells that increased in EPRO cells, whereas cells lacking Lbr exhibited complete growth arrest at both stages. Lipid production increased during wild-type neutrophil maturation, but ic/ic cells exhibited deficient levels of lipid and cholesterol production. Ectopic expression of a full length Lbr in EML-ic/ic cells rescued both nuclear lobulation and growth arrest in cholesterol starvation conditions. Lipid production also was rescued, and a deficient respiratory burst was corrected. Expression of just the C-terminal sterol reductase domain of Lbr in ic/ic cells also improved each of these phenotypes. Our data support the conclusion that the sterol Δ14 reductase domain of LBR plays a critical role in cholesterol biosynthesis, and that this process is essential to both myeloid cell growth and functional maturation. PMID:22140257

  4. Isolation and Characterization of cDNAs Encoding Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Anthocyanidin Reductase from Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wanxiang; Yang, Li; Karim, Abdul; Luo, Keming

    2013-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA) and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+)-catechin and (−)-epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05) in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus. PMID:23741362

  5. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    PubMed

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies. PMID:27466384

  6. Sail intelligent terminal evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruitt, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Engineering assessments, recommendations, and equipment necessary to solve the operational problems are described, and operational flexibility of the intelligent terminal facility are extended. The following capabilities were considered: (1) the operation of at least two D/D stations and one remote graphics terminal simultaneously; (2) the capability to run plotter, AIDS and FORTRAN programs simultaneously; (3) simultaneous use of system utility routines of D/D stations and remote graphics terminal; (4) the capability to provide large volume hardcopy of data and graphics; and (5) the capability to eliminate or at least ease the current operation/programming problems with related labor costs. The overall intelligent terminal development, and plans guiding the analysis and equipment acquisitions were studied, and the assessments and analyses performed are also summarized.

  7. Nearest Alignment Space Termination

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-07-13

    Near Alignment Space Termination (NAST) is the Greengenes algorithm that matches up submitted sequences with the Greengenes database to look for similarities and align the submitted sequences based on those similarities.

  8. Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Anson; Shieh, Biehuoy; Chang, Kun-Che; Pal, Arttatrana; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; Ruzycki, Philip; Palla, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G. Bhanuprakesh; Petrash, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic eye diseases, including cataract and retinopathy. However, not all diabetics develop ocular complications. Paradoxically, some diabetics with poor metabolic control appear to be protected against retinopathy, while others with a history of excellent metabolic control develop severe complications. These observations indicate that one or more risk factors may influence the likelihood that an individual with diabetes will develop cataracts and/or retinopathy. We hypothesize that an elevated level of AR gene expression could confer higher risk for development of diabetic eye disease. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the onset and severity of diabetes-induced cataract in transgenic mice, designated AR-TG, that were either heterozygous or homozygous for the human AR (AKR1B1) transgene construct. AR-TG mice homozygous for the transgene demonstrated a conditional cataract phenotype, whereby they developed lens vacuoles and cataract-associated structural changes only after induction of experimental diabetes; no such changes were observed in AR-TG heterozygotes or nontransgenic mice with or without experimental diabetes induction. We observed that nondiabetic AR-TG mice did not show lens structural changes even though they had lenticular sorbitol levels almost as high as the diabetic AR-TG lenses that showed early signs of cataract. Over-expression of AR led to increases in the ratio of activated to total levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK1/2), which are known to be involved in cell growth and apoptosis respectively. After diabetes induction, AR-TG but not WT controls had decreased levels of phosphorylated as well as total ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. These results indicate that high AR expression in the context of hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency may constitute a risk factor that could predispose the

  9. Aldose reductase expression as a risk factor for cataract.

    PubMed

    Snow, Anson; Shieh, Biehuoy; Chang, Kun-Che; Pal, Arttatrana; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; Ruzycki, Philip; Palla, Suryanarayana; Reddy, G Bhanuprakesh; Petrash, J Mark

    2015-06-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic eye diseases, including cataract and retinopathy. However, not all diabetics develop ocular complications. Paradoxically, some diabetics with poor metabolic control appear to be protected against retinopathy, while others with a history of excellent metabolic control develop severe complications. These observations indicate that one or more risk factors may influence the likelihood that an individual with diabetes will develop cataracts and/or retinopathy. We hypothesize that an elevated level of AR gene expression could confer higher risk for development of diabetic eye disease. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the onset and severity of diabetes-induced cataract in transgenic mice, designated AR-TG, that were either heterozygous or homozygous for the human AR (AKR1B1) transgene construct. AR-TG mice homozygous for the transgene demonstrated a conditional cataract phenotype, whereby they developed lens vacuoles and cataract-associated structural changes only after induction of experimental diabetes; no such changes were observed in AR-TG heterozygotes or nontransgenic mice with or without experimental diabetes induction. We observed that nondiabetic AR-TG mice did not show lens structural changes even though they had lenticular sorbitol levels almost as high as the diabetic AR-TG lenses that showed early signs of cataract. Over-expression of AR led to increases in the ratio of activated to total levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK1/2), which are known to be involved in cell growth and apoptosis, respectively. After diabetes induction, AR-TG but not WT controls had decreased levels of phosphorylated as well as total ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 compared to their nondiabetic counterparts. These results indicate that high AR expression in the context of hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency may constitute a risk factor that could predispose the

  10. Expression of catalytically active barley glutamyl tRNAGlu reductase in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Vothknecht, U C; Kannangara, C G; von Wettstein, D

    1996-08-20

    delta-Aminolevulinate in plants, algae, cyanobacteria, and several other bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis is synthesized from glutamate by means of a tRNA(Glu) mediated pathway. The enzyme glutamyl tRNA(Glu) reductase catalyzes the second step in this pathway, the reduction of tRNA bound glutamate to give glutamate 1-semialdehyde. The hemA gene from barley encoding the glutamyl tRNA(Glu) reductase was expressed in E. coli cells joined at its amino terminal end to Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase (GST). GST-glutamyl tRNA(Glu) reductase fusion protein and the reductase released from it by thrombin digestion catalyzed the reduction of glutamyl tRNA(Glu) to glutamate 1-semialdehyde. The specific activity of the fusion protein was 120 pmol.micrograms-1.min-1. The fusion protein used tRNA(Glu) from barley chloroplasts preferentially to E. coli tRNA(Glu) and its activity was inhibited by hemin. It migrated as an 82-kDa polypeptide with SDS/PAGE and eluted with an apparent molecular mass of 450 kDa from Superose 12. After removal of the GST by thrombin, the protein migrated as an approximately equal to 60-kDa polypeptide with SDS/PAGE, whereas gel filtration on Superose 12 yielded an apparent molecule mass of 250 kDa. Isolated fusion protein contained heme, which could be reduced by NADPH and oxidized by air. PMID:8799193

  11. Molecular cloning of cDNAs of human liver and placenta NADH-cytochrome b/sub 5/ reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Yubisui, T.; Naitoh, Y.; Zenno, S.; Tamura, M.; Takeshita, M.; Sakaki, Y.

    1987-06-01

    A cDNA coding for human liver NADH-cytochrome b/sub 5/ reductase was cloned from a human liver cDNA library constructed in phage lambdagt11. The library was screened by using an affinity-purified rabbit antibody against NADH-cytochrome b/sub 5/ reductase of human erythrocytes. A cDNA about 1.3 kilobase pairs long was isolated. By using the cDNA as a probe, another cDNA (pb/sub 5/R141) of 1817 base pairs was isolated that hybridized with a synthetic oligonucleotide encoding Pro-Asp-Ile-Lys-Tyr-Pro, derived from the amino acid sequence at the amino-terminal region of the enzyme from human erythrocytes. Furthermore, by using the pb/sub 5/R141 as a probe, cDNA clones having more 5' sequence were isolated from a human placenta cDNA library. The amino acid sequences deduced from the nucleotide sequences of these cDNA clones overlapped each other and consisted of a sequence that completely coincides with that of human erythrocytes and a sequence of 19 amino acid residues extended at the amino-terminal side. The latter sequence closely resembles that of the membrane-binding domain of steer liver microsomal enzyme

  12. Human biliverdin reductase: a member of the insulin receptor substrate family with serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Shen, Jenny; Torno, Michael D; Kravets, Anatoliy; Hu, Zhenbo; Maines, Mahin D

    2005-05-17

    We describe here the tyrosine kinase activity of human biliverdin reductase (BVR) and its potential role in the insulin-signaling pathway. BVR is both a substrate for insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (IRK) activity and a kinase for serine phosphorylation of IR substrate 1 (IRS-1). Our previous studies have revealed serine/threonine kinase activity of BVR. Y198, in the YMKM motif found in the C-terminal domain of BVR, is shown to be a substrate for insulin-activated IRK. This motif in IRS proteins provides a docking site for proteins that contain a Src homology 2 domain. Additionally, Y228 in the YLSF sequence and Y291 are IRK substrates; the former sequence provides optimum recognition motif in the tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1, and for SHC (Src homology 2 domain containing transfroming protein 1). BVR autophosphorylates N-terminal tyrosines Y72 and Y83. Serine residues in IRS-1 are targets for BVR phosphorylation, and point mutation of serine residues in the kinase domain of the reductase inhibits phosphotransferase activity. Because tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 activates the insulin signaling pathway and serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 blocks insulin action, our findings that insulin increases BVR tyrosine phosphorylation and that there is an increase in glucose uptake in response to insulin when expression of BVR is "knocked down" by small interfering RNA suggest a potential role for BVR in the insulin signaling pathway. PMID:15870194

