Sample records for mudflat beach contaminated

  1. Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press Telegram

    E-print Network

    Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press coast showed high levels of methylmercury and moderate levels of PCBs in fish in Long Beach bay waters the coast. In the bay waters of Long Beach, the levels found in fish were of "high concern," according

  2. Comparative effects of mercury contamination and wastewater effluent input on Gram-negative merA gene abundance in mudflats of an anthropized estuary (Seine, France): a microcosm approach.

    PubMed

    Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Berthe, Thierry; Duran, Robert; Petit, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    The macrotidal Seine estuary (France) is one of the most man-altered and mercury-contaminated European estuaries. Molecular quantification by competitive PCR has shown that the highest quantities of Gram-negative merA genes in intertidal freshwater mudflat sediments are located in recent sediment deposits independently of mercury concentrations, suggesting that particle-attached allochtonous mercury-resistant merA bacteria are deposited on mudflat surfaces. To investigate this hypothesis, a microcosm experiment was carried out to evaluate the respective contributions of (i) the input of allochtonous merA bacteria supplied by WWTP-treated effluents and (ii) merA gene abundance corresponding to a response of the sediment's autochthonous bacterial community to mercury contamination. Gram-negative merA gene quantification and T-RFLP analysis of both 16S rDNA and merA genes demonstrated that deposited allochtonous bacteria did not develop in estuarine sediments, whereas mercury contamination (10microg g(-1) wet sediment) selected an autochthonous mercury-resistant merA bacterial community. Thus, in mudflats of highly anthropized macrotidal estuaries, i.e. those subjected to intense hydrosedimentary processes and continuously contaminated by mercury and fecal bacteria, inputs of allochtonous merA bacteria are largely responsible for the high quantities of merA genes on the surface of mudflat sediments. PMID:19013517

  3. Beach Sand Analysis for Indicators of Microbial Contamination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional beach monitoring has focused on water quality, with little attention paid to health risks associated with beach sand. Recent research has reported that fecal indicator bacteria, as well as human pathogens can be found in beach sand and may constitute a risk to human h...

  4. Can QMRA be used to Discount Pathogen Risk to Swimmers from Animal Fecal Contamination? Doheny Beach, CA Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimated health risks to swimmers from seagull and bather sources of fecal contamination at Doheny Beach, California were compared using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) with a view to aiding beach closure decisions. Surfzone pathogens from seagulls were thought to...

  5. Bacterial contamination at Huntington Beach, California - is it from a local offshore wastewater outfall?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, Jingping; Noble, Marlene; Rosenfeld, Leslie; Largier, John; Hamilton, Peter; Jones, Burt; Hendley, James W., II; Stauffer, Peter H.

    2003-01-01

    During the summers of 1999 and 2000, beaches at Huntington Beach, California, were repeatedly closed to swimming because of high bacteria levels in the surf zone. The city’s beaches are a major recreational and commercial resource, normally attracting millions of visitors each summer. One possible source of the bacterial contamination was the Orange County Sanitation District’s sewage outfall, which discharges treated wastewater 4.5 miles offshore at a depth of 200 feet. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating organizations have been investigating whether ocean currents and waves transport the wastewater to the beaches. These studies indicate that bacteria from the outfall are not a significant source of the beach contamination.

  6. Vulnerability of Selected Beaches to Petroleum Contamination, Placentia Bay, NL, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, M.; Catto, N.

    2009-04-01

    Placentia Bay currently hosts the highest volume of ship traffic in along the Atlantic Canadian coastline, and is additionally exposed to accidental and deliberate discharges of petroleum products by Trans-Atlantic ship traffic. Placentia Bay has been identified as the region in Canada that is most likely to suffer a petroleum contamination event within the next 10 years. The morphological, sedimentological, energy regime, and marine debris characteristics of 4 beaches at the head of Placentia Bay were investigated in detail. Differing morphological, sedimentological and energy regime conditions alter the sensitivity of each system to oil spill contamination. Differences in the type and amount of marine debris between each system alter the potential risk of exposure to oil spill contamination. Based on differences in sensitivity and exposure, a vulnerability assessment was created for each system. This system was applied to additional beaches and rocky coastlines to demonstrate the applicability of the method and to highlight the actual vulnerability of each study beach relative to the spectrum of beaches actually present throughout eastern Newfoundland. Typical of the majority of beaches throughout Placentia Bay, the 4 study beaches are characterized by gravel dominated, reflective, moderate to high energy systems. Observations of sediment re-working and accretionary features along the beaches of Arnold's Cove and Come by Chance indicate that self-cleaning would not be an effective agent of oil removal in the case of a spill. The absence of sediment re-working and protected nature of Goose Cove beach suggest that oil would persist in this environment for an extended period of time. Evidence of high wave energies at Hollett's Cove indicates that this beach would self-clean effectively. Differing types and quantities of marine debris indicate that each beach, with the exception of Goose Cove, would likely be exposed to oil originating from a Placentia Bay spill. The heaviest quantities would be expected at Hollett's Cove and Arnold's Cove. Based on these factors, Arnold's Cove and Come by Chance are considered the most vulnerable beaches to oil contamination. Hollett's Cove and Goose Cove are considered the least vulnerable respectively. Applying the vulnerability assessment to the additional coastlines revealed that the 4 study beaches rank as moderately to highly vulnerable to oil spill contamination. This ranking, combined with the frequency of vessel traffic, indicates that a significant risk exists.

  7. Huntington beach shoreline contamination investigation, phase III: coastal circulation and transport patterns : the likelihood of OCSD's plume impacting Huntington beach shoreline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, Marlene; Xu, Jingping; Rosenfeld, Leslie; Largier, John; Hamilton, Peter; Jones, Burt; Robertson, George

    2003-01-01

    A consortium of agencies have conducted an extensive investigation of the coastal ocean circulation and transport pathways off Huntington Beach, with the aim of identifying any causal links that may exist between the offshore discharge of wastewater by OCSD and the significant bacterial contamination observed along the Huntington Beach shoreline. This is the third study supported by OCSD to determine possible land-based and coa Although the study identifies several possible coastal ocean pathways by which diluted wastewater may be transported to the beach, including internal tide, sea-breeze and subtidal flow features, there were no direct observations of either the high bacteria concentrations seen in the OCSD plume at the shelf break reaching the shoreline in significant levels or of an association between the existence of a coastal ocean process and beach contamination at or above AB411 levels. It is concluded that the OCSD plume is not a major cause of beach contamination; no causal links could be demonstrated. This conclusion is based on the absence of direct observation of plume-beach links, on analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of shoreline contamination and coastal ocean processes, and on the observation of higher levels of contamination at the beach than in the plume.

  8. Bioremediation of oil contaminated beach material in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, P.H. (Environmental Protection Agency, Gulf Breeze, FL (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The Office of Research and Development within the Environmental Protection Agency has been evaluating bioremediation to help clean up beaches in Alaska's Prince William Sound following the March 24, 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. Bioremediation techniques have been used elsewhere to accelerate the natural biological degradation of environmental contaminants. The purpose of EPA's project was to determine the best bioremediation approach for the oil contaminated shoreline of Prince William Sound. The major portion of the EPA study, therefore, has been a field demonstration to determine if nutrient (fertilizer) addition to contaminated beaches will effectively stimulate hydrocarbon breakdown by indigenous bacteria. Concurrently, a monitoring program has been instituted to check for any possible adverse environmental effects from nutrient addition. Techniques of applying nutrient mixtures to the beaches have been investigated.

  9. Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the transport and fate of Escherichia coli were conducted at Chicago's 63rd Street Beach, an embayed beach that had the highest mean E. coli concentration among 23 similar Lake Michigan beaches during summer months of 2000-2005, in order to find the cause for the high bacterial contamination. The numerical model was based on the transport of E. coli by current circulation patterns in the embayment driven by longshore main currents and the loss of E. coli in the water column, taking settling as well as bacterial dark- and solar-related decay into account. Two E. coli loading scenarios were considered: one from the open boundary north of the embayment and the other from the shallow water near the beachfront. Simulations showed that the embayed beach behaves as a sink for E. coli in that it generally receives E. coli more efficiently than it releases them. This is a result of the significantly different hydrodynamic forcing factors between the inside of the embayment and the main coastal flow outside. The settled E. coli inside the embayment can be a potential source of contamination during subsequent sediment resuspension events, suggesting that deposition-resuspension cycles of E. coli have resulted in excessive bacterial contamination of beach water. A further hypothetical case with a breakwater shortened to half its original length, which was anticipated to enhance the current circulation in the embayment, showed a reduction in E. coli concentrations of nearly 20%.

  10. Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the transport and fate of Escherichia coli were conducted at Chicago’s 63rd Street Beach, an embayed beach that had the highest mean E. coli concentration among 23 similar Lake Michigan beaches during summer months of 2000-2005, in order to find the cause for the high bacterial contamination. The numerical model was based on the transport of E. coli by current circulation patterns in the embayment driven by longshore main currents and the loss of E. coli in the water column, taking settling as well as bacterial dark- and solar-related decay into account. Two E. coli loading scenarios were considered: one from the open boundary north of the embayment and the other from the shallow water near the beachfront. Simulations showed that the embayed beach behaves as a sink for E. coli in that it generally receives E. coli more efficiently than it releases them. This is a result of the significantly different hydrodynamic forcing factors between the inside of the embayment and the main coastal flow outside. The settled E. coli inside the embayment can be a potential source of contamination during subsequent sediment resuspension events, suggesting that deposition-resuspension cycles of E. coli have resulted in excessive bacterial contamination of beach water. A further hypothetical case with a breakwater shortened to half its original length, which was anticipated to enhance the current circulation in the embayment, showed a reduction in E. coli concentrations of nearly 20%.

  11. Development of a mobile system for cleaning oil-contaminated beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. X. Dolan; J. P. Bowersox

    1973-01-01

    A system has been developed for the restoration of oil-contaminated beach sands. The method involves washing the sand in a high energy jet contactor washer and separation of the cleaned sand from the washing fluid in a conventional solid liquid cyclone. Separation and concentration of the oil-water effluent from the washing process is also accomplished in cyclones. The two separate

  12. Nowcasting and Forecasting Concentrations of Biological Contaminants at Beaches: A Feasibility and Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Public concern over microbial contamination of recreational waters has increased in recent years. A common approach to evaluating beach water quality has been to use the persistence model which assumes that day-old monitoring results provide accurate estimates of current concentr...

  13. NUTRIENT TRANSPORT DURING BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED BEACHES: EVALUATION WITH LITHIUM AS A CONSERVATIVE TRACER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of oil-contaminated beaches typically involves fertilization with nutrients that are thought to limit the growth rate of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Much of the available technology involves application of fertilizers that release nutrients in a water-soluble ...

  14. Enhanced ex situ bioremediation of crude oil contaminated beach sand by supplementation with nutrients and rhamnolipids.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulou, M; Pasadakis, N; Norf, H; Kalogerakis, N

    2013-12-15

    Mediterranean coastal regions are particularly exposed to oil pollution due to extensive industrialization, urbanization and transport of crude and refined oil to and from refineries. Bioremediation of contaminated beach sand through landfarming is both simple and cost-effective to implement compared to other treatment technologies. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of alternative nutrients on biodegradation of crude oil contaminated beach sand in an effort to reduce the time required for bioremediation employing only indigenous hydrocarbon degraders. A natural sandy soil was collected from Agios Onoufrios beach (Chania, Greece) and was contaminated with weathered crude oil. The indigenous microbial population in the contaminated sand was tested alone (control treatment) or in combination with inorganic nutrients (KNO3 and K2HPO4) to investigate their effects on oil biodegradation rates. In addition, the ability of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids), in the presence of organic nutrients (uric acid and lecithin), to further stimulate biodegradation was investigated in laboratory microcosms over a 45-day period. Biodegradation was tracked by GC/MS analysis of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons components and the measured concentrations were corrected for abiotic removal by hopane normalizations. It was found that the saturated fraction of the residual oil is degraded more extensively than the aromatic fraction and the bacterial growth after an incubation period of approximately 3 weeks was much greater from the bacterial growth in the control. The results show that the treatments with inorganic or organic nutrients are equally effective over almost 30 days where C12-C35n-alkanes were degraded more than 97% and polyaromatic hydrocarbons with two or three rings were degraded more than 95% within 45 days. The results clearly show that the addition of nutrients to contaminated beach sand significantly enhanced the activity of indigenous microorganisms, as well as the removal of total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH) over a 45-day study period. PMID:24229785

  15. Accessing Hurricane-Produced Mudflat BSC

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Mudflats (open water in background) derived via erosion and habitat conversion from former mangrove forests often have a band of mangroves adjacent to the creek bank.  Here a researcher accesses a mudflat at high tide to make measurements....

  16. High Levels of Sediment Contamination Have Little Influence on Estuarine Beach Fish Communities

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Andrew C.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Taylor, Matthew D.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2011-01-01

    While contaminants are predicted to have measurable impacts on fish assemblages, studies have rarely assessed this potential in the context of natural variability in physico-chemical conditions within and between estuaries. We investigated links between the distribution of sediment contamination (metals and PAHs), physico-chemical variables (pH, salinity, temperature, turbidity) and beach fish assemblages in estuarine environments. Fish communities were sampled using a beach seine within the inner and outer zones of six estuaries that were either heavily modified or relatively unmodified by urbanization and industrial activity. All sampling was replicated over two years with two periods sampled each year. Shannon diversity, biomass and abundance were all significantly higher in the inner zone of estuaries while fish were larger on average in the outer zone. Strong differences in community composition were also detected between the inner and outer zones. Few differences were detected between fish assemblages in heavily modified versus relatively unmodified estuaries despite high concentrations of sediment contaminants in the inner zones of modified estuaries that exceeded recognized sediment quality guidelines. Trends in species distributions, community composition, abundance, Shannon diversity, and average fish weight were strongly correlated to physico-chemical variables and showed a weaker relationship to sediment metal contamination. Sediment PAH concentrations were not significantly related to the fish assemblage. These findings suggest that variation in some physico-chemical factors (salinity, temperature, pH) or variables that co-vary with these factors (e.g., wave activity or grain size) have a much greater influence on this fish assemblage than anthropogenic stressors such as contamination. PMID:22039470

  17. Sources and Pathways of Bacterial Contamination in Urban Streams and Ocean Beaches, Santa Barbara, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. D.; Mendez, G. O.; La, J. X.; Izbicki, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Streams and ocean beaches in Santa Barbara, California, occasionally have concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria that exceed public health standards for recreational water, forcing temporary beach closures. Possible sources of fecal bacteria contamination include transient human populations, animal populations, and leaking sewer lines. The purpose of this three-year study is to identify important sources of fecal bacteria affecting the urban streams and beaches and to identify important pathways of transport. Contamination may enter streams and beaches directly by surface runoff, but also may be transmitted short distances through shallow ground water. Our analysis of existing historical data shows that fecal indicator bacteria concentrations are higher in near-shore ocean water following extreme high tides. The possible role of near shore ground water in supplying contaminants to the sea will be investigated by sampling water from an array of shallow wells installed for this study between an older city sewer line and the ocean. The ground water flux to the ocean will be inferred from water levels in these wells, and further tested by radium isotope values in near shore ocean samples. Two additional well arrays will be installed to test for leakage from residential sewage hookups and measure associated exchanges between ground water, streams, and ocean. Preliminary data collected by this study show fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in urban reaches of Mission Creek and its tributaries, the principle drainage through the city, are higher during low flow periods than during periods of higher flow. Analysis of preliminary data also shows short-term temporal variations in bacterial concentrations during twenty-four hour periods. Human enterovirus has been detected in our sample from one urban-drain tributary to Mission Creek. In order to identify the origins of fecal indicator bacteria water samples from Mission Creek, its tributaries, urban drains, and associated shallow ground water will be analyzed for nutrients, dissolved organic carbon (including optical properties to characterize the composition of the organic carbon), fecal sterols, DNA (using Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Poylmorphism), and phospholipid fatty acids.

  18. Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach

    E-print Network

    at an embayed beach Zhongfu Ge,a,* Richard L. Whitman,a Meredith B. Nevers,a Mantha S. Phanikumar coli were conducted at Chicago's 63rd Street Beach, an embayed beach that had the highest mean E. coli concentration among 23 similar Lake Michigan beaches during summer months of 2000­2005, in order to find

  19. Arcobacter in Lake Erie Beach Waters: an Emerging Gastrointestinal Pathogen Linked with Human-Associated Fecal Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Agidi, Senyo; Marion, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Arcobacter has been associated with human illness and fecal contamination by humans and animals. To better characterize the health risk posed by this emerging waterborne pathogen, we investigated the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in Lake Erie beach waters. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 35 times from the Euclid, Villa Angela, and Headlands (East and West) beaches, located along Ohio's Lake Erie coast. After sample concentration, Arcobacter was quantified by real-time PCR targeting the Arcobacter 23S rRNA gene. Other fecal genetic markers (Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene [HuBac], Escherichia coli uidA gene, Enterococcus 23S rRNA gene, and tetracycline resistance genes) were also assessed. Arcobacter was detected frequently at all beaches, and both the occurrence and densities of Arcobacter spp. were higher at the Euclid and Villa Angela beaches (with higher levels of fecal contamination) than at the East and West Headlands beaches. The Arcobacter density in Lake Erie beach water was significantly correlated with the human-specific fecal marker HuBac according to Spearman's correlation analysis (r = 0.592; P < 0.001). Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that most of the identified Arcobacter sequences were closely related to Arcobacter cryaerophilus, which is known to cause gastrointestinal diseases in humans. Since human-pathogenic Arcobacter spp. are linked to human-associated fecal sources, it is important to identify and manage the human-associated contamination sources for the prevention of Arcobacter-associated public health risks at Lake Erie beaches. PMID:22660704

  20. RESULTS FROM THE 2005 NATIONAL BEACHES STUDY: THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN RAPIDLY MEASURED INDICATORS OF FECAL CONTAMINATION AND SWIMMING ASSOCIATED GASTROENTERITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2003, the US EPA Office of Research and Development conducted studies at two Great Lakes beaches to evaluate the association between novel, rapid methods of measuring fecal contamination and swimming associated health effects. These results were presented at the 2004 Science F...

  1. Use of Spatial Sampling and Microbial Source-Tracking Tools for Understanding Fecal Contamination at Two Lake Erie Beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Bertke, Erin E.; Finnegan, Dennis P.; Kephart, Christopher M.; Sheets, Rodney A.; Rhoades, John; Stumpe, Lester

    2006-01-01

    Source-tracking tools were used to identify potential sources of fecal contamination at two Lake Erie bathing beaches: an urban beach (Edgewater in Cleveland, Ohio) and a beach in a small city (Lakeshore in Ashtabula, Ohio). These tools included identifying spatial patterns of Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations in each area, determining weather patterns that caused elevated E. coli, and applying microbial source tracking (MST) techniques to specific sites. Three MST methods were used during this study: multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) indexing of E. coli isolates and the presence of human-specific genetic markers within two types of bacteria, the genus Bacteroides and the species Enterococcus faecium. At Edgewater, sampling for E. coli was done during 2003-05 at bathing-area sites, at nearshore lake sites, and in shallow ground water in foreshore and backshore areas. Spatial sampling at nearshore lake sites showed that fecal contamination was most likely of local origin; E. coli concentrations near the mouths of rivers and outfalls remote to the beach were elevated (greater than 235 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters (CFU/100 mL)) but decreased along transport pathways to the beach. In addition, E. coli concentrations were generally highest in bathing-area samples collected at 1- and 2-foot water depths, midrange at 3-foot depths, and lowest in nearshore lake samples typically collected 150 feet from the shoreline. Elevated E. coli concentrations at bathing-area sites were generally associated with increased wave heights and rainfall, but not always. E. coli concentrations were often elevated in shallow ground-water samples, especially in samples collected less than 10 feet from the edge of water (near foreshore area). The interaction of shallow ground water and waves may be a mechanism of E. coli storage and accumulation in foreshore sands. Infiltration of bird feces through sand with surface water from rainfall and high waves may be concentrating E. coli in shallow ground water in foreshore and backshore sands. At Lakeshore, sampling for E. coli was done at bathing-area, nearshore lake, and parking-lot sites during 2004-05. Low concentrations of E. coli at nearshore lake sites furthest from the shoreline indicated that fecal contamination was most likely of local origin. High concentrations of E. coli in water and bed sediments at several nearshore lake sites showed that contamination was emanating from several points along the shoreline during wet and dry weather, including the boat ramp, an area near the pond drainage, and parking-lot sediments. Physical evidence confirmed that runoff from the parking lot leads to degradation of water quality at the beach. MST samples were collected to help interpret spatial findings and determine whether sources of fecal contamination were from wastewater or bird feces and if a human-specific marker was present. MAR indices were useful in distinguishing between bird feces and wastewater sources because they were about 10 times higher in the latter. The results from MAR indices agreed with results from the two human-specific markers in some but not all of the samples tested. Bacteroides and enterococci human-specific markers were found on one day at Edgewater and two days at Lakeshore. On three days at Edgewater and two days at Lakeshore, the MAR index indicated a mixed source, but neither marker was found in bathing-water samples; this may be because bacterial indicator concentrations were too low to detect a marker. Multiple tools are needed to help identify sources of fecal contamination at coastal beaches. Spatial sampling identified patterns in E. coli concentrations and yielded information on the physical pathways of contamination. MST methods provided information on whether the source was likely of human or nonhuman origin only; however, MST did not provide information on the pathways of contamination.

  2. Regional Public Health Cost Estimates of Contaminated Coastal Waters: A Case Study of Gastroenteritis at Southern California Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Given, S.; Pendleton, L.; Boehm, A.

    2007-05-01

    We present estimates of annual public health impacts, both illnesses and cost of illness,attributable to excess gastrointestinal illnesses caused by swimming in contaminated coastal waters at beaches in southern California, USA. Beach-specific enterococci densities are used as inputs to two epidemiological dose-response models to predict the risk of gastrointestinal illness at 28 beaches spanning 160 km of coastline in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. We use attendance data along with the health cost of gastrointestinal illness to estimate the number of illnesses among swimmers . We estimate that between 627,800 and 1,479,200 excess gastrointestinal illnesses occur at beaches in Los Angeles and Orange Counties each year. Using a conservative health cost of gastroenteritis, this corresponds to an annual economic loss of 21 or 51 million depending upon the underlying epidemiological model used (in year 2000 dollars). Results demonstrate that improving coastal water quality could result in a reduction of gastrointestinal illnesses locally and a concurrent savings in expenditures on related health care costs.

  3. Sandy beaches contamination by arsenic, a result of nearshore sediment diagenesis and transport (Brazilian coastline)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirlean, N.; Garcia, F.; Baisch, P.; Quintana, G. C.; Agnes, F.

    2013-12-01

    We studied the distribution of As, Fe, Ca and Al in beach sands and near-shore surface sediments along the Brazilian coast from the equatorial zone to Rio de Janeiro state. High concentrations of As (up to 120 mg kg-1) exceeding the environmentally acceptable thresholds were found in the beach sands and near-shore surface sediment in several segments of the studied coast. That increased from north to south. The significant positive correlation (R2 = 0.58) between As and calcium carbonate in the beach sands corroborated the hypothesis that calcareous bioclasts participate in metalloid retention and its accumulation in beach sediments. Most likely, enrichment of As occurs in the oxic horizon of sediments caused by the diagenetic redistribution of various elements. Enrichment of As in beach sands occurs in the coast of Bahia and Espirito Santo states. That is facilitated by clastic material of calcareous algae.

  4. Water quality indicators and the risk of illness at beaches with nonpoint sources of fecal contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Indicator bacteria are a good predictor of illness at marine beaches that have point sources of pollution with human fecal content. Few studies have addressed the utility of indicator bacteria where nonpoint sources are the dominant fecal input. Extrapolating current ...

  5. Mudflat Field Inquiry Grade Level: Third Grade

    E-print Network

    "Mudflats" with a slide show/pictures, cover water movement, high/low areas !" Introduce animals living a picture of quadrat in field journal BEFORE digging. Include plants, holes, bits of sticks, and anything, students complete their science work samples !" Write a poem or short story inspired by their estuary

  6. Bioaccumulation of organic contaminants in the liver and blubber of pilot whales (Globicephala melaena) beached on Cape Cod, MA

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrod, A.V.; Shea, D. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Toxicology; Moore, M.J.; Stegeman, J.J. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Populations of many marine organisms in Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay have been declining for decades. Overfishing, habitat loss, disease, and exposure to toxic contaminants have been implicated as causative factors for reductions in both commercially important species and endangered marine mammal populations. The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to organic contaminants could be a factor in the pilot whale population decline and to develop a simple bioaccumulation model to assess the relative importance of the route of uptake and the significance of total elimination. Liver and blubber samples from ten individuals beached in 1991 on Cape Cod, MA were analyzed by gas chromatography/electron capture detection (GC/ECD) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and linear alkyl benzenes (LABs). PCBs, DDT, DDE, DDD, and other chlorinated pesticides were identified and found to be high (ppm range) in several individuals. PAHs and LABs were typically below one ppb. Concentrations of these contaminants in the water and food that pilot whales consume were used in a bioaccumulation model. The model predicted lower concentrations in the whale than the authors observed. For all but the least hydrophobic contaminants (e.g., naphthalene) they predict that food (biomagnification) is the dominant route of uptake into the whales.

  7. Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Trace Contamination of Streams and Beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nickles, James

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of fecal-indicator bacteria in urban streams and ocean beaches in and around Santa Barbara occasionally can exceed public-health standards for recreation. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), working with the City of Santa Barbara, has used multi-disciplinary science to trace the sources of the bacteria. This research is helping local agencies take steps to improve recreational water quality. The USGS used an approach that combined traditional hydrologic and microbiological data, with state-of-the-art genetic, molecular, and chemical tracer analysis. This research integrated physical data on streamflow, ground water, and near-shore oceanography, and made extensive use of modern geophysical and isotopic techniques. Using those techniques, the USGS was able to evaluate the movement of water and the exchange of ground water with near-shore ocean water. The USGS has found that most fecal bacteria in the urban streams came from storm-drain discharges, with the highest concentrations occurring during storm flow. During low streamflow, the concentrations varied as much as three-fold, owing to variable contribution of non-point sources such as outdoor water use and urban runoff to streamflow. Fecal indicator bacteria along ocean beaches were from both stream discharge to the ocean and from non-point sources such as bird fecal material that accumulates in kelp and sand at the high-tide line. Low levels of human-specific Bacteroides, suggesting fecal material from a human source, were consistently detected on area beaches. One potential source, a local sewer line buried beneath the beach, was found not to be responsible for the fecal bacteria.

  8. Relationships between hydrosedimentary processes and occurrence of mercury-resistant bacteria (merA) in estuary mudflats (Seine, France).

    PubMed

    Ramond, Jean-Baptiste; Berthe, Thierry; Lafite, Robert; Deloffre, Julien; Ouddane, Baghdad; Petit, Fabienne

    2008-06-01

    The Seine estuary (France) is one of the world's macrotidal systems that is most contaminated with heavy metals. To study the mercury-resistant bacterial community in such an environment, we have developed a molecular tool, based on competitive PCR, enabling the quantification of Gram-negative merA gene abundance. The occurrence of the Gram-negative merA gene in relation with the topology (erosion/deposit periods) and the mercury contamination of three contrasted mudflats was investigated through a multidisciplinary approach and compared with a non-anthropized site (Authie, France). The higher abundance of the Gram-negative merA gene in the Seine estuary mudflats indicates a relationship between the degree of anthropization and the abundance of the merA gene in the mudflat sediments. In the Seine mudflats, the maxima of abundance are always located in fresh sediment deposits. Therefore, the abundance is closely related with the hydrosedimentary processes, which thus seem to be determining factors in the occurrence of the Gram-negative merA gene in the surface sediments of the Seine's mudflat. PMID:18381217

  9. Bottom Shear Stresses in Runnels Flanking a Mudflat Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagherazzi, S.; Mariotti, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mudflats are dissected by flow-parallel runnels separated by ridges. These bedforms are usually equispaced with a depth of tens of centimeters. The most accepted hypothesis for runnels formation is the presence of stream-wise helical flows above the mudflat surface. Here we explore an alternative mechanism for the formation and maintenance of runnels that arises near tidal channels draining a mudflat. To this end we present a novel numerical model that determines the distribution of shear stresses inside a runnel. The model is validated with data of tidal velocity and sediment concentration measured in mudflat runnels in Willapa Bay, Washington State, USA. Results show that very shallow flows draining the mudflat platform during ebb are concentrated in the runnels. The corresponding shear stresses are strong enough to erode bottom sediments and keep the runnel flushed. Similar shallow flows during flood might lead to sediment resuspension and further runnel incision. Mudflat runnels in Willapa Bay, WA, USA

  10. Great Lakes BeachCast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Great Lakes Information Network developed this website to "broadcast critical information about beach closings and educational content on human health concerns." The website provides the latest news on erosion control projects, contamination and cleanup efforts, beach testing efforts, and other environmental news. Users can explore monitoring data and maps by location. The website also contains the proceedings from the Great Lakes Beach Conferences from 2001 and 2002 and the US EPA's Beach Program activities.

  11. Influences of Drawdown onInfluences of Drawdown on Waterbird Use of Mudflats inWaterbird Use of Mudflats in

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Recreation NavigationNavigation Hydroelectric Power ProductionHydroelectric Power Production Reservoir Operations Study, mudflats exposed middrawdown delayed until July 5, mudflats exposed mid--AugustAugust Recent legislationRecent legislation ­­ delay drawdown until after Labor Daydelay drawdown until after Labor Day Regional Assessment

  12. Contact with beach sand among beach-goers and risk of illness

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Recently, numerous studies of fecal contamination of beach sand have triggered interest among scientists, the news media, and the general public. Evidence shows that beach sand harbors higher concentrations of fecal indicator organisms (microbes considered to indicate...

  13. Great Lakes Beach Health

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    As schools close for the year and summer weather beckons, many recreationalists head to the Great Lakes' public beaches. However, these coastal areas can become contaminated with disease-causing bacteria that threaten public health, disrupt water recreation, and pay a toll on the Great Lakes economi...

  14. The Beach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-04-26

    Have you ever wondered what sand is made of? Where does it come from? How can we keep our beaches clean? Let's work together using the internet to find out a little bit more about the beach. Web Quest Links Introduction Task Resources Evaluation Conclusion Teacher Guide TASK Dear students, Miss Kaysha was at the beach last week and she saw lots of sand. She wants to know how it got there and what it is made of. She also saw ...

  15. Beach Classification

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lisa Davis

    This activity provides students with an in-class practice of landscape interpretation using slides of beaches shown by the instructor. Students view a select number of slides and are asked to classify each beach shown using the Wright and Short Beach Classification: dissipative, reflexive, and intermediate by visually identifying landforms and processes of each beach type. The outcome of this activity is that students have practice identifying landforms and processes and applying their observations and interpretations of geomorphic features and processes for an applied purpose. Designed for a geomorphology course Has minimal/no quantitative component

  16. Beach Measurements

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    chris worley

    2012-09-13

    The students will read about children playing at the beach. These children want to know how tall their sand castle is and use some very creative ways to find the height. Students will follow the same idea and have the opportunity to use beach equipment to do the same. A fun and engaging lesson on non-standard measurement.

  17. Health effects of swimming in fecally-contaminated recreational water: Results from studies at nine coastal beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to fecally-contaminated water has long been known to transmit infectious disease. In 2003, EPA and the CDC initiated studies to better describe the health effects associated with exposure to fecal contamination in recreational waters and to test faster ways of measuring ...

  18. BEACH Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Environmental Protection Agency has released data from the third annual National Health Protection Survey of Beaches for the 1999 swimming season. Based on voluntarily returned surveys, the site offers information on water quality at 1,891 beaches in the US. Using an interactive map, users can find out if the water at a selected beach is being monitored, who is responsible for monitoring, and if any advisories or closures have been issued. Initial entries for each beach include basic monitoring information, contact information, and a map. Users can also read the submitted survey form in full. Additional resources at the BEACH Watch site include summary results from the survey, a fact sheet, technical reports and reference, brochures amd pamphlets, a FAQ, and related links.

  19. Seminole Beach \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederick H. Harrington

    It is still a wonderful beach though it is no longer in Dade County. Seminole Beach is one of the forgotten developments that scattered the South Florida landscape with the bones of dead dreams. It belongs with Inter-Ocean City, Holleman Park, Fulford- by-the-Sea and other schemes to build a fortune in a sub-tropical land. Some of these ventures were poorly

  20. Beach Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Beach Erosion site of the WhyFiles (last mentioned in the August 9, 1996 Scout Report), a project funded by the graduate school of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has been recently updated. Its newest addition includes a story about the population of the tiny Pacific Island nation of Tuvalu that is preparing to abandon its home due to rising sea levels. The site takes a look at this subject and the resulting increased beach erosion that takes place around the world. Visitors can read about the physical processes of beach erosion, view a QuickTime movie of a house falling into the ocean, and more. The site includes good descriptions, photographs, and links to additional information (although some were broken at the time of this annotation), giving interested readers insight into this widespread phenomenon.

  1. Molecular detection of marine bacterial populations on beaches contaminated by the Nakhodka tanker oil-spill accident.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Y; Kishira, H; Syutsubo, K; Harayama, S

    2001-04-01

    In January 1997, the tanker Nakhodka sank in the Japan Sea, and more than 5000 tons of heavy oil leaked. The released oil contaminated more than 500 km of the coastline, and some still remained even by June 1999. To investigate the long-term influence of the Nakhodka oil spill on marine bacterial populations, sea water and residual oil were sampled from the oil-contaminated zones 10, 18, 22 and 29 months after the accident, and the bacterial populations in these samples were analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments. The dominant DGGE bands were sequenced, and the sequences were compared with those in DNA sequence libraries. Most of the bacteria in the sea water samples were classified as the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum, alpha-Proteobacteria or cyanobacteria. The bacteria detected in the oil paste samples were different from those detected in the sea water samples; they were types related to hydrocarbon degraders, exemplified by strains closely related to Sphingomonas subarctica and Alcanivorax borkumensis. The sizes of the major bacterial populations in the oil paste samples ranged from 3.4 x 10(5) to 1.6 x 10(6) bacteria per gram of oil paste, these low numbers explaining the slow rate of natural attenuation. PMID:11359510

  2. Beach Sand

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Francis Eberle

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment probe is to elicit students' ideas about weathering, erosion, deposition, and landforms. It is designed to determine if students recognize that sand on a beach may have come from distant mountains and landforms as a result of the weathering of rock, subsequent erosion, and deposition.

  3. Shore litter along sandy beaches of the Gulf of Oman

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel R. Claereboudt

    2004-01-01

    Beach debris abundance and weight were estimated from surveys on 11 beaches of the Gulf of Oman along the Omani coast. Debris were collected on two occasions from 100 m transects, sorted and categorized by origin and type. Overall contaminations ranged from 0.43 to 6.01 items m?1 of beach front on different beaches with a mean value of 1.79±1.04 gm?1

  4. Decomposition of litter of three mudflat annual species in a northern prairie marsh during drawdown

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dale A. Wrubleski; Henry R. Murkin; Arnold G. van der Valk; Craig B. Davis

    1997-01-01

    The loss of dry mass, nitrogen and phosphorus from shoot and root litter of mudflat annuals was examined in a series of experimental marshes in the Delta Marsh, Manitoba, Canada. Litter bags containing shoot material of three mudflat annuals (Aster laurentianus Fern., Atriplex patula L., and Chenopodium rubrum L.) were placed on the sediment surface of the marshes under drawdown

  5. Influence of subtle substrate differences on feeding by shorebirds on intertidal mudflats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. Quammen

    1982-01-01

    Shallow-feeding shorebirds, dowitchers (Limnodromus griseus and L. scolopaceus), western sandpipers (Calidris mauri), dunlin (C. alpina) and American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), reduced the density of their prey in mudflats with little sand but not in mudflats with a moderate admixture of sand. An experiment in Upper Newport Bay, Southern California, during October and November 1979 to explain the difference in density

  6. Daytona Beach Student Voices

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    Highlights Daytona Beach Student Voices Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will stop at a restaurant

  7. Daytona Beach Activities Schedule

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    Highlights · Daytona Beach · Activities Schedule · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach A day of fun in the sun! WHAT: Come for a day of surf, sun, and sand at world famous Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach

  8. On the beach Introduction

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge Mathematical Design of Hele-Shaw Beach Beach-Shaw' Beach Evolution by Breaking Waves Onno Bokhove "Mathematics of Computational Science", University of Twente CASA, TU Eindhoven, November 2011 #12;On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge

  9. Beach monitoring criteria: reading the fine print

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Beach monitoring programs aim to decrease swimming-related illnesses resulting from exposure to harmful microbes in recreational waters, while providing maximum beach access. Managers are advised by the U.S. EPA to estimate microbiological water quality based on a 5-day geometric mean of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations or on a jurisdiction-specific single-sample maximum; however, most opt instead to apply a default single-sample maximum to ease application. We examined whether re-evaluation of the U.S. EPA ambient water quality criteria (AWQC) and the epidemiological studies on which they are based could increase public beach access without affecting presumed health risk. Single-sample maxima were calculated using historic monitoring data for 50 beaches along coastal Lake Michigan on various temporal and spatial groupings to assess flexibility in the application of the AWQC. No calculation on either scale was as low as the default maximum (235 CFU/100 mL) that managers typically use, indicating that current applications may be more conservative than the outlined AWQC. It was notable that beaches subject to point source FIB contamination had lower variation, highlighting the bias in the standards for these beaches. Until new water quality standards are promulgated, more site-specific application of the AWQC may benefit beach managers by allowing swimmers greater access to beaches. This issue will be an important consideration in addressing the forthcoming beach monitoring standards.

