These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Analyze of waves dynamic over an intertidal mudflat of a sandy-gravely estuarine beach - Field survey and preliminary modeling approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As well as marine submersion or erosive phenomena, clay-silted sediment in-filling on estuarial and bay beaches are a main issue in these human-attractive areas. Coupled sandy/gravely and clay/silty intertidal areas can be observed in these particular coastal areas, depending of rivers characteristic (discharge of particle, water flow), ocean dynamics (wave exposure, current) and sediments sources. All around the world, sandy/gravely beaches are exposed to punctual or continuous input clay sediments. Vilaine estuary, Bay of Arcachon and Bay of Seine in France, Plymouth Bay in UK and also Wadden Sea in Deutschland are few examples of muddy/sandy coupled or mixed system. The beach of Bétahon (Ambon town, Brittany - France) is located on the external Vilaine estuary and is an example of this issue. This meso-macrotidal intermediate (low tide terrace) beach presents heterogeneous sediments. The upper intertidal zone is composed by sand and gravel and characterized by a steep slope. A very gentle slope characterized the lower part of the beach and is constituted by silt and clay. Clay/sand limit is characterized by a decimetric erosion cliff of mudflat along the beach. In order to understand bed variations and sediment transport of this complex heterogeneous beach, a well understanding of wave dynamic across the beach is necessary. This study focus on wave dynamics over the beach, using field observations and MIKE 21 3D wave numerical model. This paper is a preliminary approach of an upcoming global understanding of this estuarial beach behavior. Swell from deep-sea to near-shore area is modeled over a 100 km² area and real wind, deep sea wave characteristic, river water flow and tidal level are defined as open boundary conditions for the regional model. This last one is based on multiple bathymetric surveys over the last 50 years. Local model, triangular mesh gridded to 5 meters, covering Bétahon beach , is based on topographic and photographic survey of the mudflat since 2005 (an amplitude above 1.4 meters has been observed over a start reference state). Modeling significant wave height, wave direction and period are compared to a cross-shore wave dynamics survey over the beach, during one week. Surf zone positions over the beach, wave characteristics at local and regional scales, impacts of mudflat altitude on waves are analyzed and discussed.

Morio, Olivier; Sedrati, Mouncef; Goubert, Evelyne

2014-05-01

2

Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press Telegram  

E-print Network

Fish in Long Beach waters have risky contamination levels From staff reports Long Beach Press coast showed high levels of methylmercury and moderate levels of PCBs in fish in Long Beach bay waters the coast. In the bay waters of Long Beach, the levels found in fish were of "high concern," according

3

Environmental contaminants in the food chain, NWS Seal Beach and Seal Beach NWR  

SciTech Connect

The authors conducted a study to determine whether environmental contaminants occurred in fish and invertebrates at concentrations that could be harmful to birds feeding in the estuarine salt marsh at Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), which is part of Naval Weapons Station (NWS) Seal Beach. Management of the refuge is focused primarily on endangered species, especially the light-footed clapper rail and the California least tern. Important food-chain organisms taken by rails (e.g., crabs and snails) and least terns (small fish) were sampled and analyzed for inorganic and organic contaminants that might be related to Navy activities at the Station. Results indicated that those contaminants are not likely to have lethal effects on rails or terns, although some chemicals (including cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, zinc and DDE) occurred at elevated concentrations in portions of the marsh. Possible sublethal effects also were evaluated and will be discussed.

Ohlendorf, H.M.; Byron, E.R. [CH2M Hill, Sacramento, CA (United States); Freas, K.E. [CH2M Hill, San Jose, CA (United States); Casados, E.M.; Kidwell, J.J. [Naval Facilities Engineering Command, San Diego, CA (United States). SW Division

1994-12-31

4

Can QMRA be used to Discount Pathogen Risk to Swimmers from Animal Fecal Contamination? Doheny Beach, CA Case Study  

EPA Science Inventory

Estimated health risks to swimmers from seagull and bather sources of fecal contamination at Doheny Beach, California were compared using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) with a view to aiding beach closure decisions. Surfzone pathogens from seagulls were thought to...

5

Bacterial contamination at Huntington Beach, California - is it from a local offshore wastewater outfall?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the summers of 1999 and 2000, beaches at Huntington Beach, California, were repeatedly closed to swimming because of high bacteria levels in the surf zone. The city’s beaches are a major recreational and commercial resource, normally attracting millions of visitors each summer. One possible source of the bacterial contamination was the Orange County Sanitation District’s sewage outfall, which discharges treated wastewater 4.5 miles offshore at a depth of 200 feet. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey and cooperating organizations have been investigating whether ocean currents and waves transport the wastewater to the beaches. These studies indicate that bacteria from the outfall are not a significant source of the beach contamination.

Xu, Jingping; Noble, Marlene; Rosenfeld, Leslie; Largier, John; Hamilton, Peter; Jones, Burt; Hendley, James W.; Stauffer, Peter H.

2003-01-01

6

Huntington beach shoreline contamination investigation, phase III: coastal circulation and transport patterns : the likelihood of OCSD's plume impacting Huntington beach shoreline  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A consortium of agencies have conducted an extensive investigation of the coastal ocean circulation and transport pathways off Huntington Beach, with the aim of identifying any causal links that may exist between the offshore discharge of wastewater by OCSD and the significant bacterial contamination observed along the Huntington Beach shoreline. This is the third study supported by OCSD to determine possible land-based and coa Although the study identifies several possible coastal ocean pathways by which diluted wastewater may be transported to the beach, including internal tide, sea-breeze and subtidal flow features, there were no direct observations of either the high bacteria concentrations seen in the OCSD plume at the shelf break reaching the shoreline in significant levels or of an association between the existence of a coastal ocean process and beach contamination at or above AB411 levels. It is concluded that the OCSD plume is not a major cause of beach contamination; no causal links could be demonstrated. This conclusion is based on the absence of direct observation of plume-beach links, on analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of shoreline contamination and coastal ocean processes, and on the observation of higher levels of contamination at the beach than in the plume.

Noble, Marlene; Xu, Jingping; Rosenfeld, Leslie; Largier, John; Hamilton, Peter; Jones, Burt; Robertson, George

2003-01-01

7

Research on the mudflats  

E-print Network

Pre-1965 Research on the mudflats OSU scientists sought access to the estuary and the ocean to study basic estuarine bi- ology, develop water quality bioassays and create a robust oyster aquaculture- 1958 Beginnings of OSU ocean research OSU began offering oceanography classes in 1955, and by 1958

8

High Levels of Sediment Contamination Have Little Influence on Estuarine Beach Fish Communities  

PubMed Central

While contaminants are predicted to have measurable impacts on fish assemblages, studies have rarely assessed this potential in the context of natural variability in physico-chemical conditions within and between estuaries. We investigated links between the distribution of sediment contamination (metals and PAHs), physico-chemical variables (pH, salinity, temperature, turbidity) and beach fish assemblages in estuarine environments. Fish communities were sampled using a beach seine within the inner and outer zones of six estuaries that were either heavily modified or relatively unmodified by urbanization and industrial activity. All sampling was replicated over two years with two periods sampled each year. Shannon diversity, biomass and abundance were all significantly higher in the inner zone of estuaries while fish were larger on average in the outer zone. Strong differences in community composition were also detected between the inner and outer zones. Few differences were detected between fish assemblages in heavily modified versus relatively unmodified estuaries despite high concentrations of sediment contaminants in the inner zones of modified estuaries that exceeded recognized sediment quality guidelines. Trends in species distributions, community composition, abundance, Shannon diversity, and average fish weight were strongly correlated to physico-chemical variables and showed a weaker relationship to sediment metal contamination. Sediment PAH concentrations were not significantly related to the fish assemblage. These findings suggest that variation in some physico-chemical factors (salinity, temperature, pH) or variables that co-vary with these factors (e.g., wave activity or grain size) have a much greater influence on this fish assemblage than anthropogenic stressors such as contamination. PMID:22039470

McKinley, Andrew C.; Dafforn, Katherine A.; Taylor, Matthew D.; Johnston, Emma L.

2011-01-01

9

Nearshore hydrodynamics as loading and forcing factors for Escherichia coli contamination at an embayed beach  

E-print Network

at an embayed beach Zhongfu Ge,a,* Richard L. Whitman,a Meredith B. Nevers,a Mantha S. Phanikumar coli were conducted at Chicago's 63rd Street Beach, an embayed beach that had the highest mean E. coli concentration among 23 similar Lake Michigan beaches during summer months of 2000­2005, in order to find

10

Maritime litter and sewage contamination at Cramond Beach Edinburgh — A comparative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach litter was monitored between April and October 1994 at Cramond Beach, Edinburgh. When compared with data collected over the same period in 1984, it was found that overall there was a twofold increase in litter, although the proportion of items found in some categories had decreased (containers, confectionery and crisp wrappers, clothing, fishing line, fishing net, shotgun cartridges, metal,

Kathryn A Velander; Marina Mocogni

1998-01-01

11

Where Has All the Oil Gone? The use of trace metals as potential indicators of oil contamination in marine sediments and beach sands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report initial results to determine if select trace metals are effective indicators for the magnitude and spatial extent of Deep Water Horizon (DWH) oil contamination in Gulf of Mexico marine sediments and beach sands. Since crude oil is known to have elevated concentrations of nickel and vanadium, contamination can be detected even after the degradation of oil by measuring enrichment of these metals within marine sediments and beach sands. A sample of crude oil from the Macondo Prospect, source of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, was fully digested and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) at the College of Marine Science, University of South Florida. Results indicate the crude oil is enriched in nickel, vanadium, and cobalt, with concentrations of 0.86 ppm, 2.76 ppm, and 84 ppb, respectively. With this known trace metal enrichment in DWH oil, Gulf of Mexico marine sediments from 400 and 1100m water depth near DeSoto Canyon and beach sands from Pensacola, FL were examined for enrichment of V, Ni, and Co. Both marine sediment and beach sand samples were partially digested with HNO3 before analysis via ICP-MS. With marine sediments, the visually contaminated layer at or near the surface typically exhibited an enrichment in Ni, V, and Co compared to the pristine control sediments. Vanadium and nickel enrichment in marine sediments varied from 10 to 32% and 0 to 22%, respectively. Visible contamination in beach sands was found between 20-60cm beneath the surface and, likewise, showed Ni, V, and Co enrichment up to 33%, 45%, and 100%. This data shows that enrichment of V, Ni, and Co in marine sediments and beach sands may be an effective proxy for contamination even after the degradation of oil. Marine sediments and beach sands will continue to be monitored for trace metal enrichment in an effort to assess the continuing impacts of the DWH spill on the Gulf of Mexico.

Roeder, T. K.; Hastings, D. W.; Holzinger, C.; Playle, E.; Brooks, G.; Huettel, M. H.; Kostka, J. E.; Larson, R. A.; Flower, B. P.

2011-12-01

12

Water quality indicators and the risk of illness at beaches with nonpoint sources of fecal contaminants  

EPA Science Inventory

BACKGROUND: Indicator bacteria are a good predictor of illness at marine beaches that have point sources of pollution with human fecal content. Few studies have addressed the utility of indicator bacteria where nonpoint sources are the dominant fecal input. Extrapolating current ...

13

The Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Have you ever wondered what sand is made of? Where does it come from? How can we keep our beaches clean? Let's work together using the internet to find out a little bit more about the beach. Web Quest Links Introduction Task Resources Evaluation Conclusion Teacher Guide TASK Dear students, Miss Kaysha was at the beach last week and she saw lots of sand. She wants to know how it got there and what it is made of. She also saw ...

2009-04-26

14

Beach Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Why Files article considers beach erosion. Topics covered are: the nature and extent of beach losses, the role of beaches in protecting coasts, some measures -good and bad- to prevent coastal erosion, predicted effects of global warming and sea-level changes on beaches and the impact of melting ice sheets on global ocean volume. Some glaciologists using new calculations, think that instead of possibly collapsing in 100 years, as was considered possible 10 years ago, that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is more likely to collapse in perhaps 5,000 years at the soonest. Five scientists were interviewed for this article.

Tenenbaum, David

1999-07-22

15

Interplay between biology and sedimentology in a mudflat (Biezelingse Ham, Westerschelde, The Netherlands)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this research was to investigate the importance of biological processes on the sediment characteristics and the morphology of a mudflat in the Westerschelde (The Netherlands). For this purpose, a transect in the Biezelingse Ham mudflat was sampled on a monthly basis. In spring, the muddy part of the mudflat was dominated by a biofilm of microphytobenthos that

J. F. C de Brouwer; S. Bjelic; E. M. G. T. De Deckere; L. J. Stal

2000-01-01

16

Health effects of swimming in fecally-contaminated recreational water: Results from studies at nine coastal beaches  

EPA Science Inventory

Exposure to fecally-contaminated water has long been known to transmit infectious disease. In 2003, EPA and the CDC initiated studies to better describe the health effects associated with exposure to fecal contamination in recreational waters and to test faster ways of measuring ...

17

Diatoms from two macro-tidal mudflats in Chignecto Bay, Upper Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mudflat research is dispersed among several fields (ecology, sedimentology), each with its own focus and methodology. Consequently, although the volume of mudflat literature is considerable, our understanding of mudflat ecology remains fragmented. For example, little is known about the structure of microbial communities outside Western Europe. Here we present the first North American specific composition and densities of live mudflat

M. Trites; I. Kaczmarska; J. M. Ehrman; P. W. Hicklin; J. Ollerhead

2005-01-01

18

Seasonal sediment storage on mudflats adjacent to the Amazon River  

Microsoft Academic Search

210Pb and 234Th activity profiles in sediment cores from underconsolidated mudflats 300 km downdrift of the Amazon river mouth record an ephemeral surface layer of fine-grained sediment up to 1.5 m thick. This layer contains about l.5 × 108 tons of Amazon sediment deposited rapidly (~1 cm\\/d) from a fluid-mud suspension (10–400 g\\/l) during the months between January and June.

M. A. Allison; C. A. Nittrouer; G. C. Kineke

1995-01-01

19

Daytona Beach Activities Schedule  

E-print Network

Highlights · Daytona Beach · Activities Schedule · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach A day of fun in the sun! WHAT: Come for a day of surf, sun, and sand at world famous Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

20

Daytona Beach Student Voices  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Student Voices Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will drive to the beach in the morning and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will stop at a restaurant

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

21

On the beach Introduction  

E-print Network

On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge Mathematical Design of Hele-Shaw Beach Beach-Shaw' Beach Evolution by Breaking Waves Onno Bokhove "Mathematics of Computational Science", University of Twente CASA, TU Eindhoven, November 2011 #12;On the beach Onno Bokhove Introduction: Cutting Edge

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

22

Seed germination ecology of the summer annual Cyperus squarrosus in an unpredictable mudflat habitat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of our study was to better understand seed germination ecology of the summer annual sedge Cyperus squarrosus, which grows in various habitats, including mudflats and shallow soil over limestone bedrock (rock outcrops), where timing of the period favorable for germination and completion of the life cycle is unpredictable. Over a 28.5-month period, temperature and light:dark requirements for germination were determined at monthly intervals for seeds collected from mudflats and buried under flooded and under nonflooded conditions at natural temperature regimes. Data on dormancy and germination were compared to those published for seeds collected from plants growing on rock outcrops. Under both flooded and nonflooded conditions, seeds from mudflats exhibited an annual conditional dormancy/nondormancy cycle, similar to those from rock outcrops buried under nonflooded conditions. Seeds from mudflats germinated to higher percentages at mid-summer temperatures (35/20 °C) in mid-summer than those from rock outcrops. On the other hand, seeds from rock outcrops germinated to higher percentages at March temperatures (15/6 °C) in March than those from mudflats. Thus, seeds could germinate on mudflats any time from April through September if dewatering occurred, and they could germinate on rock outcrops any time from March through June and in September if soil moisture was nonlimiting; in both habitats light would be required for germination. Since seeds on mudflats may be flooded for several consecutive years, mudflats are more unpredictable than rock outcrops. Ability of seeds from mudflats to germinate to high percentages in light at 35/20 °C throughout the summer and those from rock outcrops not to do so may be related to the greater unpredictability of the mudflat. Each year for 11 years, seeds germinated in mudflat soil samples kept in a nonheated greenhouse, reaching a total of 22526 ± 1401 (mean ± S.E.) seeds m -2; thus, the species has the potential to form a large long-lived persistent soil seed bank.

Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Chester, Edward W.

2004-07-01

23

Seasonal Variation in Erodibility of Two Temperate, Microtidal Mudflats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The erodibility of two microtidal mudflats in the Danish Wadden Sea area was examined over a year at monthly intervals (EROMES erosion equipment). One site was dominated by macrofauna (mainly Hydrobia ulvae) whereas the other was only sparsely inhabited by macrofauna with the temporary formation of diatom biofilms. The erodibility of the mudflat surface was mediated by the presence of both biofilms and H. ulvae. Biofilms increase erosion threshold and decrease the erosion rate but the correlation between chlorophyll a and erosion threshold was not strong. Biofilms formed in spring, summer and autumn at one study site and the erodibility of the site was consequently generally low during these seasons and higher during the winter period. Biofilms were absent where macro faunal populations were dominant and low erosion thresholds were found at these sites. The erosion rate was dependent on the fecal pellet content of the bed material. A strong seasonal variation of the content of fecal pellets of the bed material was found and this causes a seasonal variation of the erosion rate. The temporal variation of the erodibility at the sites dominated by H. ulvae was actually opposite to the other sites as an increase in the erosion rate was observed during the warmer seasons, probably due to the higher egestion-rate and higher production of fecal pellets by H. ulvae under higher temperatures. The data demonstrates that sites dominated by H. ulvae are easily eroded, both because of the snails grazing activities on benthic diatoms and the pelletization of the surface material. However, it is only by examination of the erosion rates in addition to the erosion thresholds that the destabilizing effect of H. ulvae becomes clear. The study demonstrates that the prediction of the seasonality of the erodibility at intertidal mudflats is not straightforward but requires information on both benthic micro algae contents and macrofaunal community structure and population densities.

Andersen, T. J.

2001-07-01

24

Bacterivory of a mudflat nematode community under different1 environmental conditions2  

E-print Network

1 Bacterivory of a mudflat nematode community under different1 environmental conditions2 Pierre fauna. The trophic role of bacteria for a nematode community on the Brouage mudflat14 (Marennes of bacteria by nematodes. In order to assess simultaneously bacteria and algal21 assimilation rates, algal

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Influence of subtle substrate differences on feeding by shorebirds on intertidal mudflats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shallow-feeding shorebirds, dowitchers (Limnodromus griseus and L. scolopaceus), western sandpipers (Calidris mauri), dunlin (C. alpina) and American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), reduced the density of their prey in mudflats with little sand but not in mudflats with a moderate admixture of sand. An experiment in Upper Newport Bay, Southern California, during October and November 1979 to explain the difference in density

M. L. Quammen

1982-01-01

26

Beach profile variation on Hawaiian carbonate beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beach profiles from selected Oahu and Maui beaches quantitatively document beach volume variation and change between 1994 and 1999. Along exposed, high-energy beaches, large fluctuations in beach volume, characterized primarily by the formation and erosion of extensive berms, dominate the seasonal changes. Beaches along more protected stretches of coastline show much less variation in profile morphology. Beaches on the west (leeward) coast of Oahu experienced the most seasonal variation in profile volume, followed by the north shore, east (windward) shore, and south shore. Similar to Oahu, beaches along the west coast of Maui showed the greatest overall profile variation. However, the mean variation for profiles along a single coastal reach showed little difference compared to other coastal segments. Although some beaches showed net gain or loss during the study period, most beaches remained relatively stable with change limited to a finite envelope. No island-wide trends in beach erosion or accretion were observed during the study period. However, no extreme events, such as tropical storms or hurricanes, directly influenced the Hawaiian Islands during the study period. This data set should therefore be considered as representative of typical annual beach activity. Greater variation and possible long-term change would be expected during extreme events.

Gibbs, A. E.; Richmond, B. M.; Fletcher, C. H.

2000-01-01

27

Sediment balance of intertidal mudflats in a macrotidal estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intertidal area contributes widely to fine-grained sediment balance in estuarine environments. Their sedimentary dynamics is controlled by several forcing parameters including tidal range, river flow and swell, affected by human activities such as dredging, construction or vessels traffic leading to modify sediment transport pattern. Although the estuarine hydrodynamics is well documented, the link between forcing parameters and these sedimentary processes is weakly understood. One of the main reasons is the difficulty to integrate spatial (from the fluvial to the estuary mouth) and temporal (from swell in seconds to pluriannual river flow variability) patterns. This study achieved on intertidal mudflats distributed along the macrotidal Seine estuary (France) aims (i) to quantify the impact of forcing parameters on each intertidal area respect to its longitudinal position in the estuarine system and (ii) to assess the fine-grained sediment budget at estuarine scale. The Seine estuary is a macrotidal estuary developed over 160 km up the upstream limit of tidal wave penetration. With an average river flow of 450m3.s-1, 80% of the Suspended Particles Matter (SPM) annual flux is discharged during the flood period. In the downstream part, the Seine estuary Turbidity Maximum (TM) is the SPM stock located near the mouth. During their transfer toward the sea, the fine particles can be trapped in (i) the intertidal mudflats; preferential areas characterized by low hydrodynamics and generally sheltered of the tidal dominant flow, the main tidal current the Seine River and (ii) the TM. The Seine estuary is an anthropic estuary in order to secure navigation: one consequence of these developments is the tidal bore disappearance. Along the macrotidal Seine estuary hydrodynamics features and sedimentary fluxes were followed during at least 1 year using respectively Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter, Optical BackScatter and altimeter. Results in the fluvial estuary enhance the role of hydrological cycle that lead to (i) an increased mean water level and (ii) provide SPM from the continental area. This feature leads to significant accretion over intertidal area. In the middle and marine estuary the TM is the main SPM supplier. In these parts of the estuary deposition over these intertidal area is driven by (i) tidal cycle in particular fortnightly cycle link to maximum TM resuspension during (strongest) spring tide and (ii) TM location controlled by river inflow that varies following an annual and inter-annual variability. Outside sedimentation period, the erosion is driven by the combination of (i) progressive erosion driven by fortnightly cycle and (ii) sudden erosion controlled either by wave or boat generated waves respectively at the mouth and in the middle/upper estuary. This last is reinforced by the rheological characteristics of deposit that correspond to fluid/low consolidated mud. During most of the year, the Seine estuary mudflats record an erosion pattern. Significant and intensive sedimentation only occurs few days per year. This pattern is linked to highly variable hydrodynamics conditions (bottom shear stress ranging from 0.5 to 5 N.m-2) that control the sediment supply availability. In this infilling macrotidal anthropized system mudflats are close to equilibrium with an annual rate ranging between +/- 5cm.yrs-1: they act as temporal storage area of fined-grained sediments.

lafite, R.; Deloffre, J.; Lemoine, M.

2012-12-01

28

BEACHES HEALTH SURVEY  

EPA Science Inventory

Baterial samples were taken at swimming beaches (primarily freshwater beaches) in Region 10 while evaluating potential bacterial sources (e.g., people, cattle, pets, septic systems, runoff, birds). For each beach selected, the preferred sampling is: background, low/no use period...

29

Evaluation of the potential bioaccumulation ability of the blood cockle (Anadara granosa L.) for assessment of environmental matrices of mudflats.  

PubMed

The spatial distribution of 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (tPAHs) was quantified in aquacultures located in intertidal mudflats of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia in order to investigate bioaccumulation of PAH in blood cockles, Anadara granosa (A. granosa). Fifty-four samples from environmental matrices and A. granosa were collected. The sampling locations were representative of a remote area as well as PAH-polluted areas. The relationship of increased background levels of PAH to anthropogenic PAH sources in the environment and their effects on bioaccumulation levels of A. granosa are investigated in this study. The levels of PAH in the most polluted station were found to be up to ten-fold higher than in remote areas in blood cockle. These high concentrations of PAHs reflected background contamination, which originates from distant airborne and waterborne transportation of contaminated particles. The fraction and source identification of PAHs, based on fate and transport considerations, showed a mix of petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. The relative biota-sediment accumulation factors (RBSAF), relative bioaccumulation factors from filtered water (RBAFw), and from suspended particulate matter (SPM) (RBAFSP) showed higher bioaccumulations of the lower molecular weight of PAHs (LMWs) in all stations, except Kuala Juru, which showed higher bioaccumulation of the higher molecular weight of PAHs (HMWs). Calculations of bioaccumulation factors showed that blood cockle can accumulate PAHs from sediment as well as water samples, based on the physico-chemical characteristics of habitat and behaviour of blood cockles. Correlations among concentrations of PAHs in water, SPM, sediment and A. granosa at the same sites were also found. Identification of PAH levels in different matrices showed that A. granosa can be used as a good biomonitor for LMW of PAHs and tPAHs in mudflats. Considering the toxicity and carcinogenicity of PAHs, the bioaccumulation by blood cockles are a potential hazard for both blood cockles and their consumers. PMID:23583984

Mirsadeghi, Seiedeh Aghileh; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Yap, Chee Kong; Gobas, Frank

2013-06-01

30

Dramatic Improvements in Beach Water Quality Following Gull Removal  

EPA Science Inventory

Gulls are often cited as important contributors of fecal contamination to surface waters, and some recreational beaches have used gull control measures to improve microbial water quality. In this study, gulls were chased from a Lake Michigan beach using specially trained dogs, a...

31

Virtual Beach 3: user's guide  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Virtual Beach version 3 (VB3) is a decision support tool that constructs site-specific statistical models to predict fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations at recreational beaches. VB3 is primarily designed for beach managers responsible for making decisions regarding beach closures or the issuance of swimming advisories due to pathogen contamination. However, researchers, scientists, engineers, and students interested in studying relationships between water quality indicators and ambient environmental conditions will find VB3 useful. VB3 reads input data from a text file or Excel document, assists the user in preparing the data for analysis, enables automated model selection using a wide array of possible model evaluation criteria, and provides predictions using a chosen model parameterized with new data. With an integrated mapping component to determine the geographic orientation of the beach, the software can automatically decompose wind/current/wave speed and magnitude information into along-shore and onshore/offshore components for use in subsequent analyses. Data can be examined using simple scatter plots to evaluate relationships between the response and independent variables (IVs). VB3 can produce interaction terms between the primary IVs, and it can also test an array of transformations to maximize the linearity of the relationship The software includes search routines for finding the "best" models from an array of possible choices. Automated censoring of statistical models with highly correlated IVs occurs during the selection process. Models can be constructed either using previously collected data or forecasted environmental information. VB3 has residual diagnostics for regression models, including automated outlier identification and removal using DFFITs or Cook's Distances.

Cyterski, Mike; Brooks, Wesley; Galvin, Mike; Wolfe, Kurt; Carvin, Rebecca; Roddick, Tonia; Fienen, Mike; Corsi, Steve

2014-01-01

32

THE VISUAL BEACH NUMERICAL MODEL: A DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC MODELING APPROACH TO ACHIEVING US BEACHES AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION  

EPA Science Inventory

Under the BEACH Act of 2000, EPA has committed to a program to monitor beach water quality and develop strategies, including modeling, for timely notification of the public when bacterial contamination poses a risk to bathers. EPA's goal is to manage 100% of significant public be...

33

Persistence of fecal indicator bacteria in Santa Monica Bay beach sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monitoring the water quality of recreational beaches is only one step toward understanding microbial contamination—the primary cause of beach closings. The surf zone sediment reservoir is typically overlooked and may also be important. This study involved monitoring the fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) levels in water and sediment at three ocean beaches (two exposed and one enclosed) during a storm event,

Christine M. Lee; Tiffany Y. Lin; Chu-Ching Lin; GoleNaz A. Kohbodi; Anita Bhatt; Robin Lee; Jennifer A. Jay

2006-01-01

34

Sands and environmental conditions impact the abundance and persistence of the fecal indicator bacteria Enterococcus at recreational beaches  

E-print Network

The marine fecal indicator Enterococcus is measured at beaches to detect fecal contamination events, and beaches are closed to bathers when Enterococcus is found to exceed the federally mandated limit. This dissertation ...

Halliday, Elizabeth (Elizabeth Ann)

2012-01-01

35

Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates  

E-print Network

Highlights Daytona Beach Fall 2012 Dates Birthdays Manners TheELIWeekly Daytona Beach Fun in the sun! Join us for a day of surf, sun, and sand at Daytona Beach. We will be going to the beach to Gainesville around 10:30pm. Transportation: Bus passes for Daytona Beach are now sold out! If you bought

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

36

Morphological response of an exposed intertidal mudflat to its adjacent channel in the Yangtze Estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Study of sediment transport is key to understanding morphological response of intertidal flats. In order to investigate the effect of a channel on its adjacent mudflat, an integrated in situ measurement was carried out on Eastern Chongming Island in Yangtze Estuary. Flow velocities, suspended sediment concentrations, and local bed level changes were measured on six sites throughout an exposed intertidal mudflat and an adjacent small channel. A longer-term monitoring of bed level profiles from 2005 to 2012 was also acquired to determine the morphological variation resulted from sediment transport. Time series of water level and velocity show that this area is flood dominant, suggesting continuous growing intertidal flat. Observed bed elevation, however, shows decreasing trend on the site near the channel. The longer-term bed level profiles also show accretion on the flat above mean sea level (MSL), while degradation on the flat below MSL. It can be inferred from the estimation of net flux of suspended sediments on intertidal mudflat: 1) there are net landward flux on sites above MSL, 2) nearly zero around MSL, and 3) net seaward flux on site blow MSL, which is on the boarder of the small channel. A conceptual model for morphological response of open intertidal growing mudflat to an adjacent channel is proposed such that the upper part continues accreting, while lower part being eroded. The presence of the channel has restrained the expansion of the mudflat.

Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.

2013-12-01

37

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

2011-12-01

38

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological state of the oil contaminated beach system. In this paper, we present our understanding of what is known and known to be unknown with regard to the current state of Alabama's beaches in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Motivated by our observations of the evolving distribution of oil in Alabama's beaches and BP's clean-up activities, we offer our thoughts on the lessons learned from this oil spill disaster.

Hayworth, J. S.; Clement, T. P.; Valentine, J. F.

2011-07-01

39

Actinian dominated intertidal mudflats: A new case of an extraordinary rare phenomenon from Southern Chile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generally, estuarine intertidal mudflats constitute important nurseries for fish and foraging grounds for coastal birds by providing a plenitude of mollusks, worms, and crustaceans as prey, which in turn mostly feed on suspended and benthic microalgae, bacteria, and detritus. Despite the high productivity of such habitats, pronounced variability in both salinity and temperature results typically in low diversity. The only

Dirk Schories; Karsten Reise; Karen Sanamyan; Nadya Sanamyan; Elena Clasing; Anneken Reise

2011-01-01

40

A new snapping shrimp (Crustacea Decapoda, Alpheidae, Alpheus) from the estuarine mudflats of Kuwait  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new snapping shrimp, Alpheus lutosus spec. nov., is described from the intertidal mudflats of Bubiyan Island, northern Kuwait, south of the vast Shatt-Al-Arab delta. The new species appears to be closely related to Alpheus hoplocheles Coutière, 1897 from similar estuarine habitats in China and Japan, differing mainly in the absence of a sharp distolateral tooth on the palm of

A. Anker; Grave De S

2009-01-01

41

State of the Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This annual Surfrider Foundation report surveys the state of the beaches in coastal and Great Lakes states that are home to Foundation chapters. Each state is rated based on the availability of information and status of eight indicators, including beach access, Website access, surf zone water quality, and beach erosion, among others. The report is written from the perspective of a "concerned local citizen" and aimed at "the people who use and care most about this precious resource." The online report contains six sections, including an executive summary, an explanation of the indicators, conclusions, and recommendations.

2000-01-01

42

Anthropogenic influence on sedimentation and intertidal mudflat change in San Pablo Bay, California: 1856-1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analysis of a series of historical bathymetric surveys has revealed large changes in morphology and sedimentation from 1856 to 1983 in San Pablo Bay, California. In 1856, the morphology of the bay was complex, with a broad main channel, a major side channel connecting to the Petaluma River, and an ebb-tidal delta crossing shallow parts of the bay. In 1983, its morphology was simpler because all channels except the main channel had filled with sediment and erosion had planed the shallows creating a uniform gently sloping surface. The timing and patterns of geomorphic change and deposition and erosion of sediment were influenced by human activities that altered sediment delivery from rivers. From 1856 to 1887, high sediment delivery (14.1 ?? 106 m3/yr) to San Francisco Bay during the hydraulic gold-mining period in the Sierra Nevada resulted in net deposition of 259 ?? 14 ?? 106 m3 in San Pablo Bay. This rapid deposition filled channels and increased intertidal mudflat area by 60% (37.4 ?? 3.4 to 60.6 ?? 6.2 km2). From 1951 to 1983, 23 ?? 3 ?? 106 m3 of sediment was eroded from San Pablo Bay as sediment delivery from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers decreased to 2.8 ?? 106 m3/yr because of damming of rivers, riverbank protection, and altered land use. Intertidal mudflat area in 1983 was 31.8 ?? 3.9 km2, similar to that in 1856. Intertidal mudflat distribution in 1983, however, was fairly uniform whereas most of the intertidal mudflats were in the western part of San Pablo Bay in 1856. Sediment delivery, through its affect on shallow parts of the bay, was determined to be a primary control on intertidal mudflat area. San Pablo Bay has been greatly affected by human activities and will likely continue to erode in the near term in response to a diminished sediment delivery from rivers. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Jaffe, B. E.; Smith, R. E.; Foxgrover, A. C.

2007-01-01

43

Hawaii Beach Monitoring Program: Beach Profile Data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Coastal erosion is widespread and locally severe in Hawaii and other low-latitude areas. Typical erosion rates in Hawaii are in the range of 15 to 30 cm/yr (0.5 to 1 ft/yr; Hwang, 1981; Sea Engineering, Inc., 1988; Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc.,1991). Recent studies on Oahu (Fletcher et al., 1997; Coyne et al., 1996) have shown that nearly 24%, or 27.5 km (17.1 mi) of an original 115 km (71.6 mi) of sandy shoreline (1940's) has been either significantly narrowed (17.2 km; 10.7 mi) or lost (10.3 km; 6.4 mi). Nearly one-quarter of the islands' beaches have been significantly degraded over the last half-century and all shorelines have been affected to some degree. Oahu shorelines are by far the most studied, however, beach loss has been identified on the other islands as well, with nearly 13 km (8 mi) of beach likely lost due to shoreline hardening on Maui (Makai Engineering, Inc. and Sea Engineering, Inc., 1991). Causes of coastal erosion and beach loss in Hawaii are numerous but, unfortunately, poorly understood and rarely quantified. Construction of shoreline protection structures limits coastal land loss, but does not alleviate beach loss and may actually accelerate the problem by prohibiting sediment deposition in front of the structures. Other factors contributing to beach loss include: a) reduced sediment supply; b) large storms; and, c) sea-level rise. Reduction in sand supply, either from landward or seaward (primarily reef) sources, can have a myriad of causes. Obvious causes such as beach sand mining and emplacement of structures that interrupt natural sediment transport pathways or prevent access to backbeach sand deposits, remove sediment from the active littoral system. More complex issues of sediment supply can be related to reef health and carbonate production which, in turn, may be linked to changes in water quality. Second, the accumulated effect of large storms is to transport sediment beyond the littoral system. Third, rising sea level leads to a natural landward migration of the shoreline. Dramatic examples of coastal erosion, such as houses and roads falling into the sea, are rare in Hawaii, but the impact of erosion is still very serious. The signs of erosion are much more subtle and typically start as a "temporary" hardening structure designed to mitigate an immediate problem which, eventually, results in a proliferation of structures along a stretch of coast. The natural ability of the sandy shoreline to respond to changes in wave climate is lost. The overall goals of this study are to document the coastal erosion history in Hawaii, determine the causal factors of that erosion, provide high-quality data for other "end-users" in applied studies (i.e. coastal engineers, planners, and managers), and increase our general understanding of low-latitude coastal geologic development. This project involves close cooperation between the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the University of Hawaii.

Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.; Hillman, Kindra P.

2001-01-01

44

Virtual Beach: Decision Support Tools for Beach Pathogen Prediction  

EPA Science Inventory

The Virtual Beach Managers Tool (VB) is decision-making software developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tool is being developed under the umbrella of EPA's Advanced Monit...

45

Contamination  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contamination of spacecraft in the aerospace environment is examined. The optical systems, thermal control systems and solar power systems were deemed to be most vulnerable to particle damage. It was decided that all orbits should be considered. Specific issues concern whether there are changes in transmittance of optics and the radiative properties of protective coatings.

Maag, Carl R.

1989-01-01

46

Weak diurnal changes in the biochemical properties and benthic macrofauna of urbanised mangrove forests and mudflats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diurnal changes in the biochemical properties and the benthic macrofaunal assemblage of sediments in urbanised mangrove forests\\u000a and their adjacent mudflats in Sydney Harbour were investigated. Behavioural and physiological changes in the microphytobenthos\\u000a between day and night were predicted to cause diurnal changes in the micro-scale depth distribution of chlorophylls a and b and colloidal carbohydrate. In addition, because macrofauna

T. J. Tolhurst

2009-01-01

47

Foraging behavior of green-winged teal and mallards on tidal mudflats in Louisiana  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used time-activity budget techniques to measure foraging behavior of green-winged teal (Anas crecca carolinensis) and mallards (A. platyrhynchos). Observations were made on tidal mudflats in the Atchafalaya River Delta, Louisiana, USA, in the winter of 1994–1995. Green-winged\\u000a teal spent more diurnal time than mallards foraging (68% vs. 35%). Time spent in different foraging postures also differed\\u000a between species. Green-winged

William P. Johnson; Frank C. Rohwer

2000-01-01

48

Seed germination ecology of the summer annual Cyperus squarrosus in an unpredictable mudflat habitat  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of our study was to better understand seed germination ecology of the summer annual sedge Cyperus squarrosus, which grows in various habitats, including mudflats and shallow soil over limestone bedrock (rock outcrops), where timing of the period favorable for germination and completion of the life cycle is unpredictable. Over a 28.5-month period, temperature and light:dark requirements for germination

Carol C Baskin; Jerry M Baskin; Edward W Chester

2004-01-01

49

Episodic colonization of an intertidal mudflat by native cordgrass ( Spartina foliosa ) at Tijuana Estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following heavy winter storms and sedimentation in 1993,Spartina foliosa (Pacific cordgrass) clones established on a 6.5-ha mudflat in Tijuana Estuary, with over 80 new clones counted by 1997. El\\u000a Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) storms in 1993 apparently facilitated the habitat conversion through river flooding, which\\u000a caused a temporary reduction in soil salinity and delivered large volumes of sediment. Extreme sedimentation

Kristen M. Ward; John C. Callaway; Joy B. Zedler

2003-01-01

50

Morphodynamics of Prograding Beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term coastal evolution often results from the cumulative effects of small residual differences between relatively large signals. In light of dire projections of sea level rise over the next several decades to century, there is a strong societal need for accurate forecasts of net interannual- to decadal-scale coastal change. However, our present understanding of the processes responsible for storm-induced erosion and coastal recession is significantly more advanced than our knowledge of coastal recovery during calm periods. To investigate the processes and morphodynamics associated with progading beaches we synthesize findings from a long-term (15 years) beach morphology monitoring program in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Most of the beaches along the Columbia River littoral cell (northwest Oregon and southwest Washington) were eroded during the two intense winters of 1997/1998 (a major El Niño event) and 1998/1999 (a moderate La Niña event). Subsequent to these winters the beaches have exhibited net residual progradation of several meters per year resulting in significant shoreline advance. During this same period as many as two to three new foredunes formed with backshore beach profiles accumulating sand at rates of well over 10 m3/m/yr. Interestingly, these large signals of horizontal and vertical coastal advance have occurred on beaches in which nearshore morphological variability is dominated by net offshore sandbar migration. Net offshore sandbar migration follows a three-stage process; bar generation near the shoreline, seaward migration, and bar degeneration in the outer nearshore with a cyclic return period of approximately 4 to 5 years in the region. Gradients in alongshore sediment transport, net onshore directed cross-shore sediment transport within the surf zone, and cross-shore feeding from a shoreface out of equilibrium with forcing conditions may each be partially responsible for the sediment supplied to the beaches and dunes during the study period. In this paper we will exploit regional variability in physical (e.g. sediment supply) and ecological variables (e.g. % cover of exotic beach grass species and density) thought responsible for the varying rates and form of coastal advance in the region. These gradients allow us to test hypotheses regarding the relative role of the various controls on interannual- to decadal-scale coastal evolution.

