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Sample records for mucin gene expression

  1. Regulation of Airway Mucin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Philip; Loukoianov, Artem; Wachi, Shinichiro; Wu, Reen

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are important components that exert a variety of functions in cell-cell interaction, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, and airways protection. In the conducting airways of the lungs, mucins are the major contributor to the viscoelastic property of mucous secretion, which is the major barrier to trapping inhaled microbial organism, particulates, and oxidative pollutants. The homeostasis of mucin production is an important feature in conducting airways for the maintenance of mucociliary function. Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer. Among 20 known mucin genes identified, 11 of them have been verified at either the mRNA and/or protein level in airways. The regulation of mucin genes is complicated, as are the mediators and signaling pathways. This review summarizes the current view on the mediators, the signaling pathways, and the transcriptional units that are involved in the regulation of airway mucin gene expression. In addition, we also point out essential features of epigenetic mechanisms for the regulation of these genes. PMID:17961085

  2. Design and expression of a synthetic mucin gene fragment in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dolby, N; Dombrowski, K E; Wright, S E

    1999-02-01

    Adenocarcinomas of glandular tissues produce a hypoglycosylated form of a normal glycoprotein (mucin) that elicits an immune response. A tumor-specific epitope of mucin occurs in a 20-amino-acid, tandemly repeated domain of human MUC1 mucin. A synthetic gene encoding five tandem repeats of the tumor-specific epitope of human mucin (m5tr) was designed for efficient cloning and expression in Escherichia coli for subsequent use in preparing reagent quantities of the mucin 5 tandem repeat (mtr5) polypeptide. The synthetic gene was cloned in the correct reading frame into the maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion expression vector pMAL-p2. Bacterial clones containing the mucin synthetic gene (m5tr) were shown to produce the intended recombinant fusion protein, MBP-mtr5. The fusion protein represents a significant fraction of the cell protein, 50% or more of which is secreted into the periplasm. The MBP-mtr5 protein is largely intact and easily prepared in sufficient quantity and purity for preliminary structure-function studies. PMID:10024481

  3. Shigella dysenteriae Modulates BMP Pathway to Induce Mucin Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ashidha; Iyer, Soumya Chidambaram; Gopal, Udhayakumar; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells in the intestine act as the first line of host defense against pathogens by increasing mucin production for clearance. Despite this fact, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which Shigella dysenteriae transduce mucin gene expression remain poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway in mucin gene expression during S. dysenteriae infection. In this study we demonstrate that S. dysenteriae activates BMP signaling to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression in rat ileal loop model and in vitro. We also observed that BMP pathway regulates CDX2 expression which plays a critical role in induction of MUC2 gene during S. dysenteriae infection. In SMAD4 silenced cells S. dysenteriae infection did not abrogate MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression whereas in CDX2 silenced cells it induces differential expression of MUC5AC gene. These results suggest that SMAD4-CDX2 induces MUC2 gene expression whereas SMAD4 directly influences differential expression of MUC5AC gene. Altogether, our results show that during S. dysenteriae infection the BMP pathway modulates inflammatory transcription factors CDX2 and SMAD4 to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression which plays a key role in the regulation of host mucosal defense thereby paving a cue for therapeutic application. PMID:25365201

  4. Expression of c-myc and mutation of the KRAS gene in patients with ovarian mucinous tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, X S; Sun, J; He, X L

    2015-01-01

    We examined the expression of c-myc and mutations in the KRAS gene in ovarian mucinous tumors to explore the pathogenesis of these tumors and the feasibility of targeted gene therapy. Expression of c-myc protein and mutations in the KRAS gene in 24 cases of ovarian mucinous cystadenoma, 46 cases of ovarian borderline mucinous cystadenoma, and 46 cases of ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma were detected using the immunohistochemistry PV-9000 2-step method and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The positive expression rates of c-myc in ovarian mucinous cystadenoma, borderline mucinous cystadenoma, and cystadenocarcinoma were 0, 39.1, and 65.2%, respectively (P < 0.01), while the mutation rates in KRAS were 0, 39.1 and 13.0%, respectively. The mutation rate of the borderline group was significantly higher, while rates in the other 2 groups were similar (P > 0.05). c-myc was not correlated with clinical stage, pathological grade, or age of patients with ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma or borderline mucinous cystadenoma (P > 0.05), but was correlated with tumor size (P < 0.05). Mutations in KRAS were not correlated with clinical stage or tumor size in patients with borderline mucinous cystadenoma (P > 0.05), whereas it was correlated with age (P < 0.05). In borderline mucinous cystadenoma, c-myc expression and KRAS mutations were not correlated (P > 0.05). c-myc is involved in the formation of ovarian borderline mucinous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, and the KRAS gene may contribute to the formation of borderline mucinous cystadenoma. PMID:26400304

  5. Mucin gene 19 (MUC19) expression and response to inflammatory cytokines in middle ear epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kerschner, Joseph E; Khampang, Pawjai; Erbe, Christy B; Kolker, Alexander; Cioffi, Joseph A

    2009-12-01

    Mucin gene 19 (MUC19) has been identified as a major gel-forming mucin in the human middle ear (ME). The objectives of this investigation were to characterize the expression and assess the regulation of MUC19 in the ME cell culture models utilized in the study of otitis media (OM). Findings demonstrate that MUC19 is expressed in both human immortalized cell culture (HMEEC) and chinchilla primary epithelial culture (CMEEC). ME exposure to inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 up-regulate MUC19 transcription, most robustly after exposure to TNF-alpha. Kinetic experiments suggest a relative early response in MUC19 transcription and a down-regulation after prolonged exposure. Glycoprotein production was increased in response to the increased transcription as well. Similar to other mucin genes in the ME, MUC19 is differentially regulated after exposure to inflammatory cytokines. The large size, gel-forming properties and up-regulation in response to important inflammatory cytokines of MUC19 suggest that it has significant potential to play a role in both physiology and pathophysiology of the ME. PMID:19533339

  6. Luteolin inhibited the gene expression, production and secretion of MUC5AC mucin via regulation of nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Seo, Hyo-Seok; Ryu, Jiho; Yoon, Yong Pill; Park, Su Hyun; Lee, Choong Jae

    2015-04-01

    Luteolin, a flavonoidal compound derived from Lonicera japonica Thunb. and Chrysanthemum indicum L., has been reported to show anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-carcinogenic effects. In this study, we investigated whether luteolin significantly affects the secretion, production and gene expression of airway mucin. Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with luteolin for 30 min and then stimulated with EGF (epidermal growth factor) or PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) for 24 h or the indicated periods. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression was measured by RT-PCR. Production and secretion of MUC5AC mucin protein were measured by ELISA. To elucidate the action mechanism of luteolin, effect of luteolin on PMA-induced NF-κB signaling pathway was investigated by western blot analysis. The results were as follows: (1) Luteolin inhibited the secretion of MUC5AC mucin protein induced by EGF or PMA; (2) Luteolin inhibited the production of MUC5AC mucin protein and the expression of MUC5AC mucin gene induced by EGF or PMA; (3) Luteolin inhibited PMA-induced phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitory kappa Bα (IκBα); (4) Luteolin inhibited PMA-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65. This result suggests that luteolin can regulate the secretion, production and gene expression of mucin by acting on airway epithelial cells via regulation of NF-kB signaling pathway. PMID:25285988

  7. Effects of Lupenone, Lupeol, and Taraxerol Derived from Adenophora triphylla on the Gene Expression and Production of Airway MUC5AC Mucin

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yong Pill; Lee, Hyun Jae; Lee, Dong-Ung; Lee, Sang Kook; Hong, Jang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background Adenophora triphylla var. japonica is empirically used for controlling airway inflammatory diseases in folk medicine. We evaluated the gene expression and production of mucin from airway epithelial cells in response to lupenone, lupeol and taraxerol derived from Adenophora triphylla var. japonica. Methods Confluent NCI-H292 cells were pretreated with lupenone, lupeol or taraxerol for 30 minutes and then stimulated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) for 24 hours. The MUC5AC mucin gene expression and production were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Additionally, we examined whether lupenone, lupeol or taraxerol affects MUC5AC mucin production induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), the other 2 stimulators of airway mucin production. Results Lupenone, lupeol, and taraxerol inhibited the gene expression and production of MUC5AC mucin induced by TNF-α from NCI-H292 cells, respectively. The 3 compounds inhibited the EGF or PMA-induced production of MUC5AC mucin in NCI-H292 cells. Conclusion These results indicated that lupenone, lupeol and taraxerol derived from Adenophora triphylla var. japonica regulates the production and gene expression of mucin, by directly acting on airway epithelial cells. In addition, the results partly explain the mechanism of of Adenophora triphylla var. japonica as a traditional remedy for diverse inflammatory pulmonary diseases. PMID:26175774

  8. Fasciola hepatica mucin-encoding gene: expression, variability and its potential relevance in host-parasite relationship.

    PubMed

    Cancela, Martín; Santos, Guilherme B; Carmona, Carlos; Ferreira, Henrique B; Tort, José Francisco; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2015-12-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a zoonosis with significant impact both in human and animal health. Understanding the basic processes of parasite biology, especially those related to interactions with its host, will contribute to control F. hepatica infections and hence liver pathology. Mucins have been described as important mediators for parasite establishment within its host, due to their key roles in immune evasion. In F. hepatica, mucin expression is upregulated in the mammalian invasive newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage in comparison with the adult stage. Here, we performed sequencing of mucin cDNAs prepared from NEJ RNA, resulting in six different cDNAs clusters. The differences are due to the presence of a tandem repeated sequence of 66 bp encoded by different exons. Two groups of apomucins one with three and the other with four repeats, with 459 and 393 bp respectively, were identified. These cDNAs have open reading frames encoding Ser-Thr enriched proteins with an N-terminal signal peptide, characteristic of apomucin backbone. We cloned a 4470 bp gene comprising eight exons and seven introns that encodes all the cDNA variants identified in NEJs. By real time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting approaches of individual flukes we infer that fhemuc-1 is a single-copy gene, with at least two different alleles. Our data suggest that both gene polymorphism and alternative splicing might account for apomucin variability in the fhemuc-1 gene that is upregulated in NEJ invasive stage. The relevance of this variation in host-parasite interplay is discussed. PMID:26440911

  9. The Bacillus subtilis and Lactic Acid Bacteria Probiotics Influences Intestinal Mucin Gene Expression, Histomorphology and Growth Performance in Broilers.

    PubMed

    Aliakbarpour, H R; Chamani, M; Rahimi, G; Sadeghi, A A; Qujeq, D

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of commercial monostrain and multistrain probiotics in diets on growth performance, intestinal morphology and mucin gene (MUC2) expression in broiler chicks. Three hundred seventy-eight 1-d-old male Arian broiler chicks were allocated in 3 experimental groups for 6 wk. The birds were fed on a corn-soybean based diet and depending on the addition were labeled as follows: control-unsupplemented (C), birds supplemented with Bacillus subtilis (BS) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) based probiotics. Each treatment had 6 replicates of 21 broilers each. Treatment effects on body weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio and biomarkers such as intestinal goblet cell density, villus length, villus width, and mucin gene expression were determined. Total feed intake did not differ significantly between control birds and those fed a diet with probiotics (p>0.05). However, significant differences in growth performance were found. Final body weight at 42 d of age was higher in birds fed a diet with probiotics compared to those fed a diet without probiotic (p<0.05). Inclusion of Bacillus subtilis based probiotic in the diets also significantly affected feed conversion rate (FCR) compared with control birds (p<0.05). No differences in growth performance were observed in birds fed different types of probiotic supplemented diets. Inclusion of lactic acid bacteria based probiotic in the diets significantly increased goblet cell number and villus length (p<0.05). Furthermore, diets with Bacillus subtilis based probiotics significantly increased gene expression (p<0.05), with higher intestinal MUC2 mRNA in birds fed diet with probiotics compared to those fed the control diet. In BS and LAB probiotic fed chicks, higher growth performance may be related to higher expression of the MUC2 gene in goblet cells and/or morphological change of small intestinal tract. The higher synthesis of the mucin gene after probiotic administration may

  10. The Bacillus subtilis and Lactic Acid Bacteria Probiotics Influences Intestinal Mucin Gene Expression, Histomorphology and Growth Performance in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Aliakbarpour, H. R.; Chamani, M.; Rahimi, G.; Sadeghi, A. A.; Qujeq, D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of commercial monostrain and multistrain probiotics in diets on growth performance, intestinal morphology and mucin gene (MUC2) expression in broiler chicks. Three hundred seventy-eight 1-d-old male Arian broiler chicks were allocated in 3 experimental groups for 6 wk. The birds were fed on a corn-soybean based diet and depending on the addition were labeled as follows: control-unsupplemented (C), birds supplemented with Bacillus subtilis (BS) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) based probiotics. Each treatment had 6 replicates of 21 broilers each. Treatment effects on body weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio and biomarkers such as intestinal goblet cell density, villus length, villus width, and mucin gene expression were determined. Total feed intake did not differ significantly between control birds and those fed a diet with probiotics (p>0.05). However, significant differences in growth performance were found. Final body weight at 42 d of age was higher in birds fed a diet with probiotics compared to those fed a diet without probiotic (p<0.05). Inclusion of Bacillus subtilis based probiotic in the diets also significantly affected feed conversion rate (FCR) compared with control birds (p<0.05). No differences in growth performance were observed in birds fed different types of probiotic supplemented diets. Inclusion of lactic acid bacteria based probiotic in the diets significantly increased goblet cell number and villus length (p<0.05). Furthermore, diets with Bacillus subtilis based probiotics significantly increased gene expression (p<0.05), with higher intestinal MUC2 mRNA in birds fed diet with probiotics compared to those fed the control diet. In BS and LAB probiotic fed chicks, higher growth performance may be related to higher expression of the MUC2 gene in goblet cells and/or morphological change of small intestinal tract. The higher synthesis of the mucin gene after probiotic administration may

  11. Expression of REG4 in ovarian mucinous tumors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiong; Chen, Xiaoduan; Lu, Weiguo; Lai, Maode; Lu, Bingjian

    2014-04-01

    Regenerating islet-deprived gene family, number 4 (REG4), is a novel marker for intestinal differentiation. We performed immunohistochemical studies on REG4, cytokeratin (CK)7, CK20, and caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2) in 291 ovarian mucinous tumors. There were 226 primary tumors and 65 metastatic tumors. The primary tumors comprised 69/226 mucinous cystadenomas, 79/226 mucinous borderline tumors (64/79 intestinal-type and 15/79 endocervical-like tumors), and 78/226 mucinous carcinomas. We found that REG4 expression was significantly higher in mucinous borderline tumors (30/79, 38.0%) and primary mucinous carcinomas (26/78, 33.3%) than in mucinous cystadenomas (4/69, 5.8%; P<0.05). However, REG4 expression was more commonly associated with intestinal-type, borderline, mucinous tumors rather than the endocervical-like type (30/64 vs. 0/15, P<0.001). There was a significant correlation between the REG4 and CDX2 expression profiles in primary ovarian mucinous tumors (r=0.772, P<0.001). REG4, CDX2, and diffuse CK20 had higher expression frequencies in metastatic lower gastrointestinal adenocarcinoma than in primary mucinous tumors (P<0.01). The CK7/REG4 coordinate expression profile was comparable in diagnostic value to CK7/CK20 or CK7/CDX2 profile. We conclude that REG4 expression is common in mucinous borderline tumors of the intestinal type as it is absent in the endocervical-like form in this series. Expression of CK7/REG4 may contribute to the differential diagnosis between primary and metastatic ovarian mucinous tumors. PMID:23958547

  12. Effect of dietary zinc oxide on morphological characteristics, mucin composition and gene expression in the colon of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Pieper, Robert; Rieger, Juliane; Vahjen, Wilfried; Davin, Roger; Plendl, Johanna; Meyer, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The trace element zinc is often used in the diet of weaned piglets, as high doses have resulted in positive effects on intestinal health. However, the majority of previous studies evaluated zinc supplementations for a short period only and focused on the small intestine. The hypothesis of the present study was that low, medium and high levels of dietary zinc (57, 164 and 2,425 mg Zn/kg from zinc oxide) would affect colonic morphology and innate host defense mechanisms across 4 weeks post-weaning. Histological examinations were conducted regarding the colonic morphology and neutral, acidic, sialylated and sulphated mucins. The mRNA expression levels of mucin (MUC) 1, 2, 13, 20, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, 4, interleukin (IL)-1β, 8, 10, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were also measured. The colonic crypt area increased in an age-depending manner, and the greatest area was found with medium concentration of dietary zinc. With the high concentration of dietary zinc, the number of goblet cells containing mixed neutral-acidic mucins and total mucins increased. Sialomucin containing goblet cells increased age-dependently. The expression of MUC2 increased with age and reached the highest level at 47 days of age. The expression levels of TLR2 and 4 decreased with age. The mRNA expression of TLR4 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 were down-regulated with high dietary zinc treatment, while piglets fed with medium dietary zinc had the highest expression. It is concluded that dietary zinc level had a clear impact on colonic morphology, mucin profiles and immunological traits in piglets after weaning. Those changes might support local defense mechanisms and affect colonic physiology and contribute to the reported reduction of post-weaning diarrhea. PMID:24609095

  13. Effect of Dietary Zinc Oxide on Morphological Characteristics, Mucin Composition and Gene Expression in the Colon of Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Pieper, Robert; Rieger, Juliane; Vahjen, Wilfried; Davin, Roger; Plendl, Johanna; Meyer, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The trace element zinc is often used in the diet of weaned piglets, as high doses have resulted in positive effects on intestinal health. However, the majority of previous studies evaluated zinc supplementations for a short period only and focused on the small intestine. The hypothesis of the present study was that low, medium and high levels of dietary zinc (57, 164 and 2,425 mg Zn/kg from zinc oxide) would affect colonic morphology and innate host defense mechanisms across 4 weeks post-weaning. Histological examinations were conducted regarding the colonic morphology and neutral, acidic, sialylated and sulphated mucins. The mRNA expression levels of mucin (MUC) 1, 2, 13, 20, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, 4, interleukin (IL)-1β, 8, 10, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were also measured. The colonic crypt area increased in an age-depending manner, and the greatest area was found with medium concentration of dietary zinc. With the high concentration of dietary zinc, the number of goblet cells containing mixed neutral-acidic mucins and total mucins increased. Sialomucin containing goblet cells increased age-dependently. The expression of MUC2 increased with age and reached the highest level at 47 days of age. The expression levels of TLR2 and 4 decreased with age. The mRNA expression of TLR4 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 were down-regulated with high dietary zinc treatment, while piglets fed with medium dietary zinc had the highest expression. It is concluded that dietary zinc level had a clear impact on colonic morphology, mucin profiles and immunological traits in piglets after weaning. Those changes might support local defense mechanisms and affect colonic physiology and contribute to the reported reduction of post-weaning diarrhea. PMID:24609095

  14. Osteopontin modulates inflammation, mucin production, and gene expression signatures after inhalation of asbestos in a murine model of fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Ramos-Nino, Maria E; Eugenia-Ariza, Maria; Macpherson, Maximilian B; Butnor, Kelly J; Vacek, Pamela C; McGee, Sean P; Clark, Jessica C; Steele, Chad; Mossman, Brooke T

    2011-05-01

    Inflammation and lung remodeling are hallmarks of asbestos-induced fibrosis, but the molecular mechanisms that control these events are unclear. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM) of distal bronchioles in a murine asbestos inhalation model, we show that osteopontin (OPN) is up-regulated by bronchiolar epithelial cells after chrysotile asbestos exposures. In contrast to OPN wild-type mice (OPN(+/+)) inhaling asbestos, OPN null mice (OPN(-/-)) exposed to asbestos showed less eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, diminished lung inflammation, and decreased mucin production. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-12 subunit p40, MIP1α, MIP1β, and eotaxin) also were significantly less in asbestos-exposed OPN(-/-) mice. Microarrays performed on lung tissues from asbestos-exposed OPN(+/+) and OPN(-/-) mice showed that OPN modulated the expression of a number of genes (Col1a2, Timp1, Tnc, Eln, and Col3a1) linked to fibrosis via initiation and cross talk between IL-1β and epidermal growth factor receptor-related signaling pathways. Novel targets of OPN identified include genes involved in cell signaling, immune system/defense, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cell cycle regulation. Although it is unclear whether the present findings are specific to chrysotile asbestos or would be observed after inhalation of other fibers in general, these results highlight new potential mechanisms and therapeutic targets for asbestosis and other diseases (asthma, smoking-related interstitial lung diseases) linked to OPN overexpression. PMID:21514415

  15. Asian Sand Dust Enhances the Inflammatory Response and Mucin Gene Expression in the Middle Ear

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jiwon; Go, Yoon Young; Park, Moo Kyun; Chae, Sung-Won; Lee, Seon-Heui; Song, Jae-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Asia sand dust (ASD) is known to cause various human diseases including respiratory infection. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ASD on inflammatory response in human middle ear epithelial cells (HMEECs) in vitro and in vivo. Methods. Cell viability was assessed using the cell counting kit-8 assay. The mRNA levels of various genes including COX-2, TNF-a, MUC 5AC, MUC 5B, TP53, BAX, BCL-2, NOX4, and SOD1 were analyzed using semiquantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction. COX-2 protein levels were determined by western blot analysis. Sprague Dawley rats were used for in vivo investigations of inflammatory reactions in the middle ear epithelium as a result of ASD injection. Results. We observed dose-dependent decrease in HMEEC viability. ASD exposure significantly increased COX-2, TNF-a, MUC5AC, and MUC5B mRNA expression. Also, ASD affected the mRNA levels of apoptosis- and oxidative stress-related genes. Western blot analysis revealed a dose-dependent increase in COX-2 production. Animal studies also demonstrated an ASD-induced inflammatory response in the middle ear epithelium. Conclusion. Environmental ASD exposure can result in the development of otitis media. PMID:27095518

  16. GABA selectively increases mucin-1 expression in isolated pig jejunum.

    PubMed

    Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Sponder, Gerhard; Pieper, Robert; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Deiner, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase, which is expressed in the central nervous system and in various other tissues including the intestine. Moreover, GABA can be ingested in vegetarian diets or produced by bacterial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. As previous studies in lung have suggested a link between locally increased GABA availability and mucin 5AC production, the present study sought to test whether the presence or lack of GABA (and its precursor glutamine) has an effect on intestinal mucin expression. Porcine jejunum epithelial preparations were incubated with two different amounts of GABA or glutamine on the mucosal side for 4 h, and changes in the relative gene expression of seven different mucins, enzymes involved in mucin shedding, GABA B receptor, enzymes involved in glutamine/GABA metabolism, glutathione peroxidase 2, and interleukin 10 were examined by quantitative PCR (TaqMan(®) assays). Protein expression of mucin-1 (MUC1) was analyzed by Western blot. On the RNA level, only MUC1 was significantly up-regulated by both GABA concentrations compared with the control. Glutamine-treated groups showed the same trend. On the protein level, all treatment groups showed a significantly higher MUC1 expression than the control group. We conclude that GABA selectively increases the expression of MUC1, a cell surface mucin that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms, because of its size and negative charge, and therefore propose that the well-described positive effects of glutamine on enterocytes and intestinal integrity are partly attributable to effects of its metabolite GABA. PMID:26471792

  17. Identification of Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Appendiceal Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma from Mucinous Cystadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard Licheng; Ali, Shadan; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Beydoun, Rafic

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of appendix is a rare entity. Differentiating mucinous cystadenocarcinoma from mucinous cystadenoma is very challenging and depends on establishing the presence of malignant cells in the appendix wall. The invasion may be very difficult to assess in some cases, especially in early stages of the disease, which could have devastating prognostic effects on patients. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an ancillary test that can differentiate the mucinous cystadenocarcinoma from mucinous cystadenoma. So far, there is no report available about the role of differentially expressed miRNAs in the diagnosis of appendiceal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Materials and Methods Six confirmed mucinous appendiceal cystadenocarcinoma and twelve mucinous appendiceal cystadenoma cases were selected. The total RNAs were extracted from the formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimen of these cases. The comprehensive miRNA microarray expression profiling from pooled aliquots of RNA samples from these two entities were analyzed to detect the differentially expressed miRNAs in mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. The best seven differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in individual cases by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). Results The microarray miRNA expression profiling analysis revealed 646 miRNAs that were differentially expressed in the mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. Among these differentially expressed miRNAs, the expression of 80 miRNAs showed statistical difference (p<0.01). The quantitative RT-PCR validated that the expression of miR-1, miR-4328 was significantly down regulated in mucinous cystadenocarcinoma compared to the mucinous cystadenoma (p<0.05). On the other hand, the expression of miR-200b, miR-200c, miR-451, miR-223 and miR-21 were significantly upregulated in mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (p<0.05). Conclusion The expression levels of miRNAs tested were significantly altered in the appendiceal mucinous cystadenocarcinoma

  18. Identification of a polymorphic mucin-like gene expressed in the midgut of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, using an integrated bulked segregant and differential display analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Morlais, I; Severson, D W

    2001-01-01

    The identification of putative differentially expressed genes within genome regions containing QTL determining susceptibility of the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, to the malarial parasite, Plasmodium gallinaceum, was investigated using an integrated, targeted approach based on bulked segregant and differential display analysis. A mosquito F2 population was obtained from pairwise matings between the parasite-susceptible RED strain and the resistant MOYO-R substrain. DNA from female carcasses was used to genotype individuals at RFLP markers of known chromosomal position around the major QTL (pgs 1). Midguts, dissected 48 hr after an infected blood meal, were used to prepare two RNA bulks, each representing one of the parental genotypes at the QTL interval. The RNA bulks were compared by differential display PCR. A mucin-like protein gene (AeIMUC1) was isolated and characterized. The gene maps within the pgs 1 QTL interval and is expressed in the adult female midgut. AeIMUC1 RNA abundance decreased with time after blood meal ingestion. No differential expression was observed between the two mosquito strains but three different alleles with inter- and intrastrain allelic polymorphisms including indels and SNPs were characterized. The AeIMUC1 gene chromosome location and allelic polymorphisms raise the possibility that the protein might be involved in parasite-mosquito interactions. PMID:11454761

  19. Polymorphisms in mucin genes in the development of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Rong; Gao, Fang; Zhou, Cheng-Jiang; Jia, Yan-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In areas of high prevalence, such as Japan, South Korea and China, most cases of GC are related to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), which involves well-characterized sequential stages, including infection, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and GC. Mucins are the most abundant high-molecular-weight glycoproteins in mucus, which is the first line of defense and plays a major role in blocking pathogenic factors. Normal gastric mucosa shows expression of MUC1, MUC5AC and MUC6 that is specific to cell type. However, the specific pattern of MUC1, MUC5AC and MUC6 expression is changed in gastric carcinogenesis, accompanied by de novo expression of secreted MUC2. Recent studies have provided evidence that variations in these mucin genes affect many steps of GC development, such as H. pylori infection, and gastric precancerous lesions. In this review, we focus on studies of the association between polymorphisms in mucin genes and development of GC. This information should be helpful for the early detection, surveillance, and treatment of GC. PMID:26600932

  20. REG4 Is Highly Expressed in Mucinous Ovarian Cancer: A Potential Novel Serum Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Lehtinen, Laura; Vesterkvist, Pia; Roering, Pia; Korpela, Taina; Hattara, Liisa; Kaipio, Katja; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Hynninen, Johanna; Auranen, Annika; Davidson, Ben; Haglund, Caj; Iljin, Kristiina; Grenman, Seija; Siitari, Harri; Carpen, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative diagnostics of ovarian neoplasms rely on ultrasound imaging and the serum biomarkers CA125 and HE4. However, these markers may be elevated in non-neoplastic conditions and may fail to identify most non-serous epithelial cancer subtypes. The objective of this study was to identify histotype-specific serum biomarkers for mucinous ovarian cancer. The candidate genes with mucinous histotype specific expression profile were identified from publicly available gene-expression databases and further in silico data mining was performed utilizing the MediSapiens database. Candidate biomarker validation was done using qRT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining of tumor tissue microarrays. The expression level of the candidate gene in serum was compared to the serum CA125 and HE4 levels in a patient cohort of prospectively collected advanced ovarian cancer. Database searches identified REG4 as a potential biomarker with specificity for the mucinous ovarian cancer subtype. The specific expression within epithelial ovarian tumors was further confirmed by mRNA analysis. Immunohistochemical staining of ovarian tumor tissue arrays showed distinctive cytoplasmic expression pattern only in mucinous carcinomas and suggested differential expression between benign and malignant mucinous neoplasms. Finally, an ELISA based serum biomarker assay demonstrated increased expression only in patients with mucinous ovarian cancer. This study identifies REG4 as a potential serum biomarker for histotype-specific detection of mucinous ovarian cancer and suggests serum REG4 measurement as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for postoperative follow-up of patients with mucinous ovarian cancer. PMID:26981633

  1. REG4 Is Highly Expressed in Mucinous Ovarian Cancer: A Potential Novel Serum Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Laura; Vesterkvist, Pia; Roering, Pia; Korpela, Taina; Hattara, Liisa; Kaipio, Katja; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Hynninen, Johanna; Auranen, Annika; Davidson, Ben; Haglund, Caj; Iljin, Kristiina; Grenman, Seija; Siitari, Harri; Carpen, Olli

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative diagnostics of ovarian neoplasms rely on ultrasound imaging and the serum biomarkers CA125 and HE4. However, these markers may be elevated in non-neoplastic conditions and may fail to identify most non-serous epithelial cancer subtypes. The objective of this study was to identify histotype-specific serum biomarkers for mucinous ovarian cancer. The candidate genes with mucinous histotype specific expression profile were identified from publicly available gene-expression databases and further in silico data mining was performed utilizing the MediSapiens database. Candidate biomarker validation was done using qRT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining of tumor tissue microarrays. The expression level of the candidate gene in serum was compared to the serum CA125 and HE4 levels in a patient cohort of prospectively collected advanced ovarian cancer. Database searches identified REG4 as a potential biomarker with specificity for the mucinous ovarian cancer subtype. The specific expression within epithelial ovarian tumors was further confirmed by mRNA analysis. Immunohistochemical staining of ovarian tumor tissue arrays showed distinctive cytoplasmic expression pattern only in mucinous carcinomas and suggested differential expression between benign and malignant mucinous neoplasms. Finally, an ELISA based serum biomarker assay demonstrated increased expression only in patients with mucinous ovarian cancer. This study identifies REG4 as a potential serum biomarker for histotype-specific detection of mucinous ovarian cancer and suggests serum REG4 measurement as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for postoperative follow-up of patients with mucinous ovarian cancer. PMID:26981633

  2. Mucin 1 Regulates Cox-2 Gene in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sritama; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Grover, Priyanka; Rao, Shanti; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2015-01-01

    Objective Eighty percent of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAs) overexpress mucin 1 (MUC1), a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein. MUC1high PDA patients also express high levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and show poor prognosis. The cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 (MUC1-CT) partakes in oncogenic signaling, resulting in accelerated cancer progression. Our aim was to understand the regulation of Cox-2 expression by MUC1. Methods Levels of COX-2 and MUC1 were determined in MUC1−/−, MUC1low, and MUC1high PDA cells and tumors using reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Proliferative and invasive potential was assessed using MTT and Boyden chamber assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed to evaluate binding of MUC1-CT to the promoter of COX-2 gene. Results Significantly higher levels of COX-2 mRNA and protein were detected in MUC1high versus MUC1low/null cells, which were recapitulated in vivo. In addition, deletion of MUC1 gene and transient knockdown of MUC1 led to decreased COX-2 level. Also, MUC1-CT associated with the COX-2 promoter at ∼1000 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site, the same gene locus where nuclear factor κB p65 associates with the COX-2 promoter. Conclusions Data supports a novel regulation of COX-2 gene by MUC1 in PDA, the intervention of which may lead to a better therapeutic targeting in PDA patients. PMID:26035123

  3. Muc5ac Mucin Expression During Rat Skin Development

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, V.; Segal-Eiras, A.; Barbeito, C.G.; Croce, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Some mucin genes have been detected during human embryonic and fetal organ development; however, little is known about mucin expression in epidermal development, neither in humans nor in other species. The present research was developed to explore Muc5ac skin expression during pre- and post-natal rat development. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blotting (WB) and RT-PCR were employed. By IHC, Muc5ac protein was found early in embryonic epidermis from day 13 of gestation until seven days after birth when the surface epidermis became negative and the reaction was restricted to secreting sebum cells. In coincidence with IHC findings, WB analysis showed a band at approximately 200KDa at the same periods of development. Results were also confirmed by RT-PCR. Muc5ac expression in rat embryonic epidermis suggests that Muc5ac may play a protective role in embryonic skin previous to birth which may be replaced by pile covering. To our knowledge, this is the first report that confirmed Muc5ac expression during skin development. PMID:25820562

  4. Virulent Shigella flexneri Affects Secretion, Expression, and Glycosylation of Gel-Forming Mucins in Mucus-Producing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Brice; Fischer, Natalie; Chevalier-Curt, Marie Joncquel; Rossez, Yannick; Roux, Pascal; Robbe Masselot, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Mucin glycoproteins are secreted in large amounts by the intestinal epithelium and constitute an efficient component of innate immune defenses to promote homeostasis and protect against enteric pathogens. In this study, our objective was to investigate how the bacterial enteropathogen Shigella flexneri, which causes bacillary dysentery, copes with the mucin defense barrier. We report that upon in vitro infection of mucin-producing polarized human intestinal epithelial cells, virulent S. flexneri manipulates the secretion of gel-forming mucins. This phenomenon, which is triggered only by virulent strains, results in accumulation of mucins at the cell apical surface, leading to the appearance of a gel-like structure that favors access of bacteria to the cell surface and the subsequent invasion process. We identify MUC5AC, a gel-forming mucin, as a component of this structure. Formation of this gel does not depend on modifications of electrolyte concentrations, induction of trefoil factor expression, endoplasmic reticulum stress, or response to unfolded proteins. In addition, transcriptional and biochemical analyses of infected cells reveal modulations of mucin gene expression and modifications of mucin glycosylation patterns, both of which are induced by virulent bacteria in a type III secretion system-dependent manner. Thus, S. flexneri has developed a dedicated strategy to alter the mucus barrier by targeting key elements of the gel-forming capacity of mucins: gene transcription, protein glycosylation, and secretion. PMID:23876800

  5. Regulation of multidrug resistance 1 expression by CDX2 in ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Koh, Iemasa; Hinoi, Takao; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Hirata, Eiji; Nosaka, Suguru; Niitsu, Hiroaki; Miguchi, Masashi; Adachi, Tomohiro; Yasui, Wataru; Ohdan, Hideki; Kudo, Yoshiki

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is an aggressive gynecological malignancy with a high mortality rate. Resistance against chemotherapeutic agents often develops in ovarian cancer patients, contributing to high recurrence rates. The multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1/ABCB1) gene encodes P-glycoprotein, which affects the pharmacokinetic properties of anticancer agents. We previously reported that the Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor CDX2 transcriptionally regulates MDR1 expression in colorectal cancer. CDX2 is a factor that influences cancer cell differentiation, malignancy, and cancer progression. We hypothesized that profiling of CDX2 and MDR1 expression could be an effective strategy for predicting anticancer drug resistance. We studied the expression of these factors in clinical samples from ovarian cancer patients. We found that endogenous MDR1 expression was positively associated with CDX2 expression in ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma. Using ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma cell lines, we also observed decreased MDR1 expression following inhibition of CDX2 by RNA interference. In addition, CDX2 overexpression in MN-1 cells, which display low endogenous CDX2, resulted in upregulation of MDR1 expression. CDX2 induced MDR1-dependent resistance to vincristine and paclitaxel, which was reversed by treatment with the MDR1-specific inhibitor verapamil. Our findings show that CDX2 promotes upregulation of MDR1 expression, leading to drug resistance in ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma. Therefore, our study demonstrates the potential of novel chemotherapy regimens based on CDX2 status and MDR1 expression in ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma. PMID:27060927

  6. Expression profile of mucins in ovarian mucinous tumors: distinguishing primary ovarian from metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jayson; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian mucinous tumors (OMTs) of the intestinal type share morphologic features with primary tumors of other sites, and it can often be difficult to distinguish primary ovarian from metastatic mucinous tumors. MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6 expressions were studied by immunohistochemistry in 36 OMTs of intestinal type (17 malignant, 19 borderline), 18 pancreatic, 12 biliary, 15 esophageal, 9 gastric, and 7 colorectal/appendiceal adenocarcinomas. All samples were from primary sites, except for colorectal tumors which were from ovarian metastases. Borderline and malignant OMTs show similar mucin immunoprofile, being strongly and uniformly positive for MUC5AC (97.2% of cases), whereas only focally positive for MUC1 (19.4%), MUC2 (38.9%), and MUC6 (22.2%). The positive frequencies of pancreatic adenocarcinomas for MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6, respectively, were 100%, 16.7%, 94.4%, and 61.1%; for biliary (cholangiocarcinomas) were 91.7%, 0%, 16.7%, and 8.3%; for esophageal carcinomas were 73.3%, 33.3%, 53.3%, and 26.7%; for gastric carcinomas were 44.4%, 44.4%, 44.4%, and 0% and for lower gastrointestinal tract cancers were 28.6%, 85.7%, 42.9%, and 0%. Our study shows that OMTs are usually MUC5AC+/MUC1-, which is different from pancreatic, biliary, esophageal, gastric, and colorectal/appendiceal carcinomas. We recommend that these mucin stains be added to the panel of immunostains to differentiate metastatic tumors to the ovary from primary OMTs. PMID:24487472

  7. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant. PMID:17600317

  8. Genome wide analysis of the bovine mucin genes and their gastrointestinal transcription profile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucins are large glycoproteins implicated in protection of all mucosal surfaces. In humans and rodents, the mucin gene family has been well described and previous studies have investigated the distribution and function of mucins in the respiratory, urogenital and gastrointestinal (GI) tracts. In con...