  10. Variations in sediment properties, Skeffling mudflat, Humber Estuary, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, D. M.; Tolhurst, T. J.; Kelly, J. A.; Honeywill, C.; de Deckere, E. M. G. T.; Huet, V.; Shayler, S. A.; Black, K. S.; de Brouwer, J.; Davidson, I.

    2000-07-01

    The generic importance of biogenic mediation of sediment erosion and transport is a matter of debate and a multidisciplinary approach is required to investigate biologically mediated mechanisms of sediment stability. Biogenic influence on sediment behaviour can be inferred from a variety of correlative parameters that act as proxies for biological effects. These include pigment content, organic content and biomass. These biological "indicators" are routinely measured by biologists on a number of differing scales and depth resolutions. Few attempts have been made to examine the importance of an appropriate "match" between the erosion process, the measured physical response and the scale/resolution of the measured biological parameter. This scale dependency was examined along an extensive shore normal transect on the Skeffling mudflat (Humber Estuary, UK). Measurements of physical sediment properties, macrobenthos and selected biogeochemical properties (extracellular polymeric substances) were made. Biogeochemical properties were measured on a "traditional" cm scale and at a depth resolution of 5 mm but also on a microspatial scale, at a 0.2 mm depth resolution. Sediment stability was measured using a cohesive strength meter (CSM). Correlation analysis was used to determine the interactions between variables. A complementary investigation of the sediment micro-fabric (low-temperature scanning electron microscopy) was also conducted. Results demonstrate that the depth resolution of biogeochemical measurements is an influential factor in the interpretation of the biogenic stabilisation of intertidal cohesive sediments. Sediment stability varied with time and with bed feature. Stability increased with time except where influenced by other factors such as rain which markedly reduce surface stability. Critical erosion threshold increased towards the shore whilst suspension index (erosion rate) decreased, and crests were generally more stable than troughs. The study emphasises the temporal and spatial variability of mudflat stability and the importance of biological processes on the erosional behaviour of cohesive sediments.

  11. Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, A.E.; Richmond, B.M.; Fletcher, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

  12. Daytona Beach Activities Schedule

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    Highlights · Daytona Beach · Activities Schedule · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach A day of fun in the sun! WHAT: Come for a day of surf, sun, and sand at world famous Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! WHEN: Saturday

  13. Sedimentation on intertidal mudflats in the lower part of macrotidal estuaries: Sedimentation rhythms and their preservation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Deloffre; R. Verney; R. Lafite; P. Lesueur; S. Lesourd; A. B. Cundy

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose an original approach to the analysis of the formation of intertidal rhythmites, their preservation, and the evaluation of sedimentation rates on estuarine mudflats. Three mudflats, one from each of three estuaries, were analysed using a combination of long-term (>a year), high-frequency (1 burst\\/10 or 20 min), and high-resolution (0.2 cm) altimeter datasets and X-ray

  14. Evaluation of the potential bioaccumulation ability of the blood cockle (Anadara granosa L.) for assessment of environmental matrices of mudflats.

    PubMed

    Mirsadeghi, Seiedeh Aghileh; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Yap, Chee Kong; Gobas, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The spatial distribution of 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (tPAHs) was quantified in aquacultures located in intertidal mudflats of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia in order to investigate bioaccumulation of PAH in blood cockles, Anadara granosa (A. granosa). Fifty-four samples from environmental matrices and A. granosa were collected. The sampling locations were representative of a remote area as well as PAH-polluted areas. The relationship of increased background levels of PAH to anthropogenic PAH sources in the environment and their effects on bioaccumulation levels of A. granosa are investigated in this study. The levels of PAH in the most polluted station were found to be up to ten-fold higher than in remote areas in blood cockle. These high concentrations of PAHs reflected background contamination, which originates from distant airborne and waterborne transportation of contaminated particles. The fraction and source identification of PAHs, based on fate and transport considerations, showed a mix of petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. The relative biota-sediment accumulation factors (RBSAF), relative bioaccumulation factors from filtered water (RBAFw), and from suspended particulate matter (SPM) (RBAFSP) showed higher bioaccumulations of the lower molecular weight of PAHs (LMWs) in all stations, except Kuala Juru, which showed higher bioaccumulation of the higher molecular weight of PAHs (HMWs). Calculations of bioaccumulation factors showed that blood cockle can accumulate PAHs from sediment as well as water samples, based on the physico-chemical characteristics of habitat and behaviour of blood cockles. Correlations among concentrations of PAHs in water, SPM, sediment and A. granosa at the same sites were also found. Identification of PAH levels in different matrices showed that A. granosa can be used as a good biomonitor for LMW of PAHs and tPAHs in mudflats. Considering the toxicity and carcinogenicity of PAHs, the bioaccumulation by blood cockles are a potential hazard for both blood cockles and their consumers. PMID:23583984

  15. NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY OF BEACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose: The annual Beach Survey is designed to gather information about beach water quality, standards, monitoring, and beach health advisories or closures issued during the previous year's bathing season. Each year the survey updates previously submitted beach i...

  16. Shore litter along sandy beaches of the Gulf of Oman.

    PubMed

    Claereboudt, Michel R

    2004-11-01

    Beach debris abundance and weight were estimated from surveys on 11 beaches of the Gulf of Oman along the Omani coast. Debris were collected on two occasions from 100 m transects, sorted and categorized by origin and type. Overall contaminations ranged from 0.43 to 6.01 items m(-1) of beach front on different beaches with a mean value of 1.79+/-1.04 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of weight, contamination levels ranged from 7.8 to 75.44 gm(-1) of beach front with a mean contamination of 27.02+/-14.48 gm(-1) (95% C.I). In terms of numbers of items, plastic debris ranked first on all beaches followed by either wood items or other organic materials such as cigarette butts. Industrial debris remained few on all beaches (<10%). Most debris had a local origin and, in terms of numbers, were associated with beach recreational activities whereas fishing debris represented the largest proportion of the debris in terms of weight. There were notable differences between beaches in the relative abundance of recreation-related and fishing-related debris. PMID:15530520

  17. Tracer Studies In Laboratory Beach Simulating Tidal Influences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioremediation of oil spills on tidally influenced beaches commonly involves the addition of a nutrient solution to the contaminated region of the beach at low tide to stimulate the growth of indigenous oil-degrading bacteria. Maximizing the residentce time of nutrients in the be...

  18. Dramatic Improvements in Beach Water Quality Following Gull Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulls are often cited as important contributors of fecal contamination to surface waters, and some recreational beaches have used gull control measures to improve microbial water quality. In this study, gulls were chased from a Lake Michigan beach using specially trained dogs, a...

  19. Beach and Surf Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    Beach and Surf Safety While the beach can be a fun and relaxing place to enjoy your summer, it is important to also respect the power of the sea. ... hospitals." While you should keep in mind different beaches have different dangers, ACEP offers the following practical ...

  20. Virtual Beach Manager Toolset

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Virtual Beach Manager Toolset (VB) is a set of decision support software tools developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tools are being developed under the umbrella of...

  1. BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

  2. Sands and environmental conditions impact the abundance and persistence of the fecal indicator bacteria Enterococcus at recreational beaches

    E-print Network

    Halliday, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

    2012-01-01

    The marine fecal indicator Enterococcus is measured at beaches to detect fecal contamination events, and beaches are closed to bathers when Enterococcus is found to exceed the federally mandated limit. This dissertation ...

  3. Taxonomic survey of the microphytobenthic communities of two Tagus estuary mudflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Lourenço; Brotas, Vanda; Mascarell, Gérard; Couté, Alain

    2003-05-01

    A taxonomic survey of the microphytobenthic communities was conducted in two intertidal mudflats of the Tagus estuary. These mudflats are located in different littoral zones of the estuary and had distinct sediment characteristics and salinity range. Sampling was performed monthly during low tide over a 14-month-period. Sediment cores were collected and brought to the laboratory, where the microalgae were harvested using the lens-tissue technique under light stimulation. Samples were examined using both light and scanning electron microscopy. The epipelic pennate diatoms dominated the microphytobenthic assemblages on both mudflats but cyanobacteria and euglenophytes were also found. Of the 52 taxa identified, 47 were pennate diatoms, five of which seem to be previously unreported for Portugal. The species more frequently found in the samples were Gyrosigma fasciola, Cylindrotheca cf. signata, Cylindrotheca closterium, Staurophora amphioxys and Navicula gregaria.

  4. Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    Highlights Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will be going to the beach Garage at 10:00 am. Our return time will depend on how long we want to spend at the beach. We will return

  5. VIEW OF THE AREA BETWEEN THE BEACH (LEFT) AND BEACH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE AREA BETWEEN THE BEACH (LEFT) AND BEACH ROAD. NOTE THE RESIDENCES ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF BEACH ROAD. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  6. A new snapping shrimp (Crustacea Decapoda, Alpheidae, Alpheus) from the estuarine mudflats of Kuwait

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Anker; Grave De S

    2009-01-01

    A new snapping shrimp, Alpheus lutosus spec. nov., is described from the intertidal mudflats of Bubiyan Island, northern Kuwait, south of the vast Shatt-Al-Arab delta. The new species appears to be closely related to Alpheus hoplocheles Coutière, 1897 from similar estuarine habitats in China and Japan, differing mainly in the absence of a sharp distolateral tooth on the palm of

  7. World Beach Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sometimes visiting a website makes you want to dash out, leave your computer behind, and get busy doing whatever the site's talking about. The World Beach Project is one of those sites. It's a gallery of art made by all kinds of people, using stones gathered on beaches all over the world. Visitors to this site can browse images of these creations, and read a little bit about how each work came about. For example, there are 64 projects in North America, and 232 in Europe and visitors can travel (via the artwork) from the beaches of England to Malaysia to Mexico in seconds. The World Beach Project was devised by artist-in-residence Sue Lawty in association with the Victoria & Albert Museum. Detailed instructions are provided so that anyone can participate in the World Beach Project, or, from the map, simply click the button labeled "I want to add my beach project to the map".

  8. Anthropogenic influence on sedimentation and intertidal mudflat change in San Pablo Bay, California: 1856-1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaffe, B.E.; Smith, R.E.; Foxgrover, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of a series of historical bathymetric surveys has revealed large changes in morphology and sedimentation from 1856 to 1983 in San Pablo Bay, California. In 1856, the morphology of the bay was complex, with a broad main channel, a major side channel connecting to the Petaluma River, and an ebb-tidal delta crossing shallow parts of the bay. In 1983, its morphology was simpler because all channels except the main channel had filled with sediment and erosion had planed the shallows creating a uniform gently sloping surface. The timing and patterns of geomorphic change and deposition and erosion of sediment were influenced by human activities that altered sediment delivery from rivers. From 1856 to 1887, high sediment delivery (14.1 ?? 106 m3/yr) to San Francisco Bay during the hydraulic gold-mining period in the Sierra Nevada resulted in net deposition of 259 ?? 14 ?? 106 m3 in San Pablo Bay. This rapid deposition filled channels and increased intertidal mudflat area by 60% (37.4 ?? 3.4 to 60.6 ?? 6.2 km2). From 1951 to 1983, 23 ?? 3 ?? 106 m3 of sediment was eroded from San Pablo Bay as sediment delivery from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers decreased to 2.8 ?? 106 m3/yr because of damming of rivers, riverbank protection, and altered land use. Intertidal mudflat area in 1983 was 31.8 ?? 3.9 km2, similar to that in 1856. Intertidal mudflat distribution in 1983, however, was fairly uniform whereas most of the intertidal mudflats were in the western part of San Pablo Bay in 1856. Sediment delivery, through its affect on shallow parts of the bay, was determined to be a primary control on intertidal mudflat area. San Pablo Bay has been greatly affected by human activities and will likely continue to erode in the near term in response to a diminished sediment delivery from rivers. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anthropogenic influence on sedimentation and intertidal mudflat change in San Pablo Bay, California: 1856 1983

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Bruce E.; Smith, Richard E.; Foxgrover, Amy C.

    2007-06-01

    Analysis of a series of historical bathymetric surveys has revealed large changes in morphology and sedimentation from 1856 to 1983 in San Pablo Bay, California. In 1856, the morphology of the bay was complex, with a broad main channel, a major side channel connecting to the Petaluma River, and an ebb-tidal delta crossing shallow parts of the bay. In 1983, its morphology was simpler because all channels except the main channel had filled with sediment and erosion had planed the shallows creating a uniform gently sloping surface. The timing and patterns of geomorphic change and deposition and erosion of sediment were influenced by human activities that altered sediment delivery from rivers. From 1856 to 1887, high sediment delivery (14.1 × 10 6 m 3/yr) to San Francisco Bay during the hydraulic gold-mining period in the Sierra Nevada resulted in net deposition of 259 ± 14 × 10 6 m 3 in San Pablo Bay. This rapid deposition filled channels and increased intertidal mudflat area by 60% (37.4 ± 3.4 to 60.6 ± 6.2 km 2). From 1951 to 1983, 23 ± 3 × 10 6 m 3 of sediment was eroded from San Pablo Bay as sediment delivery from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers decreased to 2.8 × 10 6 m 3/yr because of damming of rivers, riverbank protection, and altered land use. Intertidal mudflat area in 1983 was 31.8 ± 3.9 km 2, similar to that in 1856. Intertidal mudflat distribution in 1983, however, was fairly uniform whereas most of the intertidal mudflats were in the western part of San Pablo Bay in 1856. Sediment delivery, through its affect on shallow parts of the bay, was determined to be a primary control on intertidal mudflat area. San Pablo Bay has been greatly affected by human activities and will likely continue to erode in the near term in response to a diminished sediment delivery from rivers.

  10. Louisiana's statewide beach cleanup

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindstedt, Dianne M.; Holmes, Joseph C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Litter along Lousiana's beaches has become a well-recognized problem. In September 1987, Louisiana's first statewide beach cleanup attracted about 3300 volunteers who filled 16,000 bags with trash collected along 15 beaches. An estimated 800,173 items were gathered. Forty percent of the items were made of plastic and 11% were of polystyrene. Of all the litter collected, 37% was beverage-related. Litter from the oil and gas, commercial fishing, and maritime shipping industries was found, as well as that left by recreational users. Although beach cleanups temporarily rid Louisiana beaches of litter, the real value of the effort is in public participation and education. Civic groups, school children, and individuals have benefited by increasing their awareness of the problems of trash disposal.

  11. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

  12. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

    2011-07-01

    From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

  13. [Analysis of the source, potential biological toxicity of heavy metals in the surface sediments from shellfish culture mudflats of Rudong Country, Jiangsu Province].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wang, Yun-long; Jiang, Mei; Yuan, Qi; Shen, Xin-qiang

    2012-08-01

    Concentrations of six heavy metals were measured in the surface sediments from shellfish culture mudflats of Rudong Country, Jiangsu Province in 2010. The geo-accumulation index (Igeo) was employed to evaluate the pollution level of heavy metals and the results showed that the heavy metal contamination could be divided into three groups: no contamination (Igeo), as in the case of Cu, Cd, Hg; light to moderate contamination (0 < Igeo, < 1), as in the case of Pb, As; and moderate contamination (1 < Igeo, < 2), as in the case of Zn. The pollution level of heavy metals followed the order of Zn > As > Pb > Cd > Cu > Hg. The potential biological toxicity was analyzed using sediment quality guidelines (SQG), as the guideline values, Cd showed no potential biological toxicity, As showed occasional potential biological toxicity in all sampling stations, Cu, Pb, Zn, Hg showed potential biological toxicity in some sampling stations, whereas Zn was the only one showing frequent potential biological toxicity in some sampling stations. Sigma TUs revealed that only one of the sampling stations showed significant acute toxicity, whereas the others showed no acute toxicity. Analysis of heavy metal contamination source through principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the contribution rates of the top two principal components were 37.56% and 33.71%, respectively, indicating that the two main sources of heavy metals were industrial waste water and pollution from transportation and shipping. PMID:23213880

  14. Coastal Mudflat Accretion under Energetic Conditions, Louisiana Chenier-Plain Coast, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draut, Amy E.; Kineke, Gail C.; Huh, Oscar K.; Grymes, John M., III; Westphal, Karen A.; Moeller, Christopher C.

    2005-01-01

    Mudflat accretion on the chenier-plain coast of Louisiana, northern Gulf of Mexico, is anomalous in an area that otherwise experiences widespread land loss due to rapid relative sea level rise. Accretion is shown to be related to energetic events (Winta cold fronts and occasional tropical-dcprrssion srmms) using a 17-year record of meteorological conditions and aerial surveys The results indicate substantial differences between the behavior of sand- and mud-dominated coastal systems under energetic conditions. Comparison of the Louisiana chenier plain to other mud-rich coasts indicates that certain conditions are necessary for mudflat accretion to occur during energetic atmospheric activity. These include an abundant supply of fine-grained fluvial sediment and resuspension events that maintain an unconsolidated sea floor, dominant onshore wind direction during energetic conditions, particularly when onshore winds coincide with high fluvial sediment input to the coastal ocean, and a low tidal range.

  15. Tower construction by the manicure crab Cleistostoma dilatatum during dry periods on an intertidal mudflat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tae Won Kim; Heung Jin Ryu; Jae Boong Choi; Jae Chun Choe

    Animals living on upper intertidal mudflats experience habitat desiccation during neap tides when water does not flood the\\u000a habitat. Individuals of the manicure crab Cleistostoma dilatatum construct cone-shaped towers at the entrance of their burrows, in which they remain during neap tides. These towers are the\\u000a tallest known structures compared to body size built by crabs living on intertidal flats.

  16. Foraging behavior of green-winged teal and mallards on tidal mudflats in Louisiana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William P. Johnson; Frank C. Rohwer

    2000-01-01

    We used time-activity budget techniques to measure foraging behavior of green-winged teal (Anas crecca carolinensis) and mallards (A. platyrhynchos). Observations were made on tidal mudflats in the Atchafalaya River Delta, Louisiana, USA, in the winter of 1994–1995. Green-winged\\u000a teal spent more diurnal time than mallards foraging (68% vs. 35%). Time spent in different foraging postures also differed\\u000a between species. Green-winged

  17. State of the Beach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

  18. Novel nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes sequenced from intertidal mudflat bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tambadou, Fatoumata; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Sablé, Sophie; Klein, Géraldine L; Doghri, Ibtissem; Sopéna, Valérie; Didelot, Sandrine; Barthélémy, Cyrille; Thiéry, Valérie; Chevrot, Romain

    2014-08-01

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) are actively sought out, due to pharmacologically important activities of their metabolites. In marine environment, the most prevalent nonribosomal peptide antibiotic producers are sponges inhabiting microorganisms. Conversely, strains from marine sediments and more especially from intertidal mudflats have not been extensively screened for the presence of new NRPS. In this study, for the first time, a collection of one hundred intertidal mudflat bacterial isolates (Marennes-Oléron Bay, France) was assessed for (1) the presence of NRPS genes by degenerated PCR targeting conserved adenylation domains and (2) for their production of antimicrobial molecules. (1) Bacteria with adenylation domains (14 strains) were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and grouped into Firmicutes (one strain) and Proteobacteria (13 strains). In silico analysis of the NRPS amino acid sequences (n = 7) showed 41-58% ID with sequences found in the NCBI database. Three new putative adenylation domain signatures were found. (2) The culture supernatant of one of these strains, identified as a Bacillus, was shown to strongly inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, and Enterococcus faecalis. This study portends that the intertidal mudflat niche could be of interest for the discovery of new NRPS genes and antimicrobial producing strains. PMID:25039651

  19. Best Beaches in the USA

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Leatherman, Stephen.

    1997-01-01

    Dr. Stephen Leatherman, professor and director of the Laboratory for Coastal Research at the University of Maryland, College Park, has released his annual list of America's best beaches. "Dr. Beach" considered fifty different factors, including current, wave size, smell, views and vistas, and intensity of beach use, to rate the twenty finest public beaches of 650 nation wide. This site features photos of the winners, a complete list of the Beach Rating Scale Criteria, and Dr. Leatherman's selections for the five best Walking, Wild, and Romantic Beaches.

  20. BACTERIA, BEACHES AND SWIMMABLE WATERS: INTRODUCING VIRTUAL BEACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Safe beaches meet water quality standards and are valued for their aesthetics and the recreational opportunities that they afford. In the United States recreational water quality assessments and beach closure decisions are presently based on samples of enterococci or Escherichia ...

  1. Quantification of toxic metals derived from macroplastic litter on Ookushi Beach, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Etsuko; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Kako, Shin'ichiro; Itai, Takaaki; Takahashi, Shin

    2012-09-18

    The potential risk of toxic metals that could leach into a beach environment from plastic litter washed ashore on Ookushi Beach, Goto Islands, Japan was estimated by balloon aerial photography, in situ beach surveys, and leaching experiments in conjunction with a Fickian diffusion model analysis. Chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), tin (Sn), antimony (Sb), and lead (Pb) were detected in plastic litter collected during the beach surveys. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) fishing floats contained the highest quantity of Pb. Balloon aerial photography in conjunction with a beach survey gave an estimated mass of Pb derived from plastic litter of 313 ± 247 g. Lead leaching experiments on collected PVC floats showed that Pb in the plastic litter could leach into surrounding water on the actual beach, and that plastic litter may act as a "transport vector" of toxic metals to the beach environment. Using the experimental data, the total mass of Pb that could leach from PVC plastic litter over a year onto Ookushi Beach was estimated as 0.6 ± 0.6 g/year, suggesting that toxic metals derived from plastic beach litter are a potential "pathway" to contamination of the beach environment due to their accumulation in beach soil over time. PMID:22916725

  2. Variation of the Beach Profile, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Hansen; T. Ho; A. Li; A. Perez; Y. Wong; M. Bissell

    2006-01-01

    Ocean Beach is a 7-km-long stretch of beach that is the western boundary of the city of San Francisco with the Pacific Ocean. This beach is exposed to large winter waves produced in the North Pacific and smaller summer waves from both the North and South Pacific. Recent decades have seen an increased rate of erosion at the south end

  3. Frank A. Beach’s Unpublished Textbook on Comparative Psychology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald A. Dewsbury

    1990-01-01

    At his death in 1988, Frank A. Beach left unpublished a textbook in comparative psychology that he had written in the late 1950s. In it, Beach contrasted comparative behavioral science, as he viewed it, with both ethology and classical human-oriented psychology. He provided a solid background of zoological principles and focused on orienting attitudes. Beach emphasized a functionalist approach to

  4. BROWARD COUNTY BEACH DEMONSTRATION PROJECT: FROM BEERS TO BEACHES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Makowski; Gordon Thomson; Peter Foye; Stephen Higgins

    Broward County relies on its beaches to attract tourists but 21 of the 24 miles of Broward beaches are defined as critically eroded. The Broward County Office of Waste and Recycling Services processed approximately 15,000 tons of glass each year and is searching for beneficial use of this material. The Broward County Beach Demonstration Project is investigating the feasibility of

  5. Virtual Beach: Decision Support Tools for Beach Pathogen Prediction

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Virtual Beach Managers Tool (VB) is decision-making software developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tool is being developed under the umbrella of EPA's Advanced Monit...

  6. A universal nutrient application strategy for the bioremediation of oil-polluted beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hailong Li; Qinghong Zhao; Michel C. Boufadel; Albert D. Venosa

    2007-01-01

    Biostimulation by nutrient application is a viable technology for restoring oil-contaminated beaches. Maximizing the nutrient residence time is key for achieving a rapid cost-effective cleanup. We considered the nutrient injection strategy through a perforated pipe at the high tide line and we simulated numerically beach hydraulics, which allowed us to estimate the optimal injection flow rate of nutrient solution. Our

  7. Contact with beach sand, concentrations of fecal indicators, and enteric illness risk

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies ofbeach sand fecal contamination have triggered interest among scientists and in the media. Although evidence shows that beach sand can harbor fecal indicator organisms as well as fecal pathogens, illness risk associated with beach sand contact and fecal indicators...

  8. Long-term persistence of oil from the Exxon Valdez spill in two-layer beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hailong Li; Michel C. Boufadel

    2010-01-01

    Oil spilled from the tanker Exxon Valdez in 1989 (refs 1, 2) persists in the subsurface of gravel beaches in Prince William Sound, Alaska. The contamination includes considerable amounts of chemicals that are harmful to the local fauna. However, remediation of the beaches was stopped in 1992, because it was assumed that the disappearance rate of oil was large enough

  9. INFLUENCE OF TIDE AND WAVES ON WASHOUT OF DISSOLVED NUTRIENTS FROM THE BIOREMEDIATION ZONE OF A COARSE-SAND BEACH: APPLICATION IN OIL-SPILL BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Successful bioremediation of oil-contaminated beaches requires maintenance of a sufficient quantity of growth-limiting nutrients in contact with the oiled beach materials. A conservative tracer study was conducted on a moderate-energy, sandy beach on Delaware Bay to estimate the...

  10. Novel Biphenyl-Oxidizing Bacteria and Dioxygenase Genes from a Korean Tidal Mudflat?†

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Kwon; Lee, Jaejin; Sul, Woo Jun; Iwai, Shoko; Chai, Benli; Tiedje, James M.; Park, Joonhong

    2011-01-01

    Gene-targeted FLX titanium pyrosequencing integrated with stable isotope probing (SIP) using [13C]biphenyl substrate revealed that tidal mudflat sediments harbor novel aromatic ring hydroxylating dioxygenases (ARHD). More than 80% of the detected ARHD genes comprise four clades (0.5 distance) with 49 to 70% amino acid identity to sequences in public databases. The 16S rRNA sequences enriched in the 13C fraction were from the Betaproteobacteria, bacilli (primarily Paenibacillus-like), and unclassified phyla. PMID:21498748

  11. CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    SESSION February 2012 06 REPORT BY CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management for Migrating Shore Birds and Human Recreation At the Holiday Inn, Fort Myers Beach, Project Team member Bruce Delaney welcomedthe,emotions,andpeople. this issue Welcome to Ft Myers Beach P.1 Florida Bay P.2 Difficult Dynamics P.3 Fieldtrip to Carlos Pointe P

  12. Morphodynamics of Prograding Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, P.

    2012-12-01

    Long-term coastal evolution often results from the cumulative effects of small residual differences between relatively large signals. In light of dire projections of sea level rise over the next several decades to century, there is a strong societal need for accurate forecasts of net interannual- to decadal-scale coastal change. However, our present understanding of the processes responsible for storm-induced erosion and coastal recession is significantly more advanced than our knowledge of coastal recovery during calm periods. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with progading beaches we synthesize findings from a long-term (15 years) beach morphology monitoring program in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Most of the beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) were eroded during the two intense winters of 1997/1998 (a major El Niño event) and 1998/1999 (a moderate La Niña event). Subsequent to these winters the beaches have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year resulting in significant shoreline advance. During this same period as many as two to three new foredunes formed with backshore beach profiles accumulating sand at rates of well over 10 m3/m/yr. Interestingly, these large signals of horizontal and vertical coastal advance have occurred on beaches in which nearshore morphological variability is dominated by net offshore sandbar migration. Net offshore sandbar migration follows a three-stage process; bar generation near the shoreline, seaward migration, and bar degeneration in the outer nearshore with a cyclic return period of approximately 4 to 5 years in the region. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for the sediment supplied to the beaches and dunes during the study period. In this paper we will exploit regional variability in physical (e.g. sediment supply) and ecological variables (e.g. % cover of exotic beach grass species and density) thought responsible for the varying rates and form of coastal advance in the region. These gradients allow us to test hypotheses regarding the relative role of the various controls on interannual- to decadal-scale coastal evolution.

  13. Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast Beaches Following Beach Oiling

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial beach oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven beaches stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern beaches (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from beach sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual beaches had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these beach community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219

  14. Tidal and meteorological forcing of sediment transport in tributary mudflat channels

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, David K.; Stacey, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    Field observations of flow and sediment transport in a tributary channel through intertidal mudflats indicate that suspended sediment was closely linked to advection and dispersion of a tidal salinity front. During calm weather when tidal forcing was dominant, high concentrations of suspended sediment advected up the mudflat channel in the narrow region between salty water from San Francisco Bay and much fresher runoff from the small local watershed. Salinity and suspended sediment dispersed at similar rates through each tidal inundation, such that during receding ebbs the sediment pulse had spread spatially and maximum concentrations had decreased. Net sediment transport was moderately onshore during the calm weather, as asymmetries in stratification due to tidal straining of the salinity front enhanced deposition, particularly during weaker neap tidal forcing. Sediment transport by tidal forcing was periodically altered by winter storms. During storms, strong winds from the south generated wind waves and temporarily increased suspended sediment concentrations. Increased discharge down the tributary channels due to precipitation had more lasting impact on sediment transport, supplying both buoyancy and fine sediment to the system. Net sediment transport depended on the balance between calm weather tidal forcing and perturbations by episodic storms. Net transport in the tributary channel was generally off-shore during storms and during calm weather spring tides, and on-shore during calm weather neap tides. PMID:21499572

  15. Research on pathogens at Great Lakes beaches: sampling, influential factors, and potential sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    The overall mission of this work is to provide science-based information and methods that will allow beach managers to more accurately make beach closure and advisory decisions, understand the sources and physical processes affecting beach contaminants, and understand how science-based information can be used to mitigate and restore beaches and protect the public. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with many Federal, State, and local agencies and universities, has conducted research on beach health issues in the Great Lakes Region for more than a decade. The work consists of four science elements that align with the USGS Beach Health Initiative Mission: real-time assessments of water quality; coastal processes; pathogens and source tracking; and data analysis, interpretation, and communication. The ongoing or completed research for the pathogens and source tracking topic is described in this fact sheet.

  16. Effects of the nuisance algae, Cladophora, on Escherichia coli at recreational beaches in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Englebert, Erik T; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory T

    2008-10-01

    Recreational beaches constitute a large part of the 12 billion dollar per year tourism industry in Wisconsin. Beach closures due to microbial contamination are costly in terms of lost tourism revenue and adverse publicity for an area. Escherichia coli (E. coli), is used as an indicator of microbial contamination, as high concentrations of this organism should indicate a recent fecal contamination event that may contain other, more pathogenic, bacteria. An additional problem at many beaches in the state is the nuisance algae, Cladophora. It has been hypothesized that mats of Cladophora may harbor high concentrations of E. coli. Three beaches in Door County, WI were selected for study, based on tourist activity and amounts of algae present. Concentrations of E. coli were higher within Cladophora mats than in surrounding water. Beaches displayed an E. coli concentration gradient in water extending away from the Cladophora mats, although this was not statistically significant. Likewise, the amount of Cladophora observed on a beach did not correlate with E. coli concentrations found in routine beach monitoring samples. More work is needed to determine the impact of mats of Cladophora on beach water quality, as well as likely sources of E. coli found within the mats. PMID:18639919

  17. ProvincialParks,Trails,Beaches,andProtectedAreas Provincial Parks, Trails, Beaches,

    E-print Network

    Charles, Anthony

    ProvincialParks,Trails,Beaches,andProtectedAreas Provincial Parks, Trails, Beaches, and Protected PARKS, TRAILS, BEACHES, AND PROTECTED AREAS TO THE STEERING PANEL February 2010 Cape Chignecto Provincial Park--Gerry Lunn #12;ProvincialParks,Trails,Beaches

  18. Coastal processes influencing water quality at Great Lakes beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    In a series of studies along the Great Lakes, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are examining the physical processes that influence concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and related pathogens at recreational beaches. These studies aim to estimate human health risk, improve management strategies, and understand the fate and transport of microbes in the nearshore area. It was determined that embayed beaches act as traps, accumulating Escherichia coli (E. coli) and other bacteria in the basin and even in beach sand. Further, shear stress and wave run-up could resuspend accumulated bacteria, leading to water-contamination events. These findings are being used to target beach design and circulation projects. In previous research, it was determined that E. coli followed a diurnal pattern, with concentrations decreasing throughout the day, largely owing to solar inactivation, but rebounding overnight. Studies at a Chicago beach identified the impact of wave-induced mass transport on this phenomenon, a finding that will extend our understanding of bacterial fate in the natural environment. In another series of studies, scientists examined the impact of river outfalls on bacteria concentrations, using mechanistic and empirical modeling. Through these studies, the models can indicate range and extent of impact, given E. coli concentration in the source water. These findings have been extended to extended lengths of coastlines and have been applied in beach management using empirical predictive modeling. Together, these studies are helping scientists identify and eliminate threats to human and coastal health.

  19. Evaluation of Beach Grooming Techniques on Escherichia coli Density in Foreshore Sand at North Beach, Racine, WI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie L. Kinzelman; Richard L. Whitman; Muruleedhara Byappanahalli; Emma Jackson; Robert C. Bagley

    2003-01-01

    Elevated levels of Escherichia coli(E. coli) in bathing waters at North Beach, a popular recreational site in Racine, Wisconsin, have been a persistent problem often resulting in the issuance of poor water quality advisories. Moreover, waterfowl (mostly Larus delawarensis and L. argentatus) in nearshore and offshore areas are common and may serve as non-point sources for bacterial contamination of recreational

  20. Beach/Fireworks Notes from the Office

    E-print Network

    Pilyugin, Sergei S.

    Highlights · Beach/Fireworks · Notes from the Office · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Beach at Crescent Beach. We will drive to the beach and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will come back to campus to watch fireworks at Flavet Field. WHEN: Saturday, July 3rd. Meet

  1. Beach boundary layer: a framework for addressing recreational water quality impairment at enclosed beaches.

    PubMed

    Grant, Stanley B; Sanders, Brett F

    2010-12-01

    Nearshore waters in bays, harbors, and estuaries are frequently contaminated with human pathogens and fecal indicator bacteria. Tracking down and mitigating this contamination is complicated by the many point and nonpoint sources of fecal pollution that can degrade water quality along the shore. From a survey of the published literature, we propose a conceptual and mathematical framework, the "beach boundary layer model", for understanding and quantifying the relative impact of beach-side and bay-side sources of fecal pollution on nearshore water quality. In the model, bacterial concentration in ankle depth water C(ankle) [bacteria L(-3)] depends on the flux m'' [bacteria L(-2) T(-1)] of fecal bacteria from beach-side sources (bather shedding, bird and dog feces, tidal washing of sediments, decaying vegetation, runoff from small drains, and shallow groundwater discharge), a cross-shore mass transfer velocity k [L T(-1)] that accounts for the physics of nearshore transport and mixing, and a background concentration C(bay) [bacteria L(-3)] attributable to bay-side sources of pollution that impact water quality over large regions (sewage outfalls, creeks and rivers): C(ankle) = m''/k + C(bay). We demonstrate the utility of the model for identifying risk factors and pollution sources likely to impact shoreline water quality, and evaluate the model's underlying assumptions using computational fluid dynamic simulations of flow, turbulence, and mass transport in a trapezoidal channel. PMID:20949912

  2. Sand hazards on tourist beaches.

    PubMed

    Heggie, Travis W

    2013-01-01

    Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report. PMID:23290717

  3. Shell use and partitioning of two sympatric species of hermit crabs on a tropical mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teoh, Hong Wooi; Chong, Ving Ching

    2014-02-01

    Shell use and partitioning of two sympatric hermit crab species (Diogenes moosai and Diogenes lopochir), as determined by shell shape, size and availability, were examined from August 2009 to March 2011 in a tropical mudflat (Malaysia). Shells of 14 gastropod species were used but > 85% comprised shells of Cerithidea cingulata, Nassarius cf. olivaceus, Nassarius jacksonianus, and Thais malayensis. Shell partitioning between hermit crab species, sexes, and developmental stages was evident from occupied shells of different species, shapes, and sizes. Extreme bias in shell use pattern by male and female of both species of hermit crabs suggests that shell shape, which depends on shell species, is the major determinant of shell use. The hermit crab must however fit well into the shell so that compatibility between crab size and shell size becomes crucial. Although shell availability possibly influenced shell use and hermit crab distribution, this is not critical in a tropical setting of high gastropod diversity and abundance.

  4. Getting Aquainted with Beaches and Coasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWall, Allan E.

    1980-01-01

    Explains how a shoreline is formed and how it changes, and why its changes do not always coincide with human plans. Subjects discussed include beaches, beach processes, inlets and beaches, and a marine glossary. (Author/DS)

  5. 2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY

    E-print Network

    2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY by Gilbert R. Yochum, Ph.D. gyochum University Research Foundation Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (757) 683 May 2009 2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼ 2008 Virginia Beach Visitor Annual Summary Direct City Taxes and Fees

  6. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamin...

  7. Routine screening of harmful microorganisms in beach sands: implications to public health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabino, Raquel; Rodrigues, R.; Costa, I.; Carneiro, Carlos; Cunha, M.; Duarte, A.; Faria, N.; Ferriera, F.C.; Gargate, M.J.; Julio, C.; Martins, M.L.; Nevers, Meredith; Oleastro, M.; Solo-Gabriele, H.; Verissimo, C.; Viegas, C.; Whitman, Richard L.; Brandao, J.

    2014-01-01

    Beaches worldwide provide recreational opportunities to hundreds of millions of people and serve as important components of coastal economies. Beach water is often monitored for microbiological quality to detect the presence of indicators of human sewage contamination so as to prevent public health outbreaks associated with water contact. However, growing evidence suggests that beach sand can harbor microbes harmful to human health, often in concentrations greater than the beach water. Currently, there are no standards for monitoring, sampling, analyzing, or managing beach sand quality. In addition to indicator microbes, growing evidence has identified pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and fungi in a variety of beach sands worldwide. The public health threat associated with these populations through direct and indirect contact is unknown because so little research has been conducted relating to health outcomes associated with sand quality. In this manuscript, we present the consensus findings of a workshop of experts convened in Lisbon, Portugal to discuss the current state of knowledge on beach sand microbiological quality and to develop suggestions for standardizing the evaluation of sand at coastal beaches. The expert group at the “Microareias 2012” workshop recommends that 1) beach sand should be screened for a variety of pathogens harmful to human health, and sand monitoring should then be initiated alongside regular water monitoring; 2) sampling and analysis protocols should be standardized to allow proper comparisons among beach locations; and 3) further studies are needed to estimate human health risk with exposure to contaminated beach sand. Much of the manuscript is focused on research specific to Portugal, but similar results have been found elsewhere, and the findings have worldwide implications.