Ruggiero, P.

2012-12-01

51

CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management  

E-print Network

SESSION February 2012 06 REPORT BY CLASS XI NRLI Beach Management for Migrating Shore Birds and Human Recreation At the Holiday Inn, Fort Myers Beach, Project Team member Bruce Delaney welcomedthe,emotions,andpeople. this issue Welcome to Ft Myers Beach P.1 Florida Bay P.2 Difficult Dynamics P.3 Fieldtrip to Carlos Pointe P

Florida, University of

52

INFLUENCE OF TIDE AND WAVES ON WASHOUT OF DISSOLVED NUTRIENTS FROM THE BIOREMEDIATION ZONE OF A COARSE-SAND BEACH: APPLICATION IN OIL-SPILL BIOREMEDIATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Successful bioremediation of oil-contaminated beaches requires maintenance of a sufficient quantity of growth-limiting nutrients in contact with the oiled beach materials. A conservative tracer study was conducted on a moderate-energy, sandy beach on Delaware Bay to estimate the...

53

Shifts in the Microbial Community Composition of Gulf Coast Beaches Following Beach Oiling  

PubMed Central

Microorganisms associated with coastal sands serve as a natural biofilter, providing essential nutrient recycling in nearshore environments and acting to maintain coastal ecosystem health. Anthropogenic stressors often impact these ecosystems, but little is known about whether these disturbances can be identified through microbial community change. The blowout of the Macondo Prospect reservoir on April 20, 2010, which released oil hydrocarbons into the Gulf of Mexico, presented an opportunity to examine whether microbial community composition might provide a sensitive measure of ecosystem disturbance. Samples were collected on four occasions, beginning in mid-June, during initial beach oiling, until mid-November from surface sand and surf zone waters at seven beaches stretching from Bay St. Louis, MS to St. George Island, FL USA. Oil hydrocarbon measurements and NOAA shoreline assessments indicated little to no impact on the two most eastern beaches (controls). Sequence comparisons of bacterial ribosomal RNA gene hypervariable regions isolated from beach sands located to the east and west of Mobile Bay in Alabama demonstrated that regional drivers account for markedly different bacterial communities. Individual beaches had unique community signatures that persisted over time and exhibited spatial relationships, where community similarity decreased as horizontal distance between samples increased from one to hundreds of meters. In contrast, sequence analyses detected larger temporal and less spatial variation among the water samples. Superimposed upon these beach community distance and time relationships, was increased variability in bacterial community composition from oil hydrocarbon contaminated sands. The increased variability was observed among the core, resident, and transient community members, indicating the occurrence of community-wide impacts rather than solely an overprinting of oil hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria onto otherwise relatively stable sand population structures. Among sequences classified to genus, Alcanivorax, Alteromonas, Marinobacter, Winogradskyella, and Zeaxanthinibacter exhibited the largest relative abundance increases in oiled sands. PMID:24040219

Newton, Ryan J.; Huse, Susan M.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Peake, Colin S.; Sogin, Mitchell L.; McLellan, Sandra L.

2013-01-01

54

77 FR 50019 - Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean located east of Cocoa Beach...in aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach,...

2012-08-20

55

NAME: Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project LOCATION: Cedar Beach County Parke, Suffolk Co., NY  

E-print Network

NAME: Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project LOCATION: Cedar Beach County: The Cedar Beach Creek Habitat Restoration Demonstration Project will restore local essential ecosystem, beach, and open water mosaic. This project will establish and enhance three critical marine habitats

US Army Corps of Engineers

56

Beach/Fireworks Notes from the Office  

E-print Network

Highlights · Beach/Fireworks · Notes from the Office · Birthdays · Manners TheELIWeekly Beach at Crescent Beach. We will drive to the beach and spend the day sunning, swimming, and having fun! After the beach, we will come back to campus to watch fireworks at Flavet Field. WHEN: Saturday, July 3rd. Meet

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

57

Heavy metal concentrations in three shorebird species from Okgu Mudflat, Gunsan, Korea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Iron, zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium were measured in livers of three shorebird species from Okgu Mudflat, Korea in the East\\u000a Asian-Australian migration flyways. Iron concentrations in red-necked stints (Calidris ruficollis) (geomean = 1,322 ?g\\/g dw) were higher than in terek sandpipers (Xenus cinereus) (467 ?g\\/g dw), and great knots (Calidris tenuirostris) (158 ?g\\/g dw). Copper concentrations in great knots (85.8 ?g\\/g dw) were significantly higher than in red-necked stints (15.9 ?g\\/g dw)\\u000a and terek

Jungsoo Kim; Hwa-Su Lee; Tae-Hoe Koo

2009-01-01

58

Ecological risk assessment: Seal Beach, California  

SciTech Connect

Ecological risk assessment offers a means of quantifying the probability and degree of hazard posed toward the well-being of ecological resources by a myriad of physical, chemical and biological agents generated from human activity. In this paper, the authors discuss the results of a screening-level ecological risk assessment conducted in a unique coastal setting-the Seal beach National Wildlife Refuge, which is located within the US Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach, California. Evaluation of activities formerly conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration indicated the presence of various organic and inorganic chemical contaminants in subsurface soil and groundwater resources located beneath the weapons station, as well as potential pathways for introduction of those contaminants to the ecological resources of the wildlife refuge. Completion of the screening-level assessment identified inorganic contaminants-antimony, arsenic, beryllium, and manganese-as the primary risk drivers, leading to a recommendation for definitive characterization of the extent of chemical degradation of the subsurface environs and concurrent performance of a full-scale ecological risk assessment. It is the author's understanding that both of the recommended studies were initiated and were nearing completion at the time of the submittal of this paper.

Vernon, K.J.; Kuo, J.

1999-07-01

59

Evaluation of Beach Grooming Techniques on Escherichia coli Density in Foreshore Sand at North Beach, Racine, WI  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elevated levels of Escherichia coli(E. coli) in bathing waters at North Beach, a popular recreational site in Racine, Wisconsin, have been a persistent problem often resulting in the issuance of poor water quality advisories. Moreover, waterfowl (mostly Larus delawarensis and L. argentatus) in nearshore and offshore areas are common and may serve as non-point sources for bacterial contamination of recreational

Julie L. Kinzelman; Richard L. Whitman; Muruleedhara Byappanahalli; Emma Jackson; Robert C. Bagley

2003-01-01

60

On the importance of size of plastic fragments and pellets on the strandline: a snapshot of a Brazilian beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virgin plastic pellets and plastic fragments are reported as ubiquitous beach contaminants in the peer-reviewed literature.\\u000a A surface density of 0.3 virgin plastic pellets and plastic fragments per square centimeter of the strandline area was registered\\u000a on an urban beach of the northeast of Brazil. This beach is presently not affected by petrochemical facilities or pellet processing\\u000a plants. The main

Monica F. Costa; Juliana A. Ivar do Sul; Jacqueline S. Silva-Cavalcanti; Maria Christina B. Araújo; Ângela Spengler; Paula S. Tourinho

2010-01-01

61

Routine screening of harmful microorganisms in beach sands: implications to public health.  

PubMed

Beaches worldwide provide recreational opportunities to hundreds of millions of people and serve as important components of coastal economies. Beach water is often monitored for microbiological quality to detect the presence of indicators of human sewage contamination so as to prevent public health outbreaks associated with water contact. However, growing evidence suggests that beach sand can harbor microbes harmful to human health, often in concentrations greater than the beach water. Currently, there are no standards for monitoring, sampling, analyzing, or managing beach sand quality. In addition to indicator microbes, growing evidence has identified pathogenic bacteria, viruses, and fungi in a variety of beach sands worldwide. The public health threat associated with these populations through direct and indirect contact is unknown because so little research has been conducted relating to health outcomes associated with sand quality. In this manuscript, we present the consensus findings of a workshop of experts convened in Lisbon, Portugal to discuss the current state of knowledge on beach sand microbiological quality and to develop suggestions for standardizing the evaluation of sand at coastal beaches. The expert group at the "Microareias 2012" workshop recommends that 1) beach sand should be screened for a variety of pathogens harmful to human health, and sand monitoring should then be initiated alongside regular water monitoring; 2) sampling and analysis protocols should be standardized to allow proper comparisons among beach locations; and 3) further studies are needed to estimate human health risk with exposure to contaminated beach sand. Much of the manuscript is focused on research specific to Portugal, but similar results have been found elsewhere, and the findings have worldwide implications. PMID:24355396

Sabino, R; Rodrigues, R; Costa, I; Carneiro, C; Cunha, M; Duarte, A; Faria, N; Ferreira, F C; Gargaté, M J; Júlio, C; Martins, M L; Nevers, M B; Oleastro, M; Solo-Gabriele, H; Veríssimo, C; Viegas, C; Whitman, R L; Brandão, J

2014-02-15

62

The Influence of Benthic Diatoms and Invertebrates on the Erodibility of an Intertidal Mudflat, the Danish Wadden Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The erodibility of mudflat surfaces has been investigated in the Lister Dyb tidal area. A description is given of the short-term erosional, depositional history and the main biological factors governing the stability of the sediment surface. The erosion threshold seems mainly to be controlled by the relationship between algal biomass, expressed as chlorophylla content and the abundance of deposit feeders.

I. Austen; T. J. Andersen; K. Edelvang

1999-01-01

63

Are They Beach Cusps or Beach Horns? A Kauai Observation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach cusps on a southwest Kauai shoreline exhibit departures from the current schools of thought on cusp dynamics. Beach sediment is either carbonate sand or volcanic sand. The horns of the beach cusps are depositional features, reflecting the migration of sediment along the beach during the waning storm-wave (energy) phase and represent a building of the beach face. This phase may be comparable to the development of distinct sediment-transport bedforms in a unidirectional flow environment that develop at distinct ranges of Froude number. Heterogeneities such as groundwater-sapping patterns after storms, protruding bedrock, and variation of sediment size along the initial beach front (perhaps as a result of previous cusp development) provide the initial irregularities to initiate cusp morphology with evolution to a more rhythmic pattern because of the major feedback processes in the beach cusp environment. Although cusps may be stationary at some locations, transport of sediment along the shore is still occurring. The term beach horns, instead of beach cusps, should be used because the morphology is developed as a consequence of horn development. At the start of the field observation, long-period (LP) waves from south-southwest of Kauai dominated the shorter period Trade-Wind (TW) waves which are refracted around the island. The LP waves generated high-surf warnings. At this time, the cusps had an asymmetric pattern with the main backwash close to the horn located on the side of the cusp that represents the direction of longshore transport. Active erosion of the horn took place on the side of the cusp where more backwash occurred. The horn crests had an acute angle towards the approaching LP wave front. As the energy of the LP waves decreased, the TW waves became more dominant in the interference pattern of the two wave forms. The beach cusps reflected this change of interference in terms of symmetry as they became more symmetrical. Significant transport of sediment within the cusp feature was limited to high-tide periods. Troughs form offshore in front of the horns and sediment buildup occurs offshore of the cusps. Backwash in the cusp interferes with incoming waves, resulting in sediment deposition. In contrast, waves impinging on the horns had no interference from backwash and eroded the offshore troughs, depositing the sediment on the surface of the horn with additional sediment being carried into the cusps. Beach cusp processes were the same on the two types of beaches along this shoreline.

Pederson, D. T.

2004-12-01

64

Sedimentology of coarse-clastic beach-ridge deposits, Essex, southeast England  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distinction of cheniers from other types of beach ridge can often be problematic. The stratigraphy, sedimentology and geomorphological development of sand- and gravel-rich beach ridges at three sites on the northern Essex coast, England were determined using ground-penetrating radar (GPR), ground-truthing trenches and auger holes, and historical-aerial photograph analysis. The 900 MHz GPR system used achieved a maximum vertical resolution between 0.02 and 0.06 m. There was good correspondence between the radar stratigraphy obtained from time-migrated radar reflection profiles and the nature and form of bounding surfaces, sets of lamination, beds and bedsets observed in trenches. Data for one of the study sites (Colne Point) illustrate a complex beach-ridge stratigraphy and sequence of development that confirms they are not true cheniers. Instead, the ridges form part of both retrogradational and progradational barrier-spit sequences. Chenier designation at the other two study sites (Foulton Hall and Stone Point) is more straightforward, as the beach ridges lie at the junction between actively eroding mudflat and saltmarsh. However, despite the distinction between the barrier-spit beach ridges and the cheniers, the same types of deposit are recognised in both, indicating similar formative processes. Washover-sheet deposits consist of low-angle (<5°), sub-parallel, landward-dipping stratification, which is concordant with bounding surfaces above and below. Washover sheets develop when high-wave energy/storm-related overwash moves landward onto unflooded marsh or lagoonal surfaces. Washover-delta deposits are characterised by high-angle cross-stratification (up to 28°) that downlaps onto the underlying marsh or lagoonal surface. Washover deltas develop when overwash enters a significant body of standing water to landward, such as a flooded marsh or lagoon. Alternations between washover-sheet and washover-delta development are seen in many instances, but their time scale is unclear due to paucity of detailed information regarding overwash sedimentation rates, or chenier and berm-ridge migration rates. Similarity of the internal structure in both the cheniers and barrier-spit beach ridges confirms that this criterion alone cannot be used to distinguish different types of beach-ridge deposit. Detailed stratigraphic data, preferably complemented by direct evidence for the geomorphological context in which the ridge developed, are also required.

Neal, Adrian; Richards, Julie; Pye, Ken

2003-12-01

65

Florida: Clearwater Beach and Pier 60  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clearwater Beach, a year-round vacation spot, spans 3 miles along the coast of Florida. With its clean white sand and various attractions, this beach, located just 20 miles from the Tampa International Airport, makes the perfect vacation spot for any age group. Amenities on the beach and around the beach include: parasailing, pirate ship cruises, restaurants, and a range from

Chet Smolski

1978-01-01

66

Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade  

E-print Network

Beach Hopper Bonanza Grade Level: Second Grade Developers: Jan Ward, Merry Lojkovic, Kara Davidson the characteristics, behavior, and anatomy of beach hoppers. !" Examine the relationships between the beach hopper (transparent) !" 1-2 buckets !" sieves !" shovel !" small plastic container with lid to hold beach hoppers

67

AES Huntington Beach Generation Station Surf Zone  

E-print Network

AES Huntington Beach Generation Station Surf Zone Water Quality Study Prepared For: California HUNTINGTON BEACH GENERATING STATION SURF ZONE WATER QUALITY STUDY Prepared for: California of the Applied Energy Services (AES) Huntington Beach Generating Station (AES HBGS) in 2001, a near shore beach

68

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ion response to the rf-field in the magnetic beach problem can be essentially nonlinear. This paper presents a self-consistent theory of the rf-wave propagation and ion motion through the ion cyclotron resonance. An important ingredient of the problem is the ion flow along the magnetic field. The flow velocity limits the time the ions spend at the resonance, which in turn limits the ion energy gain. A feature that makes the problem nonlinear is that the flow accelerates under the effect of the grad B force and rf-pressure. This acceleration can produce a steep decrease in the plasma density at the resonance, resulting in partial reflection of the incident wave. *Work supported by VASIMR project at NASA and by U.S. DOE Contract DE-FG03-96ER-54346.

Arefiev, A.; Breizman, B.

2000-10-01

69

NATURE: Hippo Beach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is the online companion to Hippo Beach, which recently aired on the PBS series NATURE. And as the website explains, "from the study of hippos' essential relationships with birds to the discovery that hippos can communicate underwater, these mammals deserve a closer look." Students can get a closer look with "Sun, Sand, and Hippos," an interdisciplinary lesson plan for grades 3-5. The lesson guides students in researching and creating presentations on hippos and helpful weblinks, worksheets, and a teacher's guide are provided. The website contains other special features as well, including video clips from the program, multimedia activities, informative essays, and more. [RS] This site is also reviewed in the November 14, 2003 NSDL Life Sciences Report.

70

Coastal Erosion: Where's the Beach?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This data tip from Bridge, the Ocean Sciences Education Teacher Resource Center archive, explores erosion and accretion of coastal sediments, the two processes that keep our beaches in a constant state of change. Both natural and not-so-natural factors influencing these processes are discussed. Learners can view a variety of weblinks on the topic and conduct their own beach profile investigation, or access profile data from a 1999 Ocean City, Maryland beach and plot the changes over time for a graphic illustration of these processes.

2000-05-01

71

Temperature changes in the tidal excursion front and surface sediment of a subtropical mudflat in autumn  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temperature changes in sediment and the inundating water of a subtropical mudflat were determined using a series of data-loggers to monitor the temperature on fine days around the equinox at Lota, Queensland, Australia. On fine days the temperature of the forward shallow (ca. 5 cm) section of an incoming tide is up to 8 °C higher than that of the body of water from which it originates. Stationary data-loggers in the sediment indicate that during the day heat exchange occurred between the sediment and inundating waters, the sediment temperatures dropping from up to 10 °C higher than channel waters to temperatures approaching that of channel water in as little as 30 min following inundation. The implications for intertidal nekton and benthos are discussed.

Birt, Mekiel J.; Tibbetts, Ian R.

2007-08-01

72

Effects of shorebird predation and snail abundance on an intertidal mudflat community  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Top-down effects of predation are well documented in a variety of ecological communities, including marine soft-sediment systems. It has been proposed that intertidal mudflats in the upper Bay of Fundy, Canada, which host a large population of foraging shorebirds each summer, may exhibit this community dynamic. Biofilm (consisting mainly of diatoms) forms the base of the mudflat community food web, which is dominated by the amphipod Corophium volutator. To assess the potential for a trophic cascade, we conducted a manipulative field experiment examining individual and combined effects of the shorebird Calidris pusilla, a primary predator of C. volutator, and the eastern mudsnail (Nassarius obsoletus), an intraguild predator, on community structure (including macrofauna and large meiofauna retained by a 250-?m screen). Snails exhibited density-dependent top-down effects, primarily from strong negative interactions with juvenile and adult C. volutator, likely due to interference, consumption and emigration. Medium and high densities of snails reduced chlorophyll a concentration (a measure of diatom abundance), likely through consumption and disturbance of the sediment. When present at higher densities, snails also increased variability in community structure. Shorebirds were less influential in determining community structure. They reduced C. volutator biomass through consumption, but there was no resulting effect on primary production. Top-down effects of snails and birds were cumulative on C. volutator, but did not generate a trophic cascade. We suggest that a combination of omnivory and intraguild predation by shorebirds and snails, coupled with relatively low grazing pressure by C. volutator, prevented transmission of top-down effects.

Cheverie, Anne V.; Hamilton, Diana J.; Coffin, Michael R. S.; Barbeau, Myriam A.

2014-09-01

73

Actinian dominated intertidal mudflats: A new case of an extraordinary rare phenomenon from Southern Chile  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Generally, estuarine intertidal mudflats constitute important nurseries for fish and foraging grounds for coastal birds by providing a plenitude of mollusks, worms, and crustaceans as prey, which in turn mostly feed on suspended and benthic microalgae, bacteria, and detritus. Despite the high productivity of such habitats, pronounced variability in both salinity and temperature results typically in low diversity. The only sea anemone reported from estuarine mud is the edwardsiid Nematostella vectensisStephenson, 1935. It occurs widely in the northern hemisphere, and occasionally in extremely high density. Here we document another sea anemone from estuarine mud and muddy sand found in Southern Chile which has similar ecological attributes. Taxonomic confusion has impeded the reporting on this small but prominent member in a macrozoobenthic assemblage, the brooding Anthopleura hermaphroditica (Carlgren, 1899; Anthozoa: Actiniidae). It differs from N. vectensis by the presence of symbiotic algae. Average density under poly- to euhaline conditions in mud and muddy sand at around mid tide level was about 3 actinians per cm 2. An average abundance of 11,000 m - 2 , a biovolume of 487 cm 3 m - 2 , and a biomass of 35.5 g dry organic weight m - 2 were found in mud and muddy sand in two surveys 20 years apart. The mean fishing area of fully expanded individuals covers 42 ± 25 mm 2, corresponding to a circular area with a diameter of 7.3 ± 5.7 mm. Preliminary experiments indicate that associated benthos may be relegated to life below surface by the net of tentacles above the sediment. As no predators on A. hermaphroditica could be found on the mudflat, the success of this mixotrophic sea anemone may entail a trophic dead end.

Schories, Dirk; Reise, Karsten; Sanamyan, Karen; Sanamyan, Nadya; Clasing, Elena; Reise, Anneken

2011-02-01

74

77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY...a temporary safety zone on the Atlantic Ocean in the vicinity of Virginia Beach...vessel traffic movement on the Atlantic Ocean to protect mariners from the...

2012-05-09

75

Testing the Waters: A Guide to Water Quality at Vacation Beaches  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As Americans head for the beach, the Natural Resource Defense Council (NRDC) issues its twelfth annual report on the status of beach and recreational water quality. Entitled Testing the Waters, the report offers readers a fifty-fifty appraisal of the nation's lake and ocean recreational beach sites. That is, while water quality overall is indeed improving in the United States, beach water quality is suffering notable setbacks, with increasing reports of beach closings and harmful bacteria or contaminant postings. With more than one third of all Americans visiting or vacationing at beach areas, water quality is no small issue, as it impacts both health and economic vitality of areas branded by closings or warnings. In public interest, therefore, the NRDC urges that more be done to ensure that water quality is carefully monitored, reported, and addressed at governmental, corporate, and local levels. Toward that end, the NRDC lists both the good and the bad, groups they identify as "Beach Buddies" and "Beach Bums," respectively those areas that monitor and disclose findings and those that don't. With state-by-state listings of water quality reports and links to many other environmentally dedicated resources, the report should interest all who use America's recreational water sites.

2002-01-01

76

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Early Coverage of Times Beach: Watchdog or Muted Trumpet?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Times Beach, Missouri, a small town close to the Meramec River and about 25 miles from St. Louis, is now deserted due to contamination from dioxin, a contaminant generated during the production of some cleansers, herbicides, and pesticides. From November 30, 1982, until the end of January 1983, the "St. Louis Post-Dispatch" ran 55 articles about…

La Pierre, Yvette

77

Molecular analysis of bacterial diversity in mudflats along the salinity gradient of an acidified tropical Bornean estuary (South East Asia)  

PubMed Central

Background The Brunei River and Bay estuarine system (BES) in the northwest of Borneo is acidic and highly turbid. The system supports extensive intertidal mudflats and presents a potentially steep salinity and pH gradient along its length (45 km). Temporal variation in physical parameters is observed diurnally due to seawater flux during tidal forcing, and stochastically due to elevated freshwater inflow after rains, resulting in a salinity range between 0 and 34 psu. High velocity freshwater run-off from acid sulphate formations during monsoon seasons results in highly variable and acidic conditions (pH 4) at the upper reaches of the BES, whereas the pH is relatively stable (pH 8) at the seaward extremes, due to mixing with seawater from the South China Sea. At their surfaces, the BES mudflats present microbial ecosystems driven by oxygenic phototrophs. To study the effect of various physical parameters on the bacterial diversity of the BES mudflats, surface samples were collected from six sites stretching over 40 km for molecular and phylogentic analysis. Results The bacterial diversity at these sites was compared by community fingerprinting analysis using 16S rRNA gene based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Results revealed functionally conserved, diatom-driven microbial mudflat communities composed of mainly novel, uncultured species. Species composition was evaluated as 50-70% unique for each site along the BES. Clustering of the sequences commonly occurred and revealed that proteobacterial diversity was related to the salinity gradient. When considering all phyla, the diversity varied consistently with physical parameters (including anthropogenic) that are expected to influence microbial composition. Conclusion The BES mudflats were found to comprise the typical functional groups of microorganisms associated with photosynthetic carbon flux, sulfur cycling (Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria), and decomposition (Bacteroidetes). From a structural perspective, however, the mudflats constituted discretely distributed communities along the physical gradient of the BES, composed of largely novel species of Bacteria. This study provides first insights into patterns of bacterial community structure in tropical South East Asian coastal ecosystems that are potentially threatened by increasing variability in pH and salinity, in line with predicted future environmental change. PMID:25392733

2014-01-01

78

Estimate of removal rate of Nereis virens (Polychaeta: Nereidae) from an intertidal mudflat by gulls ( Larus spp.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feeding behavior of herring gulls (Larus argentatus), ringed-billed gulls (L. delawarensis) and great blackbacked gulls (L. marinus) on an intertidal mudflat in Maine, USA, was investigated. Remains of fish, mussels, crabs, insects, and the polychaeteNereis virens were recovered from gull feces. Forty-three percent of the fecal samples containedN. virens jaws, setae, or both. A comparison of jaws from fecal

W. G. Ambrose

1986-01-01

79

Population structure of resident, immigrant, and swimming Corophium volutator (Amphipoda) on an intertidal mudflat in the Bay of Fundy, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spatial variation in biotic and abiotic conditions, and differences in dispersive behavior of different life history stages can result in the formation of zones with different demography for infaunal and epifaunal species within vast intertidal flats. In this study, we evaluated within-mudflat homogeneity of the infaunal amphipod Corophium volutator found in the mud (residents), colonizing artificially disturbed areas (immigrants), and caught in the water column (swimmers) on a large mudflat in the upper Bay of Fundy, Canada. Densities of residents, immigrants, and swimmers were well structured in space (both along and across shore). Occasionally, significant differences in size structure, sex ratio, and proportion of ovigerous females were found at different intertidal levels, but these were short-lived. Comparisons of size and sex structure of residents, immigrants, and swimmers revealed occasional marked differences, with small juveniles and large adult males moving most. However, this size-bias in movement did not translate into zones with different population dynamics, suggesting that ample dispersal, through swimming and drifting in the water column, homogenized the population and masked potential effects of variation in environmental conditions. We therefore conclude that the mudflat represents one homogeneous population.

Drolet, David; Barbeau, Myriam A.

2012-05-01

80

75 FR 24997 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...from ``FPL Energy Point Beach...to ``NextEra Energy Point Beach...for Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units...a significant effect on the quality of the human environment....

2010-05-06

81

Beach Cusps of Monterey Bay, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A radiographic study was conducted on impregnated sand samples taken from beach cusps on Marina Beach, Monterey Bay, California, over a 7-month period from September 1970 to April 1971. The radiographs revealed much more structure than is discernable with...

J. L. Brueggeman

1971-01-01

82

Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660  

E-print Network

Newport Beach Police Department Press Release870 Santa Barbara Dr., Newport Beach, CA 92660, at approximately 8 a.m., Newport Beach Police Detectives served a search warrant in the 1000 block of Valencia for 496 PC ­ Possession of Stolen Property. They were booked at the Newport Beach Police Jail and were

Rose, Michael R.

83

Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset.  

E-print Network

Week 5, A 'Sweet As' Beach and Ride Murdering Beach at sunset. I'm starting to get used Point trailhead, we turned off on a steep road down to Murdering Beach. Apparently a murder did occur for the sunset. #12;Tidal Pool at Murdering Beach Also this week, I brought the camera along on what has become

Bardsley, John

84

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2011-07-01

85

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2013-07-01

86

West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina  

E-print Network

West Onslow Beach and New River Inlet (Topsail Beach), North Carolina 17 April 2008 Abstract: Topsail Beach lies along the southwestern end of Topsail Island, a sandy barrier island about two miles are estimated at $9,200,00 The proposed project for coastal storm damage reduction is a traditional beach

US Army Corps of Engineers

87

NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California  

E-print Network

NAME: City of Long Beach's Colorado Lagoon LOCATION: Long Beach, California ACRES: 28.3 acres NON-FEDERAL SPONSORS: City of Long Beach Friends of Colorado Lagoon PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Colorado Lagoon is a 28 of visitors from communities within and surrounding the City of Long Beach, California. There are over 700

US Army Corps of Engineers

88

33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation...NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.736 Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL....

2012-07-01

89

Coupling Between the Changes in CO2 Concentration and Sediment Biogeochemistry in the Salinas De San Pedro Mudflat, California, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the effects of elevated carbon dioxide [CO2] on biogeochemistry of marsh sediment including speciation of selected heavy metals in Salinas de San Pedro mudflat in California. The Salinas de San Pedro mudflat has higher carbon (C) content than the vast majority of fully-vegetated salt marshes even with the higher tidal action in the mudflat. Sources for CO2 were identified as atmospheric CO2 as well as due to local fault degassing process. We measured carbon dioxide [CO2], methane [CH4], total organic carbon, dissolved oxygen, salinity, and heavy metal concentration in various salt marsh locations. Overall, our results showed that CO2 concentration ranging from 418.7 to 436.9 [ppm], which are slightly different in various chambers but are in good agreement with some heavy metal concentrations values in mudflat at or around the same location. The selected metal concentration values (ppm) ranging from 0.003 - 0.011(As); 0.001-0.005 (Cd); 0.04-0.02 (Cr); 0.13-0.38 (Cu); 0.11-0.38 (Pb); 0.0009-0.020 (Se); and 0.188-0.321 (Zn). The low dissolved O2 [ppm] in the pore water sediment indicates suboxic environment. Additionally, CO2 [ppm] and loss on ignition (LOI) [%] correlated inversely; the higher CO2 content, the lower was the LOI; that is to say the excess CO2 may caused higher rates of decomposition and therefore it leads to lower soil organic matter (LOI) [%] on the mudflat surface. It appears that the elevated CO2 makes changes in salt marsh pore water chemistry for instance the free ionic metal (Cu2+, Pb2+, etc.) speciation is one of the most reactive form because simply assimilated by the non-decayed or alive organisms in sediment of salt marsh and/or in water. This means that CO2 not only is a sign of improvement in plant productivity, but also activates microbial decomposition through increases in dissolved organic carbon availability. CO2 also increases acidification processes such as anaerobic degradation of microorganism and oxidation of reduced components. The heavy metal concentrations in sediment samples were slightly higher in suboxic layer, yet it appears that salt marsh sediment in Salinas de San Pedro act like a sink for nutrient and carbon by maximizing carbon sequestration.

Rezaie Boroon, M.; Diaz, S.; Torres, V.; Lazzaretto, T.; Dehyn, D.

2013-12-01

90

Diel and semi-lunar patterns in the use of an intertidal mudflat by juveniles of Senegal sole, Solea senegalensis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intertidal mudflats are a dominant feature in many estuarine systems and may comprise a significant component of the feeding grounds available to fish. The Senegal sole, Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858, is one of the most important flatfishes in the Tagus estuary (Portugal) and its juveniles feed in the large intertidal flats. Many aspects of the ecology and lifecycle of this species are unknown, including its behavioural adaptations to environmental variations like day-night and semi-lunar cycles. Such activity patterns may strongly influence its use of mudflat habitats. Two encircling nets were deployed on an intertidal flat, one in the lower and the other in the upper mudflat. Nets were placed during high tide and organisms collected when the ebbing tide left the flats dry. Sampling took place in June-July 2004, covering all possible combinations of the diel and semi-lunar cycles with six replicates. Monthly beam trawls were carried out to determine density and average length of the predators of S. senegalensis in the intertidal and subtidal areas, and sediment samples were also taken, to determine prey density in the intertidal and subtidal areas. Solea senegalensis captured were mostly 0-group juveniles. The density and average length of Crangon crangon, one of the main predators, was higher in the subtidal than in the intertidal. Prey density decreased from the upper intertidal to the subtidal area. The highest average density of S. senegalensis occurred during full moon at dawn/dusk. A semi-lunar activity pattern was detected. At spring tides abundance peaked at dusk/dawn, whilst at neap tides abundance peaked during the day. Predators' densities over these periods were analysed and predator avoidance is discussed. During quarter and full-moon nights S. senegalensis extended its distribution over the lower and upper mudflat, but during the new moon colonisation was restricted to the lower mudflat. It was concluded that, while diel patterns of activity are well studied and are probably associated with feeding rhythms, the influence of the moon cycle, despite its importance, is a more complex phenomena that needs further investigation.

Vinagre, C.; França, S.; Cabral, H. N.

2006-08-01

91

Response of archaeal communities to oil spill in bioturbated mudflat sediments.  

PubMed

The response of archaeal community to oil spill with the combined effect of the bioturbation activity of the polychaetes Hediste diversicolor was determined in mudflat sediments from the Aber-Benoît basin (Brittany, French Atlantic coast), maintained in microcosms. The dynamics of the archaeal community was monitored by combining comparative terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprints and sequence library analyses based on 16S rRNA genes and 16S cDNA. Methanogens were also followed by targeting the mcrA gene. Crenarchaeota were always detected in all communities irrespective of the addition of H. diversicolor and/or oil. In the presence of oil, modifications of archaeal community structures were observed. These modifications were more pronounced when H. diversicolor was added resulting in a more diverse community especially for the Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. The analysis of mcrA transcripts showed a specific structure for each condition since the beginning of the experiment. Overall, oiled microcosms showed different communities irrespective of H. diversicolor addition, while similar hydrocarbon removal capacities were observed. PMID:24057322

Stauffert, Magalie; Duran, Robert; Gassie, Claire; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana

2014-01-01

92

ODU Virginia Beach 1881 University Drive  

E-print Network

Live at ODU Virginia Beach 1881 University Drive Virginia Beach, VA 23453 757-368-4100 www.odu.edu/vabeach Thursday October 9 2014 12:30--1:30pm Lecture Hall Book signing and Reception to follow: Book sales in Lot 3 Ellen Dor� Watson The HungryHeart isTellingYou ODU Virginia Beach Presents Poetry Readings

93

The Belgian sandy beach ecosystem: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the available knowledge on sedimentology, hydrodynamics and five major ecosystem components (microphytobenthos, vascular plants, terrestrial arthropods, zoobenthos, and avifauna) of Belgian sandy beaches. It covers the area from the foredunes to the lower foreshore, takes an ecosystem approach to beaches of this specific geographic area. Morphodynamically, Bel- gian beaches are (ultra-)dissipative, macrotidal, and wide. Characteristic grain sizes

Jeroen Speybroeck; Dries Bonte; Wouter Courtens; Tom Gheskiere; Patrick Grootaert; Jean-Pierre Maelfait; Sam Provoost; Koen Sabbe; Eric W. M. Stienen; Vera Van Lancker; Wouter Van Landuyt; Magda Vincx; Steven Degraer

2008-01-01

94

Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy,  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach occupancy, 2009 2010 Cefas contract report C3635 Environment Report RL 01/10 #12;1 Environment Report RL 01/10 Radiological Habits Survey: Cumbrian coast beach. Survey area 9 Map 1 The Cumbrian coast beach occupancy survey area 10 3.1 General observations 11 3

95

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Environment Report RL 02/08 Customer: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory to Seamill 12 4.2.1 Beach description 12 4.2.2 Activities 13 4.3 Seamill Lane to Coulderton and Nethertown 15

96

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development  

E-print Network

City of Manhattan Beach Community Development Phone: (310) 802-5500 FAX: (310) 802-5501 TDD: (310 Sacramento, Ca. 95814 Attention: Joe Loyer j mloycr@cncrgy.stalc.ca.us Subject: City of Manhattan Beach the City of Manhattan Beach adoption of our local more stringent energy efficiency standards. In accordance

97

Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach  

E-print Network

Week 14, Surfing It Is Smaills Beach One of the things that I had hoped to be able to do while I enjoy swimming at the beach; the ocean is cold this far south, even in summer. Over the past couple to go out for an hour before school. And we also have two body boards, so going to the beach is now

Bardsley, John

98

Inside the "Long Beach Way"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features Long Beach Unified School District, the 2003 winner of a prestigious prize in urban education. The district of more than 90,000 students is the first winner of the award to return to the competition as a finalist. Its reappearance on the list after earning the prize in 2003 raises interesting questions about how districts…

Olson, Lynn

2007-01-01

99

Trophic dynamics of a mud snail [ Ilyanassa obsoleta (Say)] population on an intertidal mudflat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling and energy transfer by a field population of the mud snail, Ilyanassa obsoleta (Say), were measured throughout a year at Branford Harbor, Connecticut. The elements and energy returned by Ilyanassa to the mudflat system were 95% particulate organic matter (894 g C m -2 year -1+66 g N m -2 year -1 in mucus plus feces; 9541 kcal m -2 year -1) 4% dissolved organic matter (26 g DOC m -2 year -1+1.7g DON m -2 year -1+0.3g DOP m -2 year -1 in excretory products plus fecal DOM; 307 kcal m -2 year -1) and 1% dissolved inorganic matter (2.8g CO 2-C m -2 year -1+8.13g NH 4++NO 4--N m -2 year -1+1.9g PO 43--P m -2 year -1) for use by sympatric primary and secondary consumers. The gross trophic efficiencies clearly show that most of consumption was not assimilated and was defecated ( UF: I was 0.63, 0.58, 0.91 and 0.62 for carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and energy, respectively). Mucus production (fecal envelope and trail) was estimated to be 80% of total assimilation ( Pm: A) for carbon, nitrogen and energy, while estimated tissue production (somatic, reproductive and shell periostracum) was 2-3% for each element and for energy. The net respiration efficiency ( R: I) was 16% for carbon and for energy assimilation. The net excretion efficiency ( Ex: A) was 1% for carbon, 2% for energy, 23% for nitrogen and 98% for phosphorus.

Edwards, Steven F.; Welsh, Barbara L.

1982-06-01

100

Trophic resource partitioning within a shorebird community feeding on intertidal mudflat habitats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In ecological systems, it is necessary to describe the trophic niches of species and their segregation or overlap to understand the distribution of species in the community. In oceanic systems, the community structure of top predators such as seabird communities has been well documented with many studies in several biogeographical areas. But for coastal habitats, very few investigations on the trophic structure have been carried out in avian communities. In this study, the trophic resource partitioning was investigated on eight of the most abundant species of a shorebird community on the central Atlantic coast of France. Our work comprised a comprehensive sample of birds with different ecomorphogical patterns and data on their main prey to encompass potential sources of overlap and segregation in this community. We examined the stable carbon (?13C) and nitrogen (?15N) isotopic composition of blood to investigate the trophic structure (1) on a temporal scale by comparing migration and wintering periods; (2) on a spatial scale through inter-site comparisons; and (3) on the community level within groups of phylogenetically related species. Diets appeared different in several cases between periods, between sites and between juveniles and adults for the same sites. A clear trophic partitioning was established with four functional groups of predators in winter inside the community. The Grey Plover, the Bar-tailed Godwit, the Curlew and a majority of the dunlins were worm-eaters mainly feeding on Nereis diversicolor or Nephtys hombergii. Two species were predominantly deposit-suspensivorous mollusc-eaters, including the Red Knot and the Black-tailed Godwit feeding mainly on Macoma balthica. The Oystercatcher fed mainly on suspensivorous molluscs like Cerastodrema edule and two species including the Redshank and some dunlins adopted opportunistic behaviours feeding on mudflat and/or in marshes.

Bocher, Pierrick; Robin, Frédéric; Kojadinovic, Jessica; Delaporte, Philippe; Rousseau, Pierre; Dupuy, Christine; Bustamante, Paco

2014-09-01

101

Valuing Recreation and Amenities at San Diego County Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policymakers and analysts concerned with coastal issues often need economic value information to evaluate policies that affect beach recreation. This paper presents economic values associated with beach recreation in San Diego County generated from a recreation demand model that explains a beach user's choice of which beach to visit. These include estimates of the economic values of a beach day,

DANIEL K. LEW; DOUGLAS M. LARSON

2005-01-01

102

Huntington Beach offshore Parcel 14  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parcel 14 of the Huntington Beach Oil Field (California) is located down the west plunge of a large east-west-trending asymmetrical anticlinal structure. This offshore structure extends from the shore westward approximately 3 miles. The south flank of the anticline is steep-dipping with known dips up to 65°. The north flank has an average dip of 10$. Faulting is minor on

1966-01-01

103

The presence and near-shore transport of human fecal pollution in Lake Michigan beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Great Lakes are a source of water for municipal, agricultural and industrial use, and support significant recreation, commercial and sport fishing industries. Every year millions of people visit the 500 plus recreational beaches in the Great Lakes. An increasing public health risk has been suggested with increased evidence of fecal contamination at the shoreline. To investigate the transport and

S. L. Molloy; L. B. Liu; M. S. Phanikumar; T. M. Jenkins; M. V. Wong; J. B. Rose; R. L. Whitman; D. A. Shively; M. B. Nevers

2005-01-01

104

A Universal Nutrient Application Strategy For The Bioremediation Of Oil-Polluted Beaches  

EPA Science Inventory

Biostimulation by nutrient application is a viable technology for restoring oil-contaminated beaches. Maximizing the nutrient residence time is key for achieving a rapid cost-effective cleanup. We considered the nutrient injection strategy through a perforated pipe at the high ti...

