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Sample records for multi-component quantum gases

  1. Fast Rotating Scalar and Multi-component Bose Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, TIn-Lun Jason

    2003-01-01

    We show that in the limit of large angular momentum, many equilibrium and dynamical phenomena of scalar and multi-component Bose gases can be accounted for by approximating the system to reside in an effective lowest Landau level. This method explains the origin of the mysterious stripe formation in fast rotating Bose gas recently observed at JILA, and accounts for all the dynamical details observed in this experiment. To further demonstrate the usefulness of this method, we present its predictions of the interference patterns of two vortex lattices, and rich vortex lattice structures in multi-component Bose gases.

  2. Topics in multi-component ultracold gases and gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Tomoki

    In this thesis, we present theoretical studies on three topics related to multi-component ultracold gases and gauge fields. The first topic that we discuss is artificial gauge fields in ultracold gases. Recently, methods to create artificial gauge fields coupled to neutral ultracold systems using a light-induced Berry's connection have been rapidly developing. These methods are not only capable of creating Abelian gauge fields, such as a conventional magnetic field, but also non-Abelian gauge fields, which opens a way to explore and simulate a wide variety of physical models. In this thesis, we discuss various properties of bosons with Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling, which is a special type of non-Abelian gauge field. We investigate the stability of Bose-Einstein condensates with Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling, and show that the condensates are stable against quantum and thermal fluctuations. We also consider the renormalization of the bare interaction by calculating the t-matrix and its consequence on the ground state phase diagrams. The second topic discussed here is three-component ultracold fermionic systems. It is known that ferromagnetism and superfluidity can coexist at low enough temperature in three-component ultracold fermions. In this thesis, we elucidate how fermionic pairing and population imbalance enhance each other. We also describe a crossover from Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer state of fermionic pairing state to the limit of Bose-Einstein condensate of three weakly interacting species of molecules, as the interaction increases. Furthermore, we find an interesting similarity in the free energies between three-component ultracold fermions and quantum chromodynamics. The last topic discussed here is Niels Bohr's double-slit interference gedankenexperiment with charged particles, which argues that the consistency of elementary quantum mechanics requires that the electromagnetic field must be quantized. In the experiment a particle's path

  3. Universal low-energy physics in 1D strongly repulsive multi-component Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuzhu; He, Peng; Guan, Xi-Wen

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown (Yang and You 2011 Chin. Phys. Lett. 28 020503) that at zero temperature the ground state of the one-dimensional (1D) w-component Fermi gas coincides with that of the spinless Bose gas in the limit ω \\to ∞ . This behavior was experimentally evidenced through quasi-1D tightly trapping ultracold 173Yb atoms in a recent paper (Pagano et al 2014 Nat. Phys. 10 198). However, understanding of low-temperature behavior of Fermi gases with a repulsive interaction requires spin-charge separated conformal field theories of an effective Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid and an antiferromagnetic SU(w) Heisenberg spin chain. Here we analytically derive universal thermodynamics of 1D strongly repulsive fermionic gases with SU(w) symmetry via the Yang-Yang thermodynamic Bethe ansatz method. The analytical free energy and magnetic properties of the systems at low temperature in a weak magnetic field are obtained through the Wiener-Hopf method. In particular, the free energy essentially manifests the spin-charge separated conformal field theories for high-symmetry systems with arbitrary repulsive interaction strength. We also find that the sound velocity of the Fermi gases in the large w limit coincides with that for the spinless Bose gas, whereas the spin velocity vanishes quickly as w becomes large. This indicates strong suppression of the Fermi exclusion statistics by the commutativity feature among the w-component fermions with different spin states in the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid phase. Moreover, the equations of state and critical behavior of physical quantities at finite temperature are analytically derived in terms of the polylogarithm functions in the quantum critical region.

  4. Equilibration of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrelly, Terry

    2016-07-01

    Finding equilibration times is a major unsolved problem in physics with few analytical results. Here we look at equilibration times for quantum gases of bosons and fermions in the regime of negligibly weak interactions, a setting which not only includes paradigmatic systems such as gases confined to boxes, but also Luttinger liquids and the free superfluid Hubbard model. To do this, we focus on two classes of measurements: (i) coarse-grained observables, such as the number of particles in a region of space, and (ii) few-mode measurements, such as phase correlators. We show that, in this setting, equilibration occurs quite generally despite the fact that the particles are not interacting. Furthermore, for coarse-grained measurements the timescale is generally at most polynomial in the number of particles N, which is much faster than previous general upper bounds, which were exponential in N. For local measurements on lattice systems, the timescale is typically linear in the number of lattice sites. In fact, for one-dimensional lattices, the scaling is generally linear in the length of the lattice, which is optimal. Additionally, we look at a few specific examples, one of which consists of N fermions initially confined on one side of a partition in a box. The partition is removed and the fermions equilibrate extremely quickly in time O(1/N).

  5. Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmettler, Peter; Kollath, Corinna

    2015-09-01

    The experimental realization of correlated quantum phases with ultracold gases in optical lattices and their theoretical understanding has witnessed remarkable progress during the last decade. In this review we introduce basic concepts and tools to describe the many-body physics of quantum gases in optical lattices. This includes the derivation of effective lattice Hamiltonians from first principles and an overview of the emerging quantum phases. Additionally, state-of-the-art numerical tools to quantitatively treat bosons or fermions on different lattices are introduced.

  6. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  7. Phase Diagram of Fractional Quantum Hall Effect of Composite Fermions in Multi-Component Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coimbatore Balram, Ajit; Töke, Csaba; Wójs, Arkadiusz; Jain, Jainendra

    2015-03-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) of composite fermions (CFs) produces delicate states arising from a weak residual interaction between CFs. We study the spin phase diagram of these states, motivated by the recent experimental observation by Liu et al. of several spin-polarization transitions at 4/5, 5/7, 6/5, 9/7, 7/9, 8/11 and 10/13 in GaAs systems. We show that the FQHE of CFs is much more prevalent in multicomponent systems, and consider the feasibility of such states for systems with N components for an SU(N) symmetric interaction. Our results apply to GaAs quantum wells, wherein electrons have two components, to AlAs quantum wells and graphene, wherein electrons have four components (two spins and two valleys), and to an H-terminated Si(111) surface, which can have six components. We provide a fairly comprehensive list of possible incompressible FQH states of CFs, their SU(N) spin content, their energies, and their phase diagram as a function of the generalized ``Zeeman'' energy. The results are in good agreement with available experiments. DOE Grant No. DE-SC0005042, Hungarian Scientific Research Funds No. K105149 (CT), the Polish NCN grant 2011/01/B/ST3/04504 and the EU Marie Curie Grant PCIG09-GA-2011-294186.

  8. Exact density profiles and symmetry classification for strongly interacting multi-component Fermi gases in tight waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Jean; Armagnat, Pacome; Fang, Bess; Albert, Mathias; Minguzzi, Anna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    We consider a mixture of one-dimensional strongly interacting Fermi gases with up to six components, subjected to a longitudinal harmonic confinement. In the limit of infinitely strong repulsions we provide an exact solution which generalizes the one for the two-component mixture. We show that an imbalanced mixture under harmonic confinement displays partial spatial separation among the components, with a structure which depends on the relative population of the various components. Furthermore, we provide a symmetry characterization of the ground and excited states of the mixture introducing and evaluating a suitable operator, namely the conjugacy class sum. We show that, even under external confinement, the gas has a definite symmetry which corresponds to the most symmetric one compatible with the imbalance among the components. This generalizes the predictions of the Lieb–Mattis theorem for a Fermionic mixture with more than two components.

  9. Magnetism in ultracold quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaljohann, H.; Erhard, M.; Kronjäger, J.; Kottke, M.; van Staa, S.; Arlt, J. J.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2004-12-01

    We study the static and dynamic magnetic properties of ultracold quantum gases, in particular the spinor physics of F = 1 and F = 2 Bose-Einstein condensates of 87Rb atoms. Our data lead to the conclusion, that the F = 2 ground state of 87Rb is polar, while we find the F = 1 ground state to be ferromagnetic. The dynamics of spinor systems is linked to an interplay between coherent mean-field interactions, losses and interactions with atoms in the thermal cloud. Within this rich parameter space we observe indications for coherent spinor dynamics and novel thermalization regimes.

  10. Exact mapping between different dynamics of isotropically trapped quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamba, Etienne; Pelster, Axel; Anglin, James R.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments on trapped quantum gases can probe challenging regimes of quantum many-body dynamics, where strong interactions or non-equilibrium states prevent exact theoretical treatment. In this talk, we present a class of exact mappings between all the observables of different experiments, under the experimentally attainable conditions that the gas particles interact via a homogeneously scaling two-body potential which is in general time-dependent, and are confined in an isotropic harmonic trap. We express our result through an identity relating second-quantized field operators in the Heisenberg picture of quantum mechanics which makes it general. It applies to arbitrary measurements on possibly multi-component Bose or Fermi gases in arbitrary initial quantum states, no matter how highly excited or far from equilibrium. We use an example to show how the results of two different and currently feasible experiments can be mapped onto each other by our spacetime transformation. DAMOP sorting category: 6.11 Nonlinear dynamics and out-of-equilibrium trapped gases EW acknowledge the financial support from the Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

  11. Multi-component quantum gases in spin-dependent hexagonal lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltan-Panahi, P.; Struck, J.; Hauke, P.; Bick, A.; Plenkers, W.; Meineke, G.; Becker, C.; Windpassinger, P.; Lewenstein, M.; Sengstock, K.

    2011-05-01

    In solid-state materials, the static and dynamic properties as well as the magnetic and electronic characteristics are crucially influenced by the crystal symmetry. Hexagonal structures play a particularly important role and lead to novel physics, such as that of carbon nanotubes or graphene. Here we report on the realization of ultracold atoms in a spin-dependent optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. We show how the combined effects of the lattice and interactions between atoms lead to a forced antiferromagnetic Néel order when two spin-components localize at different lattice sites. We also demonstrate that the coexistence of two components--one Mott-insulating and the other one superfluid--leads to an interaction-induced modulation of the superfluid density, which is observed spectroscopically. Our studies reveal the vast impact of the interaction-induced modulation on the superfluid-to-Mott-insulator transition. The observations are consistent with theoretical predictions using Gutzwiller mean-field theory.

  12. Quantum gases: The high-symmetry switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2014-10-01

    Accessing orbital exchange between highly symmetric many-component spins may hold the key to a number of exotic, strongly correlated quantum phenomena, but probing such exchange is far from easy. An experiment with ultracold gases takes on the task.

  13. Ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Immanuel

    2005-10-01

    Artificial crystals of light, consisting of hundreds of thousands of optical microtraps, are routinely created by interfering optical laser beams. These so-called optical lattices act as versatile potential landscapes to trap ultracold quantum gases of bosons and fermions. They form powerful model systems of quantum many-body systems in periodic potentials for probing nonlinear wave dynamics and strongly correlated quantum phases, building fundamental quantum gates or observing Fermi surfaces in periodic potentials. Optical lattices represent a fast-paced modern and interdisciplinary field of research.

  14. Dynamics and thermodynamics in spinor quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaljohann, H.; Erhard, M.; Kronjäger, J.; Sengstock, K.; Bongs, K.

    2004-12-01

    We discuss magnetism in spinor quantum gases theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on temporal dynamics of the spinor order parameter in the presence of an external magnetic field. In a simple coupled Gross Pitaevskii picture we observe a dramatic suppression of spin dynamics due to quadratic Zeeman “dephasing”. In view of an inhomogeneous density profile of the trapped condensate we present evidence of spatial variations of spin dynamics. In addition we study spinor quantum gases as a model system for thermodynamics of Bose Einstein condensation. As a particular example we present measurements on condensate magnetisation due to the interaction with a thermal bath.

  15. Scattering in Quantum Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Love, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA) are of interest for their use in simulating quantum mechanics on both classical and quantum computers. QLGAs are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata where the constraint of unitary evolution is added. In the late 1990s, David A. Meyer as well as Bruce Boghosian and Washington Taylor produced similar models of QLGAs. We start by presenting a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the physics of wave-packet scattering. We show that the Meyer and Boghosian-Taylor models are actually the same basic model with slightly different parameterizations and limits. We then implement these models computationally using the Python programming language and show that QLGAs are able to replicate the analytic results of quantum mechanics (for example reflected and transmitted amplitudes for step potentials and the Klein paradox).

  16. A New Approach to Energy Integral for Investigation of Dust—Ion Acoustic (DIA) Waves in Multi-Component Plasmas with Quantum Effects in Inertia Less Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, B. C.; Kalita, R.

    2015-06-01

    Dust-ion acoustic waves are investigated in this model of plasma consisting of negatively charged dusts, cold ions and inertia less quantum effected electrons with the help of a typical energy integral. In this case, a new technique is applied formulating a differential equation to establish the energy integral in case of multi-component plasmas which is not possible in general. Dust-ion acoustic (DIA) compressive and rarefactive, supersonic and subsonic solitons of various amplitudes are established. The consideration of smaller order nonlinearity in support of the newly established quantum plasma model is observed to generate small amplitude solitons at the decrease of Mach number. The growths of soliton amplitudes and potential depths are found more sensitive to the density of quantum electrons. The small density ratio r(= 1 - f) with a little quantized electrons supplemented by the dust charges Zd and the in-deterministic new quantum parameter C2 are found responsible to finally support the generation of small amplitude solitons admissible for the model.

  17. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  18. Nonlinear electrostatic coherent structures: solitary and shock waves in a dissipative, nonplanar multi-component quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiu-Ning; Luo, Jun-Hua; Li, Jun-Xiu

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic solitary and shock waves in a dissipative, nonplanar quantum plasma comprised of electrons, positrons, and ions are studied. A modified Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation is derived in the limit of low frequency and long wavelength by taking into account the kinematic viscosity among the plasma constituents. It is shown that this plasma system supports the propagation of both compressive and rarefactive nonlinear waves. The effects of variation of various plasma parameters on the time evolution of nonplanar solitary waves, the profile of shock waves, and the nonlinear structure induced by the collision of solitary waves are discussed. It is found that these parameters have significant effects on the properties of nonlinear waves in cylindrical and spherical geometries, and these effects for compressive and rarefactive nonlinear waves are obviously different.

  19. In Situ Imaging of Atomic Quantum Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chen-Lung; Chin, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    One exciting progress in recent cold atom experiments is the development of high resolution, in situ imaging techniques for atomic quantum gases.1-3 These new powerful tools provide detailed information on the distribution of atoms in a trap with resolution approaching the level of single atom and even single lattice site, and complement the welldeveloped time-of-flight method that probes the system in momentum space. In a condensed matter analogy, this technique is equivalent to locating electrons of a material in a snap shot. In situ imaging has offered a new powerful tool to study atomic gases and inspired many new research directions and ideas. In this chapter, we will describe the experimental setup of in situ absorption imaging, observables that can be extracted from the images, and new physics that can be explored with this technique.

  20. Deviation from the Knudsen law on quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Babac, Gulru

    2014-12-09

    Gas flow in micro/nano scale systems has been generally studied for the Maxwell gases. In the limits of very low temperature and very confined domains, the Maxwellian approximation can break down and the quantum character of the gases becomes important. In these cases, Knudsen law, which is one of the important equations to analyze rarefied gas flows is invalid and should be reanalyzed for quantum gases. In this work, the availability of quantum gas conditions in the high Knudsen number cases is discussed and Knudsen law is analyzed for quantum gases.

  1. Quantum gases and white dwarfs with quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    This paper addresses the effect of a generalized uncertainty principle produced by different approaches of quantum gravity within the Planck scale on statistical and thermodynamical properties of ideal fermion and boson gases. The partition function and some thermodynamical properties are investigated. The Bose-Einstein condensation and the ground state properties of fermion gases are also considered. The target approach is extended to a white dwarf as an application. The modified mass-radius relation is calculated. A decrease in the pressure of degenerate fermions due to the presence of quantum gravity leads to a contraction in the star radius. It is also found that the gravity background does not result in any change in white dwarf stability.

  2. [Using 2-DCOS to identify the molecular spectrum peaks for the isomer in the multi-component mixture gases Fourier transform infrared analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, An-Xin; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2014-10-01

    The generalized two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared were used to identify hydrocarbon isomers in the mixed gases for absorption spectra resolution enhancement. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of n-butane and iso-butane and the two-dimensional correlation infrared spectrum of concentration perturbation were used for analysis as an example. The all band and the main absorption peak wavelengths of Fourier transform infrared spectrum for single component gas showed that the spectra are similar, and if they were mixed together, absorption peaks overlap and peak is difficult to identify. The synchronous and asynchronous spectrum of two-dimensional correlation spectrum can clearly identify the iso-butane and normal butane and their respective characteristic absorption peak intensity. Iso-butane has strong absorption characteristics spectrum lines at 2,893, 2,954 and 2,893 cm(-1), and n-butane at 2,895 and 2,965 cm(-1). The analysis result in this paper preliminary verified that the two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy can be used for resolution enhancement in Fourier transform infrared spectrum quantitative analysis. PMID:25739197

  3. Peltier cooling of fermionic quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Ch; Georges, A; Kollath, C

    2014-11-14

    We propose a cooling scheme for fermionic quantum gases, based on the principles of the Peltier thermoelectric effect and energy filtering. The system to be cooled is connected to another harmonically trapped gas acting as a reservoir. The cooling is achieved by two simultaneous processes: (i) the system is evaporatively cooled, and (ii) cold fermions from deep below the Fermi surface of the reservoir are injected below the Fermi level of the system, in order to fill the "holes" in the energy distribution. This is achieved by a suitable energy dependence of the transmission coefficient connecting the system to the reservoir. The two processes can be viewed as simultaneous evaporative cooling of particles and holes. We show that both a significantly lower entropy per particle and faster cooling rate can be achieved in this way than by using only evaporative cooling. PMID:25432033

  4. Quantum gases in trimerized kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Damski, B.; Fehrmann, H.; Everts, H.-U.; Baranov, M.; Santos, L.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-11-15

    We study low-temperature properties of atomic gases in trimerized optical kagome lattices. The laser arrangements that can be used to create these lattices are briefly described. We also present explicit results for the coupling constants of the generalized Hubbard models that can be realized in such lattices. In the case of a single-component Bose gas the existence of a Mott insulator phase with fractional numbers of particles per trimer is verified in a mean-field approach. The main emphasis of the paper is on an atomic spinless interacting Fermi gas in the trimerized kagome lattice with two fermions per site. This system is shown to be described by a quantum spin-1/2 model on the triangular lattice with couplings that depend on the bond directions. We investigate this model by means of exact diagonalization. Our key finding is that the system exhibits nonstandard properties of a quantum spin-liquid crystal: it combines planar antiferromagnetic order in the ground state with an exceptionally large number of low-energy excitations. The possibilities of experimental verification of our theoretical results are critically discussed.

  5. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  6. Statistically interacting quantum gases in D dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Geoffrey G.

    Chapter 1. Exact and explicit results are derived for the thermodynamic properties (isochores, isotherms, isobars, response functions, speed of sound) of a quantum gas in dimensions D ≥ 1 and with fractional exclusion statistics 0 ≤ g ≤ 1 connecting bosons (g = 0) and fermions (g = 1). In D = 1 the results are equivalent to those of the Calogero-Sutherland model, a gas with long-range two-body interaction. Emphasis is given to the crossover between boson-like and fermion-like features, caused by aspects of the statistical interaction that mimic long-range attraction and short-range repulsion. A phase transition along the isobar occurs at a nonzero temperature in all dimensions. The T-dependence of the speed of sound is in simple relation to isochores and isobars. The effects of soft container walls are accounted for rigorously for the case of a pure power-law potential. Chapter 2. The exact thermodynamics (isochores, isotherms, isobars, response functions, speed of sound) is worked out for a statistically interacting quantum gas in D dimensions. The results in D = 1 are those of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz for the Nonlinear Schrodinger model, a gas with repulsive two-body contact potential. In all dimensions the ideal boson and fermion gases are recovered in the weak-coupling and strong-coupling limits, respectively. For all nonzero couplings ideal fermion gas behavior emerges for D >> 1 and, in the limit D → infinity, a phase transition occurs at T > 0. Significant deviations from ideal quantum gas behavior are found for intermediate coupling and finite D . Chapter 3. Methodology previously developed in the framework of the coordinate Bethe ansatz applied to integrable quantum gas models is employed to calculate some ground-state properties and elementary excitations for quantum gas models in D = 1 dimensions with statistical interactions that are not equivalent to dynamical interactions. The focus in this comparative study is on modifications of the

  7. Single particle density of trapped interacting quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Renu; Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-05-15

    An expression for single particle density for trapped interacting gases has been obtained in first order of interaction using Green’s function method. Results are easily simplified for homogeneous quantum gases and are found to agree with famous results obtained by Huang-Yang-Luttinger and Lee-Yang.

  8. Probing 1D super-strongly correlated dipolar quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, R.; de Palo, S.; Orignac, E.; Pedri, P.; Chiofalo, M.-L.

    2009-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) dipolar quantum gases are characterized by a very special condition where super-strong correlations occur to significantly affect the static and dynamical low-energy behavior. This behavior is accurately described by the Luttinger Liquid theory with parameter K < 1. Dipolar Bose gases are routinely studied in laboratory with Chromium atoms. On the other hand, 1D realizations with molecular quantum gases can be at reach of current experimental expertises, allowing to explore such extreme quantum degenerate conditions which are the bottom line for designing technological devices. Aim of the present contribution is to focus on the possible probes expected to signal the reach of Luttinger-Liquid behavior in 1D dipolar gases.

  9. Spin-orbit-coupled quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radic, Juraj

    The dissertation explores the effects of synthetic spin-orbit coupling on the behaviour of quantum gases in several different contexts. We first study realistic methods to create vortices in spin-orbit-coupled (SOC) Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC). We propose two different methods to induce thermodynamically stable static vortex configurations: (1) to rotate both the Raman lasers and the anisotropic trap; and (2) to impose a synthetic Abelian field on top of synthetic spin-orbit interactions. We solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for several experimentally relevant regimes and find new interesting effects such as spatial separation of left- and right-moving spin-orbit-coupled condensates, and the appearance of unusual vortex arrangements. Next we consider cold atoms in an optical lattice with synthetic SOC in the Mott-insulator regime. We calculate the parameters of the corresponding tight-binding model and derive the low-energy spin Hamiltonian which is a combination of Heisenberg model, quantum compass model and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. We find that the Hamiltonian supports a rich classical phase diagram with collinear, spiral and vortex phases. Next we study the time evolution of the magnetization in a Rashba spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas, starting from a fully-polarized initial state. We model the dynamics using a Boltzmann equation, which we solve in the Hartree-Fock approximation. The resulting non-linear system of equations gives rise to three distinct dynamical regimes controlled by the ratio of interaction and spin-orbit-coupling strength lambda: for small lambda, the magnetization decays to zero. For intermediate lambda, it displays undamped oscillations about zero and for large lambda, a partially magnetized state is dynamically stabilized. Motivated by an interesting stripe phase which appears in BEC with SOC [Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 225301 (2011)], we study the finite-temperature phase diagram of a pseudospin-1/2 Bose gas with

  10. New directions for quantum lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata with the added constraints of linearity and unitary evolution. They were defined in the late 1990s by Meyer, and Boghosian and Taylor. We present a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the quantum simulation of problems of quantum dynamics of practical interest including chemical reactive scattering.