  9. Two Patients with Dry Eye Disease Followed Up Using an Expression Assay of Ocular Surface Mucin

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Yumiko; Shoji, Jun; Harada, Natsuko; Inada, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report 2 patients with dry eye disease followed up using the expression levels of ocular surface mucin. Case Reports Patient 1: a 57-year-old woman with Sjögren's syndrome-associated dry eyes experienced severe dryness and foreign body sensation in both her eyes, and instilled sodium hyaluronate ophthalmic solution 0.3% about 10–15 times daily. We measured the expression levels of MUC5AC mRNA (MUC5AC) and MUC16 mRNA (MUC16) by using real-time reversed transcription polymerase chain reaction for the specimens of modified impression cytology. Expression levels of MUC5AC and MUC16 on her ocular surface were very low. Subjective symptoms and expression levels of ocular surface mucin improved after combined treatment of rebamipide (4 times daily) and fluorometholone (once daily) ophthalmic suspension. Patient 2: a 62-year-old man with chronic graft-versus-host disease-associated dry eye experienced severe foreign body sensation and developed superficial punctate keratopathy with mucous thread and filamentary keratitis. Expression level of MUC5AC was very high at baseline. Subjective symptoms and expression levels of ocular surface mucin improved by combined treatment of rebamipide (4 times daily) and fluorometholone (once daily) ophthalmic suspension. Conclusion Clinical test for MUC gene expression on the ocular surface was found to be useful in the follow-up of dry eye treatment. PMID:27194990

  10. Transmembrane mucins as novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Pamela E; Danysh, Brian P; Dharmaraj, Neeraja; Carson, Daniel D

    2011-01-01

    Membrane-tethered mucin glycoproteins are abundantly expressed at the apical surfaces of simple epithelia, where they play important roles in lubricating and protecting tissues from pathogens and enzymatic attack. Notable examples of these mucins are MUC1, MUC4 and MUC16 (also known as cancer antigen 125). In adenocarcinomas, apical mucin restriction is lost and overall expression is often highly increased. High-level mucin expression protects tumors from killing by the host immune system, as well as by chemotherapeutic agents, and affords protection from apoptosis. Mucin expression can increase as the result of gene duplication and/or in response to hormones, cytokines and growth factors prevalent in the tumor milieu. Rises in the normally low levels of mucin fragments in serum have been used as markers of disease, such as tumor burden, for many years. Currently, several approaches are being examined that target mucins for immunization or nanomedicine using mucin-specific antibodies. PMID:22201009

  11. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Stephen; Abel, Paul; Madaan, Sanjeev; Jeffs, James; Chaudhary, Khurram; Stamp, Gordon; Lalani, El-Nasir

    2002-01-01

    Abstract MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor (AR) activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1 protein expression: 1) AR+MUC1+ [DAR17+19 (AR transfectants of DU-145), ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2) AR-MUC1+ [DZeo1 (AR-vector control), DU-145, BT20,MDA-MB-231, and MCF7]; 3) AR+MUC1- (LNCaP and LNCaP-r). Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1 expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide (4-OH), a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1 expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1+ cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1 expression with AR activation (P (range) =.01 to.0001), reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1 was associated with a significant (P (range) =.002 to.001) reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1 mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes. PMID:11922395

  12. Transforming Growth Factor-β2 Induces Bronchial Epithelial Mucin Expression in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hong Wei; Balzar, Silvana; Seedorf, Gregory J.; Westcott, Jay Y.; Trudeau, John B.; Silkoff, Phil; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2004-01-01

    The transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family is important for tissue repair in pathological conditions including asthma. However, little is known about the impact of either TGF-β1 or TGF-β2 on asthmatic airway epithelial mucin expression. We evaluated bronchial epithelial TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 expression and their effects on mucin expression, and the role of TGF-β1 or TGF-β2 in interleukin (IL)-13-induced mucin expression. Epithelial TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and mucin expression were evaluated in endobronchial biopsies from asthmatics and normal subjects. The effects of TGF-β1 or TGF-β2 on mucin MUC5AC protein and mRNA expression, and the impact of IL-13 on epithelial TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and MUC5AC were determined in cultured bronchial epithelial cells from endobronchial brushings of both subject groups. In biopsy tissue, epithelial TGF-β2 expression levels were higher than TGF-β1 in both asthmatics and normals. TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1, was increased in asthmatics compared with normals, and significantly correlated with mucin expression. TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1, increased mucin expression in cultured epithelial cells from both subject groups. IL-13 increased the release of TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1, from epithelial cells. A neutralizing TGF-β2 antibody partially inhibited IL-13-induced mucin expression. These data suggest that TGF-β2 production by asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells may increase airway mucin expression. IL-13-induced mucin expression may occur in part through TGF-β2 up-regulation. PMID:15466377

  13. Transforming growth factor-beta2 induces bronchial epithelial mucin expression in asthma.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hong Wei; Balzar, Silvana; Seedorf, Gregory J; Westcott, Jay Y; Trudeau, John B; Silkoff, Phil; Wenzel, Sally E

    2004-10-01

    The transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta family is important for tissue repair in pathological conditions including asthma. However, little is known about the impact of either TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta2 on asthmatic airway epithelial mucin expression. We evaluated bronchial epithelial TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2 expression and their effects on mucin expression, and the role of TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta2 in interleukin (IL)-13-induced mucin expression. Epithelial TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, and mucin expression were evaluated in endobronchial biopsies from asthmatics and normal subjects. The effects of TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta2 on mucin MUC5AC protein and mRNA expression, and the impact of IL-13 on epithelial TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, and MUC5AC were determined in cultured bronchial epithelial cells from endobronchial brushings of both subject groups. In biopsy tissue, epithelial TGF-beta2 expression levels were higher than TGF-beta1 in both asthmatics and normals. TGF-beta2, but not TGF-beta1, was increased in asthmatics compared with normals, and significantly correlated with mucin expression. TGF-beta2, but not TGF-beta1, increased mucin expression in cultured epithelial cells from both subject groups. IL-13 increased the release of TGF-beta2, but not TGF-beta1, from epithelial cells. A neutralizing TGF-beta2 antibody partially inhibited IL-13-induced mucin expression. These data suggest that TGF-beta2 production by asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells may increase airway mucin expression. IL-13-induced mucin expression may occur in part through TGF-beta2 up-regulation. PMID:15466377

  14. Upregulation of Intestinal Mucin Expression by the Probiotic Bacterium E. coli Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mohamed M

    2012-06-01

    The probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been reported to have various health benefits; however, very little is known about their underlying mechanisms. In this regard, the present study aimed to elucidate the effect of the bacterium on mucin production by intestinal epithelial cells. Incubation of HT-29 cells with EcN lead to a contact time-dependent rise in mRNA levels of the MUC2, MUC3, MUC5AC, and MUC5A. The expression was markedly higher with MUC5AC gene. In most cases, MUC genes expression was more pronounced in polarized cells compared to non-polarized ones. In contrast to MUC3, the basal stimulation of polarized cells brought about markedly higher levels of other tested mucins. Similar but milder results were observed when living EcN was replaced by inactivated bacteria. With exception of MUC3, the conditioned media showed no significant effect on the mRNA level of the tested mucins. The above-mentioned mRNA results were confirmed on protein level using enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). In contrast to other treatments, basal stimulation of polarized cells showed a growth phase-dependent MUC induction with more prominent effect by stationary-phase bacteria. In contrast to MUC 2 and MUC3, the induction of MUC5AC and MUC5B showed a bacterial count-dependent pattern. In conclusion, EcN was found to stimulate MUC gene expression in HT-29 intestinal cells. This stimulation was more distinct with polarized cells. Such observation may partially interpret some health benefits of the probiotic bacterium including antagonizing pathogen adhesion and protection of the intestinal mucosa. PMID:26781849

  15. Differential expression of mucins in Middle Eastern patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    AL-KHAYAL, KHAYAL; ABDULLA, MAHA; AL-OBAID, OMAR; ZUBAIDI, AHMAD; VAALI-MOHAMMED, MANSOOR-ALI; ALSHEIKH, ABDULMALIK; AHMAD, REHAN

    2016-01-01

    Mucin overexpression has been implicated in the tumorigenesis and progression of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, data obtained on the prognostic importance of mucin expression in CRC is inconsistent. Due to lack of data on mucin expression and the increase in CRC incidence in Saudi Arabia, the aim of the present study was to analyze the mucin expression profile in patients with CRC in this ethnic group. The present study consisted of 22 patients that underwent surgery for CRC. Histopathological and immunohistochemical staining was performed on CRC tumor and adjacent normal tissues. A tissue microarray was prepared from the tumor and normal adjacent samples to investigate the mucin expression profile using immunohistochemistry. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human colorectal cancer tissues were immunostained with mucin 1 (MUC1), mucin 2 (MUC2) and mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) antibodies. Associations between mucin expression and histopathological variables were evaluated. The present study indicated that MUC1 was highly expressed in early (stage I and II; P=0.0016) and late (stage III and IV; P<0.0001) stage CRC tissues compared to normal adjacent tissues. However, MUC2 expression was observed to be downregulated in early and late stage CRC tissues compared to normal and adjacent tissues. Furthermore, serum MUC1 levels were observed to be increased in early and late stage CRC. The present findings indicate that MUC1 expression was significantly higher in early and late stage CRC tissues and MUC2 was downregulated in CRC tissues compared with normal adjacent tissues, and serum MUC1 protein was significantly higher in CRC patients compared to control serum. In conclusion, during colorectal tumorigenesis the pattern of MUC1 and MUC2 expression is altered in Saudi Arabian patients with CRC compared with normal. A higher expression of MUC1 may be used as an independent biomarker in various stages of CRC tumors, which would aid in the early detection of CRC. PMID:27347157

  16. Differential expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in mucinous and nonmucinous colorectal carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; El-Hawary, Amira K; Abdel-Aziz, Azza

    2013-08-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is a major health problem all over the world. Mucinous CRCs are known to have a peculiar behavior and genetic derangements. This study aimed to investigate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 expression in mucinous and nonmucinous CRCs. We studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with mucinous and nonmucinous CRC who underwent radical surgery from January 2007 to January 2012. High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using a modified mechanical pencil tip technique, and paraffin sections were submitted for immunohistochemistry using MMP-13. Statistical analysis was performed for clinical and pathological data of all studied cases together with MMP-13 expression in mucinous and nonmucinous groups. Mucinous carcinoma was significantly associated with young age, more depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and less peritumoral and intratumoral neutrophils. Nonmucinous carcinomas showed higher MMP-13 expression compared with mucinous carcinomas. Despite the negative or low expression of MMP-13, mucinous carcinomas had more depth of invasion and more frequency of lymph node metastasis than did nonmucinous carcinomas. PMID:23665089

  17. Helicobacter pylori and gastric mucin expression: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Niv, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and mucin expression in gastric mucosa. METHODS: English Medical literature searches were conducted for gastric mucin expression in H. pylori infected people vs uninfected people. Searches were performed up to December 31th 2014, using MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and CENTRAL. Studies comparing mucin expression in the gastric mucosa in patients positive and negative for H. pylori infection, were included. Meta-analysis was performed by using Comprehensive meta-analysis software (Version 3, Biostat Inc., Englewood, NJ, United States). Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated compared mucin expression in individual studies by using the random effects model. Heterogeneity between studies was evaluated using the Cochran Q-test, and it was considered to be present if the Q-test P value was less than 0.10. I2 statistic was used to measure the proportion of inconsistency in individual studies, with I2 > 50% representing substantial heterogeneity. We also calculated a potential publication bias. RESULTS: Eleven studies, which represent 53 sub-studies of 15 different kinds of mucin expression, were selected according to the inclusion criteria. Every kind of mucin has been considered as one study. When a specific mucin has been studied in more than one paper, we combined the results in a nested meta-analysis of this particular mucin: MUC2, MUC6, STn, Paradoxical con A, Tn, T, Type 1 chain mucin, LeA, SLeA, LeB, AB-PAS, MUC1, and MUC5AC. The odds ratio of mucin expression in random analysis was 2.33, 95%CI: 1.230-4.411, P = 0.009, higher expression in H. pylori infected patients. Odds ratio for mucin expression in H. pylori positive patients was higher for MUC6 (9.244, 95%CI: 1.567-54.515, P = 0.014), and significantly lower for MUC5AC (0.447, 95%CI: 0.211-0.949, P = 0.036). Thus, H. pylori infection may increase MUC6 expression and decrease MUC5AC expression by

  18. Relation of glypican-3 and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis of mucinous and non-mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohammad, Mie Ali; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal

    2015-06-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a member of the membrane-bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans. E-cadherin is an adhesive receptor that is believed to act as a tumor suppressor gene. Many studies had investigated E-cadherin expressions in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) while only one study had investigated GPC3 expression in CRC. This study aims to investigate expression of GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal mucinous carcinoma (MA) and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA) using manual tissue microarray technique. Tumor tissue specimens are collected from 75 cases of MC and 75 cases of NMA who underwent radical surgery from Jan 2007 to Jan 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. Their clinicopathological parameters and survival data were revised and analyzed using established statistical methodologies. High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique and immunohistochemistry for GPC3 and E-cadherin was done. NMA showed higher expression of GPC3 than MA with no statistically significant relation. NMA showed a significantly higher E-cadherin expression than MA. GPC3 and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in NMA, but not in MA, group. In NMA group, there was no significant relation between either GPC3 or E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features. In a univariate analysis, neither GPC3 nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS). GPC3 and E-cadherin expressions are not independent prognostic factors in CRC. However, expressions of both are significantly interrelated in NMA patients, suggesting an excellent interplay between both, in contrast to MA. Further molecular studies are needed to further explore the relationship between GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25619476

  19. Identification of a Novel Mucin Gene HCG22 Associated With Steroid-Induced Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Shinwu; Patel, Nitin; Edlund, Christopher K.; Hartiala, Jaana; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Itakura, Tatsuo; Wu, Pei-Chang; Avery, Robert L.; Davis, Janet L.; Flynn, Harry W.; Lalwani, Geeta; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Wafapoor, Hussein; Hijikata, Minako; Keicho, Naoto; Gao, Xiaoyi; Argüeso, Pablo; Allayee, Hooman; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pletcher, Mathew T.; Conti, David V.; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Eaton, Alexander M.; Fini, M. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The pathophysiology of ocular hypertension (OH) leading to primary open-angle glaucoma shares many features with a secondary form of OH caused by treatment with glucocorticoids, but also exhibits distinct differences. In this study, a pharmacogenomics approach was taken to discover candidate genes for this disorder. Methods. A genome-wide association study was performed, followed by an independent candidate gene study, using a cohort enrolled from patients treated with off-label intravitreal triamcinolone, and handling change in IOP as a quantitative trait. Results. An intergenic quantitative trait locus (QTL) was identified at chromosome 6p21.33 near the 5′ end of HCG22 that attained the accepted statistical threshold for genome-level significance. The HCG22 transcript, encoding a novel mucin protein, was expressed in trabecular meshwork cells, and expression was stimulated by IL-1, and inhibited by triamcinolone acetate and TGF-β. Bioinformatic analysis defined the QTL as an approximately 4 kilobase (kb) linkage disequilibrium block containing 10 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Four of these SNPs were identified in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) GTEx eQTL browser as modifiers of HCG22 expression. Most are predicted to disrupt or improve motifs for transcription factor binding, the most relevant being disruption of the glucocorticoid receptor binding motif. A second QTL was identified within the predicted signal peptide of the HCG22 encoded protein that could affect its secretion. Translation, O-glycosylation, and secretion of the predicted HCG22 protein was verified in cultured trabecular meshwork cells. Conclusions. Identification of two independent QTLs that could affect expression of the HCG22 mucin gene product via two different mechanisms (transcription or secretion) is highly suggestive of a role in steroid-induced OH. PMID:25813999

  20. Mucin1 expression in focal epidermal dysplasia of actinic keratosis

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Luz Marina; Rojas, Héctor; Ramírez, Richard; Reyes, Oscar; Suárez, Ambar; Ortega, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    Background Actinic keratoses (AKs) are generally considered as premalignant skin lesions that can progress into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in situ and invasive SCC. However, its progression to SCC is still matter of debate. A transmembrane glycoprotein that contributes to the progression of certain premalignant and malignant lesions is mucin1 (MUC1). Nevertheless, their functions in the skin lesions are not yet fully clear. Therefore, the aim of this study is to ascertain whether MUC1 is present in the focal epidermal dysplasia of AK. Methods Fourteen skin biopsies from patients diagnosed with AK were selected. They were classified according to the degree of dysplasia in keratinocyte intraepidermal neoplasia (KIN) I, KIN II, and KIN III. In five biopsies the three degrees were present, in two biopsies both KIN I and KIN II, in four biopsies only KIN I, and in three biopsies only KIN III. The presence of MUC1 was assessed by immunofluorescence staining using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Immunostaining revealed that MUC1 was present over the entire cell surface of only a few atypical basal keratinocytes confined to the lower third of the epidermis (KIN I). While in KIN II where atypical keratinocytes occupy the lower two thirds, MUC1 was localized at the apical surface of some atypical keratinocytes and over the entire cell surface of some of them. Interestingly, in KIN III where the atypical keratinocytes extend throughout the full thickness, MUC1 was localized at the apical surface and over the entire cell surface of many of these cells. Conversely, MUC1 expression was not detected in the epidermis of normal skin. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the expression of MUC1 in AK would be induced by alteration of keratinocyte stratification and differentiation and associated to the degree of dysplasia rather than the thickness of the epidermis. PMID:26605291

  1. Characterization of the human mucin gene MUC5AC: a consensus cysteine-rich domain for 11p15 mucin genes?

    PubMed Central

    Guyonnet Duperat, V; Audie, J P; Debailleul, V; Laine, A; Buisine, M P; Galiegue-Zouitina, S; Pigny, P; Degand, P; Aubert, J P; Porchet, N

    1995-01-01

    To date five human mucin cDNAs (MUC2, 5A, 5B, 5C and 6) mapped to 11p15.3-15.5, so it appears that this chromosome region might contain several distinct gene loci for mucins. Three of these cDNAs, MUC5A, B and C, were cloned in our laboratory and previously published. A common number, 5, was recommended by the Human Gene Mapping Nomenclature Committee to designate them because of their common provenance from human tracheobronchial mucosa. In order to define whether they are products of the same gene locus or distinct loci, we describe in this paper physical mapping of these cDNAs using the strategy of analysis of CpG islands by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. The data suggest that MUC5A and MUC5C are part of the same gene (called MUC5AC) which is distinct from MUC5B. In the second part of this work, complete sequences of the inserts corresponding to previously described (JER47, JER58) and novel (JER62, JUL32, MAR2, MAR10 and MAR11) cDNAs of the so-called MUC5AC gene are presented and analysed. The data show that in this mucin gene, the tandem repeat domain is interrupted several times with a subdomain encoding a 130 amino acid cysteine-rich peptide in which the TR3A and TR3B peptides previously isolated by Rose et al. [Rose, Kaufman and Martin (1989) J. Biol. Chem., 264, 8193-8199] from airway mucins are found. A consensus peptide sequence for these subdomains involving invariant positions of most of the cysteines is proposed. The consensus nucleotide sequence of this subdomain is also found in the MUC2 gene and in the MUC5B gene, two other mucin genes mapped to 11p15. The functional significance for secreted mucins of these cysteine-rich subdomains and the modular organization of mucin peptides are discussed. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 PMID:7826332

  2. PAX2, PAX8 and CDX2 Expression in Metastatic Mucinous, Primary Ovarian Mucinous and Seromucinous Tumors and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ates Ozdemir, D; Usubutun, A

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of gynecologic cancer death. Both morphologically and immunohistochemically, metastatic mucinous tumors are the best mimickers of mucinous ovarian tumors; its pathogenesis still remains a mystery. PAX2 and PAX8 immunohisyochemistries are useful for differentiating numerous primary tumour types from metastatic ones. There are few studies in literature about PAX expressions in mucinous and seromucinous tumors. None of these are takes into account the histologic type (whether it is seromucinous or mucinous) or the metastatic origin. With this purpose hematoxylin and eosine slides of ovarian mucinous and seromucinous tumors were re-evaluated and one block was chosen for each case. The study included 76 ovarian mucinous and seromucinous tumors of the ovary reported in Hacettepe University department of pathology between 2000 and 2013. Tissue microarray (TMA) was designed from the chosen blocks, PAX2, PAX8, CDX2 immunostains was preformed to the TMA slides. As a result, most of the metastatic cases were negative for PAX2 (91.2 %) and PAX8 (86.3 %), many were diffusely and strongly positive for CDX2 (68.2 %). Seromucinous tumors were devoid of CDX2 expression; but all cases (except one) displayed strong and diffuse positivity with PAX8. In other words differing from mucinous tumors, seromucinous tumors show strong PAX8 positivity-similar to serous tumors. This study shows that PAX8 and CDX2 could be useful in differentiating primary mucinous from metastatic tumor. Furthermore unlike the homogeneity in seromucinous tumors for PAX8 and CDX2 mucinous tumors shows heterogeneity with different expression patterns. PMID:26797858

  3. Characterization of pig colonic mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, F J; Hutton, D A; Jumel, K; Pearson, J P; Harding, S E; Allen, A

    1996-01-01

    Pig colonic mucins isolated from the adherent mucus gel in the presence of proteinase inhibitors were solubilized by homogenization and the component mucins fractionated by CsC1 density-gradient centrifugation. Polymeric and reduced pig colonic mucin were both largely excluded on Sepharose CL-2B, papain-digested colonic mucin was included. The M(r) values of polymeric, reduced and digested mucins were 5.5 x 10(6), 2.1 x 10(6) and 0.6 x 10(6) respectively. This suggests that pig colonic mucin is comprised of 2-3 subunits, each subunit containing 3-4 glycosylated regions. The intrinsic viscosities of polymeric, reduced and digested mucin were 240 ml.g-1, 100 ml.g-1 and 20 ml.g-1 respectively. Polymeric pig colonic mucin comprised 16% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine and proline (43% of total amino acids). There were approx. 150 disulphide bridges and 53 free thiol groups per mucin polymer. A seventh of the protein content was lost on reduction. This protein was particularly rich in proline and the hydrophobic amino acids. Papain-digested pig colonic mucin contained 11% protein per mg of glycoprotein and was rich in serine, threonine, glutamate and aspartate. All types of amino acids with the exception of aspartate were lost on digestion. The amino acid analysis of the proteolytically digested regions of pig colonic mucin are markedly different to the tandem repeat regions of the human mucin genes shown to be expressed in the colon. PMID:8670173

  4. Gallbladder inflammation is associated with increase in mucin expression and pigmented stone formation.

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alexander; Nudelman, Israel; Morgenstern, Sara; Geller, Alex; Bar Dayan, Yosefa; Levi, Zohar; Rodionov, Galina; Hardy, Britta; Konikoff, Fred; Gobbic, Diana; Niv, Yaron

    2007-07-01

    Mucin is a high molecular weight glycoprotein that plays an important role in protecting the gallbladder epithelium from the detergent effect of bile. However, it also participates in gallstone formation. There is little information about a possible relationship between gallbladder inflammation and mucin expression or gallbladder stones' characteristics. The aims of this study were to investigate stone characteristics and patterns of mucin expression in the gallbladder epithelium and bile of gallstone patients, in relation to inflammation. Gallbladder bile and tissue samples from 21 patients were obtained at surgery. Mucin content was evaluated by gel filtration on a Sepharose CL-4B column. Dot blot for bile mucin apoproteins and immunohistochemistry staining for gallbladder mucosal mucin apoproteins were performed with antibodies to MUC2, MUC3, MUC5AC, MUC5B and MUC6. Staining intensity score (0-3) was used for assessment of antigen expression and the level of inflammation. Gallstone cholesterol content was determined in 16 patients. MUC 5AC and MUC 5B were demonstrated in 95.4 and 100% of gallbladder bile samples, respectively. Immunohistochemistry staining with antibodies to MUC 2, MUC 3, MUC 5AC, MUC 5B and MUC 6 were positive in 0, 100, 85.7, 100 and 95.4% of the gallbladder mucosal samples, respectively. Pigmented brown stones were associated with a higher level of gallbladder inflammation. Mucin species expressed in gallbladder epithelium are MUC3, MUC5AC, MUC5B and MUC6. MUC5AC and MUC5B are secreted into bile. Inflammation of the gallbladder is accompanied by a higher level of MUC5AC expression and is associated with pigmented brown stones. PMID:17385041

  5. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Mucin Expression and Suppresses the Mucosal Immune Function of the Respiratory Tract in Chicks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanhua; Zhao, Jingpeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Wang, Xiaojuan; Song, Zhigang; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The chicken immune system is immature at the time of hatching. The development of the respiratory immune system after hatching is vital to young chicks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary vitamin A supplement levels on respiratory mucin and IgA production in chicks. In this study, 120 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 4 groups consisting of three replicates of 10 broilers and subjected to dietary vitamin A supplement levels of 0, 1,500, 6,000, or 12,000 IU/kg for seven days. Compared with control birds, vitamin A supplementation significantly increased the mucin and IgA levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as the IgA level in serum. In the lungs, vitamin A supplementation downregulated TNF-α and EGFR mRNA expression. The TGF-β and MUC5AC mRNA expression levels were upregulated by vitamin A supplementation at a dose of 6,000 IU/kg, and the IL-13 mRNA expression level was increased at the 12,000 IU/kg supplement level. Vitamin A deficiency (control) significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of MUC2, IgA, EGFR, IL-13 and TGF-β in trachea tissue. Histological section analysis revealed that the number of goblet cells in the tracheal epithelium was less in the 0 and 12,000 IU/kg vitamin A supplement groups than in the other groups. In conclusion, vitamin A deficiency suppressed the immunity of the airway by decreasing the IgA and mucin concentrations in neonatal chicks. This study suggested that a suitable level of vitamin A is essential for the secretion of IgA and mucin in the respiratory tract by regulating the gene expression of cytokines and epithelial growth factors. PMID:26422233

  6. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Mucin Expression and Suppresses the Mucosal Immune Function of the Respiratory Tract in Chicks.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Shaoqiong; Liu, Guanhua; Zhao, Jingpeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Wang, Xiaojuan; Song, Zhigang; Lin, Hai

    2015-01-01

    The chicken immune system is immature at the time of hatching. The development of the respiratory immune system after hatching is vital to young chicks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary vitamin A supplement levels on respiratory mucin and IgA production in chicks. In this study, 120 one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly divided into 4 groups consisting of three replicates of 10 broilers and subjected to dietary vitamin A supplement levels of 0, 1,500, 6,000, or 12,000 IU/kg for seven days. Compared with control birds, vitamin A supplementation significantly increased the mucin and IgA levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as the IgA level in serum. In the lungs, vitamin A supplementation downregulated TNF-α and EGFR mRNA expression. The TGF-β and MUC5AC mRNA expression levels were upregulated by vitamin A supplementation at a dose of 6,000 IU/kg, and the IL-13 mRNA expression level was increased at the 12,000 IU/kg supplement level. Vitamin A deficiency (control) significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of MUC2, IgA, EGFR, IL-13 and TGF-β in trachea tissue. Histological section analysis revealed that the number of goblet cells in the tracheal epithelium was less in the 0 and 12,000 IU/kg vitamin A supplement groups than in the other groups. In conclusion, vitamin A deficiency suppressed the immunity of the airway by decreasing the IgA and mucin concentrations in neonatal chicks. This study suggested that a suitable level of vitamin A is essential for the secretion of IgA and mucin in the respiratory tract by regulating the gene expression of cytokines and epithelial growth factors. PMID:26422233

  7. SNAP23 is selectively expressed in airway secretory cells and mediates baseline and stimulated mucin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Binhui; Azzegagh, Zoulikha; Jaramillo, Ana M.; Zhu, Yunxiang; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Flores, Jose R.; Han, Wei; Tang, Yong-jun; Tu, Jing; Alanis, Denise M.; Evans, Christopher M.; Guindani, Michele; Roche, Paul A.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Chen, Jichao; Davis, C. William; Tuvim, Michael J.; Dickey, Burton F.