105

The presence and near-shore transport of human fecal pollution in Lake Michigan beaches  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Great Lakes are a source of water for municipal, agricultural and industrial use, and support significant recreation, commercial and sport fishing industries. Every year millions of people visit the 500 plus recreational beaches in the Great Lakes. An increasing public health risk has been suggested with increased evidence of fecal contamination at the shoreline. To investigate the transport and fate of fecal pollution at Great Lakes beaches and the health risk associated with swimming at these beaches, the near-shore waters of Mt Baldy Beach, Lake Michigan and Trail Creek, a tributary discharging into the lake were examined for fecal pollution indicators. A model of surf zone hydrodynamics coupled with a transport model with first-order inactivation of pollutant was used to understand the relative importance of different processes operating in the surf zone (e.g. physical versus biological processes). The Enterococcus human fecal pollution marker, which targets a putative virulence factor, the enterococcal surface protein (esp) in Enterococcus faecium, was detected in 2/28 samples (7%) from the tributaries draining into Lake Michigan and in 6/30 samples (20%) from Lake Michigan beaches. Preliminary analysis suggests that the majority of fecal indicator bactateria variation and water quality changes at the beaches can be explained by inputs from the influential stream and hydrometeorological conditions. Using modeling methods to predict impaired water quality may help reduce potential health threats to recreational visitors.

Molloy, S.L.; Liu, L.B.; Phanikumar, M.S.; Jenkins, T.M.; Wong, M.V.; Rose, J.B.; Whitman, R.L.; Shively, D.A.; Nevers, M.B.

2005-01-01

106

1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH  

E-print Network

KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER BOULEVARD, LONG BEACH, CA 90840 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH PA SRM FND HRL IPCDC LIB MLSC PP/CMREC WHSE RH1 RH4 RH5 RH3 RH2 SH MMC VEC SLH BEACH DRIVE 1 = Apprx.500 Steps Beach Striders Campus Tour · 2.35 miles · apprx.4700 steps #12;KKJZ AS HC 1250 BELLFLOWER

Sorin, Eric J.

107

2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY  

E-print Network

2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY by Gilbert R. Yochum, Ph.D. gyochum University Research Foundation Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (757) 683 May 2009 2008 VIRGINIA BEACH TOURISM¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼¼ 2008 Virginia Beach Visitor Annual Summary Direct City Taxes and Fees

108

Caribbean beach changes and climate change adaptation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beach monitoring data are presented and show an average beach erosion trend of 0.5 m yr in eight Caribbean islands over the period 1985–2000, with elevated rates in those islands impacted by a higher number of hurricanes. The data are based on 5 to 15 years of continuous monitoring, conducted at three-month intervals, at 113 beaches (200 profile sites) on

Gillian Cambers

2009-01-01

109

An energy?mobility beach classification system as a basis for the management of beach resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The successful implementation of structural and nonstructural solution to problems of shoreline erosion is greatly facilitated if the accumulation and analysis of data sets are accomplished within a design framework which has both theoretical validity and practical application. An inventory of beach resources based upon breaking?wave energy and beach mobility is presented as a basis for a beach classification system.

Karl F. Nordstrom

1979-01-01

110

VISUAL BEACH: SOFTWARE FOR ACHIEVING BEACH AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION  

EPA Science Inventory

The Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act of 2000 directs the EPA to assure that 100% of significant public beaches are managed by 2008. Under the Act EPA is developing a program to monitor beach water quality and strategies for timely notification of the public...

111

Factors controlling beach changes of a Texas gulf coast beach  

E-print Network

of the old Brazos delta retreated 1000 feet since 1937, while the the shoreline of the new Brazos delta grew a comparable distance (Figures 7, 9 and Appendix 0). 1941: Hurricane tides of nine feet were recorded at the Freeport Jetties (Bodine, 3). 1942... National Ocean Survey) 21 beach profile than normal and caused high ebbing velocities at Brown Cedar Cut. 1946; Photographs by the U. S. Department of Agriculture of the new Brazos delta show the shoreline changed only an insignificant amount between...

Seelig, William Newton

2012-06-07

112

75 FR 16201 - FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...NRC-2010-0123] FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background FPL Energy Point Beach, LLC (FPLE...NRC) to M. S. Fertel (Nuclear Energy Institute) dated June...

2010-03-31

113

Impacts of disturbance from construction work on the densities and feeding behavior of waterbirds using the intertidal mudflats of Cardiff Bay, UK.  

PubMed

The impact of disturbance from construction work around Cardiff Bay, south Wales, on the densities and feeding behavior of seven waterbird species was studied over an 11-year period. Construction of a barrage across the mouth of the bay has subsequently resulted in its impoundment; other major works included the construction of a bridge carrying a divided highway. Construction work disturbance significantly reduced the densities of five species--green-winged teal (Anas crecca), Eurasian oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus), dunlin (Calidris alpina), Eurasian curlew (Numenius arquata), and common redshank (Tringa totanus)--on adjacent intertidal mudflats, and thus the overall carrying capacity of the bay. Construction work also reduced the feeding activity of Eurasian oystercatcher, dunlin, and common redshank on these mudflats. The possible impact of the loss of birds from these mudflats upon the populations that the bay supported is discussed. Evidence from other local studies suggests that the displacement of common redshank from these mudflats did not contribute to a decline in this species. PMID:12402100

Burton, Niall H K; Rehfisch, Mark M; Clark, Nigel A

2002-12-01

114

Rip Currents on a Cornish Beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

RIP currents have been measured at Holywell in West Cornwall, where a sandy beach is open to waves and swells from the Atlantic. A rip current is a narrow streak of water which flows seawards from the beach; it carries the return flow of the general shorewards transport of water produced by the breaking of waves. Such currents cause many

L. Draper; P. J. DOBSON

1965-01-01

115

Plastics and beaches: A degrading relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plastic debris in Earth’s oceans presents a serious environmental issue because breakdown by chemical weathering and mechanical erosion is minimal at sea. Following deposition on beaches, plastic materials are exposed to UV radiation and physical processes controlled by wind, current, wave and tide action. Plastic particles from Kauai’s beaches were sampled to determine relationships between composition, surface textures, and plastics

Patricia L. Corcoran; Mark C. Biesinger; Meriem Grifi

2009-01-01

116

PREDICTING BACTERIAL CONCENTRATION ON THE NATION'S BEACHES  

EPA Science Inventory

A classical example of the failure of institutions and environmental technology to protect the nation's aesthetic, recreational, and public health values is represented by the July-August, 1999 Huntington Beach, California beach closure. This multi-million dollar regional public ...

117

Hydrodynamic variability on megatidal beaches, Normandy, France  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several experiments aimed at characterising the hydrodynamics of megatidal beaches outside the surf zone were carried out between 1990 and 1994 on the Cotentin coast of the Cherbourg Peninsula in Normandy. The database was established from the records of several electromagnetic current meters and pressure sensors and from field surveys. The mean spring tidal range on these beaches varies between

Franck Levoy; Olivier Monfort; Claude Larsonneur

2001-01-01

118

Effects of beach cast cleaning on beach quality, microbial food web, and littoral macrofaunal biodiversity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the end of the summer, drifting filamentous red algae cover shallow bottoms and accumulate in huge cast walls on the open shores of the non-tidal central Baltic Sea. The hypotheses that beach cleaning increases water clarity, decreases the organic content of the sand, and increases the species diversity in the shallow zone closest to the shore, were tested through field investigations and experiments. Cleaned shorelines were compared with un-cleaned shorelines at two sites with different intensity of beach cleaning in a rural area of SE Sweden. The results show that water clarity was significantly increased off the intensively cleaned beach but not off the moderately cleaned one. Similarly, the total leakage of nitrogenous compounds decreased off the intensively cleaned beach, but not off the moderately cleaned. The organic content of the sand was lower on both cleaned beaches compared with nearby un-cleaned beaches. The total animal biomass was significantly lower on the intensively cleaned beach compared with the un-cleaned beach, but the moderately cleaned beach gave no such effect. The difference in biodiversity and community structure between cleaned and un-cleaned beaches was insignificant. The most obvious difference in species composition was a much higher number of planktivore opossum shrimps of the genus Mysis and Praunus on the un-cleaned beaches. The bacterial production and the amount of ciliates larger than 20 mm were also higher on un-cleaned beaches, indicating that the microbial food web off the un-cleaned beaches is stimulated by the discharge of decomposing algal material. The conclusion of the study is that mechanical cleaning reduces the organic content of the beach sand and may change the water quality and microbial production, but the effect on the macrofaunal biodiversity is insignificant.

Malm, Torleif; Råberg, Sonja; Fell, Sabine; Carlsson, Per

2004-06-01

119

Escherichia coli and enterococci at beaches in the Grand Traverse Bay, Lake Michigan: Sources, characteristics, and environmental pathways  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study quantified Escherichia coli(EC) and enterococci (ENT) in beach waters and dominant source materials, correlated these with ambient conditions, and determined selected EC genotypes and ENT phenotypes. Bathing-water ENT criteria were exceeded more frequently than EC criteria, providing conflicting interpretations of water quality. Dominant sources of EC and ENT were bird feces (108/d/bird), storm drains (107/d), and river water (1011/d); beach sands, shallow groundwater and detritus were additional sources. Beach-water EC genotypes and ENT phenotypes formed clusters with those from all source types, reflecting diffuse inputs. Some ENT isolates had phenotypes similar to those of human pathogens and/or exhibited high-level resistance to human-use antibiotics. EC and ENT concentrations were influenced by collection time and wind direction. There was a 48-72-h lag between rainfall and elevated EC concentrations at three southern shoreline beaches, but no such lag at western and eastern shoreline beaches, reflecting the influence of beach orientation with respect to cyclic (3-5 d) summer weather patterns. In addition to local contamination sources and processes, conceptual or predictive models of Great Lakes beach water quality should consider regional weather patterns, lake hydrodynamics, and the influence of monitoring method variables (time of day, frequency).

Haack, S. K.; Fogarty, L. R.; Wright, C.

2003-01-01

120

Seasonal variation in physical and biological factors that influence sediment porosity on a temperate mudflat: Willapa Bay, Washington, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A field study of a temperate mudflat in Willapa Bay, Washington was conducted to determine whether seasonal variation in physical forcings (e.g., temperature, rainfall, insolation) coupled with variation in key biological properties (e.g., seagrass and microphytobenthos abundance) would result in measurable changes in seabed porosity. On two mudflats and in a nearby secondary channel, replicate samples for surficial grain size, chlorophyll a content, and seagrass (Zostera japonica) shoot density were obtained at roughly 7-wk intervals for one year starting in November 2009. In addition, high-resolution profiles of porosity in the upper ˜9cm of the seabed were measured using an in situ resistivity profiler. Ancillary meteorological and river discharge data were obtained from nearby stations operated by Washington State University and the U. S. Geological Survey, respectively. Despite significant seasonal variation in seagrass abundance (0 to >3000 shoots m-2), a less dramatic, but still significant variation in chlorophyll a content, as well as seasonal changes in physical forcings, the near-surface porosity of the flats was a normally consolidated bed that remained steady throughout the year. In contrast, porosity of the channel often departed from a normally consolidated profile, with evidence for both erosion and deposition of several centimeters of sediment. These departures did not display a clear seasonal pattern (i.e., deposition in winter, erosion in summer), however, suggesting that the provision and removal of sediment to/from the channels was governed by processes (e.g., channel slumps, rainfall events) occurring on shorter time scales or that there was significant, unresolved small-scale variability.

Wheatcroft, Robert A.; Sanders, Rhea D.; Law, Brent A.

2013-06-01

121

Horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) reproductive activity on Delaware Bay beaches: Interactions with beach characteristics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used results from a survey of horseshoe crab reproductive activity that was conducted in 1999 throughout Delaware Bay to examine the relationship between estimates of spawning females and egg deposition and analyze how that relationship varies with geography, time within a spawning season, beach morphology, and wave energy. We found that beach morphology and wave energy interacted with density of spawning females to explain variation in the density and distribution of eggs and larvae. For example, the quantity of eggs in surface sediment (i.e., eggs that are potentially available to foraging shorebirds) was associated with the density of spawning females, beach morphology, and wave energy. The association between beach morphology and live eggs in surface sediment was strong especially in late May (Percent Reduction in Error = 86% from regression tree model) where egg density was an order of magnitude higher on beaches <15 m wide (3.38*105 m-2; 90% CI: 2.29*105, 4.47*105) compared to wider beaches (1.49*104 m-2; 90% CI: 4.47*103, 2.53*104). Results also indicate that, among bay-front beaches, horseshoe crabs prefer to spawn on narrow beaches, possibly because of reduced wave energy. At peak periods of spawning activity, density of spawning females was inversely related to foreshore width on mid-latitude beaches within Delaware Bay (t = -2.68, 7 df, p = 0.03). Because the distribution of eggs across the foreshore varied with beach morphology and widened as the spawning season progressed, methods used to sample eggs need to be robust to variation in beach morphology and applicable regardless of when the samples are taken. Because beach morphology and wave energy were associated with the quantity of eggs in surface sediment, certain beach types may be critical to the conservation of shorebird foraging habitat.

Smith, D.R.; Pooler, P.S.; Loveland, R.E.; Botton, M.L.; Michels, S.F.; Weber, R.G.; Carter, D.B.

2002-01-01

122

Tracking biological pollution sources using PCR-DGGE technology at Ta-An Beach.  

PubMed

The environmental authority of Taiwan has announced that ocean quality standard A, with E. coli less than 1,000 CFU/100 mL is safe for swimming. Ta-An Beach in central Taiwan was found to have exceeded 1,000 CFU/100 mL, which is 51% of the total monitoring records. Sewage, piggery and duck wastewater are discharged directly into this area. The traditional pollution source trace methods did not clearly identify the pollution source. This study used PCR-DGGE technology to establish micro-organisms fingerprints from water samples using comparative analysis with microbiological composition, and then determined the possible sources of biological contamination. The E. coli colonies at all samples were processed using linear regression analysis and compared with each other. The R(2) is 0.4102-0.7387 for the livestock farm and beach. This shows a positively relation. The piggery impact is more obvious. The beach microbial communities exhibited high similarity with piggery wastewater from the upstream region. We confirmed that the major pollution source for Ta-An Beach comes from piggery wastewater. The proposed method has high stability and reliability. It can be used as the basis for rapid identification of pollution sources at other beach water sites in the future. PMID:21076208

Shen, Shu-Min; Hwang, Hoei-Yuan; Fang, Hung-Yuan

2010-01-01

123

Policies and practices of beach monitoring in the Great Lakes, USA: a critical review  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Beaches throughout the Great Lakes are monitored for fecal indicator bacteria (typically Escherichia coli) in order to protect the public from potential sewage contamination. Currently, there is no universal standard for sample collection and analysis or results interpretation. Monitoring policies are developed by individual beach management jurisdictions, and applications are highly variable across and within lakes, states, and provinces. Extensive research has demonstrated that sampling decisions for time, depth, number of replicates, frequency of sampling, and laboratory analysis all influence the results outcome, as well as calculations of the mean and interpretation of the results in policy decisions. Additional shortcomings to current monitoring approaches include appropriateness and reliability of currently used indicator bacteria and the overall goal of these monitoring programs. Current research is attempting to circumvent these complex issues by developing new tools and methods for beach monitoring. In this review, we highlight the variety of sampling routines used across the Great Lakes and the extensive body of research that challenges comparisons among beaches. We also assess the future of Great Lakes monitoring and the advantages and disadvantages of establishing standards that are evenly applied across all beaches.

Nevers, Meredith B.; Whitman, Richard L.

2010-01-01

124

Basic Information on the Beach Standards, Monitoring, & Notification Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The U.S. EPA BEACH Program website describes how the public's health and environmental quality of our nation's beaches can be improved. It focuses on strengthening beach standards and testing, providing faster laboratory test methods, predicting pollution, investing in health and methods research, and informing the public about the environmental quality of our beaches.

2006-11-30

125

Hispanics push for equality in Palm Beach County school district  

E-print Network

Hispanics push for equality in Palm Beach County school district WPEC - CBS12.com 2011-09-21 22:16:58 PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. -- A group of Hispanic business and community leaders pack the Palm Beach, 29 percent of Palm Beach County Students are Hispanic. Meanwhile, less than 10 percent of teachers

Belogay, Eugene A.

126

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain By EMILY ROACH  

E-print Network

Palm Beach County nonprofits get creative, gain stability By EMILY ROACH Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:47 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 Posted: 10:26 p.m. Monday, Aug. 29, 2011 Palm Beach. The center had committed six years earlier to moving to West Palm Beach's city hall complex on Clematis

Belogay, Eugene A.

127

Surf City and North Topsail Beach, NC 27 August 2010  

E-print Network

Surf City and North Topsail Beach, NC 27 August 2010 Abstract: Surf City and North Topsail Beach elevation of 15 feet NGVD fronted by a 7-foot NGVD (50-foot wide) beach berm. The project also includes Topsail Beach. The total average annual benefits are $39,775,000 with $11,180,000 in total annual costs

US Army Corps of Engineers

128

78 FR 33969 - Special Local Regulations; Daytona Beach Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Beach Grand Prix of the Sea, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL AGENCY...regulation on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach,...

2013-06-06

129

75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh...performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park...aircraft over a specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State...

2010-04-21

130

The recreational value of beaches in the Nelson Mandela Bay area, South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using beach visitation data collected via the administration of a questionnaire to 226 respondents, this paper estimates a random utility model of beach recreation. The relative value of selected attributes of beaches is estimated, and the recreational values of lost access to four Blue Flag beaches in the Nelson Mandela Bay area, namely Kings beach, Humewood beach, Hobie beach and

Mario Du Preez; Deborah Ellen Lee; Stephen Gerald Hosking

2011-01-01

131

Case study Piçarras Beach: Erosion and nourishment of a headland bay beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Master project report.\\u000aPiçarras is one of the touristic beaches of Santa Catarina state in Brazil. Piçarras beach is a headland bay beach. In the bay irregular features like an island, rocky outcrops and shoals are present influencing wave propagation. In the south Piçarras is bounded by Piçarras river. The river mouth has been fixated in 1970, after which erosion

S. Van den Heuvel; R. Hoekstra; R. De Zeeuw; A. Zoon

2008-01-01

132

Morphodynamics of a mesotidal rocky beach: Palmeras beach, Gorgona Island National Natural Park, Colombia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The response of a rocky beach to different possible combinations of hydrodynamic conditions (tides, waves, oceanic currents) has been little studied. In this work, the morphodynamic response to different hydrodynamic forcing is evaluated from sedimentological and geomorphological analysis in seasonal and medium term (19 years) scale in Palmeras beach, located in the southwest of Gorgona Island National Natural Park (NNP), a mesotidal rocky island on the Colombian Pacific continental shelf. Palmeras is an important nesting area of two types of marine turtles, with no anthropogenic stress. In the last years, coastal erosion has reduced the beach width, restricting the safe areas for nesting and conservation of these species. Until now, the sinks, sources, reservoirs, rates, and paths of sediments were unknown, as well as their hydrodynamic forcing. The beach seasonal variability, from October 2010 to August 2012, was analyzed based on biweekly or monthly measurements of five beach profiles distributed every 200 m along the 1.2 km of beach length. The main paths for sediment transport were defined from the modeling of wave currents with the SMC model (Coastal Modeling System), as well as the oceanic currents, simulated for the dry and wet seasons of 2011 using the ELCOM model (Estuary and Lake COmputer Model). Extreme morphologic variations over a time span of 19 years were analyzed with the Hsu and Evans beach static equilibrium parabolic model, from one wave diffraction point which dominates the general beach plan shape. The beach lost 672 m3/m during the measuring period, and erosional processes were intensified during the wet season. The beach trends responded directly to a wave mean energy flux change, resulting in an increase of up to 14 m in the width northward and loss of sediments in the beach southward. This study showed that to obtain the integral morphodynamic behavior of a rocky beach it is necessary to combine information of hydrodynamic, sedimentology and geomorphology in different time scales.

Gómez-García, A. M.; Bernal, G. R.; Osorio, A. F.; Botero, V.

2014-10-01

133

Distribution and sources of surfzone bacteria at Huntington Beach before and after disinfection on an ocean outfall - A frequency-domain analysis  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) were measured approximately 5 days a week in ankle-depth water at 19 surfzone stations along Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, California, from 1998 to the end of 2003. These sampling periods span the time before and after treated sewage effluent, discharged into the coastal ocean from the local outfall, was disinfected. Bacterial samples were also taken in the vicinity of the outfall during the pre- and post-disinfection periods. Our analysis of the results from both data sets suggest that land-based sources, rather than the local outfall, were the source of the FIB responsible for the frequent closures and postings of local beaches in the summers of 2001 and 2002. Because the annual cycle is the dominant frequency in the fecal and total coliform data sets at most sampling stations, we infer that sources associated with local runoff were responsible for the majority of coliform contamination along wide stretches of the beach. The dominant fortnightly cycle in enterococci at many surfzone sampling stations suggests that the source for these relatively frequent bacteria contamination events in summer is related to the wetting and draining of the land due to the large tidal excursions found during spring tides. Along the most frequently closed section of the beach at stations 3N-15N, the fortnightly cycle is dominant in all FIBs. The strikingly different spatial and spectral patterns found in coliform and in enterococci suggest the presence of different sources, at least for large sections of beach. The presence of a relatively large enterococci fortnightly cycle along the beaches near Newport Harbor indicates that contamination sources similar to those found off Huntington Beach are present, though not at high enough levels to close the Newport beaches. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Noble, M.A.; Xu, J.P.; Robertson, G.L.; Rosenfeld, L.K.

2006-01-01

134

(dm-)Beach Creation by Breaking Waves  

E-print Network

(1938-2007). #12;... Howell Peregrine... ·! British applied mathematician on surface wave phenomena. ·! Hypothesis: beach forms because sea has energy in all frequencies; slow because only bit of correct frequency

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

135

A Day at the Beach, Anyone?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A field trip to the shore can engage students in real-world science and offer plentiful opportunities for interdisciplinary learning. This field trip "action plan" ensures that a day at the beach goes smoothly for students and chaperones alike.

Fredericks, Anthony D.; Childers, Julie

2004-07-01

136

Sea level anomalies exacerbate beach erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

level anomalies are intra-seasonal increases in water level forced by meteorological and oceanographic processes unrelated to storms. The effects of sea level anomalies on beach morphology are unknown but important to constrain because these events have been recognized over large stretches of continental margins. Here, we present beach erosion measurements along Onslow Beach, a barrier island on the U.S. East Coast, in response to a year with frequent sea level anomalies and no major storms. The anomalies enabled extensive erosion, which was similar and in most places greater than the erosion that occurred during a year with a hurricane. These results highlight the importance of sea level anomalies in facilitating coastal erosion and advocate for their inclusion in beach-erosion models and management plans. Sea level anomalies amplify the erosive effects of accelerated sea level rise and changes in storminess associated with global climate change.

Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Rodriguez, Antonio B.; Fegley, Stephen R.; Luettich, Richard A.

2014-07-01

137

Salinity and groundwater flow below beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High rates of exchange between seawater and fresh groundwater in beach sediments drive significant chemical reactions, but the groundwater flow that controls this is poorly understood. Current conceptual models for groundwater flow in beaches highlight an upper saline plume, which is separated from the traditional freshwater-saltwater interface by a zone of brackish to fresh groundwater discharge. The lack of an upper saline plume at our study site led us to ask whether the plume exists in all beaches and what hydrogeological features control its formation. We used variable-density, saturated-unsaturated, transient groundwater flow models to investigate the geometry of the freshwater-saltwater interface in beaches with slopes varying from 0.1 to 0.01. We also varied hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity, tidal amplitude, inflow of fresh groundwater and precipitation. All models showed that a salinity gradient developed between the fresh groundwater and seawater in the intertidal zone, but the magnitude of the gradient was variable. The hydraulic conductivity was an important control on the development of an upper saline plume. A hydraulic conductivity of 100 m/d allowed the formation of an upper saline plume in every beach slope. No upper saline plumes formed in any beach with hydraulic conductivities less than 10 m/d. The slope of the beach was also a significant control. In models using a representative hydraulic conductivity of 10 m/d, the upper saline plume only formed in beaches with a slope of 0.5 or greater. The salinity of brackish groundwater that discharges seaward of the upper saline plume was inversely proportional to the input of fresh groundwater. Prior studies of groundwater flow and salinity in beaches have used very small dispersivities, but we found that the upper saline plume becomes much less distinct when larger dispersivities are used. Real beaches are highly mixed environments and the appropriate magnitude of dispersivity remains unclear. Our results suggest that upper saline plumes may not form in beaches of the U.S. Southeast, which are characterized by fine-grained sediment and moderate slopes. The concentration gradient between the upper saline plume and adjacent groundwater discharge zone increased with decreasing longitudinal dispersivity.

Evans, T. B.; Wilson, A. M.; Moore, W. S.

2013-12-01

138

Mixed sediment beach processes: Kachemak Bay, AK  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous studies have documented the rates of sediment transport along well-sorted, sand-rich beaches relating sediment transport to forcing by waves and currents. The dynamics of mixed-grain size beaches, however, have received relatively little attention in the scientific literature in spite of the estimate that these systems represent approximately 80 percent of the world's non-rocky coastlines. The tectonically active, megatidal, sea

P. Ruggiero; P. N. Adams; J. A. Warrick

2006-01-01

139

Effects of flooding and temperature on dormancy break in seeds of the summer annual mudflat species Ammannia coccinea and Rotala ramosior (Lythraceae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies were undertaken on seeds of the summer annual mudflat species Ammannia coccinea and Rotala ramosior to determine the (1) effects of flooding during late autumn to late spring on dormancy break and (2) optimum temperature\\u000a for dormancy break. At maturity in autumn, about 65–100% of the seeds of these species were dormant. Seeds of both species\\u000a buried under flooded

Carol C. Baskin; Jerry M. Baskin; Edward W. Chester

2002-01-01

140

The effects of chemical pollution on the bioturbation potential of estuarine intertidal mudflats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bioturbation by benthic infauna has important implications for the fate of contaminants as well as for changes to the sediment\\u000a structure, chemistry and transport characteristics. There is an extensive literature dealing with the influence of sedimentary\\u000a variables on the structure and function of infaunal marine and estuarine organisms but less is known of the converse, the\\u000a influence of biota on

Krystina Mazik; M. Elliott

2000-01-01

141

Draft genome sequences for oil-degrading bacterial strains from beach sands impacted by the deepwater horizon oil spill.  

PubMed

We report the draft genome sequences of 10 proteobacterial strains isolated from beach sands contaminated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon spill, which were cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with crude oil as the sole carbon source. All strains contain multiple putative genes belonging to hydrocarbon degradation pathways. PMID:24356826

Overholt, Will A; Green, Stefan J; Marks, Kala P; Venkatraman, Raghavee; Prakash, Om; Kostka, Joel E

2013-01-01

142

Assessing the Impact of Urban Runoff in Recreational Beaches in South Carolina and Florida Using Culturable and QPCR Fecal Indicator  

EPA Science Inventory

Urban/suburban runoff carries a variety of pollutants that often includes bacterial pathogens and indicators of fecal contamination. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial water quality of recreational beaches impacted solely by urban runoff through the use of cu...

143

An holistic approach to beach erosion vulnerability assessment.  

PubMed

Erosion is a major threat for coasts worldwide, beaches in particular, which constitute one of the most valuable coastal landforms. Vulnerability assessments related to beach erosion may contribute to planning measures to counteract erosion by identifying, quantifying and ranking vulnerability. Herein, we present a new index, the Beach Vulnerability Index (BVI), which combines simplicity in calculations, easily obtainable data and low processing capacity. This approach provides results not only for different beaches, but also for different sectors of the same beach and enables the identification of the relative significance of the processes involved. It functions through the numerical approximation of indicators that correspond to the mechanisms related to the processes that control beach evolution, such as sediment availability, wave climate, beach morhodynamics and sea level change. The BVI is also intended to be used as a managerial tool for beach sustainability, including resilience to climate change impact on beach erosion. PMID:25123815

Alexandrakis, George; Poulos, Serafim ?

2014-01-01

144

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN  

E-print Network

MONITORING AND MODELING NEARSHORE DREDGE DISPOSAL FOR INDIRECT BEACH NOURISHMENT, OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO Patrick L. Barnard1 , Daniel M. Hanes1 , Jamie Lescinski1 and Edwin Elias2 Nearshore dredge toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over

145

Visitors' Motivation for Attending the South Beach Wine and Food Festival, Miami Beach, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to identify the major factors that motivated visitors to attend the South Beach Wine and Food Festival in Miami Beach, Florida, and determine whether these factors varied among the visitors from the United States, Canada, South America, Europe, and Asia. A survey of 475 visitors to South Florida was conducted in February 2006. Forty?four

Yvette Reisinger

2008-01-01

146

The significance of solid wastes with land-based sources for a tourist beach: Pernambuco, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluates the significance of land-based sources of solid wastes (plastics, rubber, polystyrene and nylon), in the contamination of a tourist beach on the southern coast of Pernambuco State, NE Brazil, from July 2001 to September 2002. Four transects each covering 2,500 m2 and extending from the frontal dune to the water line at low tide were sampled along

MARIA CHRISTINA BARBOSA DE ARAÚJO; MONICA FERREIRA DA COSTA

147

What's in a beach? Soil micromorphology of sediments from the Lower Paleolithic site of 'Ubeidiya, Israel.  

PubMed

A micromorphological study of archaeological sediments from the early Pleistocene site of 'Ubeidiya (Jordan Valley, Israel) was conducted to provide microenvironmental detail for the hominin occupation contexts and investigate site formation issues. Previous research shows that the hominin groups occupied the marshes and pebbly beaches at the shores of a lake during a regressive period, but given that some portions of the lithic and faunal assemblages are abraded and others fresh, there remains a question of whether the archaeological assemblages are in situ or reworked, and if reworked, by what mechanisms and from where. The rates of sedimentation within the regressive cycle, by which we can learn about the frequency and duration of exposed surfaces amenable for hominin occupation is also unknown. Finally, the artificial nature of some of the pebbly layers has been questioned. The micromorphological analysis yielded the identification of twelve microfacies; the majority of these represent fluvially derived floodplain soils or distal mudflow deposits, and a minor number are sediments of lacustrine origin: mudflats and shallow subaqueous sediments. These represent the natural habitats of the 'Ubeidiya hominins and might serve as a reference to similar contexts of other early hominin sites. The sedimentary model proposed here entails the rapid deposition of fluvially derived low-energy sediments at and around the shoreline, followed by prolonged periods of exposure, during which surfaces stabilized within a relatively wet, marshy environment. This interpretation suggests that the abraded portions of the archaeological assemblages are a result of prolonged surface exposure rather than high-energy transport from a distant source or to wave reworking at the shoreline, and supports the consideration of these assemblages as archaeological palimpsests, with locally reworked fresh and abraded elements. No micromorphological evidence supporting anthropogenic agency in the formation of the pebbly layers was found. The entire regressive cycle entailed unvarying climatic conditions with seasonal fluctuations and episodic lacustrine incursions, and with a trend towards arid conditions in the end. PMID:16697031

Mallol, Carolina

2006-08-01

148

Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of beach systems or the human impacts on beaches are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy beaches. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not been widely implemented in sandy beaches, could be a key tool for biodiversity conservation and should also facilitate spillover effects into adjacent beach habitats. Setback and zoning strategies need to be enforced through legislation, and all relevant stakeholders should be included in the design, implementation and institutionalisation of these initiatives. New perspectives for rational management of sandy beaches require paradigm shifts, by including not only basic ecosystem principles, but also incentives for effective governance and sharing of management roles between government and local stakeholders.

Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita

2009-01-01

149

Influence of Beach Scraping on Beach Profile Morphology: Fire Island, New York  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fire Island is part of a barrier island system located just south of Long Island, New York. The island is 50 km long, oriented southwest-northeast, and varies in width from 150 meters to 1 kilometer. Established communities on Fire Island are part of Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) which is managed by the National Park Service. The island is densely populated, and thus mitigating coastal erosion caused by large-scale storm waves has become an important issue. Severe nor'easter storms in 1991, 1992, and 1993 caused substantial erosion and property damage. This prompted communities within FIIS to conduct a pilot study in which the preventative, non-structural practice of beach scraping was employed as a method of erosion control. Beach scraping is the anthropogenic movement of sand from the berm to the back beach creating an artificial foredune. Currently, there is no published research that explores the morphologic influence of beach scraping on Fire Island, although the practice is still in place today for a number of communities. This study assesses changes caused by beach scraping using a temporally robust beach profile dataset of over 150 profiles, spanning thirteen years. Three study areas were chosen based on location (western, central, and eastern parts of Fire Island) and data availability in scraped and adjacent control areas. Analyzed characteristics include beach width, beach volume, slope (dune, beachface, global), berm crest elevation, and dune crest elevation. Initial results indicate a detectable difference in the behavior of the beach between scraped and control areas. Seasonal signals show beach width decreasing substantially westward from the scraped profile location, which is in the direction of net littoral transport. Anthropogenic relocation of berm material to the foredune zone during scraping places sediment in the back beach area that might otherwise be mobilized by storm waves, therefore depriving downcoast beaches of sediment. Longer-term comparisons (decadal) indicate that the beach is both widening and increasing in volume in the western study area (by 30-50%), which corresponds spatially to a persistent accretional cell that has been identified in current studies along this section of Fire Island.

Kratzmann, M.; Hapke, C.

2007-12-01

150

Beach morphodynamics forcements in oiled shorelines: Coupled physical and chemical processes during and after fuel burial.  

PubMed

In November 2002, the sinking of the Prestige oil tanker off the Galician coast (N.W. Spain) caused the largest ecological catastrophe in the history of Spain, affecting the coast called the 'Costa da Morte' (Galicia, N.W. Spain). This work is focused on the study of the oil contamination of the intertidal area of two beaches located on this stretch of coast. The study of twenty cores extracted from both beaches has identified fuel embedded in the sedimentary column up to a depth of 2.38 m (this being the maximum depth of extraction). This, along with the presence of oil below the groundwater indicates the existence of a new factor which determines the burial of oil: the morphodynamic behaviour of the beach. Furthermore, this morphodynamic variation conditions the physical appearance of the buried oil. Four different types have been identified: tar-balls (cm), particles (mm), oil coatings on sediment grains and on emulsion, with distribution patterns conditioned by the degree of wave exposure. The analysis of the information obtained have permitted the development of a conceptual model of the burial and oil evolution in the sedimentary column in relation to wave exposure, and thus to the morphodynamic variability of the beach. PMID:16650444

Bernabeu, A M; Nuez de la Fuente, M; Rey, D; Rubio, B; Vilas, F; Medina, R; González, M E

2006-10-01

151

USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Stretches of beach along popular Huntington Beach, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...

152

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev  

E-print Network

Nonlinear Magnetic Beach* Boris N. Breizman and Alexey V. Arefiev Institute for Fusion Studies into the directed energy of the ion flow. This work can be viewed as a nonlinear version of the magnetic beach

153

Multiple lines of evidence to identify the sources of fecal pollution at a freshwater beach in Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario.  

PubMed

Multiple microbial source-tracking methods were investigated to determine the source of elevated Escherichia coli levels at Bayfront Park Beach in Hamilton Harbour, Lake Ontario. E. coli concentrations were highest in wet foreshore sand (114,000 CFU/g dry sand) and ankle-depth water (177,000 CFU/100mL), declining rapidly in deeper waters. Many gull and geese droppings were enumerated each week on the foreshore sand within 2m of the waterline. Both antimicrobial resistance analysis and rep-PCR DNA fingerprinting of E. coli collected at the beach and nearby fecal pollution sources indicated that E. coli in sand and water samples were predominantly from bird droppings rather than from pet droppings or municipal wastewater. Both methods indicated a trend of decreasing bird contamination, and increasing wastewater contamination, moving offshore from the beach. When foreshore sand was treated as a reservoir and secondary source of E. coli, waterborne E. coli were found to be more similar to sand isolates than bird or wastewater isolates out to 150 m offshore. Multiple lines of evidence indicated the importance of bird droppings and foreshore sand as primary and secondary sources of E. coli contamination in beach water at Bayfront Park. PMID:17575998

Edge, Thomas A; Hill, Stephen

2007-08-01

154

Genetic Diversity of Escherichia coli Isolated from Urban Rivers and Beach Water  

PubMed Central

Repetitive element anchored PCR was used to evaluate the genetic profiles of Escherichia coli isolated from surface water contaminated with urban stormwater, sanitary sewage, and gull feces to determine if strains found in environmental samples reflect the strain composition of E. coli obtained from host sources. Overall, there was less diversity in isolates collected from river and beach sites than with isolates obtained from human and nonhuman sources. Unique strain types comprised 28.8, 29.2, and 15.0% of the isolate data sets recovered from stormwater, river water, and beach water, respectively. In contrast, 50.4% of gull isolates and 41.2% of sewage isolates were unique strain types. River water, which is expected to contain E. coli strains from many diffuse sources of nonpoint source pollution, contained strains most closely associated with other river water isolates that were collected at different sites or on different days. However, river sites impacted by sewage discharge had approximately 20% more strains similar to sewage isolates than did sites impacted by stormwater alone. Beach sites with known gull fecal contamination contained E. coli most similar to other beach isolates rather than gull isolates collected at these same sites, indicating underrepresentation of possible gull strains. These results suggest large numbers of strains are needed to represent contributing host sources within a geographical location. Additionally, environmental survival may influence the composition of strains that can be recovered from contaminated waters. Understanding the ecology of indicator bacteria is important when interpreting fecal pollution assessments and developing source detection methodology. PMID:15294799

McLellan, Sandra L.

2004-01-01

155

Depositional settings of sand beaches along whitewater rivers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The numbers and sizes of sand beaches suitable for recreation along selected whitewater rivers in the western United States depend on sand concentrations, range of discharge and the size, frequency and type of depositional settings. River-width expansions downstream from constrictions are the predominant depositional setting for sand beaches in the upper Grand Canyon and along five Wild and Scenic Rivers in Idaho, but not along other rivers. Beaches located upstream from constrictions are rare, in general, except in the Grand Canyon. Beaches found in expansions without constrictions dominate depositional sites along the Yampa and Green Rivers, are fairly common along the rivers in Idaho, but are relatively rare in the Grand Canyon. The magnitude of flow expansion is a reliable predictor of beach size. Beaches located on the inside of curves are uncommon, in general, but can be important recreation sites. The mid-channel bar setting is the least important from a recreation standpoint because that setting is rare and beaches there are typically small, and emergent only at low flow. The frequency of beaches is highly variable among rivers and the concentration of sand in transport is only partially responsible. Of the rivers studied, the unregulated Yampa River carries the highest concentrations of suspended sand and has among the most beaches (1.2 beaches km-1). Emergent sand beaches are essentially nonexistent along the Deschutes River and are rare along other Oregon rivers, yet these rivers transport some sand. Sand beaches are fairly common (0.8-1.1 beaches km-1) along the regulated Colorado River, but are comparatively rare (0.6 beaches km-1) along the unregulated Middle Fork Salmon River. The suspended sand concentrations in study reaches of these two rivers are similar, and the difference in the frequency of beaches may be largely because the processes that create beach-deposition settings are less active along the Middle Fork Salmon.

Vincent, K.R.; Andrews, E.D.

2008-01-01

156

Monitoring of beach enteromorpha variation with near shore video  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach is an important coastal protective barrier and tourism resources. Beach environment monitoring can help beach managers to make feasible decisions. Digital image of video monitoring technology can provide high resolution information of temporal and spatial variation of near shore in real time. The application of Video monitoring technology has been implemented in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach. The clustering method based on Gaussian mixture model is applied to extract beach enteromorpha changs for the digital images. Analysis results show that, the period of enteromorpha in Qingdao's Shilaoren beach was mainly from the early July to the mid-August in 2011, and the decline of enteromorpha is mainly associated with the rising temperature in the mid-August. Storm has significant impact on the beach enteromorpha. Tourists' activity space on the beach will decrease due to the enteromorpha covering on the beach, which affects beach tourism activities. Therefore, it's necessary to make preventive measures to avoid enteromorpha piling up on the beach, which is of great importance to the bathing beach environment and tourism development.