  11. Quantum simulation of magnetic kinks with dipolar lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lushuai; Yin, Xiangguo; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We propose an effective Ising spin chain constructed with dipolar quantum gases confined in a one-dimensional optical superlattice. Mapping the motional degrees of freedom of a single particle in the lattice onto a pseudo-spin results in effective transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields. This effective Ising spin chain exhibits a quantum phase transition from a paramagnetic to a single-kink phase as the dipolar interaction increases. Particularly in the single-kink phase, a magnetic kink arises in the effective spin chain and behaves as a quasi-particle in a pinning potential exerted by the longitudinal magnetic field. Being realizable with current experimental techniques, this effective Ising chain presents a unique platform for emulating the quantum phase transition as well as the magnetic kink effects in the Ising-spin chain and enriches the toolbox for quantum emulation of spin models by ultracold quantum gases.

  12. Orbital excitation blockade and algorithmic cooling in quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Ma, Ruichao; Simon, Jonathan; Greiner, Markus

    2011-12-22

    Interaction blockade occurs when strong interactions in a confined, few-body system prevent a particle from occupying an otherwise accessible quantum state. Blockade phenomena reveal the underlying granular nature of quantum systems and allow for the detection and manipulation of the constituent particles, be they electrons, spins, atoms or photons. Applications include single-electron transistors based on electronic Coulomb blockade and quantum logic gates in Rydberg atoms. Here we report a form of interaction blockade that occurs when transferring ultracold atoms between orbitals in an optical lattice. We call this orbital excitation blockade (OEB). In this system, atoms at the same lattice site undergo coherent collisions described by a contact interaction whose strength depends strongly on the orbital wavefunctions of the atoms. We induce coherent orbital excitations by modulating the lattice depth, and observe staircase-like excitation behaviour as we cross the interaction-split resonances by tuning the modulation frequency. As an application of OEB, we demonstrate algorithmic cooling of quantum gases: a sequence of reversible OEB-based quantum operations isolates the entropy in one part of the system and then an irreversible step removes the entropy from the gas. This technique may make it possible to cool quantum gases to have the ultralow entropies required for quantum simulation of strongly correlated electron systems. In addition, the close analogy between OEB and dipole blockade in Rydberg atoms provides a plan for the implementation of two-quantum-bit gates in a quantum computing architecture with natural scalability. PMID:22193104

  13. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  14. Ultracold quantum gases in triangular optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, C.; Soltan-Panahi, P.; Kronjäger, J.; Dörscher, S.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2010-06-01

    Over recent years, exciting developments in the field of ultracold atoms confined in optical lattices have led to numerous theoretical proposals devoted to the quantum simulation of problems e.g. known from condensed matter physics. Many of those ideas demand experimental environments with non-cubic lattice geometries. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a versatile three-beam lattice allowing for the generation of triangular as well as hexagonal optical lattices. As an important step, the superfluid-Mott insulator (SF-MI) quantum phase transition has been observed and investigated in detail in this lattice geometry for the first time. In addition to this, we study the physics of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in the presence of the triangular optical lattice potential, especially spin changing dynamics across the SF-MI transition. Our results suggest that, below the SF-MI phase transition, a well-established mean-field model describes the observed data when renormalizing the spin-dependent interaction. Interestingly, this opens up new perspectives for a lattice-driven tuning of a spin dynamics resonance occurring through the interplay of the quadratic Zeeman effect and spin-dependent interaction. Finally, we discuss further lattice configurations that can be realized with our setup.

  15. A new apparatus for studying quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Ulrich; Duca, Lucia; Li, Tracy; Boll, Martin; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Braun, Simon; Will, Sebastian; Rom, Tim; Schreiber, Michael; Bloch, Immanuel

    2011-05-01

    We present the design of a new apparatus targeted at the study of equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium phenomena of quantum gases in 2D and 3D optical lattices. Specifically this apparatus will allow for a study of the crossover between 2D and 3D using bosonic and fermionic gases as well as Bose-Fermi mixtures. In addition we present a new analysis of previous results concerning the Fermi-Hubbard model and will analyze possible routes for creating many-body states with long range order, including antiferromagnetically ordered states and BCS-superfluids. This work is supported by DARPA/OLE MURI DFG MPQ.

  16. Atomic Quantum Gases in Kagomé Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, L.; Baranov, M. A.; Cirac, J. I.; Everts, H.-U.; Fehrmann, H.; Lewenstein, M.

    2004-07-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of creating and controlling an ideal and trimerized optical Kagomé lattice, and study the low temperature physics of various atomic gases in such lattices. In the trimerized Kagomé lattice, a Bose gas exhibits a Mott transition with fractional filling factors, whereas a spinless interacting Fermi gas at 2/3 filling behaves as a quantum magnet on a triangular lattice. Finally, a Fermi-Fermi mixture at half-filling for both components represents a frustrated quantum antiferromagnet with a resonating-valence-bond ground state and quantum spin liquid behavior dominated by a continuous spectrum of singlet and triplet excitations. We discuss the method of preparing and observing such a quantum spin liquid employing molecular Bose condensates.

  17. Excitations of quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesilada, Emek

    This thesis describes experiments that studied the excitations of an ultra-cold atomic Rb gas in an optical lattice using Bragg spectroscopy. A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 87Rb was formed in a cloverleaf trap. An optical lattice of cubic symmetry, formed by the interference of six laser beams, was superimposed on the Rb BEC and turned on adiabatically. Such a system is well described by the Bose-Hubbard model, which predicts a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator state at a critical lattice depth. In the first experiment, we studied the superfluid regime. The superfluid admits sound waves as phonon excitations. In two photon Bragg spectroscopy two laser beams intersecting at angle on the condensate create such excitations. The excitation spectrum of BEC was measured in a three dimensional optical lattice as a function of lattice strength. In the second experiment we studied the excitation spectrum of the Mott insulator. The lowest energy excitations in such a system are particle-hole excitations. These correspond to the hopping of atoms from one lattice site to another. The insulating phase is characterized by a gap in the excitation spectrum and we measured this particle-hole gap by Bragg spectroscopy. The precise nature of our measurement allowed us to study the opening of the excitation gap that has previously eluded experimental verification.

  18. Quantum fluctuations of vortex lattices in ultracold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasigroch, M. P.; Cooper, N. R.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss the effects of quantum fluctuations on the properties of vortex lattices in rapidly rotating ultracold atomic gases. We develop a variational method that goes beyond the Bogoliubov theory by including the effects of interactions between the quasiparticle excitations. These interactions are found to have significant quantitative effects on physical properties even at relatively large filling factors. We use our theory to predict the expected experimental signatures of quantum fluctuations of vortices and to assess the competition of the triangular vortex lattice phase with other phases in finite-sized systems.

  19. Multiphoton interband excitations of quantum gases in driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, M.; Ölschläger, C.; Sträter, C.; Prelle, S.; Eckardt, A.; Sengstock, K.; Simonet, J.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the observation of multiphoton interband absorption processes for quantum gases in shaken light crystals. Periodic inertial forcing, induced by a spatial motion of the lattice potential, drives multiphoton interband excitations of up to the ninth order. The occurrence of such excitation features is systematically investigated with respect to the potential depth and the driving amplitude. Ab initio calculations of resonance positions as well as numerical evaluation of their strengths exhibit good agreement with experimental data. In addition our findings could make it possible to reach novel phases of quantum matter by tailoring appropriate driving schemes.

  20. All-optical production of 6Li quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchianti, A.; Seman, J. A.; Valtolina, G.; Morales, A.; Inguscio, M.; Zaccanti, M.; Roati, G.

    2015-03-01

    We report efficient production of quantum gases of 6Li using a sub-Doppler cooling scheme based on the D1 transition. After loading in a standard magneto-optical trap, an atomic sample of 109 atoms is cooled at a temperature of 40 μK by a bichromatic D1 gray-molasses. More than 2×107 atoms are then transferred into a high-intensity optical dipole trap, where a two-spin state mixture is evaporatively cooled down to quantum degeneracy. We observe that D1 cooling remains effective in the deep trapping potential, allowing an effective increase of the atomic phase-space density before starting the evaporation. In a total experimental cycle of 11 s, we produce weakly-interacting degenerate Fermi gases of 7×105 atoms at T/TF < 0.1 and molecular Bose-Einstein condensates of up 5×105 molecules. We further describe a simple and compact optical system both for high-resolution imaging and for imprinting a thin optical barrier on the atomic cloud; this represents a first step towards the study of quantum tunneling in strongly interacting superfluid Fermi gases.

  1. From quantum cellular automata to quantum lattice gases

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    A natural architecture for nanoscale quantum computation is that of a quantum cellular automaton. Motivated by this observation, we begin an investigation of exactly unitary cellular automata. After proving that there can be no nontrivial, homogeneous, local, unitary, scalar cellular automaton in one dimension, we weaken the homogeneity condition and show that there are nontrivial, exactly unitary, partitioning cellular automata. We find a one-parameter family of evolution rules which are best interpreted as those for a one-particle quantum automaton. This model is naturally reformulated as a two component cellular automaton which we demonstrate to limit to the Dirac equation. We describe two generalizations of this automaton, the second of which, to multiple interacting particles, is the correct definition of a quantum lattice gas.

  2. Towards Quantum Magnetism with Ultracold Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Immanuel

    2008-05-01

    Quantum mechanical superexchange interactions form the basis of quantum magnetism in strongly correlated electronic media and are believed to play a major role in high-Tc superconducting materials. We report on the first direct measurement of such superexchange interactions with ultracold atoms in optical lattices. After preparing a spin-mixture of ultracold atoms with the help of optical superlattices in an antiferromagnetically ordered state, we are able to observe a coherent superexchange mediated spin dynamics down to coupling energies as low as 5 Hz. Furthermore, it is shown how these superexchange interactions can be fully controlled in magnitude and sign. The prospects of using such superexchange interactions for the investigation of dynamical behaviour in quantum spin systems and for quantum information processing will be outlined in the talk. In addition we present results on the dynamical resolved co-tunneling of repulsively bound atom pairs in optical superlattices and show how by using ``Coulomb-blockade'' type tunneling resonance one can count atoms one by one to determine their number statistics in the lattice potential. Finally, latest results on ultracold Fermions and Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices will be presented.

  3. Towards Quantum Magnetism with Ultracold Quantum Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Immanuel

    2008-03-01

    Quantum mechanical superexchange interactions form the basis of quantum magnetism in strongly correlated electronic media and are believed to play a major role in high-Tc superconducting materials. We report on the first direct measurement of such superexchange interactions with ultracold atoms in optical lattices. After preparing a spin-mixture of ultracold atoms with the help of optical superlattices in an antiferromagnetically ordered state, we are able to observe a coherent superexchange mediated spin dynamics down to coupling energies as low as 5 Hz. Furthermore, it is shown how these superexchange interactions can be fully controlled in magnitude and sign. The prospects of using such superexchange interactions for the investigation of dynamical behaviour in quantum spin systems and for quantum information processing will be outlined in the talk. In addition we present results on the dynamical resolved co-tunnelling of repulsively bound atom pairs in optical superlattices and show how by using ``Coulomb-blockade'' type tunnelling resonance one can count atoms one by one to determine their number statistics in the lattice potential. Finally, latest results on ultracold Fermions and Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices will be presented.

  4. Multi-component assembly casting

    SciTech Connect

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  5. Quantum gases. Observation of isolated monopoles in a quantum field.

    PubMed

    Ray, M W; Ruokokoski, E; Tiurev, K; Möttönen, M; Hall, D S

    2015-05-01

    Topological defects play important roles throughout nature, appearing in contexts as diverse as cosmology, particle physics, superfluidity, liquid crystals, and metallurgy. Point defects can arise naturally as magnetic monopoles resulting from symmetry breaking in grand unified theories. We devised an experiment to create and detect quantum mechanical analogs of such monopoles in a spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensate. The defects, which were stable on the time scale of our experiments, were identified from spin-resolved images of the condensate density profile that exhibit a characteristic dependence on the choice of quantization axis. Our observations lay the foundation for experimental studies of the dynamics and stability of topological point defects in quantum systems. PMID:25931553

  6. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.240405]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state.

  7. Nonequilibrium steady states of ideal bosonic and fermionic quantum gases.

    PubMed

    Vorberg, Daniel; Wustmann, Waltraut; Schomerus, Henning; Ketzmerick, Roland; Eckardt, André

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium steady states of driven-dissipative ideal quantum gases of both bosons and fermions. We focus on systems of sharp particle number that are driven out of equilibrium either by the coupling to several heat baths of different temperature or by time-periodic driving in combination with the coupling to a heat bath. Within the framework of (Floquet-)Born-Markov theory, several analytical and numerical methods are described in detail. This includes a mean-field theory in terms of occupation numbers, an augmented mean-field theory taking into account also nontrivial two-particle correlations, and quantum-jump-type Monte Carlo simulations. For the case of the ideal Fermi gas, these methods are applied to simple lattice models and the possibility of achieving exotic states via bath engineering is pointed out. The largest part of this work is devoted to bosonic quantum gases and the phenomenon of Bose selection, a nonequilibrium generalization of Bose condensation, where multiple single-particle states are selected to acquire a large occupation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240405 (2013)]. In this context, among others, we provide a theory for transitions where the set of selected states changes, describe an efficient algorithm for finding the set of selected states, investigate beyond-mean-field effects, and identify the dominant mechanisms for heat transport in the Bose-selected state. PMID:26764644

  8. Quantum interference of high-order harmonics from mixed gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Fernández, A.; Velarde, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present a theoretical study about the interference of the harmonics generated by a mixture of two gases, He-Ne. Our model is based on the electron quantum paths, a discrete number of electron trajectories, and continuum-bound transitions. A laser with intensity around 1014W/cm2 that interacts with a mixture of gases, He-Ne, produces an interference that is destructive at the low-order harmonics and oscillates between constructive and destructive near to cutoff. This destructive interference at high-order harmonics may be used to explore other transitions, which are currently hidden. At low-order harmonic frequencies, our numerical results are in very good agreement with experimental data. At higher-order harmonics, where there are no experimental data, comparison is with a Schrödinger solver.

  9. Stopping power of two-dimensional spin quantum electron gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Quantum effects can contribute significantly to the electronic stopping powers in the interactions between the fast moving beams and the degenerate electron gases. From the Pauli equation, the spin quantum hydrodynamic (SQHD) model is derived and used to calculate the stopping power and the induced electron density for protons moving above a two-dimensional (2D) electron gas with considering spin effect under an external in-plane magnetic field. In our calculation, the stopping power is not only modulated by the spin direction, but also varied with the strength of the spin effect. It is demonstrated that the spin effect can obviously enhance or reduce the stopping power of a 2D electron gas within a laboratory magnetic field condition (several tens of Tesla), thus a negative stopping power appears at some specific proton velocity, which implies the protons drain energy from the Pauli gas, showing another significant example of the low-dimensional physics.

  10. Glimmers of a Quantum KAM Theorem: Insights from Quantum Quenches in One-Dimensional Bose Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandino, G. P.; Caux, J.-S.; Konik, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    Real-time dynamics in a quantum many-body system are inherently complicated and hence difficult to predict. There are, however, a special set of systems where these dynamics are theoretically tractable: integrable models. Such models possess nontrivial conserved quantities beyond energy and momentum. These quantities are believed to control dynamics and thermalization in low-dimensional atomic gases as well as in quantum spin chains. But what happens when the special symmetries leading to the existence of the extra conserved quantities are broken? Is there any memory of the quantities if the breaking is weak? Here, in the presence of weak integrability breaking, we show that it is possible to construct residual quasiconserved quantities, thus providing a quantum analog to the KAM theorem and its attendant Nekhoreshev estimates. We demonstrate this construction explicitly in the context of quantum quenches in one-dimensional Bose gases and argue that these quasiconserved quantities can be probed experimentally.

  11. Dynamics of uniform quantum gases, I: Density and current correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.; Singh, G. S.

    2010-02-01

    A unified approach valid for any wavenumber q, frequency ω, and temperature T is presented for uniform ideal quantum gases allowing for a comprehensive study of number density and particle-current density response functions. Exact analytical expressions are obtained for spectral functions in terms of polylogarithms. Also, particle-number and particle-current static susceptibilities are presented which, for fugacity less than unity, additionally involve Kummer functions. The q- and T-dependent transverse-current static susceptibility is used to show explicitly that current correlations are of long range in a Bose-condensed uniform ideal gas but for bosons at T>Tc and for Fermi and Boltzmann gases at all temperatures these correlations are of short range. Contact repulsive interactions for systems of neutral quantum particles are considered within the random phase approximation. The expressions for particle-number and transverse-current susceptibilities are utilized to discuss the existence or nonexistence of superfluidity in the systems under consideration.

  12. Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Allan; Carr, Lincoln D.; Schaefer, Thomas; Steinberg, Peter; Thomas, John E.

    2013-04-01

    The last few years have witnessed a dramatic convergence of three distinct lines of research concerned with different kinds of extreme quantum matter. Two of these involve new quantum fluids that can be studied in the laboratory, ultracold quantum gases and quantum chromodynamics (QCD) plasmas. Even though these systems involve vastly different energy scales, the physical properties of the two quantum fluids are remarkably similar. The third line of research is based on the discovery of a new theoretical tool for investigating the properties of extreme quantum matter, holographic dualties. The main goal of this focus issue is to foster communication and understanding between these three fields. We proceed to describe each in more detail. Ultracold quantum gases offer a new paradigm for the study of nonperturbative quantum many-body physics. With widely tunable interaction strength, spin composition, and temperature, using different hyperfine states one can model spin-1/2 fermions, spin-3/2 fermions, and many other spin structures of bosons, fermions, and mixtures thereof. Such systems have produced a revolution in the study of strongly interacting Fermi systems, for example in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) crossover region, where a close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists—typical in this field—enabled ground-breaking studies in an area spanning several decades. Half-way through this crossover, when the scattering length characterizing low-energy collisions diverges, one obtains a unitary quantum gas, which is universal and scale invariant. The unitary gas has close parallels in the hydrodynamics of QCD plasmas, where the ratio of viscosity to entropy density is extremely low and comparable to the minimum viscosity conjecture, an important prediction of AdS/CFT (see below). Exciting developments in the thermodynamic and transport properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases are of broad

  13. From cavity QED with quantum gases to optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Ritsch, Helmut

    2011-10-03

    We study the nonlinear coupled dynamics of ultra-cold quantum gases trapped in the light field of high Q optical resonators. In the very low temperature limit the quantum nature of both, light and ultra-cold matter play equally important roles. Using the dynamically generated entanglement and properly designed measurements procedures of the light field allows controlled preparation of many-body atomic states as e.g. atom number squeezed states or Schroedinger cat states. If one traps the particles inside the optical cavity, one can create a optical potential, which is a quantized and a dynamical variable itself. In addition it mediates controllable long range interactions. The self-consistent solution for light and particles the includes new classes of quantum many-body states as super-solid states and polaron like excitations. In the deep trap limit the collective coupling of the particles and the field can be tailored to reproduce a wide range of optomechanic Hamiltonians with linear, quadratic or even higher order couplings in an environment very close to zero temperature.

  14. Dynamics of uniform quantum gases, II: Magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.; Singh, G. S.

    2010-03-01

    A general expression for temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility of quantum gases composed of particles possessing both charge and spin degrees of freedom has been obtained within the framework of the generalized random phase approximation. The conditions for the existence of dia-, para-, and ferro-magnetism have been analyzed in terms of a parameter involving single-particle charge and spin. The limit T→0 retrieves the expressions for the Landau and the Pauli susceptibilities for an electron gas. It is found for a Bose gas that on decreasing the temperature, it passes either through a diamagnetic incomplete Meissner-effect regime or through a paramagnetic-ferromagnetic large magnetization fluctuation regime before going to the Meissner phase at T=T.

  15. Properties of dipolar bosonic quantum gases at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjemâa, Abdelâali

    2016-07-01

    The properties of ultracold quantum gases of bosons with dipole–dipole interaction are investigated at finite temperature in the frame of representative ensembles theory. Self-consistent coupled equations of motion are derived for the condensate and the non-condensate components. Corrections due to the dipolar interaction to condensate depletion, the anomalous density and thermodynamic quantities such as the ground state energy, the equation of state, the compressibility and the presure are calculated in the homogeneous case at both zero and finite temperatures. Effects of interaction and temperature on the structure factor are also discussed. Within the realm of the local density approximation, we generalize our results to the case of a trapped dipolar gas.

  16. Quantum degenerate atomic gases in controlled optical lattice potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemelke, Nathan D.

    2007-12-01

    Since the achievement of Bose Einstein condensation in cold atomic gases, mean-field treatments of the condensed phase have provided an excellent description for the static and dynamic properties observed in experiments. Recent experimental efforts have focused on studying deviations from mean-field behavior. I will describe work on two experiments which introduce controlled single particle degeneracies with time-dependent optical potentials, aiming to induce correlated motion and nontrivial statistics in the gas. In the first experiment, an optical lattice with locally rotating site potentials is produced to investigate fractional quantum Hall effects (FQHE) in rotating Bose gases. Here, the necessary gauge potential is provided by the rotating reference frame of the gas, which, in direct analogy to the electronic system, organizes single particle states into degenerate Landau levels. At low temperatures the repulsive interaction provided by elastic scattering is expected to produce ground states with structure nearly identical to those in the FQHE. I will discuss how these effects are made experimentally feasible by working at small particle numbers in the tight trapping potentials of an optical lattice, and present first results on the use of photoassociation to probe correlation in this system. In the second experiment, a vibrated optical lattice potential alters the single-particle dispersion underlying a condensed Bose gas and offers tailored phase-matching for nonlinear atom optical processes. I will demonstrate how this leads to parametric instability in the condensed gas, and draw analogy to an optical parametric oscillator operating above threshold.