  8. Routine screening of harmful microorganisms in beach sands: implications to public health.

    PubMed

    Sabino, R; Rodrigues, R; Costa, I; Carneiro, C; Cunha, M; Duarte, A; Faria, N; Ferreira, F C; Gargaté, M J; Júlio, C; Martins, M L; Nevers, M B; Oleastro, M; Solo-Gabriele, H; Veríssimo, C; Viegas, C; Whitman, R L; Brandão, J

    2014-02-15

    Beaches worldwide provide recreational opportunities to hundreds of millions of people and serve as important components of coastal economies. Beach water is often monitored for microbiological quality to detect the presence of indicators of human sewage contamination so as to prevent public health outbreaks associated with water contact. However, growing evidence suggests that beach sand can harbor microbes harmful to human health, often in concentrations greater than the beach water. Currently, there are no standards for monitoring, sampling, analyzing, or managing beach sand quality. In addition to indicator microbes, growing evidence has identified pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and fungi in a variety of beach sands worldwide. The public health threat associated with these populations through direct and indirect contact is unknown because so little research has been conducted relating to health outcomes associated with sand quality. In this manuscript, we present the consensus findings of a workshop of experts convened in Lisbon, Portugal to discuss the current state of knowledge on beach sand microbiological quality and to develop suggestions for standardizing the evaluation of sand at coastal beaches. The expert group at the "Microareias 2012" workshop recommends that 1) beach sand should be screened for a variety of pathogens harmful to human health, and sand monitoring should then be initiated alongside regular water monitoring; 2) sampling and analysis protocols should be standardized to allow proper comparisons among beach locations; and 3) further studies are needed to estimate human health risk with exposure to contaminated beach sand. Much of the manuscript is focused on research specific to Portugal, but similar results have been found elsewhere, and the findings have worldwide implications. PMID:24355396

  9. Sunny with a chance of gastroenteritis: predicting swimmer risk at California beaches.

    PubMed

    Thoe, W; Gold, M; Griesbach, A; Grimmer, M; Taggart, M L; Boehm, A B

    2015-01-01

    Traditional beach management that uses concentrations of cultivatable fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) may lead to delayed notification of unsafe swimming conditions. Predictive, nowcast models of beach water quality may help reduce beach management errors and enhance protection of public health. This study compares performances of five different types of statistical, data-driven predictive models: multiple linear regression model, binary logistic regression model, partial least-squares regression model, artificial neural network, and classification tree, in predicting advisories due to FIB contamination at 25 beaches along the California coastline. Classification tree and the binary logistic regression model with threshold tuning are consistently the best performing model types for California beaches. Beaches with good performing models usually have a rainfall/flow related dominating factor affecting beach water quality, while beaches having a deteriorating water quality trend or low FIB exceedance rates are less likely to have a good performing model. This study identifies circumstances when predictive models are the most effective, and suggests that using predictive models for public notification of unsafe swimming conditions may improve public health protection at California beaches relative to current practices. PMID:25489920

  10. Variation of the Beach Profile, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Ho, T.; Li, A.; Perez, A.; Wong, Y.; Bissell, M.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean Beach is a 7-km-long stretch of beach that is the western boundary of the city of San Francisco with the Pacific Ocean. This beach is exposed to large winter waves produced in the North Pacific and smaller summer waves from both the North and South Pacific. Recent decades have seen an increased rate of erosion at the south end of the beach that has led to the partial collapse of a parking lot, and continued erosion threatens both public and private infrastructure. To gain an understanding of the variation in beach profiles we established six cross-shore profiles approximately 1 km apart. Each profile represents a part of the beach that experiences different wave conditions, caused by refraction across the San Francisco Bar, and thus has a different morphologic response to offshore sea conditions. The six sub-aerial profiles were measured using a total station one week apart in August 2006. All profiles increased in elevation and five of the six profiles showed the early formation or continued growth of berms. The same profiles will be re-analyzed in the autumn to determine further change, and compared to data collected by a 2004 SF-ROCKS group that also studied Ocean Beach. We will relate beach profile change to wave conditions measured at an offshore buoy to determine what wave conditions cause profile accretion or erosion. The results of this study will shed light on the processes occurring at Ocean Beach and will help us to understand why the south end of the beach is eroding.

  11. Molecular analysis of bacterial diversity in mudflats along the salinity gradient of an acidified tropical Bornean estuary (South East Asia)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Brunei River and Bay estuarine system (BES) in the northwest of Borneo is acidic and highly turbid. The system supports extensive intertidal mudflats and presents a potentially steep salinity and pH gradient along its length (45 km). Temporal variation in physical parameters is observed diurnally due to seawater flux during tidal forcing, and stochastically due to elevated freshwater inflow after rains, resulting in a salinity range between 0 and 34 psu. High velocity freshwater run-off from acid sulphate formations during monsoon seasons results in highly variable and acidic conditions (pH 4) at the upper reaches of the BES, whereas the pH is relatively stable (pH 8) at the seaward extremes, due to mixing with seawater from the South China Sea. At their surfaces, the BES mudflats present microbial ecosystems driven by oxygenic phototrophs. To study the effect of various physical parameters on the bacterial diversity of the BES mudflats, surface samples were collected from six sites stretching over 40 km for molecular and phylogentic analysis. Results The bacterial diversity at these sites was compared by community fingerprinting analysis using 16S rRNA gene based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Results revealed functionally conserved, diatom-driven microbial mudflat communities composed of mainly novel, uncultured species. Species composition was evaluated as 50-70% unique for each site along the BES. Clustering of the sequences commonly occurred and revealed that proteobacterial diversity was related to the salinity gradient. When considering all phyla, the diversity varied consistently with physical parameters (including anthropogenic) that are expected to influence microbial composition. Conclusion The BES mudflats were found to comprise the typical functional groups of microorganisms associated with photosynthetic carbon flux, sulfur cycling (Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria), and decomposition (Bacteroidetes). From a structural perspective, however, the mudflats constituted discretely distributed communities along the physical gradient of the BES, composed of largely novel species of Bacteria. This study provides first insights into patterns of bacterial community structure in tropical South East Asian coastal ecosystems that are potentially threatened by increasing variability in pH and salinity, in line with predicted future environmental change. PMID:25392733

  12. Beach-cusp formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments on beach-cusp formation were undertaken to document how the cuspate form develops and to test the edge-wave hypothesis on the uniform spacing of cusps. These involved observations of cusps forming from an initially plane foreshore. The cuspate form was observed to be a product of swash modification of an intertidal beach ridge as follows. A ridge, cut by a series of channels quasi-equally spaced along its length, was deposited onto the lower foreshore. The ridge migrated shoreward with flood tide, while the longshore positions of the channels remained fixed. On ebb tide, changes in swash circulation over the ridge allowed the upwash to flow shoreward through the channels and the channel mouths were eroded progressively wider until adjacent mouths met, effecting a cuspate shape. Measured spacings of cusps, ranging in size from less than 1 m to more than 12 m, agree well with computed spacings due to either zero-mode subharmonic or zero-mode synchronous edge waves. Edge-wave-induced longshore variations in run up will cause water ponded behind a ridge to converge at points of low swash and flow seaward as relatively narrow currents eroding channels spaced at one edge-wave wavelength for synchronous edge waves or one half wavelength for subharmonic edge waves. The channels are subsequently modified into cusp troughs as described above.

  13. Human trampling as short-term disturbance on intertidal mudflats: effects on macrofauna biodiversity and population dynamics of bivalves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Rossi; R. M. Forster; F. Montserrat; M. Ponti; A. Terlizzi; T. Ysebaert; J. J. Middelburg

    2007-01-01

    The effect of physical disturbance in the form of trampling on the benthic environment of an intertidal mudflat was investigated.\\u000a Intense trampling was created as unintended side-effect by benthic ecologists during field experiments in spring and summer\\u000a 2005, when a mid-shore area of 25 × 25 m was visited twice per month by on average five researchers for a period of 8 months.\\u000a At

  14. Mudflat surface morphology as a structuring agent of algae and associated macroepifauna communities: A case study in the Ria Formosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aníbal, J.; Rocha, C.; Sprung, M.

    2007-01-01

    Although mudflats seem relatively planar, closer inspection reveals a succession of meso-topographical features, including consecutive convex and concave meso- and micro-topographical features. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of meso-scale surface sediment morphology on the dynamics of the macroalgae Ulvales (Chlorophyta) and associated macroepifauna in the Ria Formosa tidal lagoon (southern coast of Portugal). Four sites in the Ria Formosa were sampled monthly. Two were located on convex sections (mounds) of the mudflat and the other two on concave sections (depressions). Macroalgae and related macroepifauna were sampled at each station. Biomass was quantified by determination of the ash-free dry weight (AFDW). Data were analysed using the software package 'PRIMER' (Plymouth Routines In Multivariate Ecological Research). Results show a clear distinction between convex and concave areas. In convex sections, Enteromorpha dominated, to the point of being the only algal species present during part of the year. Conversely, biomass and dynamics of Enteromorpha and Ulva were almost the same in concave sections. The associated macroepifauna was also different in protruding or depressed sections of the mudflat. In the convex areas, the macroepifauna population showed less diversity and was dominated by the snail Hydrobia ulvae. In concave areas, the species diversity was larger, but dominated in terms of biomass by the amphipod Melita palmata and the gastropod Nassarius pfeifferi. Results of the study indicate that the benthic communities associated with concave or convex features were different. No relevant differences in texture and sediment physico-chemical characteristics were found between convex and concave sections. The inference is that the morphological nature of the bottom in tidal mudflats can act as a structuring agent of benthic communities.

  15. Coasts, Beaches & Coastal Introduc5on

    E-print Network

    Chen, Po

    Coasts, Beaches & Coastal Storms #12;Introduc5on · Con5nents are surrounded of New England and Oregon to the broad, sandy beaches of Florida and Texas constructed to stop beach erosion. No5ce that some areas of the beach maintain

  16. Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade

    E-print Network

    Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade Developers: Jan Ward, Merry Lojkovic, Kara Davidson the characteristics, behavior, and anatomy of beach hoppers. !" Examine the relationships between the beach hopper (transparent) !" 1-2 buckets !" sieves !" shovel !" small plastic container with lid to hold beach hoppers

  17. Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan

    E-print Network

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Recent Hawaii Beach Nourishment Projects Scott Sullivan Vice President, Sea Engineering, Inc. Abstract Hawaii is blessed with beautiful natural sand beaches, but over time many of these beaches have relegated beach maintenance to a relatively low priority. With Hawaii's population increasing, and nature

  18. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Early Coverage of Times Beach: Watchdog or Muted Trumpet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Pierre, Yvette

    Times Beach, Missouri, a small town close to the Meramec River and about 25 miles from St. Louis, is now deserted due to contamination from dioxin, a contaminant generated during the production of some cleansers, herbicides, and pesticides. From November 30, 1982, until the end of January 1983, the "St. Louis Post-Dispatch" ran 55 articles about…

  19. Managed realignment as compensation for the loss of intertidal mudflat: A short term solution to a long term problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazik, Krysia; Musk, Will; Dawes, Oliver; Solyanko, Katya; Brown, Sue; Mander, Lucas; Elliott, Mike

    2010-11-01

    Intertidal mudflats are critical to the functional ecology of estuaries yet large areas are being lost as a result of land claim, erosion and coastal squeeze. This study examines whether managed realignment (at Paull Holme Strays, Humber estuary) can realistically achieve compensation for the loss of intertidal mudflat in the long term. Typical estuarine species quickly colonised the site with the total number of species recorded from the site as a whole being almost equal to that in the reference area within one year. Comparable biomass between the two areas was achieved after 2 years. However, organism abundance remains an order of magnitude lower within the realignment site compared to outside. Community structure within the realignment has changed from one characterised by terrestrial/freshwater organisms and early colonising species to one composed of typically estuarine species. However, the developing benthic communities only represent those typical of the estuary in areas of low elevation and high inundation frequency. Rapid accretion has favoured saltmarsh colonisation in much of the realignment site and this is expected to increase as accretion proceeds with invertebrate colonisation being inhibited by increasing elevation. Hence, realignment to restore intertidal mudflats can only be a short term solution in sites of high tidal elevation and in a dynamic and turbid estuary with high natural accretion rates, such as the Humber.

  20. Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

  1. Testing the Waters: A Guide to Water Quality at Vacation Beaches

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    As Americans head for the beach, the Natural Resource Defense Council (NRDC) issues its twelfth annual report on the status of beach and recreational water quality. Entitled Testing the Waters, the report offers readers a fifty-fifty appraisal of the nation's lake and ocean recreational beach sites. That is, while water quality overall is indeed improving in the United States, beach water quality is suffering notable setbacks, with increasing reports of beach closings and harmful bacteria or contaminant postings. With more than one third of all Americans visiting or vacationing at beach areas, water quality is no small issue, as it impacts both health and economic vitality of areas branded by closings or warnings. In public interest, therefore, the NRDC urges that more be done to ensure that water quality is carefully monitored, reported, and addressed at governmental, corporate, and local levels. Toward that end, the NRDC lists both the good and the bad, groups they identify as "Beach Buddies" and "Beach Bums," respectively those areas that monitor and disclose findings and those that don't. With state-by-state listings of water quality reports and links to many other environmentally dedicated resources, the report should interest all who use America's recreational water sites.

  2. Groundwater dynamics in a coastal aquifer: combined effects of tides and beach morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Li, L.; Erler, D.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between fresh groundwater and seawater, driven by oceanic oscillations and the inland hydraulic head gradient, has been shown to affect the pore water characteristics, which in turn influence the fate of contaminants in coastal aquifers. We show here that beach morphology interacting with the tidal force can also modulate nearshore groundwater flow and solute transport. Detailed field investigations were combined with numerical simulations to examine the groundwater dynamics in a carbonate-sandy intertidal aquifer on the tropical island of Rarotonga, Cook Islands. Groundwater salinity values revealed different salinity distributions under conditions of different beach profiles, inland heads and tidal signals. Fresh groundwater was also found to discharge around an intertidal beach slope break (located in the middle region of intertidal zone). This suggests that the interplay of beach morphology and tidal forcing may play an important role in groundwater flow and solute transport near the shore. The numerical models enabled quantitatively analysis of the effects of beach morphology on groundwater circulations and solute pathway. We found that (1) the groundwater discharge location is largely controlled by beach morphology in connection with the tidal force; (2) under particular conditions, the groundwater flow pattern is very sensitive to the beach slope breaks. In particular, the beach slope break combined with the tidal oscillation can induce local circulation cells. These results further demonstrate the complexity of nearshore groundwater systems and have implications for future studies of nutrients transport and transformations associated with SGD.

  3. Coupling Between the Changes in CO2 Concentration and Sediment Biogeochemistry in the Salinas De San Pedro Mudflat, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaie Boroon, M.; Diaz, S.; Torres, V.; Lazzaretto, T.; Dehyn, D.

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effects of elevated carbon dioxide [CO2] on biogeochemistry of marsh sediment including speciation of selected heavy metals in Salinas de San Pedro mudflat in California. The Salinas de San Pedro mudflat has higher carbon (C) content than the vast majority of fully-vegetated salt marshes even with the higher tidal action in the mudflat. Sources for CO2 were identified as atmospheric CO2 as well as due to local fault degassing process. We measured carbon dioxide [CO2], methane [CH4], total organic carbon, dissolved oxygen, salinity, and heavy metal concentration in various salt marsh locations. Overall, our results showed that CO2 concentration ranging from 418.7 to 436.9 [ppm], which are slightly different in various chambers but are in good agreement with some heavy metal concentrations values in mudflat at or around the same location. The selected metal concentration values (ppm) ranging from 0.003 - 0.011(As); 0.001-0.005 (Cd); 0.04-0.02 (Cr); 0.13-0.38 (Cu); 0.11-0.38 (Pb); 0.0009-0.020 (Se); and 0.188-0.321 (Zn). The low dissolved O2 [ppm] in the pore water sediment indicates suboxic environment. Additionally, CO2 [ppm] and loss on ignition (LOI) [%] correlated inversely; the higher CO2 content, the lower was the LOI; that is to say the excess CO2 may caused higher rates of decomposition and therefore it leads to lower soil organic matter (LOI) [%] on the mudflat surface. It appears that the elevated CO2 makes changes in salt marsh pore water chemistry for instance the free ionic metal (Cu2+, Pb2+, etc.) speciation is one of the most reactive form because simply assimilated by the non-decayed or alive organisms in sediment of salt marsh and/or in water. This means that CO2 not only is a sign of improvement in plant productivity, but also activates microbial decomposition through increases in dissolved organic carbon availability. CO2 also increases acidification processes such as anaerobic degradation of microorganism and oxidation of reduced components. The heavy metal concentrations in sediment samples were slightly higher in suboxic layer, yet it appears that salt marsh sediment in Salinas de San Pedro act like a sink for nutrient and carbon by maximizing carbon sequestration.

  4. 76 FR 37700 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ...USCG-2011-0001] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

  5. 77 FR 14321 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...USCG-2012-0041] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

  6. 76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ...USCG-2011-0001] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle...

  7. 77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ...USCG-2012-0095] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA. This action is necessary...

  8. 77 FR 5793 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act; Availability of BEACH Act Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ...Health Act; Availability of BEACH Act Grants AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...program development and implementation grants to eligible states, territories, tribes...and tribes that have received BEACH Act grants in the past to apply for BEACH Act...

  9. Spatial self-organization on intertidal mudflats through biophysical stress divergence.

    PubMed

    Weerman, Ellen J; van de Koppel, Johan; Eppinga, Maarten B; Montserrat, Francesc; Liu, Quan-Xing; Herman, Peter M J

    2010-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the emergence of spatial self-organized patterns on intertidal flats, resulting from the interaction between biological and geomorphological processes. Autocorrelation analysis of aerial photographs revealed that diatoms occur in regularly spaced patterns consisting of elevated hummocks alternating with water-filled hollows. Hummocks were characterized by high diatom content and a high sediment erosion threshold, while both were low in hollows. These results highlight the interaction between diatom growth and sedimentary processes as a potential mechanism for spatial patterning. Several alternative mechanisms could be excluded as important mechanisms in the formation of spatial patterns. We developed a spatially explicit mathematical model that revealed that scale-dependent interactions between sedimentation, diatom growth, and water redistribution explain the observed patterns. The model predicts that areas exhibiting spatially self-organized patterns have increased sediment accretion and diatom biomass compared with areas lacking spatial patterns, a prediction confirmed by empirical evidence. Our study on intertidal mudflats provides a simple but clear-cut example of how the interaction between biological and sedimentary processes, through the process of self-organization, induces spatial patterns at a landscape level. PMID:20497053

  10. Response of archaeal communities to oil spill in bioturbated mudflat sediments.

    PubMed

    Stauffert, Magalie; Duran, Robert; Gassie, Claire; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana

    2014-01-01

    The response of archaeal community to oil spill with the combined effect of the bioturbation activity of the polychaetes Hediste diversicolor was determined in mudflat sediments from the Aber-Benoît basin (Brittany, French Atlantic coast), maintained in microcosms. The dynamics of the archaeal community was monitored by combining comparative terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprints and sequence library analyses based on 16S rRNA genes and 16S cDNA. Methanogens were also followed by targeting the mcrA gene. Crenarchaeota were always detected in all communities irrespective of the addition of H. diversicolor and/or oil. In the presence of oil, modifications of archaeal community structures were observed. These modifications were more pronounced when H. diversicolor was added resulting in a more diverse community especially for the Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. The analysis of mcrA transcripts showed a specific structure for each condition since the beginning of the experiment. Overall, oiled microcosms showed different communities irrespective of H. diversicolor addition, while similar hydrocarbon removal capacities were observed. PMID:24057322

  11. Estuarine macrofauna responses to continuous in situ nutrient addition on a tropical mudflat.

    PubMed

    Botter-Carvalho, Mônica L; Carvalho, Paulo V V C; Valença, Ana Paula M C; Santos, Paulo J P

    2014-06-15

    A field experiment to assess the effects of continuous nutrient addition on the macrobenthic community was carried out on an estuarine mudflat on the northeast coast of Brazil. The experiment began on 5 October 2005 and ended on 8 February 2006. Macrofauna was compared at approximately four-week intervals in triplicate plots with three levels (Control - C, Low Dose - LD and High Dose - HD) of weekly fertilizer additions for 17 weeks. Inorganic fertilizer (N-P-K) was applied on nine randomly defined quadrangular plots (4m(2) each). All measurements were calculated from species abundances. Multivariate analyses as well as the univariate indices (richness, abundance and Shannon-Wiener index) showed statistically significant differences between the enriched and control areas during the period of the experiment. The expected gradual response based on the succession model of Pearson and Rosenberg was not observed. The nutrient doses used were high enough to cause severe decreases in abundance, richness and evenness, and an increase in dominance. PMID:24835372

  12. Medium timescale stability of tidal mudflats in Bridgwater Bay, Bristol Channel, UK: Influence of tides, waves and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Jason R.; Kirby, Robert

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an 11-year study into mudflat elevation changes within the intertidal zone at Stert Flats in Bridgwater Bay, Somerset. This site is located in the outer Severn Estuary/inner Bristol Channel which is a macro-hypertidal regime dominated by physical processes, characterized by strong tidal currents, high turbidity and a significant degree of exposure to wind generated waves. Two transects of stakes were installed perpendicular to the coast, extending seawards 300 m from the edge of the saltmarsh onto the mudflats, against which variations in accretion or erosion could be measured. The mudflats themselves consisted of an underlying consolidated clay of Holocene age and a surface veneer of fluid mud and/or mobile sand patches which varied both spatially and temporally. Mudflat development was recorded over both short-term (monthly/seasonal) and medium-term (inter-annual) timescales. The results display a significant degree of scatter over all timescales. Such variability in response may be expected in such a dynamic system where noise can be attributed to a combination of factors such as the mobility of surface fluid mud and sand patches and the migration of the underlying ridge-runnel drainage network. Despite this, the expected short-term variations related to neap-spring tidal conditions and seasonal influences were observed at a number of locations on the transects although these were weakly expressed. The over-riding feature of the profiles is a consistent long-term trend of erosion which appears to be masking shorter term trends within the dataset. Viewed over the 11-year period, the changes in mudflat elevation closely match the pattern of the index of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) during the 1990s, suggesting a strong climatic control over mudflat development on a medium-term/decadal scale. Most profiles display a strong erosional trend during the early 1990s when the NAO index was positive. The erosional trend peaked in 1995 at a time during which the values for monthly winter mean significant wave height were notably high. Between 1996 and 2001 the profiles generally record accretion and the data display significant variability. This corresponds with a shift to a strongly negative and then weakly positive NAO index phase. The fact that such a general atmospheric factor correlates so closely with medium timescale elevation change is attributed to relative weakness of biological binding and burrowing at this site, and more-so to the overwhelming dominance of the physical regime, especially the tidal current and the wind-wave regime. Both the background erosional trend and the influence of the index of the NAO in controlling mudflat evolution have important implications relating to coastal management. These are discussed in relation to coastal defence measures, morphological response to major civil engineering projects (e.g. Severn Tidal Power Barrage) and the prospect of climate change, sea-level rise and a possible increase in strength of NAO conditions in the future.

  13. Factors affecting the presence of human-associated and fecal indicator real-time quantitative PCR genetic markers in urban-impacted recreational beaches.

    PubMed

    Molina, Marirosa; Hunter, Shayla; Cyterski, Mike; Peed, Lindsay A; Kelty, Catherine A; Sivaganesan, Mano; Mooney, Thomas; Prieto, Lourdes; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-11-01

    Urban runoff can carry a variety of pollutants into recreational beaches, often including bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. To develop complete recreational criteria and risk assessments, it is necessary to understand conditions under which human contamination could be present at beaches solely impacted by urban runoff. Accurately estimating risk requires understanding sources, concentrations, and transport mechanisms of microbial contaminants in these environments. By applying microbial source tracking methods and empirical modeling, we assessed the presence and level of human contamination at urban runoff impacted recreational beaches. We also identified environmental parameters and pollution sources that can influence the concentration and transport of culturable and molecular fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in systems impacted solely by urban runoff. Water samples and physico-chemical parameters were collected from shoreline locations from three South Carolina (SC) beaches (five locations per beach) and two Florida (FL) beaches (three locations per beach). Each SC beach was directly impacted by swashes or tidal creeks receiving stormwater runoff from the urbanized area and therefore were designated as swash drain associated (SDA) beaches, while FL beaches were designated as non-swash drain associated (NSDA). Sampling in swash drains (SD; three sites per SD) directly impacting each SC beach was also conducted. Results indicate that although culturable (enterococci) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (EC23S857, Entero1, and GenBac3) FIB concentrations were, on average, higher at SD locations, SDA beaches did not have consistently higher molecular FIB signals compared to NSDA beaches. Both human-associated markers (HF183 and HumM2) were concomitantly found only at SDA beaches. Bacteroidales species-specific qPCR markers (BsteriF1 and BuniF2) identified differences in the Bacteroidales community, depending on beach type. The marker for general Bacteroidales was most abundant at SD locations and exhibited a high correlation with both culturable and other molecular markers. Combining molecular information with predictive modeling allowed us to identify both alongshore movement of currents and SD outflow as significant influences on the concentration of molecular and culturable indicators in the bathing zone. Data also suggests that combining methodologies is a useful and cost effective approach to help understand transport dynamics of fecal contamination and identify potential sources of contamination at marine beaches. PMID:25061692

  14. Popham Beach, Maine: An example of engineering activity that saved beach property without harming the beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Joseph T.

    2013-10-01

    Beach and property erosion on coasts is a widespread and chronic problem. Historical approaches to this issue, including seawalls and sand replenishment, are often inappropriate or too expensive. In Maine, seawalls were banned in 1983 and replenishment is too costly to employ. Replacement of storm-damaged buildings is also not allowed, and a precedent case on Popham Beach, Maine required that the owner remove an unpermitted building from a site where an earlier structure was damaged. When the most popular park in Maine, Popham Beach State Park, experienced inlet associated erosion that threatened park infrastructure (a bathhouse), temporary measures were all that the law allowed. Because it was clear that the inlet channel causing the erosion would eventually change course, the state opted to erect a temporary seawall with fallen trees at the site. This may or may not have slowed the erosion temporarily, but reassured the public that "something was being done". Once a storm cut a new tidal inlet channel and closed off the old one, tidal water still entered the former channel and continued to threaten the bathhouse. To ultimately save the property, beach scraping was employed. Sand was scraped from the lower beach to construct a sand berm that deflected the tidal current away from the endangered property. This action created enough time for natural processes to drive the remains of the former spit onto the beach and widen it significantly. Whereas many examples of engineering practices exist that endanger instead of saving beaches, this example is one of an appropriate engineering effort to rescue unwisely located beach-front property.

  15. Biodiversity of meiofauna in the intertidal khe nhan mudflat, can gio mangrove forest, vietnam with special emphasis on free living nematodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Quang Ngo; Vanreusel, Ann; Thanh, Nguyen Vu; Smol, Nic

    2007-09-01

    The ecological aspect of meiofaunal communities in Can Gio mangrove forest, Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam has not been investigated before. The composition, distribution, density and biodiversity of meiofaunal communities were studied along an intertidal transect at the Khe Nhan mudflat. Each time, three replicate samples were collected in four stations along a transect following the water line from low tide level up to the mangrove forest edge. In total, 18 meiofaunal taxa were found with the dominant taxa belonging to Nematoda, Copepoda, Sarcomastigophora and Polychaeta. The densities of meiofauna ranged from 1156 inds/10 cm2 to 2082 inds/10 cm2. The increase in densities from the mangrove forest edge towards the low water line was significant. Along the mudflat transect, the biodiversity (expressed by different indices) was relatively high at different taxonomic levels but did not vary significantly along the mudflat except for taxa richness. Eighty nematode genera belonging to 24 families with Comesomatidae having the highest abundance 33.8 % were found. Theristus and Neochromadora decreased in densities from the lower water line towards the mangrove forest edge, while Paracomesoma and Hopperia are typical and more abundant at the middle of the mudflat. Halalaimus increased from high on the mudflat to the low water line.

  16. Trophic resource partitioning within a shorebird community feeding on intertidal mudflat habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocher, Pierrick; Robin, Frédéric; Kojadinovic, Jessica; Delaporte, Philippe; Rousseau, Pierre; Dupuy, Christine; Bustamante, Paco

    2014-09-01

    In ecological systems, it is necessary to describe the trophic niches of species and their segregation or overlap to understand the distribution of species in the community. In oceanic systems, the community structure of top predators such as seabird communities has been well documented with many studies in several biogeographical areas. But for coastal habitats, very few investigations on the trophic structure have been carried out in avian communities. In this study, the trophic resource partitioning was investigated on eight of the most abundant species of a shorebird community on the central Atlantic coast of France. Our work comprised a comprehensive sample of birds with different ecomorphogical patterns and data on their main prey to encompass potential sources of overlap and segregation in this community. We examined the stable carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) isotopic composition of blood to investigate the trophic structure (1) on a temporal scale by comparing migration and wintering periods; (2) on a spatial scale through inter-site comparisons; and (3) on the community level within groups of phylogenetically related species. Diets appeared different in several cases between periods, between sites and between juveniles and adults for the same sites. A clear trophic partitioning was established with four functional groups of predators in winter inside the community. The Grey Plover, the Bar-tailed Godwit, the Curlew and a majority of the dunlins were worm-eaters mainly feeding on Nereis diversicolor or Nephtys hombergii. Two species were predominantly deposit-suspensivorous mollusc-eaters, including the Red Knot and the Black-tailed Godwit feeding mainly on Macoma balthica. The Oystercatcher fed mainly on suspensivorous molluscs like Cerastodrema edule and two species including the Redshank and some dunlins adopted opportunistic behaviours feeding on mudflat and/or in marshes.

  17. Photo-regulation in microphytobenthos from intertidal mudflats and non-tidal coastal shallows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pniewski, Filip F.; Biskup, Paulina; Bubak, Iwona; Richard, Pierre; Lata?a, Adam; Blanchard, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated seasonal changes in the photo-regulatory mechanisms of microphytobenthos found in intertidal mudflats (Aiguillon Bay, the Atlantic, France) and non-tidal sandy coastal shallows (Puck Bay, the Baltic, Poland) based on photosynthetic pigment characteristics and the estimates of photosynthetic parameters obtained through oxygen evolution measurements. The intertidal communities consisted of motile diatom species typical of epipelon. The non-tidal microphytobenthos was composed of epipsammic species mostly belonging to four taxonomic groups chiefly contributing to the assemblage biomass, namely cyanobacteria, euglenophytes, green algae and diatoms (comprising mainly small-sized species). The epipelon was low light acclimated as shown by the lower values of photoprotective/photosynthetic (PPC/PSC) carotenoids and diatoxanthin/diadinoxanthin (Dt/Dd) ratios. In contrast, the epipsammon exhibited features of high light acclimation (high PPC/PSC and Dt/Dd ratios). In both microphytobenthos types, the photosynthetic capacity (Pm) showed the same seasonal variation pattern and there were no statistically significant differences between the investigated sites in corresponding seasons (P > 0.05). In both assemblage types, the photosynthetic efficiency at limiting irradiance (?) decreased over time. The epipelon had higher ? compared to the epipsammon. Seasonal changes of the photoacclimation index (Ek) estimated for the epipelic communities reflected variations observed in Pm, whereas in the epipsammon an increasing trend in Ek values was observed. Ek was always higher for the epipsammon when comparing analogous seasons, which further corroborated low and high light acclimation in the epipelic and epipsammic communities, respectively. The presence of the photoinhibition parameter (?) in the epipelon and the lack of it in the epipsammon suggested that the latter was resistant to high irradiance and the physiological mechanisms were sufficient to protect it from photoinhibition. In the epipelon, a downturn in photosynthetic rates showed that it was susceptible to high light intensities, suggesting that physiological photoprotective mechanisms must be supported by behavioural photoacclimation in order to avoid damaging light influence.

  18. Interactions between waves, sediment, and turbulence on a shallow estuarine mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVean, Lissa J.; Lacy, Jessica R.

    2014-03-01

    Measurements were collected on a shallow estuarine mudflat in northern San Francisco Bay to examine the physical processes controlling waves, turbulence, sediment resuspension, and their interactions. Tides alone forced weak to moderate currents of 10-30 cm s-1 in depths of 0-3 m, and maintained a background suspension of 30-50 mg L-1 of fine sediment. In the presence of wind waves, bottom orbital velocities spanned 20-30 cm s-1, suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC) at 15 and 30 cm above the bed (cmab) increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude, and vertical gradients in SSC were strong enough to produce turbulence-limiting stratification, with gradient Richardson numbers exceeding 0.25. Simultaneously, turbulent stresses (decomposed from wave motions) increased by an order of magnitude. The apparent contradiction of energetic turbulence in the presence of strong stratification was reconciled by considering the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget: in general, dissipation and buoyancy flux were balanced by local shear production, and each of these terms increased during wave events. The classic wave-current boundary layer model represented the observations qualitatively, but not quantitatively since the velocity profile could not be approximated as logarithmic. Rather, the mean shear was elevated by the Stokes drift return flow and wind-generated surface stress, which diffused sediment upward and limited stratification. Our findings highlight a pathway for waves to supply energy to both the production and destruction of turbulence, and demonstrate that in such shallow depths, TKE and SSC can be elevated over more of the water column than predicted by traditional models.

  19. LAKE WORTH INLET (PALM BEACH HARBOR) NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    LAKE WORTH INLET (PALM BEACH HARBOR) NAVIGATION IMPROVEMENT PROJECT PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA 24 January 2014 ABSTRACT: Lake Worth Inlet connects Palm Beach Harbor to the Atlantic Ocean. The port is located in Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida. The Port of Palm Beach is the fourth busiest

  20. Fatty acid profiles indicate the habitat of mud snails Hydrobia ulvae within the same estuary: Mudflats vs. seagrass meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Helena; Lopes da Silva, Teresa; Reis, Alberto; Queiroga, Henrique; Serôdio, João; Calado, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    Mud snails Hydrobia ulvae occupy different habitats in complex estuarine ecosystems. In order to determine if fatty acid profiles displayed by mud snails can be used to identify the habitat that they occupy within the same estuary, fatty acids of H. ulvae from one mudflat and one seagrass meadow in the Ria de Aveiro (Portugal) were analyzed and compared to those displayed by microphytobenthos (MPB), the green leaves (epiphyte-free) of Zostera noltii, as well as those exhibited by the epiphytic community colonizing this seagrass. MPB and epiphytic diatom-dominated samples displayed characteristic fatty acids, such as 16:1 n-7 and 20:5 n-3, while 18:2 n-6 and 18:3 n-3 were the dominant fatty acids in the green leaves of Z. noltii. Significant differences between the fatty acid profiles of H. ulvae specimens sampled in the mudflat and the seagrass meadow could be identified, with those from the mudflat displaying higher levels of fatty acids known to be characteristic of MPB. This result points towards the well known existence of grazing activity on MPB by mud snails. The fatty acid profiles displayed by H. ulvae inhabiting the seagrass meadows show no evidence of direct bioaccumulation of the two most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids of Z. noltii (18:2 n-6 and 18:3 n-3) in the mud snails, which probably indicates that either these compounds can be metabolized to produce energy, used as precursors for the synthesis of essential fatty acids, or that the snails do not consume seagrass leaves at all. Moreover, the fatty acid profiles of mud snails inhabiting the seagrass meadows revealed the existence of substantial inputs from microalgae, suggesting that the epiphytic community colonizing the leaves of Z. noltii displays an important role on the diet of these organisms. This assumption is supported by the high levels of 20:5 n-3 and 22:6 n-3 recorded in mud snails sampled from seagrass meadows. In conclusion, fatty acid analyses of H. ulvae can be successfully used to identify the habitat occupied by these organisms within the same estuary (e.g. mudflats and seagrass meadows) and reveal the existence of contrasting dietary regimes.

  1. Microorganism dynamics during a rising tide: Disentangling effects of resuspension and mixing with offshore waters above an intertidal mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guizien, Katell; Dupuy, Christine; Ory, Pascaline; Montanié, Hélène; Hartmann, Hans; Chatelain, Mathieu; Karpytchev, Mikhaïl

    2014-01-01

    Resuspension of microphytobenthic biomass that builds up during low tide has been acknowledged as a major driver of the highly productive food web of intertidal mudflats. Yet, little is known about the contribution to pelagic food web of the resuspension of other microorganisms such as viruses, picoeukaryotes, cyanobacteria, bacteria, nanoflagellates, and ciliates, living in biofilms associated with microphytobenthos and surficial sediment. In the present study, a novel approach that involves simultaneous Lagrangian and Eulerian surveys enabled to disentangle the effects of resuspension and mixing with offshore waters on the dynamics of water column microorganisms during a rising tide in the presence of waves. Temporal changes in the concentration of microorganisms present in the water column were recorded along a 3 km cross-shore transect and at a fixed subtidal location. In both surveys, physical and biological processes were separated by comparing the time-evolution of sedimentary particles and microorganism concentrations. During a rising tide, sediment erosion under wave action occurred over the lower and upper parts of the mudflat, where erodibility was highest. Although erosion was expected to enrich the water column with the most abundant benthic microorganisms, such as diatoms, bacteria and viruses, enrichment was only observed for nanoflagellates and ciliates. Grazing probably overwhelmed erosion transfer for diatoms and bacteria, while adsorption on clayed particles may have masked the expected water column enrichment in free viruses due to resuspension. Ciliate enrichment could not be attributed to resuspension as those organisms were absent from the sediment. Wave agitation during the water flow on the mudflat likely dispersed gregarious ciliates over the entire water column. During the rising tide, offshore waters imported more autotrophic, mainly cyanobacteria genus Synechococcus sp. than heterotrophic microorganisms, but this import was also heavily grazed. Finally, the water column became a less heterotrophic structure in the subtidal part of the semi-enclosed bay, where mixing with offshore waters occurs (50% decrease), compared to the intertidal mudflat, when resuspension occurs. The present study suggests that this differential evolution resulted predominantly from dilution with offshore waters less rich in heterotrophic microorganisms. Indeed, any input of microorganisms accompanying physical transfers due to bed erosion or offshore water mixing was immediately buffered, probably to the benefit of grazers.