Hu, Yali; Yu, Xinsheng; Yan, Zhijin; Yi, Weidong

2014-07-01

157

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia  

E-print Network

Lynnhaven River Basin Ecosystem Restoration Project Virginia Beach, Virginia 24 September 2013 the Lynnhaven River Basin. The watershed is located within the City of Virginia Beach in Southeastern Virginia is the City of Virginia Beach. The study area consists of the entire Lynnhaven River Basin, a 64-square- mile

US Army Corps of Engineers

158

107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

107. VIEW OF BEACH DEVELOPMENT ON NORTHWEST SIDE OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. SECTION OF PIER IS IN BACKGROUND Photograph #1579-HB. Photographer unknown, c. 1930-31 prior to replacement of original light standards in 1930-31 - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

159

Modelling Groundwater Flow in Beach Profiles for Optimising Stabilising Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

VESTERBY, H., 2000. Modelling Groundwater Flow in Beach Profiles for Optimising Stabilising Measures. The coherence between the elevation of the beach groundwater and erosional or accretionary trends of the beach face has been reported for years. Manipulation of the groundwater flow has during physical model tests and at the prototype scale shown reduction of the erosive processes and often let

Hans Vesterby

2000-01-01

160

Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves  

EPA Science Inventory

This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

161

POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (PCR) TECHNOLOGY IN VISUAL BEACH  

EPA Science Inventory

In 2000, the US Congress passed the Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health Act under which the EPA has the mandate to manage all significant public beaches by 2008. As a result, EPA, USGS and NOAA are developing the Visual Beach program which consists of software eq...

162

Rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation O. Devauchelle,1  

E-print Network

Click Here for Full Article Rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation O. Devauchelle,1 L December 2009; accepted 21 January 2010; published 18 June 2010. [1] The formation of beach rhomboid beach pattern: A laboratory investigation, J. Geophys. Res., 115, F02017, doi:10.1029/2009JF001471. 1

Lajeunesse, Eric

163

SWASH ZONE CHARACTERISTICS AT OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO, CA  

E-print Network

1 SWASH ZONE CHARACTERISTICS AT OCEAN BEACH, SAN FRANCISCO, CA L. H. Erikson1 , D.M. Hanes2 , P.M. Barnard2 , and A. E. Gibbs2 Runup data collected during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco shows that the beach was dissipative with Iribarren numbers between 0.05 and 0.4 and that infragravity

164

May 20, 2004 TO: Newport Beach Planning Commission  

E-print Network

May 20, 2004 TO: Newport Beach Planning Commission We respectfully request the assistance of the city Planning Commission regarding a major community concern. AT ISSUE The city of Newport Beach has Commission= ALL required in the city's Zoning Code. The Newport Beach Zoning Code states, "Use permits

Touretzky, David S.

165

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera)  

E-print Network

World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) WAYNE N. MATH IS I SMITHSONIAN O G Y · N U M B E R 5 3 6 World Catalog of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera) Wayne N. Mathis of the Beach-Fly Family Canacidae (Diptera). Smithsonian Contributions toZoology, number 536,18 pages, 1992

Mathis, Wayne N.

166

DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach  

E-print Network

DEGREE PROGRAM COMPARISON CHART ODU and ODU Virginia Beach UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS ODU-VB ODU ODU has 69 Undergraduate Degree programs; 31 are available at ODU Virginia Beach* # of Degrees-to-degree completion by complementing Beach course offerings with online & main campus offerings. GRADUATE DEGREE

167

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged'  

E-print Network

Gingrich Palm Beach County supporters 'disappointed but not discouraged' 2012-02-01 17:16:03 PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. -- As expected Newt Gingrich lost in Florida by a landslide. The polls predicted of three created a "Palm Beach County for Newt Gingrich 2012" Facebook page in November. Shortly afterwards

Belogay, Eugene A.

168

NEWPORT BEACH STANDS UP FOR LEONA VALLEY, GREEN VALLEY  

E-print Network

NEWPORT BEACH STANDS UP FOR LEONA VALLEY, GREEN VALLEY AND BOUQUET CANYON. It's time to take business in Newport Beach. Multiple times a month, paramedics, fire &/or police are called to the property, and suffering we, the neighbors of this business in Newport Beach, have experienced. In sharing my experience

Touretzky, David S.

169

Project # 1109 September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL  

E-print Network

Project # 1109 #12;#12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL i Welcome to our 51st Annual-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL iii Table of Contents Welcome Letter ...................................................................................... 24 #12;The International Citrus & Beverage Conference iv #12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach

Florida, University of

170

Jacksonville Zoo and the beach Note from Daryl  

E-print Network

Highlights Jacksonville Zoo and the beach Note from Daryl Bicycle Safety Daily Activities! First, we will drive to Jacksonville zoo to see animals! Then, we're going to the beach to swim and see Zoo and Beach are now SOLD OUT. If you want to go, see Nate to sign up in case other students can't go

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

171

North beach (Nazaré) sand tracer experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The littoral in the vicinity of Nazaré (West Portuguese coast) is characterized by two distinct coastal stretches separated by Nazaré headland: a northern sector (Norte beach) characterized by a high energetic continuous sandy beach and a southern sector (Nazaré bay beach) that corresponds to an embayed beach, sheltered by the Nazaré headland. The bay is a geomorphological expression of the Nazaré canyon head, which acts as powerful sediment sink, capturing the large longshore net southward transport at Norte beach generated by the north Atlantic high energetic swell. The northern side of the canyon head is carved on highly resistant Cretaceous limestone sustaining an underwater vertical relief that emerges on the Nazaré headland, creating a unusual nearshore wave pattern. This wave pattern not only concentrates high energy levels at the Norte beach but also contributes to local complex longshore drift gradients capable of inducing beach seasonal cross-shore variations of more than 200 m. The main factors that influence local sediment budget are: (1) canyon head capturing and (2) headland sediment bypassing. To obtain a direct measure of the net longshore drift at Norte beach (upstream boundary of the system) a large scale fluorescent tracer experiment was performed. The data will be used to validate longshore transport formulas in a high energetic environment and to access Nazaré canyon head sediment loss. Considering the anticipation of high transport rates, approximately 10 tonnes of native sand where coated with orange fluorescent ink using a set of concrete mixers. The experiment took place on the 9th to 15th September 2013 period and followed the continuous injection method (CIM). The CIM approach was justified by the expected high energy levels that inhibits sediment sampling across the surf zone. During the tracer injection procedure (approx. 5 hours), sediment sampling was performed at 13 sites along a rectilinear coastal stretch extended through 600 m downdrift of the injection point. Tracer was injected at a rate of 16 kg each 30 sec and collected at a frequency of 10 min at each site. Complementary sampling was performed at the inner shelf and at the beach southern of the headland. In order to follow tracer downdrift movement and headland sediment bypassing low resolution sampling was extended through three more days. Oceanographic forcing throughout the experiment was measured by an offshore wave buoy and an ADCP specifically deployed for the experiment. During the first tidal cycle, data from field observations using a hand held UV light showed a southward tracer displacement of more than 600 m. After the second tidal cycle, sediment tracer was detected in the Nazaré bay beach showing headland bypassing. Further insights on the sediment transport at the Nazaré canyon head system will be supported by the analysis of sediment samples collected at the beach and inner shelf using an automated image analysis system. This work was done in the framework of the PTDC/MAR/114674/2009 program, financed by FCT which the authors acknowledge gratefully.

Duarte, João; Taborda, Rui; Ribeiro, Mónica; Cascalho, João; Silva, Ana; Bosnic, Ivana

2014-05-01

172

Monitoring of Olympic National Park Beaches to determine fate and effects of spilled bunker C fuel oil  

SciTech Connect

On December 23, 1988, the barge Nestucca was accidentally struck by its tow, a Souse Brothers Towing Company tug, releasing approximately 230,000 gallons of Bunker C fuel oil and fouling beaches from Grays Harbor north to Vancouver Island. Affected beaches in Washington included a 40-mile-long strip that has been recently added to Olympic National Park. The purpose of the monitoring program documented in this report was to determine the fate of spilled Bunker C fuel oil on selected Washington coastal beaches. We sought to determine (1) how much oil remained in intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats following clean-up and weathering, (2) to what extent intertidal and/or shallow subtidal biotic assemblages have been contaminated, and (3) how rapidly the oil has left the ecosystem. 45 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.

Strand, J.A.; Cullinan, V.I.; Crecelius, E.A.; Fortman, T.J.; Citterman, R.J.; Fleischmann, M.L.

1990-10-01

173

Microbial interactions in marine water amended by eroded benthic biofilm: A case study from an intertidal mudflat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In shallow macrotidal ecosystems with large intertidal mudflats, the sediment-water coupling plays a crucial role in structuring the pelagic microbial food web functioning, since inorganic and organic matter and microbial components (viruses and microbes) of the microphytobenthic biofilm can be suspended toward the water column. Two experimental bioassays were conducted in March and July 2008 to investigate the importance of biofilm input for the pelagic microbial and viral loops. Pelagic inocula (< 0.6 ?- and < 10 ? filtrates) were diluted either with < 30 kDa-ultrafiltered seawater or with this ultrafiltrate enriched with the respective size-fractionated benthic biofilm or with < 30 kDa-benthic compounds (BC). The kinetics of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF), bacteria and viruses were assessed together with bacterial and viral genomic fingerprints, bacterial enzymatic activities and viral life strategies. The experimental design allowed us to evaluate the effect of BC modulated by those of benthic size-fractionated microorganisms (virus + bacteria, + HNF). BC presented (1) in March, a positive effect on viruses and bacteria weakened by pelagic HNF. Benthic microorganisms consolidated this negative effect and sustained the viral production together with a relatively diverse and uneven bacterial assemblage structure; (2) in July, no direct impact on viruses but a positive effect on bacteria modulated by HNF, which indirectly enhanced viral multiplication. Both effects were intensified by benthic microorganisms and bacterial assemblage structure became more even. HNF indirectly profited from BC more in March than in July. The microbial loop would be stimulated by biofilm during periods of high resources (March) and the viral loop during periods of depleted resources (July).

Montanié, Hélène; Ory, Pascaline; Orvain, Francis; Delmas, Daniel; Dupuy, Christine; Hartmann, Hans J.

2014-09-01

174

Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu  

SciTech Connect

Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

Wayne Hu

2009-03-02

175

An Interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an interview with Beatrice Beach Szekely, a comparative education scholar that specialized in the Soviet Union. She was editor of the journal "Soviet Education" from 1970 to 1989. During the interview, Szekely talked about how she became personally involved in Russian/Soviet studies of education. She related that her interest…

Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

2007-01-01

176

Miami Beach: Eden Roc Renaissance Hotel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Eden Roc Renaissance Miami Beach was completed in 1956. Designed by architect Morris Lapidus after completing the Fontainebleu, the Eden Roc’s neighbor. Lapidus used curvy and innovative designs that were widely criticized at the time they were being built. At the time it was built, the Eden Roc was considered a vision of the Italian Renaissance. Today the style

Chet Smolski; Morris Lapidus

1978-01-01

177

Rip Channel Morphodynamics at Pensacola Beach, Florida  

E-print Network

that there are rip current hot spots at Pensacola Beach, forced by a ridge and swale topography offshore, but the annual evolution/behavior of these hotspots (i.e. location, size, frequency, and orientation) have not been examined in detail. Remote imagery from...

Labude, Daniel

2012-08-15

178

Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu  

ScienceCinema

Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

Wayne Hu

2010-01-08

179

Identification of human enteric pathogens in gull feces at Southwestern Lake Michigan bathing beaches.  

PubMed

Ring-billed (Larus delawarensis Ord, 1815) and herring (Larus argentatus Pontoppidan, 1763) gulls are predominant species of shorebirds in coastal areas. Gulls contribute to the fecal indicator burden in beach sands, which, once transported to bathing waters, may result in water quality failures. The importance of these contamination sources must not be overlooked when considering the impact of poor bathing water quality on human health. This study examined the occurrence of human enteric pathogens in gull populations at Racine, Wisconsin. For 12 weeks in 2004 and 2005, and 7 weeks in 2006, 724 gull fecal samples were examined for pathogen occurrence on traditional selective media (BBL CHROMagar-Salmonella, Remel Campy-BAP, 7% horse blood agar) or through the use of novel isolation techniques (Campylobacter, EC FP5-funded CAMPYCHECK Project), and confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for pathogens commonly harbored in gulls. An additional 226 gull fecal samples, collected in the same 12-week period in 2004, from a beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, were evaluated with standard microbiological methods and PCR. Five isolates of Salmonella (0.7%), 162 (22.7%) isolates of Campylobacter, 3 isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila group 2 (0.4%), and 28 isolates of Plesiomonas shigelloides (3.9%) were noted from the Racine beach. No occurrences of Salmonella and 3 isolates of Campylobacter (0.4%) were found at the Milwaukee beach. A subset of the 2004 samples was also examined for Giardia and Cryptosporidium and was found to be negative. Information as to the occurrence of human pathogens in beach ecosystems is essential to design further studies assessing human health risk and to determine the parameters influencing the fate and transport of pathogens in the nearshore environment. PMID:19096455

Kinzelman, Julie; McLellan, Sandra L; Amick, Ashley; Preedit, Justine; Scopel, Caitlin O; Olapade, Ola; Gradus, Steve; Singh, Ajaib; Sedmak, Gerald

2008-12-01

180

PAH concentrations in Coquina (Donax spp.) on a sandy beach shoreline impacted by a marine oil spill.  

PubMed

The BP MC252 well failure in the Gulf of Mexico, April 2010 caused concern for crude oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) exposure along the sandy beaches of the Florida Panhandle. We began collections of Coquina clams (Donax spp.) from the surf zone of Florida Panhandle beaches to monitor PAH contamination to compliment analysis of surf zone sand samples. These clams had higher levels of PAHs relative to ambient sand, and this allowed us to continue to monitor PAH levels after sand concentrations fell below limits of detection. PAH levels in the Coquina tissues were highly variable, perhaps indicative of the heterogeneous distribution of oil and tar on the beaches and exposure to tar particles. Overall, PAH levels decreased continuously in both sand and Coquina tissues, reaching limits of detection within one and two years respectively after oil landed on Florida Panhandle beaches. Our work suggests these surf zone molluscs may be used to monitor pollutant exposure along high energy sandy beach shorelines. PMID:24775069

Snyder, Richard A; Vestal, Alexandra; Welch, Christina; Barnes, Gracie; Pelot, Robert; Ederington-Hagy, Melissa; Hileman, Fredrick

2014-06-15

181

Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2  

E-print Network

WEC 165 Beach Mice1 Brittany L. Bird, Lyn C. Branch, Mark E. Hostetler2 1. This document is WEC 165/Christine Taylor Waddill, Dean. Beach mice, as their name indicates, live on beaches in Florida and Alabama. Beach live with beach mice in these dune habitats, including the six-lined racer, monarch butterflies, snowy

Branch, Lyn C.

182

Beach Closings: Science versus Public Perception  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The issue-focused, peer-reviewed article addresses how beach closings are on the rise, but the public is not being given accurate information to help them get involved in solving the problem. The media, the publics primary information source, must provide information based on factual scientific evidence, not be swayed by economic and political factors, and work with scientists to obtain data and facts.

Erika Jensen and Sandra McLellan (Great Lakes WATER Institute;)

2005-04-01

183

Virginia Beach search and rescue experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In May, 1998, the NASA Search and Rescue Mission conducted a SAR crash detection test in the swampy area south and west of Virginia Beach. A number of aircraft parts were hidden in the dense foliage. The radar used was the Navy P-3 with the ERIM XLC and UHF SAR, providing fine resolution imagery with full polarimetry and an IFSAR capability. This paper reports preliminary results of this test.

Rais, Houra; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Huxtable, Barton D.; Chotoo, Kancham

2000-08-01

184

Sand Beach Bacteria: Enumeration and Characterization  

PubMed Central

Bacteria in the water-saturated sand of a relatively unpolluted sand beach were enumerated by direct microscope and viable counting. The number of interstitial bacteria was estimated to be a significant fraction of the total number of bacteria present. Three hundred sixty-two strains were isolated and submitted to cultural and biochemical tests. Fermentational abilities and the production of indole suggested that a significant number of these bacteria were symbiotically associated with resident metazoans. PMID:4356458

Khiyama, H. M.; Makemson, J. C.

1973-01-01

185

Experience with the antibiotic resistance analysis and DNA fingerprinting in tracking faecal pollution at two lake beaches.  

PubMed

Posting or closing of swimming beaches because of faecal contamination is a widespread problem reported in many locations. In a risk-based approach to this problem, the risk to swimmers' health is assessed by field monitoring of indicator bacteria and the associated risks are managed by source controls and other remedial measures. In risk assessment, great advances have been made in recent years with the introduction of microbial source tracking (MST) techniques. Two such techniques, antibiotic resistance analysis and DNA fingerprinting, were applied in a study of causes of faecal contamination at two lake beaches in Toronto, Ontario. Both methods identified bird faeces as the dominant sources of E. coli. Coping with this type of pollution presents a major environmental challenge. PMID:18057641

Edge, T A; Hill, S; Stinson, G; Seto, P; Marsalek, J

2007-01-01

186

Dune recovery after storm erosion on a high-energy beach: Vougot Beach, Brittany (France)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 10th March 2008, the high energy storm Johanna hit the French Atlantic coast, generating severe dune erosion on Vougot Beach (Brittany, France). In this paper, the recovery of the dune of Vougot Beach is analysed through a survey of morphological changes and hydrodynamic conditions. Data collection focused on the period immediately following storm Johanna until July 2010, i.e. over two and a half years. Results showed that the dune retreated by a maximum of almost 6 m where storm surge and wave attack were the most energetic. Dune retreat led to the creation of accommodation space for the storage of sediment by widening and elevating space between the pre- and post-storm dune toe, and reducing impacts of the storm surge. Dune recovery started in the month following the storm event and is still ongoing. It is characterised by the construction of "secondary" embryo dunes, which recovered at an average rate of 4-4.5 cm per month, although average monthly volume changes varied from - 1 to 2 m 3.m - 1 . These embryo dunes accreted due to a large aeolian sand supply from the upper tidal beach to the existing foredune. These dune-construction processes were facilitated by growth of vegetation on low-profile embryo dunes promoting backshore accretion. After more than two years of survey, the sediment budget of the beach/dune system showed that more than 10,000 m 3 has been lost by the upper tidal beach. We suggest that seaward return currents generated during the storm of 10th March 2008 are responsible for offshore sediment transport. Reconstitution of the equilibrium beach profile following the storm event may therefore have generated cross-shore sediment redistribution inducing net erosion in the tidal zone.

Suanez, Serge; Cariolet, Jean-Marie; Cancouët, Romain; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Delacourt, Christophe

2012-02-01

187

Shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach in southern California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Frequent morning surveys of birds were conducted on 1 km of beach in southern California to investigate shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach. The overall mean abundance (98.6individualskm?1), estimated biomass (9.6kgkm?1), and species richness (5.5specieskm?1) of shorebirds observed were very high for a sandy beach in the temperate zone. Eight species, sanderling (Calidris alba), semipalmated plover (Charadrius semipalmatus), marbled

David M. Hubbard; Jenifer E. Dugan

2003-01-01

188

Cladophora in the Great Lakes: impacts on beach water quality and human health.  

PubMed

Cladophora in the Great Lakes grows rapidly during the warm summer months, detaches, and becomes free-floating mats as a result of environmental conditions, eventually becoming stranded on recreational beaches. Cladophora provides protection and nutrients, which allow enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli, enterococci, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Salmonella to persist and potentially regrow in the presence of the algae. As a result of wind and wave action, these microorganisms can detach and be released to surrounding waters and can influence water quality. Enteric bacterial pathogens have been detected in Cladophora mats; E. coli and enterococci may populate to become part of the naturalized microbiota in Cladophora; the high densities of these bacteria may affect water quality, resulting in unnecessary beach closures. The continued use of traditional fecal indicators at beaches with Cladophora presence is inadequate at accurately predicting the presence of fecal contamination. This paper offers a substantial review of available literature to improve the knowledge of Cladophora impacts on water quality, recreational water monitoring, fecal indicator bacteria and microorganisms, and public health and policy. PMID:20595755

Verhougstraete, M P; Byappanahalli, M N; Rose, J B; Whitman, R L

2010-01-01

189

Quantitative microbial risk assessment of human illness from exposure to marine beach sand.  

PubMed

Currently no U.S. federal guideline is available for assessing risk of illness from sand at recreational sites. The objectives of this study were to compute a reference level guideline for pathogens in beach sand and to compare these reference levels with measurements from a beach impacted by nonpoint sources of contamination. Reference levels were computed using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) coupled with Monte Carlo simulations. In order to reach an equivalent level of risk of illness as set by the U.S. EPA for marine water exposure (1.9 × 10(-2)), levels would need to be at least about 10 oocysts/g (about 1 oocyst/g for a pica child) for Cryptosporidium, about 5 MPN/g (about 1 MPN/g for pica) for enterovirus, and less than 10(6) CFU/g for S. aureus. Pathogen levels measured in sand at a nonpoint source recreational beach were lower than the reference levels. More research is needed in evaluating risk from yeast and helminth exposures as well as in identifying acceptable levels of risk for skin infections associated with sand exposures. PMID:22296573

Shibata, Tomoyuki; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

2012-03-01

190

Cladophora in the Great Lakes: Impacts on beach water quality and human health  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cladophora in the Great Lakes grows rapidly during the warm summer months, detaches, and becomes free-floating mats as a result of environmental conditions, eventually becoming stranded on recreational beaches. Cladophora provides protection and nutrients, which allow enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli, enterococci, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Salmonella to persist and potentially regrow in the presence of the algae. As a result of wind and wave action, these microorganisms can detach and be released to surrounding waters and can influence water quality. Enteric bacterial pathogens have been detected in Cladophora mats; E. coli and enterococci may populate to become part of the naturalized microbiota in Cladophora; the high densities of these bacteria may affect water quality, resulting in unnecessary beach closures. The continued use of traditional fecal indicators at beaches with Cladophora presence is inadequate at accurately predicting the presence of fecal contamination. This paper offers a substantial review of available literature to improve the knowledge of Cladophora impacts on water quality, recreational water monitoring, fecal indicator bacteria and microorganisms, and public health and policy.

Verhougstraete, M.P.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Rose, J.B.; Whitman, Richard L.

2010-01-01

191

77 FR 40541 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This action is necessary...portion of GICW in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This proposed...

2012-07-10

192

77 FR 56772 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This action is necessary...portion of GICW in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This temporary...

2012-09-14

193

77 FR 69388 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...Intracoastal Waterway in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This action is necessary...portion of GICW in Choctawhatchee Bay, Santa Rosa Beach, FL. This temporary...

2012-11-19

194

76 FR 1359 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon will be transiting across the bridge...the 2011 Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon. DATES: This deviation is effective...The Wrightsville Beach/Quintiles Marathon Committee on behalf of the North...

2011-01-10

195

78 FR 31840 - Safety Zone; USO Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Patriotic Festival Air Show, Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY...on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA. This...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA. In...

2013-05-28

196

77 FR 50065 - Safety Zone; Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Jacksonville Sea and Sky Spectacular, Atlantic Ocean; Jacksonville Beach, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Jacksonville Beach, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Jacksonville Beach, FL....

2012-08-20

197

78 FR 22814 - Special Local Regulations; Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Miami Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Miami Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast...special local regulation on the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami Beach, Florida...will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Miami Beach,...

2013-04-17

198

33 CFR 165.T05-0741 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. 165.T05-0741 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Intracoastal Waterway, mile 295.6, at Carolina Beach, North Carolina (34°03?21? N,...

2013-07-01

199

Public perception of beach quality: lessons learnt from a French case study Virginie DUVAT  

E-print Network

Public perception of beach quality: lessons learnt from a French case study 000 La Rochelle - FRANCE virginie.duvat@univ-lr.fr Keywords: beach quality to be highly valuable for beach management as they are holistic (incorporating all

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section...Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section...undertake construction of small shore and beach restoration and protection...

2011-07-01

201

33 CFR 165.T05-1082 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. 165.T05-1082 Section 165...Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The...Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina (34°13?07?...

2013-07-01

202

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section...Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section...undertake construction of small shore and beach restoration and protection...

2013-07-01

203

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section...3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in...

2010-07-01

204

Beyond beach width: Steps toward identifying and integrating ecological envelopes with geomorphic features and datums for sandy beach ecosystems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our understanding of ecological responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcing lags far behind that of physical or geomorphic responses for beach ecosystems. Reconciling geomorphic features of beaches with ecological features, such as intertidal zones and mobile biota that are not described by beach width alone, could help address this issue. First, although intertidal zones characterized by distinct groups of mobile burrowing animals are described for beaches, the locations and elevations of these zones do not coincide with standard shoreline datums. Second, intertidal zonation on beaches is extremely dynamic due to the combination of unstable sandy substrate and a highly mobile biota; shifting strongly with tides, waves, storms, and beach conditions. We propose that beach biota use ecological "envelopes" of cross-shore habitat to cope with constantly changing beach conditions. We estimated the extent of these "envelopes" for a variety of taxa on tidal to daily, semi-lunar and seasonal to annual time scales, using literature values on cross-shore animal movements and a field study of the positions of intertidal beds of two species of typical mid and upper shore beach invertebrates. Daily or tidal cross-shore movement varied most (1 m to 100 m) with daily "envelopes" covering 7% to 85% of the available beach width. Semi-lunar movement (12 m) and envelopes (28%) were relatively small, while estimated annual "envelopes" were large, averaging 61% of beach width. The large scope of annual ecological envelopes relative to beach widths reflects how intertidal animals escape seasonally extreme or episodically harsh conditions. Intertidal bed positions of a talitrid amphipod and an opheliid polychaete correlated well with selected beach features in our field study suggesting that incorporation of ecological envelopes in models of shoreline evolution may be feasible. Describing ecological zones in terms of more dynamic shoreline features, such as total water level (TWL) that incorporate wave setup and runup, may be particularly applicable to upper intertidal biota whose distributions closely followed the high tide strand line (HTS), a feature which tracks total water level (TWL). Developing a TWL approach may also provide new insights on habitat availability for beach nesting wildlife and coastal strand vegetation. Conservation of beach ecosystems could be enhanced by incorporating sufficient beach habitat to accommodate the dynamic ecological envelopes used by mobile intertidal invertebrates and wildlife.

Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Quigley, Brenna J.

2013-10-01

205

Metrics to assess ecological condition, change, and impacts in sandy beach ecosystems.  

PubMed

Complexity is increasingly the hallmark in environmental management practices of sandy shorelines. This arises primarily from meeting growing public demands (e.g., real estate, recreation) whilst reconciling economic demands with expectations of coastal users who have modern conservation ethics. Ideally, shoreline management is underpinned by empirical data, but selecting ecologically-meaningful metrics to accurately measure the condition of systems, and the ecological effects of human activities, is a complex task. Here we construct a framework for metric selection, considering six categories of issues that authorities commonly address: erosion; habitat loss; recreation; fishing; pollution (litter and chemical contaminants); and wildlife conservation. Possible metrics were scored in terms of their ability to reflect environmental change, and against criteria that are widely used for judging the performance of ecological indicators (i.e., sensitivity, practicability, costs, and public appeal). From this analysis, four types of broadly applicable metrics that also performed very well against the indicator criteria emerged: 1.) traits of bird populations and assemblages (e.g., abundance, diversity, distributions, habitat use); 2.) breeding/reproductive performance sensu lato (especially relevant for birds and turtles nesting on beaches and in dunes, but equally applicable to invertebrates and plants); 3.) population parameters and distributions of vertebrates associated primarily with dunes and the supralittoral beach zone (traditionally focused on birds and turtles, but expandable to mammals); 4.) compound measurements of the abundance/cover/biomass of biota (plants, invertebrates, vertebrates) at both the population and assemblage level. Local constraints (i.e., the absence of birds in highly degraded urban settings or lack of dunes on bluff-backed beaches) and particular issues may require alternatives. Metrics - if selected and applied correctly - provide empirical evidence of environmental condition and change, but often do not reflect deeper environmental values per se. Yet, values remain poorly articulated for many beach systems; this calls for a comprehensive identification of environmental values and the development of targeted programs to conserve these values on sandy shorelines globally. PMID:25014753

Schlacher, Thomas A; Schoeman, David S; Jones, Alan R; Dugan, Jenifer E; Hubbard, David M; Defeo, Omar; Peterson, Charles H; Weston, Michael A; Maslo, Brooke; Olds, Andrew D; Scapini, Felicita; Nel, Ronel; Harris, Linda R; Lucrezi, Serena; Lastra, Mariano; Huijbers, Chantal M; Connolly, Rod M

2014-11-01

206

77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...waters of the Atlantic Ocean bounded by the following...portion of the Atlantic Ocean from 11 a.m. until...Act, and the Endanger Species Act an environmental...that may lead to the discovery of a significant environmental...Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach,...

2012-03-07

207

The health effects of swimming at Sydney beaches. The Sydney Beach Users Study Advisory Group.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. The purpose of the study was to determine the health risks of swimming at ocean beaches in Sydney, Australia. METHODS. From people attending 12 Sydney beaches in the period from December 5, 1989 to February 26, 1990, we recruited a cohort of 8413 adults who agreed to participate in this study. Of these, 4424 were excluded either because they had been swimming in the previous 5 days or because they reported a current illness. Of the remainder, 2839 successfully completed a follow-up telephone interview conducted within 10 days after recruitment. We recorded reported respiratory, gastrointestinal, eye, and ear symptoms and fever that occurred within the 10 days between initial interview on the beach and the follow-up interview. RESULTS. A total of 683 participants (24.0%) reported experiencing symptoms in the 10 days following initial interview. Of these, 435 (63.7%) reported respiratory symptoms. Swimmers were almost twice as likely as nonswimmers to report symptoms. There was a linear relationship between water pollution and all reported symptoms with the exception of gastrointestinal complaints. CONCLUSIONS. Swimmers at Sydney ocean beaches are more likely to report respiratory, ear, and eye symptoms than beachgoers who do not swim. The incidence of these symptoms increases slightly with increasing levels of pollution. PMID:8259798

Corbett, S J; Rubin, G L; Curry, G K; Kleinbaum, D G

1993-01-01

208

Predicting the effect of beach nourishment and cross-shore sediment variation on beach morphodynamic assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of coastal morphodynamics are becoming increasingly more focused on quantification of relationships between processes, form and function of dynamic landform systems because wave climates (e.g., wave height, wave period, seasonality, cyclical patterns) and sediments (i.e., composition, size, and shape) interact in various ways to collectively produce distinctive types of beaches. This paper identifies criteria and boundary conditions that characterize

Lindino Benedet; Charles W. Finkl; Thomas Campbell; Antonio Klein

2004-01-01

209

Campus Planning Study for Daytona Beach Junior College, Daytona Beach, Florida.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Major considerations and findings are presented in regard to the updating of a long range campus plan for the development of buildings, parking areas, drives and sidewalks at Daytona Beach Junior College. Following a consideration of the background and program of the college, a site analysis is presented. Plans and recommendations are offered…

Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

210

NOWCASTING AND FORECASTING BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATION USING THE EPA VIRTUAL BEACH SOFTWARE  

EPA Science Inventory

Beaches are subject to closure when bacterial counts exceed water quality criteria. Many authorities base these decisions on sample counts, which typically require a day or more to analyze. Sometimes called the persistence model, because conditions are assumed to persist, experie...

211

Beach ridge plains and sea level change  

SciTech Connect

Beach ridge systems of the low-to-moderate energy swash-built type can be used to determine ambient near-shore wave energy values, as well as sea level changes up to 4--5 m. Wave energy values can be obtained from individual samples or mean values of individual samples, the grain-size kurtosis (inverted) is useful, as is the sixth moment measure. Sea level change information comes from sequences of beach ridge samples, spanning one or more abrupt changes in smoothed kurtosis. Other procedures are also available for each of these tasks. Settling-lag ridges (horizontal bedding) may be useful also. Dune ridges and storm-surge ridges are not appropriate for this kind of work. There are also limitations on nature and general size of the sediment in the ridge (preferably quartz sand or coarse silt; 50-gram samples), and on map geometry of the system (no sharp curvature, no splaying; parallelism or nearly so). Sampling must meet strict standards as to location, depth and thickness of the sampled layer: lab work requires 30-minute sieving on quarter-phi screens. Each beach ridge represents a sea level rise and then fall, perhaps 5 to 30 cm, over a few years or decades, but not a storm. The longest presently-known sequence of beach ridge is located in an area of slow glacio-isostatic rebound, and spans some 12,000 years, but ridge systems in stable areas cover only about 3,200 years or less. Each long system typically shows many changes of sea level, in the range of one to 4--5 meters, but there does not appear to be any clearly-marked periodicity that persists throughout the entire record, other than the time interval between the ridges themselves. This interval commonly averages 35--50 years, but in a few settings is only about four years, and in others 10--12. In a few instances, the interval may be 60 years or more.

Tanner, W.F. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

1993-03-01

212

Estimate of oil persisting on the beaches of Prince William Sound 12 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill.  

PubMed

We estimated the amount of oil remaining in Prince William Sound, Alaska, 12 yr after the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill to assess its importance as a long-term reservoir of toxic hydrocarbons. We found oil on 78 of 91 beaches randomly selected according to their oiling history. Surface oiling was recorded for randomly placed quadrats, which were then excavated and examined for subsurface oil. The cumulative area of beach contaminated by surface or subsurface oil was estimated at 11.3 ha. Surface oil varied little with tide height, but subsurface oil was more prevalent at the middle tide heights. The mass of remaining subsurface oil is conservatively estimated at 55 600 kg. Analysis of terpanes indicated that over 90% of the surface oil and all of the subsurface oil was from the Exxon Valdez and that Monterey Formation oil deposited after the 1964 Alaska earthquake accounted for the remaining surface oil. These results indicate that oil from the Exxon Valdez remains by far the largest reservoir of biologically available polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on beaches impacted by the spill and that biota dependent on these beaches risk continued exposure. PMID:14740712

Short, Jeffrey W; Lindeberg, Mandy R; Harris, Patricia M; Maselko, Jacek M; Pella, Jerome J; Rice, Stanley D

2004-01-01

213

Oregon Beach Monitoring Program: Bacterial exceedances in marine and freshwater creeks/outfall samples, October 2002-April 2005.  

PubMed

A total of 3086 samples, both marine (2916) and freshwater creeks/outfall samples (170) were collected and analyzed for enterococci during October 2002-April 2005, from 52 designated beaches in Oregon. A total of 3.2% (99/3086) of the samples at 21 beaches exceeded 158 most probable number (MPN)/100 milliliters (mL). The average enterococci levels of these 99 exceedances was 559 MPN/100 mL, with a maximum of 4352 MPN/100 mL (Otter Rock and Ona) and a minimum of 160 MPN/100 mL (Sunset Bay State Park, Bastendorff, and Mill). For marine water, 77/2916 (2.6%) exceeded 158 MPN/100 mL. For freshwater, 22/170 (12.9%) exceeded 158 MPN/100 mL, with a maximum of 587 MPN/100 mL at Sunset Bay. Sixty percent of the marine and 9% of freshwater exceedances occurred during the winter. Seventy-two percent (55/77) of the marine exceedances occurred after rainfall events (0.01-60.0 mm). At Harris and Mill Beaches, cumulative rainfall was highly correlated with bacterial densities, R = 0.7. Rainfall, at both beaches, explained about one-half the variation in log10 bacteria density (R2 = 0.5). Additional monitoring is warranted to further characterize bacterial contamination in Oregon waters. PMID:16698045

Neumann, C M; Harding, A K; Sherman, J M

2006-10-01

214

Alongshore variability in beach planform, grain-size distribution and foredune height of an embayed beach: Shoalwater Bay, Queensland, Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Headland-bay beaches (HBB) are common beach-types found throughout the coastlines of the world. Morphodynamics of these structurally-controlled beaches are primarily governed by geological inheritance, wave climate, tidal range and grain-size distribution, which ultimately influence sediment transport across the beach-dune system. For embayed beaches, the degree of curvature (i.e., indentation ratio) has significant implications for littoral cell circulation, which mediates both cross-shore and alongshore sediment transport. This study investigated the morphodynamic controls on longshore and cross-shore sediment transport for a macro-tidal, embayed beach in central Queensland, Australia. Freshwater Beach is a 10 km long embayed beach located in the Shoalwater Bay Training Area, ~50 km north of Yeppoon. Freshwater Beach exhibits an asymmetrical planform which is characterized by a curved "shadow zone" (adjacent to the headland), transitioning to a straight tangential segment extending to the north. The beach is subjected to a mean tidal range of 6 m and prevailing onshore-directed winds and swell from the southeast. A total of 12 topographic profiles at ~1 km spacing were taken along the entire length of the beach to characterize variation in beach slope and foredune height. Sediment samples were collected across each transect for detailed grain-size and geochemical (XRD/XRF and SEM) analysis. Additionally, ground-based LiDAR surveys were conducted along the topographic profiles and for comparison with aerial-based LiDAR surveys. Preliminary results from topographic profiles show that the largest foredunes are located in the central portion of the beach, contrary to most embayed beaches where the largest dunes are typically located downdrift of the headland. Along the exposed section, the foredunes become large (~15 m high) and are hypothesized to be supplied by onshore welded bars that act as a sediment source for the foredunes to grow. Presently the alongshore and cross-shore sediment exchange is unknown and the dynamics of surface drainage and freshwater seeps in close proximity to the outlet of Freshwater Swamp remain a priority for understanding the morphologic evolution of the beach-dune system. Ongoing research is currently in progress to address relationships between grain-size grading alongshore and foredune height to determine a sediment budget from the nearshore extending through the parabolic dunefield.

Weymer, B. A.; Houser, C.; Giardino, R.

2012-12-01

215

Evaluation of potential sources and transport mechanisms of fecal indicator bacteria to beach water, Murphy Park Beach, Door County, Wisconsin  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fecal Indicator Bacteria (FIB) concentrations in beach water have been used for many years as a criterion for closing beaches due to potential health concerns. Yet, current understanding of sources and transport mechanisms that drive FIB occurrence remains insufficient for accurate prediction of closures at many beaches. Murphy Park Beach, a relatively pristine beach on Green Bay in Door County, Wis., was selected for a study to evaluate FIB sources and transport mechanisms. Although the relatively pristine nature of the beach yielded no detection of pathogenic bacterial genes and relatively low FIB concentrations during the study period compared with other Great Lakes Beaches, its selection limited the number of confounding FIB sources and associated transport mechanisms. The primary sources of FIB appear to be internal to the beach rather than external sources such as rivers, storm sewer outfalls, and industrial discharges. Three potential FIB sources were identified: sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora mats. Modest correlations between FIB concentrations in these potential source reservoirs and FIB concentrations at the beach from the same day illustrate the importance of understanding transport mechanisms between FIB sources and the water column. One likely mechanism for transport and dispersion of FIB from sand and Cladophora sources appears to be agitation of Cladophora mats and erosion of beach sand due to storm activity, as inferred from storm indicators including turbidity, wave height, current speed, wind speed, sky visibility, 24-hour precipitation, and suspended particulate concentration. FIB concentrations in beach water had a statistically significant relation (p-value ‹0.05) with the magnitude of these storm indicators. In addition, transport of FIB in swash-zone groundwater into beach water appears to be driven by groundwater recharge associated with multiday precipitation and corresponding increased swash-zone groundwater discharge at the beach, as indicated by an increase in the specific conductance of beach water. Understanding the dynamics of FIB sources (sand, swash-zone groundwater, and Cladophora) and transport mechanisms (dispersion and erosion from storm energy, and swash-zone groundwater discharge) is important for improving predictions of potential health risks from FIB in beach water.

Juckem, Paul F.; Corsi, Steven R.; McDermott, Colleen; Kleinheinz, Gregory; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.