  17. Quantum gases in trimerized kagomé lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damski, B.; Fehrmann, H.; Everts, H.-U.; Baranov, M.; Santos, L.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-11-01

    We study low-temperature properties of atomic gases in trimerized optical kagomé lattices. The laser arrangements that can be used to create these lattices are briefly described. We also present explicit results for the coupling constants of the generalized Hubbard models that can be realized in such lattices. In the case of a single-component Bose gas the existence of a Mott insulator phase with fractional numbers of particles per trimer is verified in a mean-field approach. The main emphasis of the paper is on an atomic spinless interacting Fermi gas in the trimerized kagomé lattice with two fermions per site. This system is shown to be described by a quantum spin- 1/2 model on the triangular lattice with couplings that depend on the bond directions. We investigate this model by means of exact diagonalization. Our key finding is that the system exhibits nonstandard properties of a quantum spin-liquid crystal: it combines planar antiferromagnetic order in the ground state with an exceptionally large number of low-energy excitations. The possibilities of experimental verification of our theoretical results are critically discussed.

  18. Ultracold quantum gases and lattice systems: quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-11-01

    Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories are of central importance in many areas of physics. In condensed matter physics, Abelian U(1) lattice gauge theories arise in the description of certain quantum spin liquids. In quantum information theory, Kitaev's toric code is a Z(2) lattice gauge theory. In particle physics, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the non-Abelian SU(3) gauge theory of the strong interactions between quarks and gluons, is non-perturbatively regularized on a lattice. Quantum link models extend the concept of lattice gauge theories beyond the Wilson formulation, and are well suited for both digital and analog quantum simulation using ultracold atomic gases in optical lattices. Since quantum simulators do not suffer from the notorious sign problem, they open the door to studies of the real-time evolution of strongly coupled quantum systems, which are impossible with classical simulation methods. A plethora of interesting lattice gauge theories suggests itself for quantum simulation, which should allow us to address very challenging problems, ranging from confinement and deconfinement, or chiral symmetry breaking and its restoration at finite baryon density, to color superconductivity and the real-time evolution of heavy-ion collisions, first in simpler model gauge theories and ultimately in QCD.

  19. Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Thomas K.; Telschow, Kenneth

    2011-01-25

    Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

  20. Permanent magnetic lattices for ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Saeed; Kieu, Tien D.; Sidorov, Andrei; Hannaford, Peter

    2006-02-01

    We propose the use of periodic arrays of permanent magnetic films for producing magnetic lattices of microtraps for confining, manipulating and controlling small clouds of ultracold atoms and quantum degenerate gases. Using analytical expressions and numerical calculations we show that periodic arrays of magnetic films can produce one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetic lattices with non-zero potential minima, allowing ultracold atoms to be trapped without losses due to spin flips. In particular, we show that two crossed layers of periodic arrays of parallel rectangular magnets plus bias fields, or a single layer of periodic arrays of square-shaped magnets with three different thicknesses plus bias fields, can produce 2D magnetic lattices of microtraps having non-zero potential minima and controllable trap depth. For arrays with micron-scale periodicity, the magnetic microtraps can have very large trap depths (~0.5 mK for the realistic parameters chosen for the 2D lattice) and very tight confinement.

  1. Negative specific heat with trapped ultracold quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzys, M. P.; Anglin, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics normally prescribes that heat tends to disperse, but in certain cases it instead implies that heat will spontaneously concentrate. The spontaneous formation of stars out of cold cosmic nebulae, without which the universe would be dark and dead, is an example of this phenomenon. Here we show that the counter-intuitive thermodynamics of spontaneous heat concentration can be studied experimentally with trapped quantum gases, by using optical lattice potentials to realize weakly coupled arrays of simple dynamical subsystems, so that under the standard assumptions of statistical mechanics, the behavior of the whole system can be predicted from ensemble properties of the isolated components. A naive application of the standard statistical mechanical formalism then identifies the subsystem excitations as heat in this case, but predicts them to share the peculiar property of self-gravitating protostars, of having negative micro-canonical specific heat. Numerical solution of real-time evolution equations confirms the spontaneous concentration of heat in such arrays, with initially dispersed energy condensing quickly into dense ‘droplets’. Analysis of the nonlinear dynamics in adiabatic terms allows it to be related to familiar modulational instabilities. The model thus provides an example of a dictionary mesoscopic system, in which the same non-trivial phenomenon can be understood in both thermodynamical and mechanical terms.

  2. Single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Ott, Herwig

    2016-05-01

    The recent advances in single atom detection and manipulation in experiments with ultracold quantum gases are reviewed. The discussion starts with the basic principles of trapping, cooling and detecting single ions and atoms. The realization of single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases is presented in detail and the employed methods, which are based on light scattering, electron scattering, field ionization and direct neutral particle detection are discussed. The microscopic coherent manipulation of single atoms in a quantum gas is also covered. Various examples are given in order to highlight the power of these approaches to study many-body quantum systems. PMID:27093632

  3. Single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Herwig

    2016-05-01

    The recent advances in single atom detection and manipulation in experiments with ultracold quantum gases are reviewed. The discussion starts with the basic principles of trapping, cooling and detecting single ions and atoms. The realization of single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases is presented in detail and the employed methods, which are based on light scattering, electron scattering, field ionization and direct neutral particle detection are discussed. The microscopic coherent manipulation of single atoms in a quantum gas is also covered. Various examples are given in order to highlight the power of these approaches to study many-body quantum systems.

  4. Noise limits in matter-wave interferometry using degenerate quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Search, Chris P.; Meystre, Pierre

    2003-06-01

    We analyze the phase resolution limit of a Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer whose input consists of degenerate quantum gases of either bosons or fermions. For degenerate gases, the number of atoms within one de Broglie wavelength is larger than unity, so that atom-atom interactions and quantum statistics are no longer negligible. We show that for equal atom numbers, the phase resolution achievable with fermions is noticeably better than for interacting bosons.

  5. Multi-Component Reactions in Heterocyclic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas J. J.; Orru, Romano V. A.; Chebanov, Valentin A.; Sakhno, Yana I.; Saraev, Vyacheslav E.; Muravyova, Elena A.; Andrushchenko, Anastasia Yu.; Desenko, Sergey M.; Akhmetova, V. R.; Khabibullina, G. R.; Rakhimova, E. B.; Vagapov, R. A.; Khairullina, R. R.; Niatshina, Z. T.; Murzakova, N. N.; Maslivets, Andrey N.; Voskressensky, Leonid G.; Danagulyan, Gevorg G.; Murtchyan, Armen D.; Tumanyan, Araksya K.; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; de Moliner, Fabio; Guanti, Giuseppe; Petricci, Elena; Riva, Renata; Taddei, Maurizio; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza; Mashkouri, Sara; Sharifi, Ali; Przhevalski, Nikolai M.; Rozhkova, Elena N.; Tokmakov, Gennadii P.; Magedov, Igor V.; Armisheva, M. N.; Rassudihina, N. A.; Vahrin, M. I.; Gein, V. L.; Shaabani, Ahmad; Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Sarvary, Afshin; Heidary, Marjan; Ng, Seik Weng; Beliaev, Nikolai A.; Mokrushin, Vladimir S.; Paramonov, Igor V.; Ilyin, Alexey; Garkushenko, Anna K.; Dushek, Maria A.; Sagitullina, Galina P.; Sagitullin, Reva S.; Kysil, Volodymyr; Khvat, Alexander; Tsirulnikov, Sergey; Tkachenko, Sergey; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre; Gein, Vladimir L.; Panova, Olga S.; Ilyn, Alexey P.; Kravchenko, Dmitri V.; Potapov, Victor V.; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V.; Vichegjanina, V. N.; Levandovskaya, E. B.; Gein, V. L.; Vahrin, M. I.; Vladimirov, I. N.; Zorina, A. A.; Nosova, N. V.; Gein, V. L.; Fedorova, O. V.; Vahrin, M. I.

    Multi-component and domino reactions are efficient and effective methods in the sustainable and diversity-oriented synthesis of heterocycles. In particular, transition metal-catalyzed multi-component sequences have recently gained considerable interest. Based upon the Sonogashira entry to alkynones, alkenones, and intermediate allenes, we have opened new avenues to the one-pot synthesis of numerous classes of heterocyclic frameworks in an MCR fashion. This methodological approach has now found various applications in one-pot syntheses of functional chromophores, pharmaceutically active compounds, and marine alkaloids and derivatives.

  6. Mesoscopic effects in quantum phases of ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, L. D.; Wall, M. L.; Schirmer, D. G.; Brown, R. C.; Williams, J. E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2010-01-01

    We present a wide array of quantum measures on numerical solutions of one-dimensional Bose- and Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonians for finite-size systems with open boundary conditions. Finite-size effects are highly relevant to ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices, where an external trap creates smaller effective regions in the form of the celebrated “wedding cake” structure and the local density approximation is often not applicable. Specifically, for the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian we calculate number, quantum depletion, local von Neumann entropy, generalized entanglement or Q measure, fidelity, and fidelity susceptibility; for the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian we also calculate the pairing correlations, magnetization, charge-density correlations, and antiferromagnetic structure factor. Our numerical method is imaginary time propagation via time-evolving block decimation. As part of our study we provide a careful comparison of canonical versus grand canonical ensembles and Gutzwiller versus entangled simulations. The most striking effect of finite size occurs for bosons: we observe a strong blurring of the tips of the Mott lobes accompanied by higher depletion, and show how the location of the first Mott lobe tip approaches the thermodynamic value as a function of system size.

  7. Mesoscopic effects in quantum phases of ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, L. D.; Schirmer, D. G.; Wall, M. L.; Brown, R. C.; Williams, J. E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2010-01-15

    We present a wide array of quantum measures on numerical solutions of one-dimensional Bose- and Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonians for finite-size systems with open boundary conditions. Finite-size effects are highly relevant to ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices, where an external trap creates smaller effective regions in the form of the celebrated 'wedding cake' structure and the local density approximation is often not applicable. Specifically, for the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian we calculate number, quantum depletion, local von Neumann entropy, generalized entanglement or Q measure, fidelity, and fidelity susceptibility; for the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian we also calculate the pairing correlations, magnetization, charge-density correlations, and antiferromagnetic structure factor. Our numerical method is imaginary time propagation via time-evolving block decimation. As part of our study we provide a careful comparison of canonical versus grand canonical ensembles and Gutzwiller versus entangled simulations. The most striking effect of finite size occurs for bosons: we observe a strong blurring of the tips of the Mott lobes accompanied by higher depletion, and show how the location of the first Mott lobe tip approaches the thermodynamic value as a function of system size.

  8. Novel Reagents for Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanguang; Basso, Andrea; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Bushkova, Ekaterina; Parchinsky, Vladislav; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Riva, Renata; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Rozentsveig, Gulnur N.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Serykh, Valeriy J.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Cao, Song; Shen, Li; Liu, Nianjin; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Lina; Qian, Xuhong; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Jinwu; Wang, Yanguang; Lu, Ping; Heravi, Majid M.; Sadjadi, Samaheh; Kazemizadeh, Ali Reza; Ramazani, Ali; Kudyakova, Yulia S.; Goryaeva, Marina V.; Burgart, Yanina V.; Saloutin, Victor I.; Mossetti, Riccardo; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Mayorova, Olga A.; Shklyaev, Yuriy V.; Zhdanko, Alexander G.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Plekhanova, Irina V.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.

    Ketenimines are a class of versatile and highly reactive intermediates that can participate in a variety of organic reactions, such as nucleophilic additions, radical additions, [2 + 2] and [2 + 4] cycloadditions, and sigmatropic rearrangements. In this presentation, we report on a series of multi-component reactions that involve a ketenimine intermediate. These reactions could furnish diverse heterocyclic compounds, including functionalized iminocoumarin, iminodihydroqunolines, iminothiochromens, pyrrolines, isoquinolines, pyridines, β-lactams, imino-1,2-dihydrocoumarins, and benzimidazoles.

  9. Quantum control of spin correlations in ultracold lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, P.; Sewell, R. J.; Mitchell, M. W.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a technique for the preparation of quantum spin correlations in a lattice gas of ultracold atoms using an atom-light interaction of the kind routinely employed in quantum spin polarization spectroscopy. Our method is based on entropic cooling via quantum nondemolition measurement and feedback, and allows the creation and detection of quantum spin correlations, as well as a certain degree of multipartite entanglement which we verify using a generalization of the entanglement witness described previously M. Cramer , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.020401 106, 020401 (2011). We illustrate the procedure with examples drawn from the bilinear-biquadratic Hamiltonian, which can be modeled by a one-dimensional chain of spin-1 atoms.

  10. Novel Quantum Phases of Dipolar Bose Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, S.; Li, T.; Sun, C. P.

    2007-06-01

    We investigate the quantum phases of polarized dipolar bosons loaded into a two-dimensional square and three-dimensional cubic optical lattices. We show that the long-range and anisotropic nature of the dipole-dipole interaction induces a rich variety of quantum phases, including the supersolid and striped supersolid phases in two-dimensional lattices, and the layered supersolid phase in three-dimensional lattices.

  11. Thermodynamics of quantum degenerate gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakie, P. B.; Rey, A.-M.; Bezett, A.

    2007-02-01

    The entropy-temperature curves are calculated for non-interacting Bose and Fermi gases in a 3D optical lattice. These curves facilitate understanding of how adiabatic changes in the lattice depth affect the temperature, and we demonstrate regimes where the atomic sample can be significantly heated or cooled by the loading process. We assess the effects of interactions on a Bose gas in a deep optical lattice, and show that interactions ultimately limit the extent of cooling that can occur during lattice loading.

  12. Quantum magnetism without lattices in strongly interacting one-dimensional spinor gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuretzbacher, F.; Becker, D.; Bjerlin, J.; Reimann, S. M.; Santos, L.

    2014-07-01

    We show that strongly interacting multicomponent gases in one dimension realize an effective spin chain, offering an alternative simple scenario for the study of one-dimensional (1D) quantum magnetism in cold gases in the absence of an optical lattice. The spin-chain model allows for an intuitive understanding of recent experiments and for a simple calculation of relevant observables. We analyze the adiabatic preparation of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic ground states, and show that many-body spin states may be efficiently probed in tunneling experiments. The spin-chain model is valid for more than two components, opening the possibility of realizing SU(N) quantum magnetism in strongly interacting 1D alkaline-earth-metal or ytterbium Fermi gases.

  13. Isothermal-sweep theorems for ultracold quantum gases in a canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskin, M.

    2011-03-01

    After deriving the isothermal Hellmann-Feynman theorem (IHFT) that is suitable for mixed states in a canonical ensemble, we use this theorem to obtain the isothermal magnetic-field sweep theorems for the free, average, and trapping energies and for the entropy, specific heat, pressure, and atomic compressibility of strongly correlated ultracold quantum gases. In particular, we apply the sweep theorems to two-component Fermi gases in the weakly interacting Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer and Bose-Einstein condensate limits, showing that the temperature dependence of the contact parameter can be determined by varying either the entropy or specific heat with respect to the scattering length. We also use the IHFT to obtain the virial theorem in a canonical ensemble and discuss its implications for quantum gases.

  14. N-soliton statistics and condensate formation in dense quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Babur M.

    2014-09-01

    Statistics of N quantum density soliton waves [B. M. Mirza, Mod. Phys. Lett. B28 (2014) 1450148] is extended here to the case of systems with symmetric wave function. Since many such systems exhibit condensation phenomena, application is made of the soliton wave statistics to investigate condensation and phase transition in quantum gases such as 4He and also dense systems such as the alkali atoms. Specific heat discontinuities are used to determine the condensation temperature for dense quantum gases and liquids. For the model case of helium the statistical theory is shown to predict not only the observed superfluid condensation temperature (2.17 ± 0.01 K) correctly but also the normal condensation temperature (4.21 ± 0.02 K), as well as the exact specific heat λ-profile.

  15. Design of Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jieping; Kaïm, Laurent El; Tron, Gian Cesare; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Lecinska, Paulina; Riva, Renata; Arévalo, M. J.; Kielland, N.; Masdeu, C.; Miguel, M.; Isambert, N.; Lavilla, R.; Medvedeva, Alevtina S.; Novokshonov, Vladimir V.; Novokshonova, Irina A.; Demina, Maria M.; Kon'kova, Tatyana V.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Vshivkova, Tatiana S.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Kharitonova, Anastasia V.; Fisyuk, Alexander S.; Mukanov, Aleksey Y.; Poendaev, Nicolay V.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Ivantsova, Maria N.; Tokareva, Maria I.; Mironov, Maxim A.; Mokrushin, Vladimir S.; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Zhu, Jieping; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Chernyshev, Kirill A.; Krivdin, Leonid B.; Tomilov, Yury V.; Platonov, Dmitry N.; Rulev, Alexander Y.; Ushakov, Igor A.; Vorobyeva, Alexandra; Ilyin, Alexey; Kysil, Volodimir; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre

    Multi-component reactions (MCRs) have now been well established as a powerful synthetic tool for creating molecular complexity and diversity and are undoubtedly well suited for the drug discovery program. Another potential that has probably received less attention among synthetic chemists is the opportunity offered by MCRs for the development of new fundamentally important transformations (reactions). Indeed, although an MCR is composed of a series of known bimolecular reactions, the overall transformation could be novel. Consequently, it provides chemists the opportunities to uncover transformations that were otherwise difficult to realize. In this talk, we will present our recent work in this field, including: (1) the oxidative homologation of aldehydes to amides, (2) the oxidative coupling of aldehydes and isocyanides to α-ketoamides, (3) oxidative isocyanide-based MCRs, and (4) the enantioselective Passerini reaction.

  16. Quantum phases of quadrupolar Fermi gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhongale, Satyan; Mathey, Ludwig; Zhao, Erhai; Yellin, Susanne; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a new platform for quantum simulation of many-body systems based on nonspherical atoms or molecules with zero dipole moment but possessing a significant value of electric quadrupole moment. We consider a quadrupolar Fermi gas trapped in a 2D square optical lattice, and show that the peculiar symmetry and broad tunability of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction results in a rich phase diagram encompassing unconventional BCS and charge density wave phases, and opens up a perspective to create topological superfluid. Quadrupolar species, such as metastable alkaline-earth atoms and homonuclear molecules, are stable against chemical reactions and collapse and are readily available in experiment at high densities.

  17. Quantum Phases of Quadrupolar Fermi Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhongale, S. G.; Mathey, L.; Zhao, Erhai; Yelin, S. F.; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new platform for quantum simulation of many-body systems based on nonspherical atoms or molecules with zero dipole moments but possessing a significant value of electric quadrupole moments. We consider a quadrupolar Fermi gas trapped in a 2D square optical lattice, and show that the peculiar symmetry and broad tunability of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction results in a rich phase diagram encompassing unconventional BCS and charge density wave phases, and opens up a perspective to create a topological superfluid. Quadrupolar species, such as metastable alkaline-earth atoms and homonuclear molecules, are stable against chemical reactions and collapse and are readily available in experiment at high densities.

  18. Permutation-symmetry related selection rules in spinor quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Selection rules constraining possible transitions between states of quantum systems can be derived from the system symmetry. Invariance over permutations of indistinguishable particles, contained in each physical system, is one of the basic symmetries. Consider a many-body system with separable spin and spatial degrees of freedom of particles with arbitrary spins s. Eigenfunctions of such systems can be expressed as a sum of products of spin and spatial functions, which form irreducible representations (irreps) of the symmetric group. The quantum numbers are the Young diagrams λ = [λ1 , ... ,λ2 s + 1 ] . The selection rules for a general k-body interactions allow transitions between the states λ and λ' only if ∑m=12s+1 |λm -λm'| <= 2 k . For s = 1 / 2 , the Young diagrams are unambiguously related to the total spin, and if k = 1 , we get the conventional selection rule for dipole transitions. However, if s > 1 / 2 , the rules cannot be expressed in terms of spins. The selection rules provide a way of control over the formation of many-body entangled states, belonging to multidimensional, non-Abelian irreps of the symmetric group. The effects can be observed with spinor atoms in an optical lattice in the Mott-insulator regime.

  19. Photoassociation experiments on ultracold and quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Changhyun

    This thesis describes the results of several experiments that studied the photoassociation of an ultracold atomic Rb gas. In the first experiment, we produced ultracold diatomic molecules from an atomic gas via single-color photoassociation. The molecules were detected with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Trapping of these molecules in a quadrupole magnetic trap, with lifetimes up to 20 seconds, was also demonstrated. In addition, the rate constant for inelastic collisions between the trapped molecules and atoms was determined from measurements of the atomic density dependence of the decay rate of the trapped molecules. In another experiment, stimulated Raman photoassociation of Rb atoms in a Mott insulator state was studied. A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of 87Rb atoms was loaded into a three-dimensional optical lattice formed by the interference pattern of three orthogonal standing wave laser fields. This system constitutes a very good realization of the Bose-Hubbard model; which predicts a quantum phase transition between a superfluid state and a Mott insulator state at a particular lattice height. A time-of-flight imaging method was used to study the state of the atomic gas, and the quantum phase transition was observed at the predicted lattice height. The signature of the phase transition was the disappearance and reappearance of peaks in the image that arose from the interference of atoms originating from different lattice sites. Two coherent laser fields were applied to the gas in its Mott insulating state, and tuned close to a Raman photoassociation resonance, and this resulted in an observable loss of atoms due to the formation of molecules. This transition exhibited a double-peaked spectrum, with one of the peaks arising from photoassociation of atoms in sites containing only two atoms, and the other from sites containing three atoms. Also, the loss of atoms vs. the duration of the Raman photoassociation period was studied, with the lasers

  20. The SQCRAMscope: Probing exotic materials with quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shenglan; Turner, Richard; Disciacca, Jack; Lev, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating exotic order manifest in condensed matter materials. Up until now, however, no attempts have been made to use modern techniques of ultracold atomic physics to directly explore properties of strongly correlated or topologically protected materials. Our talk will present the SQCRAMscope, a novel Scanning Quantum CRyogenic Atom Microscope technique for imaging magnetic and electric fields near cryogenically cooled materials. With our SQCRAMscope, we aim to image inhomogeneous transport and domain percolation in technologically relevant materials whose order has evaded elucidation. We are grateful to the Moore Foundation and the Department of Energy for their generous support.