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucin secretion is important pathophysiologically and as a model of polarized epithelial regulated exocytosis. We find the trafficking protein, SNAP23 (23-kDa paralogue of synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa), selectively expressed in secretory cells compared with ciliated and basal cells of airway epithelium by immunohistochemistry and FACS, suggesting that SNAP23 functions in regulated but not constitutive epithelial secretion. Heterozygous SNAP23 deletant mutant mice show spontaneous accumulation of intracellular mucin, indicating a defect in baseline secretion. However mucins are released from perfused tracheas of mutant and wild-type (WT) mice at the same rate, suggesting that increased intracellular stores balance reduced release efficiency to yield a fully compensated baseline steady state. In contrast, acute stimulated release of intracellular mucin from mutant mice is impaired whether measured by a static imaging assay 5 min after exposure to the secretagogue ATP or by kinetic analysis of mucins released from perfused tracheas during the first 10 min of ATP exposure. Together, these data indicate that increased intracellular stores cannot fully compensate for the defect in release efficiency during intense stimulation. The lungs of mutant mice develop normally and clear bacteria and instilled polystyrene beads comparable to WT mice, consistent with these functions depending on baseline secretion that is fully compensated. PMID:26182382

  8. Colonic MUC2 mucin regulates the expression and antimicrobial activity of β-defensin 2

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, E R; Kissoon-Singh, V; Moreau, F; Chadee, K

    2015-01-01

    In this study we identified mechanisms at the colonic mucosa by which MUC2 mucin regulated the production of β-defensin in a proinflammatory milieu but functionally protected susceptible bacteria from its antimicrobial effects. The regulator role of MUC2 on production of β-defensin 2 in combination with the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was confirmed using purified human colonic MUC2 mucin and colonic goblet cells short hairpin RNA (shRNA) silenced for MUC2. In vivo, Muc2−/− mice showed impaired β-defensin mRNA expression and peptide localization in the colon as compared with Muc2+/− and Muc2+/+ littermates. Importantly, purified MUC2 mucin abrogated the antimicrobial activity of β-defensin 2 against nonpathogenic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. Sodium metaperiodate oxidation of MUC2 removed the capacity of MUC2 to stimulate β-defensin production and MUC2's inhibition of defensin antimicrobial activity. This study highlights that a defective MUC2 mucin barrier, typical in inflammatory bowel diseases, may lead to deficient stimulation of β-defensin 2 and an unbalanced microbiota that favor the growth of β-defensin-resistant microbes such as Clostridium difficile. PMID:25921338

  9. SATB2 Expression Distinguishes Ovarian Metastases of Colorectal and Appendiceal Origin From Primary Ovarian Tumors of Mucinous or Endometrioid Type.

    PubMed

    Moh, Michelle; Krings, Gregor; Ates, Deniz; Aysal, Anil; Kim, Grace E; Rabban, Joseph T

    2016-03-01

    The primary origin of some ovarian mucinous tumors may be challenging to determine, because some metastases of extraovarian origin may exhibit gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical features that are shared by some primary ovarian mucinous tumors. Metastases of primary colorectal, appendiceal, gastric, pancreatic, and endocervical adenocarcinomas may simulate primary ovarian mucinous cystadenoma, mucinous borderline tumor, or mucinous adenocarcinoma. Recently, immunohistochemical expression of SATB2, a transcriptional regulator involved in osteoblastic and neuronal differentiation, has been shown to be a highly sensitive marker of normal colorectal epithelium and of colorectal adenocarcinoma. SATB2 expression has not been reported in normal epithelium of the female reproductive tract. Therefore, we hypothesized that SATB2 may be of value in distinguishing ovarian metastases of colorectal adenocarcinoma from primary ovarian mucinous tumors and from primary ovarian endometrioid tumors. Among primary ovarian tumors, SATB2 staining was observed in 0/22 mucinous cystadenomas that lacked a component of mature teratoma, 4/12 mucinous cystadenomas with mature teratoma, 1/60 mucinous borderline tumors, 0/17 mucinous adenocarcinomas, 0/3 endometrioid borderline tumors, and 0/72 endometrioid adenocarcinomas. Among ovarian metastases, SATB2 staining was observed in 24/32 (75%) colorectal adenocarcinomas; 8/10 (80%) low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms; and 4/4 (100%) high-grade appendiceal adenocarcinomas. No SATB2 staining was observed in any ovarian metastasis of pancreatic, gastric, gallbladder, or endocervical origin. Evaluation of primary extraovarian tumors showed the highest incidences of SATB2 staining among primary colorectal adenocarcinomas (71%), primary appendiceal low-grade mucinous neoplasms (100%), and primary appendiceal high-grade adenocarcinomas (100%). Similar to their metastatic counterparts, none of the primary pancreatic or gastric

  10. Association of pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor expression in ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyum; Song, Si Young; Kim, Sunghoon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Yim, Ga Won; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae; Nam, Eun Ji

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) expression is elevated in both ovarian tumors and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, PAUF expression in ovarian tumors according to histologic subtype and grade has not been investigated. In this study, we examined various clinicopathologic features of 24 patients with mucinous cystadenoma (MCA), 36 with mucinous borderline tumors (MBTs), and 46 with mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACs) according to PAUF expression status assessed using immunohistochemistry. We found that MACs more frequently stained positive for PAUF than did MCAs and MBTs (P < 0.0001). Although there was no significant differences with respect to other clinicopathologic characteristics of MACs according to PAUF expression status, patients with PAUF-weakly positive and PAUF-strongly positive MACs tended to have a shorter overall survival (OS) than those with PAUF-negative MAC, determined using a Kaplan-Meier analysis (P = 0.1885). After adjusting for various clinicopathologic parameters, PAUF positivity of MACs was a significant predictive factor for disease-free survival (DFS) (negative vs. weakly positive: P = 0.045, hazard ratio [HR] = 57.406, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.090-3022.596; and negative vs. strongly positive: P = 0.034, HR = 97.890, 95% CI: 1.412-6785.925). In conclusion, PAUF was more frequently expressed in MAC than in its benign and borderline counterparts, and was associated with a poor OS and DFS in MAC patients. Therefore, we suggest that PAUF may be a practical biomarker for histopathological categorization and a prognostic marker for patients with an ovarian mucinous tumor. PMID:25197383

  11. NCOA3-mediated upregulation of mucin expression via transcriptional and post-translational changes during the development of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Das, S; Rachagani, S; Kaur, S; Joshi, S; Johansson, SL; Ponnusamy, MP; Jain, M; Batra, SK

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is characterized by aberrant overexpression of mucins that contribute to its pathogenesis. Although the inflammatory cytokines contribute to mucin overexpression, the mucin profile of PC is markedly distinct from that of normal or inflamed pancreas. We postulated that de novo expression of various mucins in PC involves chromatin modifications. Analysis of chromatin modifying enzymes by PCR array identified differential expression of NCOA3 in MUC4-expressing PC cell lines. Immunohistochemistry analysis in tumor tissues from patients and spontaneous mouse models, and microarray analysis following the knockdown of NCOA3 were performed to elucidate its role in mucin regulation and overall impact on PC. Silencing of NCOA3 in PC cell lines resulted in significant downregulation of two most differentially expressed mucins in PC, MUC4 and MUC1 (P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry analysis in PC tissues and metastatic lesions established an association between NCOA3 and mucin (MUC1 and MUC4) expression. Spontaneous mouse model of PC (K-rasG12D; Pdx-1cre) showed early expression of Ncoa3 during preneoplastic lesions. Mechanistically, NCOA3 knockdown abrogated retinoic acid-mediated MUC4 upregulation by restricting MUC4 promoter accessibility as demonstrated by micrococcus nuclease digestion (P<0.05) and chromatin immuno-precipitation analysis. NCOA3 also created pro-inflammatory conditions by upregulating chemokines like CXCL1, 2, 5 and CCL20 (P<0.001). AKT, ubiquitin C, ERK1/2 and NF-κB occupied dominant nodes in the networks significantly modulated after NCOA3 silencing. In addition, NCOA3 stabilized mucins post translationally through fucosylation by FUT8, as the knockdown of FUT8 resulted in the downregulation of MUC4 and MUC1 at protein levels. PMID:25531332

  12. Oral N-acetylcysteine reduces bleomycin-induced lung damage and mucin Muc5ac expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Mata, M; Ruíz, A; Cerdá, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Cortijo, J; Santangelo, F; Serrano-Mollar, A; Llombart-Bosch, A; Morcillo, E J

    2003-12-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, therefore antioxidants may be of therapeutic value. Clinical work indicates that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may be beneficial in this disease. The activity of this antioxidant was examined on bleomycin-induced lung damage, mucus secretory cells hyperplasia and mucin Muc5ac gene expression in rats. NAC (3 mmol x kg(-1) x day(-1)) or saline was given orally to Sprague-Dawley rats for 1 week prior to a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (2.5 U x kg(-1)) and for 14 days postinstillation. NAC decreased collagen deposition in bleomycin-exposed rats (hydroxyproline content was 4,257+/-323 and 3,200+/-192 microg x lung(-1) in vehicle- and NAC-treated rats, respectively) and lessened the fibrotic area assessed by morphometric analysis. The bleomycin-induced increases in lung tumour necrosis factor-alpha and myeloperoxidase activity were reduced by NAC treatment. The numbers of mucus secretory cells in airway epithelium, and the Muc5ac messenger ribonucleic acid and protein expression, were markedly augmented in rats exposed to bleomycin. These changes were significantly reduced in NAC-treated rats. These results indicate that bleomycin increases the number of airway secretory cells and their mucin production, and that oral N-acetylcysteine improved pulmonary lesions and reduced the mucus hypersecretion in the bleomycin rat model. PMID:14680076

  13. Direct demonstration of increased expression of Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen in colonic adenocarcinoma and ulcerative colitis mucin and its concealment in normal mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, B J; Finnie, I A; Hounsell, E F; Rhodes, J M

    1995-01-01

    Increased binding of the lectin peanut agglutinin is a common feature in epithelial malignancy and hyperplasia. This may have considerable functional importance in the intestine by allowing interaction between the epithelium and mitogenic lectins of dietary or microbial origin. Peanut agglutinin binds the disaccharide Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF, T or core 1) blood group antigen, Gal beta (1-3) GalNAc alpha-, but is not totally specific for this site. Consequently, there has been controversy about the presence of this structure in colon cancer; studies with anti-TF monoclonal antibodies have failed to detect it. We have examined the presence of TF antigen in colonic mucus glycoprotein (mucin) using endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (O-Glycanase), which specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of TF antigen from glycoconjugates. Samples of adenocarcinoma, inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis), and normal mucin were treated with O-glycanase, the liberated disaccharide was separated from the glycoprotein and analyzed using dual CarboPac PA-100 column high performance anion-exchange chromatography coupled with pulsed amperometric detection. O-Glycanase treatment released increased amounts of TF antigen from both colonic adenocarcinoma (8.0 +/- 3.9 ng/micrograms protein, n = 11; P < 0.0001 ANOVA) and ulcerative colitis mucin (3.3 +/- 0.3 ng/micrograms protein, n = 5; P = 0.04) compared with mucin samples from histologically normal mucosa distant from carcinoma (1.5 +/- 1.1 ng/micrograms protein, n = 9). However, after mild acid treatment to remove sialic acids and fucose, releasable TF antigen was increased in all nine of these histologically normal mucin samples (5.5 +/- 2.6 ng/micrograms protein, P < 0.0002). We conclude that TF antigen is an oncofetal antigen which is expressed in colon cancer, but is concealed by further glycosylation (sialylation and/or fucosylation) in the normal colonic mucosa. PMID:7860740

  14. Pseudomyxoma Peritonei: Is Disease Progression Related to Microbial Agents? A Study of Bacteria, MUC2 and MUC5AC Expression in Disseminated Peritoneal Adenomucinosis and Peritoneal Mucinous Carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Semino-Mora, Cristina; Liu, Hui; McAvoy, Thomas; Nieroda, Carol; Studeman, Kimberley; Sardi, Armando; Dubois, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is characterized by peritoneal tumors arising from a perforated appendiceal adenoma or adenocarcinoma, but associated entry of enteric bacteria in the peritoneum has not been considered as a cofactor. Because Gram-negative organisms can upregulate MUC2 mucin gene expression, we determined whether bacteria were detectable in PMP tissues. Methods In situ hybridization was performed on resection specimens from five control subjects with noninflamed, nonperforated, non-neoplastic appendix and 16 patients with PMP [six with disseminated peritoneal adenomucinosis (DPAM) and 10 with peritoneal mucinous carcinomatosis (PMCA)]. Specific probes were designed to recognize: (1) 16S rRNA common to multiple bacteria or specific to H. pylori; (2) H. pylori cagA virulence gene; or (3) MUC2 or MUC5AC apomucins. Specimens from one patient with PMCA were examined by ultra-structural immunohistochemistry. Bacterial density and apomucin expression were determined in four histopathological compartments (epithelia, inflammatory cells, stroma, and free mucus). Results Enteric bacteria were detected in all specimens. Bacterial density and MUC2 expression were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in PMCA than in DPAM and controls and were highest in free mucin. MUC2 was also expressed in dysplastic epithelia and in associated inflammatory cells. MUC2 expression was significantly correlated with bacterial density. Conclusions Multiple enteric bacteria are present in PMP, and bacterial density and MUC2 expression is highest in the malignant form of PMP. Based on these observations, we propose that the bacteria observed in PMP may play a role in the mucinous ascites and perhaps promote carcinogenesis. PMID:18299935

  15. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C.; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  16. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery.

    PubMed

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. PMID:27172221

  17. Expression of MUC1 mucin in potentially malignant disorders, oral squamous cell carcinoma and normal oral mucosa: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, M Harish; Sanjai, Karpagaselvi; Kumarswamy, Jayalakshmi; Keshavaiah, Roopavathi; Papaiah, Lokesh; Divya, S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucins alteration in glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of malignant diseases. Therefore, mucins are used as valuable markers to distinguish normal and disease conditions. Many studies on MUC1 expression have been conducted on variety of neoplastic lesions other than head and neck region. None of the study has made an attempt to show its significance in potentially malignant disorders (PMDs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Hence, ours is one of the pioneer studies done to assess and evaluate the same. Aims: This study aims to compare and correlate the expression of MUC1 mucin protein in normal oral mucosa (NOM), PMD's and OSCC by immunohistochemical method. Materials and Methods: Institutional study, archived tissue sections of OSCC (n = 20), PMD's (n = 20) and NOM (n = 20) were immunostained for MUC1 mucin and percentage of positive cells evaluated. Results obtained were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis test, Mann–Whitney test and Student's t-test. Results: The mean MUC1 mucin positive cells in the study groups were as follows, 40% in OSCC, 28% in PMD's and 0.75% in NOM. Higher mean immunohistochemical score was observed in OSCC group followed by PMD's group and NOM group. The difference in immunohistochemical score among the groups was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The result of the current study suggests that determination of MUC1 mucin expression may be a parameter in the diagnosis of malignant behavior of PMD's to OSCC. MUC1 mucin expression may be a useful diagnostic marker for prediction of the invasive/metastatic potential of OSCC. PMID:27601811

  18. Toll-like receptor signaling for the induction of mucin expression by lipopolysaccharide in the hen vagina.

    PubMed

    Ariyadi, B; Isobe, N; Yoshimura, Y

    2014-03-01

    We previously reported that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a ligand of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), induced mucin mRNA to enhance the mucosal barrier in the hen vagina. The aim of this study was to determine the intracellular signaling molecules for that mucin induction, and the effect of molting and estrogen on their expression. The expression of TLR4, its adaptor molecules, and transcriptional factors in the vaginal mucosa of laying and molting hens treated with or without estradiol was examined by reverse-transcription PCR. The expression of mucin in the cultured mucosal tissue stimulated by LPS together with inhibitors of transcriptional factors was analyzed by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. The expression of TLR4, its adaptor molecule, namely, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) or Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing IFN-β (TRIF), and transcriptional factors, namely, cFos and cJun, declined in molting hens compared with that in laying hens, and were upregulated by estradiol. In vagina of laying hens, mucin expression was upregulated by LPS, whereas it was suppressed by inhibitors of transcriptional factors, namely, ALLN (an inhibitor of IκB proteolysis), BAY-117085 (an NFκB inhibitor), U0126 [a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor], and transhinone IIA [an activated protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor]. These results suggest that a MyD88-dependent pathway downstream of TLR4 and transcriptional factors of NFκB and AP-1 participate in the induction of mucin expression by LPS in the vaginal mucosa. These signaling functions may decline during molting owing to the decline in the level of circulating estrogen. Such mucin expression system may play a role in the mucosal barrier against infection in the vaginal mucosa. PMID:24604861

  19. Mucinous Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Influence of EGFR and E-Cadherin Expression on Clinicopathologic Features and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd AlRahman M; AbdelAziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira K; Hosni, Ali; Zalata, Khalid R; Gado, Asmaa I

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin expression in colorectal carcinoma and their prognostic significance. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate EGFR and E-cadherin expression, interrelation and relation to clinicopathologic, histologic parameters, and survival in rare colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA). In this study, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal MA and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tips technique, and immunohistochemistry for EGFR and E-cadherin was performed. All relations were analyzed using established statistical methodologies. NMA expressed EGFR and E-cadherin in significantly higher rates with significant heterogenous pattern than MA. EGFR and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in both NMA and MA groups. In the NMA group, high EGFR expression was associated with old age, male sex, multiplicity of tumors, lack of mucinous component, and association with schistosomiasis. However, in the MA group, high EGFR expression was associated only with old age and MA subtype rather than signet ring carcinoma subtype. Conversely, high E-cadherin expression in MA cases was associated with old age, fungating tumor configuration, MA subtype, and negative intratumoral lymphocytic response. However, in the NMA cases, none of these factors was statistically significant. In a univariate analysis, neither EGFR nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival. Targeted therapy against EGFR and E-cadherin may not be useful in patients with MA. Neither EGFR nor E-cadherin is an independent prognostic factor in NMA or MA. PMID:26262813

  20. Mouse gastric mucin: cloning and chromosomal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Shekels, L L; Lyftogt, C; Kieliszewski, M; Filie, J D; Kozak, C A; Ho, S B

    1995-01-01

    Mucins protect gastric epithelium by maintaining a favourable pH gradient and preventing autodigestion. The purpose of this study was to clone a mouse gastric mucin which would provide a foundation for analysis of mucin gene regulation. Mucin was purified from the glandular portion of gastric specimens and deglycosylated by HF solvolysis. Antibodies against native and deglycosylated mouse gastric mucin (MGM) were raised in chickens. Screening of a mouse stomach cDNA library with the anti-(deglycosylated MGM) antibody yielded partial clones containing a 48 bp tandem repeat and 768 bp of non-repetitive sequence. The 16-amino-acid tandem repeat has a consensus sequence of QTSSPNTGKTSTISTT with 25% serine and 38% threonine. The MGM tandem repeat sequence bears no similarity to previously identified mucins. The MGM non-repetitive region shares sequence similarity with human MUC5AC and, to a lesser extent, human MUC2 and rat intestinal mucin. Northern blot analysis reveals a polydisperse message beginning at 13.5 kb in mouse stomach with no expression in oesophagus, trachea, small intestine, large intestine, caecum, lung or kidney. Immunoreactivity of antibodies against deglycosylated MGM and against a synthetic MGM tandem repeat peptide was restricted to superficial mucous cells, antral glands and Brunner's glands in the pyloric-duodenal region. DNA analysis shows that MGM recognizes mouse and rat DNA but not hamster, rabbit or human DNA. The MGM gene maps to a site on mouse chromosome 7 homologous to the location of a human secretory mucin gene cluster on human chromosome 11p15. Due to sequence similarity and predominant expression in the stomach, the MGM gene may be considered a MUC5AC homologue and named Muc5ac. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:7487932

  1. Regulation of high glucose-mediated mucin expression by matrix metalloproteinase-9 in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Juan; Xiao, Qian; Lü, Yang; Zhou, Xiangdong; Xia, Li; Nie, Daijing

    2015-04-10

    Mucus hypersecretion is the key manifestation in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases and mucin 5AC (MUC5AC) is a major component of airway mucus. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9, have been found to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway diseases. Hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. We hypothesize that high glucose (HG)-regulates MMP-9 production and MMP-9 activity through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) cascades pathways, leading to mucin production in human airway epithelial cells (16HBE). We show that HG increases MMP-9 production, MMP-9 activity and MUC5AC expression. These effects are prevented by small interfering RNA (siRNA) for MMP-9, indicating that HG-induced mucin production is MMP-9-dependent. HG activates MMP-9 production, MMP-9 activity and MUC5AC overproduction, which is inhibited by nPG, DMSO and DPI (inhibitors of ROS and NADPH), suggesting that HG-activated mucin synthesis is mediated by NADPH/ROS in 16HBE cells. These observations demonstrate an important role for MMP-9 activated by NADPH/ROS signaling pathways in regulating HG-induced MUC5AC expression. These findings may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the infections related to diabetes mellitus and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for mucin overproduction in chronic inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:25704757

  2. γδ T-cell-deficient mice show alterations in mucin expression, glycosylation, and goblet cells but maintain an intact mucus layer.

    PubMed

    Kober, Olivia I; Ahl, David; Pin, Carmen; Holm, Lena; Carding, Simon R; Juge, Nathalie

    2014-04-01

    Intestinal homeostasis is maintained by a hierarchy of immune defenses acting in concert to minimize contact between luminal microorganisms and the intestinal epithelial cell surface. The intestinal mucus layer, covering the gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells, contributes to mucosal homeostasis by limiting bacterial invasion. In this study, we used γδ T-cell-deficient (TCRδ(-/-)) mice to examine whether and how γδ T-cells modulate the properties of the intestinal mucus layer. Increased susceptibility of TCRδ(-/-) mice to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis is associated with a reduced number of goblet cells. Alterations in the number of goblet cells and crypt lengths were observed in the small intestine and colon of TCRδ(-/-) mice compared with C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. Addition of keratinocyte growth factor to small intestinal organoid cultures from TCRδ(-/-) mice showed a marked increase in crypt growth and in both goblet cell number and redistribution along the crypts. There was no apparent difference in the thickness or organization of the mucus layer between TCRδ(-/-) and WT mice, as measured in vivo. However, γδ T-cell deficiency led to reduced sialylated mucins in association with increased gene expression of gel-secreting Muc2 and membrane-bound mucins, including Muc13 and Muc17. Collectively, these data provide evidence that γδ T cells play an important role in the maintenance of mucosal homeostasis by regulating mucin expression and promoting goblet cell function in the small intestine. PMID:24503767

  3. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component: relation of MMP-13, EGFR, and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal; Aziz, Azza Abdel

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, ordinary adenocarcinoma (OA) and mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA) regarding clinicopathological parameters, survival, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin. We studied tumor tissue specimens from 28 patients with adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, 47 with OA, and 56 with MA, who underwent radical surgery from January 2007 to January 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. High density manual tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry for EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin was done. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component (AWMC) was significantly associated with more perineural invasion, lower EGFR, and MMP-13 expressions than OA, with no difference in E-cadherin expression. Conversely, only microscopic abscess formation was significantly more with colorectal AWMC than MC with no difference in EGFR, MMP-13 and E-cadherin expression between both groups. Colorectal AWMC showed a better survival than MA with no difference with OA. In a univariate analysis, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin expressions did not show a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival in patients with colorectal AWMC. Colorectal AWMC remains a vague entity that resembles OA in some clinicopathological and molecular respects as well as MA. PMID:25907382

  4. Comparative study on the development of intestinal mucin 2, IgA and polymeric Ig receptor expressions between broiler chickens and Pekin ducks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal mucin2 (MUC2), a major gel-forming mucin, represents a primary barrier component of mucus layers and target site for secretory IgA. Polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) expressed on the basolateral surface of epithelium, is used to transport polymeric IgA from the lamina propria into luminal muci...

  5. EGFR Interacts with the Fusion Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Strain 2-20 and Mediates Infection and Mucin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Stobart, Christopher C.; Hotard, Anne L.; Villenave, Remi; Meng, Jia; Pretto, Carla D.; Shields, Michael D.; Nguyen, Minh Trang; Todd, Sean O.; Chi, Michael H.; Hammonds, Jason; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Spearman, Paul; Plemper, Richard K.; Sakamoto, Kaori; Peebles, R. Stokes; Power, Ultan F.; Moore, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness in children. In contrast to the RSV prototypic strain A2, clinical isolate RSV 2–20 induces airway mucin expression in mice, a clinically relevant phenotype dependent on the fusion (F) protein of the RSV strain. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a role in airway mucin expression in other systems; therefore, we hypothesized that the RSV 2–20 F protein stimulates EGFR signaling. Infection of cells with chimeric strains RSV A2-2-20F and A2-2-20GF or over-expression of 2–20 F protein resulted in greater phosphorylation of EGFR than infection with RSV A2 or over-expression of A2 F, respectively. Chemical inhibition of EGFR signaling or knockdown of EGFR resulted in diminished infectivity of RSV A2-2-20F but not RSV A2. Over-expression of EGFR enhanced the fusion activity of 2–20 F protein in trans. EGFR co-immunoprecipitated most efficiently with RSV F proteins derived from “mucogenic” strains. RSV 2–20 F and EGFR co-localized in H292 cells, and A2-2-20GF-induced MUC5AC expression was ablated by EGFR inhibitors in these cells. Treatment of BALB/c mice with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib significantly reduced the amount of RSV A2-2-20F-induced airway mucin expression. Our results demonstrate that RSV F interacts with EGFR in a strain-specific manner, EGFR is a co-factor for infection, and EGFR plays a role in RSV-induced mucin expression, suggesting EGFR is a potential target for RSV disease. PMID:27152417

  6. Development of intestinal mucin 2, IgA, and polymeric Ig receptor expressions in broiler chickens and Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Eicher, Susan D; Applegate, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Intestinal mucin 2 (MUC2), a major gel-forming mucin, represents a primary barrier component of mucus layers and a target site for secretory IgA. Polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR) expressed on the basolateral surface of epithelium is used to transport polymeric IgA from the lamina propria into luminal mucins to establish the first lines of intestinal defense. To determine the spatio-temporal expression of MUC2, IgA, and pIgR in broiler chickens and Pekin ducks, intestinal tissues (n=6/age) were dissected from late embryonic days up to 21 d posthatch. In the intestinal tissues, MUC2 was expressed with a rapid increase at hatching, followed by steady expression through 21 d posthatch both in chickens and ducks. IgA expression was low during the first week following hatching for both species. From the second week posthatch, IgA was rapidly expressed in the chickens, arriving at steady expression in the third week after hatching. However, in ducks, IgA expression during the 2 to 3 wk posthatch period was relatively slow. The expression of pIgR was greatly increased after hatching for both species, but its expression in ducks was relatively delayed. In addition, intestinal pIgR expression was highly correlated with MUC2 and IgA expressions in chickens but just moderately correlated in ducks. The relatively slow and late expression of IgA and pIgR as well as their moderate correlation may or may not account for the susceptibility of ducklings to mucosal pathogens at a young age. PMID:25589081

  7. The regulation of intestinal mucin MUC2 expression by short-chain fatty acids: implications for epithelial protection.

    PubMed

    Burger-van Paassen, Nanda; Vincent, Audrey; Puiman, Patrycja J; van der Sluis, Maria; Bouma, Janneke; Boehm, Günther; van Goudoever, Johannes B; van Seuningen, Isabelle; Renes, Ingrid B

    2009-06-01

    SCFAs (short-chain fatty acids), fermentation products of bacteria, influence epithelial-specific gene expression. We hypothesize that SCFAs affect goblet-cell-specific mucin MUC2 expression and thereby alter epithelial protection. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the mechanisms that regulate butyrate-mediated effects on MUC2 synthesis. Human goblet cell-like LS174T cells were treated with SCFAs, after which MUC2 mRNA levels and stability, and MUC2 protein expression were analysed. SCFA-responsive regions and cis-elements within the MUC2 promoter were identified by transfection and gel-shift assays. The effects of butyrate on histone H3/H4 status at the MUC2 promoter were established by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Butyrate (at 1 mM), as well as propionate, induced an increase in MUC2 mRNA levels. MUC2 mRNA levels returned to basal levels after incubation with 5-15 mM butyrate. Interestingly, this decrease was not due to loss of RNA stability. In contrast, at concentrations of 5-15 mM propionate, MUC2 mRNA levels remained increased. Promoter-regulation studies revealed an active butyrate-responsive region at -947/-371 within the MUC2 promoter. In this region we identified an active AP1 (c-Fos/c-Jun) cis-element at -818/-808 that mediates butyrate-induced activation of the promoter. Finally, MUC2 regulation by butyrate at 10-15 mM was associated with increased acetylation of histone H3 and H4 and methylation of H3 at the MUC2 promoter. In conclusion, 1 mM butyrate and 1-15 mM propionate increase MUC2 expression. The effects of butyrate on MUC2 mRNA are mediated via AP-1 and acetylation/methylation of histones at the MUC2 promoter. PMID:19228118

  8. Expression of MUC5AC and MUC5B mucins in normal and cystic fibrosis lung.

    PubMed

    Groneberg, D A; Eynott, P R; Oates, T; Lim, S; Wu, R; Carlstedt, I; Nicholson, A G; Chung, K F

    2002-02-01

    Hypersecretion of airway mucus is a characteristic feature of chronic airway diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF) and leads via impairment of the muco-ciliary clearance and bacterial superinfection to respiratory failure. The major components of the mucus matrix forming family of mucins in the airways are MUC5AC and MUC5B. To investigate the expression of these glycoproteins in CF, immunohistochemistry was carried out on trachea, bronchi and peripheral lung obtained from CF patients and compared to normal lung tissues. MUC5AC immunohistochemistry demonstrated signals in goblet cells of the epithelial lining. Also, goblet cells inside glandular secretory ducts revealed MUC5AC-positive staining. In comparison to those from normal subjects, CF sections were characterized by inflammatory changes and goblet cell hyperplasia, resulting in increased numbers of MUC5AC-positive cells. Immunohistochemical staining for MUC5B showed abundant staining of submucosal glands and epithelial goblet cells. Inside the glands, the immunoreactivity was restricted to glandular mucous cells. MUC5AC and MUC5B are expressed in the same histological pattern in CF compared to normal tissues with an increase of MUC5AC-positive cells due to goblet cell hyper- and metaplasia. PMID:11860173

  9. Heterogeneity and persistence length in human ocular mucins.

    PubMed Central

    Round, A N; Berry, M; McMaster, T J; Stoll, S; Gowers, D; Corfield, A P; Miles, M J

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to investigate the heterogeneity and flexibility of human ocular mucins and their subunits. We have paid particular attention, in terms of theory and experiment, to the problem of inducing the polymers to assume equilibrium conformations at a surface. Mucins deposited from a buffer containing Ni(2+) ions adopt extended conformations on mica akin to those observed for DNA under similar conditions. The heterogeneity of the intracellular native mucins is evident from a histogram of contour lengths, reflecting, in part, the diversity of mucin gene products expressed. Reduction of the native mucin with dithiothreitol, thereby breaking the S==S bonds between cysteine residues, causes a marked reduction in polymer length. These results reflect the modes of transport and assembly of newly synthesized mucins in vivo. By modifying the worm-like chain model for applicability to two dimensions, we have confirmed that under the conditions employed mucin adsorbs to mica in an equilibrated conformation. The determined persistence length of the native mucin, 36 nm, is consistent with that of an extended, flexible polymer; such characteristics will influence the properties of the gels formed in vivo. PMID:12202389

  10. Ocular surface mucins and local inflammation-studies in genetically modified mouse lines.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kumi; Saika, Shizuya

    2015-01-01

    Mucins locate to the apical surfaces of all wet-surfaced epithelia including ocular surface. The functions of the mucins include anti-adhesive, lubrication, water retention, allergens and pathogen barrier function. Ocular surface pathologies, i.e. dry eye syndrome or allergic conjunctivitis, are reportedly associated with alteration of expression pattern of mucin components. Recent investigations indicated anti-bacterial adhesion or anti-inflammatory effects of members of mucins in non-ocular tissues, i.e., gastrointestinal tracts or airway tissues, by using genetically modified mouse lines that lacks an expression of a mucin member. However, examination of ocular phenotypes of each of mucin gene-ablated mouse lines has not yet fully performed. Muc16-dficient mouse is associated with spontaneous subclinical inflammation in conjunctiva. The article reviews the roles of mucin members in modulation of local inflammation in mucous membrane tissues and phenotype of mouse lines with the loss of a mucin gene. Analysis of ocular surface of mucin-gene related mutant mouse lines are to be further performed. PMID:26818460

  11. Cloning, expression and characterization of a mucin-binding GAPDH from Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhaval K; Shah, Kunal R; Pappachan, Anju; Gupta, Sarita; Singh, Desh Deepak

    2016-10-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis. It is also referred to as a moonlighting protein as it has many diverse functions like regulation of apoptosis, iron homeostasis, cell-matrix interactions, adherence to human colon etc. apart from its principal role in glycolysis. Lactobacilli are lactic acid bacteria which colonize the human gut and confer various health benefits to humans. In the present study, we have cloned, expressed and purified the GAPDH from Lactobacillus acidophilus to get a recombinant product (r-LaGAPDH) and characterized it. Size exclusion chromatography shows that r-LaGAPDH exists as a tetramer in solution and have a mucin binding and hemagglutination activity indicating carbohydrate like binding adhesion mechanism. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies showed an interaction of r-LaGAPDH with mannose, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylglucosamine with a Kd of 3.6±0.7×10(-3)M, 4.34±0.09×10(-3)M, 4±0.87×10(-3)M and 3.7±0.28×10(-3)M respectively. We hope that this preliminary data will generate more interest in further elucidation of the roles of GAPDH in the adhesion processes of the bacteria. PMID:27180300

  12. Vibrio vulnificus VvpE inhibits mucin 2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S-J; Jung, Y H; Oh, S Y; Jang, K K; Lee, H S; Choi, S H; Han, H J