2013-01-01

216

Central Role of Dynamic Tidal Biofilms Dominated by Aerobic Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacteria and Diatoms in the Biodegradation of Hydrocarbons in Coastal Mudflats  

PubMed Central

Mudflats and salt marshes are habitats at the interface of aquatic and terrestrial systems that provide valuable services to ecosystems. Therefore, it is important to determine how catastrophic incidents, such as oil spills, influence the microbial communities in sediment that are pivotal to the function of the ecosystem and to identify the oil-degrading microbes that mitigate damage to the ecosystem. In this study, an oil spill was simulated by use of a tidal chamber containing intact diatom-dominated sediment cores from a temperate mudflat. Changes in the composition of bacteria and diatoms from both the sediment and tidal biofilms that had detached from the sediment surface were monitored as a function of hydrocarbon removal. The hydrocarbon concentration in the upper 1.5 cm of sediments decreased by 78% over 21 days, with at least 60% being attributed to biodegradation. Most phylotypes were minimally perturbed by the addition of oil, but at day 21, there was a 10-fold increase in the amount of cyanobacteria in the oiled sediment. Throughout the experiment, phylotypes associated with the aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (Cycloclasticus) and alkanes (Alcanivorax, Oleibacter, and Oceanospirillales strain ME113), substantively increased in oiled mesocosms, collectively representing 2% of the pyrosequences in the oiled sediments at day 21. Tidal biofilms from oiled cores at day 22, however, consisted mostly of phylotypes related to Alcanivorax borkumensis (49% of clones), Oceanospirillales strain ME113 (11% of clones), and diatoms (14% of clones). Thus, aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation is most likely to be the main mechanism of attenuation of crude oil in the early weeks of an oil spill, with tidal biofilms representing zones of high hydrocarbon-degrading activity. PMID:22407688

Coulon, Frederic; Chronopoulou, Panagiota-Myrsini; Fahy, Anne; Paisse, Sandrine; Goni-Urriza, Marisol; Peperzak, Louis; Acuna Alvarez, Laura; McKew, Boyd A.; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Underwood, Graham J. C.; Timmis, Kenneth N.; Duran, Robert

2012-01-01

217

Mudflat/distal fan and shallow lake sedimentation (upper Vallesian-Turolian) in the Tianshui Basin, Central China: Evidence against the late Miocene eolian loess  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tianshui Basin in central China contains a thick sedimentary sequence (~ 1400 m) of continental deposits, Aragonian to Villafranchian (Miocene-Pliocene) in age. Intense Himalayan movements around the Paleogene/Miocene boundary triggered the uplift of mountain ranges around the Tianshui Basin, providing the deposition site for continental sediments. The sedimentary infill of the basin consists of four stratigraphic units (I to IV). This paper focuses on Unit II. Most of the accommodation space was occupied by Unit I, so during the sedimentation of Unit II, the morphology of the basin was relatively flat, promoting the development of wide distal fan/mudflat areas and wide shallow lakes. Deposits include: red mudstones, pedogenic and groundwater calcretes, reworked calcrete deposits, sheet-floods, fluvial channels, rippled sandstones/siltstones, ooidal/peloidal packstones, palustrine limestones, bioturbated marls and intraclastic limestones/marls. The characteristics and organization of the deposits indicate the gradual transition from alluvial to lake environments. Within the distal fan/mudflat, the deposition of reworked calcrete clasts as one of the most striking facies of the basin may be attributed to substantial recycling of calcrete levels and red clays. At the lake margins, the presence of ooids and palustrine limestones suggests the possibility of ramp-like margins within different energy settings. The origin of some of the deposits of the basin's QA-I section is under discussion, and their consideration as eolian has been recently proposed. However, we believe this possibility is precluded by the characteristics of the deposits. Our proposal has important implications for revising the interpretation of Miocene paleoclimatic conditions in central Asia.

Alonso-Zarza, A. M.; Zhao, Z.; Song, C. H.; Li, J. J.; Zhang, J.; Martín-Pérez, A.; Martín-García, R.; Wang, X. X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, M. H.

2009-12-01

218

Central role of dynamic tidal biofilms dominated by aerobic hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria and diatoms in the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in coastal mudflats.  

PubMed

Mudflats and salt marshes are habitats at the interface of aquatic and terrestrial systems that provide valuable services to ecosystems. Therefore, it is important to determine how catastrophic incidents, such as oil spills, influence the microbial communities in sediment that are pivotal to the function of the ecosystem and to identify the oil-degrading microbes that mitigate damage to the ecosystem. In this study, an oil spill was simulated by use of a tidal chamber containing intact diatom-dominated sediment cores from a temperate mudflat. Changes in the composition of bacteria and diatoms from both the sediment and tidal biofilms that had detached from the sediment surface were monitored as a function of hydrocarbon removal. The hydrocarbon concentration in the upper 1.5 cm of sediments decreased by 78% over 21 days, with at least 60% being attributed to biodegradation. Most phylotypes were minimally perturbed by the addition of oil, but at day 21, there was a 10-fold increase in the amount of cyanobacteria in the oiled sediment. Throughout the experiment, phylotypes associated with the aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (Cycloclasticus) and alkanes (Alcanivorax, Oleibacter, and Oceanospirillales strain ME113), substantively increased in oiled mesocosms, collectively representing 2% of the pyrosequences in the oiled sediments at day 21. Tidal biofilms from oiled cores at day 22, however, consisted mostly of phylotypes related to Alcanivorax borkumensis (49% of clones), Oceanospirillales strain ME113 (11% of clones), and diatoms (14% of clones). Thus, aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation is most likely to be the main mechanism of attenuation of crude oil in the early weeks of an oil spill, with tidal biofilms representing zones of high hydrocarbon-degrading activity. PMID:22407688

Coulon, Frédéric; Chronopoulou, Panagiota-Myrsini; Fahy, Anne; Païssé, Sandrine; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol; Peperzak, Louis; Acuña Alvarez, Laura; McKew, Boyd A; Brussaard, Corina P D; Underwood, Graham J C; Timmis, Kenneth N; Duran, Robert; McGenity, Terry J

2012-05-01

219

Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on Alabama beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

From mid June 2010 to early August 2010, the white sandy beaches along Alabama's Gulf coast were inundated with crude oil discharged from the Deepwater Horizon well. The long-term consequences of this environmental catastrophe are still unfolding. Although BP has attempted to clean up some of these beaches, there still exist many unanswered questions regarding the physical, chemical, and ecological

J. S. Hayworth; T. P. Clement; J. F. Valentine

2011-01-01

220

The Beach--A Natural Protection from the Sea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The beach and sand dunes are the first line of defense protecting the land from the sea. The effectiveness of the beach is caused by its sloping surface which dissipates the energy of waves and by the flexibility of the slope which changes as the waves change. The process and rate of accretion and erosion are dependent on the size and frequency of…

Sensabaugh, William M.

1983-01-01

221

Virtual Beach v2.2 User Guide  

EPA Science Inventory

Virtual Beach version 2.2 (VB 2.2) is a decision support tool. It is designed to construct site-specific Multi-Linear Regression (MLR) models to predict pathogen indicator levels (or fecal indicator bacteria, FIB) at recreational beaches. MLR analysis has outperformed persisten...

222

RECREATIONAL BEACH WATER QUALITY MONITORING WITH QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in monitoring the water at these beaches for fecal indicator bacteria as a means of determining if it is safe for pu...

223

The Florida Beach Case and the Road to Judicial Takings  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Stop the Beach Renourishment v. Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously upheld a state beach restoration project against landowner claims of an unconstitutional taking of the property. This result was not nearly as surprising as the fact that the Court granted certiorari on a case that turned on an obscure aspect of Florida property law:

Michael C. Blumm; Elizabeth B. Dawson

2011-01-01

224

WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF LAKE TEXOMA BEACHES, 1999-2001  

EPA Science Inventory

A biological and inorganic assessment of five beaches on Lake Texoma was conducted from September 1999 through July 2001. Water samples for each beach site were divided into two groups, a swimming season and non-swimming season. Water properties such as temperature, alkalinity,...

225

Composition and Distribution of Beach Debris in Orange County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many studies have quantified debris collected on beaches around the world. Only a few of those studies have been conducted in the United States, and they are largely limited to semi-quantitative efforts performed as part of volunteer clean-up activities. This study quantifies the distribution and composition of beach debris by sampling 43 stratified random sites on the Orange County, California

Shelly L. Moore; Dominic Gregorio; Michael Carreon; Stephen B. Weisberg; Molly K. Leecaster

2001-01-01

226

270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

270. OFFICERS' QUARTERS (FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES) AT DOG PATCH BEACH, C. 1939. VIEW NORTH DOWN GREENWICH ROAD TOWARD FORMER SUMMER COTTAGES, CONVERTED TO OFFICER'S QUARTERS, OVER-LOOKING DOG PATCH BEACH. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

227

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of...

2010-07-01

228

Howard Beach Youth: A Study of Racial and Ethnic Attitudes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This assessment of the climate of racial and ethnic attitudes in Howard Beach (New York) was conducted at John Adams High School, the public school attended by the greatest number of high school children in the Howard Beach community. The survey of 1,217 students was administered in December, 1986, several weeks before the incident in which a…

Lichter, Linda S.; Lichter, S. Robert

229

View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is in the foreground, the pier to the right. The painted octagonal window is above the deck. Avila's Front Street is at the rear of the building. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

230

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2011-07-01

231

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2013-07-01

232

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation and Navigable...REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of the...

2012-07-01

233

Falcon Beach School Closure Review. Research 87-01.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Falcon Beach School is a small school experiencing declining school enrollment and increasing operational costs. In February, 1987, Falcon Beach School was announced as a candidate for closure. The Planning and Research Branch of Manitoba Education conducted an economic and social analysis of the school operations. This research report provides…

Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg. Planning and Research Branch.

234

Grain size dependence on turbulence entrainment in coastal beach areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediment samples and beach profile evolution data have been collected at several sites (in Vilanova and the Ebro delta, Spain, and near Marseille, France), analyzing the structure of the grain size distribution variability and its relationship with the beach morfology. Measurement of the samples are performed in a detailled laboratory experiment using oscillating grid turbulence to compare the behaviour of

P. Medina; M. A. Sanchez

2009-01-01

235

Rip spacing and persistence on an embayed beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four years of daily time exposure images from an embayed beach were examined to study the spacing, persistence, and location preferences of rips in a natural rip channel system. A total of 5271 rip channels was observed on 782 days. Occurrence statistics showed no evidence of the preferred location pattern associated with standing edge waves trapped in an embayed beach.

R. A. Holman; G. Symonds; E. B. Thornton; R. Ranasinghe

2006-01-01

236

Geographic setting influences Great Lakes beach microbiological water quality  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Understanding of factors that influence Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) concentrations, pathogen occurrence, and microbial sources at Great Lakes beaches comes largely from individual beach studies. Using 12 representative beaches, we tested enrichment cultures from 273 beach water and 22 tributary samples for EC, ENT, and genes indicating the bacterial pathogens Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC), Shigella spp., Salmonella spp, Campylobacter jejuni/coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and 108–145 samples for Bacteroides human, ruminant, and gull source-marker genes. EC/ENT temporal patterns, general Bacteroides concentration, and pathogen types and occurrence were regionally consistent (up to 40 km), but beach catchment variables (drains/creeks, impervious surface, urban land cover) influenced exceedances of EC/ENT standards and detections of Salmonella and STEC. Pathogen detections were more numerous when the EC/ENT Beach Action Value (but not when the Geometric Mean and Statistical Threshold Value) was exceeded. EC, ENT, and pathogens were not necessarily influenced by the same variables. Multiple Bacteroides sources, varying by date, occurred at every beach. Study of multiple beaches in different geographic settings provided new insights on the contrasting influences of regional and local variables, and a broader-scale perspective, on significance of EC/ENT exceedances, bacterial sources, and pathogen occurrence.

Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Fuller, Lori M.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Johnson, Heather E.

2013-01-01

237

33 CFR 110.74b - Apollo Beach, Fla.  

...Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Apollo Beach, Fla. 110.74b Section 110.74b Navigation...ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.74b Apollo Beach, Fla. Beginning at a point approximately 300 feet south of...

2014-07-01

238

Metal-Microbial Interactions in Toronto Sunnyside Beach: Impact on Water Quality and Public Health  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Assessing recreational water quality requires a fundamental understanding of metal-microbial interactions and the key biogeochemical processes occurring in urban public beaches. Metals play an important role in the distribution and virulence (e.g. resistance) of microorganisms in water systems. In turn, microorganisms have a significant influence on metal cycling, thus affecting metal mobility, bioavailability and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Bacteria adhere to floc, small suspended mineral-bacterial aggregates, in aquatic systems resulting in high-density floc-associated bacterial biofilm communities. These nanoparticulate bacterial microhabitats are important environmental sinks for metals and potential reservoirs for antibiotic resistant and pathogenic bacteria. The objectives of this study are to identify and quantify (1) metal distributions among suspended floc, bed sediment and water-column aqueous compartments (2) important biogeochemical processes influencing metal cycling and (3) linkages between floc metals and the occurrence of floc associated antibiotic resistant bacteria and pathogens across a series of variably contaminated aquatic systems. Results of this project will provide new diagnostic indicators of pathogens in recreational water systems and aid in the development of public health policies to improve water quality and reduce water borne infectious disease. Here, results will be presented assessing the metal and microbial community dynamics in samples collected from Toronto's Sunnyside Beach (May 13 and August 20), an urban public beach on Lake Ontario. Water column, floc and bed sediments near and offshore were analyzed for physico-chemical characteristics and metal concentrations. Floc were imaged using DAPI and FISH to assess microbial community structure. Results to date, characterizing the linkages amongst bacteria, metal contaminant concentrations and sediment partitioning and system physico-chemical conditions will be discussed.

Plach, J. M.; Elliott, A.; Warren, L. A.

2009-05-01

239

Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by

C. T. Higgins; R. H. Chapman

1984-01-01

240

Beach dynamics and nest distribution of the leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) at Grande Riviere Beach, Trinidad & Tobago.  

PubMed

Grande Riviere Beach in Trinidad and Tobago is an important nesting site in the Caribbean for the Critically Endangered leatherback sea turtle, Dermochelys coriacea. Community members were concerned that beach erosion and seasonal river flooding were destroying many of the nests deposited annually and thought that a hatchery was a possible solution. Over the 2001 turtle nesting season, the Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of nests using the Global Positioning System recorded to reference points, and beach dynamics using permanent bench mark profile stations, to determine areas of high risk and more stable areas for nesting. A total of 1449 leatherback nests were positioned. It was evident that at the start of the season in March, the majority of leatherback nests were deposited at the eastern section of the beach. After May, there was a continuing westward shift in nest distribution as the season progressed until August and beach erosion in the eastern section became predominant. The backshore remained relatively stable along the entire beach throughout the nesting season, and erosion was predominant in the foreshore at the eastern section of the beach, from the middle to the end of the season. Similar trends in accretion and erosion were observed in 2000. River flooding did not occur during the study period or in the previous year. With both high risk and more stable regions for turtle nesting available at Grande Riviere Beach, there was no compelling evidence to justify the need for a hatchery. PMID:17465163

Lum, Lori Lee

2005-05-01

241

USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE BEACH TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID BEACH CLOSINGS TOOL  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these beaches to determine whether thes...

242

USING TODAY'S DATA TO CLOSE THE BEACH TODAY. QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) RAPID BEACH CLOSING TOOL  

EPA Science Inventory

Recreational beaches are an important economic and aesthetic asset to communities, states and the nation as a whole. Considerable resources are expended each year in the measurement of fecal indicator bacteria concentrations in the water at these beaches to determine whether thes...

243

Recreational water quality response to a filtering barrier at a Great Lakes beach  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recent research has sought to determine the off- or onshore origin of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in order to improve local recreational water quality. In an effort to reduce offshore contamination, a filtering barrier (FB) was installed at Calumet Beach, Lake Michigan, Chicago, IL. A horseshoe-shaped curtain (146 m long, 0.18 mm apparent opening size, 1.5–1.6 m deepest point) was designed to exclude FIB containing or promoting debris and thus reduce the number of swimming advisories during the examination period of July through September 2012. Mean water Escherichia coli concentrations were significantly lower at southern transects (S; outside FB) than at transects within the FB (WN) and at northern transects (N; outside FB) (1.45 log (MPN)/100 ml vs. 1.74 and 1.72, respectively, p < 0.05, n = 234). Turbidity was significantly higher at the WN transects (p < 0.001, n = 233), but it tended to increase throughout the sampling season within and outside the FB. E. coli in adjacent foreshore sand was significantly lower at the WN transects. A combination of factors might explain higher E. coli and turbidity within the FB including increased sediment resuspension, trapped algae, shallowing within the FB, and large lake hydrodynamic processes. This remediation approach may find better use in a different hydrodynamic setting, but the results of this experiment provide insight on sources of contamination and nearshore dynamics that may direct future beach management strategies.

Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Nevers, Meredith; Breitenbach, Cathy; Whitman, Richard L.

2013-01-01

244

Levels and fate of perfluoroalkyl substances in beached plastic pellets and sediments collected from Greece.  

PubMed

Plastic debris damages marine wildlife and ecosystems becoming an important source of marine pollution. In addition, they can sorb, concentrate and stabilise contaminants acting as toxic carriers to the marine food web. In this context, the presence of 18 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in plastic pellets (n=5) and beach sediment (n=9) samples widely distributed around Greek coastal areas was assessed. The results, mainly, showed the sorption of PFASs onto pellet surface from surrounding water with concentrations from method limit of quantification to 115ng/kg for C5, C7, C8 and C10 carboxylic acids and C8 sulfonate acid. A similar pattern was found by comparing plastic pellets and sediment for the same sampling locations that could indicate a common origin of contamination in both types of samples. However, since the number of analysed samples is limited, a more comprehensive study with a higher number of samples should be performed in future research. PMID:25172614

Llorca, Marta; Farré, Marinella; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Barceló, Damià

2014-10-15

245

Fugitive emission monitoring with open-path FTIR at Times Beach, Missouri, city park  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the cleanup of dioxin-contaminated soils from the Times Beach, Missouri, Superfund site, workers excavating a trench near the old City Park became nauseous from fumes emanating the excavation ditch. Investigations by US EPA and Missouri Department of Natural Resources found that approximately 12,000 square feet of soil was contaminated by toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. During the remediation of this site, Open-Path FTIR was used to monitor the perimeter of the excavation and stockpile areas. The air monitoring data was collected and screened on a near real time basis to ensure that off-site workers and the public were protected. This paper outlines the air monitoring procedures used during the project and the difficulties encountered while sampling at the site.

Taylor, Richard; Brunnert, James

1999-02-01

246

Persistence of 10-year old Exxon Valdez oil on Gulf of Alaska beaches: The importance of boulder-armoring  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Oil stranded as a result of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill has persisted for >10 years at study sites on Gulf of Alaska shores distant from the spill's origin. These sites were contaminated by "oil mousse", which persists in these settings due to armoring of underlying sediments and their included oil beneath boulders. The boulder-armored beaches that we resampled in 1999 showed continued contamination by subsurface oil, despite their exposure to moderate to high wave energies. Significant declines in surface oil cover occurred at all study sites. In contrast, mousse has persisted under boulders in amounts similar to what was present in 1994 and probably in 1989. Especially striking is the general lack of weathering of this subsurface oil over the last decade. Oil at five of the six armored-beach sites 10 years after the spill is compositionally similar to 11-day old Exxon Valdez oil. Analysis of movements in the boulder-armor that covers the study beaches reveals that only minor shifts have occurred since 1994, suggesting that over the last five, and probably over the last 10 years, boulder-armors have remained largely unmoved at the study sites. These findings emphasize the importance of particular geomorphic parameters in determining stranded oil persistence. Surface armoring, combined with stranding of oil mousse, results in the unexpectedly lengthy persistence of only lightly to moderately weathered oil within otherwise high-energy wave environments. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Irvine, G.V.; Mann, D.H.; Short, J.W.

2006-01-01

247

Tsunami Deposits and Hazard Analysis On Khalaktirskiy Beach Near Petropavlovsk, Pacific Coast of Kamchatka, Russia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Khalaktirskiy beach is a long, open Pacific beach just north of the narrow entrance to Avacha Bay, and is the ocean beach nearest the city of Petropavlovsk- Kamchatskiy [The city is well protected from tsunamis and has the most complete tide gage record of tsunamis affecting Kamchatka.] Khalaktirskiy is one of most populated beach areas on Kamchatka, including low-lying towns

Tatiana K. Pinegina; Joanne Bourgeois

2002-01-01

248

Impact of Offshore Nuclear Power PlantsForecasting Visits to Nearby Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multiple method investigation was undertaken to project the impact of offshore nuclear power plants on beach visitation at adjacent beaches. (1) Related literature was reviewed concerning human adjustment to natural hazards, risk-taking behavior, and public attitudes toward nuclear power. (2) People were interviewed at beaches in three states with respect to: (a) intended avoidance of beaches near a hypothetical

Earl J. Baker; Stephen G. West; Dennis J. Moss; James M. Weyant

1980-01-01

249

TESTING A BEACH BACTERIA MODEL IN LAKE MICHIGAN AND SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

Beach closures due to high bacterial concentrations deprive the public and disrupt the tourist industry. Almost half the Lake Michigan beaches are closed more than 10% of the time. In 1999 the six-mile long beach in Huntington Beach, California was closed in July and August. Due ...

250

75 FR 59966 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park...Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh...aircraft over a specified area of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State...

2010-09-29

251

Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach O. Bokhove1,2  

E-print Network

Revisiting Hele-Shaw Dynamics to Better Understand Beach Evolution O. Bokhove1,2 , A.J. van der during storms, drives the evo- lution of beaches. Beach evolution by non-linear break- ing waves to the classic "Hele-Shaw" lab- oratory experiment can be designed that creates beach mor- phologies

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

252

How Palm Beach County's economy has suffered after real-estate bust  

E-print Network

How Palm Beach County's economy has suffered after real-estate bust By JEFF OSTROWSKI Palm Beach, 2011 The collapse of the housing market has exacted a multibillion-dollar toll on Palm Beach County verges on extinction, it's no exaggeration to conclude that middle-income residents of Palm Beach County

Belogay, Eugene A.

253

!""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza  

E-print Network

!""#$%%&'()*+,-.)-)/+,(012*3#*(440&2.%5667%68%69%:()&!;!2##(*;:2,),/)%Beach Hopper Bonanza Field Introduction/Overview This second grade unit focuses on beach hoppers, tiny amphipods found on most sandy beaches. The first three lessons focus on learning beach hopper characteristics in the classroom

254

A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION  

E-print Network

1 A MODEL OF BEACH PROFILE EVOLUTION INCLUDING WAVE-UNDERTOW INTERACTION Chi Zhang1 , Jinhai Zheng2 , Titi Sui3 , Zeki Demirbilek4 and Lihwa Lin5 A numerical model of beach profile evolution is developed in beach profile evolution. Keywords: beach profile evolution; sandbar; wave; undertow; numerical model

US Army Corps of Engineers

255

At $60.6 million, FPL is Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer  

E-print Network

At $60.6 million, FPL is Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer By BILL DIPAOLO Palm Beach Quick quiz: Who'll be Palm Beach County's biggest property taxpayer this year? Donald Trump? Wrong. Jack to figures released by the Palm Beach County Tax Collector's office today. That's about 1.6 percent of the $3

Belogay, Eugene A.

256

Mixed sediment beach processes: Kachemak Bay, AK  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous studies have documented the rates of sediment transport along well-sorted, sand-rich beaches relating sediment transport to forcing by waves and currents. The dynamics of mixed-grain size beaches, however, have received relatively little attention in the scientific literature in spite of the estimate that these systems represent approximately 80 percent of the world's non-rocky coastlines. The tectonically active, megatidal, sea dominated beaches of Kachemak Bay, AK exhibit a wide range of interesting characteristics. In particular, the surficial sediments have a bimodal size distribution, in which self- organized bedforms composed of fine-to-medium sand migrate as coherent packages over a cobble substrate which is also dynamic. Our goal is to characterize and quantify, over various time scales, the coupled sediment transport dynamics and morphological development of this prototypical mixed sediment system. In February 2003 we installed an Argus Beach Monitoring System at the study site consisting of 8 cameras spanning a field of view of approximately 220 degrees. Utilizing a tidal contouring algorithm and over three years of hourly images, we are quantifying the rates, direction, and form of sediment transport taken by both the sand size and cobble fractions of the bi-modal distribution. Annual topographic surveys provide ground- truthing for the image derived data. Hydrodynamic forcing data are being collected with a wave/tide gage deployed in approximately 3m (MLLW) of water about 1.5 km (in the cross-shore) from the ARGUS station. In addition, we are applying new digital imaging technologies to map the spatial distribution of surficial grain size (both modes) along the field of view of the Argus cameras. Alongshore migration rates of intertidal sand bedforms, 1-2 m amplitude and ~200m wave length, over the cobble substrate have been documented to be approximately 250 m/yr. Strong seasonality in migration rates is evident with the majority of sand body movement, up to weekly-averaged rates of movement exceeding 6 m/day, occurring during large wave events. The cobble substrate, over which the organized sand fraction is transported, is dynamic as well. Both video measurements and ground surveys have documented the cross- shore and longshore migration of a large cobble bedform over its life cycle of more than a year. The cobble bedform was formed during a recent winter and by the following spring the bedform had organized into a mobile cobble berm with a landward slipface approximately 1.5 m high and a cross-shore length of about 50 m. During the following year, this feature increased in volume and migrated 50 m in the cross-shore direction and over 100 m in the alongshore. While the organized sand bedform migration rates are well correlated with the larger winter storm season, initial observations indicate that the cobble berm is significantly active during the relatively mild spring and summer months. The long time series of images allows us to not only quantify the transport rates and form of the two distinct sediment size modes but also to examine feedback processes within the overall coupled system.

Ruggiero, P.; Adams, P. N.; Warrick, J. A.

2006-12-01

257

Kennedy Space Center ocean beach erosion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Dune barrier erosion and possible breakthrough due to storm and hurricane wave activity is studied near Mosquito Lagoon, in Kennedy Space Center property. The results of a geological as well as hydrodynamic appraisal of the problem area indicate that no inlet has existed across the dune barrier since 500 A.D., and that there is little likelihood of a possible breakthrough inlet remaining open permanently, primarily because the relatively shallow lagoon does not contain enough volume of water to maintain an inlet between the ocean and the lagoon. It is therefore recommended that only minimal measures, such as closing up the man-made passes across the dunes, be carried out to ensure continuation of the action of natural beach maintaining processes.

Mehta, A. J.; Obrien, M. P.

1973-01-01

258

Shoulder arthroscopy positioning: lateral decubitus versus beach chair.  

PubMed

Since the introduction of the beach chair position for shoulder arthroscopy, orthopaedic surgeons have debated whether the beach chair or lateral decubitus is superior. Most surgeons use the same patient position to perform all of their arthroscopic shoulder procedures, regardless of the pathology. Each position has its advantages and disadvantages. The evidence regarding the efficiency, efficacy, and risks of the lateral decubitus and the beach chair positions for shoulder arthroscopy does not show one position to be superior. This review presents a comparison of these positions with regard to setup, surgical visualization, access, and patient risk. PMID:19664509

Peruto, Christina M; Ciccotti, Michael G; Cohen, Steven B

2009-08-01

259

Shorebirds, snails, and the amphipod ( Corophium volutator ) in the upper Bay of Fundy: top-down vs. bottom-up factors, and the influence of compensatory interactions on mudflat ecology  

Microsoft Academic Search

During their annual mid- to late-summer southward migration, Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) feed intensively on the amphipod Corophium volutator on intertidal mudflats in the Bay of Fundy. Corophium, in turn, feed on diatoms and bacteria. Using a series of bird exclosures and fertilizer addition, we examined top-down and\\u000a bottom-up effects, and investigated the presence of a trophic cascade in the

Diana J. Hamilton; Antony W. Diamond; Peter G. Wells

260

Shorebirds, snails, and the amphipod ( Corophium volutator ) in the upper Bay of Fundy: top–down vs. bottom–up factors, and the influence of compensatory interactions on mudflat ecology  

Microsoft Academic Search

During their annual mid- to late-summer southward migration, Semipalmated Sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) feed intensively on the amphipod Corophium volutator on intertidal mudflats in the Bay of Fundy. Corophium, in turn, feed on diatoms and bacteria. Using a series of bird exclosures and fertilizer addition, we examined top–down and\\u000a bottom–up effects, and investigated the presence of a trophic cascade in the

Diana J. Hamilton; Antony W. Diamond; Peter G. Wells

2006-01-01

261

Seasonal dynamics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in surface sediments of a diatom-dominated intertidal mudflat (Marennes-Oléron, France)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous field-based investigations have highlighted that the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) is physico-chemically and ecologically important for intertidal mudflats. EPS are largely secreted by marine benthic diatoms and their quantity and quality are environmental-dependant. This paper focused on the dynamic pathways, concentration rates and monosaccharides composition of colloidal, bound and residual carbohydrates extracted by using a cationic exchange resin from a diatom-dominated intertidal mudflat (Marennes-Oléron, France) during two different sampling periods: winter (February 2008) and summer (July 2008). A wide range of biotic and abiotic parameters were also studied to better understand the effect of environmental parameters, e.g., chlorophyll a, salinity, pore water amount, emersion time, luminosity, C:N ratio and tidal coefficient. Multiple colorimetric assays coupled to gas chromatographic analyses were carried out to perform the biochemical characterizations. Firstly, the quantity of carbohydrates produced during winter (5.28 ?g·?g chl a- 1) was more important than during summer (2.04 ?g·?g chl a- 1). Yet, more proteins were found during summer for the colloidal and bound fractions (0.73 and 1.04 ?g·?g chl a- 1). Further investigations showed that the dynamic pathways were equivalent between winter and summer: bound carbohydrates (BC) quantities increased during the sediment emersion periods on the contrary to colloidal carbohydrates (CC) which tended to drop throughout the emersion time. The quality in monosaccharides was fraction-dependant, whatever the season. CC were always glucose-rich confirming their role of carbon source. BC were mainly composed of rhamnose whose the ratio increased during the emersion period, thus conferring adhesive properties to the extracellular matrix bounding diatoms cells. Residual carbohydrates (RC) were composed of various monosaccharides and a major increase of glucose content was found at the end of emersion, corresponding to intracellular C-storage in prevention to immersion times. Summer-RC were composed of fucose, a monosaccharide specific to these fractions and which was non-present during the winter campaign. Environmental parameters, such as salinity, pore water amount, and tidal coefficient could have a significant impact on the concentration rates and pathways of carbohydrates.

Pierre, Guillaume; Zhao, Jean-Michel; Orvain, Francis; Dupuy, Christine; Klein, Géraldine L.; Graber, Marianne; Maugard, Thierry

2014-09-01

262

18. SAND BEACH WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. SAND BEACH WITH SUNBATHERS AND UMBRELLAS. VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. NORTHWEST ELEVATION OF REFRESHMENT STAND Photocopy of 1930-1940 photograph - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

263

11. BEACH TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. BEACH TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS Drawing No. 103-07 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

264

BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC California State University, Long Beach  

E-print Network

to the music industry include John Patitucci (bass), Mark Turner (saxophone), Tom Kubis (saxophone1 BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC California State in the Jazz Studies program at the Bob Cole Conservatory of Music at California State University, Long Beach

Sorin, Eric J.

265

Beach Erosion Project, Delaware Coast Protection Project, Delaware.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project provides for improvements along the Atlantic Coast of Delaware extending from Cape Henlopen to the Maryland State Line at Fenwick Island. Those improvements include combined beach erosion control and hurricane protection and consists of wideni...

1971-01-01

266

Nonlinear resonance of trapped waves on a plane beach  

E-print Network

Linear edge waves were first found mathematically by Stokes (1846). It has long been a topic of interest, since edge waves are believed to be responsible for the formation of beach cusps. Galvin (1965) was the first to ...

Li, Guangda, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01

267

Modes of embayed beach dynamics: analysis reveals emergent timescales  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Embayed beaches, or beaches positioned between rocky headlands, exhibit morphologic changes over many length and time scales. Beach sediment is transported as a result of the day-to-day wave forcing, causing patterns of erosion and accretion. We use the Rocky Coastline Evolution Model (RCEM) to investigate how patterns of shoreline change depend on wave climate (the distribution of wave-approach angles) and beach characteristics. Measuring changes in beach width through time allows us to track the evolution of the shape of the beach and the movement of sand within it. By using Principle Component Analysis (PCA), these changes can be categorized into modes, where the first few modes explain the majority of the variation in the time series. We analyze these modes and how they vary as a function of wave climate and headland/bay aspect ratio. In the purposefully simple RCEM, sediment transport is wave-driven and affected by wave shadowing behind the headlands. The rock elements in our model experiments (including the headlands) are fixed and unerodable so that this analysis can focus purely on sand dynamics between the headlands, without a sand contribution from the headlands or cliffs behind the beach. The wave climate is characterized by dictating the percentage of offshore waves arriving from the left and the percentage of waves arriving from high angles (very oblique to the coastline orientation). A high-angle dominated wave climate tends to amplify coastline perturbations, whereas a lower-angle wave climate is diffusive. By changing the headland/bay aspect ratio and wave climate, we can perform PCA analysis of generalized embayed beaches with differing anatomy and wave climate forcings. Previous work using PCA analysis of embayed beaches focused on specific locations and shorter timescales (<30 years; Short and Trembanis, 2004). By using the RCEM, we can more broadly characterize beach dynamics over longer timescales. The first two PCA modes, which explain a majority of the beach width time series variation (typically >70%), are a 'breathing' mode and a 'rotational' mode. The newly identified breathing mode captures the sand movement from the middle of the beach towards the edges (thickening the beach along the headlands), and the rotational mode describes the movement of sand towards one headland or another, both in response to stochastic fluctuations about the mean wave climate. The two main modes operate independently and on different timescales. In a weakly low-angle dominated wave climate, the breathing mode tends to be the first mode (capturing the most variance), but with greater low-angle dominance (greater morphological diffusivity), the rotational mode tends to be first. The aspect ratio of the bay also affects the order of the modes, because wave shadowing affects sediment transport behind the headlands. Previous work has attributed beach rotation to changes in various climate indices such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (Thomas et al., 2011); however, PCA analysis of the RCEM results suggests that embayed beaches can have characteristic timescales of sand movement that result from internal system dynamics, emerging even within a statistically constant wave climate. These results suggest that morphologic changes in embayed beaches can occur independently of readily identifiable shifts in forcing.

Murray, K. T.; Murray, A.; Limber, P. W.; Ells, K. D.

2013-12-01

268

Heart rate and motion analysis by GPS in beach soccer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ±0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2

Julen Castellano; David Casamichana

2010-01-01

269

Evaluation of airborne topographic lidar for quantifying beach changes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A scanning airborne topographic lidar was evaluated for its ability to quantify beach topography and changes during the Sandy Duck experiment in 1997 along the North Carolina coast. Elevation estimates, acquired with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM), were compared to elevations measured with three types of ground-based measurements - 1) differential GPS equipped all-terrain vehicle (ATV) that surveyed a 3-km reach of beach from the shoreline to the dune, 2) GPS antenna mounted on a stadia rod used to intensely survey a different 100 m reach of beach, and 3) a second GPS-equipped ATV that surveyed a 70-km-long transect along the coast. Over 40,000 individual intercomparisons between ATM and ground surveys were calculated. RMS vertical differences associated with the ATM when compared to ground measurements ranged from 13 to 19 cm. Considering all of the intercomparisons together, RMS ??? 15 cm. This RMS error represents a total error for individual elevation estimates including uncertainties associated with random and mean errors. The latter was the largest source of error and was attributed to drift in differential GPS. The ??? 15 cm vertical accuracy of the ATM is adequate to resolve beach-change signals typical of the impact of storms. For example, ATM surveys of Assateague Island (spanning the border of MD and VA) prior to and immediately following a severe northeaster showed vertical beach changes in places greater than 2 m, much greater than expected errors associated with the ATM. A major asset of airborne lidar is the high spatial data density. Measurements of elevation are acquired every few m2 over regional scales of hundreds of kilometers. Hence, many scales of beach morphology and change can be resolved, from beach cusps tens of meters in wavelength to entire coastal cells comprising tens to hundreds of kilometers of coast. Topographic lidars similar to the ATM are becoming increasingly available from commercial vendors and should, in the future, be widely used in beach surveying.

Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Krabill, W.B.; Swift, R.N.; Brock, J.; List, J.; Hansen, M.; Holman, R.A.; Manizade, S.; Sontag, J.; Meredith, A.; Morgan, K.; Yunkel, J.K.; Frederick, E.B.; Stockdon, H.

2003-01-01

270

Online Beach Profile Management and Analysis System (PMAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

HARRIS, M.S., TINKER, T.P., and WRIGHT, E.E. 2007. Online Beach Profile Management and Analysis System (PMAS). Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium), 62 - 66. Gold Coast, Australia, ISSN 0749.0208 Long-term beach profile datasets provide coastal communities with information critical to understanding temporal and spatial variability in coastal systems. Given the economic growth

M. S. Harris; T. P. Tinker; E. E. Wright

271

Monoaromatic hydrocarbon transformation under anaerobic conditions at Seal Beach, California: Laboratory studies  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic biotransformation of several aromatic hydrocarbons found in gasoline including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, p-xylene, and o-xylene (BTEX) was studied in batch anaerobic laboratory microcosms. Aquifer sediment and ground water were obtained from the site of a historic gasoline spill at Seal Beach, California. Sulfate is present in the site ground water at 80 mg/L, and sulfate-reducing activity appears to be the dominant intrinsic BTEX bioremediation process where nitrate is absent. In the laboratory, the microcosms were set up with different electron acceptors (sulfate and nitrate) in site ground water and various defined anaerobic media to estimate intrinsic biodegradation rates and to suggest conditions under which anaerobic bioremediation could be enhanced. In unamended microcosms, anaerobic biotransformation of toluene and m + p-xylene occurred at a rate of 7.2 and 4.1 {micro}g/liter hr, respectively, with sulfate as the apparent electron acceptor. Addition of nitrate stimulated nitrate-reducing conditions and increased rates of toluene and m + p-xylene biotransformation to 30.1 and 5.4 {micro}g/liter hr, respectively. The catabolic substrate range was altered to include ethylbenzene in the nitrate-amended microcosms, suggesting an apparent preferential use of different BTEX compounds depending on the electron acceptor available. Under all the conditions studied, more than twice the amount of nitrate or sulfate was used than could be accounted for by the observed BTEX degradation. The results of these experiments indicate that indigenous microorganisms from the Seal Beach aquifer have significant capability to degrade BTEX hydrocarbons and that intrinsic processes in the Seal Beach aquifer may remediate a portion of the hydrocarbon contamination in situ without intervention. However, the data also suggest that intervention by nitrate addition would enhance the rate and extent of anaerobic BTEX biotransformation.

Ball, H.A.; Reinhard, M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Western Region Hazardous Substance Research Center

1996-02-01

272

Predicting pathogen risks to aid beach management: the real value of quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA).  

PubMed

There has been an ongoing dilemma for agencies that set criteria for safe recreational waters in how to provide for a seasonal assessment of a beach site versus guidance for day-to-day management. Typically an overall 'safe' criterion level is derived from epidemiologic studies of sewage-impacted beaches. The decision criterion is based on a percentile value for a single sample or a moving median of a limited number (e.g. five per month) of routine samples, which are reported at least the day after recreator exposure has occurred. The focus of this paper is how to better undertake day-to-day recreational site monitoring and management. Internationally, good examples exist where predictive empirical regression models (based on rainfall, wind speed/direction, etc.) may provide an estimate of the target faecal indicator density for the day of exposure. However, at recreational swimming sites largely impacted by non-sewage sources of faecal indicators, there is concern that the indicator-illness associations derived from studies at sewage-impacted beaches may be inappropriate. Furthermore, some recent epidemiologic evidence supports the relationship to gastrointestinal (GI) illness with qPCR-derived measures of Bacteroidales/Bacteroides spp. as well as more traditional faecal indicators, but we understand less about the environmental fate of these molecular targets and their relationship to bather risk. Modelling pathogens and indicators within a quantitative microbial risk assessment framework is suggested as a way to explore the large diversity of scenarios for faecal contamination and hydrologic events, such as from waterfowl, agricultural animals, resuspended sediments and from the bathers themselves. Examples are provided that suggest that more site-specific targets derived by QMRA could provide insight, directly translatable to management actions. PMID:20638095

Ashbolt, Nicholas J; Schoen, Mary E; Soller, Jeffrey A; Roser, David J

2010-09-01

273

Physical modeling of three-dimensional intermediate beach morphodynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments have been performed in a large wave tank in order to study the morphodynamics of rip current systems. Both accretive and erosive shore-normal wave conditions were applied, the beach evolving through all the states within the intermediate beach classification, under the so-called down-state (accretive) and up-state (erosive) morphological transitions. Results show that any prescribed change in the wave conditions drastically increases the rate at which the morphology changes. The surf zone morphology tends toward a steady state when running a given wave climate for a long duration. We quantitatively describe a full down-state sequence characterized by the progressive evolution of an alongshore-uniform bar successively into a crescentic plan shape, a bar and rip channel morphology, and a terrace. From the analysis of a large data set of dense Eulerian measurements and bathymetric surveys, we depict several feedback mechanisms associated with wave-driven rip current circulation, wave nonlinearities and the seabed evolution. At first, a positive feedback mechanism drives a rapid increase in the rate of morphological change, beach three-dimensionality, and rip intensity. By the time the sandbar evolves into a bar and rip morphology, a negative feedback mechanism, characterized by a decaying beach change rate and an increasing beach alongshore uniformity, overwhelms the former mechanism. An erosive sequence characterized by both an overall offshore bar migration and an increase in beach three-dimensionality is also described.