  1. Quantum phases of quadrupolar Fermi gases in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Bhongale, S G; Mathey, L; Zhao, Erhai; Yelin, S F; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-04-12

    We introduce a new platform for quantum simulation of many-body systems based on nonspherical atoms or molecules with zero dipole moments but possessing a significant value of electric quadrupole moments. We consider a quadrupolar Fermi gas trapped in a 2D square optical lattice, and show that the peculiar symmetry and broad tunability of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction results in a rich phase diagram encompassing unconventional BCS and charge density wave phases, and opens up a perspective to create a topological superfluid. Quadrupolar species, such as metastable alkaline-earth atoms and homonuclear molecules, are stable against chemical reactions and collapse and are readily available in experiment at high densities. PMID:25167282

  2. Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jason; D'Incao, Jose; Chiow, Sheng-Wey; Yu, Nan

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space promise exciting technical capabilities for fundamental physics research, with proposals including unprecedented tests of the weak equivalence principle, precision measurements of the fine structure and gravitational constants, and detection of gravity waves and dark energy. Consequently, multiple AI-based missions have been proposed to NASA, including a dual-atomic-species interferometer that is to be integrated into the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station. In this talk, I will discuss our plans and preparation at JPL for the proposed flight experiments to use the CAL facility to study the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision measurements of fundamental physics with AIs in microgravity. The project centers on the physics of pairwise interactions and molecular dynamics in these quantum systems as a means to overcome uncontrolled shifts associated with the gravity gradient and few-particle collisions. We will further utilize the CAL AI for proof-of-principle tests of systematic mitigation and phase-readout techniques for use in the next-generation of precision metrology experiments based on AIs in microgravity. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  3. Scale-Invariant Hydrodynamics and Quantum Viscosity in Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John

    2015-05-01

    An optically-trapped gas of spin 1/2-up and spin 1/2-down 6Li atoms, tuned near a collisional (Feshbach) resonance, provides a unique paradigm for testing predictions that cross interdisciplinary boundaries, from high temperature superconductors to nuclear matter. At resonance, the dilute atomic cloud becomes the most strongly interacting, non-relativistic fluid known: Shock waves are produced when two clouds collide. We observe scale-invariant hydrodynamic expansion of a resonantly interacting gas and determine the quantum shear viscosity η = α ℏn , with n the density, as a function of interaction strength and temperature, from nearly the ground state through the superfluid phase transition. We extract the local shear viscosity coefficient α from cloud-averaged data, using iterative methods borrowed from image processing, and observe previously hidden features, which are compared to recent predictions. In collaboration with Ethan Elliott and James Joseph, Physics Department, North Carolina State University. Supported by NSF, DOE, ARO, AFOSR.

  4. Atomic and molecular quantum gases in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2007-06-01

    We report on recent progress in preparing and manipulating ultracold atomic and molecular ensembles in a 3D optical lattice. Starting from an atomic ^87Rb condensate which is adiabatically loaded into a 3D optical lattice we can control the state and dynamics of the gas on the quantum level with the help of static magnetic fields, radio-frequency and laser radiation and a Feshbach resonance. For example, we can produce a pure molecular ensemble of Rb2 Feshbach molecules in the lattice [1] and can coherently transfer it to a more deeply molecular bound state via STIRAP [2] or radio-frequency transitions. Besides possible applications for investigating molecular collisions and producing ultracold molecules in the vibrational ground state, this can also be used for spectroscopic precision measurements of molecular levels. Besides studying chemically bound molecules, optical lattices also allow for forming a novel kind of stable bound state of two atoms which is based on repulsion rather than attraction between the particles [3]. We will explain how these lattice-induced repulsively bound atom pairs come about and discuss their interesting properties. [1] G. Thalhammer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 050402 (2006). [2] K. Winkler, cond-mat/0611222 [3] K. Winkler et al., Nature 441, 853, (2006).

  5. Topological phases and polaron physics in ultracold quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusdt, Fabian

    2016-05-01

    The description of quantum many-body systems poses a formidable theoretical challenge. A seemingly simple problem is the coupling of a single impurity atom to non-interacting Bogoliubov phonons in a surrounding Bose-Einstein condensate. The system can be described by a polaron model at intermediate couplings - an 80 year problem. The situation has been realized experimentally, but when the impurity mass is small compared to the Boson mass, neither mean-field nor strong-coupling expansions are valid anymore. Now the impurity acts as an exchange particle, mediating phonon-phonon interactions. In this talk I present a semi-analytical solution to the polaron problem. I will show that the approach can be generalized to solve far-from equilibrium polaron problems, too, and elaborate on connections with recent experiments involving ultracold atoms and photons. A completely different class of many-body problems are systems with topological order. In recent years we have seen an uprise of cold-atomic or photonic implementations of artificial gauge fields, providing a corner stone for the realization of topological phases of matter. In the second part of my talk, I will address the challenging problem how non-local topological orders can be detected. It will be demonstrated that many-body topological invariants can be measured, making use of mobile impurities as coherent probes of the highly entangled groundstates. I will discuss Laughlin states and comment on possible realizations using ultracold atoms.

  6. Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; J. Richard Hess

    2004-08-01

    Abstract. In order to meet the U. S. government’s goal of supplementing the energy available from petroleum by increasing the production of energy from renewable resources, increased production of bioenergy has become one of the new goals of the United States government and our society. U.S. Executive Orders and new Federal Legislation have mandated changes in government procedures and caused reorganizations within the government to support these goals. The Biomass Research and Development Initiative is a multi-agency effort to coordinate and accelerate all U.S. Federal biobased products and bioenergy research and development. The Initiative is managed by the National Biomass Coordination Office, which is staffed by both the DOE and the USDA. One of the most readily available sources of biomass from which to produce bioenergy is an agricultural crop residue, of which straw from small grains is the most feasible residue with which to start. For the straw residue to be used its collection must be energy efficient and its removal must not impact the sustainability of the growing environment. In addition, its collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  7. Effective p -wave interaction and topological superfluids in s -wave quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Zheng, Zhen; Pu, Han; Zou, Xubo; Guo, Guangcan

    2016-03-01

    p -wave interaction in cold atoms may give rise to exotic topological superfluids. However, the realization of p -wave interaction in a cold atom system is experimentally challenging. Here we propose a simple scheme to synthesize effective p -wave interaction in conventional s -wave interacting quantum gases. The key idea is to load atoms into a spin-dependent optical lattice potential. Using two concrete examples involving spin-1/2 fermions, we show how the original system can be mapped into a model describing spinless fermions with nearest-neighbor p -wave interaction, whose ground state can be a topological superfluid that supports Majorana fermions under proper conditions. Our proposal has the advantage that it does not require spin-orbit coupling or loading atoms onto higher orbitals, which is the key in earlier proposals to synthesize effective p -wave interaction in s -wave quantum gases, and may provide a completely new route for realizing p -wave topological superfluids.

  8. Lattice Uehling-Uhlenbeck Boltzmann-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook hydrodynamics of quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jaw-Yen; Hung, Li-Hsin

    2009-05-01

    We present a semiclassical lattice Boltzmann method based on quantum kinetic theory. The method is directly derived by projecting the Uehling-Uhlenbeck Boltzmann-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook equations onto the tensor Hermite polynomials following Grad’s moment expansion method. The intrinsic discrete nodes of the Gauss-Hermite quadrature provide the natural lattice velocities for the semiclassical lattice Boltzmann method. Gases of particles of arbitrary statistics can be considered. Simulation of one-dimensional compressible gas flow and two-dimensional hydrodynamic flows are shown. The results indicate distinct characteristics of the effects of quantum statistics.

  9. Quantum fluctuations in the BCS-BEC crossover of two-dimensional Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lianyi; Lü, Haifeng; Cao, Gaoqing; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2015-08-01

    We present a theoretical study of the ground state of the BCS-BEC crossover in dilute two-dimensional Fermi gases. While the mean-field theory provides a simple and analytical equation of state, the pressure is equal to that of a noninteracting Fermi gas in the entire BCS-BEC crossover, which is not consistent with the features of a weakly interacting Bose condensate in the BEC limit and a weakly interacting Fermi liquid in the BCS limit. The inadequacy of the two-dimensional mean-field theory indicates that the quantum fluctuations are much more pronounced than those in three dimensions. In this work, we show that the inclusion of the Gaussian quantum fluctuations naturally recovers the above features in both the BEC and the BCS limits. In the BEC limit, the missing logarithmic dependence on the boson chemical potential is recovered by the quantum fluctuations. Near the quantum phase transition from the vacuum to the BEC phase, we compare our equation of state with the known grand canonical equation of state of two-dimensional Bose gases and determine the ratio of the composite boson scattering length aB to the fermion scattering length a2 D. We find aB≃0.56 a2 D , in good agreement with the exact four-body calculation. We compare our equation of state in the BCS-BEC crossover with recent results from the quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the experimental measurements and find good agreements.

  10. Nonlinear spectroscopic effects in quantum gases induced by atom-atom interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Safonov, A. I. Safonova, I. I.; Yasnikov, I. S.

    2013-05-15

    We consider nonlinear spectroscopic effects-interaction-enhanced double resonance and spectrum instability-that appear in ultracold quantum gases owing to collisional frequency shift of atomic transitions and, consequently, due to the dependence of the frequencies on the population of various internal states of the particles. Special emphasis is put to two simplest cases, (a) the gas of two-level atoms and (b) double resonance in a gas of three-level bosons, in which the probe transition frequency remains constant.

  11. Quantum gases in optical lattices : the atomic Mott insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, D.

    2004-09-01

    An optical lattice is a periodic potential for atoms, created using a standing wave pattern of light. Due to the interaction between the light and the atoms, the atoms are attracted to either the nodes or the anti-nodes of the standing wave, depending on the exact wave lenght of the light. This means that if such a lattice is loaded with a sufficiently high number of ultracold atoms, a periodic array of atoms is obtained, we an interatomic distance of a few tenths of a micrometer. In order to obtain such a high number of cold atoms, one first has to create a so-called Bose-Einstein condensate. When an optical lattice is loaded from a Bose-Einstein condensate, it is possible to create a system in which every atom is in the lowest band of the lattice and there is on average one atom in each lattice site. Because the lattice potential is created with laser light, the depth of the lattice can easily be tuned by changing the intensity of the laser. When the intensity of the laser light is low, the atoms can tunnel from one site to the next. Due to this tunneling, the gas of atoms in the lattice will remain superfluid. However, if the intensity of the laser light is increased to above a certain critical value, a quantum phase transition occurs to a so-called Mott insulator. In this state, the atoms can no longer tunnel due to the fact that the on-site interaction between atoms becomes more important then the tunneling probability. In this PhD thesis, a description is given of the experimental setup that is being constructed in our group to create these systems in our lab. Also, a theoretical description is given of these systems and several important quantities our derived, such as the gap of the Mott-insulating state. Furthermore, an experiment is proposed that can be used to accurately measure this gap.

  12. The macroscopic quantum phase of ultracold degenerate gases in the asymmetrical two-dimensional magnetic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, A.; Vasiliev, M.; Alameh, K.

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the existence of the macroscopic quantum phase in trapped ultracold quantum degenerate gases in an asymmetrical two-dimensional magnetic lattice. We show the key to adiabatically control the tunneling in the new two-dimensional magnetic lattice by means of external magnetic bias fields. In solving the system of coupled time-dependent differential equations, described here by the Boson Josephson Junctions (BJJs), we used an order parameter that includes both time-dependent variational parameters to describe the fractional population at each lattice site and the phase difference to quantify the macroscopic quantum phase signature. A dynamical oscillation of the fractional population and the phase difference at each individual lattice site is observed when solving the BJJs system.

  13. Prediction of the expansion velocity of ultracold 1D quantum gases for integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhongtao; Vidmar, Lev; Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian; Bolech, Carlos

    In the theory of Bethe-ansatz integrable quantum systems, rapidities play an important role as they are used to specify many-body states. The physical interpretation of rapidities going back to Sutherland is that they are the asymptotic momenta after letting a quantum gas expand into a larger volume rendering it dilute and noninteracting. We exploit this picture to calculate the expansion velocity of a one-dimensional Fermi-Hubbard model by using the distribution of rapidities defined by the initial state. Our results are consistent with the ones from time-dependent density-matrix renormalization. We show in addition that an approximate Bethe-ansatz solution works well also for the Bose-Hubbard model. Our results are of interests for future sudden-expansion experiments with ultracold quantum gases.

  14. The Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; John R. Hess

    2004-08-01

    collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  15. An Experimental Apparatus for Studying Rydberg-Rydberg Interactions in Quantum Degenerate Gases of Strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, Francisco; Ding, Roger; Aman, James; Zhang, Xinyue; Whalen, Joseph; Fields, Robert; Dunning, F. Barry; Killian, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the design and construction of a new apparatus for creating and studying long-range interactions in ultracold gases of strontium by exploiting Rydberg states, either through their direct excitation or through laser-induced Rydberg dressing. Strontium features one fermionic (87Sr) and three bosonic (84Sr, 86Sr, 88Sr) isotopes, all of which have been brought to quantum degeneracy. It also possesses singlet and triplet Rydberg states that furnish a wide variety of attractive and repulsive interactions. Furthermore, strontium Rydberg atoms feature an optically active core electron which can be used to manipulate and detect Rydberg atoms. These features make strontium a promising system for studying interactions in ultracold Rydberg gases. Research supported by Rice University, the NSF, the AFOSR, Shell, and the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

  16. Quantum phases of Bose gases on a lattice with pair-tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue-Ming; Liang, Jiu-Qing

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the strongly interacting lattice Bose gases on a lattice with two-body interaction of nearest neighbors characterized by pair tunneling. The excitation spectrum and the depletion of the condensate of lattice Bose gases are investigated using the Bogoliubov transformation method and the results show that there is a pair condensate as well as a single particle condensate. The various possible quantum phases, such as the Mott-insulator phase (MI), the superfluid phase (SF) of an individual atom, the charge density wave phase (CDW), the supersolid phase (SS), the pair-superfluid (PSF) phase, and the pair-supersolid phase (PSS) are discussed in different parametric regions within our extended Bose-Hubbard model using perturbation theory.

  17. Quantum fluctuations in the BCS-BEC crossover of two-dimensional Fermi gases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Lianyi; Lu, Haifeng; Cao, Gaoqing; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia -Ji

    2015-08-14

    We present a theoretical study of the ground state of the BCS-BEC crossover in dilute two-dimensional Fermi gases. While the mean-field theory provides a simple and analytical equation of state, the pressure is equal to that of a noninteracting Fermi gas in the entire BCS-BEC crossover, which is not consistent with the features of a weakly interacting Bose condensate in the BEC limit and a weakly interacting Fermi liquid in the BCS limit. The inadequacy of the two-dimensional mean-field theory indicates that the quantum fluctuations are much more pronounced than those in three dimensions. In this work, we show thatmore » the inclusion of the Gaussian quantum fluctuations naturally recovers the above features in both the BEC and the BCS limits. In the BEC limit, the missing logarithmic dependence on the boson chemical potential is recovered by the quantum fluctuations. Near the quantum phase transition from the vacuum to the BEC phase, we compare our equation of state with the known grand canonical equation of state of two-dimensional Bose gases and determine the ratio of the composite boson scattering length aB to the fermion scattering length a2D. We find aB ≃ 0.56a2D, in good agreement with the exact four-body calculation. As a result, we compare our equation of state in the BCS-BEC crossover with recent results from the quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the experimental measurements and find good agreements.« less

  18. Quantum fluctuations in the BCS-BEC crossover of two-dimensional Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lianyi; Lu, Haifeng; Cao, Gaoqing; Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia -Ji

    2015-08-14

    We present a theoretical study of the ground state of the BCS-BEC crossover in dilute two-dimensional Fermi gases. While the mean-field theory provides a simple and analytical equation of state, the pressure is equal to that of a noninteracting Fermi gas in the entire BCS-BEC crossover, which is not consistent with the features of a weakly interacting Bose condensate in the BEC limit and a weakly interacting Fermi liquid in the BCS limit. The inadequacy of the two-dimensional mean-field theory indicates that the quantum fluctuations are much more pronounced than those in three dimensions. In this work, we show that the inclusion of the Gaussian quantum fluctuations naturally recovers the above features in both the BEC and the BCS limits. In the BEC limit, the missing logarithmic dependence on the boson chemical potential is recovered by the quantum fluctuations. Near the quantum phase transition from the vacuum to the BEC phase, we compare our equation of state with the known grand canonical equation of state of two-dimensional Bose gases and determine the ratio of the composite boson scattering length aB to the fermion scattering length a2D. We find aB ≃ 0.56a2D, in good agreement with the exact four-body calculation. As a result, we compare our equation of state in the BCS-BEC crossover with recent results from the quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the experimental measurements and find good agreements.

  19. Exploring the nonequilibrium dynamics of ultracold quantum gases by using numerical tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich-Meisner, Fabian

    Numerical tools such as exact diagonalization or the density matrix renormalization group method have been vital for the study of the nonequilibrium dynamics of strongly correlated many-body systems. Moreover, they provided unique insight for the interpretation of quantum gas experiments, whenever a direct comparison with theory is possible. By considering the example of the experiment by Ronzheimer et al., in which both an interaction quench and the release of bosons from a trap into an empty optical lattice (sudden expansion) was realized, I discuss several nonequilibrium effects of strongly interacting quantum gases. These include the thermalization of a closed quantum system and its connection to the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, nonequilibrium mass transport, dynamical fermionization, and transient phenomena such as quantum distillation or dynamical quasicondensation. I highlight the role of integrability in giving rise to ballistic transport in strongly interacting 1D systems and in determining the asymptotic state after a quantum quench. The talk concludes with a perspective on open questions concerning 2D systems and the numerical simulation of their nonequilibrium dynamics. Supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) via FOR 801.

  20. Alkali-metal gases in optical lattices: Possible new type of quantum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerovich, A. E.

    2003-11-01

    Similarities between alkali-metal gases in optical lattices with noninteger occupation of the lattice sites and quantum crystals are explored. The analogy with the vacancy liquid (VL) provides an alternative explanation to the Mott transition for the recent experiment on the phase transition in the lattice. The VL can undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) with Tc within experimental reach. Direct and vacancy-assisted mechanisms of the band motion for hyperfine impurities are discussed. A large concentration of vacancies can result in the spatial decomposition of the system into pure hyperfine components. Below the vacancy condensation the impurity component resembles 3He in 3He He II mixtures.

  1. The Luttinger liquid in superlattice structures: atomic gases, quantum dots and the classical Ising chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Jha, Pradip; Kumar, Tarun; Mohan, Man

    2011-01-01

    We study the physical properties of a Luttinger liquid in a superlattice that is characterized by alternating two tunneling parameters. Using the bosonization approach, we describe the corresponding Hubbard model by the equivalent Tomonaga-Luttinger model. We analyze the spin-charge separation and transport properties of the superlattice system. We suggest that cold Fermi gases trapped in a bichromatic optical lattice and coupled quantum dots offer the opportunity to measure these effects in a convenient manner. We also study the classical Ising chain with two tunneling parameters. We find that the classical two-point correlator decreases as the difference between the two tunneling parameters increases.

  2. Gaussian potentials facilitate access to quantum Hall states in rotating Bose gases.

    PubMed

    Morris, Alexis G; Feder, David L

    2007-12-14

    Through exact numerical diagonalization for small numbers of atoms, we show that it is possible to access quantum Hall states in harmonically confined Bose gases at rotation frequencies well below the centrifugal limit by applying a repulsive Gaussian potential at the trap center. The main idea is to reduce or eliminate the effective trapping frequency in regions where the particle density is appreciable. The critical rotation frequency required to obtain the bosonic Laughlin state can be fixed at an experimentally accessible value by choosing an applied Gaussian whose amplitude increases linearly with the number of atoms while its width increases as the square root. PMID:18233424

  3. Path-integral calculation of the third virial coefficient of quantum gases at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Garberoglio, Giovanni; Harvey, Allan H.

    2011-04-07

    We derive path-integral expressions for the second and third virial coefficients of monatomic quantum gases. Unlike previous work that considered only Boltzmann statistics, we include exchange effects (Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac statistics). We use state-of-the-art pair and three-body potentials to calculate the third virial coefficient of {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He in the temperature range 2.6-24.5561 K. We obtain uncertainties smaller than those of the limited experimental data. Inclusion of exchange effects is necessary to obtain accurate results below about 7 K.

  4. Frictionless quantum quenches in ultracold gases: A quantum-dynamical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, A. de

    2011-09-15

    In this Rapid Communication, a method is proposed to spatially scale up a trapped ultracold gas while conserving the quantum correlations of the initial many-body state. For systems supporting self-similar dynamics, this is achieved by implementing an engineered finite-time quench of the harmonic trap, which induces a frictionless expansion of the gas and acts as a quantum dynamical microscope.

  5. Tunable defect interactions and supersolidity in dipolar quantum gases on a lattice potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Cinti, Fabio; Pupillo, Guido

    2015-11-01

    Point defects in self-assembled crystals, such as vacancies and interstitials, attract each other and form stable clusters. This leads to a phase separation between perfect crystalline structures and defect conglomerates at low temperatures. We propose a method that allows one to tune the effective interactions between point defects from attractive to repulsive by means of external periodic fields. In the quantum regime, this allows one to engineer strongly correlated many-body phases. We exemplify the microscopic mechanism by considering dipolar quantum gases of ground-state polar molecules and weakly bound molecules of strongly magnetic atoms trapped in a weak optical lattice in a two-dimensional configuration. By tuning the lattice depth, defect interactions turn repulsive, which allows us to deterministically design a novel supersolid phase in the continuum limit.

  6. MPH: A library for distributed multi-component environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris H.Q.; He, Yun

    2001-06-01

    Many current large and complex HPC applications are based on semi-independent program components developed by different groups or for different purposes. On distributed memory parallel supercomputers, how to perform component-name registration and initialize communications between independent components are among the first critical steps in establishing a distributed multi-component environment. Here we describe MPH, a multi-component handshaking library that resolves these tasks in a convenient and consistent way. MPH uses MPI for high performance and supports many PVM functionality. It supports two major parallel integration mechanism: multi-component multi-executable (MCME) and multi-component single-executable (MCME). It is a simple, easy-to-use module for developing practical codes, or as basis for larger software tools/frameworks.

  7. Quantum Hall states of atomic Bose gases: Density profiles in single-layer and multilayer geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N. R.; Lankvelt, F. J. M. van; Reijnders, J. W.; Schoutens, K.