  2. 1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Eric J.

    KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH PA SRM FND HRL IPCDC LIB MLSC PP/CMREC WHSE RH1 RH4 RH5 RH3 RH2 SH MMC VEC SLH BEACH DRIVE 1 = Apprx.500 Steps Beach Striders Campus Tour · 2.35 miles · apprx.4700 steps #12;KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER

  3. Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660, at approximately 8 a.m., Newport Beach Police Detectives served a search warrant in the 1000 block of Valencia for 496 PC ­ Possession of Stolen Property. They were booked at the Newport Beach Police Jail and were

  4. NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California ACRES: 28.3 acres NON-FEDERAL SPONSORS: City of Long Beach Friends of Colorado Lagoon PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Colorado Lagoon is a 28 of visitors from communities within and surrounding the City of Long Beach, California. There are over 700

  5. Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset.

    E-print Network

    Bardsley, John

    Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset. I'm starting to get used Point trailhead, we turned off on a steep road down to Murdering Beach. Apparently a murder did occur here at some point, giving the beach its awful name. Or perhaps it was named by the locals to keep

  6. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

  7. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

  8. West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina 17 April 2008 Abstract: Topsail Beach lies along the southwestern end of Topsail Island, a sandy barrier island about two miles are estimated at $9,200,00 The proposed project for coastal storm damage reduction is a traditional beach

  9. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

  10. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

  11. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

  12. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Environment Report RL 02/08 Customer: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory to Seamill 12 4.2.1 Beach description 12 4.2.2 Activities 13 4.3 Seamill Lane to Coulderton and Nethertown 15

  13. Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy,

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy, 2009 2010 Cefas contract report C3635 Environment Report RL 01/10 #12;1 Environment Report RL 01/10 Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach. Survey area 9 Map 1 The Cumbrian coast beach occupancy survey area 10 3.1 General observations 11 3

  14. City of Manhattan Beach Community Development

    E-print Network

    City of Manhattan Beach Community Development Phone: (310) 802-5500 FAX: (310) 802-5501 TDD: (310 Sacramento, Ca. 95814 Attention: Joe Loyer j mloycr@cncrgy.stalc.ca.us Subject: City of Manhattan Beach the City of Manhattan Beach adoption of our local more stringent energy efficiency standards. In accordance

  15. (dm-)Beach Creation by Breaking Waves

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    (dm-)Beach Creation by Breaking Waves Onno Bokhove Walsh Cottage GFD, July 2010 Thanks: Wout Zweers curiosity ... ·! ... playing on beach, Hele-Shaw cell (Kuipers) ... #12;Theatre of waves and sand #12 through a dynamic beach and wave ... #12;Intermezzo on design #12;#12;Laboratory Set-up Specs Quasi-3D; 2D

  16. Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach

    E-print Network

    Bardsley, John

    Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach One of the things that I had hoped to be able to do while I enjoy swimming at the beach; the ocean is cold this far south, even in summer. Over the past couple to go out for an hour before school. And we also have two body boards, so going to the beach is now

  17. A Study of Sandy Beach Zonation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Steve K.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the study of sandy beach zonations as a seashore activity for either high school or lower-level college courses in biology, ecology, or marine biology. Students first draw a profile of a beach scene and then collect specimens from the zones of the shore. In a laboratory, students identify their specimens and relate them to the beach

  18. Lake Worth Inlet Palm Beach Harbor

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;1 Lake Worth Inlet Palm Beach Harbor Palm Beach County, Florida Integrated Feasibility Report, was engaged to conduct the IEPR of the Lake Worth Inlet, Palm Beach Harbor Integrated Feasibility Report and recent rates was added to Section 4.2.3. Clarification on the grouping of asphalt, fuel oil

  19. The Belgian sandy beach ecosystem: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeroen Speybroeck; Dries Bonte; Wouter Courtens; Tom Gheskiere; Patrick Grootaert; Jean-Pierre Maelfait; Sam Provoost; Koen Sabbe; Eric W. M. Stienen; Vera Van Lancker; Wouter Van Landuyt; Magda Vincx; Steven Degraer

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the available knowledge on sedimentology, hydrodynamics and five major ecosystem components (microphytobenthos, vascular plants, terrestrial arthropods, zoobenthos, and avifauna) of Belgian sandy beaches. It covers the area from the foredunes to the lower foreshore, takes an ecosystem approach to beaches of this specific geographic area. Morphodynamically, Bel- gian beaches are (ultra-)dissipative, macrotidal, and wide. Characteristic grain sizes

  20. Wave reflection on natural beaches: an equilibrium beach profile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabeu, A. M.; Medina, R.; Vidal, C.

    2003-07-01

    Waves are the most energetic phenomena that control beach morphology. The beach profile mostly depends on the way in which the incident wave energy distributes along the profile, dissipation and reflection being the main mechanisms. While the dissipation phenomena have been widely studied, the effect of wave reflection on the beach profile has attracted much less attention and is still poorly known. In order to evaluate its importance, a new equilibrium profile model that includes reflection is proposed. The model is based on a two-section profile scheme, largely corresponding to the surf and shoaling-dominated zones of the beach profile. The obtained formulations are represented by the expression of two terms. One of the terms accounts for the dissipation effect and coincides with the Dean profile. The other term integrates the reflection process. The model and its coefficients have been calibrated using measured profiles along the Spanish coast. The validation shows a significant improvement of the fitting parameters with respect to the most popular equilibrium profiles model. Moreover, additional empirical expressions that relate morphology and hydrodynamic in the equilibrium profile model are also presented in this study as a novel contribution to this topic.

  1. Freezeup Processes on Arctic Beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. SHORT; J. R. l J. WISEMAN

    Observations made along the northern Alaskan coast during 1972 served to indicate the processes by which arctic winter beach features are formed. In sub-zero (centigrade) temperatures ice forms on the surface of brackish lagoonal and estuarine waters, and is often moved offshore by wind-generated and tidal currents. When waves, wind, and storm surges coincide with the presence of ice in

  2. Beach lamination: Nature and origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, H.E.

    1969-01-01

    A distinctive two-fold sedimentation unit characterizes lamination in the upper swash zone of beaches. Within the unit a fine and/or a heavy mineral rich layer at the base grades upward into a coarser and/or a heavy mineral poor layer at the top. This distinctive type of lamination results from grain segregation within bed flow during wave backwash. ?? 1969.

  3. Inside the "Long Beach Way"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts…

  4. A Universal Nutrient Application Strategy For The Bioremediation Of Oil-Polluted Beaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biostimulation by nutrient application is a viable technology for restoring oil-contaminated beaches. Maximizing the nutrient residence time is key for achieving a rapid cost-effective cleanup. We considered the nutrient injection strategy through a perforated pipe at the high ti...

  5. Long-term persistence of oil from the Exxon Valdez spill in two-layer beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2010-02-01

    Oil spilled from the tanker Exxon Valdez in 1989 (refs 1, 2) persists in the subsurface of gravel beaches in Prince William Sound, Alaska. The contamination includes considerable amounts of chemicals that are harmful to the local fauna. However, remediation of the beaches was stopped in 1992, because it was assumed that the disappearance rate of oil was large enough to ensure a complete removal of oil within a few years. Here we present field data and numerical simulations of a two-layered beach with a small freshwater recharge in the contaminated area, where a high-permeability upper layer is underlain by a low-permeability lower layer. We find that the upper layer temporarily stored the oil, while it slowly and continuously filled the lower layer wherever the water table dropped below the interface of the two layers, as a result of low freshwater recharge from the land. Once the oil entered the lower layer, it became entrapped by capillary forces and persisted there in nearly anoxic conditions that are a result of the tidal hydraulics in the two-layered beaches. We suggest that similar dynamics could operate on tidal gravel beaches around the world, which are particularly common in mid- and high-latitude regions, with implications for locating spilled oil and for its biological remediation.

  6. Morphodynamic monitoring of beach cusps at Massaguaçú Beach (SP), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, P. H.; Siegle, E.

    2013-05-01

    The study site is Massaguaçú beach in the Southeast of Brazil. It is a reflective beach with steep profile and narrow surf-zone. Tides are semi-diurnal and micro-tidal with a maximum range of 1.2 m. Wave climate varies from E-SE, in spring and summer, to S-SW, in winter and fall, the most energetic period. This work aims to monitor 2 cusps for 24 hours in order to collaborate with the comprehension of their formation in Massaguaçú beach. For that, a field experiment of 24 hours was carried out on July 26 and 27, 2012. It consisted of topographic surveys through the use of a DGPS covering a beach segment of about 100 m, sediment sampling and an ADCP deployed at the depth of about 8 m to collect wave information. Offshore wave data was obtained from a wave buoy from the Brazilian National Buoy Program (PNBOIA) located in Santos, at approximately 200 km from the study area. During the field work there were two blocks of cusps in the upper and medium parts of the beach, the lower one was steep from the first profile at 15:10 up to 19:10. At 20:10, cusps started to appear in the lower shoreface developing a distance between two cusp troughs of approximately 45 m with a vertical difference from the crest to trough of about 0.45 m. According to wave climate parameter, the average Tp was of 15.2 s and the average Hs was of 1.06 m. The Hs increased 0.2 m from 0.76 m at 17:30 to 0.99 m at 18:50, varying about 0.2 m up to the end of the experiment. There was discrete variation in the wave direction, where the mean wave direction was from SE. Massaguaçú is composed of medium to coarse sands with no variation along the field work. We could observe the formation of cusps in the lower shoreface, but no feature migration. Although limited in time, the experiment could provide some information in the rapid growth of these coastal features.

  7. Folly Beach Turtle Watch Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides nesting data for loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) using this South Carolina beach. Entries include: location, date discovered, number of eggs, expected and actual hatch dates, percent hatched, and photos. Data archives extend back to 1998. Site also includes information: on what you can do to help nesting turtles, strandings, impacts of beachfront construction on sea turtles, and a photo collection of turtle nesting.

  8. Quantifying Beach Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Hansen; P. L. Barnard

    2006-01-01

    Predicting beach response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent beach morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each beach system is unique and classical beach erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy beaches, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing

  9. MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN

    E-print Network

    MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although

  10. 77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ...Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard...a temporary safety zone on the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Virginia Beach, VA...vessel traffic movement on the Atlantic Ocean to protect mariners from the hazards...

  11. USING HYDROGRAPHIC DATA AND THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH MODEL TO TEST PREDICTIONS OF BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modeling study of 2006 Huntington Beach (Lake Erie) beach bacteria concentrations indicates multi-variable linear regression (MLR) can effectively estimate bacteria concentrations compared to the persistence model. Our use of the Virtual Beach (VB) model affirms that fact. VB i...

  12. NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS USING EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evidence shows that traditional persistence-based beach closure decision making is inadequate, beaches are closed when they could be open and kept open when they should be closed. Intense interest is now focused on efforts to nowcast beach conditions using surrogate variables, su...

  13. 78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ...Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY...during the Long Beach Regatta Powerboat Race scheduled for August 24-25, 2013. This...158 for the Battle on the Bay Powerboat Race. No comments or requests for public...

  14. 125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: MODIFIED RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6A of 11 (#3279) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  15. 126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: EXTENSION DETAILS Sheet 7 of 11 (#3280) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  16. BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BEACH ROAD SHOWING THE LAWN WITH KIAWE TREES BETWEEN THE ROAD AND THE BEACH. BEACH ROAD IS 14' WIDE. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Historic Housing, Along Worchester Avenue & Hope Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  17. 110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER APPROACH TO MID-SECTION Sheet 1 of 9 (#3252) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  18. 129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    129. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DIAGRAM. Sheet lO of 11 (#3283) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  19. 123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: REPAIR DETAILS Sheet 5 of 11 (#3277) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  20. 127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    127. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: FRAMING DETAILS Sheet 8 of 11 (#3281) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  1. 10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING (LEFT-RIGHT) CAPTAIN'S GALLEY'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  2. 104. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, LOOKING SOUTH. BANDSHELL IS AT RIGHT Photograph #1574-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  3. 7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING EAST FROM BEACH; SHOWING 27TH BENT LANDWARD TO MAXWELL'S RESTAURANT, NEPTUNE'S GALLEY (RIGHT OF CENTER) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  4. 8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GROUND VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM BEACH; SHOWING 17TH BENT TO END; NEPTUNE'S GALLEY TO END OF PIER - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  5. 120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 2 of 11 (#3274) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  6. 130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    130. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LIGHTING DETAILS. Sheet 11 of 11 (#3284) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  7. 122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXTENSION TO PIER Sheet 4 of 11 (#3276) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  8. 121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: LAYOUT OF EXISTING PIER Sheet 3 of 11 (#3275) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  9. 128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    128. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: BOAT LANDING DETAILS Sheet 9 of 11 (#3282) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  10. 45. VIEW OF STAIRWAY UP FROM BEACH TO PIER APPROACH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. VIEW OF STAIRWAY UP FROM BEACH TO PIER APPROACH, NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  11. 124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT, HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: RAMP DETAILS Sheet 6 of 11 (#3278) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  12. 111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. PLAN AND ELEVATION OF HUNTINGTON BEACH MUNICIPAL PIER: PIER MID-SECTION TO END Sheet 2 of 9 (#3253) - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  13. 75 FR 24997 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ...LLC'' to ``NextEra Energy Point Beach, LLC.'' The proposed...Environmental Statement for Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...of Nuclear Plants [regarding Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...III-1, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of...

  14. 75 FR 16201 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ...NRC-2010-0123] FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...NRC) to M. S. Fertel (Nuclear Energy Institute) dated June...

  15. Occurrence and origin of Escherichia coli in water and sediments at two public swimming beaches at Lake of the Ozarks State Park, Camden County, Missouri, 2011-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jordan L.; Schumacher, John G.; Burken, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    In the past several years, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources has closed two popular public beaches, Grand Glaize Beach and Public Beach 1, at Lake of the Ozarks State Park in Osage Beach, Missouri when monitoring results exceeded the established Escherichia coli (E. coli) standard. As a result of the beach closures, the U.S. Geological Survey and Missouri University of Science and Technology, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, led an investigation into the occurrence and origins of E. coli at Grand Glaize Beach and Public Beach 1. The study included the collection of more than 1,300 water, sediment, and fecal source samples between August 2011 and February 2013 from the two beaches and vicinity. Spatial and temporal patterns of E. coli concentrations in water and sediments combined with measurements of environmental variables, beach-use patterns, and Missouri Department of Natural Resources water-tracing results were used to identify possible sources of E. coli contamination at the two beaches and to corroborate microbial source tracking (MST) sampling efforts. Results from a 2011 reconnaissance sampling indicate that water samples from Grand Glaize Beach cove contained significantly larger E. coli concentrations than adjacent coves and were largest at sites at the upper end of Grand Glaize Beach cove, indicating a probable local source of E. coli contamination within the upper end of the cove. Results from an intensive sampling effort during 2012 indicated that E. coli concentrations in water samples at Grand Glaize Beach cove were significantly larger in ankle-deep water than waist-deep water, trended downward during the recreational season, significantly increased with an increase in the total number of bathers at the beach, and were largest during the middle of the day. Concentrations of E. coli in nearshore sediment (sediment near the shoreline) at Grand Glaize Beach were significantly larger in foreshore samples (samples collected above the shoreline) than in samples collected in ankle-deep water below the shoreline, significantly larger in the left and middle areas of the beach than the right area, and substantially larger than similar studies at E. coli- contaminated beaches on Lake Erie in Ohio. Concentrations of E. coli in the water column also were significantly larger after resuspension of sediments. Results of MST indicate a predominance of waterfowl-associated markers in nearshore sediments at Grand Glaize Beach consistent with frequent observations of goose and vulture fecal matter in sediment, especially on the left and middle areas of the beach. The combination of spatial and temporal sampling and MST indicate that an important source of E. coli contamination at Grand Glaize Beach during 2012 was E. coli released into the water column by bathers resuspending E. coli-contaminated sediments, especially during high-use days early in the recreational season.

  16. Microbiological water quality in urban coastal beaches: the influence of water dynamics and optimization of the sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Bordalo, Adriano A

    2003-07-01

    In the summer 2001, the microbiological water quality of two contiguous urban coastal beaches (Porto, Portugal) was surveyed for 18 consecutive days. The sampling strategy consisted in sampling surface water in early morning, noon and afternoon. A total of 184 samples were processed at Pastoras beach, a confined area between two jetties, and Ourigo Beach more open to the ocean. At the first beach site, all samples exceeded fecal contamination above guide values (GV) and 82.6% above mandatory values (MV) set out in the EU Bathing Water Directive; whereas at Pastoras Beach, the figures were 93.5% for GV and 26.1% for MV, showing a potential health risk. The periodicity of fecal indicators in raw sewage, the tidal status and wind conditions dramatically influenced the water quality. The quality decreased in the morning regardless of tide conditions, but improved subsequently during the day, particularly during high tide and under the influence of afternoon NW winds. These dynamics are incompatible with the fortnight routine sampling according to the recommendations of the EU Bathing Water Directive, and the strategy should be revised on a beach-to-beach basis, having in mind the profile for the coastal zone. PMID:14509711

  17. "Beach-Ball" Robotic Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, David E.

    1995-01-01

    Robotic vehicles resembling large beach balls proposed for carrying scientific instruments. Conceived for use in exploring planet Mars, also useful on Earth to carry meteorological or pollution-monitoring equipment to remote locations across rough terrain and even across water. Each vehicle features approximately spherical balloonlike outer shell inflated to suitable pressure. Three diametral tethers approximately perpendicular to each other attached to shell. Control box moves itself along tethers to shift center of gravity, causing vehicle to roll. Alternatively, instead of shell, structure of approximately spherical outline made of twisted rods; of course, not suitable for traversing water or thick vegetation.

  18. Rip Channel Morphodynamics at Pensacola Beach, Florida

    E-print Network

    Labude, Daniel

    2012-08-15

    80% of all lifeguard related rescues along the beaches of northwest Florida are believed to be related to rip currents. A rip current is the strong flow of water, seaward extending from the beach to the breaker line. It has previously been shown...

  19. PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

  20. Long Beach's Pivotal Turn around RTI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Judy

    2008-01-01

    This article briefly describes the tiered approach to intervention adopted by the Long Beach Unified School District. Long Beach Unified School District is the state's third largest urban school district with more than 90,000 students, 84 percent of whom are minority and 68 percent of whom qualify for free and reduced price lunch, and where over…

  1. Marsh, mudflat and tidal creek assessment Cumberland Island National Seashore. Kings Bay Environmental Monitoring Program cumberland island national seashore. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    The project was designed to determine whether backbarrier dredging for the Kings Bay Naval Base is affecting marsh habitat sustainability on Cumberland Island. Research was predicated on the hypothesis that if the operation is indeed exerting an influence on Cumberland Island, it will most likely be first perceived in the effect it has on the rates of supply and delivery of sediments to the marshes and mudflats. The authors located three comparable sites, which experience a different level of exposure to the effects of dredging. Second, we initiated a time-series of marsh/mudflat sedimentation measurements, which are expected to be continued in future years. Finally, we compared six different methods for monitoring sedimentation, all of which are currently in practice.

  2. Regime shift in sandy beach microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.

    PubMed

    Engel, Annette Summers; Gupta, Axita A

    2014-01-01

    Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales). Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria) and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales). These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment. Future research will need to assess the persistence and impact of the newly formed microbial communities to the overall sandy beach ecosystems. PMID:25036744

  3. Environmental geophysics at Beach Point, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, L.D.; Daudt, C.R.; Thompson, M.D.; Miller, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reclamation Engineering and Geosciences Section; Mandell, W.A. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Wrobel, J. [Dept. of Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Geophysical studies at Beach Point Peninsula, in the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, provide diagnostic signatures of the hydrogeologic framework and possible contaminant pathways. These studies permit construction of the most reasonable scenario linking dense, nonaqueous-phase liquid contaminants introduced at the surface with their pathway through the surficial aquifer. Subsurface geology and contaminant presence were identified by drilling, outcrop mapping, and groundwater sampling and analyses. Suspected sources of near-surface contaminants were defined by magnetic and conductivity measurements. Negative conductivity anomalies may be associated with unlined trenches. Positive magnetic and conductivity anomalies outline suspected tanks and pipes. The anomalies of greatest concern are those spatially associated with a concrete slab that formerly supported a mobile clothing impregnating plant. Resistivity and conductivity profiling and depth soundings were used to identify an electrical anomaly extending through the surficial aquifer to the basal pleistocene unconformity, which was mapped by using seismic reflection methods. The anomaly may be representative of a contaminant plume connected to surficial sources. Major activities in the area included liquid rocket fuel tests, rocket fuel fire suppression tests, pyrotechnic material and smoke generator tests, and the use of solvents at a mobile clothing impregnating plant.

  4. Effects of flooding and temperature on dormancy break in seeds of the summer annual mudflat species Ammannia coccinea and Rotala ramosior (Lythraceae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carol C. Baskin; Jerry M. Baskin; Edward W. Chester

    2002-01-01

    Studies were undertaken on seeds of the summer annual mudflat species Ammannia coccinea and Rotala ramosior to determine the (1) effects of flooding during late autumn to late spring on dormancy break and (2) optimum temperature\\u000a for dormancy break. At maturity in autumn, about 65–100% of the seeds of these species were dormant. Seeds of both species\\u000a buried under flooded

  5. Intratidal erosion and deposition rates inferred from field observations of hydrodynamic and sedimentary processes: A case study of a mudflat-saltmarsh transition at the Yangtze delta front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, B. W.; Yang, S. L.; Wang, Y. P.; Yu, Q.; Li, M. L.

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of erosional and depositional processes in intertidal wetland environments is of great importance to coastal geomorphologists, ecologists, and engineers. To evaluate the morphodynamic response of intertidal mudflats and saltmarshes to tidal inundation, we measured water depth, wave activity, current velocity profiles, suspended sediment concentration (SSC), and sediment composition at a dynamic mudflat-saltmarsh transition on eastern Chongming Island, at the Yangtze delta front, China. Based on these data, we calculated bed shear stresses generated by the combined current-wave action (?cw), and the critical shear stress required to erode the surface sediments (?ce), and so were able to calculate the erosional (E) and depositional (D) fluxes. The erodibility parameter (ME) and settling velocity (ws) used in the calculations of E and D were calibrated using daily measurements of bed-level change. Our results showed that the mudflat experienced alternating phases of net erosion and net deposition during tidal inundation. The burst-based changes in bed level ranged from -0.92 (net erosion) to +0.43 mm/10 min, and the cumulative bed-level changes over an entire tidal cycle ranged from approximately 0 to -5.4 mm (net erosion), with an average change of -3.4 mm/tide (net erosion) over five consecutive spring tides. In contrast, only net deposition was recorded on the saltmarsh during our observations. The burst-based changes in bed level ranged from around 0 to +0.56 mm/10 min, and the cumulative changes over a tidal cycle ranged from around 0 to +5 mm, with an average of +2.6 mm/tide for the five consecutive spring tides. We conclude that net erosion and net deposition during tidal cycles alternate on the mudflat, but that only net deposition occurs on the saltmarsh.

  6. How do how internal and external processes affect the behaviors of coupled marsh mudflat systems; infill, stabilize, retreat, or drown?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, J. A.; Mariotti, G.; Wiberg, P.; Fagherazzi, S.; McGlathery, K.

    2013-12-01

    Intertidal coastal environments are prone to changes induced by sea level rise, increases in storminess, and anthropogenic disturbances. It is unclear how changes in external drivers may affect the dynamics of low energy coastal environments because their response is non-linear, and characterized by many thresholds and discontinuities. As such, process-based modeling of the ecogeomorphic processes underlying the dynamics of these ecosystems is useful, not only to predict their change through time, but also to generate new hypotheses and research questions. Here, a three-point dynamic model was developed to investigate how internal and external processes affect the behavior of coupled marsh mudflat systems. The model directly incorporates ecogeomorphological feedbacks between wind waves, salt marsh vegetation, allochthonous sediment loading, tidal flat vegetation and sea level rise. The model was applied to examine potential trajectories of salt marshes on the Eastern seaboard of the United States, including those in the Plum Island Ecosystems (PIE), Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR) and Georgia Coastal Ecosystems (GCE) long term ecological research (LTER) sites. While these sites are undergoing similar rates of relative sea level rise (RSLR), they have distinct differences in site specific environmental drivers including tides, wind waves, allochthonous sediment supply and the presence or absence of seagrass. These differences lead to the emergence of altered behaviors in the coupled salt marsh-tidal flat system. For marsh systems without seagrass or significant riverine sediment supply, conditions similar to those at PIE, results indicated that horizontal and vertical marsh evolution respond in opposing ways to wave induced processes. Marsh horizontal retreat is triggered by large mudflats and strong winds, whereas small mudflats and weak winds reduce the sediment supply to the salt marsh, decreasing its capability to keep pace with sea level rise. Marsh expansion and an eventual lateral equilibrium are possible only with large allochthonous sediment supply. Once marshes expanded, marsh retreat can be prevented by a sediment supply smaller than the one that filled the basin. At the GCE, the Altamaha River allows for enhanced allochthonous supply directly to the salt marsh platform, reducing the importance of waves on the tidal flat. As a result, infilling or retreat become the prevalent behaviors. For the VCR, the presence of seagrass decreases near bed shear stresses and sediment flux to the salt marsh platform, however, seagrass also reduces the wave energy acting on the boundary of the marsh reducing boundary erosion. Results indicate that the reduction in wave power allows for seagrass to provide a strong stabilizing affect on the coupled salt marsh tidal flat system, but as external sediment supply increases and light conditions decline the system reverts to that of a bare tidal flat. Across all systems and with current rates of sea level rise, retreat is a more likely marsh loss modality than drowning.

  7. A universal nutrient application strategy for the bioremediation of oil-polluted beaches.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Zhao, Qinghong; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2007-08-01

    Biostimulation by nutrient application is a viable technology for restoring oil-contaminated beaches. Maximizing the nutrient residence time is key for achieving a rapid cost-effective cleanup. We considered the nutrient injection strategy through a perforated pipe at the high tide line and we simulated numerically beach hydraulics, which allowed us to estimate the optimal injection flow rate of nutrient solution. Our results indicate that the optimal application is one that starts following the falling high tide and lasts for half tidal cycle. The saturated wet-front of the nutrient solution on the beach surface would move seaward with the same speed of the falling tide keeping a constant distance with the tide line. The numerical results were generalized to beaches of wide ranges of hydraulic and tidal properties using a novel dimensionless formulation for water flow and solute transport in porous media. Nomographs were presented to provide the flow rate based on four parameters: The beach slope and hydraulic conductivity, and tidal amplitude and period. PMID:17588615

  8. Policies and practices of beach monitoring in the Great Lakes, USA: a critical review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Beaches throughout the Great Lakes are monitored for fecal indicator bacteria (typically Escherichia coli) in order to protect the public from potential sewage contamination. Currently, there is no universal standard for sample collection and analysis or results interpretation. Monitoring policies are developed by individual beach management jurisdictions, and applications are highly variable across and within lakes, states, and provinces. Extensive research has demonstrated that sampling decisions for time, depth, number of replicates, frequency of sampling, and laboratory analysis all influence the results outcome, as well as calculations of the mean and interpretation of the results in policy decisions. Additional shortcomings to current monitoring approaches include appropriateness and reliability of currently used indicator bacteria and the overall goal of these monitoring programs. Current research is attempting to circumvent these complex issues by developing new tools and methods for beach monitoring. In this review, we highlight the variety of sampling routines used across the Great Lakes and the extensive body of research that challenges comparisons among beaches. We also assess the future of Great Lakes monitoring and the advantages and disadvantages of establishing standards that are evenly applied across all beaches.

  9. Distribution and sources of surfzone bacteria at Huntington Beach before and after disinfection on an ocean outfall - A frequency-domain analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, M.A.; Xu, J.P.; Robertson, G.L.; Rosenfeld, L.K.

    2006-01-01

    Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) were measured approximately 5 days a week in ankle-depth water at 19 surfzone stations along Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, California, from 1998 to the end of 2003. These sampling periods span the time before and after treated sewage effluent, discharged into the coastal ocean from the local outfall, was disinfected. Bacterial samples were also taken in the vicinity of the outfall during the pre- and post-disinfection periods. Our analysis of the results from both data sets suggest that land-based sources, rather than the local outfall, were the source of the FIB responsible for the frequent closures and postings of local beaches in the summers of 2001 and 2002. Because the annual cycle is the dominant frequency in the fecal and total coliform data sets at most sampling stations, we infer that sources associated with local runoff were responsible for the majority of coliform contamination along wide stretches of the beach. The dominant fortnightly cycle in enterococci at many surfzone sampling stations suggests that the source for these relatively frequent bacteria contamination events in summer is related to the wetting and draining of the land due to the large tidal excursions found during spring tides. Along the most frequently closed section of the beach at stations 3N-15N, the fortnightly cycle is dominant in all FIBs. The strikingly different spatial and spectral patterns found in coliform and in enterococci suggest the presence of different sources, at least for large sections of beach. The presence of a relatively large enterococci fortnightly cycle along the beaches near Newport Harbor indicates that contamination sources similar to those found off Huntington Beach are present, though not at high enough levels to close the Newport beaches. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Basic Information on the Beach Standards, Monitoring, & Notification Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The U.S. EPA BEACH Program website describes how the public's health and environmental quality of our nation's beaches can be improved. It focuses on strengthening beach standards and testing, providing faster laboratory test methods, predicting pollution, investing in health and methods research, and informing the public about the environmental quality of our beaches.

  11. Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain By EMILY ROACH

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain stability By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:47 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 Posted: 10:26 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Palm Beach. The center had committed six years earlier to moving to West Palm Beach's city hall complex on Clematis

  12. Quantification of in situ polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation at a petroleum contaminated site

    E-print Network

    Conti, Enzo Mario

    1994-01-01

    hydrocarbons (PAHS) at a Bunker C contaminated soil. The effectiveness of EPA Seal Beach treatment with a consortium of biosurfactant bacteria in relation of a control is compared. using an EPA Seal Beach consortium of biosurfactant organisms in relation to PAH...

  13. Beach sands from Baja California Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza-Edwards, Arturo; Bocanegra-García, Gerardo; Rosales-Hoz, Leticia; de Pablo Galán, Liberto

    1998-08-01

    Fifty beach locations were sampled in Baja California Peninsula, México, in order to characterize textural and compositional parameters. The western beach sands are mainly associated with a lower relief coastal plain and high energy of waves and currents with the beach sands of the eastern littoral zone. Finer, better sorted and low carbonate and rich quartz and feldspar contents are observed for the western beach sands when compared to the eastern beach sands. The mineralogical maturity and provenance index are greater for the western beach sands than for the eastern beach sands. These contrasts may be explained by differences on coastal plain relief and differences on hydrodynamic energy of waves and currents that are responsible for the rock fragment dilution by enrichment of more stable quartz debris. Finally, some distinctions were found for Na 2O-K 2O-CaO values. This is thought to be a result of the presence of some samples from the eastern coastline with higher values in CaO content, probably due to the presence of basaltic rocks.

  14. Spatio-temporal structure of the epipelic diatom assemblage from an intertidal mudflat in Marennes-Oléron Bay, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, A.-G.; Sylvestre, F.; Guarini, J.-M.; Richard, P.; Blanchard, G. F.

    2005-08-01

    Spatio-temporal changes in taxonomic composition and structure of an epipelic diatom assemblage from an intertidal mudflat on the French Atlantic coast was studied over an annual cycle along a cross-shore transect. The assemblage structure was described by estimating both relative abundance and contribution to biovolume of each species. Results showed that the assemblage was numerically dominated by small-sized species (mean relative abundance of 91%). Large species, however, significantly contributed to the total biovolume (mean contribution to biovolume of 49%). A factorial correspondence analysis indicated that the epipelic assemblage was relatively homogeneous along the cross-shore transect but emphasized the seasonal succession of diatom species. In relative abundance, the assemblage structure was characterized by the dominance of the small species Navicula phyllepta throughout the year with a seasonal succession of secondary species, including only one large diatom ( Gyrosigma peisonis). In biovolume, small ( N. phyllepta and Navicula gregaria) and large species ( Pleurosigma angulatum and G. peisonis) alternatively dominated the assemblage. Describing the epipelic assemblage using cell volume emphasized the contribution of large species and revealed that the assemblage contained two diatom fractions, characterized by different biological and physiological behaviours, which may alternatively represent a large proportion of the biomass.

  15. Tar loads on Omani beaches

    SciTech Connect

    Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T. (National Research Center, Cairo (Egypt))

    1991-11-01

    Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches.

  16. Morphodynamics of a mesotidal rocky beach: Palmeras beach, Gorgona Island National Natural Park, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, A. M.; Bernal, G. R.; Osorio, A. F.; Botero, V.

    2014-10-01

    The response of a rocky beach to different possible combinations of hydrodynamic conditions (tides, waves, oceanic currents) has been little studied. In this work, the morphodynamic response to different hydrodynamic forcing is evaluated from sedimentological and geomorphological analysis in seasonal and medium term (19 years) scale in Palmeras beach, located in the southwest of Gorgona Island National Natural Park (NNP), a mesotidal rocky island on the Colombian Pacific continental shelf. Palmeras is an important nesting area of two types of marine turtles, with no anthropogenic stress. In the last years, coastal erosion has reduced the beach width, restricting the safe areas for nesting and conservation of these species. Until now, the sinks, sources, reservoirs, rates, and paths of sediments were unknown, as well as their hydrodynamic forcing. The beach seasonal variability, from October 2010 to August 2012, was analyzed based on biweekly or monthly measurements of five beach profiles distributed every 200 m along the 1.2 km of beach length. The main paths for sediment transport were defined from the modeling of wave currents with the SMC model (Coastal Modeling System), as well as the oceanic currents, simulated for the dry and wet seasons of 2011 using the ELCOM model (Estuary and Lake COmputer Model). Extreme morphologic variations over a time span of 19 years were analyzed with the Hsu and Evans beach static equilibrium parabolic model, from one wave diffraction point which dominates the general beach plan shape. The beach lost 672 m3/m during the measuring period, and erosional processes were intensified during the wet season. The beach trends responded directly to a wave mean energy flux change, resulting in an increase of up to 14 m in the width northward and loss of sediments in the beach southward. This study showed that to obtain the integral morphodynamic behavior of a rocky beach it is necessary to combine information of hydrodynamic, sedimentology and geomorphology in different time scales.

  17. The Different Faces of San Francisco's Ocean Beach: Analyzing Sand Size and Beach Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, K.; Labit, R.; Lui, S.; Rodriquez, I.; Yi, C.; Yu, M.

    2004-12-01

    Ocean Beach is located along the western edge of San Francisco adjacent to the Pacific Ocean. Erosion along the southern part of the beach is threatening a nearby highway and water treatment plant. To better understand this beach and the processes that form it, our SF-ROCKS research group collected data from seven locations along its length. We used an auto-level surveying instrument to measure beach profiles and we collected sand samples that were measured using sieves and a sieve shaker. We plotted profiles and grain-size data using Excel and Surfer software. The sediment is mostly fine sand, and the means of all samples range between 0.19-0.26 mm. There may be little variation along the beach because only small sand grains have survived the long journey from their Sierra Nevada source. Profile shape does vary along the beach. The profile at the northern end is about three times wider than the profile at the southern end. The northern profile is flatter overall, but all profiles had a steep beach face in August, when the data were collected. The differences in beach profiles may be related to position relative to the offshore bar, which appears to provide sand to the northern part of the beach. Our group will collect more data in November to see what changes have occurred after the large-wave season has begun. We will use Surfer software to compare summer and fall profiles, to see where sediment has been added and where sediment has been removed. We will also compare our results to the data collected by Dr. Patrick Barnard and his research group at the U.S. Geological Survey, who are using an All-Terrain Vehicle to measure beach profiles and a camera to measure sediment size. We will use our analysis of beach variations to make recommendations for reducing beach erosion.

  18. Contamination University of MiaMi rosenstiel sChool

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    Water Contamination University of MiaMi rosenstiel sChool of Marine and atMospheriC sCienCe 4600 indicators and predictive models of water contamination. In 2004, the National Science Foundation (NSF, bay, and Great Lakes beaches across the country have been reported. Right next to the Rosenstiel

  19. Assessing the Impact of Urban Runoff in Recreational Beaches in South Carolina and Florida Using Culturable and QPCR Fecal Indicator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban/suburban runoff carries a variety of pollutants that often includes bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial water quality of recreational beaches impacted solely by urban runoff through the use of cu...

  20. Problems and experience of detecting particles on the beaches in the vicinity of the Dounreay nuclear site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Adsley; Mike Davies; George McCulloch; Alan Gerrard

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: There are several instances where radioactive material has been released from nuclear sites and is now found in particulate form in the environment. Contamination in this form was identified on the beaches close to the Dounreay Nuclear site in the 1990's and since that time NUKEM Limited has provided a

  1. Sea level anomalies exacerbate beach erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Rodriguez, Antonio B.; Fegley, Stephen R.; Luettich, Richard A.