    2015-01-01

    Mucin is an important physical barrier against enteric pathogens. VvpE is an elastase encoded by Gram-negative bacterium Vibrio vulnificus; however, the functional role of VvpE in intestinal mucin (Muc) production is yet to be elucidated. The recombinant protein (r) VvpE significantly reduced the level of Muc2 in human mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells. The repression of Muc2 induced by rVvpE was highly susceptible to the knockdown of intelectin-1b (ITLN) and sequestration of cholesterol by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. We found that rVvpE induces the recruitment of NADPH oxidase 2 and neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 into the membrane lipid rafts coupled with ITLN to facilitate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The bacterial signaling of rVvpE through ROS production is uniquely mediated by the phosphorylation of ERK, which was downregulated by the silencing of the PKCδ. Moreover, rVvpE induced region-specific methylation in the Muc2 promoter to promote the transcriptional repression of Muc2. In two mouse models of V. vulnificus infection, the mutation of the vvpE gene from V. vulnificus exhibited an increased survival rate and maintained the level of Muc2 expression in intestine. These results demonstrate that VvpE inhibits Muc2 expression by hypermethylation via lipid raft-mediated ROS signaling in the intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26086960

  13. Ectopic expression of a GlcNAc 6-O-sulfotransferase, GlcNAc6ST-2, in colonic mucinous adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seko, Akira; Nagata, Koji; Yonezawa, Suguru; Yamashita, Katsuko

    2002-06-01

    The content of sulfated glycans having 6-O-sulfated GlcNAc residues alters in the course of colonic carcinogenesis. We previously characterized two GlcNAc 6-O-sulfotransferases (SulTs), SulT-a and -b, expressed in colonic normal tissues and adenocarcinomas [Seko et al. (2000) Glycobiology, 10, 919-929]. Levels of the enzymatic activities of SulT-a in normal colonic mucosa are higher than those in colonic adenocarcinomas, and the enzymatic activities of SulT-b are detected only in mucinous adenocarcinomas. To determine which GlcNAc 6-O-SulTs cloned so far correspond to SulT-a and -b, we expressed seven enzymes of a Gal/GalNAc/GlcNAc 6-O-SulT family in COS-7 cells and examined their substrate specificities in comparison with those of SulT-a and -b. GlcNAc6ST-2 (HEC-GlcNAc6ST, LSST, or GST-3) can recognize GlcNAcbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1-O-pNP as a good acceptor as well as other O-linked- and N-linked-type oligosaccharides, and its substrate specificity was similar to that of SulT-b. GlcNAc6ST-3(I-GlcNAc6ST or GST-4alpha) preferred Galbeta1-->3(GlcNAcbeta1-->6)GalNAcalpha1-O-pNP as an acceptor to the other oligosaccharides examined, and its specificity was similar to that of SulT-a. To confirm these correspondences, we further performed quantitative analyses of transcripts for GlcNAc6ST-2 and -3 genes by competitive RT-PCR. As a result, GlcNAc6ST-2 gene was expressed in almost all the mucinous adenocarcinomas examined and hardly expressed in normal colonic mucosa and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma. Expression levels of transcript for GlcNAc6ST-3 in normal mucosa were significantly higher than those in adenocarcinomas. From these results, it was indicated that GlcNAc6ST-2 corresponds to mucinous adenocarcinoma-specific SulT-b and that expression of GlcNAc6ST-3 is down-regulated in colonic adenocarcinomas. PMID:12107080

  14. Human mucin gene MUC5AC: organization of its 5'-region and central repetitive region.

    PubMed Central

    Escande, F; Aubert, J P; Porchet, N; Buisine, M P

    2001-01-01

    Human mucin gene MUC5AC is clustered with MUC2, MUC5B and MUC6 on chromosome 11p15.5. We report here the full length cDNA sequence upstream of the repetitive region of human MUC5AC. We have also determined the sequence of its large central tandem repeat array. The 5'-region reveals high degree of sequence similarity with MUC2 and MUC5B and codes for 1336 amino acids organized into a signal peptide, four pro-von Willebrand factor-like D domains (D1, D2, D' and D3) and a short domain which connects to the central repetitive region. In the central region, 17 major domains have been identified. Nine code for cysteine-rich domains (Cys-domains 1-9) and exhibit high sequence similarity to the cysteine-rich domains described in the central region of MUC2 and MUC5B. Cys-domains 1-5 are interspersed by domains enriched with serine, threonine, and proline residues. Cys-domains 1-9 are interspersed by four domains (TR1-TR4) composed of various numbers of MUC5AC-type repeats. Southern-blot analyses reveal allelic variations both in length and nucleotide sequence. The length polymorphism which is due to variable numbers of tandem repeats is located in TR1 and TR4, whereas a mutation polymorphism detected with TaqI is located in Cys-domain 6. In this study, the organization of MUC5AC has been entirely elucidated showing extensive similarity to the other chromosome 11p15 MUC genes, particularly MUC5B, and providing additional arguments for common evolution from a single ancestral gene. PMID:11535137

  15. Increased Understanding of the Biochemistry and Biosynthesis of MUC2 and Other Gel-Forming Mucins Through the Recombinant Expression of Their Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Ambort, Daniel; Thomsson, Elisabeth; Johansson, Malin E. V.; Hansson, Gunnar C.

    2016-01-01

    The gel-forming mucins are large and heavily O-glycosylated proteins which build up mucus gels. The recombinant production of full-length gel-forming mucins has not been possible to date. In order to study mucin biosynthesis and biochemistry, we and others have taken the alternative approach of constructing different recombinant proteins consisting of one or several domains of these large proteins and expressing them separately in different cell lines. Using this approach, we have determined that MUC2, the intestinal gel-forming mucin, dimerizes via its C-terminal cysteine-knot domain and also trimerizes via one of the N-terminal von Willebrand D domains. Both of these interactions are disulfide bond mediated. Via this assembly, a molecular network is built by which the mucus gel is formed. Here we discuss not only the functional understanding obtained from studies of the recombinant proteins, but also highlight the difficulties encountered when these proteins were produced recombinantly. We often found an accumulation of the proteins in the ER and consequently no secretion. This was especially apparent when the cysteine-rich domains of the N- and C-terminal parts of the mucins were expressed. Other proteins that we constructed were either not secreted or not expressed at all. Despite these problems, the knowledge of mucin biosynthesis and assembly has advanced considerably through the studies of these recombinant proteins. PMID:23359125

  16. Mucin degradation by Bifidobacterium strains isolated from the human intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel; Fernández-García, María; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Margolles, Abelardo

    2008-03-01

    The presence of the genes engBF (endo-alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) and afcA (1,2-alpha-L-fucosidase) was detected in several intestinal Bifidobacterium isolates. Two strains of Bifidobacterium bifidum contained both genes, and they were able to degrade high-molecular weight porcine mucin in vitro. The expression of both genes was highly induced in the presence of mucin. PMID:18223105

  17. Subcellular localization of KL-6 mucin in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yoshinori; Seyama, Yasuji; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Tang, Wei; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to clarify the expression profile of KL-6 mucin in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and its relation to tumor malignancy. Expression of KL-6 mucin in 38 IPMNs (intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma (IPMA), 24 cases; minimally invasive intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (MI-IPMC), 8 cases; invasive carcinoma originating from IPMC (IC-IPMC), 6 cases) and 66 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) was evaluated immunohistochemically. IC-IPMCs and MI-IPMCs had positive staining of KL-6 mucin whereas 58% of IPMAs tested negative. Subcellular localization of KL-6 mucin varied among IPMNs whereas all of the PDAC had positive expression in the circumferential membrane and cytoplasm of cancer cells. IC-IPMCs and MI-IPMCs had a higher frequency of circumferential membrane and cytoplasmic localization of KL-6 mucin than did IPMAs. These results suggest that localization of KL-6 mucin could be used to predict the malignancy of IPMN. PMID:25047009

  18. Mucins as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers in a Fish-Parasite Model: Transcriptional and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Estensoro, Itziar; Redondo, María José; Calduch-Giner, Josep Alvar; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Sitjà-Bobadilla, Ariadna

    2013-01-01

    Mucins are O-glycosylated glycoproteins present on the apex of all wet-surfaced epithelia with a well-defined expression pattern, which is disrupted in response to a wide range of injuries or challenges. The aim of this study was to identify mucin gene sequences of gilthead sea bream (GSB), to determine its pattern of distribution in fish tissues and to analyse their transcriptional regulation by dietary and pathogenic factors. Exhaustive search of fish mucins was done in GSB after de novo assembly of next-generation sequencing data hosted in the IATS transcriptome database (www.nutrigroup-iats.org/seabreamdb). Six sequences, three categorized as putative membrane-bound mucins and three putative secreted-gel forming mucins, were identified. The transcriptional tissue screening revealed that Muc18 was the predominant mucin in skin, gills and stomach of GSB. In contrast, Muc19 was mostly found in the oesophagus and Muc13 was along the entire intestinal tract, although the posterior intestine exhibited a differential pattern with a high expression of an isoform that does not share a clear orthologous in mammals. This mucin was annotated as intestinal mucin (I-Muc). Its RNA expression was highly regulated by the nutritional background, whereas the other mucins, including Muc2 and Muc2-like, were expressed more constitutively and did not respond to high replacement of fish oil (FO) by vegetable oils (VO) in plant protein-based diets. After challenge with the intestinal parasite Enteromyxum leei, the expression of a number of mucins was decreased mainly in the posterior intestine of infected fish. But, interestingly, the highest down-regulation was observed for the I-Muc. Overall, the magnitude of the changes reflected the intensity and progression of the infection, making mucins and I-Muc, in particular, reliable markers of prognostic and diagnostic value of fish intestinal health. PMID:23776483

  19. An abundantly expressed mucin-like protein from Toxocara canis infective larvae: the precursor of the larval surface coat glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gems, D; Maizels, R M

    1996-01-01

    Evasion of host immunity by Toxocara canis infective larvae is mediated by the nematode surface coat, which is shed in response to binding by host antibody molecules or effector cells. The major constituent of the coat is the TES-120 glycoprotein series. We have isolated a 730-bp cDNA from the gene encoding the apoprotein precursor of TES-120. The mRNA is absent from T. canis adults but hyperabundant in larvae, making up approximately 10% of total mRNA, and is trans-spliced with the nematode 5' leader sequence SL1. It encodes a 15.8-kDa protein (after signal peptide removal) containing a typical mucin domain: 86 amino acid residues, 72.1% of which are Ser or Thr, organized into an array of heptameric repeats, interspersed with proline residues. At the C-terminal end of the putative protein are two 36-amino acid repeats containing six Cys residues, in a motif that can also be identified in several genes in Caenorhabditis elegans. Although TES-120 displays size and charge heterogeneity, there is a single copy gene and a homogeneous size of mRNA. The association of overexpression of some membrane-associated mucins with immunosuppression and tumor metastasis suggests a possible model for the role of the surface coat in immune evasion by parasitic nematodes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8643687

  20. Up-Regulation of MUC2 Mucin Expression by Serum Amyloid A3 Protein in Mouse Colonic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEMURA, Hiroaki; ISHIGURO, Naotaka; INOSHIMA, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are acute-phase proteins and are classified into multiple isoforms; however, the biological functions of each SAA isoform are not fully understood. In this study, to clarify the roles of SAA3 in the intestine, we characterized mRNA expression in mouse colonic epithelial CMT-93 cells treated with rotavirus, Toxoplasma, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli, as well as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and recombinant murine SAAs (rSAAs). E. coli together with LPS, but not the other pathogens, enhanced SAA3 mRNA expression. The mRNA expression of SAA3 by dead E. coli was higher than that by living E. coli, and the mRNA expression by E. coli and LPS increased in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, mRNA expressions of SAA1 and/or SAA2 were not stimulated by any of the treatments. In comparisons of cell treatments with rSAA1 or rSAA3, rSAA3 significantly up-regulated the mRNA expression of mucin 2 (MUC2), a major component of the mucus layer of the intestines that acts as an epithelial cell barrier against pathogens, while MUC2 mRNA expression was not significantly increased by E. coli and LPS. Furthermore, treatment with rSAAs intensively induced tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression. These results suggest that SAA3 plays a role in host innate immunity in the colon by up-regulating MUC2 mucin production, which builds a physiological barrier of colonic epithelia against bacterial invasion. PMID:24694941

  1. Low Expression of Mucin-4 Predicts Poor Prognosis in Patients With Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hangcheng; Liu, Yidong; Xu, Le; Chang, Yuan; Zhou, Lin; Zhang, Weijuan; Yang, Yuanfeng; Xu, Jiejie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mucin-4 (MUC4), a member of membrane-bound mucins, has been reported to exert a large variety of distinctive roles in tumorigenesis of different cancers. MUC4 is aberrantly expressed in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) but its prognostic value is still unveiled. This study aims to assess the clinical significance of MUC4 expression in patients with ccRCC. The expression of MUC4 was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 198 patients with ccRCC who underwent nephrectomy retrospectively in 2003 and 2004. Sixty-seven patients died before the last follow-up in the cohort. Kaplan–Meier method with log-rank test was applied to compare survival curves. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression models were applied to evaluate the prognostic value of MUC4 expression in overall survival (OS). The predictive nomogram was constructed based on the independent prognostic factors. The calibration was built to evaluate the predictive accuracy of nomogram. In patients with ccRCC, MUC4 expression, which was determined to be an independent prognostic indicator for OS (hazard ratio [HR] 3.891; P < 0.001), was negatively associated with tumor size (P = 0.036), Fuhrman grade (P = 0.044), and OS (P < 0.001). The prognostic accuracy of TNM stage, UCLA Integrated Scoring System (UISS), and Mayo clinic stage, size, grade, and necrosis score (SSIGN) prognostic models was improved when MUC4 expression was added. The independent prognostic factors, pT stage, distant metastases, Fuhrman grade, sarcomatoid, and MUC4 expression were integrated to establish a predictive nomogram with high predictive accuracy. MUC4 expression is an independent prognostic factor for OS in patients with ccRCC. PMID:27124015

  2. Different staining patterns of ovarian Brenner tumor and the associated mucinous tumor.

    PubMed

    Roma, Andres A; Masand, Ramya P

    2015-02-01

    The association of ovarian Brenner tumors and adjacent mucinous tumors is well known but not completely understood. In this study, we analyzed immunohistochemical markers on Brenner tumors and their associated mucinous tumor to explore Mullerian as well as Wolffian and germ cell derivation and determine if the mucinous component is independent or related to the Brenner tumor. Of 32 consecutive cases of Brenner tumors, 8 were identified with significant mucinous component, and 7 additional cases included foci of mucinous epithelium within the Brenner transitional nests. All Brenner tumors were diffusely positive for GATA3 and negative for Paired box gene 8, PAX2, and Sal-like protein 4. Interestingly, the areas of mucinous epithelium as well as mucinous tumors, intermixed and adjacent to the Brenner tumor, were negative for all 4 markers; however, occasional basal-like cells retained expression of GATA3. The immunoprofile of mucinous tumors associated with Brenner tumors shares the lack of Mullerian markers PAX2 and Paired box gene 8 with the Brenner tumor but differs in the expression of GATA3 only in the Brenner tumor component. PMID:25596159

  3. Aberrant Mucin5B expression in lung adenocarcinomas detected by iTRAQ labeling quantitative proteomics and immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States and worldwide. The complex protein changes and/or signature of protein expression in lung cancer, particularly in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well defined. Although several studies have investigated the protein profile in lung cancers, the knowledge is far from complete. Among early studies, mucin5B (MUC5B) has been suggested to play an important role in the tumor progression. MUC5B is the major gel-forming mucin in the airway. In this study, we investigated the overall protein profile and MUC5B expression in lung adenocarcinomas, the most common type of NSCLCs. Methods Lung adenocarcinoma tissue in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks was collected and microdissected. Peptides from 8 tumors and 8 tumor-matched normal lung tissue were extracted and labeled with 8-channel iTRAQ reagents. The labeled peptides were identified and quantified by LC-MS/MS using an LTQ Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. MUC5B expression identified by iTRAQ labeling was further validated using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tumor tissue microarray (TMA). Results A total of 1288 peptides from 210 proteins were identified and quantified in tumor tissues. Twenty-two proteins showed a greater than 1.5-fold differences between tumor and tumor-matched normal lung tissues. Fifteen proteins, including MUC5B, showed significant changes in tumor tissues. The aberrant expression of MUC5B was further identified in 71.1% of lung adenocarcinomas in the TMA. Discussions A subset of tumor-associated proteins was differentially expressed in lung adenocarcinomas. The differential expression of MUC5B in lung adenocarcinomas suggests its role as a potential biomarker in the detection of adenocarcinomas. PMID:24176033

  4. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  5. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Sheena C; Fischer, Gregory J; Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M; Choera, Tsokyi; Lim, Fang Yun; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P; Fahy, John V

    2016-04-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. PMID:27058347

  6. FleA Expression in Aspergillus fumigatus Is Recognized by Fucosylated Structures on Mucins and Macrophages to Prevent Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Meenal; McCabe, Orla; Palmer, Jonathan M.; Choera, Tsokyi; Yun Lim, Fang; Wimmerova, Michaela; Carrington, Stephen D.; Yuan, Shaopeng; Lowell, Clifford A.; Oscarson, Stefan; Keller, Nancy P.; Fahy, John V.

    2016-01-01

    The immune mechanisms that recognize inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to promote their elimination from the lungs are incompletely understood. FleA is a lectin expressed by Aspergillus fumigatus that has twelve binding sites for fucosylated structures that are abundant in the glycan coats of multiple plant and animal proteins. The role of FleA is unknown: it could bind fucose in decomposed plant matter to allow Aspergillus fumigatus to thrive in soil, or it may be a virulence factor that binds fucose in lung glycoproteins to cause Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. Our studies show that FleA protein and Aspergillus fumigatus conidia bind avidly to purified lung mucin glycoproteins in a fucose-dependent manner. In addition, FleA binds strongly to macrophage cell surface proteins, and macrophages bind and phagocytose fleA-deficient (∆fleA) conidia much less efficiently than wild type (WT) conidia. Furthermore, a potent fucopyranoside glycomimetic inhibitor of FleA inhibits binding and phagocytosis of WT conidia by macrophages, confirming the specific role of fucose binding in macrophage recognition of WT conidia. Finally, mice infected with ΔfleA conidia had more severe pneumonia and invasive aspergillosis than mice infected with WT conidia. These findings demonstrate that FleA is not a virulence factor for Aspergillus fumigatus. Instead, host recognition of FleA is a critical step in mechanisms of mucin binding, mucociliary clearance, and macrophage killing that prevent Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia. PMID:27058347

  7. Expression profile of mucin-associated sialyl-Tn antigen in Chinese patients with different colorectal lesions (adenomas, carcinomas)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Fan, Cuizhen; Fan, Shanshan; Liu, Fuquan; Wen, Tao; An, Guangyu; Feng, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The sialyl-Tn (sTn) antigen is a mucin-associated carbohydrate antigen expressed by numerous human carcinomas, and is also claimed to be a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. But the associations between sTn and colorectal cancer remain elusive and controversial. Here, we investigated the expression profile of sTn antigen in a series of human colorectal tissue samples including normal colon, colorectal adenomas, and colorectal carcinomas (CRCs), with an aim to analyzing whether sTn plays a role in the progression and development of Chinese patients with CRCs. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining of sTn antigen was performed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colonic sections from 4 healthy controls, 44 patients with colorectal adenomas, and 186 patients with primary CRCs. Results: No sTn antigen was detected in normal colonic tissues. There were 41 of 44 patients with colorectal adenomas (93.2%), and 141 of 186 patients with CRCs (75.8%) found to express sTn antigen. The patterns of sTn localization were different in adenomas and carcinomas of colonic tissues. Colorectal adenomas showed predominant supranuclear distribution of sTn antigen, while carcinomas revealed apical membrane, mucin droplet and diffuse cytoplasmic localization. Notably, sTn was significantly associated with the degree of differentiation (P = 0.006) and perineural invasion (P = 0.041) of the tumors, but was independent of age, gender, tumor location, depth of penetration, status of lymph nodes, lymphovascular invasion and TNM stage. Conclusions: These results indicate that sTn may play a role in initiating colorectal carcinogenesis and promoting tumor progression. Determination of sTn expression and localization may assist in evaluating malignant status of colorectal lesions. PMID:26617889

  8. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  9. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein regulates mucin expression induced by cold temperatures in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ran, DanHua; Chen, LingXiu; Xie, WenYue; Xu, Qing; Han, Zhong; Huang, HuaPing; Zhou, XiangDong

    2016-08-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important manifestation of chronic airway inflammatory diseases, however, the mechanisms underlying the association between cold air and mucus overproduction remain unknown. We found that the expression of the cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP) was increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the present study, we tested whether CIRP was involved in inflammatory factors and mucin5AC (MUC5AC) expression after cold stimulation and investigated the potential signaling pathways involved in this process. We found that CIRP was highly expressed in the bronchi of COPD patients. The expression of CIRP, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were increased, and the CIRP was localized in cytoplasm after cold stimulation. MUC5AC mRNA and protein expression levels were elevated in a temperature- and time-dependent manner after cold stimulation and were associated with the phosphorylation of ERK and NF-κB, which reflected their activation. These responses were suppressed by knockdown of CIRP with a specific siRNA or the ERK and NF-κB inhibitors. These results demonstrated that CIRP was expressed in the bronchi of human COPD patients and was involved in inflammatory factors and MUC5AC expression after cold stimulation through the ERK and NF-κB pathways. PMID:27184164

  10. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  11. Rhythmic Pressure Waves Induce Mucin5AC Expression via an EGFR-Mediated Signaling Pathway in Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Qi; Kolosov, Victor P.; Perelman, Juliy M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmic pressure waves (RPW), mimicking the mechanical forces generated during normal breathing, play a key role in airway surface liquid (ASL) homeostasis. As a major component of ASL, we speculated that the mucin5AC (MUC5AC) expression must also be regulated by RPW. However, fewer researches have focused on this question. Therefore, our aim was to test the effect and mechanism of RPW on MUC5AC expression in cultured human bronchial epithelial cells. Compared with the relevant controls, the transcriptional level of MUC5AC and the protein expressions of MUC5AC, the phospho-epidermal growth factor receptor (p-EGFR), phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase (p-ERK), and phospho-Akt (p-Akt) were all significantly increased after mechanical stimulation. However, this effect could be significantly attenuated by transfecting with EGFR-siRNA. Similarly, pretreating with the inhibitor of ERK or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt separately or jointly also significantly reduced MUC5AC expression. Collectively, these results indicate that RPW modulate MUC5AC expression via the EGFR-PI3K-Akt/ERK-signaling pathway in human bronchial epithelial cells. PMID:23768102

  12. Expulsion of Trichuris muris is associated with increased expression of angiogenin 4 in the gut and increased acidity of mucins within the goblet cell

    PubMed Central

    D'Elia, Riccardo; deSchoolmeester, Matthew L; Zeef, Leo AH; Wright, Steven H; Pemberton, Alan D; Else, Kathryn J

    2009-01-01

    Background Trichuris muris in the mouse is an invaluable model for infection of man with the gastrointestinal nematode Trichuris trichiura. Three T. muris isolates have been studied, the Edinburgh (E), the Japan (J) and the Sobreda (S) isolates. The S isolate survives to chronicity within the C57BL/6 host whereas E and J are expelled prior to reaching fecundity. How the S isolate survives so successfully in its host is unclear. Results Microarray analysis was used as a tool to identify genes whose expression could determine the differences in expulsion kinetics between the E and S T. muris isolates. Clear differences in gene expression profiles were evident as early as day 7 post-infection (p.i.). 43 probe sets associated with immune and defence responses were up-regulated in gut tissue from an E isolate-infected C57BL/6 mouse compared to tissue from an S isolate infection, including the message for the anti-microbial protein, angiogenin 4 (Ang4). This led to the identification of distinct differences in the goblet cell phenotype post-infection with the two isolates. Conclusion Differences in gene expression levels identified between the S and E-infected mice early during infection have furthered our knowledge of how the S isolate persists for longer than the E isolate in the C57BL/6 mouse. Potential new targets for manipulation in order to aid expulsion have been identified. Further we provide evidence for a potential new marker involving the acidity of the mucins within the goblet cell which may predict outcome of infection within days of parasite exposure. PMID:19852835

  13. Butyrate enemas upregulate Muc genes expression but decrease adherent mucus thickness in mice colon.

    PubMed

    Gaudier, E; Rival, M; Buisine, M-P; Robineau, I; Hoebler, C

    2009-01-01

    Colonic mucosal protection is provided by the mucus gel, mainly composed of mucins. Several factors can modulate the formation and the secretion of mucins, and among them butyrate, an end-product of carbohydrate fermentation. However, the specific effect of butyrate on the various colonic mucins, and the consequences in terms of the mucus layer thickness are not known. Our aim was to determine whether butyrate modulates colonic MUC genes expression in vivo and whether this results in changes in mucus synthesis and mucus layer thickness. Mice received daily for 7 days rectal enemas of butyrate (100 mM) versus saline. We demonstrated that butyrate stimulated the gene expression of both secreted (Muc2) and membrane-linked (Muc1, Muc3, Muc4) mucins. Butyrate especially induced a 6-fold increase in Muc2 gene expression in proximal colon. However, butyrate enemas did not modify the number of epithelial cells containing the protein Muc2, and caused a 2-fold decrease in the thickness of adherent mucus layer. Further studies should help understanding whether this last phenomenon, i.e. the decrease in adherent mucus gel thickness, results in a diminished protective function or not. PMID:18198997

  14. Evidence and Role for Bacterial Mucin Degradation in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jeffrey M.; Niccum, David; Dunitz, Jordan M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are composed of complex microbial communities that incite persistent inflammation and airway damage. Despite the high density of bacteria that colonize the lower airways, nutrient sources that sustain bacterial growth in vivo, and how those nutrients are derived, are not well characterized. In this study, we examined the possibility that mucins serve as an important carbon reservoir for the CF lung microbiota. While Pseudomonas aeruginosa was unable to efficiently utilize mucins in isolation, we found that anaerobic, mucin-fermenting bacteria could stimulate the robust growth of CF pathogens when provided intact mucins as a sole carbon source. 16S rRNA sequencing and enrichment culturing of sputum also identified that mucin-degrading anaerobes are ubiquitous in the airways of CF patients. The collective fermentative metabolism of these mucin-degrading communities in vitro generated amino acids and short chain fatty acids (propionate and acetate) during growth on mucin, and the same metabolites were also found in abundance within expectorated sputum. The significance of these findings was supported by in vivo P. aeruginosa gene expression, which revealed a heightened expression of genes required for the catabolism of propionate. Given that propionate is exclusively derived from bacterial fermentation, these data provide evidence for an important role of mucin fermenting bacteria in the carbon flux of the lower airways. More specifically, microorganisms typically defined as commensals may contribute to airway disease by degrading mucins, in turn providing nutrients for pathogens otherwise unable to efficiently obtain carbon in the lung. PMID:27548479

  15. Evidence and Role for Bacterial Mucin Degradation in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Disease.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jeffrey M; Niccum, David; Dunitz, Jordan M; Hunter, Ryan C

    2016-08-01

    Chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are composed of complex microbial communities that incite persistent inflammation and airway damage. Despite the high density of bacteria that colonize the lower airways, nutrient sources that sustain bacterial growth in vivo, and how those nutrients are derived, are not well characterized. In this study, we examined the possibility that mucins serve as an important carbon reservoir for the CF lung microbiota. While Pseudomonas aeruginosa was unable to efficiently utilize mucins in isolation, we found that anaerobic, mucin-fermenting bacteria could stimulate the robust growth of CF pathogens when provided intact mucins as a sole carbon source. 16S rRNA sequencing and enrichment culturing of sputum also identified that mucin-degrading anaerobes are ubiquitous in the airways of CF patients. The collective fermentative metabolism of these mucin-degrading communities in vitro generated amino acids and short chain fatty acids (propionate and acetate) during growth on mucin, and the same metabolites were also found in abundance within expectorated sputum. The significance of these findings was supported by in vivo P. aeruginosa gene expression, which revealed a heightened expression of genes required for the catabolism of propionate. Given that propionate is exclusively derived from bacterial fermentation, these data provide evidence for an important role of mucin fermenting bacteria in the carbon flux of the lower airways. More specifically, microorganisms typically defined as commensals may contribute to airway disease by degrading mucins, in turn providing nutrients for pathogens otherwise unable to efficiently obtain carbon in the lung. PMID:27548479

  16. Differential expression and characterization of a member of the mucin-associated surface protein family secreted by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    De Pablos, Luis Miguel; González, Gloria González; Solano Parada, Jennifer; Seco Hidalgo, Víctor; Díaz Lozano, Isabel María; Gómez Samblás, María Mercedes; Cruz Bustos, Teresa; Osuna, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    We describe the characterization, purification, expression, and location of a 52-kDa protein secreted during interaction between the metacyclic form of Trypanosoma cruzi and its target host cell. The protein, which we have named MASP52, belongs to the family of mucin-associated surface proteins (MASPs). The highest levels of expression of both the protein and mRNA occur during the metacyclic and bloodstream trypomastigote stages, the forms that infect the vertebrate host cells. The protein is located in the plasma membrane and in the flagellar pockets of the epimastigote, metacyclic, and trypomastigote forms and is secreted into the medium at the point of contact between the parasite and the cell membrane, as well as into the host-cell cytosol during the amastigote stage. IgG antibodies specific against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the catalytic zone of MASP52 significantly reduce the parasite's capacity to infect the host cells. Furthermore, when the protein is adsorbed onto inert particles of bentonite and incubated with a nonphagocytic cell culture, the particles are able to induce endocytosis in the cells, which seems to demonstrate that MASP52 plays a role in a process whereby the trypomastigote forms of the parasite invade the host cell. PMID:21788387

  17. Intestinal Goblet Cells and Mucins in Health and Disease: Recent Insights and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samuel B.