  13. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-01-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidase activity in yeast strains containing the RNR2-lacZ fusion was inducible in response to DNA-damaging agents (UV light, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide [4-NQO], and methyl methanesulfonate [MMS]) and agents that block DNA replication (hydroxyurea [HU] and methotrexate) but not heat shock. When MATa cells were arrested in G1 by alpha-factor, RNR2 mRNA was still inducible by DNA damage, indicating that the observed induction can occur outside of S phase. In addition, RNR2 induction was not blocked by the presence of cycloheximide and is therefore likely to be independent of protein synthesis. A mutation, rnr2-314, was found to confer hypersensitivity to HU and increased sensitivity to MMS. In rnr2-314 mutant strains, the DNA damage stress response was found to be partially constitutive as well as hypersensitive to induction by HU but not MMS. The induction properties of RNR2 were examined in a rad4-2 mutant background; in this genetic background, RNR2 was hypersensitive to induction by 4-NQO but not MMS. Induction of the RNR2-lacZ fusion in a RAD(+) strain in response to 4-NQO was not enhanced by the presence of an equal number of rad4-2 cells that lacked the fusion, implying that the DNA damage stress response in cell autonomous. Images PMID:2513480

  14. From Terminal to Terminal with Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esslinger, Tilman

    2014-05-01

    We study fundamental concepts of particle and heat transport in a model system using ultracold atoms. It consists of a channel connecting two macroscopic reservoirs of fermionic lithium atoms. The channel can be switched from ballistic to diffusive, and it can be structured to form a quantum point contact or a quantum wire. Measurements of the thermoelectric effect and particle transport in the quantum regime will be presented. Our measurements find an ideal description in the Landauer-Buttiker formalism, which views conduction as the transport of carriers from one terminal to another.

  15. Documents from malicious terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Istvan Z.; Vajda, Istvan

    2003-04-01

    The user wishes to communicate with a remote partner over an insecure network. Since the user is a human being, a terminal is needed for communication. Cryptographic algorithms running on the terminal may provide authenticity for the user's messages. In this paper the problem of sending authentic messages from insecure or untrusted terminals is analyzed. In this case attackers are able to gain total control over the terminal, so the user must consider the terminal a potential attacker. Smart cards are often considered the ultimate tool for secure messaging from untrusted terminals. However, their lack of user interface enables man-in-the middle attack from the terminal. The authors assume, that user is a human being with limited memory and computational power, and also makes mistakes in his calculations. They demnostrate, that only exceptional useres are able to authenticate messages without a trusted device. Several biometric media encapsulate the content of the message and the identity of the sender, such as speech, video and handwriting. The authors suggest, that such media is far more difficult to counterfeit than plaintext. Thus, the user must rely on his other resources, like biometric ones. In the protocol proposed by the authors, the user sends messages in a biometric format, strengthened by simple algorithmic authenticators. The smart card functions as a secure time gate ensuring, that the attacker has extremely little time to counterfeit both the biometric and the algorithmic protection on the message. The authors claim, that with the proper calibration of the biometric method and the time gate of the smart card, their protocol is strong enough for practical use.

  16. TRANSPORTATION TERMINAL - DYNAMAP V.12.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    GDT Transportation Terminals represents locations within United States for transportation terminals such as bus terminals, train stations, marine terminals, and other significant transportation nodes.

  17. 29 CFR 4043.24 - Termination or partial termination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Termination or partial termination. 4043.24 Section 4043.24 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION PLAN TERMINATIONS REPORTABLE EVENTS AND CERTAIN OTHER NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Post-Event Notice of Reportable Events § 4043.24 Termination or partial...

  18. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Bradley, Alexander S; Santos, André A; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major ((34)S/(32)S) and minor ((33)S/(32)S, (36)S/(32)S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in (34)S/(32)S (hereafter, [Formula: see text]) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in (33)S, described as [Formula: see text], is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3-0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in (34)εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of [Formula: see text] is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where (34)ε r-p = 16.1‰ (r-p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments ([Formula: see text] 17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the

  19. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, William D.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Santos, André A.; Pereira, Inês A. C.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR). Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S) and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S) sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB). Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB) to be 15.3 ± 2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150 ± 0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3–0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr−p = 16.1‰ (r–p indicates reactant vs. product, n = 648). This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 1.5‰, 2σ) and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4−H2S =  17.3 ± 3.8‰). Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in

  20. Structure and dynamics of a compact state of a multidomain protein, the mercuric ion reductase.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sharp, Melissa A; Poblete, Simón; Biehl, Ralf; Zamponi, Michaela; Szekely, Noemi; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Winkler, Roland G; Nauss, Rachel E; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M; Yi, Zheng; Cheng, Xiaolin; Liang, Liyuan; Ohl, Michael; Miller, Susan M; Richter, Dieter; Gompper, Gerhard; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-15

    The functional efficacy of colocalized, linked protein domains is dependent on linker flexibility and system compaction. However, the detailed characterization of these properties in aqueous solution presents an enduring challenge. Here, we employ a novel, to our knowledge, combination of complementary techniques, including small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin-echo spectroscopy, and all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained simulation, to identify and characterize in detail the structure and dynamics of a compact form of mercuric ion reductase (MerA), an enzyme central to bacterial mercury resistance. MerA possesses metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) tethered to its catalytic core domain by linkers. The NmerA domains are found to interact principally through electrostatic interactions with the core, leashed by the linkers so as to subdiffuse on the surface over an area close to the core C-terminal Hg(II)-binding cysteines. How this compact, dynamical arrangement may facilitate delivery of Hg(II) from NmerA to the core domain is discussed. PMID:25028881

  1. Structure and Dynamics of a Compact State of a Multidomain Protein, the Mercuric Ion Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Sharp, Melissa A.; Poblete, Simón; Biehl, Ralf; Zamponi, Michaela; Szekely, Noemi; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Winkler, Roland G.; Nauss, Rachel E.; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Yi, Zheng; Cheng, Xiaolin; Liang, Liyuan; Ohl, Michael; Miller, Susan M.; Richter, Dieter; Gompper, Gerhard; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-01-01

    The functional efficacy of colocalized, linked protein domains is dependent on linker flexibility and system compaction. However, the detailed characterization of these properties in aqueous solution presents an enduring challenge. Here, we employ a novel, to our knowledge, combination of complementary techniques, including small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin-echo spectroscopy, and all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained simulation, to identify and characterize in detail the structure and dynamics of a compact form of mercuric ion reductase (MerA), an enzyme central to bacterial mercury resistance. MerA possesses metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) tethered to its catalytic core domain by linkers. The NmerA domains are found to interact principally through electrostatic interactions with the core, leashed by the linkers so as to subdiffuse on the surface over an area close to the core C-terminal Hg(II)-binding cysteines. How this compact, dynamical arrangement may facilitate delivery of Hg(II) from NmerA to the core domain is discussed. PMID:25028881

  2. Tobacco Nectarin III is a bifunctional enzyme with monodehydroascorbate reductase and carbonic anhydrase activities.

    PubMed

    Carter, Clay J; Thornburg, Robert W

    2004-02-01

    Tobacco plants secrete a limited array of proteins (nectarins) into their floral nectar. N-terminal sequencing of the Nectarin II ( NEC2; 35kD) and the Nectarin III ( NEC3; 40kD) proteins revealed that they both share identity with dioscorin, the major soluble protein of yam tubers. These sequences also revealed that NEC2 is a breakdown product of NEC3. Using these N-terminal peptide sequences, degenerate oligonucleotides were designed that permitted the isolation of a partial NEC3 cDNA. This cDNA was then used to probe a nectary specific cDNA library and a full-length NEC3 cDNA clone was isolated. Complete sequence analysis confirmed the identity of NEC3 as a dioscorin-like protein. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric fingerprinting of tryptic peptides derived from the purified NEC3 confirmed that this protein was encoded by the isolated cDNA. NEC3 was shown to possess both carbonic anhydrase and monodehydroascorbate reductase activities. RT-PCR based expression analyses demonstrated that NEC3 transcript is expressed throughout nectary development as well as in other floral organs. A proposed function in the maintenance of pH and oxidative balance in nectar is discussed. PMID:15284496

  3. The Structural Basis for Peptidomimetic Inhibition of Eukaryotic Ribonucleotide Reductase: A Conformationally Flexible Pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hai; Fairman, James W.; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; Kreischer, Nathan R.; LaMacchia, John; Helmbrecht, Elizabeth; Cooperman, Barry S.; Dealwis, Chris

    2008-08-19

    Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductase (RR) catalyzes nucleoside diphosphate conversion to deoxynucleoside diphosphate. Crucial for rapidly dividing cells, RR is a target for cancer therapy. RR activity requires formation of a complex between subunits R1 and R2 in which the R2 C-terminal peptide binds to R1. Here we report crystal structures of heterocomplexes containing mammalian R2 C-terminal heptapeptide, P7 (Ac-{sup 1}FTLDADF{sup 7}) and its peptidomimetic P6 ({sup 1}Fmoc(Me)PhgLDChaDF{sup 7}) bound to Saccharomyces cerevisiae R1 (ScR1). P7 and P6, both of which inhibit ScRR, each bind at two contiguous sites containing residues that are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Such binding is quite distinct from that reported for prokaryotes. The Fmoc group in P6 peptide makes several hydrophobic interactions that contribute to its enhanced potency in binding to ScR1. Combining all of our results, we observe three distinct conformations for peptide binding to ScR1. These structures provide pharmacophores for designing highly potent nonpeptide class I RR inhibitors.