    2014-07-01

    Sea level anomalies are intra-seasonal increases in water level forced by meteorological and oceanographic processes unrelated to storms. The effects of sea level anomalies on beach morphology are unknown but important to constrain because these events have been recognized over large stretches of continental margins. Here, we present beach erosion measurements along Onslow Beach, a barrier island on the U.S. East Coast, in response to a year with frequent sea level anomalies and no major storms. The anomalies enabled extensive erosion, which was similar and in most places greater than the erosion that occurred during a year with a hurricane. These results highlight the importance of sea level anomalies in facilitating coastal erosion and advocate for their inclusion in beach-erosion models and management plans. Sea level anomalies amplify the erosive effects of accelerated sea level rise and changes in storminess associated with global climate change.

  2. Mixed sediment beach processes: Kachemak Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggiero, P.; Adams, P.N.; Warrick, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mixed sediment beaches are morphologically distinct from and more complex than either sand or gravel only beaches. Three digital imaging techniques are employed to quantify surficial grain size and bedload sediment transport rates along the mixed sediment beaches of Kachemak Bay, Alaska. Applying digital imaging procedures originally developed for quickly and efficiently quantifying grain sizes of sand to coarse sediment classes gives promising results. Hundreds of grain size estimates lead to a quantitative characterization of the region's sediment at a significant reduction in cost and time as compared to traditional techniques. Both the sand and coarse fractions on this megatidal beach mobilize into self-organized bedforms that migrate alongshore with a seasonally reflecting the temporal pattern of the alongshore component of wave power. In contrast, the gravel bedforms also migrate in the cross-shore without significant seasonally suggesting that swash asymmetry is sufficient to mobilize the gravel even during low energy summer conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  3. What Is the Impact of Beach Debris?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jax, Dan

    2003-01-01

    Presents a marine education activity. Students construct a web of changes that shows potential problems caused by solid waste on beaches. They then determine whether each change is an increase or a decrease from previous conditions. (Author/SOE)

  4. Macrodebris and microplastics from beaches in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Laglbauer, Betty J L; Franco-Santos, Rita Melo; Andreu-Cazenave, Miguel; Brunelli, Lisa; Papadatou, Maria; Palatinus, Andreja; Grego, Mateja; Deprez, Tim

    2014-12-15

    The amount of marine debris in the environment is increasing worldwide, which results in an array of negative effects to biota. This study provides the first account of macrodebris on the beach and microplastics in the sediment (shoreline and infralittoral) in relation to tourism activities in Slovenia. The study assessed the quality and quantity of macrodebris and the quality, size and quantity of microplastics at six beaches, contrasting those under the influences of tourism and those that were not. Beach cleanliness was estimated using the Clean Coast Index. Tourism did not seem to have an effect on macrodebris or microplastic quantity at beaches. Over 64% of macrodebris was plastic, and microplastics were ubiquitous, which calls for classification of plastics as hazardous materials. Standard measures for marine debris assessment are needed, especially in the form of an all-encompassing debris index. Recommendations for future assessments are provided for the Adriatic region. PMID:25440193

  5. An holistic approach to beach erosion vulnerability assessment.

    PubMed

    Alexandrakis, George; Poulos, Serafim ?

    2014-01-01

    Erosion is a major threat for coasts worldwide, beaches in particular, which constitute one of the most valuable coastal landforms. Vulnerability assessments related to beach erosion may contribute to planning measures to counteract erosion by identifying, quantifying and ranking vulnerability. Herein, we present a new index, the Beach Vulnerability Index (BVI), which combines simplicity in calculations, easily obtainable data and low processing capacity. This approach provides results not only for different beaches, but also for different sectors of the same beach and enables the identification of the relative significance of the processes involved. It functions through the numerical approximation of indicators that correspond to the mechanisms related to the processes that control beach evolution, such as sediment availability, wave climate, beach morhodynamics and sea level change. The BVI is also intended to be used as a managerial tool for beach sustainability, including resilience to climate change impact on beach erosion. PMID:25123815

  6. Characterization of microbial community structure and population dynamics of tetrachloroethene-dechlorinating tidal mudflat communities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaejin; Lee, Tae Kwon; Löffler, Frank E; Park, Joonhong

    2011-07-01

    Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are common groundwater contaminants that also impact tidal flats, especially near urban and industrial areas. However, very little is known about dechlorinating microbial communities in tidal flats. Titanium pyrosequencing, 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and dechlorinator-targeted quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) characterized reductive dechlorinating activities and populations in tidal flat sediments collected from South Korea's central west coast near Kangwha. In microcosms established with surface sediments, PCE dechlorination to TCE began within 10 days and 100% of the initial amount of PCE was converted to TCE after 37 days. cis-1,2-Dichloroethene (cis-DCE) was observed as dechlorination end product in microcosms containing sediments collected from deeper zones (i.e., 35-40 cm below ground surface). Pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and 16S rRNA gene-targeted qPCR results revealed Desulfuromonas michiganensis-like populations predominanted in both TCE and cis-DCE producing microcosms. Other abundant groups included Desulfuromonas thiophila and Pelobacter acidigallici-like populations in the surface sediment microcosms, and Desulfovibrio dechloracetivorans and Fusibacter paucivorans-like populations in the deeper sediment microcosms. Dehalococcoides spp. populations were not detected in these sediments before and after incubation with PCE. The results suggest that tidal flats harbor novel, salt-tolerant dechlorinating populations and that titanium pyrosequencing provides more detailed insight into community structure dynamics of the dechlorinating microcosms than conventional 16S rRNA gene sequencing or fingerprinting methods. PMID:21053056

  7. Microbial interactions in marine water amended by eroded benthic biofilm: A case study from an intertidal mudflat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanié, Hélène; Ory, Pascaline; Orvain, Francis; Delmas, Daniel; Dupuy, Christine; Hartmann, Hans J.

    2014-09-01

    In shallow macrotidal ecosystems with large intertidal mudflats, the sediment-water coupling plays a crucial role in structuring the pelagic microbial food web functioning, since inorganic and organic matter and microbial components (viruses and microbes) of the microphytobenthic biofilm can be suspended toward the water column. Two experimental bioassays were conducted in March and July 2008 to investigate the importance of biofilm input for the pelagic microbial and viral loops. Pelagic inocula (< 0.6 ?- and < 10 ? filtrates) were diluted either with < 30 kDa-ultrafiltered seawater or with this ultrafiltrate enriched with the respective size-fractionated benthic biofilm or with < 30 kDa-benthic compounds (BC). The kinetics of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF), bacteria and viruses were assessed together with bacterial and viral genomic fingerprints, bacterial enzymatic activities and viral life strategies. The experimental design allowed us to evaluate the effect of BC modulated by those of benthic size-fractionated microorganisms (virus + bacteria, + HNF). BC presented (1) in March, a positive effect on viruses and bacteria weakened by pelagic HNF. Benthic microorganisms consolidated this negative effect and sustained the viral production together with a relatively diverse and uneven bacterial assemblage structure; (2) in July, no direct impact on viruses but a positive effect on bacteria modulated by HNF, which indirectly enhanced viral multiplication. Both effects were intensified by benthic microorganisms and bacterial assemblage structure became more even. HNF indirectly profited from BC more in March than in July. The microbial loop would be stimulated by biofilm during periods of high resources (March) and the viral loop during periods of depleted resources (July).

  8. The salt that wasn't there: Mudflat facies equivalents to halite of the Permian Rustler Formation, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, D.W.; Holt, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Four halite beds of the Permian Restler Formation in southeastern New Mexico thin dramatically over horst lateral distances to correlative classic (mudstone) beds. The mudstones have long been considered residues after post-burial dissolution (subrosion) of halite, assumed to have been deposited continuously across the area. Hydraulic properties of the Culebra Dolomite Member have often been related to Rustler subrosion. In cores and three shafts at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), however, these mudstones display flat bedding, graded bedding, cross-bedding, erosional contacts, and channels filled with intraformational conglomerates. Cutans indicate early stages of soil development during subaerial exposure. Smeared intraclasts developed locally as halite was removed syndepositionally during subaerial exposure. The authors interpret these beds as facies formed in salt-pan or hypersaline-lagoon, transitional, and mudflat environments. Halite is distributed approximately as it was deposited. Breccia in limited areas along one halite margin indicates post-burial dissolution, and these breccials are key to identifying areas of subrosion. A depositional model accounts for observed sedimentary features of Restler mudstones. Marked facies and thickness changes are consistent with influence by subsidence boundaries, as found in some modern continental evaporites. A subrosion model accounts for limited brecciated zones along (depositional)halite margins, but bedding observed in the mudstones would not survive 90% reduction in rock volume. Depositional margins for these halite beds will be useful in reconstructing detailed subsidence history of the Late Permian in the northern Delaware Basin, It also no longer is tenable to attribute large variations in Culebra transmissivity to Rustler subrosion.

  9. Setting conservation targets for sandy beach ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Linda; Nel, Ronel; Holness, Stephen; Sink, Kerry; Schoeman, David

    2014-10-01

    Representative and adequate reserve networks are key to conserving biodiversity. This begs the question, how much of which features need to be placed in protected areas? Setting specifically-derived conservation targets for most ecosystems is common practice; however, this has never been done for sandy beaches. The aims of this paper, therefore, are to propose a methodology for setting conservation targets for sandy beach ecosystems; and to pilot the proposed method using data describing biodiversity patterns and processes from microtidal beaches in South Africa. First, a classification scheme of valued features of beaches is constructed, including: biodiversity features; unique features; and important processes. Second, methodologies for setting targets for each feature under different data-availability scenarios are described. From this framework, targets are set for features characteristic of microtidal beaches in South Africa, as follows. 1) Targets for dune vegetation types were adopted from a previous assessment, and ranged 19-100%. 2) Targets for beach morphodynamic types (habitats) were set using species-area relationships (SARs). These SARs were derived from species richness data from 142 sampling events around the South African coast (extrapolated to total theoretical species richness estimates using previously-established species-accumulation curve relationships), plotted against the area of the beach (calculated from Google Earth imagery). The species-accumulation factor (z) was 0.22, suggesting a baseline habitat target of 27% is required to protect 75% of the species. This baseline target was modified by heuristic principles, based on habitat rarity and threat status, with final values ranging 27-40%. 3) Species targets were fixed at 20%, modified using heuristic principles based on endemism, threat status, and whether or not beaches play an important role in the species' life history, with targets ranging 20-100%. 4) Targets for processes and 5) important assemblages were set at 50%, following other studies. 6) Finally, a target for an outstanding feature (the Alexandria dunefield) was set at 80% because of its national, international and ecological importance. The greatest shortfall in the current target-setting process is in the lack of empirical models describing the key beach processes, from which robust ecological thresholds can be derived. As for many other studies, our results illustrate that the conservation target of 10% for coastal and marine systems proposed by the Convention on Biological Diversity is too low to conserve sandy beaches and their biota.

  10. Advanced Decision-Support for Coastal Beach Health: Virtual Beach 3.0

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtual Beach is a free decision-support system designed to help beach managers and researchers construct, evaluate, and operate site-specific statistical models that can predict levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) based on environmental conditions that are more readily mea...

  11. 75 FR 41926 - Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, New Smyrna Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ...Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport...its determination that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted by the City of New Smyrna Beach...FAA's determination on the noise exposure maps is July 8, 2010. FOR FURTHER...

  12. What's in a beach? Soil micromorphology of sediments from the Lower Paleolithic site of 'Ubeidiya, Israel.

    PubMed

    Mallol, Carolina

    2006-08-01

    A micromorphological study of archaeological sediments from the early Pleistocene site of 'Ubeidiya (Jordan Valley, Israel) was conducted to provide microenvironmental detail for the hominin occupation contexts and investigate site formation issues. Previous research shows that the hominin groups occupied the marshes and pebbly beaches at the shores of a lake during a regressive period, but given that some portions of the lithic and faunal assemblages are abraded and others fresh, there remains a question of whether the archaeological assemblages are in situ or reworked, and if reworked, by what mechanisms and from where. The rates of sedimentation within the regressive cycle, by which we can learn about the frequency and duration of exposed surfaces amenable for hominin occupation is also unknown. Finally, the artificial nature of some of the pebbly layers has been questioned. The micromorphological analysis yielded the identification of twelve microfacies; the majority of these represent fluvially derived floodplain soils or distal mudflow deposits, and a minor number are sediments of lacustrine origin: mudflats and shallow subaqueous sediments. These represent the natural habitats of the 'Ubeidiya hominins and might serve as a reference to similar contexts of other early hominin sites. The sedimentary model proposed here entails the rapid deposition of fluvially derived low-energy sediments at and around the shoreline, followed by prolonged periods of exposure, during which surfaces stabilized within a relatively wet, marshy environment. This interpretation suggests that the abraded portions of the archaeological assemblages are a result of prolonged surface exposure rather than high-energy transport from a distant source or to wave reworking at the shoreline, and supports the consideration of these assemblages as archaeological palimpsests, with locally reworked fresh and abraded elements. No micromorphological evidence supporting anthropogenic agency in the formation of the pebbly layers was found. The entire regressive cycle entailed unvarying climatic conditions with seasonal fluctuations and episodic lacustrine incursions, and with a trend towards arid conditions in the end. PMID:16697031

  13. Long or short? Investigating the effect of beach length and other environmental parameters on macrofaunal assemblages of Maltese pocket beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deidun, A.; Schembri, P. J.

    2008-08-01

    Despite numerous published studies that have evaluated the influence of different physical parameters, including beach slope, sediment organic content and grain size, on beach macrofaunal assemblages, very few studies have investigated the influence of beach length on biotic attributes of the same assemblages. Four beaches on the Maltese Islands were sampled using pitfall traps at night for eight consecutive seasons during 2001-2003. Macrofaunal collections were dominated by arthropods, mostly isopods (especially Tylos europaeus) and tenebrionid beetles (especially Phaleria spp.). The environmental variables of beach slope, exposure to wave action, sediment organic content, mean particle diameter, log beach length, beach width and the beach deposit index (BDI) were regressed against a number of biotic parameters, including log individual abundance, total species, Shannon-Wiener ( H') diversity index value and the psammophilic fraction of the total species collected, whilst BIO-ENV and NMDS were used to identify the physical parameter which could best explain observed biotic patterns. RELATE was used to assess the long-term persistence of macrofaunal assemblages on beaches of different lengths. Results from this study suggest that, whilst the influence of beach length and beach width on individual abundance and total species number is unimportant, these 'beach-area' parameters may affect the taxonomic composition of a beach assemblage, mainly in terms of the psammophilic fraction of assemblages, as well as the permanence of macrofaunal assemblages on a beach. Shorter and narrower beaches were found to be more prone to sporadic and random events of colonisation by euryoecious species. In the absence of human disturbance and mass mortality events, beaches of limited dimensions can still maintain stable macrofaunal assemblages. Individual abundance and total species number could not be related to a single or small suite of physical parameters. The study further highlights the need to include biological interactions, the degree of human disturbance and other variables such as environmental heterogeneity and the connectivity of the individual beaches when assessing inter-beach differences in macrofaunal assemblages.

  14. Mobilization and transport of naturally occurring enterococci in beach sands subject to transient infiltration of seawater.

    PubMed

    Russell, Todd L; Yamahara, Kevan M; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2012-06-01

    This study explores the transport of enterococci (ENT) from naturally contaminated beach sands to the groundwater table via infiltrating seawater using field, laboratory, and modeling experiments. ENT were readily mobilized and transported through the unsaturated zone during infiltration events in both the field and laboratory column experiments. Detachment mechanisms were investigated using a modified version of HYDRUS-1D. Three models for detachment kinetics were tested. Detachment kinetics that are first order with respect to the rate of change in the water content and attached surface bacterial concentrations were found to provide a best fit between predicted and observed data. From these experimental and model results we conclude that detachment mechanisms associated with the rapid increases in pore water content such as air-water interface scouring and thin film expansion are likely drivers of ENT mobilization in the investigated system. These findings suggest that through-beach transport of ENT may be an important pathway through which ENT from beach sands are transported to beach groundwater where they may be discharged to coastal waters via submarine groundwater discharge. PMID:22533299

  15. Genetic Diversity of Escherichia coli Isolated from Urban Rivers and Beach Water

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Sandra L.

    2004-01-01

    Repetitive element anchored PCR was used to evaluate the genetic profiles of Escherichia coli isolated from surface water contaminated with urban stormwater, sanitary sewage, and gull feces to determine if strains found in environmental samples reflect the strain composition of E. coli obtained from host sources. Overall, there was less diversity in isolates collected from river and beach sites than with isolates obtained from human and nonhuman sources. Unique strain types comprised 28.8, 29.2, and 15.0% of the isolate data sets recovered from stormwater, river water, and beach water, respectively. In contrast, 50.4% of gull isolates and 41.2% of sewage isolates were unique strain types. River water, which is expected to contain E. coli strains from many diffuse sources of nonpoint source pollution, contained strains most closely associated with other river water isolates that were collected at different sites or on different days. However, river sites impacted by sewage discharge had approximately 20% more strains similar to sewage isolates than did sites impacted by stormwater alone. Beach sites with known gull fecal contamination contained E. coli most similar to other beach isolates rather than gull isolates collected at these same sites, indicating underrepresentation of possible gull strains. These results suggest large numbers of strains are needed to represent contributing host sources within a geographical location. Additionally, environmental survival may influence the composition of strains that can be recovered from contaminated waters. Understanding the ecology of indicator bacteria is important when interpreting fecal pollution assessments and developing source detection methodology. PMID:15294799

  16. Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita

    2009-01-01

    We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of beach systems or the human impacts on beaches are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy beaches. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not been widely implemented in sandy beaches, could be a key tool for biodiversity conservation and should also facilitate spillover effects into adjacent beach habitats. Setback and zoning strategies need to be enforced through legislation, and all relevant stakeholders should be included in the design, implementation and institutionalisation of these initiatives. New perspectives for rational management of sandy beaches require paradigm shifts, by including not only basic ecosystem principles, but also incentives for effective governance and sharing of management roles between government and local stakeholders.

  17. Beach science in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nevers, Meredith B.; Byappanahalli, Murulee N.; Edge, Thomas A.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring beach waters for human health has led to an increase and evolution of science in the Great Lakes, which includes microbiology, limnology, hydrology, meteorology, epidemiology, and metagenomics, among others. In recent years, concerns over the accuracy of water quality standards at protecting human health have led to a significant interest in understanding the risk associated with water contact in both freshwater and marine environments. Historically, surface waters have been monitored for fecal indicator bacteria (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, enterococci), but shortcomings of the analytical test (lengthy assay) have resulted in a re-focusing of scientific efforts to improve public health protection. Research has led to the discovery of widespread populations of fecal indicator bacteria present in natural habitats such as soils, beach sand, and stranded algae. Microbial source tracking has been used to identify the source of these bacteria and subsequently assess their impact on human health. As a result of many findings, attempts have been made to improve monitoring efficiency and efficacy with the use of empirical predictive models and molecular rapid tests. All along, beach managers have actively incorporated new findings into their monitoring programs. With the abundance of research conducted and information gained over the last 25 years, “Beach Science” has emerged, and the Great Lakes have been a focal point for much of the ground-breaking work. Here, we review the accumulated research on microbiological water quality of Great Lakes beaches and provide a historic context to the collaborative efforts that have advanced this emerging science.

  18. Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev

    E-print Network

    Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev Institute for Fusion Studies into the directed energy of the ion flow. This work can be viewed as a nonlinear version of the magnetic beach

  19. USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stretches of beach along popular Huntington Beach, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...

  20. Monitoring of Olympic National Park Beaches to determine fate and effects of spilled bunker C fuel oil

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, J.A.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.; Fortman, T.J.; Citterman, R.J.; Fleischmann, M.L.

    1990-10-01

    On December 23, 1988, the barge Nestucca was accidentally struck by its tow, a Souse Brothers Towing Company tug, releasing approximately 230,000 gallons of Bunker C fuel oil and fouling beaches from Grays Harbor north to Vancouver Island. Affected beaches in Washington included a 40-mile-long strip that has been recently added to Olympic National Park. The purpose of the monitoring program documented in this report was to determine the fate of spilled Bunker C fuel oil on selected Washington coastal beaches. We sought to determine (1) how much oil remained in intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats following clean-up and weathering, (2) to what extent intertidal and/or shallow subtidal biotic assemblages have been contaminated, and (3) how rapidly the oil has left the ecosystem. 45 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Burrowing inhibition by fine textured beach fill: Implications for recovery of beach ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Sloane M.; Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.; Schooler, Nicholas K.

    2014-10-01

    Beach nourishment is often considered the most environmentally sound method of maintaining eroding shorelines. However, the ecological consequences are poorly understood. Fill activities cause intense disturbance and high mortality and have the potential to alter the diversity, abundance, and distribution of intertidal macroinvertebrates for months to years. Ecological recovery following fill activities depends on successful recolonization and recruitment of the entire sandy intertidal community. The use of incompatible sediments as fill material can strongly affect ecosystem recovery. We hypothesized that burrowing inhibition of intertidal animals by incompatible fine fill sediments contributes to ecological impacts and limits recovery in beach ecosystems. We experimentally investigated the influence of intertidal zone and burrowing mode on responses of beach invertebrates to altered sediment texture (28-38% fines), and ultimately the potential for colonization and recovery of beaches disturbed by beach filling. Using experimental trials in fill material and natural beach sand, we found that the mismatched fine fill sediments significantly inhibited burrowing of characteristic species from all intertidal zones, including sand crabs, clams, polychaetes, isopods, and talitrid amphipods. Burrowing performance of all five species we tested was consistently reduced in the fill material and burrowing was completely inhibited for several species. The threshold for burrowing inhibition by fine sediment content in middle and lower beach macroinvertebrates varied by species, with highest sensitivity for the polychaete (4% fines, below the USA regulatory limit of 10% fines), followed by sand crabs and clams (20% fines). These results suggest broader investigation of thresholds for burrowing inhibition in fine fill material is needed for beach animals. Burrowing inhibition caused by mismatched fill sediments exposes beach macroinvertebrates to stresses, which could depress recruitment and survival at all intertidal zones. Our results suggest use of incompatible fine fill sediments from dredging projects creates unsuitable intertidal habitat that excludes burrowing macroinvertebrates and could delay beach ecosystem recovery. Through effects on beach invertebrates that are prey for shorebirds and fish, the ecological impacts of filling with mismatched fine sediments could influence higher trophic levels and extend beyond the beach itself.

  2. 78 FR 33969 - Special Local Regulations; Daytona Beach Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ...Special Local Regulations; Daytona Beach...Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach...special local regulation on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona...special local regulation will encompass...the Atlantic Ocean east of...

  3. 107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. SECTION OF PIER IS IN BACKGROUND Photograph #1579-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1930-31 prior to replacement of original light standards in 1930-31 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  4. Project # 1109 September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Project # 1109 #12;#12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL i Welcome to our 51st Annual-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL iii Table of Contents Welcome Letter ...................................................................................... 24 #12;The International Citrus & Beverage Conference iv #12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach

  5. Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia 24 September 2013 the Lynnhaven River Basin. The watershed is located within the City of Virginia Beach in Southeastern Virginia is the City of Virginia Beach. The study area consists of the entire Lynnhaven River Basin, a 64-square- mile

  6. Constructing a wave reflector to protect beaches? Modelling assignment for

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Constructing a wave reflector to protect beaches? Modelling assignment for Instructional Workshop possible way to protect beaches from incoming waves would be to try to partially reflect the waves by constructing suitable bottom variations in the sea in front of the beach. To investigate the viability

  7. Dare County Beaches, Shore Protection Project Physical Monitoring Program

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Dare County Beaches, Shore Protection Project Physical Monitoring Program Profile Survey Report Hawk Profiles with complex morphology............. . 11 Figure 8. Profile Line 759 "beach push TOPO Photos G Profile Stack Plots 2003 through 2006 H Metadata files #12;2 Dare County Beaches, Shore

  8. NEWPORT BEACH STANDS UP FOR LEONA VALLEY, GREEN VALLEY

    E-print Network

    Touretzky, David S.

    NEWPORT BEACH STANDS UP FOR LEONA VALLEY, GREEN VALLEY AND BOUQUET CANYON. It's time to take business in Newport Beach. Multiple times a month, paramedics, fire &/or police are called to the property, and suffering we, the neighbors of this business in Newport Beach, have experienced. In sharing my experience

  9. Spring 2014 | Dr. Al-Kodmany Back to the Beach

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    I Spring 2014 | Dr. Al-Kodmany Back to the Beach A Community-Based Approach to Sustainable Economic Development Miller Beach, City of Gary, Indiana #12;II Instructor Kheir Al-Kodmany Project Managers Moira, beaches and parks, and a vibrant and diverse community that is committed to seeing it thrive well

  10. Beaches in Motion. Interaction and Environmental Change. Secondary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee County School District, Ft. Myers, FL. Dept. of Environmental Education and Instructional Development Services.

    The terms "high energy" and "low energy" refer to the amount of energy a wave has that reaches the face of a beach. In this student guide, two types of beaches are investigated. The objective is to be able to identify whether a beach is of high or low energy. Background information is provided, as well as instructions and worksheets for activities…

  11. Opportunities for Climate Resilience The Beaches of Stamford, Connecticut

    E-print Network

    Opportunities for Climate Resilience The Beaches of Stamford, Connecticut A Report for the City is the problem? 8 What is the solution? 9 How can Stamford make its beach parks more resilient? 16 What Stamford's beach parks. The high and powerful waves during these storms have flooded the parks, spreading

  12. On Track for the Future: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    M On Track for the Future: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional Connectivity and Natural Beauty #12;Special thanks to the City of Gary, NIRPC, and the many residents of Miller Beach whose: Capitalizing on Miller Beach's Regional Connectivity and Natural Beauty M #12;April 30, 2014 Professor Janet

  13. LONG WAVE RUNUP ON RANDOM BEACHES DENYS DUTYKH

    E-print Network

    LONG WAVE RUNUP ON RANDOM BEACHES DENYS DUTYKH , C´ELINE LABART, AND DIMITRIOS MITSOTAKIS Abstract The estimation of the long wave runup on a sloping beach is a practical problem which attracts nowadays a lot estimation methods of the wave runup and horizontal excursion over a sloping beach [TS96, KS06, DP08, MS10

  14. DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach

    E-print Network

    DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS ODU-VB ODU ODU has 69 Undergraduate Degree programs; 31 are available at ODU Virginia Beach* # of Degrees-to-degree completion by complementing Beach course offerings with online & main campus offerings. GRADUATE DEGREE

  15. World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera)

    E-print Network

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) WAYNE N. MATH IS I SMITHSONIAN O G Y · N U M B E R 5 3 6 World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) Wayne N. Mathis of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera). Smithsonian Contributions toZoology, number 536,18 pages, 1992

  16. Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged'

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged' 2012-02-01 17:16:03 PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. -- As expected Newt Gingrich lost in Florida by a landslide. The polls predicted of three created a "Palm Beach County for Newt Gingrich 2012" Facebook page in November. Shortly afterwards

  17. Recreational Shellfish Beach Closures Due to Biotoxins or Pollution

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Washington State Department of Health

    This map represents the Health Status of beaches in the state of Washington. The interactive map allows users to click on counties, water bodies, and beaches to view seasons and limits. The page also includes links to text bulletins regarding beach closures, descriptions of marine biotoxins and associated health effects, and a factsheet of shellfish program publications.

  18. 103. VIEW OF BEACH STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. VIEW OF BEACH STRUCTURES ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST; PACIFIC ELECTRIC RAILWAY CAR (UPPER LEFT), CONCESSION STANDS (LOWER LEFT), BANDSHELL (RIGHT), AND PIER IN BACKGROUND Photograph #5352-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1914 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  19. Monitoring of beach enteromorpha variation with near shore video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yali; Yu, Xinsheng; Yan, Zhijin; Yi, Weidong

    2014-07-01

    Beach is an important coastal protective barrier and tourism resources. Beach environment monitoring can help beach managers to make feasible decisions. Digital image of video monitoring technology can provide high resolution information of temporal and spatial variation of near shore in real time. The application of Video monitoring technology has been implemented in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach. The clustering method based on Gaussian mixture model is applied to extract beach enteromorpha changs for the digital images. Analysis results show that, the period of enteromorpha in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach was mainly from the early July to the mid-August in 2011, and the decline of enteromorpha is mainly associated with the rising temperature in the mid-August. Storm has significant impact on the beach enteromorpha. Tourists' activity space on the beach will decrease due to the enteromorpha covering on the beach, which affects beach tourism activities. Therefore, it's necessary to make preventive measures to avoid enteromorpha piling up on the beach, which is of great importance to the bathing beach environment and tourism development.

  20. Estimating swash zone friction coefficients on a sandy beach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack A. Puleo; K. Todd Holland

    2001-01-01

    Video-based swash motions from three studies (on two separate beaches) were analyzed with respect to theoretical swash trajectories assuming plane beach ballistic motions under quadratic friction. Friction coefficient values for both the uprush and backwash were estimated by comparing measured swash space–time trajectories to these theoretical expectations given an initial velocity and beach slope. Observations were made spanning high tides,

  1. Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

  2. Back to the Beach: Flamingo Collected

    E-print Network

    Flamingo

    Castillo was gentle. It was his choice, Sonny knew. The blond had no control over what happened to him in this dream. The long, tapered hands roved his aching body with expert skill, teasing, promising wonderful things. Sonny whimpered and writhed... Iffifi?} BACK TO THE BEACH FLAMINGO COLLECTED JtMIAMI VICE "/ ASBESTOS PRESS 28 VESEY STREET, SUITE 2255 NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10007 FJBJ ! I p3) pRH CkxL^ucke'3 BACK TO THE BEACH Along the Road of Dreams (Single Digest, Bodacious...

  3. An evaluation of beached bird monitoring approaches.

    PubMed

    Seys, Jan; Offringa, Henk; Van Waeyenberge, Jeroen; Meire, Patrick; Kuijken, Eckhart

    2002-04-01

    Oil-pollution monitoring at sea through beach bird surveying would undoubtedly benefit from a further standardisation of methods, enhancing the efficiency of data collection. In order to come up with useful recommendations, we evaluated various approaches of beached bird collection at the Belgian coast during seven winters (1993-1999). Data received in a passive way by one major rehabilitation centre were compared to the results of targeted beach surveys carried out at different scales by trained ornithologists: 'weekly' surveys - with a mean interval of 9 days - restricted to a fixed 16.7 km beach stretch, 'monthly' surveys over the entire coastline (62.1 km) and an annual 'international' survey in Belgium over the same distance at the end of February. Data collected through Belgian rehabilitation centres concern injured, living birds collected in a non-systematical way. Oil rates derived from these centres appear to be strongly biased to oiled auks and inshore bird species, and are hence of little use in assessing the extent of oil pollution at sea. The major asset of rehabilitation centres in terms of data collection seems to be their continuous warning function for events of mass mortality. Weekly surveys on a representative and large enough section rendered reliable data on oil rates, estimates of total number of bird victims, representation of various taxonomic groups and species-richness and were most sensitive in detecting events quickly (wrecks, oil-slicks, severe winter mortality, etc.). Monthly surveys gave comparable results, although they overlooked some important beaching events and demonstrated slightly higher oil rates, probably due to the higher chance to miss short-lasting wrecks of auks. Since the monthly surveys in Belgium were carried out by a network of volunteers and were spread over a larger beach section, they should be considered as best performing. Single 'international beached bird surveys' in February gave reliable data on total victim number (once the mean ratio between numbers in various months is known) and oil rate (provided a sufficiently large sample can be collected), but failed in tracking events. It is a particularly attractive approach because of its long tradition, resulting in invaluable long-term databases, and the uniformity in which these surveys are organised on a large scale. The minimal distance for a monthly survey amounts to 25-30 km (40-50% of Belgian coastline) up to 40 km (65%) in order to attain sound figures for oil rate and species-richness, respectively. These distances are primarily determined by the number of bird corpses that may be collected and are hence a function of beaching intensity and corpse detection rate. PMID:12139322

  4. North beach (Nazaré) sand tracer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, João; Taborda, Rui; Ribeiro, Mónica; Cascalho, João; Silva, Ana; Bosnic, Ivana

    2014-05-01

    The littoral in the vicinity of Nazaré (West Portuguese coast) is characterized by two distinct coastal stretches separated by Nazaré headland: a northern sector (Norte beach) characterized by a high energetic continuous sandy beach and a southern sector (Nazaré bay beach) that corresponds to an embayed beach, sheltered by the Nazaré headland. The bay is a geomorphological expression of the Nazaré canyon head, which acts as powerful sediment sink, capturing the large longshore net southward transport at Norte beach generated by the north Atlantic high energetic swell. The northern side of the canyon head is carved on highly resistant Cretaceous limestone sustaining an underwater vertical relief that emerges on the Nazaré headland, creating a unusual nearshore wave pattern. This wave pattern not only concentrates high energy levels at the Norte beach but also contributes to local complex longshore drift gradients capable of inducing beach seasonal cross-shore variations of more than 200 m. The main factors that influence local sediment budget are: (1) canyon head capturing and (2) headland sediment bypassing. To obtain a direct measure of the net longshore drift at Norte beach (upstream boundary of the system) a large scale fluorescent tracer experiment was performed. The data will be used to validate longshore transport formulas in a high energetic environment and to access Nazaré canyon head sediment loss. Considering the anticipation of high transport rates, approximately 10 tonnes of native sand where coated with orange fluorescent ink using a set of concrete mixers. The experiment took place on the 9th to 15th September 2013 period and followed the continuous injection method (CIM). The CIM approach was justified by the expected high energy levels that inhibits sediment sampling across the surf zone. During the tracer injection procedure (approx. 5 hours), sediment sampling was performed at 13 sites along a rectilinear coastal stretch extended through 600 m downdrift of the injection point. Tracer was injected at a rate of 16 kg each 30 sec and collected at a frequency of 10 min at each site. Complementary sampling was performed at the inner shelf and at the beach southern of the headland. In order to follow tracer downdrift movement and headland sediment bypassing low resolution sampling was extended through three more days. Oceanographic forcing throughout the experiment was measured by an offshore wave buoy and an ADCP specifically deployed for the experiment. During the first tidal cycle, data from field observations using a hand held UV light showed a southward tracer displacement of more than 600 m. After the second tidal cycle, sediment tracer was detected in the Nazaré bay beach showing headland bypassing. Further insights on the sediment transport at the Nazaré canyon head system will be supported by the analysis of sediment samples collected at the beach and inner shelf using an automated image analysis system. This work was done in the framework of the PTDC/MAR/114674/2009 program, financed by FCT which the authors acknowledge gratefully.

  5. Identification of human enteric pathogens in gull feces at Southwestern Lake Michigan bathing beaches.

    PubMed

    Kinzelman, Julie; McLellan, Sandra L; Amick, Ashley; Preedit, Justine; Scopel, Caitlin O; Olapade, Ola; Gradus, Steve; Singh, Ajaib; Sedmak, Gerald

    2008-12-01

    Ring-billed (Larus delawarensis Ord, 1815) and herring (Larus argentatus Pontoppidan, 1763) gulls are predominant species of shorebirds in coastal areas. Gulls contribute to the fecal indicator burden in beach sands, which, once transported to bathing waters, may result in water quality failures. The importance of these contamination sources must not be overlooked when considering the impact of poor bathing water quality on human health. This study examined the occurrence of human enteric pathogens in gull populations at Racine, Wisconsin. For 12 weeks in 2004 and 2005, and 7 weeks in 2006, 724 gull fecal samples were examined for pathogen occurrence on traditional selective media (BBL CHROMagar-Salmonella, Remel Campy-BAP, 7% horse blood agar) or through the use of novel isolation techniques (Campylobacter, EC FP5-funded CAMPYCHECK Project), and confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for pathogens commonly harbored in gulls. An additional 226 gull fecal samples, collected in the same 12-week period in 2004, from a beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, were evaluated with standard microbiological methods and PCR. Five isolates of Salmonella (0.7%), 162 (22.7%) isolates of Campylobacter, 3 isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila group 2 (0.4%), and 28 isolates of Plesiomonas shigelloides (3.9%) were noted from the Racine beach. No occurrences of Salmonella and 3 isolates of Campylobacter (0.4%) were found at the Milwaukee beach. A subset of the 2004 samples was also examined for Giardia and Cryptosporidium and was found to be negative. Information as to the occurrence of human pathogens in beach ecosystems is essential to design further studies assessing human health risk and to determine the parameters influencing the fate and transport of pathogens in the nearshore environment. PMID:19096455

  6. Speciation and antimicrobial resistance of Enterococci isolated from recreational beaches in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Ahmad, Asmat; Usup, Gires; Heng, Lee Yook

    2013-02-01

    We report the first study on the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant enterococci in coastal bathing waters in Malaysia. One hundred and sixty-five enterococci isolates recovered from two popular recreational beaches in Malaysia were speciated and screened for antibiotic resistance to a total of eight antibiotics. Prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium was highest in both beaches. E. faecalis/E. faecium ratio was 0.384:1 and 0.375:1, respectively, for isolates from Port Dickson (PD) and Bagan Lalang (BL). Analysis of Fisher's exact test showed that association of prevalence of E. faecalis and E. faecium with considered locations was not statistically significant (p < 0.05). Chi-square test revealed significant differences (?(2) = 82.630, df = 20, p < 0.001) in the frequency of occurrence of enterococci isolates from the considered sites. Resistance was highest to nalidixic acid (94.84 %) and least for chloramphenicol (8.38 %). One-way ANOVA using Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test showed that resistance to ampicillin was higher in PD beach isolates than BL isolates and the difference was extremely statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Frequency of occurrence of multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) isolates were higher for PD beach water (64.29 %) as compared to BL beach water (13.51 %), while MAR indices ranged between 0.198 and 0.48. The results suggest that samples from Port Dickson may contain MAR bacteria and that this could be due to high-risk faecal contamination from sewage discharge pipes that drain into the sea water. PMID:22592782

  7. 75 FR 14206 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ...issued to FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...for operation of the Point Beach Nuclear Plant...physical changes to the reactor, fuel, plant structures...impact [Part 73, Power Reactor Security Requirements...Nuclear Plants [regarding Point Beach Nuclear...