    2010-01-01

    The mucus layer coating the gastrointestinal tract is the front line of innate host defense, largely because of the secretory products of intestinal goblet cells. Goblet cells synthesize secretory mucin glycoproteins (MUC2) and bioactive molecules such as epithelial membrane-bound mucins (MUC1, MUC3, MUC17), trefoil factor peptides (TFF), resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ), and Fc-γ binding protein (Fcgbp). The MUC2 mucin protein forms trimers by disulfide bonding in cysteine-rich amino terminal von Willebrand factor (vWF) domains, coupled with crosslinking provided by TFF and Fcgbp proteins with MUC2 vWF domains, resulting in a highly viscous extracellular layer. Colonization by commensal intestinal microbiota is limited to an outer “loose” mucus layer, and interacts with the diverse oligosaccharides of mucin glycoproteins, whereas an “inner” adherent mucus layer is largely devoid of bacteria. Defective mucus layers resulting from lack of MUC2 mucin, mutated Muc2 mucin vWF domains, or from deletion of core mucin glycosyltransferase enzymes in mice result in increased bacterial adhesion to the surface epithelium, increased intestinal permeability, and enhanced susceptibility to colitis caused by dextran sodium sulfate. Changes in mucin gene expression and mucin glycan structures occur in cancers of the intestine, contributing to diverse biologic properties involved in the development and progression of cancer. Further research is needed on identification and functional significance of various components of mucus layers and the complex interactions among mucus layers, microbiota, epithelial cells, and the underlying innate and adaptive immunity. Further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms involved in mucin changes in cancer and inflammation may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:20703838

  18. Stromal Fibrosis and Expression of Matricellular Proteins Correlate With Histological Grade of Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Kakizaki, Yasuharu; Makino, Naohiko; Tozawa, Tomohiro; Honda, Teiichiro; Matsuda, Akiko; Ikeda, Yushi; Ito, Miho; Saito, Yoshihiko; Kimura, Wataru; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to clarify the correlation between the microenvironmental factors and histological grade in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Methods We investigated 65 IPMNs resected at Yamagata University Hospital between 2000 and 2011, and all cases were categorized to low-inter (including low- and intermediate-grade dysplasia) and high-inv (including high-grade dysplasia and IPMN with an associated invasive carcinoma) groups. We compared between the 2 groups pathologically with regard to fibrosis and the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), periostin, and galectin-1 in the periductal stroma of IPMN. Results There were 41 low-inter and 24 high-inv. The subtype was categorized as 22 main duct type (MD-IPMN) and 43 branch duct type (BD-IPMN). The degree of fibrosis and the expression of α-SMA, periostin, and galectin-1 were significantly higher in high-inv than in low-inter within BD-IPMNs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that high expression of α-SMA (odds ratio, 13.802; 95% confidence interval, 1.108–171.893; P = 0.0414) was a significant independent related factor of high-inv in BD-IPMN. Conclusions Stromal fibrosis and expression of α-SMA, periostin, and galectin-1 are more marked in high-inv than in low-inter within BD-IPMNs, and they could become new markers for determining the indications for surgery in BD-IPMN. PMID:26967452

  19. A distinct molecular profile associated with mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A; Gardiner-Garden, M; Henshall, S M; Scurry, J P; Scolyer, R A; Smith, A N; Bali, A; Bergh, P Vanden; Baron-Hay, S; Scott, C; Fink, D; Hacker, N F; Sutherland, R L; O'Brien, P M

    2006-01-01

    Mucinous epithelial ovarian cancers (MOC) are clinically and morphologically distinct from the other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. To determine the genetic basis of MOC and to identify potential tumour markers, gene expression profiling of 49 primary ovarian cancers of different histological subtypes was performed using a customised oligonucleotide microarray containing >59 000 probesets. The results show that MOC express a genetic profile that both differs and overlaps with other subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer. Concordant with its histological phenotype, MOC express genes characteristic of mucinous carcinomas of varying epithelial origin, including intestinal carcinomas. Differences in gene expression between MOC and other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer were confirmed by RT–PCR and/or immunohistochemistry. In particular, galectin 4 (LGALS4) was highly and specifically expressed in MOC, but expressed at lower levels in benign mucinous cysts and borderline (atypical proliferative) tumours, supporting a malignant progression model of MOC. Hence LGALS4 may have application as an early and differential diagnostic marker of MOC. PMID:16508639

  20. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:16886903

  1. Salivary Mucin 19 Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Culp, David J.; Robinson, Bently; Cash, Melanie N.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Stewart, Carol; Cuadra-Saenz, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Saliva functions in innate immunity of the oral cavity, protecting against demineralization of teeth (i.e. dental caries), a highly prevalent infectious disease associated with Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen also linked to endocarditis and atheromatous plaques. Gel-forming mucins are a major constituent of saliva. Because Muc19 is the dominant salivary gel-forming mucin in mice, we studied Muc19−/− mice for changes in innate immune functions of saliva in interactions with S. mutans. When challenged with S. mutans and a cariogenic diet, total smooth and sulcal surface lesions are more than 2- and 1.6-fold higher in Muc19−/− mice compared with wild type, whereas the severity of lesions are up to 6- and 10-fold higher, respectively. Furthermore, the oral microbiota of Muc19−/− mice display higher levels of indigenous streptococci. Results emphasize the importance of a single salivary constituent in the innate immune functions of saliva. In vitro studies of S. mutans and Muc19 interactions (i.e. adherence, aggregation, and biofilm formation) demonstrate Muc19 poorly aggregates S. mutans. Nonetheless, aggregation is enhanced upon adding Muc19 to saliva from Muc19−/− mice, indicating Muc19 assists in bacterial clearance through formation of heterotypic complexes with salivary constituents that bind S. mutans, thus representing a novel innate immune function for salivary gel-forming mucins. In humans, expression of salivary MUC19 is unclear. We find MUC19 transcripts in salivary glands of seven subjects and demonstrate MUC19 glycoproteins in glandular mucous cells and saliva. Similarities and differences between mice and humans in the expression and functions of salivary gel-forming mucins are discussed. PMID:25512380

  2. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  3. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  4. LGALS3 and AXIN1 gene variants playing role in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway are associated with mucinous component and tumor size in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Gurbet; Horozoglu, Cem; Arıkan, Soykan; Gural, Zeynep; Sağlam, Esra Kaytan; Turan, Saime; Özkan, Nazlı Ezgi; Kahraman, Ozlem Timirci; Yenilmez, Ezgi Nurdan; Düzköylü, Yigit; Doğan, Mehmet Baki; Zeybek, Umit; Ergen, Arzu; Yaylım, İlhan

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt pathway alterations have been identified in colorectal and many other cancer types. It has been reported that galectin-3 (which is encoded by the LGALS3 gene) alters the signaling mechanism in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by binding to β-catenin in colon and other cancers. AXIN1 is mainly responsible for the assembly of the β-catenin destruction complex in the Wnt pathway. This study investigated the relationship of rs4644 and rs4652 variants of the LGALS3 gene and rs214250 variants of the AXIN1 gene to histopathological and clinical properties. Our study included a total of 236 patients, of whom 119 had colorectal cancer (42 women, 77 men) and 117 were healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) PCR methods were used. In addition, the serum galectin-3 level was studied with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. For the rs4644 variant of the LGALS3 gene, the CC genotype a mucinous component was significantly more common than those without a mucinous component (p=0.026). C allele frequency of the rs214250 variant of the AXIN1 gene was significantly correlated to tumor size in the advanced tumor stage (p=0.022). The CCAACT haplotype was more common in colorectal cancer patients (p=0.022). Serum galectin-3 level was higher in the patient group compared to the control group (5.9± 0.69 ng/ml vs. 0.79±0.01 ng/ml; p<0.001). In conclusion, variants of LGALS3 and AXIN1 genes affect tumor sizes and the mucinous component via Wnt/β-catenin pathway in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:26894286

  5. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  6. The tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-1, is involved in bronchial mucin production during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Kyoung; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Keun Ae; Park, Chan Sun; Bae, Yun Jeong; Zhu, Zhou; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2010-02-26

    Mucus hypersecretion is a clinically important manifestation of chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as asthma and Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucin production in airway epithelia is increased under conditions of oxidative stress. Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1 suppression is related to the development of airway inflammation and increased ROS levels. In this study, we investigated the role of SHP-1 in mucin secretion triggered by oxidative stress. Human lung mucoepidermoid H292 carcinoma cells were transfected with specific siRNA to eliminate SHP-1 gene expression. Cultured cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and Mucin 5AC(MUC5AC) gene expression and mucin production were determined. Activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) in association with MUC5AC production was evaluated. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was employed to determine whether antioxidants could block MUC5AC production. To establish the precise role of p38, mucin expression was observed after pre-treatment of SHP-1-depleted H292 cells with the p38 chemical blocker. We investigated the in vivo effects of oxidative stress on airway mucus production in SHP-1-deficient heterozygous (mev/+) mice. MUC5AC expression was enhanced in SHP-1 knockdown H292 cells exposed to H(2)O(2), compared to that in control cells. The ratio between phosphorylated and total p38 was significantly increased in SHP-1-deficient cells under oxidative stress. Pre-treatment with NAC suppressed both MUC5AC production and p38 activation. Blockage of p38 MAPK led to suppression of MUC5AC mRNA expression. Notably, mucin production was enhanced in the airway epithelia of mev/+ mice exposed to oxidative stress. Our results clearly indicate that SHP-1 plays an important role in airway mucin production through regulating oxidative stress. PMID:20117097

  7. Vinpocetine Inhibits Streptococcus pneumoniae–Induced Upregulation of Mucin MUC5AC Expression via Induction of MKP-1 Phosphatase in the Pathogenesis of Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yun; Komatsu, Kensei; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Miyata, Masanori; O’Neill Bohn, Ashley; Xu, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common bacterial pathogens causing OM. Mucin MUC5AC plays an important role in mucociliary clearance of bacterial pathogens. However, if uncontrolled, excessive mucus contributes significantly to conductive hearing loss. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapeutic agents that suppress mucus overproduction. In this study, we show that a currently existing antistroke drug, vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, inhibited S. pneumoniae–induced mucin MUC5AC upregulation in cultured middle ear epithelial cells and in the middle ear of mice. Moreover, vinpocetine inhibited MUC5AC upregulation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK pathway in an MKP-1–dependent manner. Importantly, ototopical administration of vinpocetine postinfection inhibited MUC5AC expression and middle ear inflammation induced by S. pneumoniae and reduced hearing loss and pneumococcal loads in a well-established mouse model of OM. Thus, these studies identified vinpocetine as a potential therapeutic agent for inhibiting mucus production in the pathogenesis of OM. PMID:25972475

  8. Vinpocetine inhibits Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced upregulation of mucin MUC5AC expression via induction of MKP-1 phosphatase in the pathogenesis of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Yun; Komatsu, Kensei; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Miyata, Masanori; O'Neill Bohn, Ashley; Xu, Haidong; Yan, Chen; Li, Jian-Dong

    2015-06-15

    Mucin overproduction is a hallmark of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common bacterial pathogens causing OM. Mucin MUC5AC plays an important role in mucociliary clearance of bacterial pathogens. However, if uncontrolled, excessive mucus contributes significantly to conductive hearing loss. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapeutic agents that suppress mucus overproduction. In this study, we show that a currently existing antistroke drug, vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, inhibited S. pneumoniae-induced mucin MUC5AC upregulation in cultured middle ear epithelial cells and in the middle ear of mice. Moreover, vinpocetine inhibited MUC5AC upregulation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK pathway in an MKP-1-dependent manner. Importantly, ototopical administration of vinpocetine postinfection inhibited MUC5AC expression and middle ear inflammation induced by S. pneumoniae and reduced hearing loss and pneumococcal loads in a well-established mouse model of OM. Thus, these studies identified vinpocetine as a potential therapeutic agent for inhibiting mucus production in the pathogenesis of OM. PMID:25972475

  9. Ocular Surface Membrane-Associated Mucins.

    PubMed

    Ablamowicz, Anna F; Nichols, Jason J

    2016-07-01

    Ocular surface epithelial cells produce and secrete mucins that form a hydrophilic barrier for protection and lubrication of the eye. This barrier, the glycocalyx, is formed by high molecular weight heavily glycosylated membrane-associated mucins (MAMs) that include MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16. These mucins extend into the tear film from the anterior surfaces of the conjunctiva and cornea, and, through interactions with galectin-3, prevent penetrance of pathogens into the eye. Due primarily to the glycosylation of the mucins, the glycocalyx also creates less friction during blinking and enables the tear film to maintain wetting of the eye. The secretory mucins include soluble MUC7 and gel-forming MUC5AC. These mucins, particularly MUC5AC, assist with removal of debris from the tear film and contribute to the hydrophilicity of the tear film. While new methodologies and cell culture models have expanded our understanding of mucin structure and function on the ocular surface, there is still a paucity of studies characterizing the glycosylation of MAMs on a normal ocular surface and a diseased ocular surface. Although studies have shown alterations in mucin production and expression in dry eye diseases, the relationship between changes in mucins and functional consequences is unclear. This review focuses on comparing what is known about MAMs in wet-surfaced epithelia of the body to what has been studied on the eye. PMID:27154035

  10. Aberrant expressions of c-KIT and DOG-1 in mucinous and nonmucinous colorectal carcinomas and relation to clinicopathologic features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohamed, Mie Ali

    2015-10-01

    c-KIT and DOG-1 are 2 highly expressed proteins in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Few studies had investigated c-KIT, but not DOG-1, expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). This study aims to investigate expressions of c-KIT and DOG-1 in colorectal mucinous carcinoma and nonmucinous carcinoma using manual tissue microarray technique. In this work, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal mucinous (MA) and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique, and immunohistochemistry for c-KIT and DOG-1 was done. We found that aberrant c-KIT expression was detected in 12 cases (8%); 6 cases (4%) showed strong expression. Aberrant DOG-1 expression was detected in 15 cases (10%); among them, only 4 cases (2.7%) showed strong expression. Nonmucinous adenocarcinoma showed a significantly high expression of c-KIT, but not DOG-1, than MA. Aberrant c-KIT and DOG-1 expressions were significantly unrelated but were associated with excessive microscopic abscess formation. Neither c-KIT nor DOG-1 expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival or overall survival. In conclusion, aberrant c-KIT and DOG-1 expressions in CRC are rare events, either in NMA or MA. Nonmucinous adenocarcinoma showed a significantly higher expression of c-KIT, but not DOG-1, than MA. The expressions of both in CRC are significantly unrelated but are associated with microscopic abscess formation. Neither c-KIT nor DOG-1 expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival or overall survival. So, c-KIT and DOG-1 immunostaining is not a cost-effective method of identifying patients with CRC who may benefit from treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:26272691

  11. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  12. Butyrate modulates bacterial adherence on LS174T human colorectal cells by stimulating mucin secretion and MAPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae-Hwan; Park, Jeong Hyeon; Han, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Fermentation of dietary fiber results in production of various short chain fatty acids in the colon. In particular, butyrate is reported to regulate the physical and functional integrity of the normal colonic mucosa by altering mucin gene expression or the number of goblet cells. The objective of this study was to investigate whether butyrate modulates mucin secretion in LS174T human colorectal cells, thereby influencing the adhesion of probiotics such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains and subsequently inhibiting pathogenic bacteria such as E. coli. In addition, possible signaling pathways involved in mucin gene regulation induced by butyrate treatment were also investigated. MATERIALS/METHODS Mucin protein content assay and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining were performed in LS174T cells treated with butyrate at various concentrations. Effects of butyrate on the ability of probiotics to adhere to LS174T cells and their competition with E. coli strains were examined. Real time polymerase chain reaction for mucin gene expression and Taqman array 96-well fast plate-based pathway analysis were performed on butyrate-treated LS174T cells. RESULTS Treatment with butyrate resulted in a dose-dependent increase in mucin protein contents in LS174T cells with peak effects at 6 or 9 mM, which was further confirmed by PAS staining. Increase in mucin protein contents resulted in elevated adherence of probiotics, which subsequently reduced the adherent ability of E. coli. Treatment with butyrate also increased transcriptional levels of MUC3, MUC4, and MUC12, which was accompanied by higher gene expressions of signaling kinases and transcription factors involved in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. CONCLUSIONS Based on our results, butyrate is an effective regulator of modulation of mucin protein production at the transcriptional and translational levels, resulting in changes in the adherence of gut microflora. Butyrate

  13. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  14. Aberrant Expression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Ovarian Carcinoma Independent of Gene Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoxian; Yang, Fei; Du, Xiang; Lu, Yongming; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. The oncogenic role of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is well characterized in many hematopoietic and solid tumors. ALK expression in ovarian carcinoma has been reported but the exact status of ALK protein and its association with clinicopathologic features requires further investigation. ALK expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in 110 primary ovarian carcinomas, including 85 cases of serous carcinoma and 25 cases of mucinous carcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used for evaluating ALK translocation in ALK-positive ovarian carcinomas. Among 110 ovarian carcinomas, 23 (20.9%) cases were ALK positive by immunohistochemistry. All ALK-positive cases were ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma. ALK expression was detected in 23/85 (27.1%) ovarian serous carcinoma and 0/25 (0%) in ovarian mucinous carcinoma. None of the 23 ALK IHC-positive cases harbored ALK gene translocations by FISH or RT-PCR. ALK protein expression was associated with patient age, tumor stage, and histologic type. Specifically, the probability of ALK protein expression was significantly higher in high-grade serous carcinomas in older patients (above 50 y) with advanced disease (FIGO stage III and IV) compared with the low-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas in younger patients with relatively early disease. In conclusion, aberrant ALK expression is observed in ovarian serous carcinoma but not in mucinous carcinoma, is independent of gene translocation, and might be associated with progression and prognosis. PMID:27271776

  15. Mucin Dynamics in Intestinal Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Sara K.; Florin, Timothy H. J.; McGuckin, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacterial gastroenteritis causes morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Murine Citrobacter rodentium infection is a model for gastroenteritis caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli. Mucin glycoproteins are the main component of the first barrier that bacteria encounter in the intestinal tract. Methodology/Principal Findings Using Immunohistochemistry, we investigated intestinal expression of mucins (Alcian blue/PAS, Muc1, Muc2, Muc4, Muc5AC, Muc13 and Muc3/17) in healthy and C. rodentium infected mice. The majority of the C. rodentium infected mice developed systemic infection and colitis in the mid and distal colon by day 12. C. rodentium bound to the major secreted mucin, Muc2, in vitro, and high numbers of bacteria were found in secreted MUC2 in infected animals in vivo, indicating that mucins may limit bacterial access to the epithelial surface. In the small intestine, caecum and proximal colon, the mucin expression was similar in infected and non-infected animals. In the distal colonic epithelium, all secreted and cell surface mucins decreased with the exception of the Muc1 cell surface mucin which increased after infection (p<0.05). Similarly, during human infection Salmonella St Paul, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium difficile induced MUC1 in the colon. Conclusion Major changes in both the cell-surface and secreted mucins occur in response to intestinal infection. PMID:19088856

  16. Gene Expression in Oligodendroglial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Elisabeth J.; Haylock, Brian; Husband, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Sibson, D. Ross; Warnke, Peter C.; Walker, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss are more likely to be chemosensitive and have longer survival than those with intact 1p/19q, but not all respond to chemotherapy, warranting investigation of the biological basis of chemosensitivity. Methods: Gene expression profiling was performed using amplified antisense RNA from 28 oligodendroglial tumors treated with chemotherapy (26 serial stereotactic biopsy, 2 resection). Expression of differentially expressed genes was validated by real-time PCR. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clustering of multiple samples from the same case in 14/17 cases and identified subgroups associated with tumor grade and 1p/19q status. 176 genes were differentially expressed, 164 being associated with 1p/19q loss (86% not on 1p or 19q). 94 genes differed between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy; 12 were not associated with 1p/19q loss. Significant differential expression was confirmed in 11/13 selected genes. Novel genes associated with response to therapy included SSBP2, GFRA1, FAP and RASD1. IQGAP1, INA, TGIF1, NR2F2 and MYCBP were differentially expressed in oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss. Conclusion: Gene expression profiling using serial stereotactic biopsies indicated greater homogeneity within tumors than between tumors. Genes associated with 1p/19q status or response were identified warranting further elucidation of their role in oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:20966545

  17. Mucins in lung cancer: diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Macha, Muzafar A; Haridas, Dhanya; Majhi, Prabin Dhangada; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Batra, Surinder K; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of mucins is associated with cancer development and metastasis. An overexpression of few mucins contributes to oncogenesis by enhancing cancer cell growth and providing constitutive survival signals. This review focuses on the importance of mucins both in the normal bronchial epithelial cells and the malignant tumors of the lung and their contribution in the diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer patients. During lung cancer progression, mucins either alone or through their interaction with many receptor tyrosine kinases mediate cell signals for growth and survival of cancer cells. Also, stage-specific expression of certain mucins, like MUC1, is associated with poor prognosis from lung cancer. Thus, mucins are emerging as attractive targets for developing novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer. Several strategies targeting mucin expression and function are currently being investigated to control lung cancer progression. PMID:25319180

  18. A novel dissociative steroid VBP15 reduces MUC5AC gene expression in airway epithelial cells but lacks the GRE mediated transcriptional properties of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Garvin, Lindsay M; Chen, Yajun; Damsker, Jesse M; Rose, Mary C

    2016-06-01

    Overproduction of secretory mucins contributes to morbidity/mortality in inflammatory lung diseases. Inflammatory mediators directly increase expression of mucin genes, but few drugs have been shown to directly repress mucin gene expression. IL-1β upregulates the MUC5AC mucin gene in part via the transcription factors NFκB while the glucocorticoid Dexamethasone (Dex) transcriptionally represses MUC5AC expression by Dex-activated GR binding to two GRE cis-sites in the MUC5AC promoter in lung epithelial cells. VBP compounds (ReveraGen BioPharma) maintain anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of NFκB but exhibit reduced GRE-mediated transcriptional properties associated with adverse side-effects and thus have potential to minimize harmful side effects of long-term steroid therapy in inflammatory lung diseases. We investigated VBP15 efficacy as an anti-mucin agent in two types of airway epithelial cells and analyzed the transcription factor activity and promoter binding associated with VBP15-induced MUC5AC repression. VBP15 reduced MUC5AC mRNA abundance in a dose- and time-dependent manner similar to Dex in the presence or absence of IL-1β in A549 and differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells. Repression was abrogated in the presence of RU486, demonstrating a requirement for GR in the VBP15-induced repression of MUC5AC. Inhibition of NFκB activity resulted in reduced baseline expression of MUC5AC indicating that constitutive activity maintains MUC5AC production. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated lack of GR and of p65 (NFκB) binding to composite GRE domains in the MUC5AC promoter following VBP15 exposure of cells, in contrast to Dex. These data demonstrate that VBP15 is a novel anti-mucin agent that mediates the reduction of MUC5AC gene expression differently than the classical glucocorticoid, Dex. PMID:27133900

  19. Immunohistochemistry in the Diagnosis of Mucinous Neoplasms Involving the Ovary: The Added Value of SATB2 and Biomarker Discovery Through Protein Expression Database Mining.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sarah; Wasserman, Jason K; Giassi, Ana; Djordjevic, Bojana; Parra-Herran, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Immunohistochemistry is frequently used to identify ovarian mucinous neoplasms as primary or metastatic; however, there is significant overlap in expression patterns. We compared traditional markers (CK7, CK20, CDX2, PAX8, estrogen receptor, β-catenin, MUC1, MUC2, and MUC5AC) to 2 novel proteins identified through mining of the Human Protein Atlas expression database: SATB2 and POF1B. The study cohort included 49 primary gastrointestinal (GI) mucinous adenocarcinomas (19 colorectal, 15 gastric, 15 pancreatobiliary), 60 primary ovarian mucinous neoplasms (19 cystadenomas, 21 borderline tumors, 20 adenocarcinomas), and 19 metastatic carcinomas to the ovary (14 lower and 5 upper GI primaries). Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue microarrays, scored and interpreted as negative (absent or focal/weak) or positive. Metastatic tumors were frequently unilateral (42.8% of tumors from lower and 40% of tumors from upper tract) and ≥10 cm (85.7% of tumors from lower and 80% of tumors from upper tract). CK7 was positive in 88.5% upper GI and 88.3% primary ovarian compared with 24.3% lower GI neoplasms. CK20 and CDX2 were positive in 84.8% and 100% of lower GI tumors, respectively; however, expression was also common in upper GI (CK20 42.8%, CDX2 50%) and primary ovarian neoplasms (CK20 65.7%, CDX2 38.3%). Conversely, SATB2 was more specific for lower GI origin, being positive in 78.8% lower GI but only 11.5% upper GI and 1.7% primary ovarian neoplasms. PAX8 expression was common in primary ovarian neoplasms (75% of all neoplasms, 65% of carcinomas); only 1 (1.5%) GI tumor was positive. MUC2 and β-catenin were frequently positive in lower GI tumors (96.9% and 51.5%, respectively). Estrogen receptor expression was only seen in primary ovarian neoplasms (13.3%). Nuclear premature ovarian failure 1B (POF1B) expression was seen in malignant tumors regardless of their origin. A panel including CK7, SATB2, and PAX8 separated primary from secondary GI neoplasms with up to

  20. CFTR, Mucins, and Mucus Obstruction in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreda, Silvia M.; Davis, C. William; Rose, Mary Callaghan

    2012-01-01

    Mucus pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been known for as long as the disease has been recognized and is sometimes called mucoviscidosis. The disease is marked by mucus hyperproduction and plugging in many organs, which are usually most fatal in the airways of CF patients, once the problem of meconium ileus at birth is resolved. After the CF gene, CFTR, was cloned and its protein product identified as a cAMP-regulated Cl− channel, causal mechanisms underlying the strong mucus phenotype of the disease became obscure. Here we focus on mucin genes and polymeric mucin glycoproteins, examining their regulation and potential relationships to a dysfunctional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Detailed examination of CFTR expression in organs and different cell types indicates that changes in CFTR expression do not always correlate with the severity of CF disease or mucus accumulation. Thus, the mucus hyperproduction that typifies CF does not appear to be a direct cause of a defective CFTR but, rather, to be a downstream consequence. In organs like the lung, up-regulation of mucin gene expression by inflammation results from chronic infection; however, in other instances and organs, the inflammation may have a non-infectious origin. The mucus plugging phenotype of the β-subunit of the epithelial Na+ channel (βENaC)-overexpressing mouse is proving to be an archetypal example of this kind of inflammation, with a dehydrated airway surface/concentrated mucus gel apparently providing the inflammatory stimulus. Data indicate that the luminal HCO3 − deficiency recently described for CF epithelia may also provide such a stimulus, perhaps by causing a mal-maturation of mucins as they are released onto luminal surfaces. In any event, the path between CFTR dysfunction and mucus hyperproduction has proven tortuous, and its unraveling continues to offer its own twists and turns, along with fascinating glimpses into biology. PMID:22951447

  1. Mucins Suppress Virulence Traits of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Kavanaugh, Nicole L.; Zhang, Angela Q.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans, causing a variety of diseases ranging from superficial mucosal infections to deep-seated systemic invasions. Mucus, the gel that coats all wet epithelial surfaces, accommodates C. albicans as part of the normal microbiota, where C. albicans resides asymptomatically in healthy humans. Through a series of in vitro experiments combined with gene expression analysis, we show that mucin biopolymers, the main gel-forming constituents of mucus, induce a new oval-shaped morphology in C. albicans in which a range of genes related to adhesion, filamentation, and biofilm formation are downregulated. We also show that corresponding traits are suppressed, rendering C. albicans impaired in forming biofilms on a range of different synthetic surfaces and human epithelial cells. Our data suggest that mucins can manipulate C. albicans physiology, and we hypothesize that they are key environmental signals for retaining C. albicans in the host-compatible, commensal state. PMID:25389175

  2. Temporal gene expression and probiotic attributes of Lactobacillus acidophilus during growth in milk.

    PubMed

    Azcarate-Peril, M A; Tallon, R; Klaenhammer, T R

    2009-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been used as starter strains in the production of fermented dairy products for centuries. Lactobacillus acidophilus is a widely recognized probiotic bacteria commonly added to yogurt and used in dietary supplements. In this study, a whole genome microarray was employed to monitor gene expression of L. acidophilus NCFM cells propagated in 11% skim milk during early, mid and late logarithmic phase, and stationary phase. Approximately 21% of 1,864 open reading frames were differentially expressed at least in one time point. Genes differentially expressed in skim milk included several members of the proteolytic enzyme system. Expression of prtP (proteinase precursor) and prtM (maturase) increased over time as well as several peptidases and transport systems. Expression of Opp1 (oligopeptide transport system 1) was highest at 4 h, whereas gene expression of Opp2 increased over time reaching its highest level at 12 h, suggesting that the 2 systems have different specificities. Expression of a 2-component regulatory system, previously shown to regulate acid tolerance and proteolytic activity, also increased during the early log and early stationary phases of growth. Expression of the genes involved in lactose utilization increased immediately (5 min) upon exposure to milk. The acidification activity, survival under storage conditions, and adhesion to mucin and Caco-2 tissue culture cells of selected mutants containing insertionally inactivated genes differentially expressed in the wild-type strain during growth in milk were examined for any potential links between probiotic properties and bacterial growth and survival in milk. Some of the most interesting genes found to be expressed in milk were correlated with signaling (autoinducer-2) and adherence to mucin and intestinal epithelial cells, in vitro. PMID:19233780

  3. Nuclear Neighborhoods and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Bodnar, Megan S.; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic nucleus is a highly compartmentalized and dynamic environment. Chromosome territories are arranged non-randomly within the nucleus and numerous studies have indicated that a gene’s position in the nucleus can impact its transcriptional activity. Here, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the influence of specific nuclear neighborhoods on gene expression or repression. Nuclear neighborhoods associated with transcriptional repression include the inner nuclear membrane/nuclear lamina and peri-nucleolar chromatin, whereas neighborhoods surrounding the nuclear pore complex, PML nuclear bodies, and nuclear speckles seem to be transcriptionally permissive. While nuclear position appears to play an important role in gene expression, it is likely to be only one piece of a flexible puzzle that incorporates numerous parameters. We are still at a very early, yet exciting stage in our journey toward deciphering the mechanism(s) that govern the permissiveness of gene expression/repression within different nuclear neighborhoods. PMID:19339170

  4. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  5. Mucins in pancreatic cancer and its microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Kumar, Sushil; Momi, Navneet; Sasson, Aaron R.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal malignancy with poor prognosis owing to therapeutic resistance, frequent recurrence and the absence of treatment strategies that specifically target the tumour and its supporting stroma. Deregulated cell-surface proteins drive neoplastic transformations and are envisioned to mediate crosstalk between the tumour and its microenvironment. Emerging studies have elaborated on the role of mucins in diverse biological functions, including enhanced tumorigenicity, invasiveness, metastasis and drug resistance through their characteristic O-linked and N-linked oligosaccharides (glycans), extended structures and unique domains. Multiple mucin domains differentially interact and regulate different components of the tumour microenvironment. This Review discusses: the expression pattern of various mucins in the pancreas under healthy, inflammatory, and cancerous conditions; the context-dependent attributes of mucins that differ under healthy and pathological conditions; the contribution of the tumour microenvironment in pancreatic cancer development and/or progression; diagnostic and/or prognostic efficacy of mucins; and mucin-based therapeutic strategies. Overall, this information should help to delineate the intricacies of pancreatic cancer by exploring the family of mucins, which, through various mechanisms in both tumour cells and the microenvironment, worsen disease outcome. PMID:23856888

  6. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  7. Interferon-γ-Induced Unfolded Protein Response in Conjunctival Goblet Cells as a Cause of Mucin Deficiency in Sjögren Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coursey, Terry G; Tukler Henriksson, Johanna; Barbosa, Flavia L; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Goblet cells (GCs) are specialized secretory cells that produce mucins and a variety of other proteins. Significant conjunctival GC loss occurs in both experimental dry eye models and patients with keratoconjunctivitis sicca due to the induction of interferon (IFN)-γ. With the use of a primary murine culture model, we found that GCs are highly sensitive to IFN-γ with significantly reduced proliferation and altered structure with low concentrations. GC cultures treated with IFN-γ have increased gene expression of Muc2 and Muc5AC but do not express these mucin glycoproteins. We hypothesized that IFN-γ induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in GCs. Cultures treated with IFN-γ increased expression of UPR-associated genes and proteins. Increased GRP78 and sXBP1 expression was found in experimental dry eye and Sjögren syndrome models and was GC specific. Increased GRP78 was also found in the conjunctiva of patients with Sjögren syndrome at the gene and protein levels. Treatment with dexamethasone inhibited expression of UPR-associated genes and increased mucin production. These results indicate that induction of UPR by IFN-γ is an important cause of GC-associated mucin deficiency observed in aqueous-deficient dry eye. Therapies to block the effects of IFN-γ on the metabolically active endoplasmic reticulum in these cells might enhance synthesis and secretion of the protective GC mucins on the ocular surface. PMID:27085137

  8. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  9. Intracellular and Interstitial Expression of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genes in Gastric Precancerous Intestinal Metaplasia and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Semino-Mora, Cristina; Doi, Sonia Q.; Marty, Aileen; Simko, Vlado; Carlstedt, Ingemar; Dubois, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric cancer are associated with Helicobacter pylori, but the bacterium often is undetectable in these lesions. To unravel this apparent paradox, IM, H. pylori presence, and the expression of H. pylori virulence genes were quantified concurrently using histologic testing, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. H. pylori was detected inside metaplastic, dysplastic, and neoplastic epithelial cells, and cagA and babA2 expression was colocalized. Importantly, expression of cagA was significantly higher in patients with IM and adenocarcinoma than in control subjects. The preneoplastic “acidic” MUC2 mucin was detected only in the presence of H. pylori, and MUC2 expression was higher in patients with IM, dysplasia, and cancer. These novel findings are compatible with the hypothesis that all stages of gastric carcinogenesis are fostered by persistent intracellular expression of H. pylori virulence genes, especially cagA inside MUC2-producing precancerous gastric cells and pleomorphic cancer cells. PMID:12695995

  10. Nature of bacterial colonization influences transcription of mucin genes in mice during the first week of life

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postnatal regulation of the small intestinal mucus layer is potentially important in the development of adult gut functionality. We hypothesized that the nature of bacterial colonization affects mucus gene regulation in early life. We thus analyzed the influence of the presence of a conventional microbiota as well as two selected monocolonizing bacterial strains on the transcription of murine genes involved in mucus layer development during the first week of life. Mouse pups (N = 8/group) from differently colonized dams: Germ-free (GF), conventional specific pathogen free (SPF), monocolonized with either Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (Lb) or Escherichia coli Nissle (Ec) were analyzed by qPCR on isolated ileal tissue sections from postnatal days 1 and 6 (PND1, PND6) after birth with respect to: (i) transcription of specific genes involved in mucus production (Muc1-4, Tff3) and (ii) amounts of 16S rRNA of Lactobacillus and E. coli. Quantification of 16S rRNA genes was performed to obtain a measure for amounts of colonized bacteria. Results We found a microbiota-independent transcriptional increase of all five mucus genes from PND1 to PND6. Furthermore, the relative level of transcription of certain mucus genes on PND1 was increased by the presence of bacteria. This was observed for Tff3 in the SPF, Ec, and Lb groups; for Muc2 in SPF; and for Muc3 and Muc4 in Ec and Lb, respectively. Detection of bacterial 16S rRNA genes levels above the qPCR detection level occurred only on PND6 and only for some of the colonized animals. On PND6, we found significantly lower levels of Muc1, Muc2 and Muc4 gene transcription for Lb animals with detectable Lactobacillus levels as compared to animals with Lactobacillus levels below the detection limit. Conclusions In summary, our data show that development of the expression of genes encoding secreted (Muc2/Tff3) and membrane-bound (Muc1/Muc3/Muc4) mucus regulatory proteins, respectively, is distinct and that the onset of

  11. Mucinous Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Behzatğlu, Kemal; Boyaci, Ceren; Okçu, Oğuzhan; Hacihasanoğlu, Ezgi; Çakir, Yasemin; Darakçi, Seher

    2014-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma with abundant myxoid stroma is a newly-described and extremely rare entity. Since only very few cases have been reported, there is no consensus on its nomenclature. Microscopic examination revealed invasive urothelial carcinoma with widespread low-grade noninvasive areas. There were focal invasive areas in the neighborhood of the renal parenchyma. Malignant urothelial tumor/cell groups localized in the stroma had abundant myxoid/mucinous background in the invasive areas. The cytoplasm of the tumoral cells was more eosinophilic in these areas and the cells formed small groups and cords. Histochemically, PAS and Alcian Blue were positive in the cytoplasm of the tumoral cells and in the stroma while negative in the non-mucinous areas. Immunohistochemically, the tumoral cells of the mucinous invasive areas diffusely expressed MUC1 and MUC2. We discuss the origin of the mucinous/myxoid stroma, the tumor’s nature and its nomenclature with histochemical and immunohistochemical features. PMID:25568745