  4. The last glacial termination.

    PubMed

    Denton, G H; Anderson, R F; Toggweiler, J R; Edwards, R L; Schaefer, J M; Putnam, A E

    2010-06-25

    A major puzzle of paleoclimatology is why, after a long interval of cooling climate, each late Quaternary ice age ended with a relatively short warming leg called a termination. We here offer a comprehensive hypothesis of how Earth emerged from the last global ice age. A prerequisite was the growth of very large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, whose subsequent collapse created stadial conditions that disrupted global patterns of ocean and atmospheric circulation. The Southern Hemisphere westerlies shifted poleward during each northern stadial, producing pulses of ocean upwelling and warming that together accounted for much of the termination in the Southern Ocean and Antarctica. Rising atmospheric CO2 during southern upwelling pulses augmented warming during the last termination in both polar hemispheres. PMID:20576882

  5. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  6. The inhibitory activity of aldose reductase in vitro by constituents of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    PubMed

    Fatmawati, Sri; Ersam, Taslim; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-01-15

    We investigated aldose reductase inhibition of Garcinia mangostana Linn. from Indonesia. Dichloromethane extract of the root bark of this tree was found to demonstrate an IC50 value of 11.98 µg/ml for human aldose reductase in vitro. From the dichloromethane fraction, prenylated xanthones were isolated as potent human aldose reductase inhibitors. We discovered 3-isomangostin to be most potent against aldose reductase, with an IC50 of 3.48 µM. PMID:25636870

  7. ALSEP termination report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. R.; Lauderdale, W. W.; Kernaghan, H.

    1979-01-01

    The Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) final report was prepared when support operations were terminated September 30, 1977, and NASA discontinued the receiving and processing of scientific data transmitted from equipment deployed on the lunar surface. The ALSEP experiments (Apollo 11 to Apollo 17) are described and pertinent operational history is given for each experiment. The ALSEP data processing and distribution are described together with an extensive discussion on archiving. Engineering closeout tests and results are given, and the status and configuration of the experiments at termination are documented. Significant science findings are summarized by selected investigators. Significant operational data and recommendations are also included.

  8. Electrical termination techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakey, W. E.; Schleicher, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A technical review of high reliability electrical terminations for electronic equipment was made. Seven techniques were selected from this review for further investigation, experimental work, and preliminary testing. From the preliminary test results, four techniques were selected for final testing and evaluation. These four were: (1) induction soldering, (2) wire wrap, (3) percussive arc welding, and (4) resistance welding. Of these four, induction soldering was selected as the best technique in terms of minimizing operator errors, controlling temperature and time, minimizing joint contamination, and ultimately producing a reliable, uniform, and reusable electrical termination.

  9. Power terminal protection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yung K.

    1994-07-01

    Metal oxide varistors are connected in parallel with grounded capacitors to load outlet terminals coupled to a power source through inductor coils forming a low pass filter with the capacitors to delay propagation of a voltage increasing transient pulse to the power source until ground shunting paths of low resistance are developed in the varistors. Electromagnetic shielding partitions the inductor from the capacitors and varistors within a power outlet box mounting the load outlet terminals to prevent interference with absorption of transient energy by the varistors during the delay in establishing the ground shunting paths.

  10. The crystal structure of maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005 provides insights into the reaction mechanism of enzymes in its original family.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tomomi; Sato, Ai; Okamoto, Yuko; Yamauchi, Takae; Kato, Shiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tadao; Hata, Yasuo

    2016-08-01

    Maleylacetate reductase plays a crucial role in catabolism of resorcinol by catalyzing the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of maleylacetate, at a carbon-carbon double bond, to 3-oxoadipate. The crystal structure of maleylacetate reductase from Rhizobium sp. strain MTP-10005, GraC, has been elucidated by the X-ray diffraction method at 1.5 Å resolution. GraC is a homodimer, and each subunit consists of two domains: an N-terminal NADH-binding domain adopting an α/β structure and a C-terminal functional domain adopting an α-helical structure. Such structural features show similarity to those of the two existing families of enzymes in dehydroquinate synthase-like superfamily. However, GraC is distinct in dimer formation and activity expression mechanism from the families of enzymes. Two subunits in GraC have different structures from each other in the present crystal. One subunit has several ligands mimicking NADH and the substrate in the cleft and adopts a closed domain arrangement. In contrast, the other subunit does not contain any ligand causing structural changes and adopts an open domain arrangement. The structure of GraC reveals those of maleylacetate reductase both in the coenzyme, substrate-binding state and in the ligand-free state. The comparison of both subunit structures reveals a conformational change of the Tyr326 loop for interaction with His243 on ligand binding. Structures of related enzymes suggest that His243 is likely a catalytic residue of GraC. Mutational analyses of His243 and Tyr326 support the catalytic roles proposed from structural information. The crystal structure of GraC characterizes the maleylacetate reductase family as a third family in the dehydroquinate synthase-like superfamily. Proteins 2016; 84:1029-1042. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27040018

  11. Settings for Terminal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corless, Inge B.

    1988-01-01

    Examines topics related to delivery of terminal care services: ability of various hospice programs to survive financially, contributions of various models of hospice care, impact of Medicare legislation on hospice movement, demonstration of unique hospice intervention, integration of spiritual care into hospice, and role of hospice in care of…

  12. Terminal C, Gate 23.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Christian D

    2016-03-01

    This poem focuses on 19-year-old Anthony. At an airport terminal, his head is slumped and he reeks of alcohol. Anthony is unresponsive and has a pulse of 58. The author calls the paramedics and Anthony pulls through. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26963784

  13. The Versatile Terminal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, C. D.

    This paper describes the experiences of the industrial research laboratory of Kodak Ltd. in finding and providing a computer terminal most suited to its very varied requirements. These requirements include bibliographic and scientific data searching and access to a number of worldwide computing services for scientific computing work. The provision…

  14. Prematurely terminated slug tests

    SciTech Connect

    Karasaki, K. )

    1990-07-01

    A solution of the well response to a prematurely terminated slug test (PTST) is presented. The advantages of a PTST over conventional slug tests are discussed. A systematized procedure of a PTST is proposed, where a slug test is terminated in the midpoint of the flow point, and the subsequent shut-in data is recorded and analyzed. This method requires a downhole shut-in device and a pressure transducer, which is no more than the conventional deep-well slug testing. As opposed to slug tests, which are ineffective when a skin is present, more accurate estimate of formation permeability can be made using a PTST. Premature termination also shortens the test duration considerably. Because in most cases no more information is gained by completing a slug test to the end, the author recommends that conventional slug tests be replaced by the premature termination technique. This study is part of an investigation of the feasibility of geologic isolation of nuclear wastes being carried out by the US Department of Energy and the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland.