  8. 75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard...safety zone for the annual New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park in Wantagh, New York....

  9. Mile and Half Mile Beaches at Reid State Park

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This guide introduces visitors to the sediments and geologic histories of Mile and Half Mile beaches in Reid State Park on the coast of Maine. Topics include the source of the sand presently found on the beaches, the origin and migration of beach deposits, dunes, and marsh peat deposits as sea level has risen, and some history of the area. Some suggested activities for visitors include observing grain size sorting of beach sands, observing the size and angle of waves washing ashore, and making measurements of beach cusps and berms. References and links to additional information are included.

  10. Nowcasting and Forecasting Beach Bacteria Concentration Using EPA's Virtual Beach Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, W. E.; Ge, Z.

    2007-05-01

    Beaches in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads to erroneous decisions due to the great variability in bacterial concentrations. Beaches are closed when they could be open and vice versa, their true status unknown until the next day. Studies show that mathematical models based on multi-variable linear regression (MLR) principles can produce better estimates, or nowcasts, using real-time explanatory variables, such as turbidity, cloud cover, and rainfall. To make such models generally available, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing a program called Virtual Beach (VB). VB is public-domain software for developing site-specific predictive models. It features capabilities that make it possible with reasonable effort to develop, and compare the performance of, static and dynamic MLR models. The results of tests on 2006 Huntington Beach, Lake Erie beach data are presented. In addition to nowcasting, the work begins to address the question, can weather and water forecasts be used to forecast beach conditions in advance? A preliminary affirmative answer is provided based on an analysis of the Huntington Beach data, with weather forecasts for nearby Cleveland-Hopkins international airport, and NOAA lake condition forecasts. We encourage those engaged in beach monitoring and management to request VB, applying the nowcast and forecast models developed with it to their locations of interest. Disclaimer: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for presentation, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  11. Outbreak of E. coli O157 infection in the south west of the UK: risks from streams crossing seaside beaches.

    PubMed

    Ihekweazu, C; Barlow, M; Roberts, S; Christensen, H; Guttridge, B; Lewis, D; Paynter, S

    2006-01-01

    In August 2004 seven cases of Escherichia coli O157 infection were identified in children on holiday in Cornwall, southwest England, all of whom had stayed at different sites in the area. Isolates from all seven cases were confirmed as E. coli serogroup O157 phage type 21/28. We carried out a case-control study among holidaymakers who visited the beach. A standardised questionnaire was administered by telephone to parents. They were asked where on the beach the children had played, whether they had had contact with the stream that flowed across the beach, and about their use of food outlets and sources of food eaten. Cases were more likely to have played in the stream than controls (OR [1.72- undefined]). The time spent in the stream by cases was twice spent there by controls. Cases and controls were equally exposed to other suspected risk factors. PFGE profiles for all the cases were indistinguishable. Increased numbers of coliforms were found in the stream prior to the outbreak. Cattle were found grazing upstream. We suggest that the vehicle of infection for an outbreak of acute gastrointestinal illness caused by E. coli O157 was a contaminated freshwater stream flowing across a seaside beach. The onset dates were consistent with a point source. Heavy rainfall in the days preceding the outbreak might have lead to faeces from the cattle potentially contaminated by E. coli O157 contaminating the stream, thereby leading to the outbreak. Control measures included fencing off the part of the stream in which children played, and putting up warning signs around the beach. PMID:16645246

  12. Tar pollution of Sierra Leone beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wazir Okera

    1974-01-01

    THE widespread occurrence of pelagic tar and plastic wastes in parts of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans has been described previously1. Extensive and considerable fouling of the sandy beaches of Sierra Leone by tar lumps has now been observed at Lumley, Sussex, No. 2, Toke and Mamah villages (Fig. 1) during the past 14 months (June, 1973 to July, 1974).

  13. Brooklyn and the Sea: "Explore the Beach"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardi, James; Yasso, Warren E.

    1976-01-01

    The "Explore the Beach" program, which provides inner-city children from day care centers and day camps in New York City the opportunity to observe the marine environment, is described. A description of the marine science curriculum at John Dewey High School is presented. (BT)

  14. An Interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her interest…

  15. "JAZZ AT THE BEACH" INSTRUMENTAL AUDITION REQUIREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Eric J.

    "JAZZ AT THE BEACH" INSTRUMENTAL AUDITION REQUIREMENTS GENERAL INFORMATION Undergraduate auditions for acceptance to the Jazz Studies area the week before the fall semester begins. Currently enrolled music majors circumstances prevent your attendance at our regularly scheduled auditions, contact the Jazz Studies Office

  16. AES Huntington Beach Generation Station Surf Zone

    E-print Network

    : establishing a sampling and monitoring plan for a period of 14 weeks; sampling surface water and inplant waterH, temperature, salinity, conductivity, DO, turbidity, and ammonia); conducting bacterial source and to quantitatively predict the potential impact of the AES HBGS on the beach; monitor temperature and salinity

  17. A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach

    E-print Network

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    A root Cheat Sheet A. Stephen Beach June 9, 1998 Abstract This is a quick guide to root programming, but has no experience with root or C++. Its goal is to get the user up and running quickly? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Basic Questions 4 2.1 What is root

  18. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    ScienceCinema

    Wayne Hu

    2010-01-08

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  19. Swash on a gently sloping beach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Raubenheimer; R. T. Guza; Steve Elgar; N. Kobayashi

    1995-01-01

    Wave observed in the inner surf and swash zones of a fine grained, gently sloping beach are modeled accurately with the nonlinear shallow water equations. The model is initialized with observations from pressure and current sensors collocated about 50 m from the mean shoreline in about 1 m depth, and model predictions are compared to pressure fluctuations measured at five

  20. Walruses Spill Over Beach Banks onto Tundra

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Thousands of walruses gathered to rest on the shore near the Alaskan coastal community of Point Lay during September of 2013 after sea ice disappeared from their offshore foraging grounds in the eastern Chukchi Sea. Walruses clamber up on to the grassy tundra of the barrier island, once the beach b...

  1. Beaches, Dunes, and Barrier Islands. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The materials in this educational packet are designed for use with students in grades 4 through 7. They consist of a leader overview, teaching guides and student data sheets for three activities, and a poster. The leader overview describes the nature of beaches, dunes, and barrier islands, tracing their development, settlement, and management and…

  2. USGS Collects Sediments Samples at Pascagoula Beach

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists collected environmental data and samples at beach, barrier island, and wetland sites in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  The USGS Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas Science Centers collaborated to ...

  3. Semipermeable membrane devices link site-specific contaminants to effects: Part 1 – Induction of CYP1A in rainbow trout from contaminants in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathrine R. Springman; Jeffrey W. Short; Mandy R. Lindeberg; Jacek M. Maselko; Colin Khan; Peter V. Hodson; Stanley D. Rice

    2008-01-01

    Extracts from semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) deployed on beaches in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska, were used to evaluate if complex contaminant mixtures from different sources can be distinguished by the resulting cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) activity in exposed test animals. Deployment sites included canneries, salmon hatcheries, and beaches where lingering oil remains from discharges during the 1964 earthquake or

  4. Quantifying Beach Response to Episodic Large Wave Events, a Predictive Empirical Model, Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    Predicting beach response on an event scale is extremely difficult due to highly variable spatial and temporal conditions, lack of data on antecedent beach morphology, generic model shortcomings, and uncertainty of local forcing parameters. Each beach system is unique and classical beach erosion models may not be applicable to many high-energy beaches, especially those receiving large long-period waves. Therefore, developing an empirical model is the best way to predict future beach response at a given site. Based on 12 closely spaced (temporally) GPS topographic surveys during the winter of 2005-2006 at Ocean Beach, in San Francisco, California, we have developed a predictive empirical model that relates sub-aerial beach response to observed wave height, period, and direction. The model will provide important information to coastal managers, who will be able to better predict and mitigate possible loss from a forecasted wave event. Ocean Beach, located immediately south of the Golden Gate in San Francisco, is a high-energy, intermediate- slope beach that is exposed to waves generated in both the North and South Pacific. Winter breaking wave heights frequently reach 4 m and can exceed 7 m, with periods sometimes greater than 20 s. Our observations demonstrate that large seasonal variations in the sub-aerial beach profile are likely forced by several single large wave events. These events have led to the partial destruction of a recreational parking lot at the south end of the beach where an erosion hot spot is currently located, and continued erosion will threaten other parts of public infrastructure. This study, in combination with other ongoing research at Ocean Beach, will provide valuable insight that will not only aid local personnel in their management decisions but also contribute to a better understanding of sediment transport at high-energy beaches.

  5. Population carbon budgets and the importance of the amphipod corophium volutator in the carbon transfer on a cumberland basin mudflat, upper bay of fundy, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, C. M.

    The importance of Corophium volutator in the carbon flux between microalgal primary producers and other trophic levels was evaluated from population carbon budgets. In all but 4 of 39 population carbon budgets the estimated consumption was sufficient to meet the demands of production and respiration combined. A carbon budget constructed for the period from May to September 1979 revealed that Corophium production accounted for 40% of the consumption, respiration for 25% and the remainder by difference was attributed to faecal waste. Consumption was equivalent to 27% of the "net" epibenthic microalgal primary production over the same time period. Marked temporal changes in Corophium abundance appear to influence rates of benthic microalgal primary production during summer. Concurrently, an approximate 20-fold increase in Corophium biomass provides a significant food resource for birds and fishes. This implies that Corophium occupies a key link in processes of carbon flux on mudflats in the upper reaches of the Bay of Fundy.

  6. Mudflat/distal fan and shallow lake sedimentation (upper Vallesian-Turolian) in the Tianshui Basin, Central China: Evidence against the late Miocene eolian loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Zarza, A. M.; Zhao, Z.; Song, C. H.; Li, J. J.; Zhang, J.; Martín-Pérez, A.; Martín-García, R.; Wang, X. X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, M. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Tianshui Basin in central China contains a thick sedimentary sequence (~ 1400 m) of continental deposits, Aragonian to Villafranchian (Miocene-Pliocene) in age. Intense Himalayan movements around the Paleogene/Miocene boundary triggered the uplift of mountain ranges around the Tianshui Basin, providing the deposition site for continental sediments. The sedimentary infill of the basin consists of four stratigraphic units (I to IV). This paper focuses on Unit II. Most of the accommodation space was occupied by Unit I, so during the sedimentation of Unit II, the morphology of the basin was relatively flat, promoting the development of wide distal fan/mudflat areas and wide shallow lakes. Deposits include: red mudstones, pedogenic and groundwater calcretes, reworked calcrete deposits, sheet-floods, fluvial channels, rippled sandstones/siltstones, ooidal/peloidal packstones, palustrine limestones, bioturbated marls and intraclastic limestones/marls. The characteristics and organization of the deposits indicate the gradual transition from alluvial to lake environments. Within the distal fan/mudflat, the deposition of reworked calcrete clasts as one of the most striking facies of the basin may be attributed to substantial recycling of calcrete levels and red clays. At the lake margins, the presence of ooids and palustrine limestones suggests the possibility of ramp-like margins within different energy settings. The origin of some of the deposits of the basin's QA-I section is under discussion, and their consideration as eolian has been recently proposed. However, we believe this possibility is precluded by the characteristics of the deposits. Our proposal has important implications for revising the interpretation of Miocene paleoclimatic conditions in central Asia.

  7. Central Role of Dynamic Tidal Biofilms Dominated by Aerobic Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacteria and Diatoms in the Biodegradation of Hydrocarbons in Coastal Mudflats

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Frédéric; Chronopoulou, Panagiota-Myrsini; Fahy, Anne; Païssé, Sandrine; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol; Peperzak, Louis; Acuña Alvarez, Laura; McKew, Boyd A.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Underwood, Graham J. C.; Timmis, Kenneth N.; Duran, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Mudflats and salt marshes are habitats at the interface of aquatic and terrestrial systems that provide valuable services to ecosystems. Therefore, it is important to determine how catastrophic incidents, such as oil spills, influence the microbial communities in sediment that are pivotal to the function of the ecosystem and to identify the oil-degrading microbes that mitigate damage to the ecosystem. In this study, an oil spill was simulated by use of a tidal chamber containing intact diatom-dominated sediment cores from a temperate mudflat. Changes in the composition of bacteria and diatoms from both the sediment and tidal biofilms that had detached from the sediment surface were monitored as a function of hydrocarbon removal. The hydrocarbon concentration in the upper 1.5 cm of sediments decreased by 78% over 21 days, with at least 60% being attributed to biodegradation. Most phylotypes were minimally perturbed by the addition of oil, but at day 21, there was a 10-fold increase in the amount of cyanobacteria in the oiled sediment. Throughout the experiment, phylotypes associated with the aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (Cycloclasticus) and alkanes (Alcanivorax, Oleibacter, and Oceanospirillales strain ME113), substantively increased in oiled mesocosms, collectively representing 2% of the pyrosequences in the oiled sediments at day 21. Tidal biofilms from oiled cores at day 22, however, consisted mostly of phylotypes related to Alcanivorax borkumensis (49% of clones), Oceanospirillales strain ME113 (11% of clones), and diatoms (14% of clones). Thus, aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation is most likely to be the main mechanism of attenuation of crude oil in the early weeks of an oil spill, with tidal biofilms representing zones of high hydrocarbon-degrading activity. PMID:22407688

  8. Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2

    E-print Network

    Branch, Lyn C.

    WEC 165 Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2 1. This document is WEC 165/Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean. Beach mice, as their name indicates, live on beaches in Florida and Alabama. Beach live with beach mice in these dune habitats, including the six-lined racer, monarch butterflies, snowy

  9. Assessment of the aesthetic quality of a selection of beaches in the Firth of Forth, Scotland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Somerville; K. L. Miller; J. M. Mair

    2003-01-01

    The aesthetic quality of fourteen beaches in the Firth of Forth, Scotland was surveyed between May and July 2002 using a protocol designed by the UK’s National Aquatic Litter Group (NALG). Local authority beach cleaning regimes influence the amount of litter found on beaches. Frequent and thorough beach cleaning is necessary to maintain high aesthetic standards. Bathing and amenity beaches

  10. Morphological modeling of a nourished bayside beach with a low tide terrace

    E-print Network

    Kirby, James T.

    Morphological modeling of a nourished bayside beach with a low tide terrace Fengyan Shi a, , Feng 2013 Accepted 18 March 2013 Available online xxxx Keywords: Morphological model Bayside beach Low tide­long term beach profile evolution of a bayside beach with a low tide terrace. Bayside beaches

  11. Assessment of exposures to fecally-contaminated recreational water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to fecally-contaminated recreational waters can pose a health risk to swimmers and other recreators. Since 2003, we have interviewed nearly 27,000 respondents at seven beaches impacted by treated sewage discharge. Information was collected about the duration and exposure...

  12. Geotechnical properties of the Cassino Beach mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Cláudio R. R.; Alves, Antonio M. L.

    2009-03-01

    Knowledge of the marine soils properties, together with hydrodynamic and climatic data, plays an important role for a better understanding of the dynamic behavior of sandy and muddy coasts. This paper deals with reporting and basic interpretation of two campaigns of exploration and characterization of the mud of Cassino Beach, southern Brazil, carried out during the years of 2004 and 2005. Samples were obtained by means of cores collected at some locations offshore, and were submitted to various laboratory geotechnical tests, including determination of the physical index, grain size distribution, Atterberg limits, and shear resistance by both triaxial and shear vane tests. Results confirm the existence of a very soft soil deposit offshore Cassino Beach, highly plastic, compressible, and viscous, forming an important database for further studies.

  13. Edge Waves on a Sloping Beach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Ursell

    1952-01-01

    The set of eigenfrequencies of a mechanical system forms its spectrum. A discussion is given of systems with discrete, continuous and mixed spectra. It is shown that resonance occurs at discrete points of the spectrum, and at cut-off frequencies (end-points of the continuous spectrum). The motion in a semi-infinite canal of finite width closed by a sloping beach has a

  14. Coastal erosion project, Diani beach, Kenya

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Ballot; C. Hoyng; I. Kateman; M. Smits; R. De Winter

    2006-01-01

    Master project report.\\u000aSince the seventies, the establishment of hotels and other facilities has increased the pressure on the Kenyan coast. During the last decade, hotel managers and residents in Diani Beach have been experiencing problems with erosion. The only measures taken to address the problem are individually built seawalls to protect private properties. These seawalls are mostly not properly

  15. Beach Closings: Science versus Public Perception

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute; )

    2005-04-01

    The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how beach closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.

  16. Cladophora in the Great Lakes: Impacts on beach water quality and human health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verhougstraete, M.P.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Rose, J.B.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Cladophora in the Great Lakes grows rapidly during the warm summer months, detaches, and becomes free-floating mats as a result of environmental conditions, eventually becoming stranded on recreational beaches. Cladophora provides protection and nutrients, which allow enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli, enterococci, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Salmonella to persist and potentially regrow in the presence of the algae. As a result of wind and wave action, these microorganisms can detach and be released to surrounding waters and can influence water quality. Enteric bacterial pathogens have been detected in Cladophora mats; E. coli and enterococci may populate to become part of the naturalized microbiota in Cladophora; the high densities of these bacteria may affect water quality, resulting in unnecessary beach closures. The continued use of traditional fecal indicators at beaches with Cladophora presence is inadequate at accurately predicting the presence of fecal contamination. This paper offers a substantial review of available literature to improve the knowledge of Cladophora impacts on water quality, recreational water monitoring, fecal indicator bacteria and microorganisms, and public health and policy.

  17. Internal wave turbulence near a Texel beach.

    PubMed

    van Haren, Hans; Gostiaux, Louis; Laan, Martin; van Haren, Martijn; van Haren, Eva; Gerringa, Loes J A

    2012-01-01

    A summer bather entering a calm sea from the beach may sense alternating warm and cold water. This can be felt when moving forward into the sea ('vertically homogeneous' and 'horizontally different'), but also when standing still between one's feet and body ('vertically different'). On a calm summer-day, an array of high-precision sensors has measured fast temperature-changes up to 1 °C near a Texel-island (NL) beach. The measurements show that sensed variations are in fact internal waves, fronts and turbulence, supported in part by vertical stable stratification in density (temperature). Such motions are common in the deep ocean, but generally not in shallow seas where turbulent mixing is expected strong enough to homogenize. The internal beach-waves have amplitudes ten-times larger than those of the small surface wind waves. Quantifying their turbulent mixing gives diffusivity estimates of 10(-4)-10(-3) m(2) s(-1), which are larger than found in open-ocean but smaller than wave breaking above deep sloping topography. PMID:22403671

  18. Independent risk factors for beach-related injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Petronis, Kelli A; Welch, J Camille; Pruitt, Charles W

    2009-06-01

    This study was conducted in a resort area during the summer tourist season to identify independent risk factors for injuries to children in a beach environment. Surveys including demographics, environmental and beach conditions, group characteristics, and hypothesized risk factors were administered to 28 cases and 105 controls. The most common injuries were lacerations and puncture wounds, followed by musculoskeletal injuries. The following environmental factors were found to significantly increase the risk for pediatric beach-related injury: rough/choppy water, cloudy weather, greater than 3 children in the group, participation by the child in water safety classes, and use of beach equipment (including boogie boards, skim boards, and kayaks). Providers who care for children can use this information to educate parents about beach safety. Targeted interventions that address these risk factors may reduce injuries sustained by children in a beach environment. PMID:19164132

  19. Effect of submarine groundwater discharge on bacterial indicators and swimmer health at Avalon Beach, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Yau, Vincent M; Schiff, Kenneth C; Arnold, Benjamin F; Griffith, John F; Gruber, Joshua S; Wright, Catherine C; Wade, Timothy J; Burns, Susan; Hayes, Jacqueline M; McGee, Charles; Gold, Mark; Cao, Yiping; Boehm, Alexandria B; Weisberg, Stephen B; Colford, John M

    2014-08-01

    Use of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) for monitoring beach water quality is based on their co-occurrence with human pathogens, a relationship that can be dramatically altered by fate and transport processes after leaving the human intestine. We conducted a prospective cohort study at Avalon Beach, California (USA), where the indicator relationship is potentially affected by the discharge of sewage-contaminated groundwater and by solar radiation levels at this shallow, relatively quiescent beach. The goals of this study were to determine: 1) if swimmers exposed to marine water were at higher risk of illness than non-swimmers; 2) if FIB measured in marine water were associated with swimmer illness, and; 3) if the associations between FIB and swimmer health were modified by either submarine groundwater discharge or solar radiation levels. There were 7317 individuals recruited during the summers of 2007-08, 6165 (84%) of whom completed follow-up within two weeks of the beach visit. A total of 703 water quality samples were collected across multiple sites and time periods during recruitment days and analyzed for FIB using both culture-based and molecular methods. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) indicated that swimmers who swallowed water were more likely to experience Gastrointestinal Illness (GI Illness) within three days of their beach visit than non-swimmers, and that this risk was significantly elevated when either submarine groundwater discharge was high (AOR [95% CI]:2.18 [1.22-3.89]) or solar radiation was low (2.45 [1.25-4.79]). The risk of GI Illness was not significantly elevated for swimmers who swallowed water when groundwater discharge was low or solar radiation was high. Associations between GI Illness incidence and FIB levels (Enterococcus EPA Method 1600) among swimmers who swallowed water were not significant when we did not account for groundwater discharge, but were strongly associated when groundwater discharge was high (1.85 [1.06, 3.23]) compared to when it was low (0.77 [0.42, 1.42]; test of interaction: P = 0.03). These results demonstrate the need to account for local environmental conditions when monitoring for, and making decisions about, public health at recreational beaches. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:24776951

  20. 109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF PIER TAKEN FROM BEACH, LOOKING WEST. VIEW SHOWS ART DECO BUILDINGS ADDED IN 1931 AND 5TH TEE ADDED IN 1940 Photograph #5369-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1945, based on clothing of sunbathers; view probably taken in mid-1945 after the U.S. Army vacated the pier and it was reopened to the public. - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  1. Shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach in southern California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David M. Hubbard; Jenifer E. Dugan

    2003-01-01

    Frequent morning surveys of birds were conducted on 1 km of beach in southern California to investigate shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach. The overall mean abundance (98.6individualskm?1), estimated biomass (9.6kgkm?1), and species richness (5.5specieskm?1) of shorebirds observed were very high for a sandy beach in the temperate zone. Eight species, sanderling (Calidris alba), semipalmated plover (Charadrius semipalmatus), marbled

  2. Back contamination.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, G. B.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of the concept and implications of back contamination and of the ways and means for its prevention. Back contamination is defined as contamination of the terrestrial biosphere with organisms or materials returned from outer space that are capable of potentially harmful terrestrial activity. Since the question of whether or not life exists on other planets may, in reality, not be answered until many samples are returned to earth for detailed study, requirements for the prevention of back contamination are necessary. A review of methods of microbiologic contamination control is followed by a discussion of the nature of back contamination and its risk levels, contamination sources and locations, and possible defenses against back contamination. The U.S. lunar back contamination program is described and shown to provide a valuable basis for further refining the technology for the control of planetary back contamination.

  3. Changes along a seawall and natural beaches: Fourchon, LA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossa, Joann; Nakashima, Lindsay D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper compares shoreline and beach morphology changes and responses to storms from 1985 to 1988 along sections of a rapidly eroding coast at the Bayou Lafourche headland, Louisiana. A beach consisting of a cement-filled bag seawall and nourishment was compared with natural beaches to the west and east of the project. Local patterns of beach response could be attributed to several recent processes and historical conditions. Hurricane Gilbert, which made landfall in Mexico, caused about 70% of the sediment loss on both the artificially-stablized and the natural shorelines over this three-year period.

  4. 77 FR 47520 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

  5. 78 FR 19155 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

  6. 77 FR 35898 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; North Topsail Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Intracoastal Waterway at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. The safety zone will...Waterway, mile 252.3, at North Topsail Beach, North Carolina. DATES: Comments...

  7. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

  8. 33 CFR 165.T05-1082 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. 165.T05-1082 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina (34°13?07?...

  9. 33 CFR 165.T05-0741 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. 165.T05-0741 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Intracoastal Waterway, mile 295.6, at Carolina Beach, North Carolina (34°03?21? N,...

  10. 78 FR 34881 - Special Local Regulations; Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

  11. 75 FR 67214 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ...Events; Wrightsville Channel, Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...regulations for the swim portions of ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance...on the waters adjacent to Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. These special...

  12. 76 FR 48879 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...Environmental Impact Statement for Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan for Incidental...affect the federally endangered Alabama beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus ammobates...documents analyze the take of the Alabama beach mouse incidental to construction of...

  13. 75 FR 56024 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...Regulations for the swim portions of ``Beach 2 Battleship Full and Half Iron Distance...Banks Channel, adjacent to Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. These Special...

  14. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

  15. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

  16. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930 Navigation...Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area. The...United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the contiguous...

  17. 77 FR 35321 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...surrounding Harbor Island in Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. This Special Local Regulation...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, during the swim...

  18. 77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ...Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter...Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World Championship, a high speed power boat race. The Palm Beach World Championship is scheduled to take...

  19. 33 CFR 334.930 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. 334.930 Section 334.930...Harbor, Calif.; Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. (a) The restricted area...the United States Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California, and the...

  20. 76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...

  1. 77 FR 38005 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ...Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA AGENCY: Coast...zone for the Kings Beach Independence Day...William Hawn, Sector San Francisco Waterways Safety...for the Kings Beach Independence Day...Coast Guard Sector San Francisco. The PATCOM...

  2. 78 FR 39599 - Safety Zone; Independence Day Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ...Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA AGENCY: Coast...Fireworks, Kings Beach, CA in the Captain of the Port, San Francisco area of responsibility...Fireworks, Kings beach, CA in 33 CFR 165...Coast Guard Sector San Francisco. The PATCOM...

  3. 75 FR 52549 - Environmental Impact Statement; Alabama Beach Mouse Draft General Conservation Plan; Fort Morgan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ...Environmental Impact Statement; Alabama Beach Mouse Draft General Conservation Plan; Fort...statement (EIS) on the draft Alabama Beach Mouse General Conservation Plan (ABM GCP) Project...are included in the plan: Alabama beach mouse (ABM) (Peromyscus polionotus...

  4. Metrics to assess ecological condition, change, and impacts in sandy beach ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Thomas A; Schoeman, David S; Jones, Alan R; Dugan, Jenifer E; Hubbard, David M; Defeo, Omar; Peterson, Charles H; Weston, Michael A; Maslo, Brooke; Olds, Andrew D; Scapini, Felicita; Nel, Ronel; Harris, Linda R; Lucrezi, Serena; Lastra, Mariano; Huijbers, Chantal M; Connolly, Rod M

    2014-11-01

    Complexity is increasingly the hallmark in environmental management practices of sandy shorelines. This arises primarily from meeting growing public demands (e.g., real estate, recreation) whilst reconciling economic demands with expectations of coastal users who have modern conservation ethics. Ideally, shoreline management is underpinned by empirical data, but selecting ecologically-meaningful metrics to accurately measure the condition of systems, and the ecological effects of human activities, is a complex task. Here we construct a framework for metric selection, considering six categories of issues that authorities commonly address: erosion; habitat loss; recreation; fishing; pollution (litter and chemical contaminants); and wildlife conservation. Possible metrics were scored in terms of their ability to reflect environmental change, and against criteria that are widely used for judging the performance of ecological indicators (i.e., sensitivity, practicability, costs, and public appeal). From this analysis, four types of broadly applicable metrics that also performed very well against the indicator criteria emerged: 1.) traits of bird populations and assemblages (e.g., abundance, diversity, distributions, habitat use); 2.) breeding/reproductive performance sensu lato (especially relevant for birds and turtles nesting on beaches and in dunes, but equally applicable to invertebrates and plants); 3.) population parameters and distributions of vertebrates associated primarily with dunes and the supralittoral beach zone (traditionally focused on birds and turtles, but expandable to mammals); 4.) compound measurements of the abundance/cover/biomass of biota (plants, invertebrates, vertebrates) at both the population and assemblage level. Local constraints (i.e., the absence of birds in highly degraded urban settings or lack of dunes on bluff-backed beaches) and particular issues may require alternatives. Metrics - if selected and applied correctly - provide empirical evidence of environmental condition and change, but often do not reflect deeper environmental values per se. Yet, values remain poorly articulated for many beach systems; this calls for a comprehensive identification of environmental values and the development of targeted programs to conserve these values on sandy shorelines globally. PMID:25014753

  5. Journal of Coastal Research 21 3 522534 West Palm Beach, Florida May 2005 Beach Profile Equilibrium and Patterns of Wave Decay and

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Journal of Coastal Research 21 3 522­534 West Palm Beach, Florida May 2005 Beach Profile.S.A. ABSTRACT WANG, P. and KRAUS, N.C., 2005. Beach profile equilibrium and patterns of wave decay and energy Research, 21(3), 522­534. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. The widely accepted assumption

  6. Estimate of oil persisting on the beaches of Prince William Sound 12 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Short, Jeffrey W; Lindeberg, Mandy R; Harris, Patricia M; Maselko, Jacek M; Pella, Jerome J; Rice, Stanley D

    2004-01-01

    We estimated the amount of oil remaining in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 12 yr after the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill to assess its importance as a long-term reservoir of toxic hydrocarbons. We found oil on 78 of 91 beaches randomly selected according to their oiling history. Surface oiling was recorded for randomly placed quadrats, which were then excavated and examined for subsurface oil. The cumulative area of beach contaminated by surface or subsurface oil was estimated at 11.3 ha. Surface oil varied little with tide height, but subsurface oil was more prevalent at the middle tide heights. The mass of remaining subsurface oil is conservatively estimated at 55 600 kg. Analysis of terpanes indicated that over 90% of the surface oil and all of the subsurface oil was from the Exxon Valdez and that Monterey Formation oil deposited after the 1964 Alaska earthquake accounted for the remaining surface oil. These results indicate that oil from the Exxon Valdez remains by far the largest reservoir of biologically available polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on beaches impacted by the spill and that biota dependent on these beaches risk continued exposure. PMID:14740712

  7. Beyond beach width: Steps toward identifying and integrating ecological envelopes with geomorphic features and datums for sandy beach ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Quigley, Brenna J.

    2013-10-01

    Our understanding of ecological responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcing lags far behind that of physical or geomorphic responses for beach ecosystems. Reconciling geomorphic features of beaches with ecological features, such as intertidal zones and mobile biota that are not described by beach width alone, could help address this issue. First, although intertidal zones characterized by distinct groups of mobile burrowing animals are described for beaches, the locations and elevations of these zones do not coincide with standard shoreline datums. Second, intertidal zonation on beaches is extremely dynamic due to the combination of unstable sandy substrate and a highly mobile biota; shifting strongly with tides, waves, storms, and beach conditions. We propose that beach biota use ecological "envelopes" of cross-shore habitat to cope with constantly changing beach conditions. We estimated the extent of these "envelopes" for a variety of taxa on tidal to daily, semi-lunar and seasonal to annual time scales, using literature values on cross-shore animal movements and a field study of the positions of intertidal beds of two species of typical mid and upper shore beach invertebrates. Daily or tidal cross-shore movement varied most (1 m to 100 m) with daily "envelopes" covering 7% to 85% of the available beach width. Semi-lunar movement (12 m) and envelopes (28%) were relatively small, while estimated annual "envelopes" were large, averaging 61% of beach width. The large scope of annual ecological envelopes relative to beach widths reflects how intertidal animals escape seasonally extreme or episodically harsh conditions. Intertidal bed positions of a talitrid amphipod and an opheliid polychaete correlated well with selected beach features in our field study suggesting that incorporation of ecological envelopes in models of shoreline evolution may be feasible. Describing ecological zones in terms of more dynamic shoreline features, such as total water level (TWL) that incorporate wave setup and runup, may be particularly applicable to upper intertidal biota whose distributions closely followed the high tide strand line (HTS), a feature which tracks total water level (TWL). Developing a TWL approach may also provide new insights on habitat availability for beach nesting wildlife and coastal strand vegetation. Conservation of beach ecosystems could be enhanced by incorporating sufficient beach habitat to accommodate the dynamic ecological envelopes used by mobile intertidal invertebrates and wildlife.

  8. MEETING IN MEXICO: NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING EPA'S VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Beaches in the United States of (North) America are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on water samples that typically require at least 18 hours to analyze. This persistence approach, or model, often leads...

  9. NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Beaches are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...

  10. NAME: Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project LOCATION: Cedar Beach County Parke, Suffolk Co., NY

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    : The Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project will restore local essential ecosystem is productive for marine finfish, shellfish, and other wildlife and contributes significantly to the biological productivity of Noyack Bay. The creek serves as a nursery and feeding area for many estuarine fish species

  11. Metal-Microbial Interactions in Toronto Sunnyside Beach: Impact on Water Quality and Public Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plach, J. M.; Elliott, A.; Warren, L. A.

    2009-05-01

    Assessing recreational water quality requires a fundamental understanding of metal-microbial interactions and the key biogeochemical processes occurring in urban public beaches. Metals play an important role in the distribution and virulence (e.g. resistance) of microorganisms in water systems. In turn, microorganisms have a significant influence on metal cycling, thus affecting metal mobility, bioavailability and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Bacteria adhere to floc, small suspended mineral-bacterial aggregates, in aquatic systems resulting in high-density floc-associated bacterial biofilm communities. These nanoparticulate bacterial microhabitats are important environmental sinks for metals and potential reservoirs for antibiotic resistant and pathogenic bacteria. The objectives of this study are to identify and quantify (1) metal distributions among suspended floc, bed sediment and water-column aqueous compartments (2) important biogeochemical processes influencing metal cycling and (3) linkages between floc metals and the occurrence of floc associated antibiotic resistant bacteria and pathogens across a series of variably contaminated aquatic systems. Results of this project will provide new diagnostic indicators of pathogens in recreational water systems and aid in the development of public health policies to improve water quality and reduce water borne infectious disease. Here, results will be presented assessing the metal and microbial community dynamics in samples collected from Toronto's Sunnyside Beach (May 13 and August 20), an urban public beach on Lake Ontario. Water column, floc and bed sediments near and offshore were analyzed for physico-chemical characteristics and metal concentrations. Floc were imaged using DAPI and FISH to assess microbial community structure. Results to date, characterizing the linkages amongst bacteria, metal contaminant concentrations and sediment partitioning and system physico-chemical conditions will be discussed.

  12. Parametric Wave Transformation Models on Natural Beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apotsos, A. A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.; Guza, R. T.

    2006-12-01

    Seven parametric models for wave height transformation across the surf zone [e.g., Thornton and Guza, 1983] are tested with observations collected between the shoreline and about 5-m water depth during 2 experiments on a barred beach near Duck, NC, and between the shoreline and about 3.5-m water depth during 2 experiments on unbarred beaches near La Jolla, CA. Offshore wave heights ranged from about 0.1 to 3.0 m. Beach profiles were surveyed approximately every other day. The models predict the observations well. Root-mean-square errors between observed and simulated wave heights are small in water depths h > 2 m (average rms errors < 10%), and increase with decreasing depth for h < 2 m (average rms errors > 20%). The lowest rms errors (i.e., the most accurate predictions) are achieved by tuning a free parameter, ?, in each model. To tune the models accurately to the data considered here, observations are required at 3 to 5 locations, and must span the surf zone. No tuned or untuned model provides the best predictions for all data records in any one experiment. The best fit ?'s for each model-experiment pair are represented well with an empirical hyperbolic tangent curve based on the inverse Iribarren number. In 3 of the 4 data sets, estimating ? for each model using an average curve based on the predictions and observations from all 4 experiments typically improves model-data agreement relative to using a constant or previously determined empirical ?. The best fit ?'s at the 4th experiment (conducted off La Jolla, CA) are roughly 20% smaller than the ?'s for the other 3 experiments, and thus using the experiment-averaged curve increases prediction errors. Possible causes for the smaller ?'s at the 4th experiment will be discussed. Funded by ONR and NSF.

  13. Holocene cemented beach deposits in Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischler, Eberhard; Lomando, Anthony J.

    1997-06-01

    Two types of cemented beach deposits occur on reef islands off the coast of Belize. These are (1) intertidal beachrock that is dominantly cemented by marine aragonite and high-magnesium-calcite cements, and (2) supratidal cayrock that is cemented mainly by vadose low-magnesium-calcite cements. Besides differences in position relative to present sea level and resulting early diagenesic features, beachrock and cayrock can be distinguished on the basis of differences in composition, texture, geographical position, and age. Whereas the composition of beachrock is similar to that of the adjacent marginal reef sediments, cayrock is enriched in benthic foraminifera. Intertidal beachrock is moderately to well sorted and well cemented, while supratidal cayrock is very well sorted, poorly cemented and friable. Beachrock occurs preferentially on windward beaches of sand-shingle Gays on the middle and southern barrier reefs and on the isolated platforms Glovers and Lighthouse Reefs. Cayrock only occurs on larger mangrove-sand Gays of the isolated platforms Turneffe Islands, Lighthouse Reef, and the northern barrier reef. 14C-dating of ten whole-rock and mollusk shell samples produced calibrated dates between AD 345 and AD 1435 for beachrock and between BC 1085 and AD 1190 for cayrock. The large-scale distribution of beachrock in Belize supports the contention that physical processes such as water agitation rather than biological processes control beachrock formation and distribution. Only on windward sides of cays that are close to the reef crest, where large amounts of seawater flush the beaches, considerable amounts of cements can be precipitated to produce beachrock. Cayrock forms due to cementation in the vadose zone and is only preserved on larger, stable mangrove-sand cays.

  14. Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to beach water, Murphy Park Beach, Door County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.

    2013-01-01

    Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in beach water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing beaches due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many beaches. Murphy Park Beach, a relatively pristine beach on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the beach yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes Beaches, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the beach rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the beach from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of beach sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in beach water had a statistically significant relation (p-value ‹0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into beach water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the beach, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of beach water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in beach water.