  12. Gene expression during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Lionel Muller; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Vianna, Monica M R; Izquierdo, Ivan; Medina, Jorge H

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, neuroscientists have provided many clues that point out the involvement of de novo gene expression during the formation of long-lasting forms of memory. However, information regarding the transcriptional response networks involved in memory formation has been scarce and fragmented. With the advent of genome-based technologies, combined with more classical approaches (i.e., pharmacology and biochemistry), it is now feasible to address those relevant questions--which gene products are modulated, and when that processes are necessary for the proper storage of memories--with unprecedented resolution and scale. Using one-trial inhibitory (passive) avoidance training of rats, one of the most studied tasks so far, we found two time windows of sensitivity to transcriptional and translational inhibitors infused into the hippocampus: around the time of training and 3-6 h after training. Remarkably, these periods perfectly overlap with the involvement of hippocampal cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) signaling pathways in memory consolidation. Given the complexity of transcriptional responses in the brain, particularly those related to processing of behavioral information, it was clearly necessary to address this issue with a multi-variable, parallel-oriented approach. We used cDNA arrays to screen for candidate inhibitory avoidance learning-related genes and analyze the dynamic pattern of gene expression that emerges during memory consolidation. These include genes involved in intracellular kinase networks, synaptic function, DNA-binding and chromatin modification, transcriptional activation and repression, translation, membrane receptors, and oncogenes, among others. Our findings suggest that differential and orchestrated hippocampal gene expression is necessary in both early and late periods of long-term memory consolidation. Additionally, this kind of studies may lead to the identification and characterization of genes that are relevant for the pathogenesis

  13. Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 and Galectin-9 genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Duran, P L H; Padiernos, R B C; Abella, E A; Konnai, S; Mingala, C N

    2015-12-01

    Molecular characterization of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) and Galectin-9 (GAL-9) genes of swamp- and riverine-type water buffaloes was conducted to compare these genes with other species; determine the unique characteristic specific in water buffalo; and provide baseline information for the assessment of disease progression in buffalo species. TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes were amplified, purified, sequenced and characterized. The sequence result of TIM-3 in both types of water buffaloes contained 843 nucleotides encoding to 280 amino acids while GAL-9 of swamp-type and riverine-type water buffaloes contained 1023 and 972 nucleotides encoding to 340 and 323 amino acids, respectively. Meanwhile, the nucleotide and amino sequence of TIM-3 in water buffalo were 83-98% and 94-97% identical with other artiodactyl species, respectively. On the other hand, GAL-9 nucleotide and amino acid sequence in water buffalo were 85-98% and 76-96% identical with other artiodactyl species. The tyrosine-kinase phosphorylation motif and potential glycosylation sites were conserved within the tribe Bovinae. It is imperative to have further studies in the assessment of the role of these genes in disease progression in water buffalo during chronic infection. The study is the first report that describes the genetic characteristic of TIM-3 and GAL-9 genes in water buffalo. PMID:26441033

  14. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  15. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  16. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  17. Increased expression of human T-cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with system lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peiqing; Xu, Liyun; Wang, Piming; Liang, Xiaohong; Qi, Jianni; Liu, Peng; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Lining; Ma, Chunhong; Gao, Lifen

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease. Innate and adaptive immunity cooperatively contribute to the development of SLE. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) have been suggested to link innate and adaptive immunity. T-cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-4 (Tim-4; also known as Timd4), expressed primarily on the surface of APCs, is a member of the TIM family, a recently described group of molecules that have received much attention as potential regulators of the immune system. In this study, we used quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to examine the mRNA expression of Tim-4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from SLE patients and further analyzed the correlation between the expression of Tim-4 and Tim-1 (a potential ligand for Tim-4) in PBMCs and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. The results showed that Tim-4 mRNA expression in PBMCs was significantly higher in SLE patients than in healthy controls, especially those patients in the active phase of disease. Moreover, Tim-4 mRNA levels were closely correlated with Tim-1 mRNA levels in PBMCs and with serum TNF-α levels in SLE patients but not in the control group. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Tim-4 may be involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:20140011

  18. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103

  19. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  20. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  1. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  2. Changes in cecal microbiota and mucosal gene expression revealed new aspects of epizootic rabbit enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Bäuerl, Christine; Collado, M Carmen; Zúñiga, Manuel; Blas, Enrique; Pérez Martínez, Gaspar

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy (ERE) is a severe disease of unknown aetiology that mainly affects post-weaning animals. Its incidence can be prevented by antibiotic treatment suggesting that bacterial elements are crucial for the development of the disease. Microbial dynamics and host responses during the disease were studied. Cecal microbiota was characterized in three rabbit groups (ERE-affected, healthy and healthy pretreated with antibiotics), followed by transcriptional analysis of cytokines and mucins in the cecal mucosa and vermix by q-rtPCR. In healthy animals, cecal microbiota with or without antibiotic pretreatment was very similar and dominated by Alistipes and Ruminococcus. Proportions of both genera decreased in ERE rabbits whereas Bacteroides, Akkermansia and Rikenella increased, as well as Clostridium, γ-Proteobacteria and other opportunistic and pathogenic species. The ERE group displayed remarkable dysbiosis and reduced taxonomic diversity. Transcription rate of mucins and inflammatory cytokines was very high in ERE rabbits, except IL-2, and its analysis revealed the existence of two clearly different gene expression patterns corresponding to Inflammatory and (mucin) Secretory Profiles. Furthermore, these profiles were associated to different bacterial species, suggesting that they may correspond to different stages of the disease. Other data obtained in this work reinforced the notion that ERE morbidity and mortality is possibly caused by an overgrowth of different pathogens in the gut of animals whose immune defence mechanisms seem not to be adequately responding. PMID:25147938

  3. Changes in Cecal Microbiota and Mucosal Gene Expression Revealed New Aspects of Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, Manuel; Blas, Enrique; Pérez Martínez, Gaspar

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy (ERE) is a severe disease of unknown aetiology that mainly affects post-weaning animals. Its incidence can be prevented by antibiotic treatment suggesting that bacterial elements are crucial for the development of the disease. Microbial dynamics and host responses during the disease were studied. Cecal microbiota was characterized in three rabbit groups (ERE-affected, healthy and healthy pretreated with antibiotics), followed by transcriptional analysis of cytokines and mucins in the cecal mucosa and vermix by q-rtPCR. In healthy animals, cecal microbiota with or without antibiotic pretreatment was very similar and dominated by Alistipes and Ruminococcus. Proportions of both genera decreased in ERE rabbits whereas Bacteroides, Akkermansia and Rikenella increased, as well as Clostridium, γ-Proteobacteria and other opportunistic and pathogenic species. The ERE group displayed remarkable dysbiosis and reduced taxonomic diversity. Transcription rate of mucins and inflammatory cytokines was very high in ERE rabbits, except IL-2, and its analysis revealed the existence of two clearly different gene expression patterns corresponding to Inflammatory and (mucin) Secretory Profiles. Furthermore, these profiles were associated to different bacterial species, suggesting that they may correspond to different stages of the disease. Other data obtained in this work reinforced the notion that ERE morbidity and mortality is possibly caused by an overgrowth of different pathogens in the gut of animals whose immune defence mechanisms seem not to be adequately responding. PMID:25147938

  4. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, M.; Myers, C.; Faith, J.

    2008-05-01

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  5. Classification of genes based on gene expression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Angelova, M. Myers, C. Faith, J.

    2008-05-15

    Systems biology and bioinformatics are now major fields for productive research. DNA microarrays and other array technologies and genome sequencing have advanced to the point that it is now possible to monitor gene expression on a genomic scale. Gene expression analysis is discussed and some important clustering techniques are considered. The patterns identified in the data suggest similarities in the gene behavior, which provides useful information for the gene functionalities. We discuss measures for investigating the homogeneity of gene expression data in order to optimize the clustering process. We contribute to the knowledge of functional roles and regulation of E. coli genes by proposing a classification of these genes based on consistently correlated genes in expression data and similarities of gene expression patterns. A new visualization tool for targeted projection pursuit and dimensionality reduction of gene expression data is demonstrated.

  6. A Cell ELISA for the quantification of MUC1 mucin (CD227) expressed by cancer cells of epithelial and neuroectodermal origin.

    PubMed

    Falahat, Rana; Wiranowska, Marzenna; Gallant, Nathan D; Toomey, Ryan; Hill, Robert; Alcantar, Norma

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of MUC1, a cell membrane associated mucin, expressed by intact cells of epithelial origin previously has been limited to flow cytometry, which requires using large quantities of cells and antibodies. Here, for the first time, we report the development of a novel Cellular-based Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (Cell ELISA) to quantify the expression of MUC1 by cell lines of epithelial and neuroectodermal origin using an antibody recognizing a specific tandem repeat found in the extracellular domain of MUC1. In contrast to flow cytometry, this method requires a much lower number of cells. We report here the results obtained from two variants of this Cell ELISA in live and fixed cells. We found that the Cell ELISA in live cells was not sensitive enough to detect a difference in MUC1 levels between the normal cells and tumor cells. However, we found that Cell ELISA in fixed cells followed by whole cell staining was a dependable method of MUC1 level detection in the normal and tumor cells showing significantly higher levels of MUC1 receptor in the tumor cells when compared to the normal controls. Therefore, we conclude that the Cell ELISA in fixed cells is an efficient method for quantifying the expression of MUC1 by epithelial and neuroectodermal cancer cell lines. PMID:26435344

  7. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  8. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  9. Mucin 1 gene silencing inhibits the growth of SMMC-7721 human hepatoma cells through Bax-mediated mitochondrial and caspase-8-mediated death receptor apoptotic pathways

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, HONGYAN; WANG, JUAN; WANG, FENGLI; ZHANG, NANNAN; LI, QIONGSHU; XIE, FEI; CHEN, TANXIU; ZHAI, RUIPING; WANG, FANG; GUO, YINGYING; NI, WEIHUA; TAI, GUIXIANG

    2015-01-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is an oncogene that has a crucial role in the pathogenesis and progression of the majority of epithelial malignant tumors. Our previous study demonstrated that MUC1 gene silencing inhibited the growth of SMMC-7721 cells in vitro and in vivo, however, whether this growth inhibition is associated with apoptotic cell death remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was found that MUC1 gene silencing not only resulted in the inhibition of SMMC-7721 cell growth, determined using a clone formation assay in vitro and a tumor xenograft mouse model with an in vivo imaging system, but also induced apoptotic alterations in SMMC-7721 cells, determined using Hoechst 33342 staining, flow cytometry with an Annexin V-PE staining and a DNA ladder assay. Further investigation using western blotting revealed that cytochrome c was released from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, and caspase-8 and caspase-9 were activated in MUC1 gene-silenced SMMC-7721 cells. The pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and the tumor suppressor p53 were increased, while the anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 was decreased in MUC1 gene-silenced cells. In addition, results from the co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the MUC1 cytoplasmic tail can bind directly to Bax or caspase-8 and these interactions were reduced upon MUC1 gene silencing in SMMC-7721 cells. The above results indicate that MUC1 gene silencing induces growth inhibition in SMMC-7721 cells through Bax-mediated mitochondrial and caspase-8-mediated death receptor apoptotic pathways. PMID:26398332

  10. Does inbreeding affect gene expression in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Hansson, Bengt; Naurin, Sara; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding increases homozygosity, exposes genome-wide recessive deleterious alleles and often reduces fitness. The physiological and reproductive consequences of inbreeding may be manifested already during gene regulation, but the degree to which inbreeding influences gene expression is unknown in most organisms, including in birds. To evaluate the pattern of inbreeding-affected gene expression over the genome and in relation to sex, we performed a transcriptome-wide gene expression (10 695 genes) study of brain tissue of 10-day-old inbred and outbred, male and female zebra finches. We found significantly lower gene expression in females compared with males at Z-linked genes, confirming that dosage compensation is incomplete in female birds. However, inbreeding did not affect gene expression at autosomal or sex-linked genes, neither in males nor in females. Analyses of single genes again found a clear sex-biased expression at Z-linked genes, whereas only a single gene was significantly affected by inbreeding. The weak effect of inbreeding on gene expression in zebra finches contrasts to the situation, for example, in Drosophila where inbreeding has been found to influence gene expression more generally and at stress-related genes in particular. PMID:25232028

  11. Seasonal Effects on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Anita; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Henders, Anjali K.; McRae, Allan F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Powell, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Many health conditions, ranging from psychiatric disorders to cardiovascular disease, display notable seasonal variation in severity and onset. In order to understand the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon, we have examined seasonal variation in the transcriptome of 606 healthy individuals. We show that 74 transcripts associated with a 12-month seasonal cycle were enriched for processes involved in DNA repair and binding. An additional 94 transcripts demonstrated significant seasonal variability that was largely influenced by blood cell count levels. These transcripts were enriched for immune function, protein production, and specific cellular markers for lymphocytes. Accordingly, cell counts for erythrocytes, platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, and CD19 cells demonstrated significant association with a 12-month seasonal cycle. These results demonstrate that seasonal variation is an important environmental regulator of gene expression and blood cell composition. Notable changes in leukocyte counts and genes involved in immune function indicate that immune cell physiology varies throughout the year in healthy individuals. PMID:26023781

  12. Complete sequence of the human mucin MUC4: a putative cell membrane-associated mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Moniaux, N; Nollet, S; Porchet, N; Degand, P; Laine, A; Aubert, J P

    1999-01-01

    The MUC4 gene, which encodes a human epithelial mucin, is expressed in various epithelial tissues, just as well in adult as in poorly differentiated cells in the embryo and fetus. Its N-terminus and central sequences have previously been reported as comprising a 27-residue peptide signal, followed by a large domain varying in length from 3285 to 7285 amino acid residues. The present study establishes the whole coding sequence of MUC4 in which the C-terminus is 1156 amino acid residues long and shares a high degree of similarity with the rat sialomucin complex (SMC). SMC is a heterodimeric glycoprotein complex composed of mucin (ascites sialoglycoprotein 1, ASGP-1) and transmembrane (ASGP-2) subunits. The same organization is found in MUC4, where the presence of a GlyAspProHis proteolytic site may cleave the large precursor into two subunits, MUC4alpha and MUC4beta. Like ASGP-2, which binds the receptor tyrosine kinase p185(neu), MUC4beta possesses two epidermal growth factor-like domains, a transmembrane sequence and a potential phosphorylated site. MUC4, the human homologue of rat SMC, may be a heterodimeric bifunctional cell-surface glycoprotein of 2.12 micrometers. These results confer a new biological role for MUC4 as a ligand for ErbB2 in cell signalling. PMID:10024507

  13. Primary Retroperitoneal Mucinous Cystadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weon Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinomas of the ovary are clinically and histopathologically well-established common tumors. However, primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystic tumors are extremely rare, and although their histopathogenesis is still uncertain, several theories have been proposed. Most authors suggest that they develop through mucinous metaplasia in a preexisting mesothelium-lined cyst. An accurate preoperative diagnosis of these tumors is difficult because no effective diagnostic measures have been established. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of this tumor may be fatal for the patient because of complications such as rupture, infection, and malignant transformation. We describe the case of a 31-year-old woman with abdominal pain and a palpable mass. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a retroperitoneal cystic mass, which was resected successfully through laparoscopy. Histopathological examination of the resected mass confirmed the diagnosis of a primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 without any complications. PMID:26962534

  14. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomotsugu; Högemanny, Dagmar; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Tyminski, Edyta; Terada, Kinya; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Basilion, James P

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR) whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1) ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2) several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3) expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4) ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression. PMID:12407446

  15. S100P is a useful marker for differentiation of ovarian mucinous tumors.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Y; Ito, M; Nakashima, M; Mihara, Y; Naruke, Y; Kurohama, H; Yatsunami, N; Yasuhi, I

    2015-01-01

    The S100P protein stimulates cell proliferation and survival, thereby contributing to tumor progression. The purpose of this study was to evaluate S100P expression in the three subtypes of mucinous cystic tumors, cystadenomas, borderline tumors, and adenocarcinomas. The authors examined nuclear S100P expression in 60 mucinous ovarian tumor specimens, including 24 specimens of mucinous cystadenoma, 15 of borderline tumors, and 21 of adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry revealed S100P expression followed one of three patterns: (1) Expressed in most nuclei of mucinous epithelial cells, (2) sporadic (spotted or patchy) expression, or (3) absent or rarely expressed in the nuclei of mucinous epithelial cells. Most adenomas showed the first expression pattern, and borderline tumors often showed a patchy expression pattern. Adenocarcinomas generally demonstrated absence of S100P expression. These data suggest that S100P is a useful histological marker to differentiate between benign, borderline, and malignant mucinous tumors of the ovary. PMID:26050349

  16. Whole-exome sequencing identified the genetic origin of a mucinous neoplasm in a mature cystic teratoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Lee, Sung Hak; Kim, Min Sung; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Hur, Soo Young; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous tumour arising from a mature cystic teratoma associated with pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare disease and its tissue origin is not easy to specify by conventional histological and immunohistochemical analyses. To identify the origin of a secondary tumour arising from a mature teratoma, we performed whole-exome sequencing of a PMP secondary to a primary ovarian mucinous tumour. The mucinous tumour was CK20 (+), CK7 (-) and CDX2 (+). Its genome harboured 28 somatic non-silent mutations (27 missense and 1 nonsense) that included eight putative driver gene mutations catalogued in COSMIC database (KRAS, GNAS, ZBTB38, ENAM, HTR5A, BAI1, ADAMTS8 and RASA3). KRAS mutation as well as mutations in genes that antagonise RAS signalling (RASA3 and ADAMTS8) suggest that alterations in RAS signalling may play a role in its development. More importantly, the concurrent KRAS and GNAS hotspot mutations, and CK20 (+), CK7 (-) and CDX2 (+) expression strongly indicated its appendiceal origin. Our results indicate that next-generation sequencing combined with histological and immunohistochemical analyses may be a better strategy than the conventional analyses alone to identify the origin of a secondary tumour arising from a mature teratoma. Also, the data suggest that a PMP secondary to a primary ovarian mucinous tumour genome arising in the teratoma may recapitulate the mutational features of appendiceal mucinous tumours. PMID:27114374

  17. Altered Mucins (MUC) Trafficking in Benign and Malignant Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Suhasini; Kumar, Sushil; Choudhury, Amit; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Mucins are high molecular weight O-glycoproteins that are predominantly expressed at the apical surface of epithelial cells and have wide range of functions. The functional diversity is attributed to their structure that comprises of a peptide chain with unique domains and multiple carbohydrate moieties added during posttranslational modifications. Tumor cells aberrantly overexpress mucins, and thereby promote proliferation, differentiation, motility, invasion and metastasis. Along with their aberrant expression, accumulating evidence suggest the critical role of altered subcellular localization of mucins under pathological conditions due to altered endocytic processes. The mislocalization of mucins and their interactions result in change in the density and activity of important cell membrane proteins (like, receptor tyrosine kinases) to facilitate various signaling, which help cancer cells to proliferate, survive and progress to more aggressive phenotype. In this review article, we summarize studies on mucins trafficking and provide a perspective on its importance to pathological conditions and to answer critical questions including its use for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25261375

  18. Mucinous Variant of Follicular Carcinoma of the Thyroid Gland: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Squillaci, Salvatore; Pitino, Antonio; Spairani, Cinzia; Ferrari, Mauro; Carlon, Eugenio; Cosimi, Maria Fabia

    2016-04-01

    The rare reports of mucinous variant of follicular carcinoma of the thyroid gland have not provided enough evidence to support the recognition of these tumors as a distinct clinicopathologic entity or to understand their etiopathogenesis. We report the fourth case of mucinous variant of follicular carcinoma displaying a minimally invasive tumor with diffuse expression of thyroglobulin, TTF-1, CD56, PAX-8, cytokeratins 7 and 19, in the absence of monoclonal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 20, chromogranin, HBME-1, P63 expression, and BRAF gene mutation, in a 51-year-old woman who is alive without signs of disease 13 months after total thyroidectomy, bilateral neck dissection, and radioactive iodine. Herein, fine-needle aspiration cytology disclosed "worrisome" cytologic features consisting of large epithelial cells arranged in clusters or singularly, with high nucleocytoplasmic ratio, nuclear grooves and evident nucleoli which were shared by those of mucin-producing papillary thyroid carcinoma. Therefore, knowledge of the cytological and histopathological spectrum of this lesion is important to avoid misdiagnosis. The morphologic clues leading to the correct diagnosis of mucinous variant of follicular neoplasm have been correlated with the data of the literature, and the differential diagnosis is briefly discussed. PMID:26582770

  19. Gene Expression: Sizing it all up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic architecture appears to be a largely unexplored component of gene expression. Although surely not the end of the story, we are learning that when it comes to gene expression, size is important. We have been surprised to find that certain patterns of expression, tissue-specific versus constit...

  20. Deep Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes Revealed GNAS Mutations to Be Associated with Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms and Its Main Pancreatic Duct Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shinichi; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Maekawa, Shinya; Kadokura, Makoto; Miura, Mika; Shindo, Hiroko; Takahashi, Ei; Sato, Tadashi; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background To clarify the genetic mutations associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and IPMN-related pancreatic tumours, we conducted cancer-related gene profiling analyses using pure pancreatic juice and resected pancreatic tissues. Methods Pure pancreatic juice was collected from 152 patients [nine with a normal pancreas, 22 with chronic pancreatitis (CP), 39 with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and 82 with IPMN], and resected tissues from the pancreas were collected from 48 patients (six IPMNs and 42 PDACs). The extracted DNA was amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 46 cancer-related genes containing 739 mutational hotspots. The mutations were analysed using a semiconductor-based DNA sequencer. Results Among the 46 cancer-related genes, KRAS and GNAS mutations were most frequently detected in both PDAC and IPMN cases. In pure pancreatic juice, GNAS mutations were detected in 7.7% of PDAC cases and 41.5% of IPMN cases (p<0.001 vs. others). All PDAC cases with GNAS mutations (n = 3) were accompanied by IPMN. Multivariate analysis revealed that GNAS mutations in IPMN cases were associated with dilated main pancreatic ducts (MPD, p = 0.016), while no statistically independent associations with clinical variables were observed for KRAS mutations. In the resected pancreatic tissues, GNAS mutations were detected in 50% of PDAC cases concomitant with IPMN, 33.3% of PDAC cases derived from IPMN, and 66.7% of IPMN cases, while no GNAS mutations were detected in cases of PDAC without IPMN. Conclusions The GNAS mutation was specifically found in the cases with IPMN and it was speculated that some PDACs might be influenced by the concomitant but separately-located IPMN in their pathogenic mechanism. Furthermore, the GNAS mutation was significantly associated with MPD dilatation in IPMN cases, suggesting its role in mucus hypersecretion. PMID:24897499

  1. Control of RANKL Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoclasts are highly specialized cells capable of degrading mineralized tissue and form at different regions of bone to meet different physiological needs, such as mobilization of calcium, modeling of bone structure, and remodeling of bone matrix. Osteoclast production is elevated in a number of pathological conditions, many of which lead to loss of bone mass. Whether normal or pathological, osteoclastogenesis strictly depends upon support from accessory cells which supply cytokines required for osteoclast differentiation. Only one of these cytokines, receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL), is absolutely essential for osteoclast formation throughout life and is thus expressed by all cell types that support osteoclast differentiation. The central role of RANKL in bone resorption is highlighted by the fact that it is the basis for a new therapy to inhibit bone loss. This review will discuss mechanisms that control RANKL gene expression in different osteoclast-support cells and how the study of such mechanisms may lead to a better understanding of the cellular interactions that drive normal and pathological bone resorption. PMID:19716455

  2. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2008-06-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  3. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  4. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  5. The human epithelial carcinoma antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody AE3 is expressed on a sulfoglycolipid in addition to neoplastic mucins

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Angelina S.; Liu, Yan; Childs, Robert A.; Herbert, Colin; Wang, Denong; Chai, Wengang; Feizi, Ten

    2011-01-01

    The term human epithelial carcinoma antigen (HCA) has been applied collectively to mucin-type high molecular weight (>1000 kDa) glycoproteins that are over-expressed in epithelial cancers. Since the 1990s, over 40 monoclonal antibodies have been raised that recognize HCA. There has been evidence that the antigenic determinants are mostly carbohydrates, but details have been elusive. Here we have carried out carbohydrate microarray in analyses of one of the monoclonal antibodies, AE3, that has been regarded the ‘most carcinoma specific’ in respect to its ability to detect HCA in sera of patients with epithelial cancers. The microarrays encompassed a series of 492 sequence-defined glycan probes in the form of glycolipids and neoglycolipids. We have thus established that the antigen recognized by antibody AE3 is a carbohydrate sequence distinct from the A, B, H, Lewisa/b, Lewisx/y and T antigens, but that it is strongly expressed on the monosulfated tetra-glycosyl ceramide, SM1a, Galβ1-3GalNAcβ1-4(3-O-sulfate)Galβ1-4GlcCer. This is the first report of an anti-HCA to be characterized with respect to its recognition sequence and of the occurrence of the antigen on a glycolipid as well as on glycoproteins. Knowledge of a discrete glycan sequence as target antigen now opens the way to its exploration as a serologic cancer biomarker, namely to determine if the antigen elicits an autoantibody response in early non-metastatic cancer, or if it is shed and immunochemically detectable in more advanced disease. PMID:21527252

  6. Mucin-Based Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan P.; MacMillan, Derek

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated cell surface and secreted glycoproteins . In addition to orchestrating cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interactions in healthy organisms mucins are also the major carriers of altered glycosylation in carcinomas. Tumor-associated antigens displayed by cancer cells comprise oligosaccharide and glycopeptide motifs not encountered in the same locale or at the same frequency in healthy cells, and potentially confer a selective advantage to the tumor. Frequently tumor-associated antigens are under-glycosylated and prematurely sialylated, and it is these relatively simple saccharide and glycopeptide structures that have been targeted to serve as drug candidates in most cases. A major goal is to assemble glycopeptide vaccine candidates based on partial mucin sequences and displaying tumor-associated antigens that can mount a potent immunological tumor-specific response when, in reality, the tumor has already coerced the immune system into a state of co-existence.

  7. Pdx1 inactivation restricted to the intestinal epithelium in mice alters duodenal gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Rixun; Davis, Corrine; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Null mutant mice lacking the transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) are apancreatic and survive only a few days after birth. The role of Pdx1 in regulating intestinal gene expression has therefore yet to be determined in viable mice with normal pancreatic development. We hypothesized that conditional inactivation of Pdx1 restricted to the intestinal epithelium would alter intestinal gene expression and cell differentiation. Pdx1flox/flox;VilCre mice with intestine-specific Pdx1 inactivation were generated by crossing a transgenic mouse strain expressing Cre recombinase, driven by a mouse villin 1 gene promoter fragment, with a mutant mouse strain homozygous for loxP site-flanked Pdx1. Pdx1 protein is undetectable in all epithelial cells in the intestinal epithelium of Pdx1flox/flox;VilCre mice. Goblet cell number and mRNA abundance for mucin 3 and mucin 13 genes in the proximal small intestine are comparable between Pdx1flox/flox;VilCre and control mice. Similarly, Paneth cell number and expression of Paneth cell-related genes Defa1, Defcr-rs1, and Mmp7 in the proximal small intestine remain statistically unchanged by Pdx1 inactivation. Although the number of enteroendocrine cells expressing chromogranin A/B, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (Gip), or somatostatin (Sst) is unaffected in the Pdx1flox/flox;VilCre mice, mRNA abundance for Gip and Sst is significantly reduced in the proximal small intestine. Conditional Pdx1 inactivation attenuates intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity in the duodenal epithelium, consistent with an average 91% decrease in expression of the mouse enterocyte IAP gene, alkaline phosphatase 3 (a novel Pdx1 target candidate), in the proximal small intestine following Pdx1 inactivation. We conclude that Pdx1 is necessary for patterning appropriate gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells of the proximal small intestine. PMID:19808654

  8. Pdx1 inactivation restricted to the intestinal epithelium in mice alters duodenal gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin; Fang, Rixun; Davis, Corrine; Maravelias, Charalambos; Sibley, Eric

    2009-12-01

    Null mutant mice lacking the transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) are apancreatic and survive only a few days after birth. The role of Pdx1 in regulating intestinal gene expression has therefore yet to be determined in viable mice with normal pancreatic development. We hypothesized that conditional inactivation of Pdx1 restricted to the intestinal epithelium would alter intestinal gene expression and cell differentiation. Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice with intestine-specific Pdx1 inactivation were generated by crossing a transgenic mouse strain expressing Cre recombinase, driven by a mouse villin 1 gene promoter fragment, with a mutant mouse strain homozygous for loxP site-flanked Pdx1. Pdx1 protein is undetectable in all epithelial cells in the intestinal epithelium of Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice. Goblet cell number and mRNA abundance for mucin 3 and mucin 13 genes in the proximal small intestine are comparable between Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre and control mice. Similarly, Paneth cell number and expression of Paneth cell-related genes Defa1, Defcr-rs1, and Mmp7 in the proximal small intestine remain statistically unchanged by Pdx1 inactivation. Although the number of enteroendocrine cells expressing chromogranin A/B, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (Gip), or somatostatin (Sst) is unaffected in the Pdx1(flox/flox);VilCre mice, mRNA abundance for Gip and Sst is significantly reduced in the proximal small intestine. Conditional Pdx1 inactivation attenuates intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) activity in the duodenal epithelium, consistent with an average 91% decrease in expression of the mouse enterocyte IAP gene, alkaline phosphatase 3 (a novel Pdx1 target candidate), in the proximal small intestine following Pdx1 inactivation. We conclude that Pdx1 is necessary for patterning appropriate gene expression in enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells of the proximal small intestine. PMID:19808654

  9. Gene expression in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R; Penninx, B W J H; Madar, V; Xia, K; Milaneschi, Y; Hottenga, J J; Hammerschlag, A R; Beekman, A; van der Wee, N; Smit, J H; Brooks, A I; Tischfield, J; Posthuma, D; Schoevers, R; van Grootheest, G; Willemsen, G; de Geus, E J; Boomsma, D I; Wright, F A; Zou, F; Sun, W; Sullivan, P F

    2016-03-01

    The search for genetic variants underlying major depressive disorder (MDD) has not yet provided firm leads to its underlying molecular biology. A complementary approach is to study gene expression in relation to MDD. We measured gene expression in peripheral blood from 1848 subjects from The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Subjects were divided into current MDD (N=882), remitted MDD (N=635) and control (N=331) groups. MDD status and gene expression were measured again 2 years later in 414 subjects. The strongest gene expression differences were between the current MDD and control groups (129 genes at false-discovery rate, FDR<0.1). Gene expression differences across MDD status were largely unrelated to antidepressant use, inflammatory status and blood cell counts. Genes associated with MDD were enriched for interleukin-6 (IL-6)-signaling and natural killer (NK) cell pathways. We identified 13 gene expression clusters with specific clusters enriched for genes involved in NK cell activation (downregulated in current MDD, FDR=5.8 × 10(-5)) and IL-6 pathways (upregulated in current MDD, FDR=3.2 × 10(-3)). Longitudinal analyses largely confirmed results observed in the cross-sectional data. Comparisons of gene expression results to the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) MDD genome-wide association study results revealed overlap with DVL3. In conclusion, multiple gene expression associations with MDD were identified and suggest a measurable impact of current MDD state on gene expression. Identified genes and gene clusters are enriched with immune pathways previously associated with the etiology of MDD, in line with the immune suppression and immune activation hypothesis of MDD. PMID:26008736

  10. Frequent GNAS mutations in low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, G; Sekine, S; Ogawa, R; Matsubara, A; Mori, T; Taniguchi, H; Kushima, R; Hiraoka, N; Tsuta, K; Tsuda, H; Kanai, Y

    2013-01-01

    Background: The molecular basis for the development of appendiceal mucinous tumours, which can be a cause of pseudomyxoma peritonei, remains largely unknown. Methods: Thirty-five appendiceal mucinous neoplasms were analysed for GNAS and KRAS mutations. A functional analysis of mutant GNAS was performed using a colorectal cancer cell line. Results: A mutational analysis identified activating GNAS mutations in 16 of 32 low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (LAMNs) but in none of three mucinous adenocarcinomas (MACs). KRAS mutations were found in 30 LAMNs and in all MACs. We additionally analysed a total of 186 extra-appendiceal mucinous tumours and found that GNAS mutations were highly prevalent in intraductal papillary mucinous tumours of the pancreas (88%) but were rare or absent in mucinous tumours of the colorectum, ovary, lung and breast (0–9%). The prevalence of KRAS mutations was quite variable among the tumours. The introduction of the mutant GNAS into a colorectal cancer cell line markedly induced MUC2 and MUC5AC expression, but did not promote cell growth either in vitro or in vivo. Conclusion: Activating GNAS mutations are a frequent and characteristic genetic abnormality of LAMN. Mutant GNAS might play a direct role in the prominent mucin production that is a hallmark of LAMN. PMID:23403822

  11. Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns Using Biclustering.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swarup; Bhattacharyya, Dhruba K; Kalita, Jugal K