  15. Modeling Terminal Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Neal; Quintanilla, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Using a simultaneously falling softball as a stopwatch, the terminal velocity of a whiffle ball can be obtained to surprisingly high accuracy with only common household equipment. This classroom activity engages students in an apparently daunting task that nevertheless is tractable, using a simple model and mathematical techniques at their…

  16. Lantibiotic Reductase LtnJ Substrate Selectivity Assessed with a Collection of Nisin Derivatives as Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Dongdong; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Deng, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    Lantibiotics are potent antimicrobial peptides characterized by the presence of dehydrated amino acids, dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine, and (methyl)lanthionine rings. In addition to these posttranslational modifications, some lantibiotics exhibit additional modifications that usually confer increased biological activity or stability on the peptide. LtnJ is a reductase responsible for the introduction of d-alanine in the lantibiotic lacticin 3147. The conversion of l-serine into d-alanine requires dehydroalanine as the substrate, which is produced in vivo by the dehydration of serine by a lantibiotic dehydratase, i.e., LanB or LanM. In this work, we probe the substrate specificity of LtnJ using a system that combines the nisin modification machinery (dehydratase, cyclase, and transporter) and the stereospecific reductase LtnJ in Lactococcus lactis. We also describe an improvement in the production yield of this system by inserting a putative attenuator from the nisin biosynthesis gene cluster in front of the ltnJ gene. In order to clarify the sequence selectivity of LtnJ, peptides composed of truncated nisin and different mutated C-terminal tails were designed and coexpressed with LtnJ and the nisin biosynthetic machinery. In these tails, serine was flanked by diverse amino acids to determine the influence of the surrounding residues in the reaction. LtnJ successfully hydrogenated peptides when hydrophobic residues (Leu, Ile, Phe, and Ala) were flanking the intermediate dehydroalanine, while those in which dehydroalanine was flanked by one or two polar residues (Ser, Thr, Glu, Lys, and Asn) or Gly were either less prone to be modified by LtnJ or not modified at all. Moreover, our results showed that dehydrobutyrine cannot serve as a substrate for LtnJ. PMID:25795677

  17. Lantibiotic Reductase LtnJ Substrate Selectivity Assessed with a Collection of Nisin Derivatives as Substrates.

    PubMed

    Mu, Dongdong; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Deng, Jingjing; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2015-06-01

    Lantibiotics are potent antimicrobial peptides characterized by the presence of dehydrated amino acids, dehydroalanine and dehydrobutyrine, and (methyl)lanthionine rings. In addition to these posttranslational modifications, some lantibiotics exhibit additional modifications that usually confer increased biological activity or stability on the peptide. LtnJ is a reductase responsible for the introduction of D-alanine in the lantibiotic lacticin 3147. The conversion of L-serine into D-alanine requires dehydroalanine as the substrate, which is produced in vivo by the dehydration of serine by a lantibiotic dehydratase, i.e., LanB or LanM. In this work, we probe the substrate specificity of LtnJ using a system that combines the nisin modification machinery (dehydratase, cyclase, and transporter) and the stereospecific reductase LtnJ in Lactococcus lactis. We also describe an improvement in the production yield of this system by inserting a putative attenuator from the nisin biosynthesis gene cluster in front of the ltnJ gene. In order to clarify the sequence selectivity of LtnJ, peptides composed of truncated nisin and different mutated C-terminal tails were designed and coexpressed with LtnJ and the nisin biosynthetic machinery. In these tails, serine was flanked by diverse amino acids to determine the influence of the surrounding residues in the reaction. LtnJ successfully hydrogenated peptides when hydrophobic residues (Leu, Ile, Phe, and Ala) were flanking the intermediate dehydroalanine, while those in which dehydroalanine was flanked by one or two polar residues (Ser, Thr, Glu, Lys, and Asn) or Gly were either less prone to be modified by LtnJ or not modified at all. Moreover, our results showed that dehydrobutyrine cannot serve as a substrate for LtnJ. PMID:25795677

  18. Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductases C and D Are Major Antigens Constitutively Expressed by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingrid; Reitan, Liv J.; Holstad, Gudmund; Wiker, Harald G.

    2000-01-01

    Antigens characteristic for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis were identified by crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and by absorbing out cross-reactive antigens by using a polyclonal and polyvalent Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium antiserum. Two antigens were present in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and not detected in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. They were identified as antigens 17 and 20 in a CIE reference system for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens. Purified antigen 20 was identified as alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C (AhpC) while the N-terminal part of purified antigen 17 showed 80% homology with alkyl hydroperoxide reductase D (AhpD) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. AhpC had a nonreduced mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis corresponding to a molecular mass of 45 kDa and is probably a homodimer linked with disulfide bridges in its native form. AhpD had a mobility corresponding to 19 kDa. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against AhpC and AhpD reacted with 9 strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but not with 20 other mycobacterial strains except for a Mycobacterium gordonae strain, against which a weak cross-reactive band was produced. Goats experimentally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had strong gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses toward both AhpC and AhpD, and they also had antibodies against AhpC. The ability of AhpC and AhpD to induce IFN-γ production shows that these proteins potentially could be used in future vaccines or in diagnostic assays. These results further show that AhpC and AhpD are immunologically important proteins which are constitutively and highly expressed in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis without the bacteria being submitted to oxidative stress and that the specificities of antigens can be a matter of different levels of protein expression in various species as well as distinct structural differences. PMID:10639449

  19. NPOESS Field Terminal Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckmann, G.; Route, G.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products (aka, Environmental Data Records or EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process EDRs beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. IDPS also provides the software and requirements for the Field Terminal Segment (FTS). NPOESS provides support to deployed field terminals by providing mission data in the Low Rate and High Rate downlinks (LRD/HRD), mission support data needed to generate EDRs and decryption keys needed to decrypt mission data during Selective data Encryption (SDE). Mission support data consists of globally relevant data, geographically constrained data, and two line element sets. NPOESS provides these mission support data via the Internet accessible Mission Support Data Server and HRD/LRD downlinks. This presentation will illustrate and describe the NPOESS capabilities in support of Field Terminal users. This discussion will include the mission support data available to Field Terminal users, content of the direct broadcast HRD and LRD

  20. Comparative Studies on the Induction and Inactivation of Nitrate Reductase in Corn Roots and Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad; Oaks, Ann

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of induction and inactivation of nitrate reductase and two of its component activities, namely FMNH2-nitrate reductase and NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase, was made in roots and leaves of corn (Zea mays L. var. W64A × 182E). The three activities were induced in parallel in both tissues when NO3− was supplied. WO4= suppressed the induction of NADH- and FMNH2-nitrate reductase activities in root tips and leaves. The NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase activity showed a normal increase in roots treated with WO4=. In leaves, on the other hand, there was a marked superinduction of the NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase in the presence of WO4=. The half-life values of NADH-nitrate reductase and FMNH2-nitrate reductase measured by removing NO3− and adding WO4= to the medium, were 4 hours in root tips and 6 hours in excised leaves. Addition of NO3− in the induction medium together with WO4= gave partial protection of NADH-nitrate reductase and FMNH2-nitrate reductase activities in both root tips and leaves with a t0.5 of 6 and 8 hours, respectively. NO3− also reduced the loss of nitrate reductase activity from mature root sections. In the presence of cycloheximide, both NADH-nitrate reductase and NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase activities were lost at similar rates in root tips. NO3− protected the loss of NO3−-induced NADH-cytochrome c reductase to the same extent as that of NADH-nitrate reductase. PMID:16659529

  1. Activated and unactivated forms of human erythrocyte aldose reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, S K; Hair, G A; Das, B

    1985-01-01

    Aldose reductase (alditol:NADP+ 1-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.21) has been partially purified from human erythrocytes by DEAE-cellulose (DE-52) column chromatography. This enzyme is activated severalfold upon incubation with 10 microM each glucose 6-phosphate, NADPH, and glucose. The activation of the enzyme was confirmed by following the oxidation of NADPH as well as the formation of sorbitol with glucose as substrate. The activated form of aldose reductase exhibited monophasic kinetics with both glyceraldehyde and glucose (Km of glucose = 0.68 mM and Km of glyceraldehyde = 0.096 mM), whereas the native (unactivated) enzyme exhibited biphasic kinetics (Km of glucose = 9.0 and 0.9 mM and Km of glyceraldehyde = 1.1 and 0.14 mM). The unactivated enzyme was strongly inhibited by aldose reductase inhibitors such as sorbinil, alrestatin, and quercetrin, and by phosphorylated intermediates such as ADP, glycerate 3-phosphate, glycerate 1,3-bisphosphate, and glycerate 2,3-trisphosphate. The activated form of the enzyme was less susceptible to inhibition by aldose reductase inhibitors and phosphorylated intermediates. PMID:3933003

  2. The Kinetics and Inhibition of the Enzyme Methemoglobin Reductase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, A. G.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate biochemistry experiment which involves the preparation and kinetics of an oxidation-reduction enzyme system, methemoglobin reductase. A crude enzyme extract is prepared and assayed spectrophotometrically. The enzyme system obeys Michaelis-Menton kinetics with respect to both substrate and the NADH cofactor. (MLH)

  3. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  4. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5-8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5-8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction.

  5. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J. . E-mail: Robert.Hondal@uvm.edu

    2006-08-04

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k {sub cat} of 610 min{sup -1} and a K {sub m} of 610 {mu}M using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k {sub cat} is 25% of the k {sub cat} of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate.

  6. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Cesaro, Patrizia; Cattaneo, Chiara; Bona, Elisa; Berta, Graziella; Cavaletto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli, purified and used to produce polyclonal antibodies. The presence of these two enzymes was evaluated by qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and direct MS analysis. Enzymatic activity was detected in crude extracts. For the first time we detected and identified two arsenate reductase proteins (PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8) in sporophytes and gametophytes of P. vittata. Despite an increase of the mRNA levels for both proteins in roots, no difference was observed at the protein level after arsenic treatment. Overall, our data demonstrate the constitutive protein expression of PvACR2 and Pv2.5–8 in P. vittata tissues and propose their specific role in the complex metabolic network of arsenic reduction. PMID:26412036

  7. 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-11-01

    We measured the 5 ..cap alpha..-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of (/sup 3/H) dihydrotestosterone from (/sup 3/H) testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10/sup -8/ M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity in each tissue studied.