    2005-12-15

    We describe the density profiles of confined atomic Bose gases in the high-rotation limit, in single-layer and multilayer geometries. We show that, in a local-density approximation, the density in a single layer shows a landscape of quantized steps due to the formation of incompressible liquids, which are analogous to fractional quantum Hall liquids for a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field. In a multilayered setup we find different phases, depending on the strength of the interlayer tunneling t. We discuss the situation where a vortex lattice in the three-dimensional condensate (at large tunneling) undergoes quantum melting at a critical tunneling t{sub c{sub 1}}. For tunneling well below t{sub c{sub 1}} one expects weakly coupled or isolated layers, each exhibiting a landscape of quantum Hall liquids. After expansion, this gives a radial density distribution with characteristic features (cusps) that provide experimental signatures of the quantum Hall liquids.

  8. Modulated decay in the multi-component Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Seishi; Kohri, Kazunori; Matsuda, Tomohiro E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp

    2013-08-01

    The early Universe after inflation may have oscillations, kinations (nonoscillatory evolution of a field), topological defects, relativistic and non-relativistic particles at the same time. The Universe whose energy density is a sum of those components can be called the multi-component Universe. The components, which may have distinguishable density scalings, may decay modulated. In this paper we study generation of the curvature perturbations caused by the modulated decay in the multi-component Universe.

  9. Quantum cascade laser open-path system for remote sensing of trace gases in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Anna P. M.; Liu, Peter Q.; Yeung, June K.; Corrigan, Paul; Baeck, Mary Lynn; Wang, Zifa; Day, Timothy; Smith, James A.

    2010-11-01

    Exploiting several key characteristics of quantum cascade (QC) lasers, including wide tunability and room-temperature operation, the Quantum Cascade Laser Open-Path System (QCLOPS) was designed for the detection of a range of trace gases and for field deployment in urban environments. Tunability over a wavelength range from 9.3 to 9.8 μm potentially provides the capability for monitoring ozone, ammonia, and carbon dioxide, a suite of trace gases important for air quality and regional climate applications in urban environments. The 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China drew attention to air quality problems in urban environments. Prior to and during the Olympic games, regional air quality modifications through factory shutdowns, car restrictions, and construction halts in Beijing and its surrounding areas created a unique test bed for new sensor technologies such as the QCLOPS sensor. We report the design of this novel, open-path air quality sensor and the results of both laboratory tests and field trials during the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China.

  10. Synthetic p-wave interaction and topological superfluids in s-wave quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Han; Wang, Bin; Zheng, Zhen; Zou, Xubo; Guo, Guangcan

    2016-05-01

    P-wave interaction in cold atoms may give rise to exotic topological superfluids. However, realization of p-wave interaction in cold atom system is experimentally challenging. Here we propose a simple scheme to synthesize effective p-wave interaction in conventional s-wave interacting quantum gases. The key idea is to load atoms into spin-dependent optical lattice potential. Using two concrete examples involving spin-1/2 fermions, we show how the original system can be mapped into a model describing spinless fermions with nearest neighbor p-wave interaction, whose ground state can be a topological superfluid that supports Majorana fermions under proper conditions. Our proposal has the advantage that it does not require spin-orbit coupling or loading atoms onto higher orbitals, which is the key in earlier proposals to synthesize effective p-wave interaction in s-wave quantum gases, and may provide a completely new route for realizing p-wave topological superfluids.

  11. Quantum point contacts on two-dimensional electron gases with a strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon Sue; Pendaharkar, Mihir; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; McFadden, Anthony P.; Palmstrøm, Chris

    Studies of electrical transport in one-dimensional semiconductors in a presence of a strong spin-orbit interaction are crucial not only for exploring the emergent phenomena, such as topological superconductivity, but also for potential spintronic applications by controlling of the electron spins. We investigate the electrical transport properties of one-dimensional confinement defined by electrostatic potentials on large area two-dimensional electron gases of InAs and InSb, which have a strong spin-orbit coupling. The high-quality InAs and InSb quantum wells are grown on antimonide buffers by molecular beam epitaxy, and the gate-tunable regions are created using Al2O3 or HfO2 gate dielectrics by atomic layer deposition. We will discuss the modulation of spin-orbit coupling in the two-dimensional electron gases and the spin-orbit-induced spin splitting by the split-gate quantum point contacts. This work was supported by Microsoft Research.

  12. Mesoscopic effects in quantum phases of ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Wall, M. L.; Schirmer, D. G.; Brown, R. C.; Williams, J. E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2010-03-01

    We present a wide array of quantum measures on numerical solutions of one-dimensional Bose- and Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonians for finite-size systems with open boundary conditions. Specifically, for the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian we calculate number, quantum depletion, local von Neumann entropy, generalized entanglement or Q measure, fidelity, and fidelity susceptibility; for the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian we also calculate the pairing correlations, magnetization, charge-density correlations, and antiferromagnetic structure factor. Our numerical method is imaginary time propagation via time-evolving block decimation. As part of our study we provide a careful comparison of canonical versus grand canonical ensembles and Gutzwiller versus entangled simulations. The most striking effect of finite size occurs for bosons: we observe a strong blurring of the tips of the Mott lobes accompanied by higher depletion, and show how the location of the first Mott lobe tip approaches the thermodynamic value as a function of system size.

  13. Quantum optics with quantum gases: Controlled state reduction by designed light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Ritsch, Helmut

    2009-07-15

    Cavity-enhanced light scattering from an ultracold gas in an optical lattice constitutes a quantum measurement with a controllable form of the measurement backaction. Time-resolved counting of scattered photons alters the state of the atoms without particle loss implementing a quantum nondemolition measurement. The conditional dynamics is given by the interplay between photodetection events (quantum jumps) and no-count processes. The class of emerging atomic many-body states can be chosen via the optical geometry and light frequencies. Light detection along the angle of a diffraction maximum (Bragg angle) creates an atom-number-squeezed state, while light detection at diffraction minima leads to the macroscopic superposition states (Schroedinger cat states) of different atom numbers in the cavity mode. A measurement of the cavity transmission intensity can lead to atom-number-squeezed or macroscopic superposition states depending on its outcome. We analyze the robustness of the superposition with respect to missed counts and find that a transmission measurement yields more robust and controllable superposition states than the ones obtained by scattering at a diffraction minimum.

  14. Mid-infrared spectroscopy for gases and liquids based on quantum cascade technologies.

    PubMed

    Jouy, Pierre; Mangold, Markus; Tuzson, Béla; Emmenegger, Lukas; Chang, Yu-Chi; Hvozdara, Lubos; Herzig, Hans Peter; Wägli, Philip; Homsy, Alexandra; de Rooij, Nico F; Wirthmueller, Alexander; Hofstetter, Daniel; Looser, Herbert; Faist, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we present two compact, quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy based, sensors developed for trace substance detection in gases and liquids. The gas sensor, in its most integrated version, represents the first system combining a quantum cascade laser and a quantum cascade detector. Furthermore, it uses a toroidal mirror cell with a volume of only 40 cm(3) for a path length of up to 4 m. The analytical performance is assessed by the measurements of isotope ratios of CO2 at ambient abundance. For the (13)CO2/(12)CO2 isotope ratio, a measurement precision of 0.2‰ is demonstrated after an integration time of 600 s. For the liquid sensor, a microfluidic system is used to extract cocaine from saliva into a solvent (PCE) transparent in the mid-infrared. This system is bonded on top of a Si/Ge waveguide and the concentration of cocaine in PCE is measured through the interaction of the evanescent part of the waveguide optical mode and the solvent flowing on top. A detection limit of <100 μg mL(-1) was achieved with this system and down to 10 μg mL(-1) with a simplified, but improved system. PMID:24151636

  15. MPH: A Library for Distributed Multi-Component Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-01

    A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflops compyters is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. We develop MPH, a multi-component handshaking library that allows component models recognize and talk to each other in a convenient and consisten way, thus to run multi-component ulti-executable applications effectively on distributed memory architectures. MPH provides the following capabilities: component name registration, resource allocation, inter-component communication, inquiry on themore » multi-component environment, standard in/out redirect. It supports the following four integration mechanisms: Multi-Component Single-Executable (MCSE); Single-Component Multi-Executable (SCME); Multi-Component Multi-Executable (MCME); Multi-instance Multi-Executable (MIME). MPH currently works on IBM SP, SGI Origin, Compaq AlphaSC, Cray T3E, and PC clusters. It is being adopted in NCAR's CCSM and Colorado State University's icosahedra grid coupled model. A joint communicator between any two components could be created. MPI communication between local processors and remote processors are invoked through component names and the local id. More functions are available to inquire the global-id, local-id, number of executales, etc.« less

  16. Amine-phenyl multi-component gradient stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Dewoolkar, Veeren C; Kannan, Balamurali; Ashraf, Kayesh M; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2015-09-01

    Continuous multi-component gradients in amine and phenyl groups were fabricated using controlled rate infusion (CRI). Solutions prepared from either 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTEOS) or phenyltrimethoxysilane (PTMOS) were infused, in a sequential fashion, at a controlled rate into an empty graduated cylinder housing a vertically aligned thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate. The hydrolyzed precursors reacted with an abundance of silanol (SiOH) groups on the TLC plates, covalently attaching the functionalized silane to its surface. The extent of modification by phenyl and amine was determined by the kinetics of each reaction and the exposure time at each point along the TLC plate. The local concentrations of phenyl and amine were measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The profile of the multi-component gradients strongly depended on the order of infusion, the direction of the gradient and the presence of available surface silanol groups. A slightly higher amount of phenyl can be deposited on the TLC plate by first modifying its surface with amine groups as they serve as a catalyst, enhancing condensation. Separation of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and the control of retention factors were demonstrated on the multi-component gradient TLC plates. Uniformly modified and single-component TLC plates gave different separations compared to the multi-component gradient plates. The retention factors of the individual vitamins depended on the order of surface modification, the spotting end, and whether the multi-component gradients align or oppose each other. PMID:26255112

  17. Statistical mechanics of Coulomb gases as quantum theory on Riemann surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gulden, T.; Janas, M.; Koroteev, P.; Kamenev, A.

    2013-09-15

    Statistical mechanics of a 1D multivalent Coulomb gas can be mapped onto non-Hermitian quantum mechanics. We use this example to develop the instanton calculus on Riemann surfaces. Borrowing from the formalism developed in the context of the Seiberg-Witten duality, we treat momentum and coordinate as complex variables. Constant-energy manifolds are given by Riemann surfaces of genus g {>=} 1. The actions along principal cycles on these surfaces obey the ordinary differential equation in the moduli space of the Riemann surface known as the Picard-Fuchs equation. We derive and solve the Picard-Fuchs equations for Coulomb gases of various charge content. Analysis of monodromies of these solutions around their singular points yields semiclassical spectra as well as instanton effects such as the Bloch bandwidth. Both are shown to be in perfect agreement with numerical simulations.

  18. Engineering quantum magnetism in one-dimensional trapped Fermi gases with p -wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijun; Guan, Xiwen; Cui, Xiaoling

    2016-05-01

    The highly controllable ultracold atoms in a one-dimensional (1D) trap provide a new platform for the ultimate simulation of quantum magnetism. In this regard, the Néel antiferromagnetism and the itinerant ferromagnetism are of central importance and great interest. Here we show that these magnetic orders can be achieved in the strongly interacting spin-1/2 trapped Fermi gases with additional p -wave interactions. In this strong-coupling limit, the 1D trapped Fermi gas exhibits an effective Heisenberg spin X X Z chain in the anisotropic p -wave scattering channels. For a particular p -wave attraction or repulsion within the same species of fermionic atoms, the system displays ferromagnetic domains with full spin segregation or the antiferromagnetic spin configuration in the ground state. Such engineered magnetisms are likely to be probed in a quasi-1D trapped Fermi gas of 40K atoms with very close s -wave and p -wave Feshbach resonances.

  19. Statistical mechanics of Coulomb gases as quantum theory on Riemann surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulden, Tobias; Janas, Michael; Kamenev, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Statistical mechanics of 1D Coulomb gases may be mapped onto (in general) non-Hermitian quantum mechanics. We use this example to develop non-Hermitian instanton calculus. Treating momentum and coordinate as independent complex variables, constant energy manifolds are given by Riemann surfaces of genus g >= 1 . The actions along principal cycles on these surfaces obey an ODE in the moduli space of the Riemann surface known as the Picard-Fuchs equation. Solving the Picard-Fuchs equation yields semiclassical spectra as well as instanton effects such as width of Bloch bands (the latter determines energy barrier for charge transport). Both are shown to be in perfect agreement with numerical simulations. Applications include transport through biological ion channels as well as nanofluidics, e.g water filled nanotubes. The work was supported by NSF grant DMR1306734.

  20. Fractional Quantum Hall Effects with Bose-gases in Rotating Optical Lattice Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemelke, Nathan; Sarajlic, Edina; Chu, Steven

    2008-05-01

    It has previously been noted that an analog to the fractional quantum-Hall (FQH) effect for two-dimensional electron gases can be produced with harmonically trapped and rotating neutral atoms. We report progress investigating FQH-like effects in the centrifugal limit of small, rotating, two-dimensional Bose gases. An ensemble of such systems is prepared in an optical lattice with locally rotating on-site potentials, produced by manipulation only of lattice beam optical phases. The non- rotating few-atom ground states are adiabatically transformed to higher angular momentum by applying a time-dependent sweep of rotation rate and deformation of the local lattice potential. Near the centrifugal limit, where the trap rotates at its vibration frequency, correlation is expected as a result of collisions. The onset of this behavior is probed by a combination of photoassociative transitions to bound molecules, and careful analysis of time-of-flight momentum distributions of atoms suddenly released from the lattice.

  1. Elliptical polarization favors long quantum orbits in high-order above-threshold ionization of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Lai, XuanYang; Wang, ChuanLiang; Chen, YongJu; Hu, ZiLong; Quan, Wei; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing; Cheng, Ya; Xu, ZhiZhan; Becker, Wilhelm

    2013-01-25

    We demonstrate the significant role of long quantum orbits in strong-field atomic processes by investigating experimentally and theoretically the above-threshold ionization spectra of noble gases in intense elliptically polarized laser pulses. With increasing laser ellipticity, the yields of different energy regions of the measured electron spectrum in high-order above-threshold ionization drop at different rates. The experimental features can be reproduced by a theoretical simulation based on quantum-orbit theory, revealing that increasing ellipticity favors the contributions of the long quantum orbits in the high-order above-threshold ionization process. PMID:25166161

  2. Quantum phases of quadrupolar Fermi gases in coupled one-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen-Min; Lahrz, M.; Mathey, L.

    2014-01-01

    Following the recent proposal to create quadrupolar gases [Bhongale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 155301 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.155301], we investigate what quantum phases can be created in these systems in one dimension. We consider a geometry of two coupled one-dimensional (1D) systems, and derive the quantum phase diagram of ultracold fermionic atoms interacting via quadrupole-quadrupole interactions within a Tomonaga-Luttinger-liquid framework. We map out the phase diagram as a function of the distance between the two tubes and the angle between the direction of the tubes and the quadrupolar moments. The latter can be controlled by an external field. We show that there are two magic angles θB,1c and θB,2c between 0 and π /2, where the intratube quadrupolar interactions vanish and change signs. Adopting a pseudospin language with regard to the two 1D systems, the system undergoes a spin-gap transition and displays a zigzag density pattern, above θB,2c and below θB,1c. Between the two magic angles, we show that polarized triplet superfluidity and a planar spin-density-wave order compete with each other. The latter corresponds to a bond-order solid in higher dimensions. We demonstrate that this order can be further stabilized by applying a commensurate periodic potential along the tubes.

  3. Numerical methods for atomic quantum gases with applications to Bose-Einstein condensates and to ultracold fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguzzi, A.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.; Tosi, M. P.; Vignolo, P.

    2004-06-01

    The achievement of Bose-Einstein condensation in ultra-cold vapours of alkali atoms has given enormous impulse to the study of dilute atomic gases in condensed quantum states inside magnetic traps and optical lattices. High-purity and easy optical access make them ideal candidates to investigate fundamental issues on interacting quantum systems. This review presents some theoretical issues which have been addressed in this area and the numerical techniques which have been developed and used to describe them, from mean-field models to classical and quantum simulations for equilibrium and dynamical properties. After an introductory overview on dilute quantum gases, both in the homogeneus state and under harmonic or periodic confinement, the article is organized in three main sections. The first concerns Bose-condensed gases at zero temperature, with main regard to the properties of the ground state in different confinements and to collective excitations and transport in the condensate. Bose-Einstein-condensed gases at finite temperature are addressed in the next section, the main emphasis being on equilibrium properties and phase transitions and on dynamical and transport properties associated with the presence of the thermal cloud. Finally, the last section is focused on theoretical and computational issues that have emerged from the efforts to drive gases of fermionic atoms and boson-fermion mixtures deep into the quantum degeneracy regime, with the aim of realizing novel superfluids from fermion pairing. The attention given in this article to methods beyond standard mean-field approaches should make it a useful reference point for future advances in these areas.

  4. Higher orbital physics and artificial gauge fields with ultracold quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    Recently the physics of quantum gases in higher orbitals attracted a lot of attention, theoretically and experimentally. We report on studies of a new type of superfluid described by a complex order parameter, resulting from an interaction-induced hybridization of the two lowest orbitals for a binary spin-mixture. As a main result we observe a quantum phase transition between the normal superfluid and this unconventional superfluid phase, where the local phase angle of the complex order parameter is continuously twisted between neighboring lattice sites. In addition we discuss new experimental work on the creation of artificial gauge potentials for neutral atoms in 1D and 2D lattices, which do not rely on the internal structure of the atoms. Via a time-dependent driving of the optical lattice we have full control over amplitude and phase of the complex valued hopping parameters. In a 2D triangular lattice, we demonstrate the realization of gauge invariant staggered fluxes. Our system consists of an array of tubes filled with bosonic atoms having a well-defined local phase. The phase distribution obtained in presence of large amplitude staggered fluxes - where frustration plays a key role - obeys two fundamental symmetries, the discrete Ising symmetry (Z2) and a continuous global phase symmetry (U(1)). Via the full control of the staggered gauge fields, we are able to break the Ising symmetry on purpose which means lifting the degeneracy of the two possible Ising states, in analogy to a longitudinal homogenous magnetic field in the standard Ising-Spin model. The measurements reveal ``textbook like'' magnetization curves with the well known dependence on both, the external magnetic field and the temperature. We observe a thermally driven phase transition from an ordered Ising (ferromagnetic) to an unordered (paramagnetic) state. Future directions to combine orbital physics and gauge fields will be discussed.

  5. Fractional quantum Hall physics with ultracold Rydberg gases in artificial gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusdt, F.; Fleischhauer, M.

    2013-04-01

    We study ultracold Rydberg-dressed Bose gases subject to artificial gauge fields in the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) regime. The characteristics of the Rydberg interaction give rise to interesting many-body ground states different from standard FQH physics in the lowest Landau level. The nonlocal but rapidly decreasing interaction potential favors crystalline ground states for very dilute systems. While a simple Wigner crystal becomes energetically favorable compared to the Laughlin liquid for filling fractions ν<1/12, a correlated crystal of composite particles emerges already for ν≤1/6 with a large energy gap to the simple Wigner crystal. The presence of a new length scale, the Rydberg blockade radius aB, gives rise to a bubble crystal phase for ν≲1/4 when the average particle distance becomes less than aB, which describes the region of saturated, almost constant interaction potential. For larger fillings indications for strongly correlated cluster liquids are found.

  6. Multi-component transparent conducting oxides: progress in materials modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Aron; Da Silva, Juarez L. F.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2011-08-01

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) play an essential role in modern optoelectronic devices through their combination of electrical conductivity and optical transparency. We review recent progress in our understanding of multi-component TCOs formed from solid solutions of ZnO, In2O3, Ga2O3 and Al2O3, with a particular emphasis on the contributions of materials modelling, primarily based on density functional theory. In particular, we highlight three major results from our work: (i) the fundamental principles governing the crystal structures of multi-component oxide structures including (In2O3)(ZnO)n and (In2O3)m(Ga2O3)l(ZnO)n; (ii) the relationship between elemental composition and optical and electrical behaviour, including valence band alignments; (iii) the high performance of amorphous oxide semiconductors. On the basis of these advances, the challenge of the rational design of novel electroceramic materials is discussed.

  7. Electrostatic twisted modes in multi-component dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Ikram, M.

    2016-01-01

    Various electrostatic twisted modes are re-investigated with finite orbital angular momentum in an unmagnetized collisionless multi-component dusty plasma, consisting of positive/negative charged dust particles, ions, and electrons. For this purpose, hydrodynamical equations are employed to obtain paraxial equations in terms of density perturbations, while assuming the Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam solutions. Specifically, approximated solutions for potential problem are studied by using the paraxial approximation and expressed the electric field components in terms of LG functions. The energy fluxes associated with these modes are computed and corresponding expressions for orbital angular momenta are derived. Numerical analyses reveal that radial/angular mode numbers as well as dust number density and dust charging states strongly modify the LG potential profiles attributed to different electrostatic modes. Our results are important for understanding particle transport and energy transfer due to wave excitations in multi-component dusty plasmas.

  8. Structure and compositional studies of multi-component nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyavanatham, Gokul

    The laser ablation of microparticle (LAM) process was used to study nanoparticles of multi-component materials. The production process utilized laser ablation of a continuously flowing aerosol of micron-sized particles under a gas ambient. An aerosol generator entrained microparticles into a gas flow and directed them through a nozzle into a laser interaction cell. After plasma breakdown, the shock wave propagated through the microparticles and the nanoparticles condensed behind this shockwave. Two methods were developed to collect nanoparticles; the first method used supersonic impaction on substrates at room temperature to enable direct writing of thick films and the second method used electric fields to deflect and collect charged, individual nanoparticles. Two methods for generating multi-component nanostructured materials were studied. The first method involved feeding single-phase microparticles containing the desired composition. Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) microparticles were used to generate nanoparticles that were then impacted onto substrates to produce thick films. Quality, morphology, crystallization and composition variations of these thick films were analyzed using material characterization techniques. Segregation of elements and an overall deficiency in Zr and Ti were observed in the deposited thick films as a result of the agglomerated state of the PZT microparticles. However, the analysis for this material system was complicated by the presence of multiple compounds. To develop a further understanding of how segregation occurs in multi-component systems during the LAM process, a second method for generating multi-component nanoparticles by feeding mixtures of single component microparticles was studied. Nanoparticles generated by ablation of Cu and Au microparticle mixtures were collected electrostatically and analyzed. Interactions between exploding microparticles resulted in condensation of nanoparticles that were non-equilibrium solid

  9. Multi-component generalization of the Camassa-Holm equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Baoqiang; Qiao, Zhijun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a multi-component system of the Camassa-Holm equation, denoted by CH(N , H), with 2 N components and an arbitrary smooth function H. This system is shown to admit Lax pair and infinitely many conservation laws. We particularly study the case N = 2 and derive the bi-Hamiltonian structures and peaked soliton (peakon) solutions for some examples.