    2016-01-01

    Mining microarray data to unearth interesting expression profile patterns for discovery of in silico biological knowledge is an emerging area of research in computational biology. A group of functionally related genes may have similar expression patterns under a set of conditions or at some time points. Biclustering is an important data mining tool that has been successfully used to analyze gene expression data for biologically significant cluster discovery. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce interesting patterns that may be observed in expression data and discuss the role of biclustering techniques in detecting interesting functional gene groups with similar expression patterns. PMID:26350227

  12. Xenbase: gene expression and improved integration.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Jeff B; Snyder, Kevin A; Segerdell, Erik; Jarabek, Chris J; Azam, Kenan; Zorn, Aaron M; Vize, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Xenbase (www.xenbase.org), the model organism database for Xenopus laevis and X. (Silurana) tropicalis, is the principal centralized resource of genomic, development data and community information for Xenopus research. Recent improvements include the addition of the literature and interaction tabs to gene catalog pages. New content has been added including a section on gene expression patterns that incorporates image data from the literature, large scale screens and community submissions. Gene expression data are integrated into the gene catalog via an expression tab and is also searchable by multiple criteria using an expression search interface. The gene catalog has grown to contain over 15,000 genes. Collaboration with the European Xenopus Research Center (EXRC) has resulted in a stock center section with data on frog lines supplied by the EXRC. Numerous improvements have also been made to search and navigation. Xenbase is also the source of the Xenopus Anatomical Ontology and the clearinghouse for Xenopus gene nomenclature. PMID:19884130

  13. Divergent Mechanisms of Interaction of Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni with Mucus and Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Julie Ann; Mariño, Karina; Dolan, Brendan; Reid, Colm; Gough, Ronan; Gallagher, Mary E.; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Rudd, Pauline; Carrington, Stephen; Bourke, Billy

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni colonize the stomach and intestinal mucus, respectively. Using a combination of mucus-secreting cells, purified mucins, and a novel mucin microarray platform, we examined the interactions of these two organisms with mucus and mucins. H. pylori and C. jejuni bound to distinctly different mucins. C. jejuni displayed a striking tropism for chicken gastrointestinal mucins compared to mucins from other animals and preferentially bound mucins from specific avian intestinal sites (in order of descending preference: the large intestine, proximal small intestine, and cecum). H. pylori bound to a number of animal mucins, including porcine stomach mucin, but with less avidity than that of C. jejuni for chicken mucin. The strengths of interaction of various wild-type strains of H. pylori with different animal mucins were comparable, even though they did not all express the same adhesins. The production of mucus by HT29-MTX-E12 cells promoted higher levels of infection by C. jejuni and H. pylori than those for the non-mucus-producing parental cell lines. Both C. jejuni and H. pylori bound to HT29-MTX-E12 mucus, and while both organisms bound to glycosylated epitopes in the glycolipid fraction of the mucus, only C. jejuni bound to purified mucin. This study highlights the role of mucus in promoting bacterial infection and emphasizes the potential for even closely related bacteria to interact with mucus in different ways to establish successful infections. PMID:23716616

  14. HOXB homeobox gene expression in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    López, R; Garrido, E; Piña, P; Hidalgo, A; Lazos, M; Ochoa, R; Salcedo, M

    2006-01-01

    The homeobox (HOX) genes are a family of transcription factors that bind to specific DNA sequences in target genes regulating gene expression. Thirty-nine HOX genes have been mapped in four conserved clusters: A, B, C, and D; they act as master genes regulating the identity of body segments along the anteroposterior axis of the embryo. The role played by HOX genes in adult cell differentiation is unclear to date, but growing evidence suggests that they may play an important role in the development of cancer. To study the role played by HOX genes in cervical cancer, in the present work, we analyzed the expression of HOXB genes and the localization of their transcripts in human cervical tissues. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis and nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization were used to detect HOXB expression in 11 normal cervical tissues and 17 cervical carcinomas. It was determined that HOXB1, B3, B5, B6, B7, B8, and B9 genes are expressed in normal adult cervical epithelium and squamous cervical carcinomas. Interestingly, HOXB2, HOXB4, and HOXB13 gene expression was found only in tumor tissues. Our findings suggest that the new expression of HOXB2, HOXB4, and B13 genes is involved in cervical cancer. PMID:16445654

  15. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma. PMID:27030788

  16. Mucin-Microbiota Interaction During Postnatal Maturation of the Intestinal Ecosystem: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Rokhsefat, Sana; Lin, Aifeng; Comelli, Elena M

    2016-06-01

    The mucus layer and gut microbiota interplay contributes to host homeostasis. The mucus layer serves as a scaffold and a carbon source for gut microorganisms; conversely, gut microorganisms, including mucin degraders, influence mucin gene expression, glycosylation, and secretion. Conjointly they shield the epithelium from luminal pathogens, antigens, and toxins. Importantly, the mucus layer and gut microbiota are established in parallel during early postnatal life. During this period, the development of gut microbiota and mucus layer is coupled with that of the immune system. Developmental changes of different mucin types can impact the age-dependent patterns of intestinal infection in terms of incidence and severity. Altered mucus layer, dysbiotic microbiota, and abnormal mucus-gut microbiota interaction have the potential for inducing systemic effects, and accompany several intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, and radiation-induced mucositis. Early life provides a pivotal window of opportunity to favorably modulate the mucus-microbiota interaction. The support of a health-compatible mucin-microbiota maturation in early life is paramount for long-term health and serves as an important opportunity for clinical intervention. PMID:26792279

  17. Gene expression profiling in developing human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Mei, Pinchao; Lou, Rong; Zhang, Michael Q; Wu, Guanyun; Qiang, Boqin; Zhang, Zhengguo; Shen, Yan

    2002-10-15

    The gene expression profile of developing human hippocampus is of particular interest and importance to neurobiologists devoted to development of the human brain and related diseases. To gain further molecular insight into the developmental and functional characteristics, we analyzed the expression profile of active genes in developing human hippocampus. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were selected by sequencing randomly selected clones from an original 3'-directed cDNA library of 150-day human fetal hippocampus, and a digital expression profile of 946 known genes that could be divided into 16 categories was generated. We also used for comparison 14 other expression profiles of related human neural cells/tissues, including human adult hippocampus. To yield more confidence regarding differential expression, a method was applied to attach normalized expression data to genes with a low false-positive rate (<0.05). Finally, hierarchical cluster analysis was used to exhibit related gene expression patterns. Our results are in accordance with anatomical and physiological observations made during the developmental process of the human hippocampus. Furthermore, some novel findings appeared to be unique to our results. The abundant expression of genes for cell surface components and disease-related genes drew our attention. Twenty-four genes are significantly different from adult, and 13 genes might be developing hippocampus-specific candidate genes, including wnt2b and some Alzheimer's disease-related genes. Our results could provide useful information on the ontogeny, development, and function of cells in the human hippocampus at the molecular level and underscore the utility of large-scale, parallel gene expression analyses in the study of complex biological phenomena. PMID:12271469

  18. Decreased expression of mucin 18 is associated with unfavorable postoperative prognosis in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qi; Liu, Li; Long, Qilai; Xia, Yu; Wang, Jiajun; Xu, Jiejie; Guo, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Background: MUC18 is correlated with tumor progression and metastasis in types of malignancy. But the role of MUC18 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression of MUC18 and its correlation with clinical outcomes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Patients and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was performed in samples from 288 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. We used Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard models to value the association between MUC18 expression and clinical outcome. Nomogram was constructed to predict overall survival at 5 and 8 years after nephrectomy. Results: MUC18 expression was significantly decreased in tumor compared to non-tumor tissue (P<0.001). Lower MUC18 expression in tumor predicted a shorter survival time (P=0.007). By multivariate cox analysis, MUC18 was defined as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.006). The nomogram performed better in predicting 5- and 8-year overall survival than the TNM stage alone in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Conclusion: MUC18 is an independent prognostic factor for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and could be incorporated with the other parameters to predict 5- and 8-year overall survival for clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients. PMID:26617818

  19. Tear Film Mucins: Front Line Defenders of the Ocular Surface; Comparison with Airway and Gastrointestinal Tract Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Robin R.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2014-01-01

    The ocular surface including the cornea and conjunctiva and its overlying tear film are the first tissues of the eye to interact with the external environment. The tear film is complex containing multiple layers secreted by different glands and tissues. Each layer contains specific molecules and proteins that not only maintain the health of the cells on the ocular surface by providing nourishment and removal of waste products but also protect these cells from environment. A major protective mechanism that the corneal and conjunctival cells have developed is secretion of the innermost layer of the tear film, the mucous layer. Both the cornea and conjunctiva express membrane spanning mucins, whereas the conjunctiva also produces soluble mucins. The mucins present in the tear film serve to maintain the hydration of the ocular surface and to provide lubrication and anti-adhesive properties between the cells of the ocular surface and conjunctiva during the blink. A third function is to contribute to the epithelial barrier to prevent pathogens from binding to the ocular surface. This review will focus on the different types of mucins produced by the corneal and conjunctival epithelia. Also included in this review will be a presentation of the structure of mucins, regulation of mucin production, role of mucins in ocular surface diseases, and the differences in mucin production by the ocular surface, airways and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23954166

  20. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, Ester; Olender, Tsviya; Khen, Miriam; Yanai, Itai; Ophir, Ron; Lancet, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors (ORs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information. PMID:16716209

  1. A Primary Retroperitoneal Mucinous Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Heelan Gladden, Alicia A.; Wohlauer, Max; McManus, Martine C.; Gajdos, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    A twenty-five-year-old female presented with a large retroperitoneal mass. Workup included history and physical exam, imaging, biopsy, colonoscopy, and gynecologic exam. After surgical resection, the mass was determined to be a primary retroperitoneal mucinous tumor (PRMT). Clinically and histologically, these tumors are similar pancreatic and ovarian mucinous neoplasms. PRMTs are rare and few case reports have been published. PRMTs are divided into mucinous cystadenomas, mucinous borderline tumors of low malignant potential, and mucinous carcinoma. These tumors have malignant potential so resection is indicated and in some cases adjuvant chemotherapy and/or surveillance imaging. PMID:25874152

  2. Ovarian mucinous tumor with malignant mural nodules: dedifferentiation or collision?

    PubMed

    Desouki, Mohamed M; Khabele, Dineo; Crispens, Marta A; Fadare, Oluwole

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian mucinous tumors with mural nodules are rare surface epithelial-stromal tumors. The mural nodules are divergent neoplasms that may be benign or malignant. The latter may be in the form of a sarcoma, carcinosarcoma, anaplastic carcinoma, or a variety of other recognized histotypes of carcinoma, which raises the question of whether malignant mural nodules represent a form of dedifferentiation in ovarian mucinous tumors or whether they represent collision tumors. We recently reported the K-RAS gene mutation status in a case of ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma with mural nodule of high-grade sarcoma. The mucinous and sarcomatous components revealed a mutation in codon 12 of the K-RAS gene of a different nucleotide substitution, indicating that these 2 tumor components were different clones of the same tumor. Herein, we are reporting another case of a 20-yr-old woman who presented with 22 cm pelvic mass, omental caking, and ascites. A diagnosis of invasive mucinous carcinoma with mural nodules of anaplastic carcinoma was rendered. K-RAS gene mutation studies revealed p.G12V, c.35G>T mutation in the 2 components of the tumor, which is the most common mutation reported in mucinous tumors of the ovary. The fact that sarcomatous or anaplastic carcinomatous mural nodules in ovarian mucinous tumors display the same K-RAS mutations as their underlying mucinous neoplasms provides supportive evidence that at least some malignant mural nodules represent a form of dedifferentiation in ovarian mucinous tumors, rather than a collision of 2 divergent tumor types. PMID:25473748

  3. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  4. Gene Expression Studies in Lygus lineolaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genes are expressed in insect cells, as in all living organisms, by transcription of DNA into RNA followed by translation of RNA into proteins. The intricate patterns of differential gene expression in time and space directly influence the development and function of every aspect of the organism. Wh...

  5. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  6. Gearbox gene expression and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Tormo, A

    1993-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic cells usually takes place at the level of transcription initiation. Different forms of RNA polymerase recognizing specific promoters are engaged in the control of many prokaryotic regulons. This also seems to be the case for some Escherichia coli genes that are induced at low growth rates and by nutrient starvation. Their gene products are synthesized at levels inversely proportional to growth rate, and this mode of regulation has been termed gearbox gene expression. This kind of growth-rate modulation is exerted by specific transcriptional initiation signals, the gearbox promoters, and some of them depend on a putative new σ factor (RpoS). Gearbox promoters drive expression of morphogenetic and cell division genes at constant levels per cell and cycle to meet the demands of cell division and septum formation. A mechanism is proposed that could sense the growth rate of the cell to alter gene expression by the action of specific σ factors. PMID:24420108

  7. Quality Measures for Gene Expression Biclusters

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S.

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  8. Quality measures for gene expression biclusters.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Beatriz; Girldez, Ral; Aguilar-Ruiz, Jess S

    2015-01-01

    An noticeable number of biclustering approaches have been proposed proposed for the study of gene expression data, especially for discovering functionally related gene sets under different subsets of experimental conditions. In this context, recognizing groups of co-expressed or co-regulated genes, that is, genes which follow a similar expression pattern, is one of the main objectives. Due to the problem complexity, heuristic searches are usually used instead of exhaustive algorithms. Furthermore, most of biclustering approaches use a measure or cost function that determines the quality of biclusters. Having a suitable quality metric for bicluster is a critical aspect, not only for guiding the search, but also for establishing a comparison criteria among the results obtained by different biclustering techniques. In this paper, we analyse a large number of existing approaches to quality measures for gene expression biclusters, as well as we present a comparative study of them based on their capability to recognize different expression patterns in biclusters. PMID:25763839

  9. Aplysia californica neurons express microinjected neuropeptide genes.

    PubMed Central

    DesGroseillers, L; Cowan, D; Miles, M; Sweet, A; Scheller, R H

    1987-01-01

    Neuropeptide genes are expressed in specific subsets of large polyploid neurons in Aplysia californica. We have defined the transcription initiation sites of three of these neuropeptide genes (the R14, L11, and ELH genes) and determined the nucleotide sequence of the promoter regions. The genes contain the usual eucaryotic promoter signals as well as other structures of potential regulatory importance, including inverted and direct repeats. The L11 and ELH genes, which are otherwise unrelated, have homology in the promoter regions, while the R14 promoter was distinct. When cloned plasmids were microinjected into Aplysia neurons in organ culture, transitions between supercoiled, relaxed circular, and linear DNAs occurred along with ligation into high-molecular-weight species. About 20% of the microinjected neurons expressed the genes. The promoter region of the R14 gene functioned in expression of the microinjected DNA in all cells studied. When both additional 5' and 3' sequences were included, the gene was specifically expressed only in R14, suggesting that the specificity of expression is generated by a multicomponent repression system. Finally, the R14 peptide could be expressed in L11, demonstrating that it is possible to alter the transmitter phenotype of these neurons by introduction of cloned genes. Images PMID:3670293

  10. Methodological Limitations in Determining Astrocytic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Liang; Guo, Chuang; Wang, Tao; Li, Baoman; Gu, Li; Wang, Zhanyou

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, astrocytic mRNA and protein expression are studied by in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemically. This led to the concept that astrocytes lack aralar, a component of the malate-aspartate-shuttle. At least similar aralar mRNA and protein expression in astrocytes and neurons isolated by fluorescence-assisted cell sorting (FACS) reversed this opinion. Demonstration of expression of other astrocytic genes may also be erroneous. Literature data based on morphological methods were therefore compared with mRNA expression in cells obtained by recently developed methods for determination of cell-specific gene expression. All Na,K-ATPase-α subunits were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC), but there are problems with the cotransporter NKCC1. Glutamate and GABA transporter gene expression was well determined immunohistochemically. The same applies to expression of many genes of glucose metabolism, whereas a single study based on findings in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic animals showed very low astrocytic expression of hexokinase. Gene expression of the equilibrative nucleoside transporters ENT1 and ENT2 was recognized by ISH, but ENT3 was not. The same applies to the concentrative transporters CNT2 and CNT3. All were clearly expressed in FACS-isolated cells, followed by biochemical analysis. ENT3 was enriched in astrocytes. Expression of many nucleoside transporter genes were shown by microarray analysis, whereas other important genes were not. Results in cultured astrocytes resembled those obtained by FACS. These findings call for reappraisal of cellular nucleoside transporter expression. FACS cell yield is small. Further development of cell separation methods to render methods more easily available and less animal and cost consuming and parallel studies of astrocytic mRNA and protein expression by ISH/IHC and other methods are necessary, but new methods also need to be thoroughly checked. PMID:24324456

  11. Gene Expression Noise, Fitness Landscapes, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel

    The stochastic (or noisy) process of gene expression can have fitness consequences for living organisms. For example, gene expression noise facilitates the development of drug resistance by increasing the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. The present work investigates the relationship between gene expression noise and the fitness landscape. By incorporating the costs and benefits of gene expression, we track how the fluctuation magnitude and timescale of expression noise evolve in simulations of cell populations under stress. We find that properties of expression noise evolve to maximize fitness on the fitness landscape, and that low levels of expression noise emerge when the fitness benefits of gene expression exceed the fitness costs (and that high levels of noise emerge when the costs of expression exceed the benefits). The findings from our theoretical/computational work offer new hypotheses on the development of drug resistance, some of which are now being investigated in evolution experiments in our laboratory using well-characterized synthetic gene regulatory networks in budding yeast. Nserc Postdoctoral Fellowship (Grant No. PDF-453977-2014).

  12. [Physiological role of mucins in the colonic barrier integrity].

    PubMed

    Gaudier, Estelle; Hoebler, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Colonic mucus is a key element of colonic barrier as it is located at the frontier between luminal microflora and colonic mucosa itself. Colonic mucus is mainly composed of high molecular weight glycoproteins called mucins that can be either secreted or membrane-linked. The expression of various colonic mucins is altered in colorectal cancers or inflammations. The aim of this review is to highlight the crucial role played by colonic mucins in the maintenance of colonic barrier integrity, both because they are part of the protective mucus layer, and because they individually exert specific functions involved in epithelial barrier, like cell growth and differentiation, immunomodulation, signal transduction or cell adhesion. PMID:17075443

  13. A comparative gene expression database for invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As whole genome and transcriptome sequencing gets cheaper and faster, a great number of 'exotic' animal models are emerging, rapidly adding valuable data to the ever-expanding Evo-Devo field. All these new organisms serve as a fantastic resource for the research community, but the sheer amount of data, some published, some not, makes detailed comparison of gene expression patterns very difficult to summarize - a problem sometimes even noticeable within a single lab. The need to merge existing data with new information in an organized manner that is publicly available to the research community is now more necessary than ever. Description In order to offer a homogenous way of storing and handling gene expression patterns from a variety of organisms, we have developed the first web-based comparative gene expression database for invertebrates that allows species-specific as well as cross-species gene expression comparisons. The database can be queried by gene name, developmental stage and/or expression domains. Conclusions This database provides a unique tool for the Evo-Devo research community that allows the retrieval, analysis and comparison of gene expression patterns within or among species. In addition, this database enables a quick identification of putative syn-expression groups that can be used to initiate, among other things, gene regulatory network (GRN) projects. PMID:21861937

  14. Molecular cloning, tissue expression of gene Muc2 in blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala and regulation after re-feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Chunyu; Xi, Bingwen; Ren, Mingchun; Dong, Jingjing; Xie, Jun; Xu, Pao

    2015-03-01

    Mucins are important components of mucus, which form a natural, physical, biochemical and semipermeable mucosal layer on the epidermis of fish gills, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract. As the first step towards characterizing the function of Muc2, we cloned a partial Megalobrama amblycephala Muc2 cDNA of 2 175 bp, and analyzed its tissue-specific expression pattern by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). The obtained sequence comprised 41 bp 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), 2 134 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 711 amino acids. BLAST searching and phylogenetic analysis showed that the predicted protein contained several common secreted mucin-module domains (VWD-C8-TIL-VWD-C8) and had high homology with mucins from other vertebrates. Among four candidate reference genes ( β- Actin, RPI13α, RPII, 18S) for the qPCR, RPII was chosen as an appropriate reference gene because of its lowest variation in different tissues. M. amblycephala Muc2 was mainly expressed in the intestine, in the order (highest to lowest) middle-intestine > fore-intestine > hind-intestine. Muc2 was expressed relatively poorly in other organs (brain, liver, kidney, spleen, skin and gill). Furthermore, after 20-days of starvation, M. amblycephala Muc2 expressions after refeeding for 0 h, 3 h, 16 h, 3 d, and 10 d were significantly decreased in the three intestinal segments ( P<0.05) at 16 h, and were then upregulated to near the initial level at 10 d.

  15. Detecting, visualising, and quantifying mucins.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Ceri A; Thornton, David J; McGuckin, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    The extreme size, extensive glycosylation, and gel-forming nature of mucins make them a challenge to work with, and methodologies for the detection of mucins must take into consideration these features to ensure that one obtains both accurate and meaningful results. In understanding and appreciating the nature of mucins, this affords the researcher a valuable toolkit which can be used to full advantage in detecting, quantifying, and visualising mucins. The employment of a combinatorial approach to mucin detection, using antibody, chemical, and lectin detection methods, allows important information to be gleaned regarding the size, extent of glycosylation, specific mucin species, and distribution of mucins within a given sample. In this chapter, the researcher is guided through considerations into the structure of mucins and how this both affects the detection of mucins and can be used to full advantage. Techniques including ELISA, dot/slot blotting, and Western blotting, use of lectins and antibodies in mucin detection on membranes as well as immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence on both tissues and cells grown on Transwell™ inserts are described. Notes along with each section advice the researcher on best practice and describe any associated limitations of a particular technique from which the researcher can further develop a particular protocol. PMID:22259129

  16. Fibrotic gene expression coexists with alveolar proteinosis in early indium lung.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shuhei; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Kiyosawa, Hidenori; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-08-01

    Occupational inhalation of indium compounds can cause the so-called "indium lung disease". Most affected individuals show pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease. In animal experiments, inhalation of indium tin oxide or indium oxide has been shown to cause lung damage. However, the mechanisms by which indium compounds lead to indium lung disease remain unknown. In this study, we constructed a mouse model of indium lung disease and analyzed gene expression in response to indium exposure. Indium oxide (In2O3, 10 mg/kg, primary particle size <100 nm) was administered intratracheally to C57BL/6 mice (male, 8 weeks of age) twice a week for 8 weeks. Four weeks after the final instillation, histopathological analysis exhibited periodic acid-Schiff positive material in the alveoli, characteristic of PAP. Comprehensive gene expression analysis by RNA-Seq, however, revealed expression of fibrosis-related genes, such as surfactant associated protein D, surfactant associated protein A1, mucin 1, and collagen type I and III, was significantly increased, indicating that fibrotic gene expression progresses in early phase of indium lung. These data supported the latest hypothesis that PAP occurs as an acute phase response and is replaced by fibrosis after long-term latency. PMID:27308969

  17. Differential placental gene expression in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Sitras, V; Paulssen, R H; Grønaas, H; Leirvik, J; Hanssen, T A; Vårtun, A; Acharya, G

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the global placental gene expression profile in severe preeclampsia. Twenty-one women were randomly selected from 50 participants with uncomplicated pregnancies to match 21 patients with severe preeclampsia. A 30K Human Genome Survey Microarray v.2.0 (Applied Biosystems) was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. After RNA isolation, five preeclamptic placentas were excluded due to poor RNA quality. The series composed of 37 hybridizations in a one-channel detection system of chemiluminescence emitted by the microarrays. An empirical Bayes analysis was applied to find differentially expressed genes. In preeclamptic placentas 213 genes were significantly (fold-change>or=2 and pexpressed genes were associated with Alzheimer disease, angiogenesis, Notch-, TGFbeta- and VEGF-signalling pathways. Sixteen genes best discriminated preeclamptic from normal placentas. Comparison between early- (<34 weeks) and late-onset preeclampsia showed 168 differentially expressed genes with oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelin signalling pathways mainly involved in early-onset disease. Validation of the microarray results was performed by RT-PCR, quantitative urine hCG measurement and placental histopathologic examination. In summary, placental gene expression is altered in preeclampsia and we provide a comprehensive list of the differentially expressed genes. Placental gene expression is different between early- and late-onset preeclampsia, suggesting differences in pathophysiology. PMID:19249095

  18. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions. PMID:26966245

  19. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Henrique O; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients' response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  20. Transcriptional regulation of secretin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, J; Rindi, G; Lopez, M J; Upchurch, B H; Leiter, A B

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the gene encoding the hormone secretin is restricted to a specific enteroendocrine cell type and to beta-cells in developing pancreatic islets. To characterize regulatory elements in the secretin gene responsible for its expression in secretin-producing cells, we used a series of reporter genes for transient expression assays in transfection studies carried out in secretin-producing islet cell lines. Analysis of the transcriptional activity of deletion mutants identified a positive cis regulatory domain between 174 and 53 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site which was required for secretin gene expression in secretin-producing HIT insulinoma cells. Within this enhancer were sequences resembling two binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1, as well as a consensus sequence for binding to helix-loop-helix proteins. Analysis of these three elements by site-directed mutagenesis suggests that each is important for full transcriptional activity. The role of proximal enhancer sequences in directing secretin gene expression to appropriate tissues is further supported by studies in transgenic mice revealing that 1.6 kilobases of the secretin gene 5' flanking sequence were sufficient to direct the expression of either human growth hormone or simian virus 40 large T-antigen reporter genes to all major secretin-producing tissues. PMID:8774991

  1. Sexual differences of imprinted genes' expression levels.

    PubMed

    Faisal, Mohammad; Kim, Hana; Kim, Joomyeong

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, genomic imprinting has evolved as a dosage-controlling mechanism for a subset of genes that play critical roles in their unusual reproduction scheme involving viviparity and placentation. As such, many imprinted genes are highly expressed in sex-specific reproductive organs. In the current study, we sought to test whether imprinted genes are differentially expressed between the two sexes. According to the results, the expression levels of the following genes differ between the two sexes of mice: Peg3, Zim1, Igf2, H19 and Zac1. The expression levels of these imprinted genes are usually greater in males than in females. This bias is most obvious in the developing brains of 14.5-dpc embryos, but also detected in the brains of postnatal-stage mice. However, this sexual bias is not obvious in 10.5-dpc embryos, a developmental stage before the sexual differentiation. Thus, the sexual bias observed in the imprinted genes is most likely attributable by gonadal hormones rather than by sex chromosome complement. Overall, the results indicate that several imprinted genes are sexually different in terms of their expression levels, and further suggest that the transcriptional regulation of these imprinted genes may be influenced by unknown mechanisms associated with sexual differentiation. PMID:24125951

  2. High expression hampers horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Chungoo; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the movement of genetic material from one species to another, is a common phenomenon in prokaryotic evolution. Although the rate of HGT is known to vary among genes, our understanding of the cause of this variation, currently summarized by two rules, is far from complete. The first rule states that informational genes, which are involved in DNA replication, transcription, and translation, have lower transferabilities than operational genes. The second rule asserts that protein interactivity negatively impacts gene transferability. Here, we hypothesize that high expression hampers HGT, because the fitness cost of an HGT to the recipient, arising from the 1) energy expenditure in transcription and translation, 2) cytotoxic protein misfolding, 3) reduction in cellular translational efficiency, 4) detrimental protein misinteraction, and 5) disturbance of the optimal protein concentration or cell physiology, increases with the expression level of the transferred gene. To test this hypothesis, we examined laboratory and natural HGTs to Escherichia coli. We observed lower transferabilities of more highly expressed genes, even after controlling the confounding factors from the two established rules and the genic GC content. Furthermore, expression level predicts gene transferability better than all other factors examined. We also confirmed the significant negative impact of gene expression on the rate of HGTs to 127 of 133 genomes of eubacteria and archaebacteria. Together, these findings establish the gene expression level as a major determinant of horizontal gene transferability. They also suggest that most successful HGTs are initially slightly deleterious, fixed because of their negligibly low costs rather than high benefits to the recipient. PMID:22436996

  3. Gene expression in periodontal tissues following treatment

    PubMed Central

    Beikler, Thomas; Peters, Ulrike; Prior, Karola; Eisenacher, Martin; Flemmig, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Background In periodontitis, treatment aimed at controlling the periodontal biofilm infection results in a resolution of the clinical and histological signs of inflammation. Although the cell types found in periodontal tissues following treatment have been well described, information on gene expression is limited to few candidate genes. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the expression profiles of immune and inflammatory genes in periodontal tissues from sites with severe chronic periodontitis following periodontal therapy in order to identify genes involved in tissue homeostasis. Gingival biopsies from 12 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were taken six to eight weeks following non-surgical periodontal therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. As internal standard, RNA of an immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCaT) was used. Total RNA was subjected to gene expression profiling using a commercially available microarray system focusing on inflammation-related genes. Post-hoc confirmation of selected genes was done by Realtime-PCR. Results Out of the 136 genes analyzed, the 5% most strongly expressed genes compared to healthy controls were Interleukin-12A (IL-12A), Versican (CSPG-2), Matrixmetalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), Down syndrome critical region protein-1 (DSCR-1), Macrophage inflammatory protein-2β (Cxcl-3), Inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (BIRC-1), Cluster of differentiation antigen 38 (CD38), Regulator of G-protein signalling-1 (RGS-1), and Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins murine osteosarcoma virus oncogene (C-FOS); the 5% least strongly expressed genes were Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase-2 (RIP-2), Complement component 3 (C3), Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Endothelin-1 (EDN-1), Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2), Matrix-metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14), and Interferon regulating factor-7 (IRF-7). Conclusion Gene expression profiles found in periodontal tissues following therapy

  4. REG4 Independently Predicts Better Prognosis in Non-Mucinous Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaprio, Tuomas; Hagström, Jaana; Mustonen, Harri; Koskensalo, Selja; Andersson, Leif C.; Haglund, Caj

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the world’s three most common cancers and its incidence is rising. To identify patients who benefit from adjuvant therapy requires novel biomarkers. The regenerating islet-derived gene (REG) 4 belongs to a group of small secretory proteins involved in cell proliferation and regeneration. Its up-regulated expression occurs in inflammatory bowel diseases also in gastrointestinal cancers. Reports on the association of REG4 expression with CRC prognosis have been mixed. Our aim was to investigate tumor REG4 expression in CRC patients and its coexpression with other intestinal markers. Methods Tumor expression of REG4 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 840 consecutive surgically treated CRC patients at Helsinki University Central Hospital. Expression of MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, synapthophysin, and chromogranin was evaluated in a subgroup of 220 consecutively operated CRC patients. REG4 expression with clinicopathological parameters, other intestinal markers, and the impact of REG4 expression on survival were assessed. Results REG4 expression associated with favorable clinicopathological parameters and with higher overall survival from non-mucinous CRC (p = 0.019). For such patients under 65, its expression was an independent marker of lower risk of death within 5 years that cancer; univariable hazard ratio (HR) = 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.34–0.94); multivariable HR = 0.55; 95% CI (0.33–0.92). In non-mucinous CRC, REG4 associated with positive MUC2, MUC4, and MUC5AC expression. Conclusion We show, to our knowledge for the first time, that REG4 IHC expression to be an independent marker of favorable prognosis in non-mucinous CRC. Our results contradict those from studies based on quantification of REG4 mRNA levels, a discrepancy warranting further studies. PMID:25295732

  5. Gene expression homeostasis and chromosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2014-01-01

    In rapidly growing populations of bacterial cells, including those of the model organism Escherichia coli, genes essential for growth - such as those involved in protein synthesis - are expressed at high levels; this is in contrast to many horizontally-acquired genes, which are maintained at low transcriptional levels.1 This balance in gene expression states between 2 distinct classes of genes is established by a galaxy of transcriptional regulators, including the so-called nucleoid associated proteins (NAP) that contribute to shaping the chromosome.2 Besides these active players in gene regulation, it is not too far-fetched to anticipate that genome organization in terms of how genes are arranged on the chromosome,3 which is the result of long-drawn transactions among genome rearrangement processes and selection, and the manner in which it is structured inside the cell, plays a role in establishing this balance. A recent study from our group has contributed to the literature investigating the interplay between global transcriptional regulators and genome organization in establishing gene expression homeostasis.4 In particular, we address a triangle of functional interactions among genome organization, gene expression homeostasis and horizontal gene transfer. PMID:25997086

  6. Candidate reference genes for gene expression studies in water lily.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huolin; Chen, Sumei; Wan, Hongjian; Chen, Fadi; Gu, Chunsun; Liu, Zhaolei

    2010-09-01

    The selection of an appropriate reference gene(s) is a prerequisite for the proper interpretation of quantitative Real-Time polymerase chain reaction data. We report the evaluation of eight candidate reference genes across various tissues and treatments in the water lily by the two software packages geNorm and NormFinder. Across all samples, clathrin adaptor complexes medium subunit (AP47) and actin 11 (ACT11) emerged as the most suitable reference genes. Across different tissues, ACT11 and elongation factor 1-alpha (EF1alpha) exhibited a stable expression pattern. ACT11 and AP47 also stably expressed in roots subjected to various treatments, but in the leaves of the same plants the most stably expressed genes were ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 16 (UBC16) and ACT11. PMID:20452325

  7. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holter, N. S.; Maritan, A.; Cieplak, M.; Fedoroff, N. V.; Banavar, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small.