  8. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  13. Domain Evolution and Functional Diversification of Sulfite Reductases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Ashita; Goswami, Sulip; Riley, Monica; Teske, Andreas; Sogin, Mitchell

    2005-02-01

    Sulfite reductases are key enzymes of assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfur metabolism, which occur in diverse bacterial and archaeal lineages. They share a highly conserved domain "C-X5-C-n-C-X3-C" for binding siroheme and iron-sulfur clusters that facilitate electron transfer to the substrate. For each sulfite reductase cluster, the siroheme-binding domain is positioned slightly differently at the N-terminus of dsrA and dsrB, while in the assimilatory proteins the siroheme domain is located at the C-terminus. Our sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the siroheme-binding domain shows that sulfite reductase sequences diverged from a common ancestor into four separate clusters (aSir, alSir, dsr, and asrC) that are biochemically distinct; each serves a different assimilatory or dissimilatory role in sulfur metabolism. The phylogenetic distribution and functional grouping in sulfite reductase clusters (dsrA and dsrB vs. aSiR, asrC, and alSir) suggest that their functional diversification during evolution may have preceded the bacterial/archaeal divergence.

  14. Differential molecular response of monodehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase by nitration and S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Valderrama, Raquel; Padilla, María N; López-Jaramillo, Javier; Luque, Francisco; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2015-09-01

    The ascorbate-glutathione cycle is a metabolic pathway that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide and involves enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Proteomic studies have shown that some enzymes in this cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) are potential targets for post-translational modifications (PMTs) mediated by nitric oxide-derived molecules. Using purified recombinant pea peroxisomal MDAR and cytosolic and chloroplastic GR enzymes produced in Escherichia coli, the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) which are known to mediate protein nitration and S-nitrosylation processes, respectively, were analysed. Although ONOO(-) and GSNO inhibit peroxisomal MDAR activity, chloroplastic and cytosolic GR were not affected by these molecules. Mass spectrometric analysis of the nitrated MDAR revealed that Tyr213, Try292, and Tyr345 were exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by ONOO(-). The location of these residues in the structure of pea peroxisomal MDAR reveals that Tyr345 is found at 3.3 Å of His313 which is involved in the NADP-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Tyr345 as the primary site of nitration responsible for the inhibition of MDAR activity by ONOO(-). These results provide new insights into the molecular regulation of MDAR which is deactivated by nitration and S-nitrosylation. However, GR was not affected by ONOO(-) or GSNO, suggesting the existence of a mechanism to conserve redox status by maintaining the level of reduced GSH. Under a nitro-oxidative stress induced by salinity (150mM NaCl), MDAR expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels) was increased, probably to compensate the inhibitory effects of S-nitrosylation and nitration on the enzyme. The present data show the modulation of the antioxidative response of key enzymes in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle by nitric oxide (NO)-PTMs, thus indicating the close involvement of

  15. Differential molecular response of monodehydroascorbate reductase and glutathione reductase by nitration and S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Valderrama, Raquel; Padilla, María N.; Luque, Francisco; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The ascorbate–glutathione cycle is a metabolic pathway that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide and involves enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Proteomic studies have shown that some enzymes in this cycle such as ascorbate peroxidase (APX), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), and glutathione reductase (GR) are potential targets for post-translational modifications (PMTs) mediated by nitric oxide-derived molecules. Using purified recombinant pea peroxisomal MDAR and cytosolic and chloroplastic GR enzymes produced in Escherichia coli, the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO–) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) which are known to mediate protein nitration and S-nitrosylation processes, respectively, were analysed. Although ONOO– and GSNO inhibit peroxisomal MDAR activity, chloroplastic and cytosolic GR were not affected by these molecules. Mass spectrometric analysis of the nitrated MDAR revealed that Tyr213, Try292, and Tyr345 were exclusively nitrated to 3-nitrotyrosine by ONOO–. The location of these residues in the structure of pea peroxisomal MDAR reveals that Tyr345 is found at 3.3 Å of His313 which is involved in the NADP-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed Tyr345 as the primary site of nitration responsible for the inhibition of MDAR activity by ONOO–. These results provide new insights into the molecular regulation of MDAR which is deactivated by nitration and S-nitrosylation. However, GR was not affected by ONOO– or GSNO, suggesting the existence of a mechanism to conserve redox status by maintaining the level of reduced GSH. Under a nitro-oxidative stress induced by salinity (150mM NaCl), MDAR expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity levels) was increased, probably to compensate the inhibitory effects of S-nitrosylation and nitration on the enzyme. The present data show the modulation of the antioxidative response of key enzymes in the ascorbate–glutathione cycle by nitric oxide (NO)-PTMs, thus indicating the close involvement

  16. Nickel site of methane catalysis in the methyl reductase enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, J.A.; Shiemke, A.K.; Scott, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Methyl reductase is the enzyme of methanogenic bacteria that catalyzed the two-electron reduction of the methyl group of 2-(methylthio)ethanesulfonic acid (methyl-S-CoM) to methane and HS-CoM. The methyl group of methyl-S-CoM ultimately comes from the six-electron reduction of CO/sub 2/ by hydrogen, which also provides the reducing equivalents needed by methyl reductase. The nature of the catalytic site of methyl reductase is of current interest from the point of view of developing biomimetic C/sub 1/, chemistries directed toward methane synthesis and activation. In particular, Sandia is using molecular graphics and energy optimization techniques to design macromolecular catalysts that mimic the structure of sites of proteins that carry out C/sub 1/ chemistry. The goal is to produce catalysts whose function is the oxidation of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases to generate liquid fuels or, alternatively, the reduction of abundant inorganic resources such as CO/sub 2/ to generate gaseous fuels. Unfortunately, the catalytic sites of many of the enzymes of interest, e.g., methyl reductase and methane monooxygenase, have not been characterized by X-ray crystallography and other structural techniques. With the goal of learning more about the structure of one of these naturally occurring sites of C/sub 1/ chemistry, we have obtained the first resonance Raman spectra of the nickel-macrocycle, called F/sub 430/, at the site of catalysis in methyl reductase. To help us structurally interpret the Raman spectra of the enzyme we have also obtained Raman spectra of solutions of the major forms of F/sub 430/ (salt-extracted and cytosol-free) at room temperature and at 77/degree/K and also, under similar solution conditions, spectra of a nickel-corphinoid derivative that is related to F/sub 430/.

  17. Measurement of nitrous oxide reductase activity in aquatic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.; Paulsen, S.

    1986-01-01

    Denitrification in aquatic sediments was measured by an N/sub 2/O reductase assay. Sediments consumed small added quantities of N/sub 2/O over short periods (a few hours). In experiments with sediment slurries, N/sub 2/O reductase activity was inhibited by 0/sub 2/, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, heat treatment, and by high levels of nitrate (1 mM) or sulfide (10 mM). However, ambient levels of nitrate (<100 ..mu..M) did not influence activity, and moderate levels (about 150 ..mu..M) induced only a short lag before reductase activity began. Moderate levels of sulfide (<1 mM) had no effect on N/sub 2/O reductase activity. Nitrous oxide reductase displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics in sediments from freshwater, estuarine, and alkaline-saline environments. An in situ assay was devised in which a solution of N/sub 2/O was injected into sealed glass cores containing intact sediment. Two estimates of net rates of denitrification in San Francisco Bay under approximated in situ conditions were 0.009 and 0.041 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h. Addition of chlorate to inhibit denitrification in these intact-core experiments (to estimate gross rates of N/sub 2/O consumption) resulted in approximately a 14% upward revision of estimates of net rates. These results were comparable to an in situ estimate of 0.022 mmol of N/sub 2/O per m/sup 2/ per h made with the acetylene block assay.

  18. Graphics Software For VT Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Caroline

    1991-01-01

    VTGRAPH graphics software tool for DEC/VT computer terminal or terminals compatible with it, widely used by government and industry. Callable in FORTRAN or C language, library program enabling user to cope with many computer environments in which VT terminals used for window management and graphic systems. Provides PLOT10-like package plus color or shade capability for VT240, VT241, and VT300 terminals. User can easily design more-friendly user-interface programs and design PLOT10 programs on VT terminals with different computer systems. Requires ReGis graphics set terminal and FORTRAN compiler.

  19. Characterization of recombinant glutathione reductase from the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mikyoung; Barnwell, Callie V; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Glutathione reductases catalyze the reduction of oxidized glutathione (glutathione disulfide, GSSG) using NADPH as the substrate to produce reduced glutathione (GSH), which is an important antioxidant molecule that helps maintain the proper reducing environment of the cell. A recombinant form of glutathione reductase from Colwellia psychrerythraea, a marine psychrophilic bacterium, has been biochemically characterized to determine its molecular and enzymatic properties. C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was shown to be a homodimer with a molecular weight of 48.7 kDa using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and gel filtration. The C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase sequence shows significant homology to that of Escherichia coli glutathione reductase (66 % identity), and it possesses the FAD and NADPH binding motifs, as well as absorption spectrum features which are characteristic of flavoenzymes such as glutathione reductase. The psychrophilic C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase exhibits higher k cat and k cat/K m at lower temperatures (4 °C) compared to mesophilic Baker's yeast glutathione reductase. However, C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was able to complement an E. coli glutathione reductase deletion strain in oxidative stress growth assays, demonstrating the functionality of C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase over a broad temperature range, which suggests its potential utility as an antioxidant enzyme in heterologous systems. PMID:26101017

  20. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  1. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases.