Michallet, H.; Castelle, B.; BarthéLemy, E.; Berni, C.; Bonneton, P.

2013-06-01

274

Journal of Coastal Research 26 1 184198 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2010 Limits of Wave Runup and Corresponding Beach-Profile  

E-print Network

. ADDITIONAL INDEX WORDS: Beach erosion, nearshore sediment transport, wave breaking, cross-shore sediment of beach erosion. The limit of wave runup is also a key parameter in the application of the stormJournal of Coastal Research 26 1 184­198 West Palm Beach, Florida January 2010 Limits of Wave Runup

US Army Corps of Engineers

275

75 FR 77010 - Nextera Energy Point Beach, LLC; Point Beach Nuclear Plant, Units 1 and 2, Draft Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...increase the maximum thermal power at the Point Beach Nuclear Plant (PBNP), Units 1 and...One Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactor. Therefore, there...Evaluating Design Basis Accidents at Nuclear Power Reactors. The analyses...

2010-12-10

276

The responses of artificial embayed beaches to storm events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The plan-view and the profile shape of sandy beaches largely depend on the incoming wave-energy (Wright and Short, 1984). In this sense, storm events are responsible for major changes in the configuration of sandy beaches and the cumulative effect of storms and fair-weather conditions determines the morphodynamic state of a certain beach. With increasing wave energy, the beach will change from the Reflective state to the Low Tide Terrace, Transverse Bar and Rip, Rhythmic Bar and Beach, Longshore Bar and Trough and finally to the Dissipative beach state. These morphodynamic states are also observed at artificial embayed beaches, although artificial groins limit alongshore sediment transport and protect sections of the beach from waves approaching from a range of directions (Short and Masselink, 1999). This contribution focuses on the morphological changes of the shoreline and the submerged sandbars of artificial embayed (sandy) beaches due to the effect of high-wave conditions associated to storms. We characterize the morphological response of the emerged and submerged beach profile of two of the artificial embayed beaches of the Barcelona city coast (NW Mediterranean). The two embayed beaches under study are single-barred beaches subject to the same climatic conditions but with different morphological characteristics. The study comprises more than 4 years of data, from November 2001 to March 2006, obtained through an Argus video system (Holman and Stanley, 2007). The extraction of the shoreline and barline locations is accomplished using 10-minute time-exposure video images. Shorelines were extracted directly from oblique images (see Ojeda and Guillén, [2008] for a complete description) and rectified afterwards. Sandbars were inferred from the rectified time-exposure video images based on the preferential wave breaking over shallow areas, so they required a minimum significant wave height (Hs) which allowed the occurrence of a clear wave-breaking pattern. The barline extraction was accomplished through an automated alongshore tracking of the intensity maxima across each beach section (Van Enckevort and Ruessink, 2001). The mean Hs during the study period was 0.71 m and the averaged peak period was 5.7 s. The wave height time series shows a cyclic behaviour, with storm periods (October-April) separated by periods of low storm activity (May-October). The two most energetic periods affecting the beaches were from October 2001 to May 2002 and from October 2003 to April 2004 (wave data were obtained from a WANA node [virtual buoy] and direct measurements of the Barcelona-Coastal buoy). Approximately 25 storm events have been identified during the study period (following Ojeda and Guillén [2008], significant storms were defined as those with Hs higher than 2.5 m during the peak of the storm and a minimum duration of 12 h with Hs greater than 1.5 m). The morphological responses of the beach to the storm action determine the morphodynamic state. These responses were grouped into five categories: shoreline advance or retreat, beach rotation, sandbar migration, formation of megacusps, and changes in the sandbar configuration (linear or crescentic shape). The intensity and frequency of these modifications were different in both beaches. Regarding the changes in the morphodynamic state of the beaches, the bar at Bogatell switched more frequently among the four intermediate morphodynamic states during the study period than the bar at La Barceloneta. The bar at La Barceloneta only underwent the complete "reset" of the nearshore morphology (i.e., abrupt change of the plan-view shape of the beach towards a Longshore Bar and Trough state) once, associated with the high-energy wave event occurring on November 2001. At this beach, the strongest storm events produced the offshore migration of the bar and a certain decrease in the bar sinuosity, but did not generate an alongshore parallel bar. Similar storms caused different effects on the two adjacent beaches and, furthermore, the effect of storms of similar characteristics at t

Ojeda, E.; Guillén, J.; Ribas, F.

2009-09-01

277

Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in Beach Soccer  

PubMed Central

Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five beach soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that beach soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. Beach soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in beach soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. Beach soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax. PMID:24149392

Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David

2010-01-01

278

Monitoring and modeling nearshore dredge disposal for indirect beach nourishment, Ocean Beach, San Francisco  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nearshore dredge disposal was performed during the summer of 2005 at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA, a high energy tidal and wave environment. This trial run was an attempt to provide a buffer to a reach of coastline where wave attack during the winter months has had a severe impact on existing sewage infrastructure. Although the subsequent beach response was inconclusive, after one year the peak of the disposal mound had migrated ~100 m toward the shore, providing evidence that annual dredge disposal at this site could be beneficial over the long-term by at the very least providing: 1) additional wave dissipation during storms 2) compatible sediment to feed nearshore bars, 3) sediment cover on an exposed sewage outfall pipe, and 4) a viable alternative to the shoaling offshore disposal site. Numerical modeling suggests that despite the strong tidal currents in the region, wave forcing is the dominant factor moving the sediment slowly toward shore, and placing sediment at just slightly shallower depths (e.g. 9 m) in the future would have a more immediate impact.

Barnard, Patrick L.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Lescinski, Jamie; Elias, Edwin

2007-01-01

279

33 CFR 100.35T05-0482 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. 100.35T05-0482 Section 100...Events, Wrightsville Channel; Wrightsville Beach, NC. (a) Regulated area. The following...48?44? West, at Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. All coordinates...

2013-07-01

280

The effect of two mechanical beach grooming strategies on Escherichia coli density in beach sand at a southwestern Lake Michigan beach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of indicator bacteria associated with beach sands on recreational water quality has become increasingly recognized. Constant wave action may serve as a transport mechanism for delivering bacterial organisms to surface waters resulting in an increased frequency of dry weather advisories. The ability to reduce the concentration of these organisms may serve to improve recreational water quality. To date,

J. L. Kinzelman; K. R. Pond; K. D. Longmaid; R. C. Bagley

2004-01-01

281

Three-dimensional distribution of plastic pellets in sandy beaches: shifting paradigms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Plastic pellets are worldwide contaminants that accumulate in the ocean, especially in sandy beaches, where their historic standing-stock quantification relies on surface sediment samples. We demonstrated these particles present a three-dimensional instead of a simple along-across shore distribution, being found as deep as 2.0 m, with surface layers accounting for <10% of the total abundance in the sediment column. This gradient seemed to be more related to oceanographic rather than anthropic processes, suggesting a general pattern whose applicability to microplastics and sedimentary environments as a whole should be investigated. This poses criticism in the exactness of standing-stock records and demands urgent discussion of sampling protocols.

Turra, Alexander; Manzano, Aruanã B.; Dias, Rodolfo Jasão S.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Barbosa, Lucas; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Moreira, Fabiana T.

2014-03-01

282

Low faunal diversity on Maltese sandy beaches: fact or artefact?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Eight sandy beaches on Malta and two on Gozo were sampled for macrofauna to test the hypothesis that Maltese beaches have an intrinsically low diversity. Stations distributed in the supralittoral (dry zone), mediolittoral (wet zone) and upper infralittoral (submerged zone to 1 m water depth) were sampled by sieving core samples and standardised searching during daytime, and pitfall trapping and standardised sweeping of the water column using a hand-net at night, as appropriate. Physical parameters of the sediment were measured and human occupancy of the beaches was estimated. From the supralittoral and mediolittoral, 39 species represented by 1584 individuals were collected by the combined techniques of pitfall trapping, sieving and standard searching. For Ramla beach, which had the highest diversity, 267 individuals representing 25 infaunal species were collected by sieving from a combined volume of 1.175 m 3 of sand, and 149 individuals representing 28 epifaunal species were collected by standardised searching from a combined area of 700 m 2 of sand during two winter and two summer sampling sessions between 1992 and 1993. For nine other beaches sampled during the summer of 2000, only six macrofaunal species were collected from core samples, with overall population densities ranging from 4.13 to 45.45 individuals m -2. Only 92 individuals belonging to 12 species were collected by hand-net from the uppermost infralittoral of five beaches sampled using this method during the summer of 2000. Taxa of gastropods, bivalves, decapods, mysids and staphylinid beetles generally abundant on Mediterranean sandy beaches, were entirely absent from the beaches sampled. Few correlations that could explain the impoverishment of Maltese sandy beaches were found between physical parameters and faunal abundances, and other factors such as inadequate sampling effort, human disturbance and marine pollution were also excluded; however, seasonally biased sampling may partly explain the results obtained. One factor that may explain why certain species are missing could be lack of recruitment, due to Malta's geographical isolation from the European and African mainlands.

Deidun, Alan; Azzopardi, Marthese; Saliba, Stephen; Schembri, Patrick J.

2003-10-01

283

Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches.  

PubMed

Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches - Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI - with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F(+) coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand-water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:25150738

Heaney, Christopher D; Exum, Natalie G; Dufour, Alfred P; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Richard A; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J; Love, David C; Serre, Marc L; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J

2014-11-01

284

Behavioural adaptations in talitrids from two Atlantic beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of the present study was to test sun orientation and rhythmic activity of two sandhopper populations from two Atlantic macro-tidal beaches. A population from Le Verger beach (orientated to 346°, Ille et Vilaine, Brittany, France) and a population from Damgan (orientated to 195°, Morbihan, Brittany, France), were tested on the beach under clear sky discriminating for landscape vision. For both populations locomotor activity rhythm was recorded in the laboratory. The two beaches differed for climatic features, tidal range and for human use. Both talitrid populations resulted very well orientated toward the shoreline, and both used solar position and landscape vision to orient. However the multiple regression analysis of orientation with climatic features showed a different use of local cues by the two populations and a slight influence of tidal regime (ebbing and rising tide), in spite of the supralittoral zonation of sandhoppers. In the laboratory they showed a well defined rhythmic behaviour as well as a bimodal rhythmicity, explained as a tidal one. These results are a new brick in the complex picture of orientation and rhythm studies on sandy beach invertebrates.

Rossano, Claudia; Gambineri, Simone; Fanini, Lucia; Durier, Virginie; Rivault, Colette; Scapini, Felicita

2009-12-01

285

New beach ridge type: severely limited fetch, very shallow water  

SciTech Connect

The southern end of Laguna Madre (Texas) north of the Rio Grande mouth is marked by very shallow water, wide tidal flats, lunettes, islands made of beach ridges, and lesser features. The number and variety of islands in the lagoon is remarkable. The lunettes (clay dunes) are made primarily of quartz sand and coarse silt. They are common 5-10 m high, irregular in shape, and steep sided. They were deposited from wind transport and did not migrate. Those that are islands in the lagoon predate present position of sea level. Islands made of beach ridges were built from the lagoon side. Photoanalysis, field work, and granulometry all show that this sand was not moved into these ridges by Gulf of Mexico waves. Trenches in 12 beach ridges showed horizontal bedding but neither low-angle nor steep cross-bedding (quite unlike swash-built beach ridges). The ridges were built by wind-tide lag effects, not from the swash. Therefore, these beach ridges are a new type, in addition to swash-built, eolian, and storm-surge ridges. Growth of the ridges appears to be completed.

Tanner, W.F.; Demirpolat, S.

1988-09-01

286

Resin pellets from beaches of the Portuguese coast and adsorbed persistent organic pollutants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The occurrence of stranded plastic marine debris along the Portuguese coastline was investigated. Number of items m-2 and size range of resin pellets were recorded, corresponding to 53% of total marine debris collected items. In addition, concentrations of adsorbed persistent bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals (PBTC) were determined, PAH - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; PCB - polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT - dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane. Matosinhos (Mt) and Vieira de Leiria (VL) presented the highest number of items m-2 (362 and 332, respectively). Resin pellets with 4 mm diameter were the most abundant (50%). Contaminants concentration was variable. PAH concentrations recorded values between 53 and 44800 ng g-1, PCB ranged from 2 to 223 ng g-1 and DDT between 0.42 and 41 ng g-1. In general, aged and black pellets recorded higher concentrations for all contaminants. Matosinhos (Mt), Vieira de Leiria (VL) and Sines (Si), near industrial areas and port facilities, were the most contaminated beaches. Research efforts are needed to assess the points of entry of industrial plastic pellets in order to take action and minimize impacts on the ecosystems, in particular, points of transfer during transportation from plastic manufacturers to plastic converters should be identified and controlled so that virgin pellets are contained and will not enter rivers and be carried to the oceans where they can remain for a long time and travel great distances.

Antunes, J. C.; Frias, J. G. L.; Micaelo, A. C.; Sobral, P.

2013-09-01

287

Hydrodynamic influences of tidal fluctuations and beach slopes on benzene transport in unconfined, sandy costal aquifers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oil spills in oceans have led to severe environment and ecosystem problems due to high toxicity substances, large spatial extents, and long temporal durations. The BTEX compounds are key indexes generally used for identifications of such contamination events and also for quantifications of residual substances after remediations. Benzene is one of the BTEX compounds, which is recognized to be high toxicity and may threat near-shore ecosystem and human safety. Therefore, the understanding of benzene transport in costal aquifers is critical for predictions of contaminated zones and managements and organizations of remediation plans. In this study a numerical investigation was conducted to quantify the influence of tidal fluctuations and beach slopes on benzene transport in an unconfined coastal aquifer. More specifically, three different tidal amplitudes and three beach slopes were considered in the two-dimensional HYDROGEOCHEM model to characterize the spatial and temporal behavior of the benzene transport. Simulation results show that tidal fluctuations will lead to shallow seawater circulations near the ground surface where the high tides can reach periodically. Such local circulation flows will trap benzene plume and the plume may migrate to the deeper aquifer, depending on the amplitudes of tides and the surface slopes of the coastal lines. The sine curve tides with 0.5 m amplitudes will create circulation plume sizes of about 50m in length and 20m in depth, while the circulation plume sizes for tides with 1.0 m amplitudes will significantly increase to approximately 150 m in length and 60 m in depth. Additionally, double the beach slopes and keep the same tidal amplitude will lead to 40 m plume movement toward the land. The amplitude of tidal fluctuation is the key factor to decide when and where a benzene plume reaches a largest depth. In general, the plume with tidal amplitude of 0.5 m requires 50 days to reach 90% of the largest depth. However, the plume with tidal amplitude of 1.0 m requires 300 days to reach 90% of the largest depth. Same conclusions can be applied to evaluate the duration times for a benzene plume self-clean, when the benzene source on ground surface is removed.

Ni, C.-F.; Wei, Y.-M.

2012-04-01

288

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California...000 yard radius of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant centered at position...

2014-07-01

289

Beach1 functionally antagonizes Rab11 during development and in regulating synaptic morphology  

E-print Network

BEACH proteins comprise an evolutionarily conserved family characterized by the presence of a BEACH (Beige and Chediak-Higashi) domain of unknown function. They have been shown to play a role in a number of important ...

Khodosh, Rita

2005-01-01

290

US Army Symposium on Solid Mechanics (15th : 1999-Myrtle Beach, S.C.),  

E-print Network

US Army Symposium on Solid Mechanics (15th : 1999-Myrtle Beach, S.C.), edited by Kailasam Iyer Symposium on Solid Mechanics (15th : 1999-Myrtle Beach, S.C.), edited by Kailasam Iyer and Shun-chin Chou

Stewart, Sarah T.

291

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California...000 yard radius of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant centered at position...

2011-07-01

292

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California...000 yard radius of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant centered at position...

2012-07-01

293

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California...000 yard radius of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant centered at position...

2010-07-01

294

33 CFR 165.1155 - Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California... Security Zone; Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Avila Beach, California...000 yard radius of Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant centered at position...

2013-07-01

295

33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Shore Protection Policy § 263.26 Small beach erosion control...of the Army is authorized to undertake construction of small shore and beach restoration and protection projects not...

2010-07-01

296

Experimental study to determine basic performance characteristics of recycled glass as beach nourishment material  

E-print Network

Since significant amounts of recycled glass may be used as a substitute of materials for beach nourishment in urban beaches, laboratory experiments were proposed to understand the performance characteristics of glass versus natural sand. A first...

Cruz Castro, Oscar

2012-06-07

297

33 CFR 162.215 - Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. 162.215 Section 162.215 Navigation and Navigable...215 Lake Tahoe, Nev.; restricted area adjacent to Nevada Beach. (a) The restricted area. The waters of...

2013-07-01

298

Health effects associated with cyanobacteria exposure among beach attendees in Puerto Rico  

EPA Science Inventory

Cyanobacteria and their toxins are associated with adverse human health effects, although among marine waters, the pyrrhophyta, including dinoflagellates are more recognized as health hazards. We recruited beach attendees during summer 2009, at Boquerón Beach, Puerto Rico...

299

Do's and Don'ts for Protecting Your Health and Your Beach's Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Beach's Health Dos and Dont's for Protecting Your Health and Your Beach's Health You can do several things to keep yourself ... closed. Learn more about the risks to your health . Be sun safe Check the UV Index Use ...

300

Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths  

PubMed Central

Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

2014-01-01

301

Environmental contamination by canine geohelminths.  

PubMed

Intestinal nematodes affecting dogs, i.e. roundworms, hookworms and whipworms, have a relevant health-risk impact for animals and, for most of them, for human beings. Both dogs and humans are typically infected by ingesting infective stages, (i.e. larvated eggs or larvae) present in the environment. The existence of a high rate of soil and grass contamination with infective parasitic elements has been demonstrated worldwide in leisure, recreational, public and urban areas, i.e. parks, green areas, bicycle paths, city squares, playgrounds, sandpits, beaches. This review discusses the epidemiological and sanitary importance of faecal pollution with canine intestinal parasites in urban environments and the integrated approaches useful to minimize the risk of infection in different settings. PMID:24524656

Traversa, Donato; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Di Cesare, Angela; La Torre, Francesco; Drake, Jason; Pietrobelli, Mario

2014-01-01

302

Equilibrium shoreline response of a high wave energy beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four years of beach elevation surveys at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California, are used to extend an existing equilibrium shoreline change model, previously calibrated with fine sand and moderate energy waves, to medium sand and higher-energy waves. The shoreline, characterized as the cross-shore location of the mean high water contour, varied seasonally by between 30 and 60 m, depending on the alongshore location. The equilibrium shoreline change model relates the rate of horizontal shoreline displacement to the hourly wave energy E and the wave energy disequilibrium, the difference between E and the equilibrium wave energy that would cause no change in the present shoreline location. Values for the model shoreline response coefficients are tuned to fit the observations in 500 m alongshore segments and averaged over segments where the model has good skill and the estimated effects of neglected alongshore sediment transport are relatively small. Using these representative response coefficients for 0.3 mm sand from Ocean Beach and driving the model with much lower-energy winter waves observed at San Onofre Beach (also 0.3 mm sand) in southern California, qualitatively reproduces the small seasonal shoreline fluctuations at San Onofre. This consistency suggests that the shoreline model response coefficients depend on grain size and may be constant, and thus transportable, between sites with similar grain size and different wave climates. The calibrated model response coefficients predict that for equal fluctuations in wave energy, changes in shoreline location on a medium-grained (0.3 mm) beach are much smaller than on a previously studied fine-grained (0.2 mm) beach.

Yates, M. L.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Hansen, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.

2011-04-01

303

Plastic Pollution at a Sea Turtle Conservation Area in NE Brazil: Contrasting Developed and Undeveloped Beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sea turtles are highly susceptible to plastic ingestion and entanglement. Beach debris were surveyed along the most important\\u000a sea turtle nesting beaches in Brazil (Costa dos Coqueiros, Bahia State). No significant differences among developed and undeveloped\\u000a beaches were observed in terms of total number of items. Local sources (tourism activities) represented 70% of debris on developed\\u000a beaches, where cigarette butts,

Juliana Assunção Ivar do Sul; Isaac R. Santos; Ana Cláudia Friedrich; Alexandre Matthiensen; Gilberto Fillmann

2011-01-01

304

Hurricane Sandy caused extreme erosion of New York beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beaches on Fire Island, New York, lost more than half of their sand as a result of Hurricane Sandy, according to a new report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Fire Island is one of the barrier islands along the south shore of Long Island, N. Y. The finding, released 27 August, involved field surveys conducted before and after the storm. In addition, the researchers used lidar and aerial photography to evaluate changes to the beaches and shoreline and determined the volume and distribution of overwash deposits that were carried to the island's interior following the storm.

Balcerak, Ernie

2013-09-01

305

Long-term effects of dredging operations program. Collation and interpretation of data for Times Beach confined disposal facility, Buffalo, New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This interim report, collates all data gathered for the Times Beach confined disposal facility (CDF), Buffalo, New York. This purpose of the studies at the CDF was to determine the mobility and potential hazard of contaminants known to be in the dredged material placed at Times Beach by sampling and analyzing various components of the developing ecosystems. Upland, wetland, and aquatic areas are represented within the CDF and, for each area, inventories of colonizing biota were made and samples collected for measurement of heavy metals and organic compound contaminants. Samples of dredged material, vegetation, and soil-dwelling invertebrates, and vertebrates have been collected and heavy metal concentrations measured. Results suggest that the persistent contaminants, particularly cadmium, are concentrating in the leaf litter zone and moving into the detritivorous invertebrates. Highest concentrations of heavy metals were noted in earthworms. Earth worms, millipedes, woodlice, and spiders appeared to be target organisms for accumulation of heavy metals, and these groups contained higher concentrations of copper and cadmium than the other groups. Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants in the dredged material were below machine detection limits in the vertebrate top-predators. Contaminant concentrations in water from ground water wells were below guidance limits.

Stafford, E.A.; Simmers, J.W.; Rhett, R.G.; Brown, C.P.

1991-06-01

306

78 FR 669 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 17,...

2013-01-04

307

77 FR 5184 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 18,...

2012-02-02

308

78 FR 72022 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon. This deviation allows the bridge to...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon committee on behalf of the North Carolina...Quintiles Wrightsville Beach Full and Half Marathon scheduled for Sunday, March 16,...

2013-12-02

309

On the design of beach nourishment projects using static equilibrium concepts: Application to the Spanish coast  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of equilibrium plan form and equilibrium profile has been widely used as an engineering tool in order to design beach nourishment projects. The scope of this paper is to further explore this “equilibrium beach” concept in crenulated bays, as a long-term tool for beach nourishment projects. The proposed methodology is based on González and Medina (2001) and combines

Mauricio González; Raul Medina; Miguel Losada

2010-01-01

310

Quantitative analysis of small-plastic debris on beaches in the Hawaiian archipelago  

Microsoft Academic Search

Small-plastic beach debris from nine coastal locations throughout the Hawaiian Archipelago was analyzed. At each beach, replicate 20 l samples of sediment were collected, sieved for debris between 1 and 15 mm in size, sorted by type, counted and weighed. Small-plastic debris occurred on all of the beaches, but the greatest quantity was found at three of the most remote

Karla J. McDermid; Tracy L. McMullen

2004-01-01

311

The age and stratigraphic context of the Easington Raised Beach, County Durham, UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Easington Raised Beach, in Shippersea Bay, County Durham, is the most northerly known interglacial beach deposit in England. It lies directly on Magnesian Limestone bedrock at 33m O.D. and is covered by glacial sediments attributed to the Devensian. Detailed sedimentological analysis suggests that it is an interglacial beach, which is supported by the presence of pebbles bored by marine

Bethan J. Davies; David R. Bridgland; David H. Roberts; Colm Ó. Cofaigh; Stephen M. Pawley; Ian Candy; Beatrice Demarchi; Kirsty E. H. Penkman; William E. N. Austin

2009-01-01

312

A new approximation for ocean waves propagating over a beach with variable depth  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the phenomenon of ocean waves propagating over a beach with variable water depth is re-examined. Based on the assumption of shallow water, a linearised shallow water equation is solved with an arbitrary beach profile. These irregular beach profiles form a set of partial differential equation with variable coefficient as the governing equation, which is the main obstacle

D.-S. Jeng; B. R. Seymour

2005-01-01

313

76 FR 77383 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Airspace Docket No. 11-AWA-2] Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL...the Palm Beach International Airport, FL, Class C airspace area by raising the floor of Class C airspace over Palm Beach County Park Airport....

2011-12-13

314

76 FR 24813 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Offshore Challenge, Sunny Isles Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...a temporary safety zone in the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach, Florida...boat races will be held in the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Sunny Isles Beach...safety zone. All waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Sunny Isles Beach,...

2011-05-03

315

77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL AGENCY...safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Daytona Beach, Florida...host an air show event over the Atlantic Ocean in Daytona Beach, FL. In...

2012-08-20

316

The trophic significance of the invasive seaweed Sargassum muticum in sandy beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Native and exotic seaweeds frequently lie on the beach and sustain part of the benthic food web. However, the role of exotic seaweeds as food sources for beach consumers has been poorly studied. We studied the temporal and spatial variability in the trophic significance of the invasive brown seaweed Sargassum muticum on sandy beaches. We measured the stable isotopes (?13C

Francesca Rossi; Celia Olabarria; Mónica Incera; Josefina Garrido

2010-01-01

317

An Algebraic Point of View on the Crane-Beach Clemens Lautemann, Pascal Tesson 1  

E-print Network

An Algebraic Point of View on the Crane-Beach Conjecture Clemens Lautemann, Pascal Tesson 1- ship in L. The Crane-Beach Conjecture, which was recently disproved, stated that any language-free language. More generally, we say that a logic or a computational model has the Crane Beach property

Therien, Denis

318

Docket Number: 12-AFC-03 Project Title: Redondo Beach Energy Project  

E-print Network

facilities. RBEP will also include natural gas compressors, water treatment facilities, emergency services.m. Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center 1935 Manhattan Beach Blvd. Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (Map attached) #12 17, 2013, so that we can assure you a space. TELECONFERENCE OPTION: Parties and the Public may attend

319

WPTV News Channel 5 New hope for retail recovery in Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

WPTV News Channel 5 New hope for retail recovery in Palm Beach County Posted: 10/19/2011 By: Evan Axelbank PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla. - When you don't have a job, every purchase becomes a calculation. "It Beach. Martin, 23, has applied for 10 jobs in the last week, mostly at retail outlets like Walmart

Belogay, Eugene A.

320

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2013-07-01

321

40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches. 227.10 Section 227.10 Protection...to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches. (a) Wastes which may present...may present a hazard to shorelines or beaches may be dumped only at sites and...

2013-07-01

322

Paired Open Beach Seines to Study Estuarine Migrations of Juvenile Salmon  

E-print Network

Paired Open Beach Seines to Study Estuarine Migrations of Juvenile Salmon HERBERT W. JAENICKE, ADRIAN G. CELEWYCZ, JACK E. BAILEY, and JOSEPH A. ORSI Figure I. - Location of beach seining sites along straight, long unobstructed beaches in southeastern Alaska. The seines were anchored in place

323

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

2011-07-01

324

Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July Spectroscopy and pentaquark  

E-print Network

Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 1 ....... Spectroscopy and pentaquark;Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 2 .............. 4-momentum transfer squared regimes 22 )( qpw += H1 ZEUS #12;Chuanlei Liu, Beach 2006, Lancaster,UK, 2nd-8th of July 3

325

Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, May 2007  

E-print Network

1 Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, May, for the first time since it was relocated to Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, THE PLAYERS® Championship (TPC) golf, and this continued to be the case in 2007 with a purse totaling $9 million. Ponte Vedra Beach is located in the north

Florida, University of

326

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

2012-07-01

327

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2012-07-01

328

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2011-07-01

329

40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches. 227.10 Section 227.10 Protection...to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches. (a) Wastes which may present...may present a hazard to shorelines or beaches may be dumped only at sites and...

2011-07-01

330

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2013-10-01

331

Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point, California  

E-print Network

Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point). Among the most visible manifestations of marine oil in the environment is the formation and beach accumulation is common on many California beaches due to chronic oil emissions from natural oil seeps

Luyendyk, Bruce

332

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2011-07-01

333

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2012-07-01

334

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2011-07-01

335

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2012-07-01

336

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2011-07-01

337

6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd 8th  

E-print Network

6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd ­ 8th 1 Leptonic decays of Charm mesons David H. Miller Purdue University (CLEO collaboration) 7th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm And Beauty Hadrons BEACH 2006 2nd to 8th July 2006 University of Lancaster, England. #12;6/29/2006 BEACH 2006 July 2nd ­ 8th 2

338

U. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA  

E-print Network

U. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA c + Lifetime Measurement from SELEX (E781) Experiment Ugur Akgun for the SELEX Collaboration #12;U. Akgun, Beach 2006. Akgun, Beach 2006, Lancaster 3 THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWATHE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SELEX Experiment at Fermilab

Akgun, Ugur

339

33 CFR 167.501 - In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. 167.501 Section...In the approaches to Los Angeles/Long Beach: Precautionary area. (a) The precautionary...area enclosed by the Los Angeles-Long Beach breakwater and a line connecting Point...

2013-07-01

340

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

For first time since 2007, food stamp use drops in state, Palm Beach County March 13, 2013|By Donna in Palm Beach County fell in February, according to data from the Florida Department of Children from last year when the number of food stamp recipients in Palm Beach County jumped nearly 14 percent

Fernandez, Eduardo

341

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2011-07-01

342

Calculation of beach change under interacting cross-shore and longshore processes Hans Hanson a,  

E-print Network

Calculation of beach change under interacting cross-shore and longshore processes Hans Hanson a online 7 March 2010 Keywords: Longshore sediment transport Beach response Groins Coastal structures approach and numerical model that simulates beach and dune change in response to cross-shore processes

US Army Corps of Engineers

343

The Beach Study: An Empirical Analysis of the Distribution of Coastal Property Values  

E-print Network

165 The Beach Study: An Empirical Analysis of the Distribution of Coastal Property Values empirical evidence suggests that coastal properties, and particularly those proximate to a beach, have empirical evidence suggests that coastal properties, and particularly those proximate to a beach, have

Omiecinski, Curtis

344

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2011-10-01

345

Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, March 20051  

E-print Network

FE698 Economic Impact of THE PLAYERS Championship Golf Tournament at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida at the Sawgrass Stadium Golf course in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. This event is part of the PGA TOUR and is operated by PGA TOUR, Inc., which is also headquartered in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida. In 2005, the TPC

Florida, University of

346

CEF06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006  

E-print Network

CEF06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006 Optimal Endogenous Carbon Taxes School of Management University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 #12;CEF06, Amathus Beach06, Amathus Beach Hotel, Limassol, Cyprus, June 22-24, 2006 · This research was supported, in part

Nagurney, Anna

347

33 CFR 100.106 - Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY. 100.106 Section 100.106...100.106 Freeport Grand Prix, Long Beach, NY. (a) Regulated area. The...waters of Long Island to the south of Long Beach, New York. The regulated area is...

2011-07-01

348

Evidence of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice  

E-print Network

Evidence of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice Journal of adaptation from ancestral variation in young populations of beach mice Vera S. Domingues1,2,3 , Yu-Ping Poh1 receptor (Mc1r), a gene that contributes to pigmentation differences, in beach and mainland populations

349

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County  

E-print Network

Losing shuttle program to hurt Space Coast far worse than Palm Beach County By JEFF OSTROWSKI Palm Beach Post Staff Writer Updated: 5:07 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 Posted: 4:59 p.m. Sunday, July 3, 2011 agency Space Florida. For many in Palm Beach County's aerospace industry, the shuttle's demise merits

Belogay, Eugene A.

350

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section...Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General...the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long Beach, the pilot stations for the Port of...

2013-07-01

351

36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks...regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in accordance with §§ 1.5 and...

2013-07-01

352

40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches. 227.10 Section 227.10 Protection...to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches. (a) Wastes which may present...may present a hazard to shorelines or beaches may be dumped only at sites and...

2012-07-01

353

CONNECTIONS OF CARING: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER BEACH NATURALISTS  

E-print Network

CONNECTIONS OF CARING: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER BEACH NATURALISTS By DAOUD NEIL MILLER: A STUDY OF SEATTLE AQUARIUM VOLUNTEER BEACH NATURALISTS By DAOUD NEIL MILLER, Master of Arts in Counseling twelve long-term volunteer shoreline interpreters in the Seattle Aquarium Beach Naturalist program

Coble, Theresa G.

354

33 CFR 110.214 - Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. 110.214 Section...Grounds § 110.214 Los Angeles and Long Beach harbors, California. (a) General...the Captain of the Port Los Angeles-Long Beach, the pilot stations for the Port of...

2011-07-01

355

Wave run-up on a high-energy dissipative beach Peter Ruggiero  

E-print Network

Wave run-up on a high-energy dissipative beach Peter Ruggiero Coastal and Marine Geology Program, U, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA R. A. Beach Consortium for Oceanographic Research in foreshore beach morphology, wave run-up data collected along the central Oregon coast during February 1996

356

33 CFR 334.990 - Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.990 Long Beach Harbor, Calif.; naval restricted area...U.S. Naval Base Los Angeles, Long Beach, California, and such agencies as...

2013-07-01

357

33 CFR 80.160 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 80.160 Section 80.160 ...160 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from the...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2013-07-01

358

33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation...Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across the...specified in this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at...

2012-07-01

359

Coastal Dynamics 2013 MODELLING IMPACTS OF "JOHANNA SHORM" ON AN OPEN-BEACH WITH ECORS  

E-print Network

Coastal Dynamics 2013 1251 MODELLING IMPACTS OF "JOHANNA SHORM" ON AN OPEN-BEACH WITH ECORS and sedimentary dynamics processes on sandy beaches are not well understand. To better understand coastal) on Vougot Beach (Finist�re � France) using the SWAN-EPOC1DBeach modeling chain (still in development.) Dune

Brest, Université de

360

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2012-07-01

361

33 CFR 110.100 - Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. 110.100 Section...Areas § 110.100 Los Angeles and Long Beach Harbors, Calif. (a) [Reserved...beginning. (c) Area B-1. Long Beach outer harbor along east side of Pier 400 beginning at latitude...

2013-07-01

362

Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data  

E-print Network

Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach-foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Geospatial analysis of vulnerable beach- foredune systems from decadal time series of lidar data, Journal islands and their beach and dune systems. GIS- based per grid cell statistics and map algebra was applied

Mitasova, Helena

363

Submarine landslides of San Pedro Escarpment, southwest of Long Beach, California  

E-print Network

Submarine landslides of San Pedro Escarpment, southwest of Long Beach, California Robert G and slope near Long Beach. Large slope failures are present on the San Pedro Escarpment and on the basin Beach, California's ¢fth larg- est city (Fig. 1), is built in an area of rapid geo- logic changes

New Hampshire, University of

364

New census numbers show Palm Beach County's 85-plus crowd grows 41%  

E-print Network

New census numbers show Palm Beach County's 85-plus crowd grows 41% By CHRISTINE STAPLETON AND GEORGE BENNETT Palm Beach Post Staff Writers Updated: 8:32 a.m. Thursday, May 5, 2011 Posted: 8:21 a community near West Palm Beach, 87-year-old Lou Hazan tried to offer some insights into the modern

Belogay, Eugene A.

365

46 CFR 7.25 - Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. 7.25 Section 7.25 Shipping...7.25 Montauk Point, NY to Atlantic Beach, NY. (a) A line drawn from Shinnecock...the spit of land at the western end of Oak Beach. (d) A line drawn from Jones...

2012-10-01

366

A haptic geography of the beach: naked bodies, vision and touch  

Microsoft Academic Search

The beach and the naked body are a casualty of the idealism that dominates social sciences. Despite the resurgence of work on embodiment, very few accounts have actually explored the centrality of the body on the beach. Drawing on ethnographic research on the island of Menorca (Spain), this article focuses on practices of nudity on the beach. Instead of giving

Pau Obrador-Pons

2007-01-01

367

Variations in Ice Rafted Detritus on Beaches in the South Shetland Islands: A Possible Climate Proxy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Raised beach ridges on Livingston Island of the South Shetland Islands display variations in both quantity and source of ice rafted detritus (IRD) received over time. Whereas the modem beach exhibits little IRD, all of which is of local origin, the next highest beach (similar to250 C-14 yr BP) has large amounts, some of which comes from as far away

Brenda L. Hall; Ethan R. Perry

2004-01-01

368

Seasonal changes in beach morphology along the sheltered coastline of Perth, Western Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seasonal change in beach morphology is traditionally ascribed to a variation in the incident wave energy level with calm conditions in summer resulting in wide beaches with pronounced subaerial berms and energetic conditions in winter causing narrow beaches with nearshore bar morphology. The coastline of Perth, Western Australia, is characterised by a large seasonal variation in the incident wave height

G. Masselink; C. B. Pattiaratchi

2001-01-01

369

Integrating Bacterial and Viral Water Quality Assessment to Predict Swimming-Associated Illness at a Freshwater Beach: A Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Background & Objective Recreational waters impacted by fecal contamination have been linked to gastrointestinal illness in swimmer populations. To date, few epidemiologic studies examine the risk for swimming-related illnesses based upon simultaneous exposure to more than one microbial surrogate (e.g. culturable E. coli densities, genetic markers). We addressed this research gap by investigating the association between swimming-related illness frequency and water quality determined from multiple bacterial and viral genetic markers. Methods Viral and bacterial genetic marker densities were determined from beach water samples collected over 23 weekend days and were quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). These genetic marker data were paired with previously determined human exposure data gathered as part of a cohort study carried out among beach users at East Fork Lake in Ohio, USA in 2009. Using previously unavailable genetic marker data in logistic regression models, single- and multi-marker/multi-water quality indicator approaches for predicting swimming-related illness were evaluated for associations with swimming-associated gastrointestinal illness. Results Data pertaining to genetic marker exposure and 8- or 9-day health outcomes were available for a total of 600 healthy susceptible swimmers, and with this population we observed a significant positive association between human adenovirus (HAdV) exposure and diarrhea (odds ratio ?=?1.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.1–2.3) as well as gastrointestinal illness (OR ?=?1.5; 95% CI: 1.0–2.2) upon adjusting for culturable E. coli densities in multivariable models. No significant associations between bacterial genetic markers and swimming-associated illness were observed. Conclusions This study provides evidence that a combined measure of recreational water quality that simultaneously considers both bacterial and viral densities, particularly HAdV, may improve prediction of disease risk than a measure of a single agent in a beach environment likely influenced by nonpoint source human fecal contamination. PMID:25409012

Marion, Jason W.; Lee, Cheonghoon; Lee, Chang Soo; Wang, Qiuhong; Lemeshow, Stanley; Buckley, Timothy J.; Saif, Linda J.; Lee, Jiyoung

2014-01-01

370

Groundwater Contamination  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site by the Michigan Environmental Education Curriculum presents an interactive module that provides an introduction to groundwater quality issues. The information is presented as a series of slides with text, animations, quiz questions and interactive features. Topics include types of aquifers, groundwater movement, sources of contamination, the concentration and dispersion of contaminants, plumes and remediation.

Babcock, Matthew; Mayer, Alex; Curriculum, Michigan E.

371

Groundwater Contamination  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This investigation consists of two parts, in which students first model the effects of groundwater contamination and then track the flow of the contamination. However, Part I does not have to be done in order to do Part II. This Teacher Information sectio

Van Faasen, Carl; Peaslee, Graham; Soukhome, Jennifer; Statema, William

2009-04-01

372

CONTAMINANT REDISTRIBUTION CAN CONFOUND INTERPRETATION OF OIL-SPILL BIOREMEDIATION STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

The physical redistribution of oil between the inside and outside of experimental plots can affect the results of bioremediation field studies that are conducted on shorelines contaminated by real oil spills. Because untreated oil from the surrounding beach will enter the plot, ...