  10. Multi-component stress history measurements and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R.B.; Larson, D.B.

    1987-08-01

    Piezoresistance foil gages were tested dynamically in multi-component stress-strain experiments in order that the actual shock wave conditions of underground nuclear testing could be more closely simulated. The multi-component stress-strain histories were created in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by using chemical explosions to generate spherical shock waves. In addition to the resistivity measurements from the foil gages, particle velocity was also measured at several radial positions from the explosion to provide a complete set of data for analysis. The gage interpretation (inverse) problem for multi-component stress-strain fields requires obtaining a sufficient number of independent measurements so that the different stress-strain components influencing the gage response can be uniquely inferred. The piezoresistance measurements provided data from a triple material foil gage and from ytterbium foil gages (bare gages). An analysis shows that the triple material gage containing foils of ytterbium, manganin, and constantan provided three independent resistivity measurements for the gage oriented in a perpendicular direction relative to the radial propagating shock front. An analysis of the ytterbium foil gages, which were tested in both perpendicular (normal) and parallel (tangential) directions relative to the radial shock front, show the resistivity responses from these two orientations are independent measurements. The results from the analyses of the gages compared well with experimental data. This analysis shows clearly that the material properties of the foil, the dimensions of the foil, and the material surrounding the foil greatly influence the total resistivity response of foil gages in a multi-component stress-strain field. 25 refs., 16 figs.

  11. Fluid description of multi-component solar partially ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khomenko, E. Collados, M.; Vitas, N.; Díaz, A.

    2014-09-15

    We derive self-consistent formalism for the description of multi-component partially ionized solar plasma, by means of the coupled equations for the charged and neutral components for an arbitrary number of chemical species, and the radiation field. All approximations and assumptions are carefully considered. Generalized Ohm's law is derived for the single-fluid and two-fluid formalism. Our approach is analytical with some order-of-magnitude support calculations. After general equations are developed, we particularize to some frequently considered cases as for the interaction of matter and radiation.

  12. Multi-component symmetry-projected approach for molecular ground state correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2013-11-28

    The symmetry-projected Hartree–Fock ansatz for the electronic structure problem can efficiently account for static correlation in molecules, yet it is often unable to describe dynamic correlation in a balanced manner. Here, we consider a multi-component, systematically improvable approach, that accounts for all ground state correlations. Our approach is based on linear combinations of symmetry-projected configurations built out of a set of non-orthogonal, variationally optimized determinants. The resulting wavefunction preserves the symmetries of the original Hamiltonian even though it is written as a superposition of deformed (broken-symmetry) determinants. We show how short expansions of this kind can provide a very accurate description of the electronic structure of simple chemical systems such as the nitrogen and the water molecules, along the entire dissociation profile. In addition, we apply this multi-component symmetry-projected approach to provide an accurate interconversion profile among the peroxo and bis(μ-oxo) forms of [Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}]{sup 2+}, comparable to other state-of-the-art quantum chemical methods.

  13. Twisted Landau damping rates in multi-component dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Bukhari, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2016-03-01

    Keeping in view the kinetic treatment for plasma particles, the electrostatic twisted dust-acoustic (DA) and dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) waves are investigated in a collisionless unmagnetized multi-component dusty plasma, whose constituents are the electrons, singly ionized positive ions, and negatively charged massive dust particulates. With this background, the Vlasov-Poisson equations are coupled together to derive a generalized dielectric constant by utilizing the Laguerre-Gaussian perturbed distribution function and electrostatic potential in the paraxial limit. The dispersion and damping rates of twisted DA and DIA waves are analyzed with finite orbital angular momentum states in a multi-component dusty plasma. Significant modifications concerning the real wave frequencies and damping rates appeared with varying twisted dimensionless parameter and dust concentration. In particular, it is shown that dust concentration enhances the phase speed of the DIA waves in contrary to DA waves, whereas the impact of twisted parameter reduces the frequencies of both DA and DIA waves. The results should be useful for the understanding of particle transport and trapping phenomena caused by wave excitation in laboratory dusty plasmas.

  14. Effective binary theory of multi-component nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalikmanov, V. I.

    2015-03-28

    Classical theory of multi-component nucleation [O. Hirschfelder, J. Chem. Phys. 61, 2690 (1974)] belongs to the class of the so-called intractable problems: it requires computational time which is an exponential function of the number of components N. For a number of systems of practical interest with N > 10, the brute-force use of the classical theory becomes virtually impossible and one has to resort to an effective medium approach. We present an effective binary model which captures important physics of multi-component nucleation. The distinction between two effective species is based on the observation that while all N components contribute to the cluster thermodynamic properties, there is only a part of them which trigger the nucleation process. The proposed 2D-theory takes into account adsorption by means of the Gibbs dividing surface formalism and uses statistical mechanical considerations for the treatment of small clusters. Theoretical predictions for binary-, ternary-, and 14-component mixtures are compared with available experimental data and other models.

  15. Efficient all-optical production of large Li6 quantum gases using D1 gray-molasses cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchianti, A.; Valtolina, G.; Seman, J. A.; Pace, E.; De Pas, M.; Inguscio, M.; Zaccanti, M.; Roati, G.

    2014-10-01

    We use a gray molasses operating on the D1 atomic transition to produce degenerate quantum gases of Li6 with a large number of atoms. This sub-Doppler cooling phase allows us to lower the initial temperature of 109 atoms from 500 to 40 μK in 2 ms. We observe that D1 cooling remains effective into a high-intensity infrared dipole trap where two-state mixtures are evaporated to reach the degenerate regime. We produce molecular Bose-Einstein condensates of up to 5 × 105 molecules and weakly interacting degenerate Fermi gases of 7×105 atoms at T /TF<0.1 with a typical experimental duty cycle of 11 s.

  16. Transport phenomena in correlated quantum liquids: Ultracold Fermi gases and F/N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua

    Landau Fermi-liquid theory was first introduced by L. D. Landau in the effort of understanding the normal state of Fermi systems, where the application of the concept of elementary excitations to the Fermi systems has proved very fruitful in clarifying the physics of strongly correlated quantum systems at low temperatures. In this thesis, I use Landau Fermi-liquid theory to study the transport phenomena of two different correlated quantum liquids: the strongly interacting ultracold Fermi gases and the ferromagnet/normal-metal (F/N) junctions. The detailed work is presented in chapter II and chapter III of this thesis, respectively. Chapter I holds the introductory part and the background knowledge of this thesis. In chapter II, I study the transport properties of a Fermi gas with strong attractive interactions close to the unitary limit. In particular, I compute the transport lifetimes of the Fermi gas due to superfluid fluctuations above the BCS transition temperature Tc. To calculate the transport lifetimes I need the scattering amplitudes. The scattering amplitudes are dominated by the superfluid fluctuations at temperatures just above Tc. The normal scattering amplitudes are calculated from the Landau parameters. These Landau parameters are obtained from the local version of the induced interaction model for computing Landau parameters. I also calculate the leading order finite temperature corrections to the various transport lifetimes. A calculation of the spin diffusion coefficient is presented in comparison to the experimental findings. Upon choosing a proper value of F0a, I am able to present a good match between the theoretical result and the experimental measurement, which indicates the presence of the superfluid fluctuations near Tc. Calculations of the viscosity, the viscosity/entropy ratio and the thermal conductivity are also shown in support of the appearance of the superfluid fluctuations. In chapter III, I study the spin transport in the low

  17. Ground state of rotating ultracold quantum gases with anisotropic spin—orbit coupling and concentrically coupled annular potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Tan, Ren-Bing; Du, Zhi-Jing; Zhao, Wen-Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Shou-Gang

    2014-07-01

    Motivated by recent experimental realization of synthetic spin—orbit coupling in neutral quantum gases, we consider the quasi-two-dimensional rotating two-component Bose—Einstein condensates with anisotropic Rashba spin—orbit coupling subject to concentrically coupled annular potential. For experimentally feasible parameters, the rotating condensate exhibits a variety of rich ground state structures by varying the strengths of the spin—orbit coupling and rotational frequency. Moreover, the phase transitions between different ground state phases induced by the anisotropic spin—orbit coupling are obviously different from the isotropic one.

  18. Potential energy curves for Mo2: multi-component symmetry-projected Hartree-Fock and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bytautas, Laimutis; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Rodríguez-Guzmán, R.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2014-07-01

    The molybdenum dimer is an example of a transition metal system with a formal sextuple bond that constitutes a challenging case for ab initio quantum chemistry methods. In particular, the complex binding pattern in the Mo2 molecule requires a high-quality description of non-dynamic and dynamic electron correlation in order to yield the correct shape of the potential energy curve. The present study examines the performance of a recently implemented multi-component symmetry projected Hartree-Fock (HF) approach. In this work, the spin and spatial symmetries of a trial wavefunction written in terms of non-orthogonal Slater determinants are deliberately broken and then restored in a variation-after-projection framework. The resulting symmetry-projected HF wavefunctions, which possess well-defined quantum numbers, can account for static and some dynamic correlations. A single symmetry-projected configuration in a D∞hS-UHF or a D∞hKS-UHF framework offers a reasonable description of the potential energy curve of Mo2, though the binding energy is too small for the former. Our multi-component strategy offers a way to improve on the single configuration result in a systematic way towards the exact wavefunction: in the def2-TZVP basis set considered in this study, a 7-determinant multi-component D∞hS-UHF approach yields a bond length of 2.01 Å, in good agreement with experimental results, while the predicted binding energy is 39.2 mhartree. The results of this exploratory study suggest that a multi-component symmetry-projected HF stategy is a promising alternative in a high-accuracy description of the electronic structure of challenging systems. We also present and discuss some benchmark calculations based on the CEEIS-FCI (correlation energy extrapolation by intrinsic scaling - full configuration interaction) method for selected geometries.

  19. A high resolution upwind scheme for multi-component flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igra, D.; Takayama, K.

    2002-04-01

    Conservative schemes usually produce non-physical oscillations in multi-component flow solutions. Many methods were proposed to avoid these oscillations. Some of these correction schemes could fix these oscillations in the pressure profile at discontinuities, but the density profile still remained diffused between the two components. In the case of gas-liquid interfaces, density diffusion is not acceptable. In this paper, the interfacial correction scheme proposed by Cocchi et al. was modified to be used in conjunction with the level-set approach. After each time step two grid points that bound the interface are recalculated by using an exact Riemann solver so that pressure oscillations and the density diffusion at discontinuities were eliminated. The scheme presented here can be applied to any type of conservation law solver. Some examples solved by this scheme and their results are compared with the exact solution when available. Good agreement is obtained between the present results and the exact solutions. Copyright

  20. Closure conditions for non-equilibrium multi-component models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S.; Hantke, M.; Richter, P.

    2016-07-01

    A class of non-equilibrium models for compressible multi-component fluids in multi-dimensions is investigated taking into account viscosity and heat conduction. These models are subject to the choice of interfacial pressures and interfacial velocity as well as relaxation terms for velocity, pressure, temperature and chemical potentials. Sufficient conditions are derived for these quantities that ensure meaningful physical properties such as a non-negative entropy production, thermodynamical stability, Galilean invariance and mathematical properties such as hyperbolicity, subcharacteristic property and existence of an entropy-entropy flux pair. For the relaxation of chemical potentials, a two-component and a three-component models for vapor-water and gas-water-vapor, respectively, are considered.

  1. Multi-component intermetallic electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M; Trahey, Lynn; Vaughey, John T

    2015-03-10

    Multi-component intermetallic negative electrodes prepared by electrochemical deposition for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries are disclosed. More specifically, the invention relates to composite intermetallic electrodes comprising two or more compounds containing metallic or metaloid elements, at least one element of which can react with lithium to form binary, ternary, quaternary or higher order compounds, these compounds being in combination with one or more other metals that are essentially inactive toward lithium and act predominantly, but not necessarily exclusively, to the electronic conductivity of, and as current collection agent for, the electrode. The invention relates more specifically to negative electrode materials that provide an operating potential between 0.05 and 2.0 V vs. metallic lithium.

  2. Multi-component joint analysis of surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Moro, Giancarlo; Moura, Rui Miguel Marques; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.

    2015-08-01

    Propagation of surface waves can occur with complex energy distribution amongst the various modes. It is shown that even simple VS (shear-wave velocity) profiles can generate velocity spectra that, because of a complex mode excitation, can be quite difficult to interpret in terms of modal dispersion curves. In some cases, Rayleigh waves show relevant differences depending on the considered component (radial or vertical) and the kind of source (vertical impact or explosive). Contrary to several simplistic assumptions often proposed, it is shown, both via synthetic and field datasets, that the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves can be almost completely absent. This sort of evidence demonstrates the importance of a multi-component analysis capable of providing the necessary elements to properly interpret the data and adequately constrain the subsurface model. It is purposely shown, also through the sole use of horizontal geophones, how it can be possible to efficiently and quickly acquire both Love and Rayleigh (radial-component) waves. The presented field dataset reports a case where Rayleigh waves (both their vertical and radial components) appear largely dominated by higher modes with little or no evidence of the fundamental mode. The joint inversion of the radial and vertical components of Rayleigh waves jointly with Love waves is performed by adopting a multi-objective inversion scheme based on the computation of synthetic seismograms for the three considered components and the minimization of the whole velocity spectra misfits (Full Velocity Spectra - FVS - inversion). Such a FVS multi-component joint inversion can better handle complex velocity spectra thus providing a more robust subsurface model not affected by erroneous velocity spectra interpretations and non-uniqueness of the solution.

  3. Quantum measurement-induced antiferromagnetic order and density modulations in ultracold Fermi gases in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F; Mekhov, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold atomic systems offer a unique tool for understanding behavior of matter in the quantum degenerate regime, promising studies of a vast range of phenomena covering many disciplines from condensed matter to quantum information and particle physics. Coupling these systems to quantized light fields opens further possibilities of observing delicate effects typical of quantum optics in the context of strongly correlated systems. Measurement backaction is one of the most funda- mental manifestations of quantum mechanics and it is at the core of many famous quantum optics experiments. Here we show that quantum backaction of weak measurement can be used for tailoring long-range correlations of ultracold fermions, realizing quantum states with spatial modulations of the density and magnetization, thus overcoming usual requirement for a strong interatomic interactions. We propose detection schemes for implementing antiferromagnetic states and density waves. We demonstrate that such long-range correlations cannot be realized with local addressing, and they are a consequence of the competition between global but spatially structured backaction of weak quantum measurement and unitary dynamics of fermions. PMID:27510369

  4. Quantum measurement-induced antiferromagnetic order and density modulations in ultracold Fermi gases in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold atomic systems offer a unique tool for understanding behavior of matter in the quantum degenerate regime, promising studies of a vast range of phenomena covering many disciplines from condensed matter to quantum information and particle physics. Coupling these systems to quantized light fields opens further possibilities of observing delicate effects typical of quantum optics in the context of strongly correlated systems. Measurement backaction is one of the most funda- mental manifestations of quantum mechanics and it is at the core of many famous quantum optics experiments. Here we show that quantum backaction of weak measurement can be used for tailoring long-range correlations of ultracold fermions, realizing quantum states with spatial modulations of the density and magnetization, thus overcoming usual requirement for a strong interatomic interactions. We propose detection schemes for implementing antiferromagnetic states and density waves. We demonstrate that such long-range correlations cannot be realized with local addressing, and they are a consequence of the competition between global but spatially structured backaction of weak quantum measurement and unitary dynamics of fermions. PMID:27510369

  5. Much Polyphony but Little Harmony: Otto Sackur's Groping for a Quantum Theory of Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badino, Massimiliano; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2013-09-01

    The endeavor of Otto Sackur (1880-1914) was driven, on the one hand, by his interest in Nernst's heat theorem, statistical mechanics, and the problem of chemical equilibrium and, on the other hand, by his goal to shed light on classical mechanics from the quantum vantage point. Inspired by the interplay between classical physics and quantum theory, Sackur chanced to expound his personal take on the role of the quantum in the changing landscape of physics in the turbulent 1910s. We tell the story of this enthusiastic practitioner of the old quantum theory and early contributor to quantum statistical mechanics, whose scientific ontogenesis provides a telling clue about the phylogeny of his contemporaries.

  6. Probing Spatial Spin Correlations of Ultracold Gases by Quantum Noise Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bruun, G. M.; Andersen, Brian M.; Demler, Eugene; Soerensen, Anders S.

    2009-01-23

    Spin noise spectroscopy with a single laser beam is demonstrated theoretically to provide a direct probe of the spatial correlations of cold fermionic gases. We show how the generic many-body phenomena of antibunching, pairing, antiferromagnetic, and algebraic spin liquid correlations can be revealed by measuring the spin noise as a function of laser width, temperature, and frequency.

  7. Percolation model for selective dissolution of multi-component glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, R.P.; Brinker, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    A percolation model is developed which accounts for most known features of the process of porous glass membrane preparation by selective dissolution of multi-component glasses. The model is founded within tile framework of the classical percolation theory, wherein the components of a glass are represented by random sites on a suitable lattice. Computer simulation is used to mirror the generation of a porous structure during the dissolution process, reproducing many of the features associated with the phenomenon. Simulation results evaluate the effect of the initial composition of the glass on the kinetics of the leaching process as well as the morphology of the generated porous structure. The percolation model establishes the porous structure as a percolating cluster of unreachable constituents in the glass. The simulation algorithm incorporates removal of both, the accessible leachable components in the glass as well as the independent clusters of unreachable components not attached to the percolating cluster. The dissolution process thus becomes limited by the conventional site percolation thresholds of the unreachable components (which restricts the formation of the porous network), as well as the leachable components (which restricts the accessibility of the solvating medium into the glass). The simulation results delineate the range of compositional variations for successful porous glass preparation and predict the variation of porosity, surface area, dissolution rates and effluent composition with initial composition and time. Results compared well with experimental studies and improved upon similar models attempted in die past.

  8. Multi-Component Diffusion with Application To Computational Aerothermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Kenneth; Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    The accuracy and complexity of solving multicomponent gaseous diffusion using the detailed multicomponent equations, the Stefan-Maxwell equations, and two commonly used approximate equations have been examined in a two part study. Part I examined the equations in a basic study with specified inputs in which the results are applicable for many applications. Part II addressed the application of the equations in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) computational code for high-speed entries in Earth's atmosphere. The results showed that the presented iterative scheme for solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations is an accurate and effective method as compared with solutions of the detailed equations. In general, good accuracy with the approximate equations cannot be guaranteed for a species or all species in a multi-component mixture. 'Corrected' forms of the approximate equations that ensured the diffusion mass fluxes sum to zero, as required, were more accurate than the uncorrected forms. Good accuracy, as compared with the Stefan- Maxwell results, were obtained with the 'corrected' approximate equations in defining the heating rates for the three Earth entries considered in Part II.

  9. Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Beñat; Afonso, Juan Carlos; Zlotnik, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Multi-phase multi-component reactive flow (MPMCRF) controls a number of important complex geodynamic/geochemical problems, such as melt generation and percolation, metasomatism, rheological weakening, magmatic differentiation, ore emplacement, and fractionation of chemical elements, to name a few. These interacting processes occur over very different spatial and temporal scales and under very different physico-chemical conditions. Therefore, there is a strong motivation in geodynamics for investigating the equations governing MPMCRF, their mathematical structure and properties, and the numerical techniques necessary to obtain reliable and accurate results. In this contribution we present results from a novel numerical framework to solve multiscale MPMCRF problems in geodynamic contexts. Our approach is based on the effective tracking of the most basic building blocks: internal energy and chemical composition. This is achieved through the combination of rigorous solutions to the conservation equations (mass, energy and momentum) for each dynamic phase (instead of the more common "mixture-type" approach) and the transport equation for the chemical species, within the context of classical irreversible thermodynamics. Interfacial processes such as phase changes, chemical diffusion+reaction, and surface tension effects are explicitly incorporated in the context of ensemble averaging. Phase assemblages, mineral and melt compositions, and all other physical parameters of multi-phase systems are obtained through dynamic free-energy minimization procedures.

  10. Multi-component solid solution alloys having high mixing entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Hongbin

    2015-10-06

    A multi-component high-entropy alloy includes a composition selected from the following group: VNbTaTiMoWRe, VNbTaTiMoW, VNbTaTiMoRe, VNbTaTiWRe, VNbTaMoWRe, VNbTiMoWRe, VTaTiMoWRe, NbTaTiMoWRe, VNbTaTiMo, VNbTaTiW, VNbTaMoW, VNbTiMoW, VTaTiMoW, NbTaTiMoW, VNbTaTiRe, VNbTaMoRe, VNbTiMoRe, VTaTiMoRe, NbTaTiMoRe, VNbTaWRe, VNbTiWRe, VTaTiWRe, NbTaTiWRe, VNbMoWRe, VTaMoWRe, NbTaMoWRe, VTiMoWRe, NbTiMoWRe, TaTiMoWRe, wherein relative amounts of each element vary by no more than .+-.15 atomic %.

  11. Hybrid apparatus for Bose-Einstein condensation and cavity quantum electrodynamics: Single atom detection in quantum degenerate gases

    SciTech Connect

    Oettl, Anton; Ritter, Stephan; Koehl, Michael; Esslinger, Tilman

    2006-06-15

    We present and characterize an experimental system in which we achieve the integration of an ultrahigh finesse optical cavity with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The conceptually novel design of the apparatus for the production of BECs features nested vacuum chambers and an in vacuo magnetic transport configuration. It grants large scale spatial access to the BEC for samples and probes via a modular and exchangeable ''science platform.'' We are able to produce {sup 87}Rb condensates of 5x10{sup 6} atoms and to output couple continuous atom lasers. The cavity is mounted on the science platform on top of a vibration isolation system. The optical cavity works in the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics and serves as a quantum optical detector for single atoms. This system enables us to study atom optics on a single particle level and to further develop the field of quantum atom optics. We describe the technological modules and the operation of the combined BEC cavity apparatus. Its performance is characterized by single atom detection measurements for thermal and quantum degenerate atomic beams. The atom laser provides a fast and controllable supply of atoms coupling with the cavity mode and allows for an efficient study of atom field interactions in the strong coupling regime. Moreover, the high detection efficiency for quantum degenerate atoms distinguishes the cavity as a sensitive and weakly invasive probe for cold atomic clouds.