    PubMed

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K; Gang, David R; Halls, Steven C; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-12-12

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed. PMID:13129921

  2. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  3. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki , Gang; David R. , Sarkanen; Simo , Ford; Joshua D.

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  4. Shipboard fisheries management terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, R. G.; Sager, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    The needs of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMGS), National Weather Service, and the U.S. Coast Guard for locational, biological, and environmental data were assessed. The fisheries conservation zones and the yellowfin tuna jurisdiction of the NMFS operates observer programs on foreign and domestic fishing vessels. Data input terminal and data transfer and processing technology are reviewed to establish available capability. A matrix of implementation options is generated to identify the benefits of each option, and preliminary cost estimates are made. Recommendations are made for incremental application of available off the shelf hardware to obtain improved performance and benefits within a well bounded cost. Terminal recommendations are made for three interdependent shipboard units emphasizing: (1) the determination of location and fishing activity; (2) hand held data inputting and formatting in the fishing work areas; and (3) data manipulation, merging, and editing.

  5. Ice age terminations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S; Denton, George H; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-01

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2. PMID:19815769

  6. Ice Age Terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S.; Denton, George H.; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-01

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2.

  7. Mobile Phone Terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In the photo, an employee of a real estate firm is contacting his office by means of HICOM, an advanced central terminal for mobile telephones. Developed by the Orlando Division of Martin Marietta Aerospace, Orlando, Florida, and manufactured by Harris Corporation's RF Division, Rochester, N.Y., HICOM upgrades service to users, provides better system management to telephone companies, and makes more efficient use of available mobile telephone channels through a computerized central control terminal. The real estate man, for example, was able to dial his office and he could also have direct-dialed a long distance number. Mobile phones in most areas not yet served by HICOM require an operator's assistance for both local and long distance calls. HICOM improves system management by automatically recording information on all calls for accurate billing, running continual performance checks on its own operation, and reporting any malfunctions to a central office.

  8. Dusty Termination Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.H.

    2004-09-15

    In astrophysical settings, termination shocks where strong stellar wind outflows interact with the surrounding environments tend to take place in dusty regions. Just to name a few, star formation regions, planetary nebulae, supernova remnants and active galactic nuclei are all good examples. Dynamics and evolution of the associated dust clouds could have important influences on the acceleration and composition of energetic particles resulting from the diffusive shock acceleration at the termination shocks. In this note we provide a brief review of previous work predating the recent detection of ACR Mg, Na, Si and S ions which might have originated from the Kuiper belt dust. Their compositional abundance might be diagnostic of the collisional history of the Kupier belt objects.

  9. Tungstate, a Molybdate Analog Inactivating Nitrate Reductase, Deregulates the Expression of the Nitrate Reductase Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Mingde; Moureaux, Thérèse; Caboche, Michel

    1989-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1) from higher plants is a homodimeric enzyme carrying a molybdenum cofactor at the catalytic site. Tungsten can be substituted for molybdenum in the cofactor structure, resulting in an inactive enzyme. When nitratefed Nicotiana tabacum plants were grown on a nutrient solution in which tungstate was substituted for molybdate, NR activity in the leaves decreased to a very low level within 24 hours while NR protein accumulated progressively to a level severalfold higher than the control after 6 days. NR mRNA level in molybdate-grown plants exhibited a considerable day-night fluctuation. However, when plants were treated with tungstate, NR mRNA level remained very high. NR activity and protein increased over a 24-hour period when nitrate was added back to N-starved molybdate-grown plants. NR mRNA level increased markedly during the first 2 hours and then decreased. In the presence of tungstate, however, the induction of NR activity by nitrate was totally abolished while high levels of NR protein and mRNA were both induced, and the high level of NR mRNA was maintained over a 10-hour period. These results suggest that the substitution of tungsten for molybdenum in NR complex leads to an overexpression of the NR structural gene. Possible mechanisms involved in this deregulation are discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667015

  10. Remote terminal system evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, T. L.; Grams, H. L.; Lindenlaub, J. C.; Schwingendorf, S. K.; Swain, P. H.; Simmons, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    An Earth Resources Data Processing System was developed to evaluate the system for training, technology transfer, and data processing. In addition to the five sites included in this project two other sites were connected to the system under separate agreements. The experience of these two sites is discussed. The results of the remote terminal project are documented in seven reports: one from each of the five project sites, Purdue University, and an overview report summarizing the other six reports.

  11. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-02-15

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III) oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons in the periplasm to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can

  12. Eternal inflation with arrival terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltenberg, Henry; Albrecht, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the cosmological role of terminal vacua in the string theory landscape, and point out that existing work on this topic makes very strong assumptions about the properties of the terminal vacua. We explore the implications of relaxing these assumptions (by including "arrival" as well as "departure" terminals) and demonstrate that the results in earlier work are highly sensitive to their assumption of no arrival terminals. We use our discussion to make some general points about tuning and initial conditions in cosmology.

  13. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase as a cytosolic arsenate reductase.

    PubMed

    Gregus, Zoltán; Németi, Balázs

    2002-11-01

    The findings of the accompanying paper (Németi and Gregus, Toxicol: Sci. 70, 4-12) indicate that the arsenate (AsV) reductase activity of rat liver cytosol is due to an SH enzyme that uses phosphate (or its analogue, arsenate, AsV) and a purine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine) as substrates. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is such an enzyme. It catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of 6-oxopurine nucleosides according to the following scheme: guanosine (or inosine) + phosphate <--> guanine (or hypoxanthine) + ribose-1-phosphate. Therefore, we have tested the hypothesis that PNP is responsible for the thiol- and purine nucleoside-dependent reduction of AsV to AsIII by rat liver cytosol. AsIII formed from AsV was quantified by HPLC-hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis of the deproteinized incubates. The following findings support the conclusion that PNP reduces AsV to AsIII, using AsV instead of phosphate in the reaction above: (1) Specific PNP inhibitors (CI-1000, BCX-1777) at a concentration of 1 microM completely inhibited cytosolic AsV reductase activity. (2) During anion-exchange chromatography of cytosolic proteins, PNP activity perfectly coeluted with the AsV reductase activity, suggesting that both activities belong to the same protein. (3) PNP purified from calf spleen catalyzed reduction of AsV to AsIII in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) and a 6-oxopurine nucleoside (guanosine or inosine). (4) AsV reductase activity of purified PNP, like the cytosolic AsV reductase activity, was inhibited by phosphate (a substrate of PNP alternative to AsV), guanine and hypoxanthine (products of PNP favoring the reverse reaction), mercurial thiol reagents (nonspecific inhibitors of PNP), as well as CI-1000 and BCX-1777 (specific PNP inhibitors). Thus, PNP appears to be responsible for the AsV reductase activity of rat liver cytosol in the presence of DTT. Further research should clarify the mechanism and the in vivo significance of PNP

  14. T Cell Immunity to the Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase of Burkholderia pseudomallei: A Correlate of Disease Outcome in Acute Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Catherine; Goudet, Amélie; Jenjaroen, Kemajittra; Sumonwiriya, Manutsanun; Rinchai, Darawan; Musson, Julie; Overbeek, Saskia; Makinde, Julia; Quigley, Kathryn; Manji, Jiten; Spink, Natasha; Yos, Pagnarith; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Bancroft, Gregory; Robinson, John; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Dunachie, Susanna; Maillere, Bernard; Holden, Matthew; Altmann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need for a better understanding of adaptive immunity to Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis that is frequently associated with sepsis or death in patients in Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. The imperative to identify vaccine targets is driven both by the public health agenda in these regions and biological threat concerns. In several intracellular bacterial pathogens, alkyl hydroperoxidase reductases are upregulated as part of the response to host oxidative stress, and they can stimulate strong adaptive immunity. We show that alkyl hydroperoxidase reductase (AhpC) of B. pseudomallei is strongly immunogenic for T cells of ‘humanized’ HLA transgenic mice and seropositive human donors. Some T cell epitopes, such as p6, are able to bind diverse HLA class II heterodimers and stimulate strong T cell immunity in mice and humans. Importantly, patients with acute melioidosis who survive infection show stronger T cell responses to AhpC relative to those who do not. Although the sequence of AhpC is virtually invariant among global B. pseudomallei clinical isolates, a Cambodian isolate varies only in C-terminal truncation of the p6 T cell epitope, raising the possibility of selection by host immunity. This variant peptide is virtually unable to stimulate T cell immunity. For an infection in which there has been debate about centrality of T cell immunity in defense, these observations support a role for T cell immunity to AhpC in disease protection. PMID:25862821