  15. Beach ridge plains and sea level change

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, W.F. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Beach ridge systems of the low-to-moderate energy swash-built type can be used to determine ambient near-shore wave energy values, as well as sea level changes up to 4--5 m. Wave energy values can be obtained from individual samples or mean values of individual samples, the grain-size kurtosis (inverted) is useful, as is the sixth moment measure. Sea level change information comes from sequences of beach ridge samples, spanning one or more abrupt changes in smoothed kurtosis. Other procedures are also available for each of these tasks. Settling-lag ridges (horizontal bedding) may be useful also. Dune ridges and storm-surge ridges are not appropriate for this kind of work. There are also limitations on nature and general size of the sediment in the ridge (preferably quartz sand or coarse silt; 50-gram samples), and on map geometry of the system (no sharp curvature, no splaying; parallelism or nearly so). Sampling must meet strict standards as to location, depth and thickness of the sampled layer: lab work requires 30-minute sieving on quarter-phi screens. Each beach ridge represents a sea level rise and then fall, perhaps 5 to 30 cm, over a few years or decades, but not a storm. The longest presently-known sequence of beach ridge is located in an area of slow glacio-isostatic rebound, and spans some 12,000 years, but ridge systems in stable areas cover only about 3,200 years or less. Each long system typically shows many changes of sea level, in the range of one to 4--5 meters, but there does not appear to be any clearly-marked periodicity that persists throughout the entire record, other than the time interval between the ridges themselves. This interval commonly averages 35--50 years, but in a few settings is only about four years, and in others 10--12. In a few instances, the interval may be 60 years or more.

  16. Levels and fate of perfluoroalkyl substances in beached plastic pellets and sediments collected from Greece.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Marta; Farré, Marinella; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Barceló, Damià

    2014-10-15

    Plastic debris damages marine wildlife and ecosystems becoming an important source of marine pollution. In addition, they can sorb, concentrate and stabilise contaminants acting as toxic carriers to the marine food web. In this context, the presence of 18 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in plastic pellets (n=5) and beach sediment (n=9) samples widely distributed around Greek coastal areas was assessed. The results, mainly, showed the sorption of PFASs onto pellet surface from surrounding water with concentrations from method limit of quantification to 115 ng/kg for C5, C7, C8 and C10 carboxylic acids and C8 sulfonate acid. A similar pattern was found by comparing plastic pellets and sediment for the same sampling locations that could indicate a common origin of contamination in both types of samples. However, since the number of analysed samples is limited, a more comprehensive study with a higher number of samples should be performed in future research. PMID:25172614

  17. The Beach--A Natural Protection from the Sea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sensabaugh, William M.

    1983-01-01

    The beach and sand dunes are the first line of defense protecting the land from the sea. The effectiveness of the beach is caused by its sloping surface which dissipates the energy of waves and by the flexibility of the slope which changes as the waves change. The process and rate of accretion and erosion are dependent on the size and frequency of…

  18. 33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

  19. 33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

  20. Tidal Dynamics of the Water Table in Beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Nielsen

    1990-01-01

    Tidal motions of the water table height inside a sloping beach are investigated via field measurements and theoretical considerations. Only the movements forced by the tide are considered, so a beach with negligible wave activity was chosen for the field measurements. The data show that even in the absence of precipitation the time averaged inland water table stands considerably above

  1. Bodies that Matter: Performing White Possession on the Beach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreton-Robinson, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    Beaches remain important places within indigenous coastal peoples' territories, although the silence about our ownership is deafening. Many authors have argued that within Australian popular culture the beach is a key site where racialized and gendered transgressions, fantasies, and desires are played out, but none have elucidated how these…

  2. 33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

  3. 33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

  4. 33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

  5. Excitation of Edge Waves by Waves Incident on a Beach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert T. Guza; Russ E. Davis

    1974-01-01

    The dynamics of waves on a beach is known to be influenced significantly by nonlinear effects, and considerable progress has been made toward describing certain of these effects. Carrier and Greenspan [1958] found exact solutions of the shallow water equations describing temporally periodic, finite amplitude standing waves on a beach of constant slope; these waves are two-dimensional in that they

  6. Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black beach sand

    E-print Network

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    Pseudomonas sabulinigri sp. nov., isolated from black beach sand Kyoung-Ho Kim,1 Seong Woon Roh,1 , was isolated from black sand collected from Soesoggak, Jeju Island, Korea. Cells grew at 4­37 6C, at pH 5 beach sand, a bacterium was isolated and subjected to taxonomic characterization. On the basis

  7. Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches closed Chopper VIDEO captures sharks migrating Posted: March 7, 2013 By: Katie Johnson, WPTV.com PALM BEACH, Fla. - Seasonal of migrating sharks have been spotted by lifeguards, anglers and swimmers, and confirmed by television news

  8. Beach Erosion along Tottori Coast and Comprehensive Sediment Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Yasumoto; T. Uda; Y. Matsubara; G. Hirano

    2007-01-01

    YASUMOTO, Y., UDA, T., MATSUBARA, Y. and HIRANO, G., 2007. Beach erosion along Tottori coast and comprehensive sediment management. Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 82 - 87. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749.0208 Beach erosion of the Tottori coast, Japan, was investigated based on the long-term shoreline changes using aerial photographs and bathymetric

  9. Virtual Beach v2.2 User Guide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Virtual Beach version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational beaches. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...

  10. RECREATIONAL BEACH WATER QUALITY MONITORING WITH QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in monitoring the water at these beaches for fecal indicator bacteria as a means of determining if it is safe for pu...

  11. A GIS Application for the Study of Beach Morphodynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. P. Humphries; C. N. Ligdas

    This research is a continuation of work conducted at the University of Sunderland since 1990 on the impacts of the accumulation of millions of tonnes of colliery spoil on the beaches. Regular surveys of the beaches were undertaken from 1991 spanning a period of about 5 years during which all mining activity ceased on the Durham coast. During mining operations

  12. At Long Beach, Success Is Measured by Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The California State University campus at Long Beach graduated 8,720 students last month. Each one got the opportunity to walk the stage, and F. King Alexander, the university's president, shook every hand. California State at Long Beach has made graduating a greater number of its 38,000 students its top priority. The slogan "Graduation Begins…

  13. BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC California State University, Long Beach

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Eric J.

    University, Long Beach JAZZ STUDIES HANDBOOK 2013-2014 #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome to "Jazz At The Beach" 4 The Jazz Studies Faculty 6 Your Applied Instructor 9 Jazz 18 Ensemble Requirements 19 B.M. in Jazz Studies Curriculum 21 M.M. in Jazz Studies Curriculum 21

  14. Geographic setting influences Great Lakes beach microbiological water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Johnson, Heather E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of factors that influence Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) concentrations, pathogen occurrence, and microbial sources at Great Lakes beaches comes largely from individual beach studies. Using 12 representative beaches, we tested enrichment cultures from 273 beach water and 22 tributary samples for EC, ENT, and genes indicating the bacterial pathogens Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella spp., Salmonella spp, Campylobacter jejuni/coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 108–145 samples for Bacteroides human, ruminant, and gull source-marker genes. EC/ENT temporal patterns, general Bacteroides concentration, and pathogen types and occurrence were regionally consistent (up to 40 km), but beach catchment variables (drains/creeks, impervious surface, urban land cover) influenced exceedances of EC/ENT standards and detections of Salmonella and STEC. Pathogen detections were more numerous when the EC/ENT Beach Action Value (but not when the Geometric Mean and Statistical Threshold Value) was exceeded. EC, ENT, and pathogens were not necessarily influenced by the same variables. Multiple Bacteroides sources, varying by date, occurred at every beach. Study of multiple beaches in different geographic settings provided new insights on the contrasting influences of regional and local variables, and a broader-scale perspective, on significance of EC/ENT exceedances, bacterial sources, and pathogen occurrence.

  15. 17. TURNTABLE RECONSTRUCTION BEACH & HYDE: Photocopy of May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. TURNTABLE RECONSTRUCTION - BEACH & HYDE: Photocopy of May 1956 photograph of the turntable at Beach and Hyde Streets. View to the north. Note position of the tracks atop the turntable and details of the steel members that support the wooden decking. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. DEPOSITIONAL SETTINGS OF SAND BEACHES ALONG WHITEWATER RIVERSy

    E-print Network

    beaches in the upper Grand Canyon and along five Wild and Scenic Rivers in Idaho, but not along other rivers. Beaches located upstream from constrictions are rare, in general, except in the Grand Canyon Rivers, are fairly common along the rivers in Idaho, but are relatively rare in the Grand Canyon

  17. Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Hayworth; T. P. Clement; J. F. Valentine

    2011-01-01

    From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological

  18. 270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH BEACH. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  19. Recreational water quality response to a filtering barrier at a Great Lakes beach.

    PubMed

    Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Nevers, Meredith B; Breitenbach, Cathy; Whitman, Richard L

    2013-11-15

    Recent research has sought to determine the off- or onshore origin of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in order to improve local recreational water quality. In an effort to reduce offshore contamination, a filtering barrier (FB) was installed at Calumet Beach, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL. A horseshoe-shaped curtain (146 m long, 0.18 mm apparent opening size, 1.5-1.6 m deepest point) was designed to exclude FIB containing or promoting debris and thus reduce the number of swimming advisories during the examination period of July through September 2012. Mean water Escherichia coli concentrations were significantly lower at southern transects (S; outside FB) than at transects within the FB (WN) and at northern transects (N; outside FB) (1.45 log (MPN)/100 ml vs. 1.74 and 1.72, respectively, p < 0.05, n = 234). Turbidity was significantly higher at the WN transects (p < 0.001, n = 233), but it tended to increase throughout the sampling season within and outside the FB. E. coli in adjacent foreshore sand was significantly lower at the WN transects. A combination of factors might explain higher E. coli and turbidity within the FB including increased sediment resuspension, trapped algae, shallowing within the FB, and large lake hydrodynamic processes. This remediation approach may find better use in a different hydrodynamic setting, but the results of this experiment provide insight on sources of contamination and nearshore dynamics that may direct future beach management strategies. PMID:24041625

  20. Recreational water quality response to a filtering barrier at a Great Lakes beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Nevers, Meredith; Breitenbach, Cathy; Whitman, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has sought to determine the off- or onshore origin of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in order to improve local recreational water quality. In an effort to reduce offshore contamination, a filtering barrier (FB) was installed at Calumet Beach, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL. A horseshoe-shaped curtain (146 m long, 0.18 mm apparent opening size, 1.5–1.6 m deepest point) was designed to exclude FIB containing or promoting debris and thus reduce the number of swimming advisories during the examination period of July through September 2012. Mean water Escherichia coli concentrations were significantly lower at southern transects (S; outside FB) than at transects within the FB (WN) and at northern transects (N; outside FB) (1.45 log (MPN)/100 ml vs. 1.74 and 1.72, respectively, p < 0.05, n = 234). Turbidity was significantly higher at the WN transects (p < 0.001, n = 233), but it tended to increase throughout the sampling season within and outside the FB. E. coli in adjacent foreshore sand was significantly lower at the WN transects. A combination of factors might explain higher E. coli and turbidity within the FB including increased sediment resuspension, trapped algae, shallowing within the FB, and large lake hydrodynamic processes. This remediation approach may find better use in a different hydrodynamic setting, but the results of this experiment provide insight on sources of contamination and nearshore dynamics that may direct future beach management strategies.

  1. Seasonal dynamics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in surface sediments of a diatom-dominated intertidal mudflat (Marennes-Oléron, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Guillaume; Zhao, Jean-Michel; Orvain, Francis; Dupuy, Christine; Klein, Géraldine L.; Graber, Marianne; Maugard, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    Numerous field-based investigations have highlighted that the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) is physico-chemically and ecologically important for intertidal mudflats. EPS are largely secreted by marine benthic diatoms and their quantity and quality are environmental-dependant. This paper focused on the dynamic pathways, concentration rates and monosaccharides composition of colloidal, bound and residual carbohydrates extracted by using a cationic exchange resin from a diatom-dominated intertidal mudflat (Marennes-Oléron, France) during two different sampling periods: winter (February 2008) and summer (July 2008). A wide range of biotic and abiotic parameters were also studied to better understand the effect of environmental parameters, e.g., chlorophyll a, salinity, pore water amount, emersion time, luminosity, C:N ratio and tidal coefficient. Multiple colorimetric assays coupled to gas chromatographic analyses were carried out to perform the biochemical characterizations. Firstly, the quantity of carbohydrates produced during winter (5.28 ?g·?g chl a- 1) was more important than during summer (2.04 ?g·?g chl a- 1). Yet, more proteins were found during summer for the colloidal and bound fractions (0.73 and 1.04 ?g·?g chl a- 1). Further investigations showed that the dynamic pathways were equivalent between winter and summer: bound carbohydrates (BC) quantities increased during the sediment emersion periods on the contrary to colloidal carbohydrates (CC) which tended to drop throughout the emersion time. The quality in monosaccharides was fraction-dependant, whatever the season. CC were always glucose-rich confirming their role of carbon source. BC were mainly composed of rhamnose whose the ratio increased during the emersion period, thus conferring adhesive properties to the extracellular matrix bounding diatoms cells. Residual carbohydrates (RC) were composed of various monosaccharides and a major increase of glucose content was found at the end of emersion, corresponding to intracellular C-storage in prevention to immersion times. Summer-RC were composed of fucose, a monosaccharide specific to these fractions and which was non-present during the winter campaign. Environmental parameters, such as salinity, pore water amount, and tidal coefficient could have a significant impact on the concentration rates and pathways of carbohydrates.

  2. Wildlife, urban inputs, and landscape configuration are responsible for degraded swimming water quality at an embayed beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Nevers, Meredith; Whitman, Richard L.; Ge, Zhongfu; Shively, Dawn A.; Spoljaric, Ashley; Przybyla-Kelly, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Jeorse Park Beach, on southern Lake Michigan, experiences frequent closures due to high Escherichia coli (E. coli) levels since regular monitoring was implemented in 2005. During the summer of 2010, contaminant source tracking techniques, such as the conventional microbial and physical surveys and hydrodynamic models, were used to determine the reasons for poor water quality at Jeorse Park. Fecal indicator bacteria (E. coli, enterococci) were high throughout the season, with densities ranging from 12–2419 (culturable E. coli) and 1–2550 and < 1–5831 (culturable and qPCR enterococci, respectively). Genetic markers for human (Bacteroides HF183) and gull (Catellicoccus marimammalium) fecal contamination were found in 15% and 37% of the samples indicating multiple sources contributing to poor water quality. Nesting colonies of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) have steadily increased since 2005, coinciding with high E. colilevels. A hydrodynamic model indicated that limited circulation allows bacteria entering the embayed area to be retained in nearshore areas; and bacterial resuspension from sand and stranded beach wrack during storm events compounds the problem. The integration of hydrodynamics, expanded use of chemical and biological markers, as well as more complex statistical multivariate techniques can improve microbial source tracking, informing management actions to improve recreational water quality. Alterations to embayed structures to improve circulation and reduce nuisance algae as well as growing native plants to retain sand to improve beach morphometry are among some of the restoration strategies under consideration in ongoing multi-agency collaborations.

  3. Persistence of 10-year old Exxon Valdez oil on Gulf of Alaska beaches: the importance of boulder-armoring.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Gail V; Mann, Daniel H; Short, Jeffrey W

    2006-09-01

    Oil stranded as a result of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill has persisted for >10 years at study sites on Gulf of Alaska shores distant from the spill's origin. These sites were contaminated by "oil mousse", which persists in these settings due to armoring of underlying sediments and their included oil beneath boulders. The boulder-armored beaches that we resampled in 1999 showed continued contamination by subsurface oil, despite their exposure to moderate to high wave energies. Significant declines in surface oil cover occurred at all study sites. In contrast, mousse has persisted under boulders in amounts similar to what was present in 1994 and probably in 1989. Especially striking is the general lack of weathering of this subsurface oil over the last decade. Oil at five of the six armored-beach sites 10 years after the spill is compositionally similar to 11-day old Exxon Valdez oil. Analysis of movements in the boulder-armor that covers the study beaches reveals that only minor shifts have occurred since 1994, suggesting that over the last five, and probably over the last 10 years, boulder-armors have remained largely unmoved at the study sites. These findings emphasize the importance of particular geomorphic parameters in determining stranded oil persistence. Surface armoring, combined with stranding of oil mousse, results in the unexpectedly lengthy persistence of only lightly to moderately weathered oil within otherwise high-energy wave environments. PMID:16524600

  4. Groundwater Contamination

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Groundwater Foundation's sources of ground water contamination page discusses common contaminates, how they get to ground water, sources of pollution along with cleanup and prevention practices. The site's focal point is a detailed map of contaminants as they enter the water cycle.

  5. The relationship between sandy beach nematodes and environmental characteristics in two Brazilian sandy beaches (Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro).

    PubMed

    Maria, Tatiana F; Paiva, Paulo; Vanreusel, Ann; Esteves, André M

    2013-03-01

    We investigated if the differences in density and nematode communities of intertidal sediments from two Brazilian sheltered sandy beaches were related to environmental characteristics. The upper tide level (UTL) and the low tide level (LTL) of both beaches were surveyed in January (austral summer) and June 2001 (austral winter) during low-spring tides, by collecting samples of nematodes and sediments. Differences in density between beaches, tidal level and seasons, and nematode community structure were investigated. Sediments from both beaches were composed of medium to very coarse sand. The highest nematode densities were found at the UTL, and significant differences between beaches, tidal levels and months were found. A total of 54 genera were found and the genera composition on both sheltered beaches was similar to other exposed worldwide sandy beaches. The density and structure of the nematode community at both beaches clearly varied along the spatial and temporal scales. Gravel percentage was the most important variable explaining the spatial distribution of the nematodes, determining the four sub-communities; this suggests that the sediment characteristics influence the nematode community, rather than physical hydrodynamic forces. Temperature and salinity were suggested to be important variables affecting the temporal variation. PMID:23460426

  6. The modern tourist's perception of the beach: Is the sandy beach a place of conflict between tourism and biodiversity?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcin Filip

    As economic growth gave people more free time, since the 1950s coastal areas have become increasingly desirable holiday destinations, and beach tourism has grown at an enormous rate, becoming a mass phenomenon. Next to their ecological importance as bio-filters, sandy beaches in Europe tend to be of great economic value through tourism. Although, modern tourists are largely peaceful, tourism itself

  7. USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE BEACH TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID BEACH CLOSING TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these beaches to determine whether thes...

  8. USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE BEACH TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID BEACH CLOSINGS TOOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these beaches to determine whether thes...

  9. Probabilistic assessment of beach and dune changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Stockdon, H.; Haines, J.; Krabill, W.; Swift, R.; Brock, J.

    2004-01-01

    The recent availability of spatially-dense airborne lidar data makes assessment of the vulnerability of beaches and dunes to storm impacts practical over long reaches of coast. As an initial test, elevations of the tops (D high) and bases (Dlow) of foredune ridges along a 55-km reach on the northern Outer Banks, NC were found to have considerable spatial variability suggesting that different parts of the barrier island would respond differently to storms. Comparing statistics of storm wave runup to D high and Dlow, we found that net erosion due to overwash and dune retreat should be greatest at the northern and southern ends of the study area and least in the central section. This predicted spatial pattern of storm-induced erosion is similar to the spatial pattern of long-term erosion of the shoreline which may be controlled by additional processes (such as gradients in longshore transport) as well as the cross-shore processes considered here. However, consider feedback where at erosional hot spots there is a deficit of sand (caused by gradients in longshore transport) which lead to lower dunes and enhanced erosional cross-shore processes, such as overwash. Hence, the erosional hot spots would be exacerbated, further increasing the vulnerability of the beach and dunes to net erosion.

  10. Experience of monitoring beaches for radioactive particles.

    PubMed

    Davies, Mike; McCulloch, George; Adsley, Ian

    2007-09-01

    This paper discusses some of the theoretical and practical problems that are encountered in monitoring beaches for hot particles. The experience is from operating a near-continuous monitoring program, for a period of eight years, on beaches near the Dounreay site. The reliability and failure mechanisms of the monitoring systems used will be discussed, together with remedial actions employed. The viability and performance of several types and configurations of radiation detectors will be described, along with methods by which particles might be detected, given their response to buried particles. When large areas are being monitored at high spatial resolution, which is required for efficient particle detection, the volume of data recorded for audit purposes can be very large. The use and abuse of Geographical Information Systems for this work is described. Other practical aspects of performing surveys are also discussed, including understanding health-and-safety requirements; constraints imposed by weather, tides and tidal speed; the logistics of making vehicles available to perform the work; and how a particle should be recovered once detected. PMID:17768319

  11. Swash-Induced Infiltration in a Sandy Beach Aquifer, Cape Henlopen, Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, J.; Ullman, W. J.; Michael, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge has been shown to be an important source of nutrients, heavy metals, and organic compounds to the coastal ocean. Physical flow and mixing dynamics in the intertidal zone may influence these contaminant fluxes; however the mechanisms that contribute to mixing of saltwater and through-flowing freshwater are not well understood. A study of wave swash-induced infiltration at two sites on Cape Henlopen, Delaware, was performed to quantify effects of swash zone width and tidal elevation on the flux of seawater into the beach aquifer. Porewater salinity measurements indicate the presence of a well-defined intertidal freshwater-seawater mixing zone. High-frequency pressure and soil moisture measurements from shore-perpendicular arrays across the beachface were used to infer influx rates. Measurements were conducted at two sites, one with larger waves and a wide swash zone, and the other with smaller waves and a narrow swash zone. Infiltration occurred during the rising tide at the leading edge of the swash zone and increased in magnitude from low tide to high tide. Infiltration rates were on average 2.2 times greater near mean high water than near mean low water. Measurements revealed that swash zone width influences infiltration: influx rates associated with the beach with a wider swash zone were 2.7 times higher than those of a beach with a narrower swash zone. The field observations are roughly consistent with estimates from analytical models, which are highly sensitive to uncertain model parameters. Pressure measurements during rising tide also indicate changes in hydraulic gradients due to infiltrated seawater. Flow beneath the sensor array was initially seaward and as the swash zone tracked up the beachface, a groundwater mound formed that resulted in net landward flow in the vicinity of the sensor array. The results demonstrate the role of wave swash in driving beach seawater infiltration, indicate spatial trends in flux across the beachface, and suggest changes in groundwater flow direction resulting from tidal fluctuations. These insights into beach groundwater dynamics have implications for estimating fluid and chemical fluxes to coastal waters.

  12. [Residual level and ecological risk assessment of OCPs and PCBs in sediments of mudflat shellfish culturing areas in Ningbo, Zhejiang Province of East China].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Hai; You, Zhong-Jie; Shentu, Ji-Kang; Zhong, Hui-Ying; Chai, Li-Yue

    2012-06-01

    GC-ECD methods were adopted to determine the residual level of OCPs (including HCHs and DDTs) and PCBs in the surface sediments collected from mudflat shellfish culturing areas in Ningbo, with the sources of the OCPs and PCBs analyzed and the ecological risks of the residual OCPs and PCBs evaluated. The residual level of OCPs was 0.80-32.40 ng X g(-1), and that of PCBs was 3.20-33.33 ng X g(-1). The HCHs mainly came from long distance atmospheric transportation and historical residues, while the DDTs had new input at some sites, possibly coming from the application of dicofol. At most sites, there existed potential ecological risks of p, p'-DDT and DDTs, with strong indications in Qiangtou and Xidian where the residual level of p, p'-DDT was higher than the effect rang median (ERM), suggesting an ecological menace to the benthos. The residual PCBs at most sites were in low level ecological risk. PMID:22937662

  13. TESTING A BEACH BACTERIA MODEL IN LAKE MICHIGAN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Beach closures due to high bacterial concentrations deprive the public and disrupt the tourist industry. Almost half the Lake Michigan beaches are closed more than 10% of the time. In 1999 the six-mile long beach in Huntington Beach, California was closed in July and August. Due ...

  14. !""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza

    E-print Network

    !""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza Field Introduction/Overview This second grade unit focuses on beach hoppers, tiny amphipods found on most sandy beaches. The first three lessons focus on learning beach hopper characteristics in the classroom

  15. Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach O. Bokhove1,2

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach Evolution O. Bokhove1,2 , A.J. van der during storms, drives the evo- lution of beaches. Beach evolution by non-linear break- ing waves to the classic "Hele-Shaw" lab- oratory experiment can be designed that creates beach mor- phologies

  16. SPECTRAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDY BEACHES IN WESTERN PORTION OF PUERTO RICO

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    SPECTRAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDY BEACHES IN WESTERN PORTION OF PUERTO RICO By Gretchen M of the Department #12;ii Abstract Remote sensing applications to beach system in Puerto Rico have been limited reflectance measurements in 15 sandy beaches in western Puerto Rico. Samples of the beaches were analyzed

  17. A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION Chi Zhang1 , Jinhai Zheng2 , Titi Sui3 , Zeki Demirbilek4 and Lihwa Lin5 A numerical model of beach profile evolution is developed in beach profile evolution. Keywords: beach profile evolution; sandbar; wave; undertow; numerical model

  18. Yearly to decennial beach morphodynamics south the Arcachon inlet, France from satellite observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aurelie Dehouck; Nadia Sénéchal; Virginie Lafon; Rafael Almar; Bruno Castelle; Jean-Marie Froidefond

    2010-01-01

    Historical shoreline oscillations along adjacent beaches south the Arcachon tidal inlet (south-west France) have been directly controled by sediment inputs carried through the inlet by the littoral drift. In parallell, field observations aiming at understanding high frequency processes governing short-term beach morphodynamics are conducted on a very few local beach sites, among them the beach of Biscarrosse located 12 km

  19. 77 FR 26229 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ...CFR Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United...in the waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of...

  20. 77 FR 42652 - Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ...CFR Part 334 Meloy Channel, U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, FL; Restricted Area AGENCY: United...in the waters surrounding the U.S. Coast Guard Base Miami Beach, Florida (Base Miami Beach). Base Miami Beach is composed of...

  1. Kennedy Space Center ocean beach erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural beach maintaining processes.

  2. Journal of Coastal Research 26 1 184198 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2010 Limits of Wave Runup and Corresponding Beach-Profile

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    was runs where beach or dune scarps were produced, which substantially limit the uprush of swash motion- derstanding and predicting beach-profile changes. Wave runup is composed of wave setup and swash runup, DOI

  3. Monoaromatic hydrocarbon transformation under anaerobic conditions at Seal Beach, California: Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, H.A.; Reinhard, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Western Region Hazardous Substance Research Center

    1996-02-01

    Anaerobic biotransformation of several aromatic hydrocarbons found in gasoline including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, p-xylene, and o-xylene (BTEX) was studied in batch anaerobic laboratory microcosms. Aquifer sediment and ground water were obtained from the site of a historic gasoline spill at Seal Beach, California. Sulfate is present in the site ground water at 80 mg/L, and sulfate-reducing activity appears to be the dominant intrinsic BTEX bioremediation process where nitrate is absent. In the laboratory, the microcosms were set up with different electron acceptors (sulfate and nitrate) in site ground water and various defined anaerobic media to estimate intrinsic biodegradation rates and to suggest conditions under which anaerobic bioremediation could be enhanced. In unamended microcosms, anaerobic biotransformation of toluene and m + p-xylene occurred at a rate of 7.2 and 4.1 {micro}g/liter hr, respectively, with sulfate as the apparent electron acceptor. Addition of nitrate stimulated nitrate-reducing conditions and increased rates of toluene and m + p-xylene biotransformation to 30.1 and 5.4 {micro}g/liter hr, respectively. The catabolic substrate range was altered to include ethylbenzene in the nitrate-amended microcosms, suggesting an apparent preferential use of different BTEX compounds depending on the electron acceptor available. Under all the conditions studied, more than twice the amount of nitrate or sulfate was used than could be accounted for by the observed BTEX degradation. The results of these experiments indicate that indigenous microorganisms from the Seal Beach aquifer have significant capability to degrade BTEX hydrocarbons and that intrinsic processes in the Seal Beach aquifer may remediate a portion of the hydrocarbon contamination in situ without intervention. However, the data also suggest that intervention by nitrate addition would enhance the rate and extent of anaerobic BTEX biotransformation.

  4. 1. Oblique view: east side, from Condado Lagoon Beach on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view: east side, from Condado Lagoon Beach on southeast (context) - Puente Guillermo Esteves, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-25 (Juan Ponce de Leon Avenue), San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  5. Measuring the effects of stormwater mitigation on beach attendance.

    PubMed

    Atiyah, Perla; Pendleton, Linwood; Vaughn, Ryan; Lessem, Neil

    2013-07-15

    Many studies have used valuation techniques to predict the potential effect of environmental improvements on human use of coastal areas, but there is a lack of post hoc empirical evidence that these policies indeed affect the way people use coastal areas. A panel data approach is developed to statistically determine how storm drain diversions affected attendance at 26 beaches in Southern California. This study uses a 10-year time series of data to conduct a statistical analysis of attendance at beaches with and without diversions and before and after the diversions were installed, while controlling for all observable, confounding factors. Results indicate that beach attendance increased at beaches with diversions compared to those that did not have diversions (between 350,000 and 860,000 visits annually at a 95% confidence interval). Establishing this link between mitigation policies and human use patterns can lead to better management of coastal areas. PMID:23711842

  6. 75 FR 82382 - Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ...coastal recreation waters, including the Great Lakes. EPA encourages coastal and Great Lakes states and tribes that have received BEACH...defined in CWA section 502(21) to mean the Great Lakes and marine coastal waters (including...

  7. 2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND BEACH ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SHOWING NATURAL SAND BEACH ON KIDNEY LAKE, LOOKING WEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Kidney Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 4.7 miles North of Miners Gulch Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  8. CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH The 2012 Latin American Studies

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Eric J.

    CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH The 2012 Latin American Studies Film Series is Sponsored by Department, College of Liberal Arts; American Indian Studies Program; Anthropology Department; California Film Club; Future Underrepresented Educated Leaders; History Department; Hispanic Student Business

  9. 24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of Beaches and Parks, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of photograph (from Division of Beaches and Parks, State of California, Department of Natural Resources) Photographer unknown, Date unknown MAP OF SUTTER'S FORT - Sutter's Fort, L & Twenty-Seventh Streets, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  10. Groundwater Contamination

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Matthew Babcock

    This site by the Michigan Environmental Education Curriculum presents an interactive module that provides an introduction to groundwater quality issues. The information is presented as a series of slides with text, animations, quiz questions and interactive features. Topics include types of aquifers, groundwater movement, sources of contamination, the concentration and dispersion of contaminants, plumes and remediation.

  11. Groundwater Contamination

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carl Van Faasen

    2009-04-01

    This investigation consists of two parts, in which students first model the effects of groundwater contamination and then track the flow of the contamination. However, Part I does not have to be done in order to do Part II. This Teacher Information sectio

  12. Microbes in Beach Sands: Integrating Environment, Ecology and Public Health.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Richard; Harwood, Valerie J; Edge, Thomas A; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Vijayavel, Kannappan; Brandão, João; Sadowsky, Michael J; Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Crowe, Allan; Ferguson, Donna; Ge, Zhongfu; Halliday, Elizabeth; Kinzelman, Julie; Kleinheinz, Greg; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Staley, Christopher; Staley, Zachery; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2014-09-01

    Beach sand is a habitat that supports many microbes, including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa (micropsammon). The apparently inhospitable conditions of beach sand environments belie the thriving communities found there. Physical factors, such as water availability and protection from insolation; biological factors, such as competition, predation, and biofilm formation; and nutrient availability all contribute to the characteristics of the micropsammon. Sand microbial communities include autochthonous species/phylotypes indigenous to the environment. Allochthonous microbes, including fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate of these microbes ranges from death, to transient persistence and/or replication, to establishment of thriving populations (naturalization) and integration in the autochthonous community. Transport of the micropsammon within the habitat occurs both horizontally across the beach, and vertically from the sand surface and ground water table, as well as at various scales including interstitial flow within sand pores, sediment transport for particle-associated microbes, and the large-scale processes of wave action and terrestrial runoff. The concept of beach sand as a microbial habitat and reservoir of FIB and pathogens has begun to influence our thinking about human health effects associated with sand exposure and recreational water use. A variety of pathogens have been reported from beach sands, and recent epidemiology studies have found some evidence of health risks associated with sand exposure. Persistent or replicating populations of FIB and enteric pathogens have consequences for watershed/beach management strategies and regulatory standards for safe beaches. This review summarizes our understanding of the community structure, ecology, fate, transport, and public health implications of microbes in beach sand. It concludes with recommendations for future work in this vastly under-studied area. PMID:25383070

  13. Geographic variation in sandy beach macrofauna community and functional traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodil, I. F.; Compton, T. J.; Lastra, M.

    2014-10-01

    Sandy beaches are a common ocean-dominated ecosystem along the north coast of Spain. We conducted field surveys at 39 beaches distributed between 1° and 9°W, ca. 2000 km along this geographic region to document broad patterns of macrobenthic communities, and to describe their association with variables characterising both the beach environment and the characteristics of the adjacent ocean waters. Macrofaunal functional traits are considered to be an informative measure that can be useful for many ecosystem-level questions, as they are based on what organisms do (i.e., their ecological function) rather than on their identification alone. Boosted regression-trees analysis showed that the occurrence of the main taxonomic groups and feeding guilds were differentially associated with the prevailing beach features along this coastline. The occurrence (presence/absence) of molluscs was best explained by the concentration of chlorophyll-a and wave exposure whereas those of crustaceans and polychaetes were best explained by an ensemble of variables including beach slope, sea surface temperature and grain size. A comparison of the feeding guilds demonstrated that the occurrence of suspension feeders was best explained by chlorophyll-a and wave exposure, whereas the occurrence of deposit feeders was best explained by beach slope, sea surface temperature and chlorophyll-a. The occurrence of predators and scavengers was best explained by sea surface temperature and beach slope. Based on the patterns presented here, we confirm that the upwelling events that occur regularly on this coastline are a structuring agent for beach communities. Future work needs to examine the role of the oceanographic conditions of the region for they might represent the driving forces behind large-scale shifts in macrofauna communities.

  14. Properties and stability of a Texas barrier beach inlet

    E-print Network

    Mason, Curtis

    1971-01-01

    . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . 52 25 26 Tidal Differential, 20 February to 15 March, 1971 . 55 Tidal Differential, 16 March to 6 April, 1971 27 Non-Astronomical Sea Level and Corresponding Wind Regimes, Inlet Tide Station . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 28 Inlet Tide Gage Record..., 20 March, 1971 61 Computed Tidal Current Velocity, 20 February Through 3 April, 1971 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 30 Observed Current Velocity Vs. Tidal Differential . 67 31 32 33 34 35 Location of Beach Profiles East Spit Beach...

  15. Numerical models and intercomparisons of beach profile evolution

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Zheng; Robert G. Dean

    1997-01-01

    A modified non-linear cross-shore sediment transport relationship is developed based on equilibrium beach profile concepts and scaling relationships. This non-linear relationship provides a reasonable explanation for the significantly different time scales of beach evolution evident in various laboratory experiments. The proposed non-linear model called “CROSS” is calibrated and compared with the commonly employed linear transport relationship using laboratory data. A

  16. Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Brock, J.; List, J.; Hansen, M.; Holman, R.A.; Manizade, S.; Sontag, J.; Meredith, A.; Morgan, K.; Yunkel, J.K.; Frederick, E.B.; Stockdon, H.

    2003-01-01

    A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based measurements - 1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ??? 15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ??? 15 cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells comprising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future, be widely used in beach surveying.

  17. The Impacts of BackBeach Barriers on Sandy Beach Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. L. Harden

    2010-01-01

    Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-beach barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California beaches each year. Beaches in

  18. Seasonal variations in the risk of gastrointestinal illness on a tropical recreational beach

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Lyzbeth; Norat, Jose; Mattei, Hernando; Nazario, Cruz

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the seasonal changes in the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) illness of beachgoers in the tropics, to compare the association between GI illness and water quality using various indicator organisms, and to study other beach health hazards. A prospective cohort study during two seasonal periods (summer and autumn) was conducted in a beach surrounded by intensive residential development. Analyses demonstrated that although densities of indicators were well below water quality standards throughout the study, they were significantly higher during the autumn season. The incidence of GI illness among beachgoers was also higher during the rainy season. A higher incidence of GI illness was observed for bathers during the autumn season when compared to non-bathers, while a somewhat lower incidence was observed during the summer. This study showed that rainfall contributes to higher levels of microbial contaminants and GI risk to beachgoers. The association between GI illness and Enterococcus using culture counts showed the highest odds ratio among all indicator parameters including those using molecular methods. A much higher risk of GI illness among children under 5 years was observed among all beachgoers. PMID:23165715

  19. 75 FR 70305 - NextEra Energy Point Beach, LLC, Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington...operation of the Point Beach Nuclear Plant (PBNP), Units 1 and...setting values, and diesel generator (DG) start loss of...

  20. Three-dimensional distribution of plastic pellets in sandy beaches: shifting paradigms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turra, Alexander; Manzano, Aruanã B.; Dias, Rodolfo Jasão S.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Barbosa, Lucas; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Moreira, Fabiana T.

    2014-03-01

    Plastic pellets are worldwide contaminants that accumulate in the ocean, especially in sandy beaches, where their historic standing-stock quantification relies on surface sediment samples. We demonstrated these particles present a three-dimensional instead of a simple along-across shore distribution, being found as deep as 2.0 m, with surface layers accounting for <10% of the total abundance in the sediment column. This gradient seemed to be more related to oceanographic rather than anthropic processes, suggesting a general pattern whose applicability to microplastics and sedimentary environments as a whole should be investigated. This poses criticism in the exactness of standing-stock records and demands urgent discussion of sampling protocols.

  1. Three-dimensional distribution of plastic pellets in sandy beaches: shifting paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Turra, Alexander; Manzano, Aruanã B.; Dias, Rodolfo Jasão S.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Barbosa, Lucas; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Moreira, Fabiana T.