373

South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle Beach Nearshore Experiment  

E-print Network

South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study Myrtle Beach Nearshore Experiment Dec. 10 to Dec. 15, 2003 Coastal Processes Sediment Dynamics Laboratory Department of Geological Sciences University of South with the collection of offshore wave and current data as part of the U.S. Geological Survey South Carolina Coastal

Voulgaris, George

374

California State University Long Beach Department of Kinesiology  

E-print Network

California State University Long Beach Department of Kinesiology Student Learning Outcomes and apply this knowledge in academic and professional settings. Students will apply their Kinesiology the following learning outcomes: Students will apply their Kinesiology-related knowledge and skills to think

Sorin, Eric J.

375

Biodiversity of rock, beach and water fungi in Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fungal biodiversity in its overall is mostly still unknown and the ecological role of these organisms, particularly in some border ecosystems, is often underestimated. This study aims to give both an overview of the state of the art and to present new data on the mycodiversity in some peculiar environments as rocks, beach sand, and water in Italy. Particularly,

S. Onofri; A. Anastasi; G. Del Frate; S. Di Piazza; N. Garnero; M. Guglielminetti; D. Isola; L. Panno; C. Ripa; L. Selbmann; G. C. Varese; S. Voyron; M. Zotti; L. Zucconi

2011-01-01

376

Excerpts from Daytona Beach Community College Institutional Audit.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted by Daytona Beach Community College's (DBCC's) Mid-Florida Research and Business Center to determine the market for the educational services which fall within the mission of DBCC, to identify target populations within that market, to explore educational needs and perceived desires, and to examine community opinions of DBCC and…

Daytona Beach Community Coll., FL. Mid-Florida Research and Business Center.

377

Palm Beach Community College Strategic Plan, 1999-2004.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report addresses strategies and action plans for Palm Beach Community College (PBCC) (Florida) between 1999-2004. As part of a commitment to achieve specific, measurable end results, the college has set various objectives, including: (1) develop, implement and institutionalize a mission driven strategic budget for the 1999-2000 fiscal year;…

Samuels, Seymour

378

Thousands of migrating sharks spotted along South Florida coast, beaches  

E-print Network

the currents of the Atlantic Ocean to carry them and water temperatures to guide them. Tens of thousands, there have been no bites in Palm Beach County waters," he said. "Our data has shown that the bulk and water temperatures." Kajiura and graduate student Shari Tellman have conducted aerial surveys

Fernandez, Eduardo

379

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC VOICE AUDITIONS for the student to receive individual, state-paid voice lessons: #12; Freshman Year (First and second theater. Russian or Slavic songs may be sung with English translation. Performance Majors: add one

Sorin, Eric J.

380

California State University Long Beach, Research Foundation Employment Opportunities  

E-print Network

with Co-Program Directors, clinical staff, and student interns of the Long Beach Trauma Recovery Center agencies for funding. Other duties maybe required. EDUCATION, SKILLS AND ABILITIES: Minimum of a Bachelor degree in relevant health, education, social, or behavioral discipline required; experience in education

Sorin, Eric J.

381

Gille-STPA 35 1 Sewage on San Diego Beaches  

E-print Network

Gille-STPA 35 1 Sewage on San Diego Beaches For a casual reader of the San Diego Union treatment standards, so that San Diego could dump less seriously treated sewage into the ocean. Then he. As a result, sewage from Tijuana will be held to a higher treatment standard than sewage from San Diego. Why

Gille, Sarah T.

382

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC  

E-print Network

of Music. UNIVERSITY REPERTOIRE MAY INCLUDE: Scales and Technical Studies Chromatic Scale (from memory CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC CLARINET AUDITIONS in the Conservatory of Music. Conservatory admission auditions take place in November, February, and March

Sorin, Eric J.

383

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC  

E-print Network

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH BOB COLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC JAZZ VOICE MAJOR AUDITIONS Revised Sept. 1, 2003 GENERAL INFORMATION An audition is required for admittance to all degree programs, etc.) with improvisation (scatting) to follow. 2. A jazz standard of your choice (such as Tenderly

Sorin, Eric J.

384

Resources for College Students in Need PALM BEACH COUNTY  

E-print Network

to those struggling with homelessness. Contact them at 561.494.0125 or http://www.thelordsplace.org/. West service agencies and provides the following services: Homeless Prevention, Homeless Intervention, Traveler. The Homeless Coalition of Palm Beach County, Inc. works to advocate for the rights of the homeless and serves

Fernandez, Eduardo

385

Wireless Time Tracking Improves Productivity at CSU Long Beach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes California State University Long Beach's implementation of new maintenance management software, which integrated maintenance, inventory control, and key control and allows technicians to enter and receive information through handheld wireless devices for more accurate time accounting. The school estimates a 10 percent increase in…

Charmack, Scott; Walsh, Randy

2002-01-01

386

Modeling the Genesee River Plume for Improving Beach  

E-print Network

Yan Li Anthony Vodacek STUDY SITE BEACH CLOSURE MODEL INTEGRATED SYSTEM Lake Ontario Water Quality Model's Five Predictive Criteria ­ Water Clarity (48% of Closed Days, 10% of Restricted Days/Dew point temperature · Wind speed/direction · Cloud cover/height · Precipitable water · Pressure

Zanibbi, Richard

387

Plastics Distribution and Degradation on Lake Huron Beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The resistivity of plastic debris to chemical and mechanical weathering processes poses a serious threat to the environment. Numerous marine beaches are littered with plastic fragments that entangle and become ingested by organisms including birds, turtles and plankton. Although many studies have been conducted to determine the amount and effects of plastics pollution on marine organisms, relatively little is known about the distribution and quantity of polymer types along lacustrine beaches. Plastic particles sampled from selected beaches on Lake Huron were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to determine polymer composition. The majority of the plastic fragments are industrial pellets composed of polypropylene and polyethylene. Varying degrees of oxidation are indicated by multiple irregular peaks in the lower wavenumber region on the FTIR spectra. The oxidized pellets also represent the plastic particles with the most pronounced surface textures, as identified using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Crazes and flakey, fibrous, or granular textures are consistent with chemical weathering processes, whereas gauges and pits occur through abrasion during mechanical weathering. Further textural and compositional analysis will indicate which polymer types are more resistant to weathering processes. Additional investigation of the distribution of plastic debris along the beaches of Lake Huron will indicate the amount and primary transport directions of resistant plastic debris polluting one of Ontario's Great Lakes.

Zbyszewski, M.; Corcoran, P.

2009-05-01

388

Composite modelling of interactions between beaches and structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of Composite Modelling (CM) is presented, as elaborated in the EU\\/HYDRALAB joint research project Composite Modelling of the Interactions Between Beaches and Structures. An introduction and a review of the main literature on CM in the hydraulic community are given. In Section 3, the case studies of CM of the seven partners participating in this project are discussed.

Herman Gerritsen; James Sutherland; Rolf Deigaard; Mutlu Sumer; Conceição J. E. M. Fortes; Joan P. Sierra; Ulrike Schmidtke

2011-01-01

389

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LONG BEACH The 2012 Latin American Studies  

E-print Network

Studies Association; Delta Sigma Chi; Division of Academic Affairs; Division of Student Services Association; Hermanas Unidas de Long Beach; Hermanos Unidos; Journalism Department; KPFK; La Raza Student of Student Services Douglas W. Robinson; College of the Arts Interim Dean Chris Miles; Associate Dean Cyrus

Sorin, Eric J.

390

Empirical Modeling of Microbial Indicators at a South Carolina Beach  

EPA Science Inventory

Public concerns about water quality at beaches have prompted the development of multiple linear regression and other models that can be used to "nowcast" levels of bacterial indicators. Hydrometeorological and biogeochemical data from summer, 2009 were used to develop empirical m...

391

Abstract--This paper presents an investigation of a neural-based technique for detecting and quantifying persons in beach  

E-print Network

and quantifying persons in beach imagery for the purpose of predicting trends of tourist activities at beach sites, is proposed to effectively scan beach images to determine whether objects are "person" or "non-person". Encouraging results are presented for person detection using video imagery collected from a beach site

Blumenstein, Michael

392

One dimensional modeling of anthropogenic beach berm erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Anthropogenic beach berms (sometimes called artificial berms or artificial dunes) are in use internationally to guard against beach overtopping and consequent coastal flooding. Berms can be constructed on a seasonal basis or in anticipation of a hazardous event, e.g., when a storm is expected to arrive coincident with an astronomical high tide. In either case, a common approach is to scrape sand from the foreshore with heavy equipment and deposit it on the crest of the natural beach dune, thus providing added protection from the possibility of wave overtopping. Given the potential for higher sea levels globally and more extreme storm events, anthropogenic berms will surely be tested to their limits and will ultimately fail, causing flooding. A better understanding of the conditions under which these berms fail is therefore needed to support coastal flood risk management. An experimental campaign in Newport Beach, California was conducted to document the dynamic erosion of prototype beach berms under a rising tide and mild to moderate wave conditions. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) of the berm produced a digital model of how the berm shape evolved over time. Here, a numerical model of swash zone hydromorphodynamics based on shallow-water flow physics is presented to evaluate whether and to what extent the timing and degree of berm erosion and overtopping can be predicted from first principles. The model tightly couples flow and sediment transport within an approximate Riemann solver, and thus is of the Godunov-type variety of finite volume schemes. Additionally, the model includes an avalanching scheme to account for non-hydrodynamic slumping down the angle of repose. Results indicate that it is possible to calibrate the model for a particular event, and then successfully predict erosion for another event, but due to parameter sensitivities, it is unlikely that the model can be applied at a site without calibration (true prediction).

Shakeri Majd, M.; Sanders, B. F.

2013-12-01

393

Disentangling Diversity Patterns in Sandy Beaches along Environmental Gradients  

PubMed Central

Species richness in sandy beaches is strongly affected by concurrent variations in morphodynamics and salinity. However, as in other ecosystems, different groups of species may exhibit contrasting patterns in response to these environmental variables, which would be obscured if only aggregate richness is considered. Deconstructing biodiversity, i.e. considering richness patterns separately for different groups of species according to their taxonomic affiliation, dispersal mode or mobility, could provide a more complete understanding about factors that drive species richness patterns. This study analyzed macroscale variations in species richness at 16 Uruguayan sandy beaches with different morphodynamics, distributed along the estuarine gradient generated by the Rio de la Plata over a 2 year period. Species richness estimates were deconstructed to discriminate among taxonomic groups, supralittoral and intertidal forms, and groups with different feeding habits and development modes. Species richness was lowest at intermediate salinities, increasing towards oceanic and inner estuarine conditions, mainly following the patterns shown for intertidal forms. Moreover, there was a differential tolerance to salinity changes according to the habitat occupied and development mode, which determines the degree of sensitivity of faunal groups to osmotic stress. Generalized (additive and linear) mixed models showed a clear increase of species richness towards dissipative beaches. All taxonomic categories exhibited the same trend, even though responses to grain size and beach slope were less marked for crustaceans and insects than for molluscs or polychaetes. However, supralittoral crustaceans exhibited the opposite trend. Feeding groups decreased from dissipative to reflective systems, deposit feeders being virtually absent in the latter. This deconstructive approach highlights the relevance of life history strategies in structuring communities, highlighting the relative importance that salinity and morphodynamic gradients have on macroscale diversity patterns in sandy beaches. PMID:22792340

Barboza, Francisco R.; Gómez, Julio; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

2012-01-01

394

Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in beach sands  

PubMed Central

Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of beaches. Although recent work shows that beach sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within beach sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the beach face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of beach sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean beach sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause beach erosion or accretion. PMID:21984862

Gast, Rebecca J.; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve

2011-01-01

395

Impact of erosion and accretion on the distribution of enterococci in beach sands.  

PubMed

Bacterial pathogens in coastal sediments may pose a health risk to users of beaches. Although recent work shows that beach sands harbor both indicator bacteria and potential pathogens, it is not known how deep within beach sands the organisms may persist nor if they may be exposed during natural physical processes. In this study, sand cores of approximately 1 m depth were collected at three sites across the beach face in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina before, during and after large waves from an offshore hurricane. The presence of DNA from the fecal indicator bacterium Enterococci was detected in subsamples at different depths within the cores by PCR amplification. Erosion and accretion of beach sand at the three sites also was determined for each sampling day. The results indicate that ocean beach sands with persisting enterococci signals could be exposed and redistributed when wind, waves, and currents cause beach erosion or accretion. PMID:21984862

Gast, Rebecca J; Gorrell, Levi; Raubenheimer, Britt; Elgar, Steve

2011-09-15

396

Comparison of recreational health risks associated with surfing and swimming in dry weather and post-storm conditions at Southern California beaches using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA).  

PubMed

Southern California is an increasingly urbanized hotspot for surfing, thus it is of great interest to assess the human illness risks associated with this popular ocean recreational water sport from exposure to fecal bacteria contaminated coastal waters. Quantitative microbial risk assessments were applied to eight popular Southern California beaches using readily available enterococcus and fecal coliform data and dose-response models to compare health risks associated with surfing during dry weather and storm conditions. The results showed that the level of gastrointestinal illness risks from surfing post-storm events was elevated, with the probability of exceeding the US EPA health risk guideline up to 28% of the time. The surfing risk was also elevated in comparison with swimming at the same beach due to ingestion of greater volume of water. The study suggests that refinement of dose-response model, improving monitoring practice and better surfer behavior surveillance will improve the risk estimation. PMID:22472787

Tseng, Linda Y; Jiang, Sunny C

2012-05-01

397

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in plastic pellets: variability in the concentration and composition at different sediment depths in a sandy beach.  

PubMed

Plastic pellets have the ability to adsorb organic pollutants such as PAHs. This study analyzed the variability in the concentration and composition of PAHs on plastic pellets sampled up to 1m deep in the sediment of a sandy beach. The toxic potential of PAHs was analyzed, and the possible sources of contamination are discussed. The total PAHs varied, with the highest concentrations in the surface layer; the priority PAHs showed a different pattern. PAHs at greater depths did not reach toxicity levels above the PEL. The composition of PAHs differed between pellets from the shallower and from deeper sediment layers, and was suggested a mixture of sources. These results provided the first information on the depth distribution of PAHs in sandy beaches, associated with plastic pellets; and evidenced the potential environmental risk. Similarly to the abundance of pellets, the toxic potential is underestimated in surface samples. PMID:23582976

Fisner, Mara; Taniguchi, Satie; Moreira, Fabiana; Bícego, Márcia C; Turra, Alexander

2013-05-15

398

Sequential resuspension of biofilm components (viruses, prokaryotes and protists) as measured by erodimetry experiments in the Brouage mudflat (French Atlantic coast)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Resuspension thresholds in terms of friction velocity were experimentally quantified for the prokaryotes, protists and for the first time, viruses of intertidal mudflat biofilms. Differences in resuspension thresholds could be related to the type, behaviour and size of microorganisms and their association with particles. Free microorganisms (viruses, bacteria and some nanoflagellates) were resuspended by weak flow at friction velocities lower than 2 cm s- 1. Chlorophyll a, some nanoflagellates and attached bacteria were resuspended together with the bed's muddy sediment, which required friction velocities larger than 3 cm s- 1. Diatoms smaller than 60 ?m were resuspended at velocities between 3 and 5 cm s- 1, while those larger than 60 ?m were resuspended at higher friction velocities (5.5 to 6.5 cm s- 1). The thresholds of resuspension also depended on the micro-scale position of microorganisms in the sediment (horizontal and vertical distributions). In the field, the vertical distribution of chlorophyll a (a proxy of microphytobenthos) was skewed, with a maximum in the first 2 mm of sediment. Along the neap-spring tidal cycle, chlorophyll a revealed an increase in MPB biomass in the first 2 mm of the sediment, in relation to light increases with exposure durations. The horizontal distribution of chlorophyll a could be inferred from erosion experiments. During the initial phase of biofilm growth, the distribution of chlorophyll a seemed horizontally homogeneous, and was uniformly eroded at the beginning of the increase in chlorophyll a. From these results, we can make a hypothesis: in the subsequent phase of biofilm growth until the maximum of emersion duration, the eroded quantity of chlorophyll a was larger than expected based from chlorophyll a vertical distribution, suggesting that biofilm horizontal distribution became patchy and enriched chlorophyll a was preferentially eroded. When emersion duration and biofilm growth decreased, the trend was reversed, and eroded quantity of chlorophyll a was lower than expected from chlorophyll a vertical distribution, suggesting that areas with low chlorophyll a were preferentially eroded. Such erosion patterns when biofilm growth decreased probably resulted from the bulldozing activity of a surficial sediment bioturbator, the gastropod Peringia ulvae. Our study did not directly prove this horizontal distribution but it should be further discussed. This distribution needs to be studied to acquire real evidence of patchy distributions.

Dupuy, Christine; Mallet, Clarisse; Guizien, Katell; Montanié, Hélène; Bréret, Martine; Mornet, Françoise; Fontaine, Camille; Nérot, Caroline; Orvain, Francis

2014-09-01

399

Water Quality, Weather and Environmental Factors Associated with Fecal Indicator Organism Density in Beach Sand at Two Recreational Marine Beaches  

EPA Science Inventory

Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers wit sand contact have important public health implicatons because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact act...

400

Pro-Environmental Beach Driving is Uncommon and Ineffective in Reducing Disturbance to Beach-Dwelling Birds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Vehicles on beaches cause numerous deleterious effects to coastal wildlife. These impacts may, hypothetically, be lessened if drivers act to reduce disturbance. Since it is unknown to what extent such behavior occurs, and whether it can reduce disturbance, we quantified the behavior of drivers who encountered birds on open-coast, sandy beaches in eastern Australia and the consequent bird responses. Drivers of commercial tourist buses never slowed or altered course ("evaded birds") to avoid disturbing birds; conversely, 34 % of drivers of private cars did evade birds. Drivers of vehicles with fishing rod holders tended ( P = 0.09) to evade birds more frequently than non-fishing vehicles. Evasion, when it occurred, was modest, and did not significantly decrease the intensity of bird response or the probability of escapes on the wing. Voluntary behavioral adjustments to alleviate impacts on wildlife may be unworkable, suggesting that other solutions (e.g., beach closures) might be the only effective and feasible way to reduce disturbance to birds on ocean beaches.

Weston, Michael A.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Lynn, David

2014-05-01

401

Physicochemical parameters aid microbial community? A case study from marine recreational beaches, Southern India.  

PubMed

A total of 176 (water and sediment) samples from 22 stations belonging to four different (urban, semi-urban, rural, and holy places) human habitations of Tamil Nadu beaches were collected and analyzed for physiochemical and microbial parameters during 2008-2009. Bacterial counts were two- to tenfold higher in sediments than in water due to strong bacterial aggregations by dynamic flocculation and rich organic content. The elevated bacterial communities during the monsoon explain rainfalls and several other wastes from inlands. Coliform counts drastically increased at holy and urban places due to pilgrimage and other ritual activities. Higher values of the pollution index (PI) ratio (>1) reveals, human fecal pollutions affect the water quality. The averaged PI ratio shows a substantial higher microbial contamination in holy places than in urban areas and the order of decreasing PI ratios observed were: holy places?>?urban areas?>?semi-urban areas?>?rural areas. Correlation and factor analysis proves microbial communities were not related to physicochemical parameters. Principal component analysis indicates 55.32 % of the total variance resulted from human/animal fecal matters and sewage contaminants whereas 19.95 % were related to organic contents and waste materials from the rivers. More than 80 % of the samples showed a higher fecal coliform and Streptococci by crossing the World Health Organization's permissible limits. PMID:24292984

Vignesh, Sivanandham; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Emmanuel, Kunnampuram Varghese; Gokul, Murugaiah Santhosh; Muthukumar, Krishnan; Kim, Bong-Rae; James, Rathinam Arthur

2014-03-01

402

Relationship between sediment morphology and oil pollution along the Suez Canal beaches, Egypt  

SciTech Connect

In this study, marine surface sediments are collected from nine locations along the Suez Canal in order to investigate the relationship between the morphology of sands in the studied beaches and pollution by oil. Basically, the studied samples were analyzed by three techniques: grains-size analysis, microscopic examination, and gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. This study concluded that medium sand is the major class represented in the studied marine sediments. Pollution in these sand grains increases in the irregular grains more so than in the more rounded grains. Also, deep surface points, pitting, and fissures are considered to be good sites to precipitate oil contamination. Also, the presence of iron oxides may be taken as evidence for tanker ballast washings. The heavy fraction (zircon) shows more contamination than the light fraction (quartz) in these samples. Finally, GC profiles have shown two types of samples: one typical of weathered or highly weathered crude oil patterns and the other for samples with very highly weathered profiles. The relationship obtained between morphology studies and both oil content and GC chromatogram profiles indicates that all of the studied locations are suffering from pollution of oil that is spilled while shipping petroleum through the Suez Canal.

Barakat, M.A.K.; Shimy, T.M.; Mostafa, Y.M. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Inst., Cairo (Egypt)

1996-10-01

403

Storm recovery on two Italian coarse-grained beaches: a comparison between a mixed sand and gravel and a pebble beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High energy events emphasize beach erosion processes, sometimes leading to huge volume deficits not balanced by recovery under fair-weather conditions. In this scenario, artificial replenishments are frequently used as a form of coastal protection with large volumes of sediments re-injected in the system without strongly altering the environment as it happens with hard structures. Since climate change is expected to accentuate in the near future erosion effects, the need to artificially feed beaches is likely to increase. Gravel and pebbles are more and more often used as beach fill, on some occasions replacing sandy sediments. That was the case for two beaches located at either sides of the Italian Peninsula (Portonovo, Adriatic Sea; Marina di Pisa, Ligurian Sea), which constitute the study area of the present research. Portonovo is a 500 m-long mixed sand and gravel beach with a significant pebble-sized content (about 40%), unloaded on the beach during multiple replenishments. Marina di Pisa is an artificial, 180 m-long beach, mainly composed of 40-to-90 mm pebbles; it was built in 2008 as a part of a larger protection scheme. Groins or headlands that prevent any sediment exchange with adjacent areas bound both beaches. Periodic topographic surveys were carried out to evaluate the response of these human-altered beaches to high-energy events. The topographic surveys, undertaken with a DGPS-RTK instrument along cross-shore transects (from the landward end of the backshore to about 1.5 m depth seaward), were done following intense storm events occurred during the time period of the research. Transects were done out every 10 m along the entire length of the beaches. Prior to the first topographic survey, a sediment tracing experiment was set up as a form of control of the results provided by the geomorphologic analysis. Pebbles directly sampled from the beaches were marked by means of the RFID technology and injected back all along the beachface. As expected, considerable beach profile changes after the storms were identified, in particular at Portonovo (mixed beach), where huge sediment volumes were displaced longshore according to the incident wave direction as opposed to Marina di Pisa (gravel dominated), where the main beach changes developed along the cross-shore direction. In terms of resilience, results showed a better response of the Portonovo beach rather than the Marina di Pisa beach. The different response might be ascribed to the grain-size that constitutes the beaches: no physical process can rework the pebbles at Marina di Pisa once they are moved during the storms towards the back-end of the backshore or seaward of the step, thus preventing any beach recovery process to take place. Since the awareness on storm impacts is more critical than in the past, the understanding of beach recovery to extreme events needs new insights to combine the preservation of natural beach evolution as well as maintenance for end-users. That is particularly pressing on coarse-grained beaches, where the need to predict storm impact and recovery is much more vital considering that finding suitable sediment to refill the beach is never an easy task.

Bertoni, Duccio; Grottoli, Edoardo; Ciavola, Paolo; Sarti, Giovanni; Pozzebon, Alessandro

2014-05-01

404

Beach dune sand hydrophobicity due to the presence of beach vitex ( Vitex rotundifolia L. f.).  

PubMed

Conservation and preservation concerns have led to efforts to understand mechanisms of invasiveness and the effects these mechanisms have on the environment. Vitex rotundifolia L. f. [beach vitex (BV)] was introduced as a salt-tolerant woody ground cover, but it has since become invasive on primary and secondary dunes in coastal areas of the southeastern United States. Much of its invasive potential may be the result of intense substrate hydrophobicity underneath established stands, which is believed to prohibit seedling establishment by other plants including native plant species. This research was conducted to better understand BV-induced sand hydrophobicity by carrying out dune surveys of BV-infested areas of the South Carolina coast, identifying the compounds responsible for this activity via chemical analysis, and quantifying hydrophobicity persistence by resampling sites following removal of above-ground BV. The findings indicated that sand under BV cover was significantly hydrophobic, that cuticular alkanes from leaves and fruits were responsible for this hydrophobicity, and that extreme substrate hydrophobicity persisted for >3 years following BV removal. PMID:19090757

Cousins, Matthew M; Gresham, Charles A; Riley, Melissa B; Whitwell, Ted

2009-01-28

405

Food web structure of sandy beaches: Temporal and spatial variation using stable isotope analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The food web structure of two sandy beach ecosystems with contrasting morphodynamics (dissipative vs. reflective) was examined using stable carbon (? 13C) and nitrogen (? 15N) isotope analysis. Organic matter sources (POM: particulate organic matter; SOM: sediment organic matter) and consumers (zooplankton, benthic invertebrates and fishes) were sampled seasonally in both sandy beaches. Food webs significantly differed between beaches: even though both webs were mainly supported by POM, depleted ? 13C and ? 15N values for food sources and consumers were found in the dissipative system (following the reverse pattern in ? 13C values for consumers) for all the four seasons. Primary consumers (zooplankton and benthic invertebrates) use different organic matter sources on each beach and these differences are propagated up in the food web. The higher productivity found in the dissipative beach provided a significant amount of food for primary consumers, notably suspension feeders. Thus, the dissipative beach supported a more complex food web with more trophic links and a higher number of prey and top predators than the reflective beach. Morphodynamic factors could explain the contrasting differences in food web structure. The high degree of retention (nutrients and phytoplankton) recorded for the surf zone of the dissipative beach would result in the renewed accumulation of POM that sustains a more diverse and richer fauna than the reflective beach. Further studies directed to assess connections between the macroscopic food web, the surf-zone microbial loop and the interstitial compartment will provide a deeper understanding on the functioning of sandy beach ecosystems.

Bergamino, Leandro; Lercari, Diego; Defeo, Omar

2011-03-01

406

Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final Report 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by

C. T. Higgins; R. H. Chapman

1984-01-01

407

Environmental contaminants  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the ecotoxicology of major classes of environmental contaminants, with respect to sources, environmental chemistry, most likely routes of exposure, potential bioaccumulation and biomagification, mechanisms of toxicity, and effects on potentially vulnerable species of mammalian wildlife. Major contaminants reviewed were selected on the basis of their use patterns, availability and potential toxicity to wild mammals. These included pesticides used in agroecosystems (organochlorines, organophosphorus and carbamate compounds, anticoagulants, herbicides and fungicides), various organic pollutants (chlorobenzenes, chlorophenols, polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), heavy metals (lead, mercury, and cadmium), agricultural drainwater mixtures, leachates and radionuclides. Many of the above aspects of ecotoxicology and contaminants will be expanded upon in subsequent chapters of this book as they relate to distinct mammalian species and potential risk.

Hoffman, D.J.; Rattner, B.A.; Scheunert, I.; Korte, F.

2001-01-01

408

Mercury Contamination  

PubMed Central

IN BRIEF A residential elemental mercury contamination incident in Rhode Island resulted in the evacuation of an entire apartment complex. To develop recommendations for improved response, all response-related documents were examined; personnel involved in the response were interviewed; policies and procedures were reviewed; and environmental monitoring data were compiled from specific phases of the response for analysis of effect. A significant challenge of responding to residential elemental mercury contamination lies in communicating risk to residents affected py a HazMat spill. An ongoing, open and honest dialogue is emphasized where concerns of the public are heard and addressed, particularly when establishing and/or modifying policies and procedures for responding to residential elemental mercury contamination. PMID:23436951

Thompson, Marcella R.

2013-01-01

409

A Tour of Mudflat Town.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is designed for use as part of a curriculum series developed by the Regional Marine Science Project. It serves as a second grade supplementary reading text about the marine environment. Reading material characterizes the ocean, fresh water and salt water, and the seashore. An ecological approach to nature is emphasized, by…

Scarff, Judith M.

410

Backshore sill beach and dune erosion control system  

SciTech Connect

A backshore sill beach and dune erosion control system is described comprising: a supporting protective apron formed of weather and water resistant cloth. The apron includes a flat base portion and an angularly sloped portion extending seaward of the base portion, a toe scour anchor tube connected to the seaward end of the apron sloped portion, and longitudinal sand-filled geotextile containers placed upon the apron base portion each extending longitudinally shore parallel to the incoming surf. The sand-filled geotextile containers are specifically placed upon the beach in a pyramidal longitudinally extending shore parallel relation to an area being protected whereby wave action impacts upon relatively soft surfaces of the containers and is dissipated before normally impacting surfaces that would otherwise be eroded.

Sample, J.W.

1988-03-08

411

Documenting the global impacts of beach sand mining  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For centuries, beach sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of beach (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of beach sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of beach have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by beach sand mining include: destruction of natural beaches and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a significant rise in global sea level over the coming decades. Most governments recognize the local impacts of sand mining and mining activities are illegal in many localities. However, enforcement of these protections has been problematic and there has been little pressure to stop the practice from local or international environmental groups. In many cases, addressing the issue of sand mining requires addressing the local issues that allow it to persist. This includes poverty, corruption, and unregulated development. In areas where beach sand mining significantly supports the local economy, care needs to be given that local workers are given alternative means of income, and builders are provided an affordable substitute for the sand (e.g. crushed rock). Regardless, it is time for both academics and NGOs to address the cumulative environmental impacts of the direct destruction of the world's beaches through mining activities.

Young, R.; Griffith, A.

2009-04-01

412

Shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach in southern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Frequent morning surveys of birds were conducted on 1 km of beach in southern California to investigate shorebird use of an exposed sandy beach. The overall mean abundance (98.6 individuals km -1), estimated biomass (9.6 kg km -1), and species richness (5.5 species km -1) of shorebirds observed were very high for a sandy beach in the temperate zone. Eight species, sanderling ( Calidris alba), semipalmated plover ( Charadrius semipalmatus), marbled godwit ( Limosa fedoa), black-bellied plover ( Pluvialis squatarola), western sandpiper ( Calidris mauri), willet ( Catoptrophorus semipalmatus), surfbird ( Aphriza virgata), and whimbrel ( Numenius phaeopus), occurred in overall mean abundances >1 bird km -1 and accounted for 97% of the abundance and biomass of shorebirds. Sanderlings were the most abundant shorebird every year (64% of individuals and 35% of the biomass). Different species of abundant shorebirds exhibited distinct patterns of use of beach habitat, including fall, spring, and winter peaks in abundance. Temporal variation in shorebird use on seasonal and interannual scales was associated with migration patterns, and also with habitat availability and condition. Seasonal variation in monthly mean abundance and estimated biomass of shorebirds varied over more than an order of magnitude and followed a similar pattern in each year, reaching maxima in the fall or winter (161-280 individuals km -1 and 15.4-23.9 kg km -1) and minima in May or June (3-11 individuals km -1 and 0.8-2.2 kg km -1). A minor peak in shorebird abundance and biomass coinciding with spring migration was observed in April of most years. The number of species of shorebirds observed in individual surveys ranged from 0 to 11 species km -1 and was positively and significantly correlated with abundance. Monthly mean species richness and the total species observed monthly followed similar seasonal patterns, ranging from annual maxima of 7.4-9.1 and 12-17 species km -1 between August and October to minima of 0.8-2.1 and 2-8 species km -1, respectively, during June. In contrast, species turnover was lowest (1.1-1.7) in October and November, and generally highest (2-4) during early summer (June). The amount of sandy intertidal habitat available to shorebirds on the transect was estimated using sand elevations and predicted tide heights. In the fall and winter, the abundance of shorebirds was significantly and positively correlated with tide height, possibly reflecting feeding opportunities and high tide refuge effects during the highest tides. In the spring when sand levels were low, the abundance of shorebirds was negatively correlated with tide height. Prey availability, beach condition and the local availability, and condition of alternative foraging habitats may influence those relationships. Interannual variations in shorebird use and beach condition were observed in the course of the study. During an El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event (1997-1998), the extent of sandy habitat was greatly reduced and intertidal habitat was mostly converted to rocky substrate. The overall abundance of shorebirds and the mean abundance of some common species (e.g. sanderling) were depressed, and an uncommon species (surfbird, A. virgata) was unusually abundant during the ENSO event. In summary, the results suggest that sandy beaches are important habitat for many species of shorebirds, particularly in areas where alternative coastal foraging habitats, such as coastal wetlands, have become scarce. Understanding the dynamics of and threats to exposed sandy beaches may be increasingly important for shorebird conservation in many coastal regions.

Hubbard, David M.; Dugan, Jenifer E.

2003-10-01

413

Modes and emergent time scales of embayed beach dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we use a simple numerical model (the Coastline Evolution Model) to explore alongshore transport-driven shoreline dynamics within generalized embayed beaches (neglecting cross-shore effects). Using principal component analysis (PCA), we identify two primary orthogonal modes of shoreline behavior that describe shoreline variation about its unchanging mean position: the rotation mode, which has been previously identified and describes changes in the mean shoreline orientation, and a newly identified breathing mode, which represents changes in shoreline curvature. Wavelet analysis of the PCA mode time series reveals characteristic time scales of these modes (typically years to decades) that emerge within even a statistically constant white-noise wave climate (without changes in external forcing), suggesting that these time scales can arise from internal system dynamics. The time scales of both modes increase linearly with shoreface depth, suggesting that the embayed beach sediment transport dynamics exhibit a diffusive scaling.

Ratliff, Katherine M.; Murray, A. Brad

2014-10-01

414

Regional beach/cliff system dynamics along the california coast  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The coast of California is comprised of both sandy shorelines and cliffed coastline, and in many areas these features spatially coincide. In order to better understand the regional trends of change along the California coast, the U.S. Geological Survey is quantifying both sandy shoreline change and coastal cliff retreat for the state. The resulting database was used to examine the dynamics of the beach/cliff system. We found inconsistent evidence of a relationship between rates of cliff retreat and shoreline change on the spatial scale of 100-km cells. However, when the data are correlated within individual regions, a strong relationship exists between the geomorphology of the coast and the behavior of the beach/cliff system. Areas of high-relief coast show negative correlations, indicating that higher rates of cliff retreat correlate with lower rates of shoreline erosion. In contrast, low- to moderate-relief coasts show strong positive correlations.

Hapke, C.J.; Reid, D.

2007-01-01

415

Contamination study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The time dependence of the angular reflectance from molecularly contaminated optical surfaces in the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) is measured. The light scattering measurements are accomplished in situ on optical surfaces in real time during deposition of molecular contaminants. The measurements are taken using non-coherent VUV sources with the predominant wavelengths being the Krypton resonance lines at 1236 and 1600 A. Detection of the scattered light is accomplished using a set of three solar blind VUV photomultipliers. An in-plane VUV BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions) experiment is described and details of the ongoing program to characterize optical materials exposed to the space environment is reported.

Johnson, R. Barry; Herren, Kenneth A.

1990-01-01

416

Beach protection by a system of permeable groins  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new type of permeable groin (called System of Groins Maltec-Savard - SGMS) has been installed at three eroded sites located in the coastal area on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, Quebec, Canada. In this area, the narrow sandy beaches with sandy or sand-silty cliff of variable height (10-15~m) are exposed to obliquely incident waves arriving from both

B. Boczar-Karakiewicz; W. Romanczyk; N. Roy

2002-01-01

417

Morphodynamic modeling of an embayed beach under wave group forcing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The morphodynamic response of the nearshore zone of an embayed beach induced by wave groups is examined with a numerical model. The model utilizes the nonlinear shallow water equations to phase resolve the mean and infragravity motions in combination with an advection-diffusion equation for the sediment transport. The sediment transport associated with the short-wave asymmetry is accounted for by means of a time-integrated contribution of the wave nonlinearity using stream function theory. The two-dimensional (2-D) computations consider wave group energy made up of directionally spread, short waves with a zero mean approach angle with respect to the shore normal, incident on an initially alongshore uniform barred beach. Prior to the 2-D computations, the model is calibrated with prototype flume measurements of waves, currents, and bed level changes during erosive and accretive conditions. The most prominent feature of the 2-D model computations is the development of an alongshore quasi-periodic bathymetry of shoals cut by rip channels. Without directional spreading, the smallest alongshore separation of the rip channels is obtained, and the beach response is self-organizing in nature. Introducing a small amount of directional spreading (less than 2°) results in a strong increase in the alongshore length scales as the beach response changes from self-organizing to being quasi-forced. A further increase in directional spreading leads again to smaller length scales. The hypothesized correlation between the observed rip spacing and wave group forced edge waves over the initially alongshore uniform bathymetry is not found. However, there is a correlation between the alongshore length scales of the wave group-induced quasi-steady flow circulations and the eventual alongshore spacing of the rip channels. This suggests that the scouring associated with the quasi-steady flow induced by the initial wave groups triggers the development of rip channels via a positive feedback mechanism in which the small scour holes start attracting more and more discharge.

Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Roelvink, J. A.; Thornton, E. B.

2004-01-01

418

Properties and stability of a Texas barrier beach inlet  

E-print Network

OP A TEXAS BARRIER BEACH INLET (August 1971) Curtis Mason, B. A. , Oregon State University; M. S. , Texas A6M University; Directed by: Dr. Robert M. Sorensen An environmental study was conducted at Brawn Cedar Cut, a natural unstable barrier... of astronomi- cal tidal currents leads to degradation of the inlet channel and westward migration of the entire inlet system. iv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author would like to thank Dr. Robert M. Sorensen for his direction and assistance while acting...

Mason, Curtis

2012-06-07

419

Microbial Load from Animal Feces at a Recreational Beach  

PubMed Central

The goal of this study was to quantify the microbial load (enterococci) contributed by the different animals that frequent a beach site. The highest enterococci concentrations were observed in dog feces with average levels of 7.4 × 106 CFU/g; the next highest enterococci levels were observed in birds averaging 3.3 × 105 CFU/g. The lowest measured levels of enterococci were observed in material collected from shrimp fecal mounds (2.0 CFU/g). A comparison of the microbial loads showed that 1 dog fecal event was equivalent to 6,940 bird fecal events or 3.2 × 108 shrimp fecal mounds. Comparing animal contributions to previously published numbers for human bather shedding indicates that one adult human swimmer contributes approximately the same microbial load as one bird fecal event. Given the abundance of animals observed on the beach, this study suggests that dogs are the largest contributing animal source of enterococci to the beach site. PMID:19664785

Wright, Mary E.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Elmir, Samir; Fleming, Lora E.

2009-01-01

420

Assessment of tar pollution on the United Arab emirates beaches  

SciTech Connect

In light of the inadequate information concerning stranded tar on the southwest beaches of the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, particularly following the massive oil releases during the Gulf War, the present investigation was designed to provide reference-integrated information on the nature, location, and levels of stranded tar balls on the beaches of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The recorded levels appeared to be higher than expected or previously reported. The tar distribution pattern, in addition to the degree of weathering, indicates that the massive oil release during the Gulf War did not reach the UAE shorelines. The highest reported levels of stranded tar ever recorded in the Arabian Gulf at Jabal Dhannah apparently originated from oil spills and tankers' ballast water at the main oil terminal at the Al-Ruwaiss oil refinery some 10 km to the east. The surprising, relatively high levels of stranded tar on the beaches of the Gulf of Oman were solely attributed to the heavy navigation traffic close to the shorelines. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Abu-Hilal, A.H.; Khordagui, H.K. (United Arab Emirates Univ., Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates))

1993-01-01

421

Intraspecific diet shift in Talitrus saltator inhabiting exposed sandy beaches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Talitrid amphipods are the most abundant herbivores on exposed sandy beaches. Despite their important role as trophic intermediates between macrophytes and higher levels (i.e. insect and bird) of beach food webs, very little information is available on their feeding patterns. The main aim of this study was to investigate intraspecific differences in the feeding behaviour of Talitrus saltator. We tested the hypotheses that: (1) adult females and males showed different isotope signatures and therefore relied on different sources of food; and (2) patterns of variation of isotope signatures of juveniles differed from those of adult specimens, evidencing a diet shift during the development. We used stable isotope signatures and tested for differences upon the level on the shore, times of the year and beaches experiencing similar morpho-dynamic and environmental conditions. Finally, we investigated the trophic significance of macrophyte detritus in the diet of males, females and juveniles. Results showed that adult males had a more variable diet than females and juveniles (inferred from ? 13C and ? 15N values). Dual-isotope graphs suggested that Sargassum muticum and Cystoseira baccata wrack could be among the main food sources for both juvenile and adult stage.