  15. A cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase isolated from the marine denitrifier Pseudomonas nautica 617: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Besson, S; Carneiro, C; Moura, J J; Moura, I; Fauque, G

    1995-08-01

    Nitrite reductase (cytochrome cd1) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from the soluble extract of the marine denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas nautica strain 617. Cells were anaerobically grown with 10 mM nitrate as final electron acceptor. The soluble fraction was purified by four successive chromatographic steps and the purest cytochrome cd1 exhibited an A280 nm(oxidized)/A410nm(oxidized) coefficient of 0.90. In the course of purification, cytochrome cd1 specific activity presented a maximum value of 0.048 units/mg of protein. This periplasmic enzyme is a homodimer and each 60 kDa subunit contains one heme c and one heme d1 as prosthetic moieties, both in a low spin state. Redox potentials of hemes c and d1 were determined at three different pH values (6.6, 7.6 and 8.6) and did not show any pH dependence. The first 20 amino acids of the NH2-terminal region of the protein were identified and the sequence showed 45% identity with the corresponding region of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nitrite reductase but no homology to Pseudomonas stutzeri and Paracoccus denitrificans enzymes. Spectroscopic properties of Pseudomonas nautica 617 cytochrome cd1 in the ultraviolet-visible range and in electron paramagnetic resonance are described. The formation of a heme d1 -nitric-oxide complex as an intermediate of nitrite reduction was demonstrated by electron paramagnetic resonance experiments. PMID:16887530

  16. Analysis of the contribution of the globin and reductase domains to the ligand-binding properties of bacterial haemoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Farrés, Judith; Burckhardt-Herold, Susanna; Scherrer, Jan; Frey, Alexander D.; Kallio, Pauli T.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial Hbs (haemoglobins), like VHb (Vitreoscilla sp. Hb), and flavoHbs (flavohaemoglobins), such as FHP (Ralstonia eutropha flavoHb), have different autoxidation and ligand-binding rates. To determine the influence of each domain of flavoHbs on ligand binding, we have studied the kinetic ligand-binding properties of oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide to the chimaeric proteins, FHPg (truncated form of FHP comprising the globin domain alone) and VHb-Red (fusion protein between VHb and the C-terminal reductase domain of FHP) and compared them with those of their natural counterparts, FHP and VHb. Moreover, we also analysed polarity and solvent accessibility to the haem pocket of these proteins. The rate constants for the engineered proteins, VHb-Red and FHPg, do not differ significantly from those of their natural counterparts, VHb and FHP respectively. Our results suggest that the globin domain structure controls the reactivity towards oxygen, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide. The presence or absence of a reductase domain does not affect the affinity to these ligands. PMID:17617059

  17. Structural insights into the regulation of NADPH binding to reductase domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases: A concerted loop movement model.

    PubMed

    Kinatukara, Priyadarshan; Patel, Ketan D; Haque, Asfarul S; Singh, Raghavendra; Gokhale, Rajesh S; Sankaranarayananan, Rajan

    2016-06-01

    The termination module of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) and polyketide synthases (PKS) offloads the final product as an acid (occasionally also accompanied by cyclization) upon hydrolysis by employing thioesterase domains (TE-domains). Reductase domains (R-domains) of short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family offer an alternative offloading mechanism by reducing 4'-phosphopantetheine (4'-PPant) arm-tethered peptidyl chain, a thioester, to an aldehyde or an alcohol. Recent studies have highlighted their functional importance, for instance in the glycopeptidolipid (GPL) biosynthesis of Mycobacterium smegmatis, where the resulting alcoholic group is the site for subsequent modifications such as glycosylations. The mechanistic understanding of how these R-domains function in the context of multi-modular NRPS and PKS is poorly understood. In this study, conformational differences in functionally important loops, not reported previously, were identified in a new crystal form of R-domain which may be relevant to functioning in the context of assembly-line NRPS and PKS enzymology. Here, we propose a concerted loop movement model that allows gating of cofactor binding to these enzymes, enabling the release of the final product only after the substrate has reached the active site during biosynthesis, and therefore distinct from a canonical single domain SDR family of enzymes. PMID:26993465

  18. Terminal weather information management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1990-01-01

    Since the mid-1960's, microburst/windshear events have caused at least 30 aircraft accidents and incidents and have killed more than 600 people in the United States alone. This study evaluated alternative means of alerting an airline crew to the presence of microburst/windshear events in the terminal area. Of particular interest was the relative effectiveness of conventional and data link ground-to-air transmissions of ground-based radar and low-level windshear sensing information on microburst/windshear avoidance. The Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator located at Ames Research Center was employed in a line oriented simulation of a scheduled round-trip airline flight from Salt Lake City to Denver Stapleton Airport. Actual weather en route and in the terminal area was simulated using recorded data. The microburst/windshear incident of July 11, 1988 was re-created for the Denver area operations. Six experienced airline crews currently flying scheduled routes were employed as test subjects for each of three groups: (1) A baseline group which received alerts via conventional air traffic control (ATC) tower transmissions; (2) An experimental group which received alerts/events displayed visually and aurally in the cockpit six miles (approx. 2 min.) from the microburst event; and (3) An additional experimental group received displayed alerts/events 23 linear miles (approx. 7 min.) from the microburst event. Analyses of crew communications and decision times showed a marked improvement in both situation awareness and decision-making with visually displayed ground-based radar information. Substantial reductions in the variability of decision times among crews in the visual display groups were also found. These findings suggest that crew performance will be enhanced and individual differences among crews due to differences in training and prior experience are significantly reduced by providing real-time, graphic display of terminal weather hazards.

  19. Identification of an interleukin-3-regulated aldoketo reductase gene in myeloid cells which may function in autocrine regulation of myelopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Y; Tsai, S; Keller, J R; Williams, S C

    2000-03-10

    The EML hematopoietic progenitor cell line is a model system for studying molecular events regulating myeloid commitment and terminal differentiation. We used representational difference analysis to identify genes that are expressed differentially during myeloid differentiation of EML cells. One gene (named mAKRa) encoded a novel member of the aldoketo reductase (AKR) superfamily of cytosolic NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. mAKRa mRNA was detected in murine hematopoietic tissues including bone marrow, spleen, and thymus. In myeloid cell lines, mAKRa was expressed at highest levels in cells representative of promyelocytes. mAKRa mRNA levels increased rapidly in response to interleukin-3 over the first 24 h of EML cell differentiation when the cells undergo lineage commitment and extensive proliferation. mAKRa mRNA levels decreased later in the differentiation process particularly when the EML cells were cultured with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor and retinoic acid to induce terminal granulocytic maturation. mAKRa mRNA levels decreased during retinoic acid-induced terminal granulocytic differentiation of the MPRO promyelocyte cell line. AKRs act as molecular switches by catalyzing the interconversion or inactivation of bioactive molecules including steroids and prostaglandins. We propose that mAKRa may catalyze the production or catabolism of autocrine factors that promote the proliferation and/or lineage commitment of early myeloid progenitors. PMID:10702227

  20. Aldose and aldehyde reductases : structure-function studies on the coenzyme and inhibitor-binding sites.

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kabbani, O.; Old, S. E.; Ginell, S. L.; Carper, D. A.; Biosciences Division; Monash Univ.; NIH

    1999-09-03

    PURPOSE: To identify the structural features responsible for the differences in coenzyme and inhibitor specificities of aldose and aldehyde reductases. METHODS: The crystal structure of porcine aldehyde reductase in complex with NADPH and the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil was determined. The contribution of each amino acid lining the coenzyme-binding site to the binding of NADPH was calculated using the Discover package. In human aldose reductase, the role of the non-conserved Pro 216 (Ser in aldehyde reductase) in the binding of coenzyme was examined by site-directed mutagenesis. RESULTS: Sorbinil binds to the active site of aldehyde reductase and is hydrogen-bonded to Trp 22, Tyr 50, His 113, and the non-conserved Arg 312. Unlike tolrestat, the binding of sorbinil does not induce a change in the side chain conformation of Arg 312. Mutation of Pro 216 to Ser in aldose reductase makes the binding of coenzyme more similar to that of aldehyde reductase. CONCLUSIONS: The participation of non-conserved active site residues in the binding of inhibitors and the differences in the structural changes required for the binding to occur are responsible for the differences in the potency of inhibition of aldose and aldehyde reductases. We report that the non-conserved Pro 216 in aldose reductase contributes to the tight binding of NADPH.

  1. Terminal Doppler weather radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, M.; Shrader, W. W.; Wieler, J. G.

    1990-02-01

    The terminal Doppler weather radar (TDWR) system, now under development, will provide automatic detection of microbursts and low-level wind shear. This paper discusses the TDWR performance parameters and describes its structural elements, including the antenna subsystem, the transmitter, the receiver/exciter, the digital signal processor, and the radar product generator/remote monitoring subsystem. Attention is also given to the processes of the base data formation, point target removal, signal-to-noise thresholding, and velocity de-aliasing and to the TDWR algorithms and displays. A schematic diagram of the TDWR system is presented.