  12. Creation of quantum-degenerate gases of ytterbium in a compact 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap setup

    SciTech Connect

    Doerscher, Soeren; Thobe, Alexander; Hundt, Bastian; Kochanke, Andre; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Windpassinger, Patrick; Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-04-15

    We report on the first experimental setup based on a 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap (MOT) scheme to create both Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases of several ytterbium isotopes. Our setup does not require a Zeeman slower and offers the flexibility to simultaneously produce ultracold samples of other atomic species. Furthermore, the extraordinary optical access favors future experiments in optical lattices. A 2D-MOT on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition captures ytterbium directly from a dispenser of atoms and loads a 3D-MOT on the narrow {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination transition. Subsequently, atoms are transferred to a crossed optical dipole trap and cooled evaporatively to quantum degeneracy.

  13. Creation of quantum-degenerate gases of ytterbium in a compact 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap setup.

    PubMed

    Dörscher, Sören; Thobe, Alexander; Hundt, Bastian; Kochanke, André; Le Targat, Rodolphe; Windpassinger, Patrick; Becker, Christoph; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    We report on the first experimental setup based on a 2D-/3D-magneto-optical trap (MOT) scheme to create both Bose-Einstein condensates and degenerate Fermi gases of several ytterbium isotopes. Our setup does not require a Zeeman slower and offers the flexibility to simultaneously produce ultracold samples of other atomic species. Furthermore, the extraordinary optical access favors future experiments in optical lattices. A 2D-MOT on the strong (1)S0 → (1)P1 transition captures ytterbium directly from a dispenser of atoms and loads a 3D-MOT on the narrow (1)S0 → (3)P1 intercombination transition. Subsequently, atoms are transferred to a crossed optical dipole trap and cooled evaporatively to quantum degeneracy. PMID:23635183

  14. Design for robustness of unique, multi-component engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Kenneth A.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to advance the science of conceptual designing for robustness in unique, multi-component engineering systems. Robustness is herein defined as the ability of an engineering system to operate within a desired performance range even if the actual configuration has differences from specifications within specified tolerances. These differences are caused by three sources, namely manufacturing errors, system degradation (operational wear and tear), and parts availability. Unique, multi-component engineering systems are defined as systems produced in unique or very small production numbers. They typically have design and manufacturing costs on the order of billions of dollars, and have multiple, competing performance objectives. Design time for these systems must be minimized due to competition, high manpower costs, long manufacturing times, technology obsolescence, and limited available manpower expertise. Most importantly, design mistakes cannot be easily corrected after the systems are operational. For all these reasons, robustness of these systems is absolutely critical. This research examines the space satellite industry in particular. Although inherent robustness assurance is absolutely critical, it is difficult to achieve in practice. The current state of the art for robustness in the industry is to overdesign components and subsystems with redundancy and margin. The shortfall is that it is not known if the added margins were either necessary or sufficient given the risk management preferences of the designer or engineering system customer. To address this shortcoming, new assessment criteria to evaluate robustness in design concepts have been developed. The criteria are comprised of the "Value Distance", addressing manufacturing errors and system degradation, and "Component Distance", addressing parts availability. They are based on an evolutionary computation format that uses a string of alleles to describe the components in the

  15. Transport properties of multi-component fluids and of suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheim, I.; McBride, J.

    1990-10-31

    This report summarizes work performed under Grant Number DE-FG03-88ER13911 for the period June 15, 1988 through October 31, 1990. The first year's work dealt with derivations of the fundamental equations describing suspensions of inelastic particles. This work was documented in last year's annual progress report, and has since been published in Physica A. We include the published version as an Appendix to this report. During the past year our work has focused on derivations of the nonlinear hydrodynamic equations for multi-component systems. The remainder of this report summarizes the results of these latter studies. The report is organized as follows. In Section 2, we derive a general set of nonlinear hydrodynamic equations for a two-component, classical fluid system. We then show under what circumstances the exact equations can be approximated by the phenomenological, nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations. In Section 3, we use the general results of Section 2 to obtain explicit, nonlinear equations for the evolution of the hydrodynamic variables of two-component fluid mixtures (total mass density, mass density of one of the two species, momentum density and energy density). In Section 4, we give the linearized, fundamental equations that follow from the results of Section 3. In Section 5, we discuss a particular thermodynamic quantity of interest in the hydrodynamic equations, which follows from the composition dependences of the chemical potentials. The dispersion relations which arise from the linearized hydrodynamic equations are derived in Section 6. Finally, in Section 7, we discuss certain effects of long time tail behavior, and section 8 contains a summary.

  16. Propene concentration sensing for combustion gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption near 11 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystie, Robin S. M.; Nasir, Ehson F.; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-08-01

    We report on a strategy to measure, in situ, the concentration of propene (C3H6) in combustion gases using laser absorption spectroscopy. Pyrolysis of n-butane was conducted in a shock tube, in which the resultant gases were probed using an extended cavity quantum-cascade laser. A differential absorption approach using online and offline wavelengths near λ = 10.9 μm enabled discrimination of propene, cancelling the effects of spectral interference from the simultaneous presence of intermediate hydrocarbon species during combustion. Such interference-free measurements were facilitated by exploiting the =C-H bending mode characteristic to alkenes (olefins). It was confirmed, for intermediate species present during pyrolysis of n-butane, that their absorption cross sections were the same magnitude for both online and offline wavelengths. Hence, this allowed time profiles of propene concentration to be measured during pyrolysis of n-butane in a shock tube. Time profiles of propene subsequent to a passing shock wave exhibit trends similar to that predicted by the well-established JetSurF 1.0 chemical kinetic mechanism, albeit lower by a factor of two. Such a laser diagnostic is a first step to experimentally determining propene in real time with sufficient time resolution, thus aiding the refinement and development of chemical kinetic models for combustion.

  17. Multi-component testing using HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN Sorbents for OSPREY Model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, Troy G.; Greenhalgh, Mitchell; Lyon, Kevin L.; Law, Jack D.

    2015-04-01

    In efforts to further develop the capability of the Off-gas SeParation and RecoverY (OSPREY) model, multi-component tests were completed using both HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN sorbents. The primary purpose of this effort was to obtain multi-component xenon and krypton capacities for comparison to future OSPREY predicted multi-component capacities using previously acquired Langmuir equilibrium parameters determined from single component isotherms. Experimental capacities were determined for each sorbent using two feed gas compositions of 1000 ppmv xenon and 150 ppmv krypton in either a helium or air balance. Test temperatures were consistently held at 220 K and the gas flowrate was 50 sccm. Capacities were calculated from breakthrough curves using TableCurve® 2D software by Jandel Scientific. The HZ-PAN sorbent was tested in the custom designed cryostat while the AgZ-PAN was tested in a newly installed cooling apparatus. Previous modeling validation efforts indicated the OSPREY model can be used to effectively predict single component xenon and krypton capacities for both engineered form sorbents. Results indicated good agreement with the experimental and predicted capacity values for both krypton and xenon on the sorbents. Overall, the model predicted slightly elevated capacities for both gases which can be partially attributed to the estimation of the parameters and the uncertainty associated with the experimental measurements. Currently, OSPREY is configured such that one species adsorbs and one does not (i.e. krypton in helium). Modification of OSPREY code is currently being performed to incorporate multiple adsorbing species and non-ideal interactions of gas phase species with the sorbent and adsorbed phases. Once these modifications are complete, the sorbent capacities determined in the present work will be used to validate OSPREY multicomponent adsorption predictions.

  18. (2+1)-dimensional non-isospectral multi-component AKNS equations and its integrable couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yepeng

    2010-03-08

    (2+1)-dimensional non-isospectral multi-component AKNS equations are derived from an arbitrary order matrix spectral problem. As a reduction, (2+1)-dimensional non-isospectral multi-component Schroedinger equations are obtained. Moreover, new (2+1)-dimensional non-isospectral integrable couplings of the resulting AKNS equations are constructed by enlarging the associated matrix spectral problem.

  19. Alcohol-Related Information in Multi-Component Interventions and College Students' Drinking Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thadani, Vandana; Huchting, Karen; LaBrie, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Education-only interventions produce little change in drinking behaviors; but, multi-component prevention programs, which include alcohol information as one feature, can decrease drinking. This study examined the role of alcohol knowledge in a multi-component intervention previously found to reduce first-year female college students' alcohol…

  20. Emergent Devil's Staircase without Particle-Hole Symmetry in Rydberg Quantum Gases with Competing Attractive and Repulsive Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lan, Zhihao; Minář, Jiří; Levi, Emanuele; Li, Weibin; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-11-13

    The devil's staircase is a fractal structure that characterizes the ground state of one-dimensional classical lattice gases with long-range repulsive convex interactions. Its plateaus mark regions of stability for specific filling fractions which are controlled by a chemical potential. Typically, such a staircase has an explicit particle-hole symmetry; i.e., the staircase at more than half filling can be trivially extracted from the one at less than half filling by exchanging the roles of holes and particles. Here, we introduce a quantum spin chain with competing short-range attractive and long-range repulsive interactions, i.e., a nonconvex potential. In the classical limit the ground state features generalized Wigner crystals that--depending on the filling fraction--are composed of either dimer particles or dimer holes, which results in an emergent complete devil's staircase without explicit particle-hole symmetry of the underlying microscopic model. In our system the particle-hole symmetry is lifted due to the fact that the staircase is controlled through a two-body interaction rather than a one-body chemical potential. The introduction of quantum fluctuations through a transverse field melts the staircase and ultimately makes the system enter a paramagnetic phase. For intermediate transverse field strengths, however, we identify a region where the density-density correlations suggest the emergence of quasi-long-range order. We discuss how this physics can be explored with Rydberg-dressed atoms held in a lattice. PMID:26613435

  1. Emergent Devil's Staircase without Particle-Hole Symmetry in Rydberg Quantum Gases with Competing Attractive and Repulsive Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhihao; Minář, Jiří; Levi, Emanuele; Li, Weibin; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The devil's staircase is a fractal structure that characterizes the ground state of one-dimensional classical lattice gases with long-range repulsive convex interactions. Its plateaus mark regions of stability for specific filling fractions which are controlled by a chemical potential. Typically, such a staircase has an explicit particle-hole symmetry; i.e., the staircase at more than half filling can be trivially extracted from the one at less than half filling by exchanging the roles of holes and particles. Here, we introduce a quantum spin chain with competing short-range attractive and long-range repulsive interactions, i.e., a nonconvex potential. In the classical limit the ground state features generalized Wigner crystals that—depending on the filling fraction—are composed of either dimer particles or dimer holes, which results in an emergent complete devil's staircase without explicit particle-hole symmetry of the underlying microscopic model. In our system the particle-hole symmetry is lifted due to the fact that the staircase is controlled through a two-body interaction rather than a one-body chemical potential. The introduction of quantum fluctuations through a transverse field melts the staircase and ultimately makes the system enter a paramagnetic phase. For intermediate transverse field strengths, however, we identify a region where the density-density correlations suggest the emergence of quasi-long-range order. We discuss how this physics can be explored with Rydberg-dressed atoms held in a lattice.

  2. Quantum phase transitions in disordered superconductors and detection of modulated superfluidity in imbalanced Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Mason

    Ultracold atomic gas experiments have emerged as a new testing ground for finding elusive, exotic states of matter. One such state that has eluded detection is the Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) phase predicted to exist in a system with unequal populations of up and down fermions. This phase is characterized by periodic domain walls across which the order parameter changes sign and the excess polarization is localized Despite fifty years of theoretical and experimental work, there has so far been no unambiguous observation of an LO phase. In this thesis, we propose an experiment in which two fermion clouds, prepared with unequal population imbalances, are allowed to expand and interfere. We show that a pattern of staggered fringes in the interference is unequivocal evidence of LO physics. Finally, we study the superconductor-insulator quantum phase transition. Both superconductivity and localization stand on the shoulders of giants -- the BCS theory of superconductivity and the Anderson theory of localization. Yet, when their combined effects are considered, both paradigms break down, even for s-wave superconductors. In this work, we calculate the dynamical quantities that help guide present and future experiments. Specifically, we calculate the conductivity sigma(o) and the bosonic (pair) spectral function P(o) from quantum Monte Carlo simulations across clean and disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transitions (SIT). Using these quantities, we identify characteristic energy scales in both the superconducting and insulating phases that vanish at the transition due to enhanced quantum fluctuations, despite the persistence of a robust fermionic gap across the SIT. The clean and disordered transition are compared throughout, and we find that disorder leads to enhanced absorption in sigma(o) at low frequencies and a change in the universality class, although the underlying T = 0quantum critical point remains in both transitions.

  3. Design for robustness of unique, multi-component engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Kenneth A.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to advance the science of conceptual designing for robustness in unique, multi-component engineering systems. Robustness is herein defined as the ability of an engineering system to operate within a desired performance range even if the actual configuration has differences from specifications within specified tolerances. These differences are caused by three sources, namely manufacturing errors, system degradation (operational wear and tear), and parts availability. Unique, multi-component engineering systems are defined as systems produced in unique or very small production numbers. They typically have design and manufacturing costs on the order of billions of dollars, and have multiple, competing performance objectives. Design time for these systems must be minimized due to competition, high manpower costs, long manufacturing times, technology obsolescence, and limited available manpower expertise. Most importantly, design mistakes cannot be easily corrected after the systems are operational. For all these reasons, robustness of these systems is absolutely critical. This research examines the space satellite industry in particular. Although inherent robustness assurance is absolutely critical, it is difficult to achieve in practice. The current state of the art for robustness in the industry is to overdesign components and subsystems with redundancy and margin. The shortfall is that it is not known if the added margins were either necessary or sufficient given the risk management preferences of the designer or engineering system customer. To address this shortcoming, new assessment criteria to evaluate robustness in design concepts have been developed. The criteria are comprised of the "Value Distance", addressing manufacturing errors and system degradation, and "Component Distance", addressing parts availability. They are based on an evolutionary computation format that uses a string of alleles to describe the components in the

  4. Fundamental Interactions for Atom Interferometry with Ultracold Quantum Gases in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Incao, Jose P.; Willians, Jason R.

    2015-05-01

    Precision atom interferometers (AI) in space are a key element for several applications of interest to NASA. Our proposal for participating in the Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) onboard the International Space Station is dedicated to mitigating the leading-order systematics expected to corrupt future high-precision AI-based measurements of fundamental physics in microgravity. One important focus of our proposal is to enhance initial state preparation for dual-species AIs. Our proposed filtering scheme uses Feshbach molecular states to create highly correlated mixtures of heteronuclear atomic gases in both their position and momentum distributions. We will detail our filtering scheme along with the main factors that determine its efficiency. We also show that the atomic and molecular heating and loss rates can be mitigated at the unique temperature and density regimes accessible on CAL. This research is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Quantum phases of atomic Fermi gases with anisotropic spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Iskin, M.; Subasi, A. L.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a general anisotropic spin-orbit coupling and analyze the phase diagrams of both balanced and imbalanced Fermi gases for the entire BCS-BEC evolution. In the first part, we use the self-consistent mean-field theory at zero temperature, and show that the topological structure of the ground-state phase diagrams is quite robust against the effects of anisotropy. In the second part, we go beyond the mean-field description, and investigate the effects of Gaussian fluctuations near the critical temperature. This allows us to derive the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, from which we extract the effective mass of the Cooper pairs and their critical condensation temperature in the molecular BEC limit.

  6. Topological semimetal: a probable new state of quantum optical lattice gases protected by D4 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, W. Vincent; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate that a novel topological semimetal emerges as a parity-protected critical theory for fermionic atoms loaded in the p and d orbital bands of a two-dimensional optical lattice. The new quantum state is characterized by a parabolic band-degeneracy point with Berry flux 2 π , in sharp contrast to the π flux of Dirac points as in graphene. We prove that this topological liquid is a universal property for all lattices of D4 point group symmetry and the band degeneracy is protected by odd parity. Turning on interparticle repulsive interaction, the system undergoes a phase transition to a topological insulator, whose experimental signature includes chiral gapless domain-wall modes, reminiscent of quantum Hall edge states. KS and SDS acknowledge the support of JQI-NSF-PFC, AFOSR-MURI, ARO-DARPA-OLE and ARO-MURI. W.V.L. is supported by ARO and ARO-DARPA-OLE. We thank the KITP at UCSB for its hospitality where this research is supported in part by NSF Grant No. PHY05-51164.

  7. Memory effects in noninteracting isolated systems from dynamical geometry transformations in ultracold quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chen-Yen; Chien, Chin-Chun

    Memory effects have been of broad interest and particularly relevant in condensate matter systems where dynamical properties depend on history. Here we explore possibilities of observing memory effects in simple isolated quantum systems undergoing geometry transformations. By transforming into lattices supporting flat-bands consisting of localized states, memory effects could be observed in ultracold atoms in optical lattices due to different time scales of localized and mobile atoms. As an optical lattice is continuously transformed from a triangular lattice into a kagome or square lattice, the system reach a non-thermal quasi-steady state. In the absence of interactions and dissipations, the emergence of steady states are highly nontrivial and crucial in identifying memory effects unambiguously. Moreover, when the lattices transform from a triangular lattice into a kagome lattice with a flat band, history-dependent density distributions even in noninteracting systems can be observed in fermionic as well as bosonic systems. Rapid growth of cold atom technology and possibilities of various mechanisms for inducing memory effect promise interesting applications of novel quantum devices utilizing memory effect, especially in the thriving field of atomtronics. (arXiv:1510.08978)

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo study of quasi-one-dimensional Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrakharchik, G. E.; Blume, D.; Giorgini, S.; Granger, B. E.

    2004-04-01

    We study the behaviour of quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) Bose gases by Monte Carlo techniques, i.e. by the variational Monte Carlo, the diffusion Monte Carlo and the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo techniques. Our calculations confirm and extend our results of an earlier study (Astrakharchik et al 2003 Preprint cond-mat/0308585). We find that a quasi-1D Bose gas (i) is well described by a 1D model Hamiltonian with contact interactions and renormalized coupling constant; (ii) reaches the Tonks-Girardeau regime for a critical value of the 3D scattering length a3D; (iii) enters a unitary regime for |a3D| rarr infin, where the properties of the gas are independent of a3D and are similar to those of a 1D gas of hard-rods and (iv) becomes unstable against cluster formation for a critical value of the 1D gas parameter. The accuracy and implications of our results are discussed in detail.

  9. Multi-component Erlang distribution of plant seed masses and sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, San-Hong; Wei, Hua-Rong

    2012-12-01

    The mass and the size distributions of plant seeds are very similar to the multi-component Erlang distribution of final-state particle multiplicities in high-energy collisions. We study the mass, length, width, and thickness distributions of pumpkin and marrow squash seeds in this paper. The corresponding distribution curves are obtained and fitted by using the multi-component Erlang distribution. In the comparison, the method of χ2-testing is used. The mass and the size distributions of the mentioned seeds are shown to obey approximately the multi-component Erlang distribution with the component number being 1.

  10. Quantum cascade laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide in high-pressure gases using wavelength modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spearrin, R M; Goldenstein, C S; Jeffries, J B; Hanson, R K

    2014-03-20

    A tunable quantum cascade laser sensor, based on wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy near 4.8 μm, was developed to measure CO concentration in harsh, high-pressure combustion gases. The sensor employs a normalized second harmonic detection technique (WMS-2f/1f) at a modulation frequency of 50 kHz. Wavelength selection at 2059.91  cm⁻¹ targets the P(20) transition within the fundamental vibrational band of CO, chosen for absorption strength and relative isolation from infrared water and carbon dioxide absorption. The CO spectral model is defined by the Voigt line-shape function, and key line-strength and line-broadening spectroscopic parameters were taken from the literature or measured. Sensitivity analysis identified the CO-N₂ collisional broadening coefficient as most critical for uncertainty mitigation in hydrocarbon/air combustion exhaust measurements, and this parameter was experimentally derived over a range of combustion temperatures (1100-2600 K) produced in a shock tube. Accuracy of the wavelength-modulation-spectroscopy-based sensor, using the refined spectral model, was validated at pressures greater than 40 atm in nonreactive shock-heated gas mixtures. The laser was then free-space coupled to an indium-fluoride single-mode fiber for remote light delivery. The fiber-coupled sensor was demonstrated on an ethylene/air pulse detonation combustor, providing time-resolved (~20  kHz), in situ measurements of CO concentration in a harsh flow field. PMID:24663473

  11. Permutation Symmetry in Spinor Quantum Gases: Selection Rules, Conservation Laws, and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Vladimir A.

    2014-11-01

    Many-body systems of identical arbitrary-spin particles, with separable spin and spatial degrees of freedom, are considered. Their eigenstates can be classified by Young diagrams, corresponding to nontrivial permutation symmetries (beyond the conventional paradigm of symmetric-antisymmetric states). The present work obtains the following. (a) Selection rules for additional nonseparable (dependent on spins and coordinates) k -body interactions: the Young diagrams, associated with the initial and final states of a transition, can differ by relocation of no more than k boxes between their rows. (b) Correlation rules in which eigenstate-averaged local correlations of k particles vanish if k exceeds the number of columns (for bosons) or rows (for fermions) in the associated Young diagram. It also elucidates the physical meaning of the quantities conserved due to permutation symmetry—in 1929, Dirac identified those with characters of the symmetric group—relating them to experimentally observable correlations of several particles. The results provide a way to control the formation of entangled states belonging to multidimensional non-Abelian representations of the symmetric group. These states can find applications in quantum computation and metrology.

  12. New Design Methods and Algorithms for Multi-component Distillation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose main goal is to develop methods and software tools for the identification and analysis of optimal multi-component distillation configurations for reduced energy consumption in industrial processes.