    2014-01-01

    Plastic pellets are worldwide contaminants that accumulate in the ocean, especially in sandy beaches, where their historic standing-stock quantification relies on surface sediment samples. We demonstrated these particles present a three-dimensional instead of a simple along-across shore distribution, being found as deep as 2.0?m, with surface layers accounting for <10% of the total abundance in the sediment column. This gradient seemed to be more related to oceanographic rather than anthropic processes, suggesting a general pattern whose applicability to microplastics and sedimentary environments as a whole should be investigated. This poses criticism in the exactness of standing-stock records and demands urgent discussion of sampling protocols. PMID:24670631

  2. Three-dimensional distribution of plastic pellets in sandy beaches: shifting paradigms.

    PubMed

    Turra, Alexander; Manzano, Aruanã B; Dias, Rodolfo Jasão S; Mahiques, Michel M; Barbosa, Lucas; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Moreira, Fabiana T

    2014-01-01

    Plastic pellets are worldwide contaminants that accumulate in the ocean, especially in sandy beaches, where their historic standing-stock quantification relies on surface sediment samples. We demonstrated these particles present a three-dimensional instead of a simple along-across shore distribution, being found as deep as 2.0?m, with surface layers accounting for <10% of the total abundance in the sediment column. This gradient seemed to be more related to oceanographic rather than anthropic processes, suggesting a general pattern whose applicability to microplastics and sedimentary environments as a whole should be investigated. This poses criticism in the exactness of standing-stock records and demands urgent discussion of sampling protocols. PMID:24670631

  3. CONTAMINANT REDISTRIBUTION CAN CONFOUND INTERPRETATION OF OIL-SPILL BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical redistribution of oil between the inside and outside of experimental plots can affect the results of bioremediation field studies that are conducted on shorelines contaminated by real oil spills. Because untreated oil from the surrounding beach will enter the plot, ...

  4. Groundwater Contamination

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christine McLelland

    This lesson addresses groundwater contamination from leakage of underground gasoline, oil, or other hazardous chemical tanks. Students read two short articles and investigate causes, effects, solutions, and prevention measures.

  5. ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic pollutants may constitute the most widespread waste loadings into the waters of Lake Superior. There are essentially three categories of organic contaminants. The first grouping consists of those organic compounds that readily degrade biologically or chemically. The secon...

  6. 33 CFR 167.500 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation...167.500 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach Traffic Separation...Separation Scheme in the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach consists of...

  7. 75 FR 9616 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Notice of Consideration of Issuance of Amendment to Facility...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ...licensee) for operation of the Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...and owner from ``FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC'' to ``NextEra Energy Point Beach, LLC.'' On January...i.e., fuel cladding, reactor coolant system pressure...

  8. 33 CFR 110.215 - Anaheim Bay Harbor, California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California; Naval...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...California; U.S. Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California; Naval Explosives Anchorage...Commanding Officer, Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach,...

  9. 77 FR 2966 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-000] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...Filing Date: January 5, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project. f....

  10. 78 FR 48155 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the Commission; Intent To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project f....

  11. 77 FR 73636 - Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...Regulatory Commission [Project No. 14345-001] Rock River Beach, Inc.; Notice of Application...filed: November 23, 2012. d. Applicant: Rock River Beach, Inc. e. Name of Project: Rock River Beach Hydroelectric Project. f....

  12. Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Upjohn Company sought a solution to their problem of potential particulate contamination of sterile injectable drugs. Contamination was caused by dust particles attracted by static electrical charge, which clung to plastic curtains in clean rooms. Upjohn found guidance in NASA Tech Briefs which provided detailed information for reducing static electricity. Guidelines for setting up static free work stations, materials and equipment needed to maintain antistatic protection.

  13. Late Pleistocene raised beaches of coastal Estremadura, central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Michael M.; Haws, Jonathan A.; Funk, Caroline L.; Daniels, J. Michael; Hesp, Patrick A.; Bicho, Nuno F.; Minckley, Thomas A.; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Forman, Steven L.

    2009-12-01

    We present new stratigraphic, sedimentological, and chronological data for a suite of tectonically raised beaches dating to Marine Isotope Stages 5, 4, and 3 along the Estremadura coast of west-central Portugal. The beach deposits are found in association with ancient tidal channels and coastal dunes, pollen bearing mud and peat, and Middle Paleolithic archaeological sites that confirm occupation of the coastal zone by Neanderthal populations. The significance of these deposits is discussed in terms of the archaeological record, the tectonic and geomorphic evolution of the coast, and correlation with reconstructions of global climate and eustatic sea-level change. Direct correlation between the Estremadura beach sections is complicated by the tectonic complexity of the area and the age of the beach deposits (which are near or beyond the limit of radiocarbon dating). Evidence from multiple sites dated by AMS radiocarbon and optical luminescence methods suggests broad synchroneity in relative sea-level changes along this coast during Marine Isotope Stage 3. Two beach complexes with luminescence and radiocarbon age control date to about 35 ka and 42 ka, recording a rise in relative sea level around the time of Heinrich Event 4 at 39 ka. Depending on assumptions about eustatic sea level at the time they were deposited, we estimate that these beaches have been uplifted at rates of 0.4-4.3 mm yr -1 by the combined effects of tectonic, halokinetic, and isostatic processes. Uplift rates of 1-2 mm yr -1 are likely if the beaches represent sea level stands at roughly 40 m below modern, as suggested by recent eustatic sea level reconstructions. Evidence from coastal bluffs and the interior of the study area indicates extensive colluvial, fluvial, and aeolian sedimentation beginning around 31 ka and continuing into the Holocene. These geomorphic adjustments are related to concomitant changes in climate and sea level, providing context that improves our understanding of Late Pleistocene landscape change and human occupation on the western Iberian margin.

  14. Solder Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.

    1999-02-22

    There are two sources of contamination in solder alloys. The first source is trace elements from the primary metals used in the as-manufactured product, be that product in ingot, wire, or powder form. Their levels in the primary metal are determined by the refining process. While some of these trace elements are naturally occurring materials, additional contamination can result from the refining and/or forming processes. Sources include: furnace pot liners, debris on the cutting edges of shears, rolling mill rollers, etc. The types and levels of contaminants per solder alloy are set by recognized industrial, federal, military, and international specifications. For example, the 63Sn-37Pb solder purchased to the ASTM B 32 standard can have maximum levels of contamination for the following metals: 0.08(wt.)%Cu, 0.001 %Cd, 0.005%Al, 0.25%Bi, 0.03%As, 0.02%Fe, and 0.005 %Zn. A second cause of contamination in solders, and solder baths in particular, is their actual use in soldering operations. Each time a workpiece is introduced into the bath, some dissolution of the joint base metal(s), protective or solderable coatings, and fixture metal takes place which adds to contamination levels in the solder. The potential impurities include Cu; Ni; Au or other noble metals used as protective finishes and Al; Fe; and Zn to name a few. Even dissolution of the pot wall or liner is a source of impurities, typically Fe.

  15. Bioremediation potential of microorganisms from a sandy beach affected by a major oil spill.

    PubMed

    Reis, Izabela; Almeida, C Marisa R; Magalhães, Catarina M; Cochofel, Jaqueline; Guedes, Paula; Basto, M Clara P; Bordalo, Adriano A; Mucha, Ana P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the bioremediation potential of microorganisms from intertidal sediments of a sandy beach affected by a major oil spill 7 years before and subject to chronic petroleum contamination since then. For that, the response of microorganisms to a new oil contamination was assessed in terms of community structure, abundance, and capacity to degrade hydrocarbons. Experiments were carried out under laboratory-controlled conditions by mixing sediment with crude oil with three different nitrogen supplementations in 50 ml serum bottles under constant shake for 15 days. Autochthonous microorganisms were able to respond to the new oil contamination by increasing their abundance (quantified by DAPI) and changing the community structure (evaluated by DGGE). This response was particularly clear for some specific bacterial groups such as Pseudomonas, Actinomycetales, and Betaproteobacteria. These communities presented an important potential for hydrocarbon degradation (up to 85 % for TPHs and 70 % for total PAHs), being the biodegradation stimulated by addition of an appropriate amount of nitrogen. PMID:24271736

  16. Resin pellets from beaches of the Portuguese coast and adsorbed persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, J. C.; Frias, J. G. L.; Micaelo, A. C.; Sobral, P.

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of stranded plastic marine debris along the Portuguese coastline was investigated. Number of items m-2 and size range of resin pellets were recorded, corresponding to 53% of total marine debris collected items. In addition, concentrations of adsorbed persistent bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals (PBTC) were determined, PAH - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; PCB - polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT - dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane. Matosinhos (Mt) and Vieira de Leiria (VL) presented the highest number of items m-2 (362 and 332, respectively). Resin pellets with 4 mm diameter were the most abundant (50%). Contaminants concentration was variable. PAH concentrations recorded values between 53 and 44800 ng g-1, PCB ranged from 2 to 223 ng g-1 and DDT between 0.42 and 41 ng g-1. In general, aged and black pellets recorded higher concentrations for all contaminants. Matosinhos (Mt), Vieira de Leiria (VL) and Sines (Si), near industrial areas and port facilities, were the most contaminated beaches. Research efforts are needed to assess the points of entry of industrial plastic pellets in order to take action and minimize impacts on the ecosystems, in particular, points of transfer during transportation from plastic manufacturers to plastic converters should be identified and controlled so that virgin pellets are contained and will not enter rivers and be carried to the oceans where they can remain for a long time and travel great distances.

  17. Monitoring and modeling nearshore dredge disposal for indirect beach nourishment, Ocean Beach, San Francisco

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Lescinski, Jamie; Elias, Edwin

    2007-01-01

    Nearshore dredge disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal and wave environment. This trial run was an attempt to provide a buffer to a reach of coastline where wave attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over the long-term by at the very least providing: 1) additional wave dissipation during storms 2) compatible sediment to feed nearshore bars, 3) sediment cover on an exposed sewage outfall pipe, and 4) a viable alternative to the shoaling offshore disposal site. Numerical modeling suggests that despite the strong tidal currents in the region, wave forcing is the dominant factor moving the sediment slowly toward shore, and placing sediment at just slightly shallower depths (e.g. 9 m) in the future would have a more immediate impact.

  18. Hydrodynamic influences of tidal fluctuations and beach slopes on benzene transport in unconfined, sandy costal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, C.-F.; Wei, Y.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Oil spills in oceans have led to severe environment and ecosystem problems due to high toxicity substances, large spatial extents, and long temporal durations. The BTEX compounds are key indexes generally used for identifications of such contamination events and also for quantifications of residual substances after remediations. Benzene is one of the BTEX compounds, which is recognized to be high toxicity and may threat near-shore ecosystem and human safety. Therefore, the understanding of benzene transport in costal aquifers is critical for predictions of contaminated zones and managements and organizations of remediation plans. In this study a numerical investigation was conducted to quantify the influence of tidal fluctuations and beach slopes on benzene transport in an unconfined coastal aquifer. More specifically, three different tidal amplitudes and three beach slopes were considered in the two-dimensional HYDROGEOCHEM model to characterize the spatial and temporal behavior of the benzene transport. Simulation results show that tidal fluctuations will lead to shallow seawater circulations near the ground surface where the high tides can reach periodically. Such local circulation flows will trap benzene plume and the plume may migrate to the deeper aquifer, depending on the amplitudes of tides and the surface slopes of the coastal lines. The sine curve tides with 0.5 m amplitudes will create circulation plume sizes of about 50m in length and 20m in depth, while the circulation plume sizes for tides with 1.0 m amplitudes will significantly increase to approximately 150 m in length and 60 m in depth. Additionally, double the beach slopes and keep the same tidal amplitude will lead to 40 m plume movement toward the land. The amplitude of tidal fluctuation is the key factor to decide when and where a benzene plume reaches a largest depth. In general, the plume with tidal amplitude of 0.5 m requires 50 days to reach 90% of the largest depth. However, the plume with tidal amplitude of 1.0 m requires 300 days to reach 90% of the largest depth. Same conclusions can be applied to evaluate the duration times for a benzene plume self-clean, when the benzene source on ground surface is removed.

  19. The effect of two mechanical beach grooming strategies on Escherichia coli density in beach sand at a southwestern Lake Michigan beach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Kinzelman; K. R. Pond; K. D. Longmaid; R. C. Bagley

    2004-01-01

    The influence of indicator bacteria associated with beach sands on recreational water quality has become increasingly recognized. Constant wave action may serve as a transport mechanism for delivering bacterial organisms to surface waters resulting in an increased frequency of dry weather advisories. The ability to reduce the concentration of these organisms may serve to improve recreational water quality. To date,

  20. Detached macroalgae: Its importance to inshore sandy beach fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Kyla K.; Wilding, Thomas A.; Horstmeyer, Lena; Weigl, Simon; Heymans, Johanna J.

    2014-10-01

    Kelp forests shed a large proportion of their biomass through storm-mediated defoliation, senescence of kelp blades, and constant erosion of particulate organic matter from the kelp fronds. Much of this detached macroalgae drifts in the water column and is deposited on intertidal zones of beaches. Detached macroalgae may provide inshore sandy beach fauna with refuge and food subsidies in an exposed and bare environment, with limited in situ primary production. We evaluated the relationship between detached macroalgae and the density of inshore fauna, where 'inshore' was the body of water extending from low water seawards for approximately 50 m. Inshore fauna were sampled using a push-net (1 mm mesh) on 11 beaches, and using a beam-trawl (4 mm mesh) on a subset of 8 beaches. On each beach, the density of detached macroalgae in the water column was quantified, together with a suite of physico-chemical beach characteristics. Push-net samples principally comprised omnivorous and detritivorous crustaceans such as gammarid amphipods, mysids and valviferan isopods, which have limited swimming abilities and reside inshore year-round. Beam-trawl fauna were mainly carnivorous decapods and fish, which undergo seasonal inshore-offshore migrations to utilize sandy beaches as nursery habitats. Linear models predicted increases of 11% (95% CI: 3.5-19%) and 2.4% (95% CI: 0.7-4.2%) in the density of push-net and beam-trawl fauna, respectively, with a 1 ?.100 m-3 increase in detached macroalgae. This suggests that detached macroalgae is more important in the provision of food and shelter to small, weak-swimming detritivores/omnivores than to larger and more mobile predators. The densities of large predators were mostly explained by physical beach characteristics, which overshadowed the role of macroalgae. Maximum abundances of decapods and fish were found on wide, flat beaches with low wave heights. Large accumulations of macroalgae may inhibit the foraging efficiencies of predatory fauna such as decapods and fish, and restrict their abundance.

  1. Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Christopher D; Exum, Natalie G; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Richard A; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J; Love, David C; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60 m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches - Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI - with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F(+) coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand-water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:25150738

  2. Sediment transport on dissipative, intermediate and reflective beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aagaard, Troels; Greenwood, Brian; Hughes, Michael

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we review and synthesize field measurements of suspended sediment transport on the shoreface of dissipative, intermediate and reflective beach states. The morphodynamic beach state continuum was originally established in the 1970s but at the time, only hydrodynamic processes and morphologies in these various states were described. Since the early 1980s when sensors capable of resolving suspended sediment concentration at intra-wave time scale became available, many studies have examined suspended sediment transport by waves and currents on the shoreface. The synthesis of this work shows that the two end states in the morphodynamic continuum, which are the dissipative and reflective states, exhibit relatively small rates of cross-shore sediment transport and weak gradients in that transport which both ensure that the nearshore morphology is relatively stable. The intervening intermediate beach states typically exhibit prominent bar topographies and in these states, strong morphodynamic feedbacks between hydrodynamic processes and morphology create locally large transport rates and sharp transport gradients which is the reason for the dynamic nature of these beach states. Transport processes driving sediment onshore and offshore within beach states are discussed as well as the transport processes responsible for state transitions.

  3. Sequential resuspension of biofilm components (viruses, prokaryotes and protists) as measured by erodimetry experiments in the Brouage mudflat (French Atlantic coast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Christine; Mallet, Clarisse; Guizien, Katell; Montanié, Hélène; Bréret, Martine; Mornet, Françoise; Fontaine, Camille; Nérot, Caroline; Orvain, Francis

    2014-09-01

    Resuspension thresholds in terms of friction velocity were experimentally quantified for the prokaryotes, protists and for the first time, viruses of intertidal mudflat biofilms. Differences in resuspension thresholds could be related to the type, behaviour and size of microorganisms and their association with particles. Free microorganisms (viruses, bacteria and some nanoflagellates) were resuspended by weak flow at friction velocities lower than 2 cm s- 1. Chlorophyll a, some nanoflagellates and attached bacteria were resuspended together with the bed's muddy sediment, which required friction velocities larger than 3 cm s- 1. Diatoms smaller than 60 ?m were resuspended at velocities between 3 and 5 cm s- 1, while those larger than 60 ?m were resuspended at higher friction velocities (5.5 to 6.5 cm s- 1). The thresholds of resuspension also depended on the micro-scale position of microorganisms in the sediment (horizontal and vertical distributions). In the field, the vertical distribution of chlorophyll a (a proxy of microphytobenthos) was skewed, with a maximum in the first 2 mm of sediment. Along the neap-spring tidal cycle, chlorophyll a revealed an increase in MPB biomass in the first 2 mm of the sediment, in relation to light increases with exposure durations. The horizontal distribution of chlorophyll a could be inferred from erosion experiments. During the initial phase of biofilm growth, the distribution of chlorophyll a seemed horizontally homogeneous, and was uniformly eroded at the beginning of the increase in chlorophyll a. From these results, we can make a hypothesis: in the subsequent phase of biofilm growth until the maximum of emersion duration, the eroded quantity of chlorophyll a was larger than expected based from chlorophyll a vertical distribution, suggesting that biofilm horizontal distribution became patchy and enriched chlorophyll a was preferentially eroded. When emersion duration and biofilm growth decreased, the trend was reversed, and eroded quantity of chlorophyll a was lower than expected from chlorophyll a vertical distribution, suggesting that areas with low chlorophyll a were preferentially eroded. Such erosion patterns when biofilm growth decreased probably resulted from the bulldozing activity of a surficial sediment bioturbator, the gastropod Peringia ulvae. Our study did not directly prove this horizontal distribution but it should be further discussed. This distribution needs to be studied to acquire real evidence of patchy distributions.

  4. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters...

  5. Health effects associated with cyanobacteria exposure among beach attendees in Puerto Rico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanobacteria and their toxins are associated with adverse human health effects, although among marine waters, the pyrrhophyta, including dinoflagellates are more recognized as health hazards. We recruited beach attendees during summer 2009, at Boquerón Beach, Puerto Rico...

  6. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

  7. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

  8. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

  9. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

  10. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

  11. Waves, currents, and sediment transport in the surf zone along long, straight beaches

    E-print Network

    Tajima, Yoshimitsu, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a theoretical model for predictions of near-shore hydrodynamic characteristics and the local sediment transport rate along long, straight beaches. The wave may be periodic or random, the beach may be ...

  12. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

  13. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

  14. 33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

  15. 33 CFR 110.40 - Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. 110.40 Section 110...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.40 Silver Beach Harbor, North Falmouth, Mass. All the waters of the...

  16. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

  17. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

  18. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

  19. 78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ...navigable waters of the United States during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship. On June 1, 2013, Game One Sports Marketing Group is hosting the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship. The race will be held on the waters of the...

  20. 78 FR 2916 - Special Local Regulation; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway, West...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ...States during the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship. C. Discussion of Proposed Rule On June 1, 2013, Game One Sports Marketing Group is hosting the West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship. The races will be held on the waters of the...

  1. 33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations —(1) Anchorage...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

  4. 33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations —(1) Anchorage...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

  7. 33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section 110.214 Navigation and Navigable...Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General Regulations —(1) Anchorage...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. 165.1155 Section 165.1155 Navigation and Navigable...Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California. (a) Location. The following area is a security...

  9. 40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...which may present a serious obstacle to fishing or navigation may be dumped only...

  10. 40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...which may present a serious obstacle to fishing or navigation may be dumped only...

  11. 40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...which may present a serious obstacle to fishing or navigation may be dumped only...

  12. 40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches...which may present a serious obstacle to fishing or navigation may be dumped only...

  13. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

  14. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section...PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a)...

  15. Beach1 functionally antagonizes Rab11 during development and in regulating synaptic morphology

    E-print Network

    Khodosh, Rita

    2005-01-01

    BEACH proteins comprise an evolutionarily conserved family characterized by the presence of a BEACH (Beige and Chediak-Higashi) domain of unknown function. They have been shown to play a role in a number of important ...

  16. Recreational water exposures and health effects at a tropical and a runoff impacted beach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Studies conducted by the EPA at beaches with nearby treated sewage discharges established associations between gastrointestinal (GI) illnesses among swimmers and measurements of fecal indicator bacteria, Enterococcus and Bacteroidales (marine beaches only) measured by...

  17. Integrating Bacterial and Viral Water Quality Assessment to Predict Swimming-Associated Illness at a Freshwater Beach: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Jason W.; Lee, Cheonghoon; Lee, Chang Soo; Wang, Qiuhong; Lemeshow, Stanley; Buckley, Timothy J.; Saif, Linda J.; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-01-01

    Background & Objective Recreational waters impacted by fecal contamination have been linked to gastrointestinal illness in swimmer populations. To date, few epidemiologic studies examine the risk for swimming-related illnesses based upon simultaneous exposure to more than one microbial surrogate (e.g. culturable E. coli densities, genetic markers). We addressed this research gap by investigating the association between swimming-related illness frequency and water quality determined from multiple bacterial and viral genetic markers. Methods Viral and bacterial genetic marker densities were determined from beach water samples collected over 23 weekend days and were quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). These genetic marker data were paired with previously determined human exposure data gathered as part of a cohort study carried out among beach users at East Fork Lake in Ohio, USA in 2009. Using previously unavailable genetic marker data in logistic regression models, single- and multi-marker/multi-water quality indicator approaches for predicting swimming-related illness were evaluated for associations with swimming-associated gastrointestinal illness. Results Data pertaining to genetic marker exposure and 8- or 9-day health outcomes were available for a total of 600 healthy susceptible swimmers, and with this population we observed a significant positive association between human adenovirus (HAdV) exposure and diarrhea (odds ratio ?=?1.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.1–2.3) as well as gastrointestinal illness (OR ?=?1.5; 95% CI: 1.0–2.2) upon adjusting for culturable E. coli densities in multivariable models. No significant associations between bacterial genetic markers and swimming-associated illness were observed. Conclusions This study provides evidence that a combined measure of recreational water quality that simultaneously considers both bacterial and viral densities, particularly HAdV, may improve prediction of disease risk than a measure of a single agent in a beach environment likely influenced by nonpoint source human fecal contamination. PMID:25409012

  18. Mercury Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Marcella R.

    2013-01-01

    IN BRIEF A residential elemental mercury contamination incident in Rhode Island resulted in the evacuation of an entire apartment complex. To develop recommendations for improved response, all response-related documents were examined; personnel involved in the response were interviewed; policies and procedures were reviewed; and environmental monitoring data were compiled from specific phases of the response for analysis of effect. A significant challenge of responding to residential elemental mercury contamination lies in communicating risk to residents affected py a HazMat spill. An ongoing, open and honest dialogue is emphasized where concerns of the public are heard and addressed, particularly when establishing and/or modifying policies and procedures for responding to residential elemental mercury contamination. PMID:23436951

  19. A method for determining average beach slope and beach slope variability for U.S. sandy coastlines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doran, Kara S.; Long, Joseph W.; Overbeck, Jacquelyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Assessment of Hurricane-Induced Coastal Erosion Hazards compares measurements of beach morphology with storm-induced total water levels to produce forecasts of coastal change for storms impacting the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coastlines of the United States. The wave-induced water level component (wave setup and swash) is estimated by using modeled offshore wave height and period and measured beach slope (from dune toe to shoreline) through the empirical parameterization of Stockdon and others (2006). Spatial and temporal variability in beach slope leads to corresponding variability in predicted wave setup and swash. For instance, seasonal and storm-induced changes in beach slope can lead to differences on the order of 1 meter (m) in wave-induced water level elevation, making accurate specification of this parameter and its associated uncertainty essential to skillful forecasts of coastal change. A method for calculating spatially and temporally averaged beach slopes is presented here along with a method for determining total uncertainty for each 200-m alongshore section of coastline.

  20. Response of intertidal sandy-beach macrofauna to human trampling: An urban vs. natural beach system approach.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Martínez, Ma José; Ruíz-Delgado, Ma Carmen; Sánchez-Moyano, Juan Emilio; García-García, Francisco José

    2015-02-01

    Sandy beaches are subjected to intense stressors, which are mainly derived from the increasing pattern of beach urbanization. These ecosystems are also a magnet for tourists, who prefer these locations as leisure and holiday destinations, and such activity further increases the factors that have an adverse effect on beaches. In the study reported here the effect of human trampling on macrofauna assemblages that inhabit intertidal areas of sandy beaches was assessed using a BACI design. For this purpose, three contrasting sectors of the same beach were investigated: an urban area with a high level of visitors, a protected sector with a low density of users, and a transitional area with a high level of human occupancy. The physical variables were constant over time in each sector, whereas differences were found in the intensity of human use between sectors. Density variations and changes in the taxonomic structure of the macrofauna with time were shown by PERMANOVA analysis in the urban and transitional locations whereas the protected sector remained constant throughout the study period. The amphipod Bathyporeia pelagica appears sensitive to human trampling pressure and the use of this species as a bioindicator for these types of impact is recommended. PMID:25460060

  1. External costs of coastal beach pollution: an hedonic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wilman, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for inputing a monetary value to the loss in beach recreational services that would result from a hypothetical oil spill in the Georges Bank area combines an oil-spill risk analysis model with a hedonic pricing model of the market for tourist accommodations on Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. The estimate of beach pollution costs associated with offshore oil development allows a rational judgment of whether the benefits of developing offshore oil outweigh the costs. The method is an effort to improve the economic efficiency of coastal zone management. The report concludes with a discussion of the many sources of uncertainty and suggestions for overcoming them. Five appendices present information on the models, variables, questionnaire responses, beaches, and factor patterns. 7 figures, 27 tables.

  2. Analysis of morphological and volumetric patterns along the beach of South Padre Island

    E-print Network

    Chaffey, Scott Allen

    1986-01-01

    and Volumetric Changes Beach Nourishment 10 RESULTS. Morphological Changes Calculated From 1983-85 Survey Data Volumetric Change Calculated Prom 1983 ? 85 Survey Data. . . . . ll Normalized Morphological Changes Calculated From 1983-85 Survey Data... From Aerial Photographs Rates of Volumetric Change Calculated From Aerial 75 Photographs 75 Beach Nourishment . . 75 SUMMARI DISCUSSION. . 81 Morphology of Beach width Calculated From 1983-85 Survey Data. , . 81 Morphology of Beach Width...

  3. Plastic Pollution at a Sea Turtle Conservation Area in NE Brazil: Contrasting Developed and Undeveloped Beaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul; Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Alexandre Matthiensen; Gilberto Fillmann

    2011-01-01

    Sea turtles are highly susceptible to plastic ingestion and entanglement. Beach debris were surveyed along the most important\\u000a sea turtle nesting beaches in Brazil (Costa dos Coqueiros, Bahia State). No significant differences among developed and undeveloped\\u000a beaches were observed in terms of total number of items. Local sources (tourism activities) represented 70% of debris on developed\\u000a beaches, where cigarette butts,

  4. Water quality in the Withers Swash Basin, with emphasis on enteric bacteria, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, 1991-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guimaraes, W.B.

    1995-01-01

    Water samples were collected in 1991-93 from Withers Swash and its two tributaries (the Mainstem and KOA Branches) in Myrtle Beach, S.C., and analyzed for physical properties, organic and inorganic constituents, and fecal coliform and streptococcus bacteria. Samples were collected during wet- and dry-weather conditions to assess the water quality of the streams before and after storm runoff. Water samples were analyzed for over 200 separate physical, chemical, and biological constituents. Concentrations of 11 constituents violated State criteria for shellfish harvesting waters, and State Human Health Criteria. The 11 constituents included concentrations of dissolved oxygen, arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, chlordane, dieldrin, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and fecal coliform bacteria. Water samples were examined for the presence of enteric bacteria (fecal coliform and fecal streptococcus) at 46 sites throughout the Withers Swash Basin and 5 sites on the beach and in the Atlantic Ocean. Water samples were collected just upstream from all confluences in order to determine sources of bacterial contamination. Temporally and spatially high concentrations of enteric bacteria were detected throughout the Withers Swash Basin; however, these sporadic bacteria concentrations made it difficult to determine a single source of the contamination. These enteric bacteria concentrations are probably derived from a number of sources in the basin including septic tanks, garbage containers, and the feces of waterfowl and domestic animals.

  5. (Contaminated soil)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.

    1991-01-08

    The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Contaminated Soil, held in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Conference was a status conference for worldwide research and practice in contaminated soil assessment and environmental restoration, with more than 1500 attendees representing over 26 countries. The traveler made an oral presentation and presented a poster. At the Federal Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the traveler met with Dr. Z. Filip, Director and Professor, and Dr. R. Smed-Hildmann, Research Scientist. Detailed discussions were held regarding the results and conclusions of a collaborative experiment concerning humic substance formation in waste-amended soils.

  6. Contamination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Herren, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence of the angular reflectance from molecularly contaminated optical surfaces in the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) is measured. The light scattering measurements are accomplished in situ on optical surfaces in real time during deposition of molecular contaminants. The measurements are taken using non-coherent VUV sources with the predominant wavelengths being the Krypton resonance lines at 1236 and 1600 A. Detection of the scattered light is accomplished using a set of three solar blind VUV photomultipliers. An in-plane VUV BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions) experiment is described and details of the ongoing program to characterize optical materials exposed to the space environment is reported.

  7. Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, M. L.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.

    2011-04-01

    Four years of beach elevation surveys at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean Beach and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre Beach (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) beach are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) beach.

  8. Predaceous ants, beach replenishment, and nest placement by sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Wetterer, James K; Wood, Lawrence D; Johnson, Chris; Krahe, Holly; Fitchett, Stephanie

    2007-10-01

    Ants known for attacking and killing hatchling birds and reptiles include the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren), tropical fire ant [Solenopsis geminata (Fabr.)], and little fire ant [Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger)]. We tested whether sea turtle nest placement influenced exposure to predaceous ants. In 2000 and 2001, we surveyed ants along a Florida beach where green turtles (Chelonia mydas L.), leatherbacks (Dermochelys coriacea Vandelli), and loggerheads (Caretta caretta L.) nest. Part of the beach was artificially replenished between our two surveys. As a result, mean beach width experienced by nesting turtles differed greatly between the two nesting seasons. We surveyed 1,548 sea turtle nests (2000: 909 nests; 2001: 639 nests) and found 22 ant species. S. invicta was by far the most common species (on 431 nests); S. geminata and W. auropunctata were uncommon (on 3 and 16 nests, respectively). In 2000, 62.5% of nests had ants present (35.9% with S. invicta), but in 2001, only 30.5% of the nests had ants present (16.4% with S. invicta). Turtle nests closer to dune vegetation had significantly greater exposure to ants. Differences in ant presence on turtle nests between years and among turtle species were closely related to differences in nest placement relative to dune vegetation. Beach replenishment significantly lowered exposure of nests to ants because on the wider beaches turtles nested farther from the dune vegetation. Selective pressures on nesting sea turtles are altered both by the presence of predaceous ants and the practice of beach replenishment. PMID:18284732

  9. Porosity and packing of Holocene river, dune, and beach sands

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, J.E. (Conoco, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)); McBride, E.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The porosity and packing of 174 samples of well-sorted surficial and shallowly buried (to 17 m), unconsolidated Holocene sands were determined by point counting the upper surface of thin sections of epoxy-impregnated samples in reflected light. Average depositional porosity for 124 surficial beach sands, river point-bar and braid-bar sands, and eolian dune sands is between 40% and 58%. Beach sands exhibit an average packing value (contact index = CI) of 0.79, river sands an average IC of 0.91, and eolian dune sands an average CI of 1.02. Packing gets tighter with depth, but the authors found no decrease in porosity with depth for river and beach sands buried to 17 m. Thus, packing is more sensitive to small changes in fabric than is porosity. Beach sands typically contain 5.5% oversized pores (OSP), river sands 3.8% OSP, and eolian dune sands 4.0% OSP. Most OSP are packing defects rather than dissolution pores, although trapped air bubbles are common in some beach sands. OSP decrease linearly with depth to 17 m, our deepest sample. Extrapolation of our data indicates that they will be destroyed at a depth less than 100 m. Significant differences in porosity, oversized-pore, and packing values exist between most point-bar and braid-bar deposits and between two heavily sampled point bars, but no significant differences in these values exist when braid-bar sands are compared to other braid-bar sands. Sands form different beaches have significant differences in porosity, oversized pores, and packing. The average porosity is 46% for eolian ripple strata, 50% for grain-fall strata, and 51% for grain-flow strata. Ripple strata are tighter packed than grain-fall and grain-flow strata.

  10. Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy beach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, M.L.; Guza, R.T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J.E.; Barnard, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Four years of beach elevation surveys at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean Beach and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre Beach (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) beach are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) beach. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. 76 FR 36014 - Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ...11-AWA-2] RIN 2120-AA66 Proposed Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL...modify the Palm Beach International Airport Class C airspace area by raising the floor of Class C airspace above Palm Beach County Park...

  12. 76 FR 77383 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...Airspace Docket No. 11-AWA-2] Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL...the Palm Beach International Airport, FL, Class C airspace area by raising the floor of Class C airspace over Palm Beach County Park Airport....

  13. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif...Anchorage Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif...authorized by the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long Beach. [CGFR...

  14. 33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area...167.501 In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area...the water area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a...

  15. 33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California...Anchorage Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California...directed by the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long Beach, the pilot...

  16. Beach Sediment Alteration by Natural Processes and Human Actions: Elba Island, Italy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl F. Nordstrom; Nancy L. Jackson; Enzo Pranzini

    2004-01-01

    The surface characteristics and dimensions of many beaches reflect past inputs of sediment due to human activity in tributary drainage basins. Subsequent control of erosion in drainage basins, changes in flow regimes of streams, and construction of shorefront structures have reduced sediment input and eliminated beach area in many coastal segments, leading to calls for artificial beach nourishment. This study

  17. Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County By JEFF OSTROWSKI Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:07 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 Posted: 4:59 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 agency Space Florida. For many in Palm Beach County's aerospace industry, the shuttle's demise merits

  18. Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July Spectroscopy and pentaquark

    E-print Network

    Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 1 ....... Spectroscopy and pentaquark;Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 2 .............. 4-momentum transfer squared regimes 22 )( qpw += H1 ZEUS #12;Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 3

  19. Weeks 22 & 23, Mom's Visit Mom and I at Tunnel Beach

    E-print Network

    Bardsley, John

    Weeks 22 & 23, Mom's Visit Mom and I at Tunnel Beach This journal entry will have to suffice days were filled with what have become typical outings for us: beach trips to Brighton and St. Clair, walks to Allans and Victory Beaches and Sandfly Bay, and various explorations of the city. The trip

  20. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

  1. 36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

  2. 33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

  3. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

  4. Calculation of beach change under interacting cross-shore and longshore processes Hans Hanson a,

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Calculation of beach change under interacting cross-shore and longshore processes Hans Hanson a online 7 March 2010 Keywords: Longshore sediment transport Beach response Groins Coastal structures approach and numerical model that simulates beach and dune change in response to cross-shore processes

  5. Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data

    E-print Network

    Mitasova, Helena

    Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach- foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Journal islands and their beach and dune systems. GIS- based per grid cell statistics and map algebra was applied

  6. Evidence of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice

    E-print Network

    Evidence of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice Journal of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice Vera S. Domingues1,2,3 , Yu-Ping Poh1 receptor (Mc1r), a gene that contributes to pigmentation differences, in beach and mainland populations

  7. U. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

    E-print Network

    Akgun, Ugur

    U. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA c + Lifetime Measurement from SELEX (E781) Experiment Ugur Akgun for the SELEX Collaboration #12;U. Akgun, Beach 2006. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 3 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SELEX Experiment at Fermilab

  8. 46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  9. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  10. 78 FR 11094 - Safety Zone; Lake Worth Dredge Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ...Operations, Lake Worth Inlet; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...safety zone on Lake Worth Inlet, West Palm Beach, Florida, to provide for the safety of...conducted on Lake Worth Inlet in West Palm Beach, Florida. These operations will...

  11. 36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

  12. 33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

  13. Submarine landslides of San Pedro Escarpment, southwest of Long Beach, California

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Submarine landslides of San Pedro Escarpment, southwest of Long Beach, California Robert G and slope near Long Beach. Large slope failures are present on the San Pedro Escarpment and on the basin Beach, California's ¢fth larg- est city (Fig. 1), is built in an area of rapid geo- logic changes

  14. 33 CFR 100.106 - Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY. 100.106 Section 100.106...100.106 Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY. (a) Regulated area. The...waters of Long Island to the south of Long Beach, New York. The regulated area is...

  15. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Job growth is expanding in West Palm Beach, Miami By Donna Gehrke in Palm Beach and Broward counties, according to new projections released Monday by a leading economist, and will rise by 1.5 percent in Palm Beach County, Wells Fargo Securities senior economist Mark Vitner said

  16. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

  17. 33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

  18. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

  19. 33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

  20. AN INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR REMOTE MONITORING AND PREDICTION OF BEACH SAFETY.

    E-print Network

    Blumenstein, Michael

    AN INTELLIGENT SYSTEM FOR REMOTE MONITORING AND PREDICTION OF BEACH SAFETY. Matthew Browne and potentially rich source of in- formation on the state of the near-shore beach zone. The present paper presents sources of weather and wave data for the purpose of assessing and predicting beach safety conditions using