  2. Methyltetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism influences onset of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Brune, N; Andrich, J; Gencik, M; Saft, C; Müller, Th; Valentin, S; Przuntek, H; Epplen, J T

    2004-01-01

    Onset of Huntington's disease (HD) negatively correlates with CAG repeat length of the HD gene, which encodes the protein huntingtin. This protein interacts with the homocysteine metabolizing enzyme cystathionine betasynthase (CBS). Objective of this study was to analyze the impact of CAG repeats, polymorphisms of various homocysteine metabolizing enzymes, like CBS, Methyltetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHTR), Methionine Synthase Reductase (MSR) and methionine synthase (MS) on HD onset in 171 patients. The significant impact of CAG repeats on HD onset (chi2= 25.54, FG = 4, p<0.0001) with a significant correlation between both (R= -0.521, p=0.01) was obvious. HD patients with the homozygous MTHFR-1298-CC significantly (p = 0.024) earlier experienced HD symptoms. There was no influence demonstrable of CBS, MSR and MS. Determination of MTHFR polymorphisms and CAG repeats enables screening for subjects with putative early HD onset in order to study neuroprotective compounds in their efficacy to delay HD symptoms. PMID:15354395

  3. Involvement of nitrate reductase in auxin-induced NO synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Erdei, L

    2008-01-01

    It is well known for a long time, that nitric oxide (NO) functions in variable physiological and developmental processes in plants, however the source of this signaling molecule in the diverse plant responses is very obscure.1 Although existance of nitric oxide sythase (NOS) in plants is still questionable, LNMMA (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine)-sensitive NO generation was observed in different plant species.2,3 In addition, nitrate reductase (NR) is confirmed to have a major role as source of NO.4,5 This multifaced molecule acts also in auxin-induced lateral root (LR) formation, since exogenous auxin enhanced NO levels in regions of Arabidopsis LR initiatives. Our results pointed out the involvement of nitrate reductase enzyme in auxin-induced NO formation. In this addendum, we speculate on auxin-induced NO production in lateral root primordial formation. PMID:19704423

  4. Involvement of nitrate reductase in auxin-induced NO synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Erdei, L

    2008-11-01

    It is well known for a long time, that nitric oxide (NO) functions in variable physiological and developmental processes in plants, however the source of this signaling molecule in the diverse plant responses is very obscure.1 Although existance of nitric oxide sythase (NOS) in plants is still questionable, LNMMA (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine)-sensitive NO generation was observed in different plant species.2,3 In addition, nitrate reductase (NR) is confirmed to have a major role as source of NO.4,5 This multifaced molecule acts also in auxin-induced lateral root (LR) formation, since exogenous auxin enhanced NO levels in regions of Arabidopsis LR initiatives. Our results pointed out the involvement of nitrate reductase enzyme in auxin-induced NO formation. In this addendum, we speculate on auxin-induced NO production in lateral root primordial formation. PMID:19704423

  5. The effect of 5alpha-reductase inhibition with finasteride and dutasteride on bone mineral density in older men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mačukat, Indira Radin; Spanjol, Josip; Orlič, Zeljka Crncevič; Butorac, Marta Zuvič; Marinovič, Marin; Ćupič, Dora Fučkar

    2014-09-01

    Testosterone is converted to dihyrotestosterone by two isoenzymes of 5alpha-reductase. Finasteride and dutasteride are 5alpha-reductase inhibitors commonly used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We compared indices of bone mineral density in 50 men treated with finasteride, 50 men treated with dutasteride and 50 men as control. Bone mineral density of spine and hip were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone formation was assessed by measuring serum osteocalcin and bone resorptionby measuring serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type 1. In addition serum total testosteron and estradiol were determined. The dutasteride group had significantly higher mean bone min- eral density, mean bone mineral content, mean T score, mean Z score at femoral neck and mean total hip Z score than control. Mean total testosterone and estradiol levels were higher in the dutasteride group. There were no significant dif- ferences between the groups in lumbar spine bone density parameters or bone turnover markers. Our results provide evidence that long-term 5alpha-reductase suppression does not adversely affect bone mineral density. Dutasteride therapy could have beneficial effect on bone density. PMID:25507347

  6. The effect of 5alpha-reductase inhibition with finasteride and dutasteride on bone mineral density in older men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mačukat, Indira Radin; Spanjol, Josip; Orlič, Zeljka Crncevič; Butorac, Marta Zuvič; Marinovič, Marin; Ćupič, Dora Fučkar

    2014-09-01

    Testosterone is converted to dihyrotestosterone by two isoenzymes of 5alpha-reductase. Finasteride and dutasteride are 5alpha-reductase inhibitors commonly used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We compared indices of bone mineral density in 50 men treated with finasteride, 50 men treated with dutasteride and 50 men as control. Bone mineral density of spine and hip were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone formation was assessed by measuring serum osteocalcin and bone resorptionby measuring serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type 1. In addition serum total testosteron and estradiol were determined. The dutasteride group had significantly higher mean bone min- eral density, mean bone mineral content, mean T score, mean Z score at femoral neck and mean total hip Z score than control. Mean total testosterone and estradiol levels were higher in the dutasteride group. There were no significant dif- ferences between the groups in lumbar spine bone density parameters or bone turnover markers. Our results provide evidence that long-term 5alpha-reductase suppression does not adversely affect bone mineral density. Dutasteride therapy could have beneficial effect on bone density. PMID:25420363

  7. Structure/Function Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Role of Dynamic Motions in Mercuric Ion Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the activities and findings of our structure/function studies of the bacterial detoxification enzyme mercuric ion reductase. The objectives of the work were to obtain crystal structure information for the catalytic core of this enzyme, use the information to investigate the importance of specific parts of the enzyme to its function, and investigate the role of one domain of the enzyme in its function within cells. We describe the accomplishments towards these goals including many structures of the wild type and mutant forms of the enzyme that highlight its interactions with its Hg(II) substrate, elucidation of the role of the N-terminal domain in vitro and in vivo, and elucidation of the roles of at two conserved residues in the core in the mechanism of catalysis.

  8. Solution Structure of Pyrobaculum aerophilum DsrC, an Archaeal Homologue of the Gamma Subunit of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, John R.; Mariappan, S.V. S.; Kim, Chang Y.; Park, Min S.; Peat, Thomas S.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2001-11-29

    The solution structure of DsrC, an archaeal homologue of the g subunit of dissimilatory sulfite reductase has been determined by NMR spectroscopy. This 12.7 kDa protein from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum adopts a novel fold consisting of an orthogonal helical bundle with a b-hairpin along one side. A portion of the structure resembles the helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif common in transcriptional regulator proteins. The protein contains two disulfide bonds but remains folded in the presence of DTT. DsrC proteins from organisms other than Pyrobaculum species do not contain these disulfide bonds. A conserved cysteine next to the C-terminus, which is not involved in the disulfide bonds, is not part of the globular structure of the protein and is located on an unstructured 7-residue C-terminal arm that extends away from the center of the protein.

  9. Structure of the (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-diphosphate reductase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Rekittke, Ingo; Olkhova, Elena; Wiesner, Jochen; Demmer, Ulrike; Warkentin, Eberhard; Jomaa, Hassan; Ermler, Ulrich

    2013-12-11

    Terpenoid precursor biosynthesis occurs in human and many pathogenic organisms via the mevalonate and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways, respectively. We determined the X-ray structure of the Fe/S containing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl-diphosphate reductase (LytB) of the pathogenic protozoa Plasmodium falciparum which catalyzes the terminal step of the MEP pathway. The cloverleaf fold and the active site of P. falciparum LytB corresponds to those of the Aquifex aeolicus and Escherichia coli enzymes. Its distinct electron donor [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin was modeled to its binding site by docking calculations. The presented structural data provide a platform for a rational search of anti-malarian drugs. PMID:24188825

  10. Enzymatic reduction of disulfide bonds in lysosomes: Characterization of a Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Balasubramanian; Phan, Uyen T.; Geuze, Hans J.; Cresswell, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Proteins internalized into the endocytic pathway are usually degraded. Efficient proteolysis requires denaturation, induced by acidic conditions within lysosomes, and reduction of inter- and intrachain disulfide bonds. Cytosolic reduction is mediated enzymatically by thioredoxin, but the mechanism of lysosomal reduction is unknown. We describe here a lysosomal thiol reductase optimally active at low pH and capable of catalyzing disulfide bond reduction both in vivo and in vitro. The active site, determined by mutagenesis, consists of a pair of cysteine residues separated by two amino acids, similar to other enzymes of the thioredoxin family. The enzyme is a soluble glycoprotein that is synthesized as a precursor. After delivery into the endosomal/lysosomal system by the mannose 6-phosphate receptor, N- and C-terminal prosequences are removed. The enzyme is expressed constitutively in antigen-presenting cells and induced by IFN-γ in other cell types, suggesting a potentially important role in antigen processing.