  8. Dynamic modeling of gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Holter, Neal S.; Maritan, Amos; Cieplak, Marek; Fedoroff, Nina V.; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the time evolution of gene expression levels by using a time translational matrix to predict future expression levels of genes based on their expression levels at some initial time. We deduce the time translational matrix for previously published DNA microarray gene expression data sets by modeling them within a linear framework by using the characteristic modes obtained by singular value decomposition. The resulting time translation matrix provides a measure of the relationships among the modes and governs their time evolution. We show that a truncated matrix linking just a few modes is a good approximation of the full time translation matrix. This finding suggests that the number of essential connections among the genes is small. PMID:11172013

  9. Nucleosomal promoter variation generates gene expression noise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher R.; Boeger, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    Gene product molecule numbers fluctuate over time and between cells, confounding deterministic expectations. The molecular origins of this noise of gene expression remain unknown. Recent EM analysis of single PHO5 gene molecules of yeast indicated that promoter molecules stochastically assume alternative nucleosome configurations at steady state, including the fully nucleosomal and nucleosome-free configuration. Given that distinct configurations are unequally conducive to transcription, the nucleosomal variation of promoter molecules may constitute a source of gene expression noise. This notion, however, implies an untested conjecture, namely that the nucleosomal variation arises de novo or intrinsically (i.e., that it cannot be explained as the result of the promoter’s deterministic response to variation in its molecular surroundings). Here, we show—by microscopically analyzing the nucleosome configurations of two juxtaposed physically linked PHO5 promoter copies—that the configurational variation, indeed, is intrinsically stochastic and thus, a cause of gene expression noise rather than its effect. PMID:25468975

  10. Amino acid regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Fafournoux, P; Bruhat, A; Jousse, C

    2000-01-01

    The impact of nutrients on gene expression in mammals has become an important area of research. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the amino acid-dependent control of gene expression is limited. Because amino acids have multiple and important functions, their homoeostasis has to be finely maintained. However, amino-acidaemia can be affected by certain nutritional conditions or various forms of stress. It follows that mammals have to adjust several of their physiological functions involved in the adaptation to amino acid availability by regulating the expression of numerous genes. The aim of the present review is to examine the role of amino acids in regulating mammalian gene expression and protein turnover. It has been reported that some genes involved in the control of growth or amino acid metabolism are regulated by amino acid availability. For instance, limitation of several amino acids greatly increases the expression of the genes encoding insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, CHOP (C/EBP homologous protein, where C/EBP is CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and asparagine synthetase. Elevated mRNA levels result from both an increase in the rate of transcription and an increase in mRNA stability. Several observations suggest that the amino acid regulation of gene expression observed in mammalian cells and the general control process described in yeast share common features. Moreover, amino acid response elements have been characterized in the promoters of the CHOP and asparagine synthetase genes. Taken together, the results discussed in the present review demonstrate that amino acids, by themselves, can, in concert with hormones, play an important role in the control of gene expression. PMID:10998343

  11. Efficient ectopic gene expression targeting chick mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Kerby C; Pira, Charmaine U; Revelli, Jean-Pierre; Ratz, Beate; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Eichele, Gregor

    2002-07-01

    The chick model has been instrumental in illuminating genes that regulate early vertebrate development and pattern formation. Targeted ectopic gene expression is critical to dissect further the complicated gene interactions that are involved. In an effort to develop a consistent method to ectopically introduce and focally express genes in chick mesoderm, we evaluated and optimized several gene delivery methods, including implantation of 293 cells laden with viral vectors, direct adenoviral injection, and electroporation (EP). We targeted the mesoderm of chick wing buds between stages 19 and 21 (Hamburger and Hamilton stages) and used beta-galactosidase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) to document gene transfer. Expression constructs using the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, the beta-actin promoter, and vectors with an internal ribosomal entry sequence linked to GFP (IRES-GFP) were also compared. After gene transfer, we monitored expression for up to 3 days. The functionality of ectopic expression was demonstrated with constructs containing the coding sequences for Shh, a secreted signaling protein, or Hoxb-8, a transcription factor, both of which can induce digit duplication when ectopically expressed in anterior limb mesoderm. We identified several factors that enhance mesodermal gene transfer. First, the use of a vector with the beta-actin promoter coupled to the 69% fragment of the bovine papilloma virus yielded superior mesodermal expression both by markers and functional results when compared with several CMV-driven vectors. Second, we found the use of mineral oil to be an important adjuvant for EP and direct viral injection to localize and contain vector within the mesoderm at the injection site. Lastly, although ectopic expression could be achieved with all three methods, we favored EP confined to the mesoderm with insulated microelectrodes (confined microelectroporation- CMEP), because vector construction is rapid, the method is efficient, and results

  12. The O-Linked Glycome and Blood Group Antigens ABO on Mucin-Type Glycoproteins in Mucinous and Serous Epithelial Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vitiazeva, Varvara; Kattla, Jayesh J.; Flowers, Sarah A.; Lindén, Sara K.; Premaratne, Pushpa; Weijdegård, Birgitta; Sundfeldt, Karin; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins where the glycosylation has been shown to play an important role in cancer. Normal epithelial ovarian cells do not express secreted mucins, but their abnormal expression has previously been described in epithelial ovarian cancer and may relate to tumor formation and progression. The cyst fluids were shown to be a rich source for acidic glycoproteins. The study of these proteins can potentially lead to the identification of more effective biomarkers for ovarian cancer. Methods In this study, we analyzed the expression of the MUC5AC and the O-glycosylation of acidic glycoproteins secreted into ovarian cyst fluids. The samples were obtained from patients with serous and mucinous ovarian tumors of different stages (benign, borderline, malignant) and grades. The O-linked oligosaccharides were released and analyzed by negative-ion graphitized carbon Liquid Chromatography (LC) coupled to Electrospray Ionization tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MSn). The LC-ESI-MSn of the oligosaccharides from ovarian cyst fluids displayed differences in expression of fucose containing structures such as blood group ABO antigens and Lewis-type epitopes. Results The obtained data showed that serous and mucinous benign adenomas, mucinous low malignant potential carcinomas (LMPs, borderline) and mucinous low-grade carcinomas have a high level of blood groups and Lewis type epitopes. In contrast, this type of fucosylated structures were low abundant in the high-grade mucinous carcinomas or in serous carcinomas. In addition, the ovarian tumors that showed a high level of expression of blood group antigens also revealed a strong reactivity towards the MUC5AC antibody. To visualize the differences between serous and mucinous ovarian tumors based on the O-glycosylation, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed using mass spectrometry average compositions (MSAC). Conclusion Mucinous benign and LMPs along with mucinous low-grade carcinomas

  13. VAMP8 is a vesicle SNARE that regulates mucin secretion in airway goblet cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lisa C; Moussa, Lama; Fulcher, M Leslie; Zhu, Yunxiang; Hudson, Elizabeth J; O'Neal, Wanda K; Randell, Scott H; Lazarowski, Eduardo R; Boucher, Richard C; Kreda, Silvia M

    2012-02-01

    Mucin secretion is an innate defence mechanism, which is noxiously upregulated in obstructive lung diseases (e.g. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis and asthma). Mucin granule exocytosis is regulated by specific protein complexes, but the SNARE exocytotic core has not been defined in airway goblet cells. In this study, we identify VAMP8 as one of the SNAREs regulating mucin granule exocytosis. VAMP8 mRNA was present in human airway and lung epithelial cells, and deep-sequencing and expression analyses of airway epithelial cells revealed that VAMP8 transcripts were expressed at 10 times higher levels than other VAMP mRNAs. In human airway epithelial cell cultures and freshly excised tissues, VAMP8 immunolocalised mainly to goblet cell mucin granules. The function of VAMP8 in airway mucin secretion was tested by RNA interference techniques. Both VAMP8 short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) reduced mucin secretion induced by PAR agonists, neutrophil elastase and ATP in two airway epithelial cell culture models. Notably, basal (non-agonist elicited) mucin secretion was also reduced in these experiments. VAMP8 knockdown was also effective in decreasing mucin secretion in airway epithelial cell cultures with induced mucous metaplasia/mucin hypersecretion. Unlike VAMP8 silencing, knockdown of VAMP2 or VAMP3 did not affect mucin secretion. Importantly, in VAMP8 knock-out (KO) mice with IL-13-induced mucous metaplasia, mucin content in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and ATP-stimulated mucin secretion in the trachea were reduced compared to WT-matched littermates. Our data indicate that VAMP8 is an essential SNARE in airway mucin granule exocytosis. Reduction of VAMP8 activity/expression may provide a novel therapeutic target to ameliorate airway mucus obstruction in lung diseases. PMID:22144578

  14. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  15. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  16. Homeobox genes expressed during echinoderm arm regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ben Khadra, Yousra; Said, Khaled; Thorndyke, Michael; Martinez, Pedro

    2014-04-01

    Regeneration in echinoderms has proved to be more amenable to study in the laboratory than the more classical vertebrate models, since the smaller genome size and the absence of multiple orthologs for different genes in echinoderms simplify the analysis of gene function during regeneration. In order to understand the role of homeobox-containing genes during arm regeneration in echinoderms, we isolated the complement of genes belonging to the Hox class that are expressed during this process in two major echinoderm groups: asteroids (Echinaster sepositus and Asterias rubens) and ophiuroids (Amphiura filiformis), both of which show an extraordinary capacity for regeneration. By exploiting the sequence conservation of the homeobox, putative orthologs of several Hox genes belonging to the anterior, medial, and posterior groups were isolated. We also report the isolation of a few Hox-like genes expressed in the same systems. PMID:24309817

  17. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose of review. This review focuses on the effect(s) of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on gene transcription as determined from data generated using cDNA microarrays. Introduced within the past decade, this methodology allows detection of the expression of thousands of genes simultaneo...

  18. Reading Genomes and Controlling Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libchaber, Albert

    2000-03-01

    Molecular recognition of DNA sequences is achieved by DNA hybridization of complementary sequences. We present various scenarios for optimization, leading to microarrays and global measurement. Gene expression can be controlled using gene constructs immobilized on a template with micron scale temperature heaters. We will discuss and present results on protein microarrays.

  19. Gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Sutcliffe, J G

    1983-08-25

    191 randomly selected cDNA clones prepared from rat brain cytoplasmic poly (A)+ RNA were screened by Northern blot hybridization to rat brain, liver and kidney RNA to determine the tissue distribution, abundance and size of the corresponding brain mRNA. 18% hybridized to mRNAs each present equally in the three tissues, 26% to mRNAs differentially expressed in the tissues, and 30% to mRNAs present only in the brain. An additional 26% of the clones failed to detect mRNA in the three tissues at an abundance level of about 0.01%, but did contain rat cDNA as demonstrated by Southern blotting; this class probably represents rare mRNAs expressed in only some brain cells. Therefore, most mRNA expressed in brain is either specific to brain or otherwise displays regulation. Rarer mRNA species tend to be larger than the more abundant species, and tend to be brain specific; the rarest, specific mRNAs average 5000 nucleotides in length. Ten percent of the clones hybridize to multiple mRNAs, some of which are expressed from small multigenic families. From these data we estimate that there are probably at most 30,000 distinct mRNA species expressed in the rat brain, the majority of which are uniquely expressed in the brain. PMID:6193485

  20. Control of gene expression in trypanosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, L; Pays, E

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan agents of major parasitic diseases such as Chagas' disease in South America and sleeping sickness of humans and nagana disease of cattle in Africa. They are transmitted to mammalian hosts by specific insect vectors. Their life cycle consists of a succession of differentiation and growth phases requiring regulated gene expression to adapt to the changing extracellular environment. Typical of such stage-specific expression is that of the major surface antigens of Trypanosoma brucei, procyclin in the procyclic (insect) form and the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) in the bloodstream (mammalian) form. In trypanosomes, the regulation of gene expression is effected mainly at posttranscriptional levels, since primary transcription of most of the genes occurs in long polycistronic units and is constitutive. The transcripts are processed by transsplicing and polyadenylation under the influence of intergenic polypyrimidine tracts. These events show some developmental regulation. Untranslated sequences of the mRNAs seem to play a prominent role in the stage-specific control of individual gene expression, through a modulation of mRNA abundance. The VSG and procyclin transcription units exhibit particular features that are probably related to the need for a high level of expression. The promoters and RNA polymerase driving the expression of these units resemble those of the ribosomal genes. Their mutually exclusive expression is ensured by controls operating at several levels, including RNA elongation. Antigenic variation in the bloodstream is achieved through DNA rearrangements or alternative activation of the telomeric VSG gene expression sites. Recent discoveries, such as the existence of a novel nucleotide in telomeric DNA and the generation of point mutations in VSG genes, have shed new light on the mechanisms and consequences of antigenic variation. PMID:7603410

  1. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  2. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent compre...

  3. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    PubMed

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching. PMID:2787158

  4. Heterelogous Expression of Plant Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yesilirmak, Filiz; Sayers, Zehra

    2009-01-01

    Heterologous expression allows the production of plant proteins in an organism which is simpler than the natural source. This technology is widely used for large-scale purification of plant proteins from microorganisms for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Additionally expression in well-defined model organisms provides insights into the functions of proteins in complex pathways. The present review gives an overview of recombinant plant protein production methods using bacteria, yeast, insect cells, and Xenopus laevis oocytes and discusses the advantages of each system for functional studies and protein characterization. PMID:19672459

  5. Introduction to the Gene Expression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; Sanz-Lozano, Catalina S

    2016-01-01

    In 1941, Beadle and Tatum published experiments that would explain the basis of the central dogma of molecular biology, whereby the DNA through an intermediate molecule, called RNA, results proteins that perform the functions in cells. Currently, biomedical research attempts to explain the mechanisms by which develops a particular disease, for this reason, gene expression studies have proven to be a great resource. Strictly, the term "gene expression" comprises from the gene activation until the mature protein is located in its corresponding compartment to perform its function and contribute to the expression of the phenotype of cell.The expression studies are directed to detect and quantify messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of a specific gene. The development of the RNA-based gene expression studies began with the Northern Blot by Alwine et al. in 1977. In 1969, Gall and Pardue and John et al. independently developed the in situ hybridization, but this technique was not employed to detect mRNA until 1986 by Coghlan. Today, many of the techniques for quantification of RNA are deprecated because other new techniques provide more information. Currently the most widely used techniques are qPCR, expression microarrays, and RNAseq for the transcriptome analysis. In this chapter, these techniques will be reviewed. PMID:27300529

  6. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  7. Impaired barrier function by dietary fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) in rats is accompanied by increased colonic mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Vink, Carolien; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary non-digestible carbohydrates stimulate the gut microflora and are therefore presumed to improve host resistance to intestinal infections. However, several strictly controlled rat infection studies showed that non-digestible fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) increase, rather than decrease, translocation of Salmonella towards extra-intestinal sites. In addition, it was shown that FOS increases intestinal permeability already before infection. The mechanism responsible for this adverse effect of FOS is unclear. Possible explanations are altered mucosal integrity due to changes in tight junctions or changes in expression of defense molecules such as antimicrobials and mucins. To examine the mechanisms underlying weakening of the intestinal barrier by FOS, a controlled dietary intervention study was performed. Two groups of 12 rats were adapted to a diet with or without FOS. mRNA was collected from colonic mucosa and changes in gene expression were assessed for each individual rat using Agilent rat whole genome microarrays. Results Among the 997 FOS induced genes we observed less mucosal integrity related genes than expected with the clear permeability changes. FOS did not induce changes in tight junction genes and only 8 genes related to mucosal defense were induced by FOS. These small effects are unlikely the cause for the clear increase in intestinal permeability that is observed. FOS significantly increased expression of 177 mitochondria-related genes. More specifically, induced expression of genes involved in all five OXPHOS complexes and the TCA cycle was observed. These results indicate that dietary FOS influences intestinal mucosal energy metabolism. Furthermore, increased expression of 113 genes related to protein turnover, including proteasome genes, ribosomal genes and protein maturation related genes, was seen. FOS upregulated expression of the peptide hormone proglucagon gene, in agreement with previous studies, as well as three other peptide

  8. Mismatch repair genes expression defects & association with clinicopathological characteristics in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurjeet; Masoud, Abdelhafid; Raihan, N.; Radzi, M.; Khamizar, W.; Kam, Lee Suk

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: DNA mismatch repair gene (MMR) abnormalities are seen in 95 per cent of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and 10-15 per cent of sporadic colorectal cancers. There are no data on MMR abnormalities in Malaysian colorectal cancer patients. This study was aimed to determine the frequency of abnormal MMR gene protein expression in colorectal carcinoma in Northern Peninsular Malaysia using immunohistochemistry. Methods: Clinicopathological information was obtained from 148 patients’ records who underwent bowel resection for colorectal cancer (CRC) at the three hospitals in Malaysia. Immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 proteins were performed on paraffin embedded tissue containing carcinoma. Results: A total of 148 subjects and 150 colorectal carcinomas of sporadic and hereditary types were assessed. Three patients had synchronous tumours. Twenty eight cancers (18.6%) from 26 subjects (17.6%) had absent immunohistochemical expression of any one of the MMR gene proteins. This comprised absent MLH1 only – 3 cancers, absent MSH2 only – 3, absent MSH6 only – 2, absent PMS2 only – 3, absent MLH1 and PMS2 – 14, absent MSH2 and MSH6 – 2 and absent MLH1, MSH6 and PMS2 – 1. There was significant association between abnormal MMR gene protein expression and proximal colon cancers, mucinous, signet ring and poorly differentiated morphology. Interpretation & conclusions: Cancers with abnormal MMR gene expression were associated with microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) phenotype. About 15 per cent demonstrated absent MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 protein expression in isolation or in combination with other MMR genes, which often predicts a germline mutation, synonymous with a diagnosis of HNPCC. This appears to be high frequency compared to reported data. PMID:21911971

  9. Aminoglycoside uptake increased by tet gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, T L; Davis, G E; Anderson, W L; Moyzis, R K; Griffith, J K

    1989-01-01

    The expression of extrachromosomal tet genes not only confers tetracycline resistance but also increases the susceptibilities of gram-negative bacteria to commonly used aminoglycoside antibiotics. We investigated the possibility that tet expression increases aminoglycoside susceptibility by increasing bacterial uptake of aminoglycoside. Studies of [3H]gentamicin uptake in paired sets of Escherichia coli HB101 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 expressing and not expressing tet showed that tet expression accelerates energy-dependent [3H]gentamicin uptake. Increased [3H]gentamicin uptake was accompanied by decreased bacterial protein synthesis and bacterial growth. Increased aminoglycoside uptake occurred whether tet expression was constitutive or induced, whether the tet gene was class B or C, and whether the tet gene was plasmid borne or integrated into the bacterial chromosome. tet expression produced no measurable change in membrane potential, suggesting that tet expression increases aminoglycoside uptake either by increasing the availability of specific carriers or by lowering the minimum membrane potential that is necessary for uptake. PMID:2684011

  10. Inferring differentiation pathways from gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ivan G.; Roepcke, Stefan; Hafemeister, Christoph; Schliep, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The regulation of proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells into mature cells is central to developmental biology. Gene expression measured in distinguishable developmental stages helps to elucidate underlying molecular processes. In previous work we showed that functional gene modules, which act distinctly in the course of development, can be represented by a mixture of trees. In general, the similarities in the gene expression programs of cell populations reflect the similarities in the differentiation path. Results: We propose a novel model for gene expression profiles and an unsupervised learning method to estimate developmental similarity and infer differentiation pathways. We assess the performance of our model on simulated data and compare it with favorable results to related methods. We also infer differentiation pathways and predict functional modules in gene expression data of lymphoid development. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time how, in principal, the incorporation of structural knowledge about the dependence structure helps to reveal differentiation pathways and potentially relevant functional gene modules from microarray datasets. Our method applies in any area of developmental biology where it is possible to obtain cells of distinguishable differentiation stages. Availability: The implementation of our method (GPL license), data and additional results are available at http://algorithmics.molgen.mpg.de/Supplements/InfDif/ Contact: filho@molgen.mpg.de, schliep@molgen.mpg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18586709

  11. Gene expression following acute morphine administration.

    PubMed

    Loguinov, A V; Anderson, L M; Crosby, G J; Yukhananov, R Y

    2001-08-28

    The long-term response to neurotropic drugs depends on drug-induced neuroplasticity and underlying changes in gene expression. However, alterations in neuronal gene expression can be observed even following single injection. To investigate the extent of these changes, gene expression in the medial striatum and lumbar part of the spinal cord was monitored by cDNA microarray following single injection of morphine. Using robust and resistant linear regression (MM-estimator) with simultaneous prediction confidence intervals, we detected differentially expressed genes. By combining the results with cluster analysis, we have found that a single morphine injection alters expression of two major groups of genes, for proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and for cytoskeleton-related proteins. RNAs for these proteins were mostly downregulated both in the medial striatum and in lumbar part of the spinal cord. These transitory changes were prevented by coadministration of the opioid antagonist naloxone. Data indicate that microarray analysis by itself is useful in describing the effect of well-known substances on the nervous system and provides sufficient information to propose a potentially novel pathway mediating its activity. PMID:11526201

  12. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  13. Emerging Potential of Natural Products for Targeting Mucins for Therapy Against Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Macha, Muzafar A.; Krishn, Shiv Ram; Jahan, Rahat; Banerjee, Kasturi; Batra, Surinder K.; Jain, Maneesh

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated mucin expression is a hallmark of several inflammatory and malignant pathologies. Emerging evidence suggests that, apart from biomarkers, these deregulated mucins are functional contributors to pathogenesis in inflammation and cancer. Both overexpression and downregulation of mucins in various organ systems is associated with pathobiology of inflammation and cancer. Restoration of mucin homeostasis has become an important goal for therapy and management of such disorders and has fueled the quest for selective mucomodulators. With improved understanding of mucin regulation and mechanistic insights into their pathobiological roles, there is optimism to find selective non-toxic agents capable of modulating mucin expression and function. Recently, natural compounds derived from dietary sources have drawn attention due to their anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties and low toxicity. Considerable efforts have been directed towards evaluating dietary natural products as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents; identification, characterization and synthesis of their active compounds; and improving their delivery and bioavailability. We describe the current understanding of mucin regulation, rationale for targeting mucins with natural products and discuss some natural products that modulate mucin expression and functions. We further discuss the approaches and parameters that should guide future research to identify and evaluate selective natural mucomodulators for therapy. PMID:25624117

  14. Emerging potential of natural products for targeting mucins for therapy against inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Macha, Muzafar A; Krishn, Shiv Ram; Jahan, Rahat; Banerjee, Kasturi; Batra, Surinder K; Jain, Maneesh

    2015-03-01

    Deregulated mucin expression is a hallmark of several inflammatory and malignant pathologies. Emerging evidence suggests that, apart from biomarkers, these deregulated mucins are functional contributors to the pathogenesis in inflammation and cancer. Both overexpression and downregulation of mucins in various organ systems is associated with pathobiology of inflammation and cancer. Restoration of mucin homeostasis has become an important goal for therapy and management of such disorders has fueled the quest for selective mucomodulators. With improved understanding of mucin regulation and mechanistic insights into their pathobiological roles, there is optimism to find selective non-toxic agents capable of modulating mucin expression and function. Recently, natural compounds derived from dietary sources have drawn attention due to their anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties and low toxicity. Considerable efforts have been directed towards evaluating dietary natural products as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents; identification, characterization and synthesis of their active compounds; and improving their delivery and bioavailability. We describe the current understanding of mucin regulation, rationale for targeting mucins with natural products and discuss some natural products that modulate mucin expression and functions. We further discuss the approaches and parameters that should guide future research to identify and evaluate selective natural mucomodulators for therapy. PMID:25624117

  15. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  16. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages) seed coats (globular and torpedo stages) and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages) and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST) (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011) were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152) had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid clones that comprise

  17. Redox signaling: globalization of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jeong-Il; Kaplan, Samuel

    2000-01-01

    Here we show that the extent of electron flow through the cbb3 oxidase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides is inversely related to the expression levels of those photosynthesis genes that are under control of the PrrBA two-component activation system: the greater the electron flow, the stronger the inhibitory signal generated by the cbb3 oxidase to repress photosynthesis gene expression. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that intramolecular electron transfer within the cbb3 oxidase is involved in signal generation and transduction and this signal does not directly involve the intervention of molecular oxygen. In addition to the cbb3 oxidase, the redox state of the quinone pool controls the transcription rate of the puc operon via the AppA–PpsR antirepressor–repressor system. Together, these interacting regulatory circuits are depicted in a model that permits us to understand the regulation by oxygen and light of photosynthesis gene expression in R.sphaeroides. PMID:10944106

  18. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  19. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  20. Chemical modification of carbohydrates in tissue sections may unmask mucin antigens.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, S

    2013-01-01

    Expression of mucins in cells and tissues is of great diagnostic and prognostic importance, and immunohistochemistry frequently is used to detect them. Reports concerning mucin localization in sections sometimes are conflicting, however, partly because immunogenic regions of the mucin molecule may be masked and thus not available for binding to an antibody. We modified carbohydrates in tissue sections chemically to enhance the binding of monoclonal mucin antibodies and of the lectin, Vicia villosa B4, to human tissue. The immunohistochemical localization of MUC1 and the simple mucin-type antigens, Tn and sialyl-Tn, was influenced by oxidation with periodic acid and by β-elimination before incubation. In some epithelial cells the staining was prevented by these procedures while in other cells it was evident. It appears that chemical modification can either destroy some antigen binding sites or unmask cryptic antigen binding sites in the mucin molecule and thereby make them accessible for immunohistochemical detection. PMID:22998734

  1. Facilitated diffusion buffers noise in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Schoech, Armin P.; Zabet, Nicolae Radu

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors perform facilitated diffusion (3D diffusion in the cytosol and 1D diffusion on the DNA) when binding to their target sites to regulate gene expression. Here, we investigated the influence of this binding mechanism on the noise in gene expression. Our results showed that, for biologically relevant parameters, the binding process can be represented by a two-state Markov model and that the accelerated target finding due to facilitated diffusion leads to a reduction in both the mRNA and the protein noise. PMID:25314467

  2. Clustering of High Throughput Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Pirim, Harun; Ekşioğlu, Burak; Perkins, Andy; Yüceer, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    High throughput biological data need to be processed, analyzed, and interpreted to address problems in life sciences. Bioinformatics, computational biology, and systems biology deal with biological problems using computational methods. Clustering is one of the methods used to gain insight into biological processes, particularly at the genomics level. Clearly, clustering can be used in many areas of biological data analysis. However, this paper presents a review of the current clustering algorithms designed especially for analyzing gene expression data. It is also intended to introduce one of the main problems in bioinformatics - clustering gene expression data - to the operations research community. PMID:23144527

  3. Visualizing Gene Expression In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Burlage, R.S.

    1998-11-02

    Visualizing bacterial cells and describing their responses to the environment are difficult tasks. Their small size is the chief reason for the difficulty, which means that we must often use many millions of cells in a sample in order to determine what the average response of the bacteria is. However, an average response can sometimes mask important events in bacterial physiology, which means that our understanding of these organisms will suffer. We have used a variety of instruments to visualize bacterial cells, all of which tell us something different about the sample. We use a fluorescence activated cell sorter to sort cells based on the fluorescence provided by bioreporter genes, and these can be used to select for particular genetic mutations. Cells can be visualized by epifluorescent microscopy, and sensitive photodetectors can be added that allow us to find a single bacterial cell that is fluorescent or bioluminescent. We have also used standard photomultipliers to examine cell aggregates as field bioreporter microorganisms. Examples of each of these instruments show how our understanding of bacterial physiology has changed with the technology.

  4. Mucin function in inflammatory bowel disease: an update.

    PubMed

    Boltin, Doron; Perets, Tsachi T; Vilkin, Alex; Niv, Yaron

    2013-02-01

    MUC2 is the primary component of the mucin barrier that separates the intestinal microbiota and the intestinal epithelium. This mucous barrier is affected by both luminal/microbial factors and host/immune factors, both of which have genetic and environmental determinants. The complex interactions between these players in health and disease states are not fully understood. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has both genetic and environmental etiologies that lead to the breakdown of the epithelial barrier. In this review, we explore the up-to-date evidence that implicates mucin in the pathogenesis of IBD. In IBD, quantitative changes in mucin secretion occur, as well as structural changes in mucin's glycoprotein core and the sulfation and sialylation of mucin's oligosaccharide residues. These changes are associated with a diminished functionality of the mucous barrier. We identify the various genetic mutations associated with these changes and outline the animal models that have enhanced the current understanding of the genetic basis for IBD. Further study is needed to better characterize the immune and genetic influences on mucin expression and secretion and role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and a defective unfolded protein response in mediating these changes. PMID:23164684

  5. Respiratory mucins: identification of core proteins and glycoforms.

    PubMed

    Thornton, D J; Carlstedt, I; Howard, M; Devine, P L; Price, M R; Sheehan, J K

    1996-06-15

    At least eight mucin apoproteins are expressed by the tracheobronchial epithelium, but it is not known which, if any, of these are major constituents of the respiratory secretions responsible for the formation of the mucus gel. To address this we have isolated mucins from normal, asthmatic and chronic bronchitic secretions. The asthmatic mucin reduced subunits were fractionated into four populations (I-IV) by anion-exchange HPLC. Amino acid and monosaccharide compositional analysis, as well as M(r) and size measurements, indicate that two of these populations (I and II) are glycoforms of the same or related apoprotein(s) and that the other populations contain two different apoproteins. A panel of antibodies and antisera recognizing the variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) of specific mucin apoproteins did not, as predicted, react with the glycosylated molecules, but after deglycosylation the majority of these probes (with the exception of those to MUC2, which were negative) reacted at a low level with each of the subunit populations. In contrast, an antiserum against a non-VNTR sequence of MUC5AC identified one of the populations (III) as the MUC5AC mucin. The MUC5AC reduced subunit had an M(r) of 2.2 x 10(6) and an RG (radius of gyration) of 57 nm. The genetic identities of the major mucin (populations I and II) and a minor component (population IV) were not established. The MUC5AC mucin was also identified as a major component in the pooled normal secretions from 20 individuals, whereas in a chronic bronchitic sample it was only a minor constituent. Furthermore, in all these different respiratory secretions the MUC5AC mucin appears as a similar biochemical entity, as assessed by Mono Q chromatography and agarose electrophoresis, suggesting that it may have a well-defined pattern of glycosylation in the respiratory tract. PMID:8670177

  6. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  7. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows

    PubMed Central

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L.; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  8. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Gene expression profiling analysis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JI-GANG; LIU, XIAN-YING; WANG, BIN; WANG, DAN-YANG; WEI, MAN; FANG, HUA; XIANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    As a gynecological oncology, ovarian cancer has high incidence and mortality. To study the mechanisms of ovarian cancer, the present study analyzed the GSE37582 microarray. GSE37582 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included data from 74 ovarian cancer cases and 47 healthy controls. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using linear models for microarray data package in R and were further screened for functional annotation. Next, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was conducted. The interaction associations of the proteins encoded by the DEGs were searched using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Moreover, module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the BioNet analysis tool in R. A total of 284 DEGs were screened, consisting of 145 upregulated genes and 139 downregulated genes. In particular, downregulated FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) was an oncogene, while downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was a tumor suppressor gene and upregulated cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) was classed as an ‘other’ gene. The enriched functions included collagen catabolic process, stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade and insulin receptor signaling pathway. Meanwhile, FOS (degree, 15), CD44 (degree, 9), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2; degree, 7), CDKN1A (degree, 7) and matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP3; degree, 6) had higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network for the DEGs. These genes may be involved in ovarian cancer by interacting with other genes in the module of the PPI network (e.g., BCL2-FOS, BCL2-CDKN1A, FOS-CDKN1A, FOS-CD44, MMP3-MMP7 and MMP7-CD44). Overall, BCL2, FOS, CDKN1A, CD44, MMP3 and MMP7 may be correlated with ovarian cancer. PMID:27347159

  10. Conditional Gene Expression in Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Mélanie; Singh, Anil Kumar; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Nassif, Xavier; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging human pathogen responsible for lung infections, skin and soft-tissue infections and disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients. It may exist either as a smooth (S) or rough (R) morphotype, the latter being associated with increased pathogenicity in various models. Genetic tools for homologous recombination and conditional gene expression are desperately needed to allow the study of M. abscessus virulence. However, descriptions of knock-out (KO) mutants in M. abscessus are rare, with only one KO mutant from an S strain described so far. Moreover, of the three major tools developed for homologous recombination in mycobacteria, only the one based on expression of phage recombinases is working. Several conditional gene expression tools have recently been engineered for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, but none have been tested yet in M. abscessus. Based on previous experience with genetic tools allowing homologous recombination and their failure in M. abscessus, we evaluated the potential interest of a conditional gene expression approach using a system derived from the two repressors system, TetR/PipOFF. After several steps necessary to adapt TetR/PipOFF for M. abscessus, we have shown the efficiency of this system for conditional expression of an essential mycobacterial gene, fadD32. Inhibition of fadD32 was demonstrated for both the S and R isotypes, with marginally better efficiency for the R isotype. Conditional gene expression using the dedicated TetR/PipOFF system vectors developed here is effective in S and R M. abscessus, and may constitute an interesting approach for future genetic studies in this pathogen. PMID:22195042