Olabarria, Celia; Incera, Mónica; Garrido, Josefina; Rodil, Iván F.; Rossi, Francesca

2009-09-01

422

Grain size dependence on turbulence entrainment in coastal beach areas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment samples and beach profile evolution data have been collected at several sites (in Vilanova and the Ebro delta, Spain, and near Marseille, France), analyzing the structure of the grain size distribution variability and its relationship with the beach morfology. Measurement of the samples are performed in a detailled laboratory experiment using oscillating grid turbulence to compare the behaviour of sediment in presence of turbulence. Particular interest is shown on the initiation of sediment motion and in the measurements of effective sediment lift - off. A turbulent velocity u' lower than that u estimated by the Shield diagram is required to start sediment motion for samples of uniform size. The minimum u' required to start sediment lift - off, is a function of sediment size, cohesivity and resting time. The lutocline height depends on u', but the vorticity at the lutocline seems constant for a fixed sediment size. On the other hand when real distributions are used, combining the grid stirring with image analysis, vertical mass fluxes are seen to correlate well with the cross-shore position of the samples. The variations are shown to be related to morphological changes in the beach profiles with high fluxes corresponding to the most unstable positions.

Medina, P.; Sanchez, M. A.

2009-04-01

423

Beach Recovery Rates Derived From Airborne LIDAR Following Hurricane Ivan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hurricanes are a major source for erosion and damage along the southeastern US coastline. This study uses airborne LIDAR data to quantify shoreline change due to Hurricane Ivan. Hurricane Ivan made landfall on the Alabama gulf coast in September, 2004 with maximum sustained winds of 58 m/s. Five separate LIDAR data sets of barrier beaches situated in the front right quadrant of the hurricane were collected during a six month period before and after landfall allowing an excellent timeline for analyzing change in shoreline position. Shorelines were extracted and incremental shoreline position differences were quantified for a 30 km portion of Panama City Beach, Florida. Preliminary results show alternating trends in shoreline change. The hurricane caused an initial average shoreline retreat of more than 16 m relative to pre-storm positions. Within three weeks this shoreline position recovered or moved seaward by 10 m. However, during the 2 month interval between October and December, 2004, the shoreline again retreated 5 m. This 5 m of shoreline retreat in the two months following the initial recovery could be attributed to the beach profile transition from summer to winter, and will have to be researched further.

Robertson, W.; Zhang, K.; Whitman, D.; Leatherman, S. P.

2005-12-01

424

Modeling the Economics of Beach Nourishment Decisions in Response to Coastal Erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beaches are constantly moving and changing. The dynamic transformations of beaches are mostly the result of the erosion of sand, which can occur through movements alongshore caused by waves, movements off-shore due to storms, or submersion due to sea-level rise. Predicted climate change impacts include potential changes in storminess and accelerated sea-level rise, which will lead to increased coastal erosion. At the same time, the number of people residing in coastal communities is increasing. The risks from eroding beaches (increased coastal flooding, damage to infrastructure, and displaced residents) are therefore increasing in number and scale; and coastal residents are taking actions to protect their homes. One such action is beach nourishment, where sand is added to a resident's property in order to widen the beach. We have developed an economic model of beach nourishment decision-making to investigate the relationship between the optimal volume and timing of beach nourishment and factors such as property value, erosion rate, and initial beach width. In this model, waterfront property owners nourish a beach when the losses in net rental income exceed the costs incurred from nourishing the beach. (Rental income is a function of property value, which in turn depends upon the width of the beach.) It is assumed that erosion and sea-level rise are related. We examine different nourishment scenarios, including one-time nourishment in the first year; constant annual nourishment; and a myopic decision process in which the homeowner nourishes the beach if property losses from erosion over the next five years are expected to exceed the cost of nourishment. One-time nourishment delays property flooding for both constant and accelerating sea level rise; however, this delay is more substantial under constant sea level rise. With continual nourishment, the beach can be maintained under constant sea-level rise, provided that the erosion rate is comparable to the additional width from nourishment each year. In contrast, for practical nourishment volumes, erosion from accelerating sea-level rise eventually out-competes beach nourishment and inundation occurs. Under the myopic decision-making model, with both constant and accelerating sea-level rise, nourishment does not take place until a property is critically endangered. The beach slope, nourishment volume, property value, and initial beach width all are found to be important factors in determining when nourishment should start and how frequently it should occur thereafter. These models can be used by policy-makers to formulate better coastal management policies, by coastal geologists to understand human impacts on beach dynamics, and by the insurance industry to realistically anticipate human risk-taking and decision-making.

Ware, M.; Ashton, A. D.; Hoagland, P.; Jin, D.; Kite-Powell, H.; Lorenzo-Trueba, J.

2012-12-01

425

Coastal geomorphological study of pocket beaches in Crete, with the use of planview indices.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The formation of pocket beaches is a result of a large number of processes and mechanisms that vary on space and time scales. This study aims in defining the planform characteristics of pocket beaches in Crete Isl. and to determine their sheltering effect, embaymentization and their status of equilibrium. Thus, data from 30 pocket beaches along the coastline of Crete, with different geomorphological and hydrodynamical setting, were collected. Planform parameters were applied and coastal planview indices from the bibliography were applied. The parameters included: length and orientation of the headlands between the pocket beach; length between the bay entrance and the center of the beach; lengths of the i) embayed shoreline, ii) embayed beach, iii) beach segment located at the shadow of a headland; linear distance and orientation between the edges of the embayed beach; direction of the incident wave energy flux; wave crest obliquity to the control line; beach area, maximum beach width and headland orientation and river/ torrent catchment areas in beach zones that an active river system existed (Bowman et al.2009). For the morphological mapping of the study areas, 1:5000 orthophoto maps were used. Wave regime has been calculated with the use of prognostic equations and utilising local wind data (mean annual frequency of wind speed and direction), provided by the Wind and Wave Atlas of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The diffraction and refraction of the waves has been simulated with the use of numerical models. The study shows that Cretan pocket beaches display a wide range of indentation, suggesting that is the result of several parameters that include tectonics, coastal hydrodynamics and river catchment areas. The more indented bays are, the shorter their beaches become, while low-indented pocket beaches are the widest and the longest ones. Beaches with headland with large length appear to be more protected and receive smaller amount of wave energy. Most of the Cretan pocket beaches have limited sediment supply for the mainland, while they appear to be in an unstable status. D. Bowman, J. Guillén, L. López, V. Pellegrino (2009), Planview Geometry and morphological characteristics of pocket beaches on the Catalan coast (Spain). Geomorphology, 108, 191-199

Alexandrakis, George; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Poulos, Serafim; Kampanis, Nikos

2013-04-01

426

Marine macrophytes directly enhance abundances of sandy beach fauna through provision of food and habitat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beach-cast wrack is a prominent feature of beaches of south-western Australia. We examined the fauna of these beaches to explore the generalisation [Polis, G.A., Hurd, S.D., 1995. Extraordinarily high spider densities on islands: flow of energy from the marine to terrestrial food webs and the absence of predation. Ecology 92, 4382-4386] that beach-cast wrack from highly productive marine ecosystems subsidises low productivity of terrestrial ecosystems, to establish whether this generalisation is relevant to oligotrophic marine systems. We sampled three beaches with high and three beaches with low volumes of beach-cast wrack to determine if: (1) the presence of wrack influences the abundance of macroinvertebrates; (2) wrack acts as a food source for beach macroinvertebrates; and (3) the influence of wrack varies between zones above the high water mark. We measured wrack volume and composition, sediment characteristics, the abundance of different epibenthic and infaunal macroinvertebrates taxa, and ?13C and ?15N of macrophytes and macroinvertebrates. The mean volume of wrack on high-wrack beaches was 0.27-1.07 m 3 wrack m -2 compared to 0.00-0.09 m 3 wrack m -2 on low-wrack beaches. There were no significant differences in sediment grain size, moisture content or loss on ignition between the two types of beaches or zones. Epibenthic fauna and infauna were consistently abundant on high-wrack beaches (20-291 and 0.5-3.5 individuals 0.64 m -2, respectively), but either absent or extremely rare in low-wrack beaches (0-3 and 0-0.1 individuals 0.64 m -2, respectively). Within high-wrack beaches, there were no significant differences in the abundance of epifauna or infauna among beaches or between zones. The ?13C values of macroinvertebrates at all sites were most similar to red and brown algae, with the exception of beetles from two beaches, which were closest to seagrasses. Mixing model (Isosource) results for mesograzing amphipods and dipteran flies suggested carbon was assimilated mostly from the seagrass Posidonia spp., the dune grass Spinifex longifolia and red algae for amphipods and from brown algae, red algae and dune vegetation for dipteran flies. We conclude that the presence of marine-derived wrack plays a major role in subsidising production of macroinvertebrates on beaches of south-western Australia. We suggest that marine subsidies can play a role in supporting terrestrial production, even in oligotrophic marine environments.

Ince, Rebecca; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Lavery, Paul S.; Vanderklift, Mathew A.

2007-08-01

427

Bacteriological monitoring and sustainable management of beach water quality in Malaysia: problems and prospects.  

PubMed

Despite the growing demand of tourism in Malaysia, there are no resolute efforts to develop beaches as tourist destinations. With no incentives to monitor public beaches or to use them in a sustainable manner, they might eventually degenerate in quality as a result of influx of pollutants. This calls for concerted action plans with a view to promoting their sustainable use. The success of such plans is inevitably anchored on the availability of robust quality monitoring schemes. Although significant efforts have been channelled to collation and public disclosure of bacteriological quality data of rivers, beach water monitoring appears left out. This partly explains the dearth of published information related to beach water quality data. As part of an on-going nation-wide surveillance study on the bacteriological quality of recreational beaches, this paper draws on a situation analysis with a view to proffering recommendations that could be adapted for ensuring better beach water quality in Malaysia. PMID:22980239

Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Asmat, Ahmad; Gires, Usup; Heng, Lee Yook; Deborah, Bandele Oluwaseun

2012-05-01

428

From a millennium base line to 2012: beach litter changes in Wales.  

PubMed

Forty-five beaches at 41 bathing area locations in Wales were analysed for litter in 2000 and 2012, via a standard seven category checklist. Fourteen resorts, 2 urban, 11 village, 15 rural 3 remote, were graded, A to D. A grade beach numbers changed from 5 to19; B, 27 to 24; C, 9 to 2; D, 4 to 0, many beaches maintaining their current status. Assuming trend continuance within the next 12 years, the A:B grade ratio would approach equilibrium of 44:56, with no grade C or D beaches. Recreational litter was ubiquitous; fishing materials prevalent along Cardigan Bay. New water treatment plant investment reduced sewage related debris. Despite apparent increased awareness of beach litter, improving visitor behaviour through information/education should be a future priority. Removing a few gross items could improve beach grades at little cost to local authorities and benefits to the Welsh economy. PMID:24880683

Williams, A T; Randerson, P; Alharbi, O A

2014-07-15

429

Evaluation of a cavity-riddled zone of the shallow aquifer near Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The shallow aquifer near Riviera Beach, Palm Beach County, Fla., contains a cavity-riddled zone extending north and south about 5 miles inland from the Atlantic Ocean. The zone lies at approximately 60 feet below land surface and varies from 15 to 50 feet in thickness. It is approximately 3 miles in width. Aquifer material is calcareous quartz sand-stone in the cavity zone, whereas the remainder of the consolidated aquifer material is primarily limestone. The zone is overlain by several thin clay beds which provide varying degrees of confinement. The transmissivity of the cavity-riddled zone of the aquifer in the area of investigation is approximately 11,000 square feet per day. Preliminary evaluation indicates that large volumes of water of suitable quality for public supply can be developed from the zone, except in an area adjacent to a landfill where leachate has adversely affected water quality. (USGS)

Fischer, John North, Jr.

1980-01-01

430

Geothermal energy at Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station, California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to determine and evaluate sources of geothermal energy at two military bases in southern California, the Long Beach Naval Shipyard and Naval Station and the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. One part of the project focused on the natural geothermal characteristics beneath the naval bases. Another part focused on the geothermal energy produced by oilfield operations on and adjacent to each base. Results of the study are presented here for the US Department of the Navy to use in its program to reduce its reliance on petrolem by the development of different sources of energy. The study was accomplished under a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy's San Francisco Operations Office and the Department of the Navy's Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California, for joint research and development of geothermal energy at military installations.

Higgins, C.T.; Chapman, R.H.

1984-01-01

431

Investigating the Hydrodynamics of a Breached Barrier Beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identifying key drivers of extreme erosion can be relatively straight forward. Severe flooding, large storms and even human interaction have all been responsible for drastically altering the coastline over short time periods. However when events such as barrier breaching occur with no obvious contributory factors, a deeper understanding of the underlying coastal processes is required. Ideally conclusions on morphological drivers should be drawn from field data collection and remote sensing over a long period of time, i.e. decades. Unfortunately when the barrier beach at Rossbeigh, County Kerry, Ireland, started to erode rapidly in the early 2000's there was no such data collection conducted. By 2008 approximately 1.5million m3 of sand had been eroded and during the winter period of that year the dune breached, resulting in the formation of a barrier island and a new tidal inlet. The initial breach length was 500m but it continued to expand to 750m and then stabilised. A research project has been ongoing at the Hydraulics and Maritime Research Centre of University College Cork since the breaching event. Assessing the threat breaching presents to local infrastructure, housing and industry is part of this research brief. Topographical surveys, sediment sampling, satellite imagery analysis and numerical modelling have previously been conducted to gain an insight into the morphodynamics of Rossbeigh. An initial analysis of the breaching suggested that erosion had slowed and regeneration of the dune was occurring; however further monitoring indicated that as the breach was stabilising other areas of the barrier beach were experiencing increased erosion. As a result of this a field monitoring campaign consisting of wave and tidal data collection was undertaken in the summer of 2011 to gain a clearer understanding of the hydrodynamic processes influencing the erosion patterns. Wave gauges were deployed along the beach at low water and also 4km offshore. Tidal currents were also measured in the breach area, alongshore of Rossbeigh beach and in the vicinity of the newly formed island. The findings provide a new insight into the active processes. The magnitude of tidal currents, directionality of incident waves at high tide and presence of low frequency infragravity waves along Rossbeigh are significant findings that influence the morphology. As a result of this work existing numerical and predictive models require updating to accurately model the morphology of the barrier beach and identify future threats to the local coastline.

O'Shea, M.; Murphy, J.

2012-04-01

432

Environmental factors controlling macrofaunal assemblages on six microtidal beaches of the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Six microtidal beaches along the Ligurian coast (NW Mediterranean, Italy) were sampled in order to study their macrofaunal assemblages. All six beaches are subject to heavy tourism in the swimming season and three were subject to nourishment activities during the study period (May 2000). The beaches of Lavagna, Varazze and Pietra Ligure were sampled three times: before the nourishment and the onset of the swimming season (March 2000), after the nourishment (June 2000) and at the end of the swimming season (October 2000). The beaches of Varigotti, Albisola and Loano were sampled twice: before and after the swimming season (March and October 2000, respectively). Sampling was performed along two transects (T1 and T2), about 500 m apart, each transect having three sampling stations: one placed in the swash zone, one in the surf zone and one in the subtidal zone (depth of 3-5 m), in order to verify how far the nourishment material reached. The beaches were characterised by coarse sediments that became finer towards the sub-littoral station. The Beach Deposit Index and Beach Index classified the beaches as reflective (Lavagna, Varazze, Albisola and Varigotti) or intermediate (Pietra Ligure and Loano). Species richness showed a clearly increasing pattern from the swash zone (average 7) to the subtidal zone (average 103). The beach communities were dominated by polychaetes, in particular Saccocirrus papillocercus, which was mainly responsible for the dissimilarity between the beach and subtidal stations. The highest abundance was observed at the surf station (average 118.6 ind. m -2) and the lowest at the subtidal station (average 82.1 ind. m -2). The sediment composition and macrofaunal assemblages were not affected by the beach nourishment. The beach communities responded to different environmental descriptors: species richness seemed to be governed by environmental harshness, while abundance seemed to be linked to the degree of homogeneity of the sediments and the quality of the food supply.

Covazzi Harriague, Anabella; Albertelli, Giancarlo

2007-06-01

433

The impact of the 2009-10 El Niño on West Coast beaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term monitoring programs at a series of beaches in California, Oregon and Washington were used to evaluate beach evolution associated with the El Niño winter of 2009-10, and to relate the observed coastal change to past winters, including the last major El Niño in 1997-98. At the California study sites, analysis of Lidar (1997-98) and semi-annual or greater high-resolution beach

P. Barnard; G. M. Kaminsky; J. E. Hansen; J. C. Allan; P. Ruggiero; D. J. Hoover

2010-01-01

434

The BEACH is hot: A LYST of emerging roles for BEACH-domain containing proteins in human disease  

PubMed Central

BEACH (named after ‘Beige and Chediak-Higashi’) is a conserved ~280 residue domain, present in nine human BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs). Most BDCPs are large, containing a PH-like domain for membrane association preceding their BEACH domain, and containing WD40 and other domains for ligand binding. Recent studies found that mutations in individual BDCPs cause several human diseases. BDCP alterations affect lysosome size (LYST and NSMAF), apoptosis (NSMAF), autophagy (LYST, WDFY3, LRBA), granule size (LYST, NBEAL2, NBEA), or synapse formation (NBEA). However, the roles of each BDCP in these membrane events remain controversial. After reviewing studies on individual BDCPs, we propose a unifying hypothesis that BDCPs act as scaffolding proteins that facilitate membrane events, including both fission and fusion, determined by their binding partners. BDCPs may also bind each other, enabling fusion or fission of vesicles that are not necessarily of the same type. Such mechanisms explain why different BDCPs may have roles in autophagy; each BDCP is specific for the cell type or the cargo, but not necessarily specific for attaching to the autophagosome. Further elucidation of these mechanisms, preferably carrying out the same experiment on multiple BDCPs, and possibly using patients’ cells, may identify potential targets for therapy. PMID:23521701

Cullinane, Andrew R.; Schaffer, Alejandro A.; Huizing, Marjan

2013-01-01

435

Response to storm conditions of two different beaches at the Mediterranean coast of Morocco  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent decades the increased demand for the recreational use of beaches has resulted in the uptake of studies on the morphodynamic processes which are acting on beaches. This knowledge is fundamental for appropriate coastal erosion management, suitable tourist use of littoral and for the design and shape of human construction. The Mediterranean sectors of Moroccan littoral investigated in this study, Ksar Rimal and Cabo Negro beaches, are respectively located north and south of Cabo Negro promontory and, over recent years, have been subject to increasing tourist activity. This has consisted mainly of the construction of two tourist ports (Marina Smir and Kabila), residential developments, hotels and a motorway which runs parallel to the coast, affecting the dune ridges and two lagoons which are of great ecological interest. In detail, the dunes located in the backshore at Ksar Rimal beach, are nowadays occupied by summer houses threaten by coastal retreat. A wide, partially urbanized, backshore is observed at Cabo Negro beach. With the intention of characterize the morphodynamic and seasonal behavior and the response of the studied beaches to storm impact, a beach monitoring program was carried out in the period 2006-2008, with special attention to the February-March 2008 stormy period. On analyzing the information obtained, it was possible to characterize the morphology and sedimentology of the studied beaches, and to calculate beach volumetric variations. Ksar Rimal is an open, exposed beach characterized by an intermediate slope (tan ? = 0.10) with medium-coarse sands. The beach showed a reflective beach state characterized by plunging breakers. Small morphological seasonal changes were observed, most important morphological and volumetric variations (about 20 m3/m) taking place after winter storms which usually gave rise to a more dissipative beach profile (tan ? = 0.05) characterized by spilling breakers. Beach recovery was quite rapid, usually lasting 2-3 weeks. Cabo Negro beach is a partially sheltered area (because of Cabo Negro promontory) and shows a smooth, dissipative slope (tan ? = 0.02) characterized by spilling breakers. Small seasonal morphological changes took place and erosion processes associated with storm events did not produce changes in beach slope and morphodynamic state.

El Mrini, Aldelmounim; Anfuso, Giorgio; Nachite, Driss; Taaouati, Mohamed

2010-05-01

436

Coastal erosion and sea level rise: implications for Ocean Beach and San Francisco's Westside Transport Project  

SciTech Connect

One of the consequences of sea level rise resulting from the greenhouse effect is increased coastal erosion. This article discusses a model of erosion that can be used to estimate the response of beaches to sea level rise. The model is applied to Ocean Beach, California, with particular attention to the consequences of accelerated erosion for the San Francisco Westside Sewer Transport. Results obtained show that erosion produced by accelerated sea level rise could cause substantial damage to the structure. Large expenditures on beach nourishment will be required to protect the transport and recreational value of the beach. 12 references, 9 figures, 5 tables.

Wilcoxen, P.J.

1986-01-01

437

Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport in a Tidally influenced gravel beach in Prince William Sound, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated beach hydraulics in a gravel beach on Eleanor Island, Prince William Sound, Alaska that was previously polluted with the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989. The beach contains trace amounts of oil such that they don’t affect beach hydraulics. Measurements of water pressure and salinity were analyzed and simulated using the model SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Groundwater Flow and Solute Transport). The results indicated that the beach consists of two layers with contrasting hydraulic properties: an upper layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 10-2 m/s, and a lower layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 10-5 m/s. The presence of the layer of low hydraulic conductivity constrained the fall of the water table resulting in a water table fluctuation that is almost independent of distance from the shoreline. This is unlike previous studies, which occurred in sandy beaches, and where the fluctuation decreased going landward. The water table remained above the layers’ interface, which suggests that the oil did not penetrate the lower layer. This could explain the presence of only tracer amount of oil in the beach. A sudden seaward increase of the slope of the two layers’ interface resulted in water leaving the lower layer near the mid-intertidal zone, and draining to the sea through the upper layer. This created the effect of a hydraulic rupture separating the hydraulics in the seaward portion of the beach from the rest of beach, especially at low tide.

Bobo, A. M.; Boufadel, M. C.; Abdollahi Nasab, A.

2009-12-01

438

Assessment of cleanup needs of oiled sandy beaches: lessons from the Prestige oil spill.  

PubMed

Surveys of the oiled sandy beaches along the northern Atlantic coast of Spain, 2-5 years after the Prestige oil spill of November 2002, have provided new evidence regarding buried fuel and its behavior. The persistence and depth of burial of oil, and the capacity of the beach for natural regeneration, depend on beach morphodynamics, which drive a sequence of physicochemical processes that reduce subsurface tar balls to highly divided oil forms while also allowing appreciable weathering despite burial. These findings prompted reassessment of current spill evaluation strategies. A protocol is proposed that combines the modeling of beach morphodynamics, an environmentally friendly coring survey, and well-calibrated hydrocarbon analysis. PMID:19452903

Bernabeu, Ana M; Rey, Daniel; Rubio, Belén; Vilas, Federico; Domínguez, Carmen; Bayona, Josep M; Albaigés, Joan

2009-04-01

439

Opaque minerals as aids in distinguishing between source and sorting effects on beach sand mineralogy in southwestern Oregon.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Source area and wave sorting effects can be separated on 4 Oregon beaches bounded by prominent headlands by studying the magnetic fraction of the sand. On 3 beaches the percentage of magnetite in the sand from the upper swash zone consistently increases toward the N end of each beach, apparently owing to selective sorting during littoral transport. However, the percentages of Cr and Ti in the magnetite are generally independent of sorting effects. Each beach appears to be characterized by a fairly distinct range of Ti/Cr in the magnetic fraction and the range differs from beach to beach. -from Author

Luepke, G.

1980-01-01

440

Heavy metal contamination and ecological risk in Spartina alterniflora marsh in intertidal sediments of Bohai Bay, China.  

PubMed

To investigate the effects of Spartina alterniflora on heavy metals pollution of intertidal sediments, sediment cores of a S. alterniflora salt marsh and a mudflat in Bohai Bay, China were analyzed. The results showed that S. alterniflora caused higher total C and P, but lower bulk density and electrical conductivity. The levels of Cd, Cu and Pb were higher in S. alterniflora sediment. Both Cd and Zn were higher than the probable effect level at both sites, indicating their toxicological importance. The geo-accumulation and potential ecological risk indexes revealed higher metal contamination in S. alterniflora sediment. Multivariate analysis implied that anthropogenic activities altered mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals. The percentage of mobile heavy metals was higher in S. alterniflora sediment, indicating improvement of conversion from the immobilized fraction to the mobilized fraction. These findings indicate that S. alterniflora may facilitate accumulation of heavy metals and increase their bioavailability and mobility. PMID:24930737

Chai, Minwei; Shi, Fuchen; Li, Ruili; Shen, Xiaoxue

2014-07-15

441

Towards improved prediction and mitigation of beach overwash: Terrestrial LiDAR observation of dynamic beach berm erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Globally, over 20 million people currently reside below high tide levels and 200 million are below storm tide levels. Future climate change along with the pressures of urbanization will exacerbate flooding in low lying coastal communities. In Southern California, coastal flooding is triggered by a combination of high tides, storm surge, and waves and recent research suggests that a current 100 year flood event may be experienced on a yearly basis by 2050 due to sea level rise adding a positive offset to return levels. Currently, Southern California coastal communities mitigate the threat of beach overwash, and consequent backshore flooding, with a combination of planning and operational activities such as protective beach berm construction. Theses berms consist of temporary alongshore sand dunes constructed days or hours before an extreme tide or wave event. Hydraulic modeling in urbanized embayments has shown that coastal flooding predictions are extremely sensitive to the presence of coastal protective infrastructure, requiring parameterization of the hard infrastructure elevations at centimetric accuracy. Beach berms are an example of temporary dynamic structures which undergo severe erosion during extreme events and are typically not included in flood risk assessment. Currently, little is known about the erosion process and performance of these structures, which adds uncertainty to flood hazard delineation and flood forecasts. To develop a deeper understanding of beach berm erosion dynamics, three trapezoidal shaped berms, approximately 35 m long and 1.5 m high, were constructed and failure during rising tide conditions was observed using terrestrial laser scanning. Concurrently, real-time kinematic GPS, high-definition time lapse photography, a local tide gauge and wave climate data were collected. The result is a rich and unique observational dataset capturing berm erosion dynamics. This poster highlights the data collected and presents methods for processing and leveraging multi-sensor field observation data. The data obtained from this study will be used to support the development and validation of a numerical beach berm overtopping and overwash model that will allow for improved predictions of coastal flood damage during winter storms and large swells.

Schubert, J. E.; Gallien, T.; Shakeri Majd, M.; Sanders, B. F.

2012-12-01

442

Summer Swimtime: Staying Healthy at the Pool and Beach  

MedlinePLUS

... But recreational waters—including swimming pools, lakes and oceans—can sometimes get contaminated with bacteria and viruses. ... plans. Natural water sources, including lakes, rivers and oceans, often get contaminated from storm water runoff. As ...

443

Beach development on an uplifted coral atoll: Niue, south west Pacific  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Niue is an uplifted coral atoll in the south western Pacific characterised by erosional terraces on its coastal margin. Beaches are found around the island located in pockets at the rear of erosional shore platforms. The beaches in Niue are < 100 m long, < 25 m wide and generally less than 0.5 m thick. The beaches sit on top of an abrasion ramp that dips seaward at a similar angle to the beach. The morphology, stability and sedimentology of these beaches are investigated through laser surveying, aerial photo analysis and petrographic techniques. Surveying was undertaken in 2008 and 2010 with data compared to previous work conducted in the 1990s in order to assess the controls on sediment deposition on uplifted coral atolls. There is a high potential for sediment transport on the island. The beaches are entirely removed during tropical cyclone events and even under calm conditions sediment is mobile. The restriction of beaches to pockets along the rocky coast suggests that these areas temporally interrupt sediment transport allowing beaches to form. All the beaches are composed of a typical chlorozoan assemblage of carbonate grains dominated by coral (20-50%), coralline algae (18%) and foraminifera (up to 81%). These sediments are produced on the platforms in the immediate vicinity of the beaches with little longshore transport between embayments being evident. The close relationship between source and depositional zones, combined with the high transport potential across the platforms indicates that the beaches are highly vulnerable to any change in either energy conditions or sediment supply.

Marsters, Teuvirihei Helene; Kennedy, David M.

2014-10-01

444

Nonlinear shoaling of directionally spread waves on a beach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shoaling of directionally spread surface gravity waves on a gently sloping beach with straight and parallel depth contours is examined with weakly dispersive Boussinesq theory. In this second-order theory, energy is transferred from the incident waves to components with both higher and lower frequencies in near-resonant nonlinear triad interactions. Directional spreading of the incident waves causes a weak detuning from resonance that is of the same order as the detuning owing to dispersion. Boussinesq theory predictions of the evolution of a single triad (i.e., two primary wave components shoaling from deep water forcing a secondary wave component) are compared to predictions of dispersive finite depth theory for a typical range of beach slopes, incident wave amplitudes, frequencies, and propagation directions. The dependencies of the predicted secondary wave growth on primary wave incidence angles are in good agreement. Whereas the sum frequency response is insensitive to the (deep water) spreading angle of the primary waves, the difference frequency (infragravity) response is significantly reduced for large spreading angles. A stochastic formulation of Boussinesq wave shoaling evolution equations is derived on the basis of the closure hypothesis that phase coupling between quartets of wave components is weak. In this approximation the second- and third-order statistics of random, directionally spread shoaling waves are described by a coupled set of evolution equations for the frequency alongshore wavenumber spectrum and bispectrum. It is shown that a smooth overlap with solutions of dispersive finite depth theory exists in the limit of small beach slope and weak nonlinearity.

Herbers, T. H. C.; Burton, M. C.

1997-09-01

445

Beach and campfire burns: a site of pleasure and tragedy.  

PubMed

Seasonal use of campground bonfires and beach fire pits is a common practice. A sense of fellowship is derived from this experience. Unfortunately, many people are injured by these fires. It was the objective of this study to quantify and better identify those factors that lead to these injuries. A retrospective review of patients injured from a beach or campground, fire pits, or bonfires was conducted using data from a regional burn registry (1999-2007). Patients sustaining burns serious enough to merit admission were included in this study. Demographic information, circumstances surrounding the injury events, size and location of burn, operative procedures, length of stay, and outcomes were analyzed. There were 3083 patients admitted to the burn center of which 241 met criteria for inclusion in this study. Each year, between 12 and 39 patients were injured by this mechanism; 84% were men. Ages fell into two discrete groups; young age (2-9 years) and adults (18-64 years). Alcohol was a contributing factor in 60.6% of adult burns. The areas of burn, by location and rank order include upper extremities (35.3% of patients), thorax/abdomen/buttocks (32.8%), lower extremities (30.7%), and hands (29.5%). The mean TBSA was 6.1% (1-100%). Approximately 80.7% of the patients sustained combination partial- and full-thickness burns whereas, 4.2% were only partial and 5.1% only full-thickness burns; 36.6% of the patients required skin grafting. The mean length of stay was 8.6 days. There were four fatalities including one suicide. Burn injuries from recreational bonfires remain a problem in our community. Beaches were the most common location for these injuries. Universal safeguards to prevent burn injury should be implemented, including designated areas for fires, protective mechanical barriers to keep children and adults from inadvertently walking or falling into the fire pit. Disposal areas for hot coals from fires or charcoal grills must be furnished and usage strictly enforced. Consideration of the elimination of free-standing beach bonfires should be considered. PMID:20061854

Fraga, Andrea M A; Fraga, Gustavo P; Noordenbos, John; Tenenhaus, Mayer; Castle, Shanon; Bhavsar, Dhaval; Lee, Jeanne G; Coimbra, Raul; Potenza, Bruce M

2010-01-01

446

SHOALING OF SOLITARY WAVES ON PLANE BEACHES By S. T. Gr'dli,1Member, ASCE, R. Subramanya, 2  

E-print Network

, beach erosion, and design of coastal structures used for beach protection. The shoaling, breaking, and runup of solitary waves on a sloping bottom is of interest both for the study of tsunami propagation

Grilli, Stéphan T.

447

33 CFR 165.159 - Safety Zone: New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... (a) Location. The following waters of the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, NY are designated...47? W; then running south to a position in the Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach at approximate position...

2011-07-01

448

The nature of a site : urban and architectural design perspectives on the renovation of Revere Beach, Massachusetts  

E-print Network

Through analyses and design studies, this thesis articulates qualities of environment and architecture that affect the redevelopment of an urban beach. Looking at Boston, Massachusetts' Revere Beach, it examines the impact ...

Katz, Jane Sarah

1985-01-01

449

A resource complex for Sandy Neck Beach : an exploration in building on an ever-changing land  

E-print Network

This thesis is an exploration into a spit of land, called Sandy Neck Beach on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. It is a barrier beach system which is experiencing many changes. These changes are manifest not only in its physical ...

Solarz, Cynthia L. (Cynthia Lynne)

1987-01-01

450

Journal of Coastal Research 22 5 13001304 West Palm Beach, Florida September 2006 Fractal Analysis of Maine's Glaciated Shoreline Tests  

E-print Network

Journal of Coastal Research 22 5 1300­1304 West Palm Beach, Florida September 2006 Fractal Analysis(5), 1300­1304. West Palm Beach (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Average fractal dimensions (D) are calculated

Perfect, Ed

451

Cardiovascular consequence of reclining vs. sitting beach-chair body position for induction of anesthesia.  

PubMed

The sitting beach-chair position is regularly used for shoulder surgery and anesthesia may be induced in that position. We tested the hypothesis that the cardiovascular challenge induced by induction of anesthesia is attenuated if the patient is placed in a reclining beach-chair position. Anesthesia was induced with propofol in the sitting beach-chair (n = 15) or with the beach-chair tilted backwards to a reclining beach-chair position (n = 15). The last group was stepwise tilted to the sitting beach-chair position prior to surgery. Hypotension was treated with ephedrine. Continuous hemodynamic variables were recorded by photoplethysmography and frontal cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) by near infrared spectroscopy. Significant differences were only observed immediately after the induction when patients induced in a reclining beach-chair position had higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) (35 ± 12 vs. 45 ± 15 % reduction from baseline, p = 0.04) and ScO2 (7 ± 6 vs. 1 ± 8% increase from baseline, p = 0.02) and received less ephedrine (mean: 4 vs. 13 mg, p = 0.048). The higher blood pressure and lower need of vasopressor following induction of anesthesia in the reclining compared to the sitting beach-chair position indicate more stable hemodynamics with the clinical implication that anesthesia should not be induced with the patient in the sitting position. PMID:24904427

Larsen, Søren L; Lyngeraa, Tobias S; Maschmann, Christian P; Van Lieshout, Johannes J; Pott, Frank C

2014-01-01

452

Evaluation of changes in beach morphology along Louisiana barrier island coast  

SciTech Connect

The Louisiana coast has been documented as the fastest eroding shoreline in the US. Rapid submergence and high beach erosion rates are the dominant responses to the seasonal wave climate, storm impacts, sea level rise, regional subsidence, and human activities. The cumulative impacts from the three hurricanes, which made landfall in Louisiana in 1985, and Hurricane Gilbert of 1988 produced extreme beach erosion. The magnitude of these effects was expressed in the cross-shore morphology, which was transformed from a wide back-barrier marsh, dune terrace or continuous dune, wide back-beach system to a narrow back-barrier marsh, washover sheet or washover terrace, and beach. The effects from Hurricane Gilbert ensured retention of this latter cross-shore morphology. These events, therefore, provided a unique opportunity to monitor the geomorphic response and recovery of the different subenvironments composing these barrier island beaches. A network of 41 beach profile lines was established in 1985 along straight and curved segments of eroding barrier island coast between Isles Dernieres and Sandy Point. The surveys preceded the 1985 hurricanes and were conducted quarterly through 1988. Efforts were made to quantify the cross-shore variability of beach response in each shoreline segment by analyzing linear and volumetric changes of the beach profiles.

Nakashima, L.D. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge (USA))

1989-09-01

453

Aspects of the ecology of coastal tundra raised beach ridges in Northwestern Ontario  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structure of lichen dominated vegetation is described within a series of raised beach ridges found along the strip of coastal tundra in northwestern Ontario. The patterns of distribution of the most abundant species correlated with the topographic influences of individual beach ridges more than with the influences of the general developmental sequence of vegetation from the coast of Hudson

Douglas William Larson

1975-01-01

454

Proceedings, 2001National Conference on Beach Preservation Technology, pp. 274-283 COASTAL INLET BANK EROSION  

E-print Network

erosion. These shorelines lie adjacent to coastal inlets and extend around the inlet from the ocean to bayProceedings, 2001National Conference on Beach Preservation Technology, pp. 274-283 COASTAL INLET BANK EROSION William C. Seabergh 1 Abstract: Much focus is placed on beach erosion on the open coast

US Army Corps of Engineers

455

33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.  

...2014-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and...167.502 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a...

2014-07-01

456

33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and...167.502 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a...

2010-07-01

457

33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and...167.502 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a...

2013-07-01

458

33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and...167.502 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a...

2012-07-01

459

33 CFR 167.502 - In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. 167.502 Section 167.502 Navigation and...167.502 In the approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach: Western approach. (a) A separation zone is bounded by a...

2011-07-01

460

2011-2012BROWNBAGCOLLOQUIUMSERIES Amy Marcy Cheney Beach: Calbido,Op.149 A Critical Analysis  

E-print Network

2011-2012BROWNBAGCOLLOQUIUMSERIES Amy Marcy Cheney Beach: Calbido,Op.149 A Critical Analysis melodies and jazz elements that had heretofore been absent in Beach's musical output. The critical analysis the socio-political and musical attributes of this one-act opera. Eldonna L. May CERTIFIED ONLINE PROFESSOR

Berdichevsky, Victor

461

Coffee Party percolating on Treasure Coast with gathering in Jensen Beach  

E-print Network

Coffee Party percolating on Treasure Coast with gathering in Jensen Beach By Christin Erazo Friday as the organizer of the Treasure Coast Coffee Party -- a chapter of the national group formed in response Library in Jensen Beach, 1150 Jack Williams Way. The Coffee Party movement was started on the social

Belogay, Eugene A.

462

Implementation Study of the Comprehensive Services Program of Palm Beach County, Florida. Final Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Comprehensive Services Program of Palm Beach County, Florida, was an ambitious and innovative effort to improve the school readiness of low-income children in Palm Beach County by identifying needs early and providing early intervention services to support physical, cognitive, and emotional health and development. Services were delivered to…

Lyons, Sandra; Karlstrom, Mikael; Haywood, Thomas

2007-01-01

463

78 FR 18848 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...deviation from the operating schedules that govern...accommodate the 6th annual PPD Beach2Battleship...Management Facility in Room W12-140 on the...from the current operating regulations set out...accommodate the 6th annual PPD Beach2Battleship...return to its regular operating schedule...

2013-03-28

464

Jeri Muoio's gun ban at West Palm Beach city hall By ANDREW ABRAMSON  

E-print Network

Jeri Muoio's gun ban at West Palm Beach city hall draws fire By ANDREW ABRAMSON Palm Beach Post Jeri Muoio might negotiate on some issues, but when it comes to guns in city hall, she holds her ground with a gun," Muoio said at a city commission meeting last month. "If you're coming into city hall, leave your

Belogay, Eugene A.

465

Predictive Modeling of a Fecal Indicator at a Subtropical Marine Beach  

EPA Science Inventory

The Virtual Beach Model Builder (VBMB) is a software tool that can be used to develop predictive models at beaches based on microbial data and observations (explanatory variables) that describe hydrometeorological and biogeochemical conditions. During the summer of 2008, a study...

466

Accumulation of Marine Debris on an Intertidal Beach in an Urban Park (Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated monthly accumulation rates and types of marine debris washed ashore at a recreational beach in Point Pleasant Park, Halifax Harbour, between April and September 2005. Black Rock Beach is 70 m long and a total of 2129 marine debris items were collected and sorted, representing a mean accumulation rate of 355 (±68 SE) items month-1. The total

Tony R. Walker; Jon Grant; Marie-Claude Archambault

467

Plastic pellets on the beaches of the northern Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of plastic pellets on the Jordanian beaches along the northeastern side of the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea) is being reported for the first time. Five beaches of about 4,650 m in length and 134,000 m in area were surveyed for the presence of these spherules during two successive years. Pellets with a variety of colors, shapes and

Ahmad H. Abu-Hilal; Tariq H. Al-Najjar

2009-01-01

468

Vibrio cholerae in recreational beach waters and tributaries of Southern California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the severe dehydrating diarrheal disease cholera. This bacterium has been detected in many estuaries around the world and the United States. In this study we examine the abundance and distribution of V. cholerae in recreational beach waters and tributaries of Southern California. Water samples were taken from 11 b