  13. EDITORIAL: Theory of Quantum Gases and Quantum Coherence: The Cortona BEC Workshop, 29 October-2 November 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuzzi, Pablo; Chitra, R.; Menotti, Chiara; Minguzz, Anna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2006-05-01

    Nonlinear, or multiphoton, interaction of intense laser radiation with matter has been a key research subject for about four decades. Every three years, the International Conference on Multiphoton Processes (ICOMP) covers the latest advances in the field. Intense-field physics has seen phenomenal progress over the last decade. What looked like dreams in the mid-nineties have become routine today. Major theoretical, experimental and technological advances in fundamental science and applications of multiphoton processes cover such diverse areas as precision measurements, femtosecond and now attosecond metrology, quantum control of atomic and molecular dynamics, laser machining of solid state materials, laser acceleration of electrons and protons, and medical applications. This special issue of Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (J. Phys. B) contains a collection of articles originating from the Tenth International Conference on Multiphoton Processes (ICOMP 2005) held on 9-14 October 2005 in Orford, Quebec, Canada (general chair Lou DiMauro, Ohio State University, program co-chairs Paul Corkum and Misha Ivanov, National Research Council of Canada). The conference focused on atoms and molecules in strong fields, femtosecond and attosecond processes, propagation of intense pulses, and of course multiphoton processes which lie at the foundation of all these subjects. Articles presented in this issue cover several key areas of intense-field physics. These include strong field ionization of atoms, molecules and inside transparent dielectric materials, methods of generation and characterization of attosecond XUV pulses and pulse trains, and new approaches to using intense laser fields and/or attosecond pulses for studying entangled systems and imaging electronic and nuclear dynamics with sub-Ångstrom spatial and sub-femtosecond temporal resolution. We have tried to group the papers according to these general areas. We would like to use this

  14. Quantum cascade laser based sensor for in situ and real time atmospheric trace gases (CO and N2O) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingsong; Parchatka, Uwe; Fischer, Horst

    2013-04-01

    In addition to the primary greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), several other atmospheric trace gases are radiatively active, and thereby can also contribute to a greenhouse warming of the lower atmosphere directly or indirectly. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential about 200-300 times that of CO2. Carbon monoxide (CO) is not considered a direct greenhouse gas, mostly because it does not absorb terrestrial thermal IR energy strongly enough. However, CO plays an important role in the oxidative chemistry of Earth's atmosphere, since it is a key trace gas for controlling the budget and distribution of the hydroxyl (OH) radical, which exerts a controlling influence on the gas phase chemistry of many atmospheric species [1]. Therefore, there is a critical need to identify sources and sinks of N2O and CO in order to better understand their impact on global climate change [2]. We present a fast, compact, and precise sensor based-on a novel thermoelectrically (TE) cooled quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating at near-room temperature in CW (continuous-wave) mode for simultaneous detection of atmospheric N2O and CO. The technique is based on atmospheric absorption of these trace species in the mid-infrared region near 4.56 µm, using a single QC laser source and two TE-cooled infrared detectors. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection technique in conjunction with a compact multi-pass absorption cell has been employed to demonstrate highly sensitive and precise measurements. CO and N2O at ambient concentration levels are detected simultaneously with a high temporal response (< 1s). Preliminary results (Laboratory investigation and field application) of the sensor's performance will be presented. This completely TE-cooled system shows the capability of long-term, unattended and continuous operation at room temperature without complicated cryogenic cooling [3]. [1] J. A. Logan, M. J. Prather, S. C

  15. Multi-component superstructures self-assembled from nanocrystal building blocks.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rui; Zhu, Hua; Cao, Can; Chen, Ou

    2016-05-21

    More than three decades of intensive study to make high-quality nanocrystals have created a unique toolbox for building multi-component superstructures, which have been recognized as a new generation of metamaterials important to both fundamental sciences and applied technologies. This minireview summarizes recent advances in this exciting field. We will focus our discussion on the synthetic strategies and superstructures of this multi-component metamaterial, and highlight their novel properties and potential applications. Additionally, some perspectives on possible developments in this field are offered at the end of this review. We hope that this minireview will both inform and stimulate research interests for the design and fabrication of these nanocrystal-based multi-component metamaterials for diverse applications in the future. PMID:27136751

  16. Dual Hierarchies of a Multi-Component Camassa-Holm System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Min; Li, Yu-Qi; Chen, Yong

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we derive the bi-Hamiltonian structure of a multi-component Camassa-Holm system, which associates with the multi-component AKNS hierarchy and multi-component KN hierarchy via the tri-Hamiltonian duality method. Furthermore, the spectral problems of the dual hierarchies may be obtained. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11275072 and 11375090, Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under No. 20120076110024, the Innovative Research Team Program of the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61321064, Shanghai Knowledge Service Platform for Trustworthy Internet of Things under Grant No. ZF1213, Talent Fund and K.C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University

  17. Multi-component superstructures self-assembled from nanocrystal building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Rui; Zhu, Hua; Cao, Can; Chen, Ou

    2016-05-01

    More than three decades of intensive study to make high-quality nanocrystals have created a unique toolbox for building multi-component superstructures, which have been recognized as a new generation of metamaterials important to both fundamental sciences and applied technologies. This minireview summarizes recent advances in this exciting field. We will focus our discussion on the synthetic strategies and superstructures of this multi-component metamaterial, and highlight their novel properties and potential applications. Additionally, some perspectives on possible developments in this field are offered at the end of this review. We hope that this minireview will both inform and stimulate research interests for the design and fabrication of these nanocrystal-based multi-component metamaterials for diverse applications in the future.

  18. An Experimental Investigation and Numerical Analysis of Multi-Component Fuel Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myong, Kwang-Jae; Arai, Motoyuki; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Senda, Jiro; Fujimoto, Hajime

    In this study, droplet atomization and vaporization characteristics with multi-component fuel were investigated by experimental and numerical simulation methods. Spray characteristics of multi-component fuel including spray cone angle, spray angle and spray tip penetration were analyzed from shadowgraph imaging. Numerical simulation to investigate spatial distribution of fuel-vapor concentration of each component within multi-component fuel was implemented in KIVA code. Vaporization process was calculated by a simple two-phase region which was approximated by modified saturated liquid-vapor line. Experimental results show that spray cone angle and spray angle become larger increasing in mass fraction of low boiling point component. And spray tip penetration becomes shorter with increasing in mass fraction of low boiling point component in vaporizing spray during that is same on every mixed fuel in non-vaporizing spray. From numerical simulation results, temporal and spatial distribution of each fuel vapor concentration was found to be stratification.

  19. Porous multi-component material for the capture and separation of species of interest

    DOEpatents

    Addleman, Raymond S.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Li, Xiaohong S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Gerasimenko, Aleksandr A

    2016-06-21

    A method and porous multi-component material for the capture, separation or chemical reaction of a species of interest is disclosed. The porous multi-component material includes a substrate and a composite thin film. The composite thin film is formed by combining a porous polymer with a nanostructured material. The nanostructured material may include a surface chemistry for the capture of chemicals or particles. The composite thin film is coupled to the support or device surface. The method and material provides a simple, fast, and chemically and physically benign way to integrate nanostructured materials into devices while preserving their chemical activity.

  20. Multi-components determination by single reference standard and HPLC fingerprint analysis for Lamiophlomis rotata Pill.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wang, Yang; Sun, Guoxiang; Ma, Yongfu; Guo, Xingjie

    2016-07-01

    A validated HPLC method was developed to evaluate the quality of Lamiophlomis rotata Pill combining the multi-components analysis by single reference standard with HPLC fingerprint analysis. Five bioactive components (shanzhiside methyl ester, loganin, 8-O-acetylshanzhiside methyl ester, forsythoside B and luteolin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside) were selected as markers to control the quality of L. rotata Pill. The results revealed that the chromatographic fingerprint method coupled with multi-components analysis provides an effective and feasible way to determine the components in L. rotata Pill. PMID:26595778

  1. Lie algebras and Hamiltonian structures of multi-component Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiao-ying; Zhang, Da-jun

    2013-05-01

    Isospectral and non-isospectral hierarchies of multi-component Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur (AKNS) are obtained from a matrix spectral problem, then by means of the zero curvature representations of the isospectral flows {Km} and non-isospectral flows {σn}, we construct the symmetries and their algebraic structures for isospectral multi-component AKNS hierarchies, demonstrate the recursive operator L is a strong and hereditary symmetry for the isospectral hierarchy. We also derive that there are implectic operator θ and symplectic operator J such that L = θJ, and discuss the multi-Hamiltonian structures and the Liouville integrability of the isospectral hierarchies.

  2. Development of high quality, density-tunable two-dimensional electron gases for the study of the quantum Hall effect in the 2nd Landau level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, John; Mondal, Sumit; Manfra, Michael

    2014-03-01

    We report on progress in state-of-the-art high mobility two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in 30 nm GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells in which the density is modulated by an in-situ grown back-gate. Such in-situ gates can be grown close to the 2DEG (~ 1 μm) and without doping layers between the 2DEG and gate, resulting in non-hysteretic gating with a very uniform electric field and large gate capacitance. We discuss heterostructure design parameters and device processing conditions leading to low gate leakage currents, low ohmic contact resistances, high electron mobilities (17 x 106 cm2/Vs), and large fractional quantum Hall energy gaps in the second Landau level. Work supported by US DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering Award DE-SC0006671.

  3. [Study on high accuracy detection of multi-component gas in oil-immerse power transformer].

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Qi-Feng; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Gang

    2013-12-01

    In order to solve the problem of low accuracy and mutual interference in multi-component gas detection, a kind of multi-component gas detection network with high accuracy was designed. A semiconductor laser with narrow bandwidth was utilized as light source and a novel long-path gas cell was also used in this system. By taking the single sine signal to modulate the spectrum of laser and using space division multiplexing (SDM) and time division multiplexing (TDM) technique, the detection of multi-component gas was achieved. The experiments indicate that the linearity relevance coefficient is 0. 99 and the measurement relative error is less than 4%. The system dynamic response time is less than 15 s, by filling a volume of multi-component gas into the gas cell gradually. The system has advantages of high accuracy and quick response, which can be used in the fault gas on-line monitoring for power transformers in real time. PMID:24611396

  4. The Effects of a Multi-Component Intervention on Preschool Children's Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Lindsay R.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a multi-component intervention program (i.e., extended instruction and iPad app technology) on preschool children's vocabulary. Instruction utilizing the intervention program was provided across 6 storybooks, 4 verbs per book, for a total of 24 verbs. Dependent variables included expressive vocabulary,…

  5. A Multi-Component Model for Assessing Learning Objects: The Learning Object Evaluation Metric (LOEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Robin H.; Knaack, Liesel

    2008-01-01

    While discussion of the criteria needed to assess learning objects has been extensive, a formal, systematic model for evaluation has yet to be thoroughly tested. The purpose of the following study was to develop and assess a multi-component model for evaluating learning objects. The Learning Object Evaluation Metric (LOEM) was developed from a…

  6. A Multi-Component Intervention Designed To Reduce Disruptive Classroom Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehle, Thomas J.; Bray, Melissa A.; Theodore, Lea A.; Jenson, William R.; Clark, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    Describes research that focused on the design of an effective, economical, and easily implemented treatment for disruptive classroom behavior in both general and special education students. Multi-component treatment options included mystery motivators, token economy with response cost, and antecedent strategies delivered within a group contingency…

  7. Multi-component self-assembled anti-tumor nano-vaccines based on MUC1 glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Y; Chen, P G; Liu, Y F; Zhang, B D; Wu, J J; Chen, Y X; Zhao, Y F; Li, Y M

    2016-06-18

    Novel multi-component self-assembled nano-vaccines containing both Pam3CSK4 and CpG were developed for the first time. These multi-component vaccines could effectively activate the macrophages in vitro and elicit strong antibody immune responses and anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. PMID:27216415

  8. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? 59.506 Section 59.506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 59.506 How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? (a) If you...

  9. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? 59.506 Section 59.506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 59.506 How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? (a) If you...

  10. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? 59.506 Section 59.506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 59.506 How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? (a) If you...

  11. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? 59.506 Section 59.506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 59.506 How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? (a) If you...

  12. 40 CFR 59.506 - How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? 59.506 Section 59.506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... § 59.506 How do I demonstrate compliance if I manufacture multi-component kits? (a) If you...

  13. Effect of composition on the density of multi-component molten nitrate salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.

    2009-12-01

    The density of molten nitrate salts was measured to determine the effects of the constituents on the density of multi-component mixtures. The molten salts consisted of various proportions of the nitrates of potassium, sodium, lithium and calcium. Density measurements ere performed using an Archimedean method and the results were compared to data reported in the literature for the individual constituent salts or simple combinations, such as the binary Solar Salt mixture of NaNO3 and KNO3. The addition of calcium nitrate generally ncreased density, relative to potassium nitrate or sodium nitrate, while lithium nitrate decreased density. The temperature dependence of density is described by a linear equation regardless of composition. The molar volume, and thereby, density of multi-component mixtures an be calculated as a function of temperature using a linear additivity rule based on the properties of the individual constituents.

  14. Integrated ultracompact and broadband wavelength demultiplexer based on multi-component nano-cavities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cuicui; Liu, Yong-Chun; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Integrated nanoscale photonic devices have wide applications ranging from optical interconnects and optical computing to optical communications. Wavelength demultiplexer is an essential on-chip optical component which can separate the incident wavelength into different channels; however, the experimental progress is very limited. Here, using a multi-component nano-cavity design, we realize an ultracompact, broadband and high-contrast wavelength demultiplexer, with 2.3 μm feature size, 200 nm operation bandwidth (from 780 nm to 980 nm) and a contrast ratio up to 13.7 dB. The physical mechanism is based on the strong modulation of the surface plasmon polaritons induced by the multi-component nano-cavities, and it can be generalized to other nanoscale photonic devices. This provides a strategy for constructing on-chip photon routers, and also has applications for chip-integrated optical filter and optical logic gates. PMID:27263859

  15. Integrated ultracompact and broadband wavelength demultiplexer based on multi-component nano-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cuicui; Liu, Yong-Chun; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-06-01

    Integrated nanoscale photonic devices have wide applications ranging from optical interconnects and optical computing to optical communications. Wavelength demultiplexer is an essential on-chip optical component which can separate the incident wavelength into different channels; however, the experimental progress is very limited. Here, using a multi-component nano-cavity design, we realize an ultracompact, broadband and high-contrast wavelength demultiplexer, with 2.3 μm feature size, 200 nm operation bandwidth (from 780 nm to 980 nm) and a contrast ratio up to 13.7 dB. The physical mechanism is based on the strong modulation of the surface plasmon polaritons induced by the multi-component nano-cavities, and it can be generalized to other nanoscale photonic devices. This provides a strategy for constructing on-chip photon routers, and also has applications for chip-integrated optical filter and optical logic gates.

  16. Integrated ultracompact and broadband wavelength demultiplexer based on multi-component nano-cavities

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cuicui; Liu, Yong-Chun; Hu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Hong; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-01-01

    Integrated nanoscale photonic devices have wide applications ranging from optical interconnects and optical computing to optical communications. Wavelength demultiplexer is an essential on-chip optical component which can separate the incident wavelength into different channels; however, the experimental progress is very limited. Here, using a multi-component nano-cavity design, we realize an ultracompact, broadband and high-contrast wavelength demultiplexer, with 2.3 μm feature size, 200 nm operation bandwidth (from 780 nm to 980 nm) and a contrast ratio up to 13.7 dB. The physical mechanism is based on the strong modulation of the surface plasmon polaritons induced by the multi-component nano-cavities, and it can be generalized to other nanoscale photonic devices. This provides a strategy for constructing on-chip photon routers, and also has applications for chip-integrated optical filter and optical logic gates. PMID:27263859

  17. Permeation of multi-component liquids through new and pre-exposed glove materials

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, K.; Faniadis, S.

    1986-03-01

    Relative to the preponderance of multi-component solutions in industry, the availability of data on the barrier effectiveness of protective clothing to such solutions is minimal. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to measure the breakthrough times and permeation rates of 13 different multi-component liquids through 13 glove compositions. The solutions were selected to be representative of those in segments of the chemical and aircraft industries. The glove materials were tested as received and after one exposure to the liquids. The latter tests were designed to investigate factors associated with the reuse of gloves. Of the 8 basic glove materials, the butyl rubber and polyvinyl alcohol specimens exhibited the longest breakthrough times over the widest range of chemicals and chemical combinations.

  18. Constraint on the Multi-Component CKP Hierarchy and Recursion Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Li, Chuanzhong; He, Jingsong

    2016-06-01

    In this article, we give the definition of the multi-component constrained CKP (McCKP) and two-component constrained CKP (cCKP) hierarchies (under the condition N=2). Then we give recursion operators for the two-component cCKP hierarchy. At last, we give the constrained condition from the two-component cCKP hierarchies to cCKP hierarchy.

  19. Whistler Emission and Absorption Coefficients from AN Anisotropic, Multi-Component Plasma Including Dielectric Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leid, Terrence Vincent

    The emission of electron cyclotron radiation parallel to the magnetic field direction near the fundamental frequency from a fully ionized, multi-component plasma, is investigated for finite (omega)(,p)/(omega)(,c) within the Klimontovich formalism. Each species may have T(,(PARLL)) different from T(,(PERP)) and may possess a loss cone. We use a bi- maxwellian with an analytic loss cone for each component. In addition, the source function for a multi-component plasma is calculated. We find that for a Maxwellian distribution function the emission coefficient is that of a system of shielded charges. It is shown that only in the case of a tenuous Maxwellian plasma is the source function the Rayleigh-Jeans blackbody intensity. For the case of the Maxwellian we present experimental evidence for finite density emission, (omega)('2)(,p)/(omega)('2) >> (beta). We have constructed a computer code that solves the radiative transfer equation. The resulting power spectra are used as an aid in extracting from experimental data the temperature and density of the various components of the TMX-Upgrade end cell plasma. The code compares both the Ellis-Tsakiris scheme for computing the emission coefficient for a multi-component plasma and the finite density multi -component emission coefficient. The Ellis- Tsakiris scheme estimates the emission coefficient by assuming. that each species radiates independently of each other.('1) Results are presented for the case of the TMX -Upgrade tandem mirror device. ('1)R. F. Ellis and G. D. Tsakiris, Nucl. Fusion 23, 1115 (1984).

  20. Impact of multi-component diffusion in turbulent combustion using direct numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, Claudio; Sankaran, Vaidyanathan; Kolla, Hemanth; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-08-28

    This study presents the results of DNS of a partially premixed turbulent syngas/air flame at atmospheric pressure. The objective was to assess the importance and possible effects of molecular transport on flame behavior and structure. To this purpose DNS were performed at with two proprietary DNS codes and with three different molecular diffusion transport models: fully multi-component, mixture averaged, and imposing the Lewis number of all species to be unity.

  1. Forward modelling of multi-component induction logging tools in layered anisotropic dipping formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Xu, Chenhao; Xiao, Jiaqi

    2013-10-01

    Multi-component induction logging provides great assistance in the exploration of thinly laminated reservoirs. The 1D parametric inversion following an adaptive borehole correction is the key step in the data processing of multi-component induction logging responses. To make the inversion process reasonably fast, an efficient forward modelling method is necessary. In this paper, a modelling method has been developed to simulate the multi-component induction tools in deviated wells drilled in layered anisotropic formations. With the introduction of generalized reflection coefficients, the analytic expressions of magnetic field in the form of a Sommerfeld integral were derived. The fast numerical computation of the integral has been completed by using the fast Fourier-Hankel transform and fast Hankel transform methods. The latter is so time efficient that it is competent enough for real-time multi-parameter inversion. In this paper, some simulated results have been presented and they are in excellent agreement with the finite difference method code's solution.

  2. Structural and Thermodynamic Factors of Suppressed Interdiffusion Kinetics in Multi-component High-entropy Materials

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shou-Yi; Li, Chen-En; Huang, Yi-Chung; Hsu, Hsun-Feng; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Lin, Su-Jien

    2014-01-01

    We report multi-component high-entropy materials as extraordinarily robust diffusion barriers and clarify the highly suppressed interdiffusion kinetics in the multi-component materials from structural and thermodynamic perspectives. The failures of six alloy barriers with different numbers of elements, from unitary Ti to senary TiTaCrZrAlRu, against the interdiffusion of Cu and Si were characterized, and experimental results indicated that, with more elements incorporated, the failure temperature of the barriers increased from 550 to 900°C. The activation energy of Cu diffusion through the alloy barriers was determined to increase from 110 to 163 kJ/mole. Mechanistic analyses suggest that, structurally, severe lattice distortion strains and a high packing density caused by different atom sizes, and, thermodynamically, a strengthened cohesion provide a total increase of 55 kJ/mole in the activation energy of substitutional Cu diffusion, and are believed to be the dominant factors of suppressed interdiffusion kinetics through the multi-component barrier materials. PMID:24561911

  3. Multi-component ground motion response spectra for coupled horizontal, vertical, angular accelerations, and tilt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, E.; Graizer, V.

    2007-01-01

    Rotational and vertical components of ground motion are almost always ignored in design or in the assessment of structures despite the fact that vertical motion can be twice as much as the horizontal motion and may exceed 2g level, and rotational excitation may reach few degrees in the proximity of fault rupture. Coupling of different components of ground excitation may significantly amplify the seismic demand by introducing additional lateral forces and enhanced P-?? effects. In this paper, a governing equation of motion is postulated to compute the response of a SDOF oscillator under a multi-component excitation. The expanded equation includes secondary P-?? components associated with the combined impacts of tilt and vertical excitations in addition to the inertial forcing terms due to the angular and translational accelerations. The elastic and inelastic spectral ordinates traditionally generated considering the uniaxial input motion are compared at the end with the multi-component response spectra of coupled horizontal, vertical and tilting motions. The proposed multi-component response spectrum reflects kinematic characteristics of the ground motion that are not identifiable by the conventional spectrum itself, at least for the near-fault region where high intensity vertical shaking and rotational excitation are likely to occur.

  4. An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for single- and multi-component fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Favier, Julien; D'Ortona, Umberto; Poncet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical method to simulate single- and multi-component fluid flows around moving/deformable solid boundaries, based on the coupling of Immersed Boundary (IB) and Lattice Boltzmann (LB) methods. The fluid domain is simulated with LB method using the single relaxation time BGK model, in which an interparticle potential model is applied for multi-component fluid flows. The IB-related force is directly calculated with the interpolated definition of the fluid macroscopic velocity on the Lagrangian points that define the immersed solid boundary. The present IB-LB method can better ensure the no-slip solid boundary condition, thanks to an improved spreading operator. The proposed method is validated through several 2D/3D single- and multi-component fluid test cases with a particular emphasis on wetting conditions on solid wall. Finally, a 3D two-fluid application case is given to show the feasibility of modeling the fluid transport via a cluster of beating cilia.

  5. A combustion model for IC engine combustion simulations with multi-component fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2011-01-15

    Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for the oxidation of representative surrogate components of a typical multi-component automotive fuel have been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced mechanism for primary reference fuel (PRF) oxidation, further improvement was made by including additional reactions and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach to that used to develop the reduced PRF mechanism, reduced mechanisms for the oxidation of n-tetradecane, toluene, cyclohexane, dimethyl ether (DME), ethanol, and methyl butanoate (MB) were built and combined with the PRF mechanism to form a multi-surrogate fuel chemistry (MultiChem) mechanism. The final version of the MultiChem mechanism consists of 113 species and 487 reactions. Validation of the present MultiChem mechanism was performed with ignition delay time measurements from shock tube tests and predictions by comprehensive mechanisms available in the literature. A combustion model was developed to simulate engine combustion with multi-component fuels using the present MultiChem mechanism, and the model was applied to simulate HCCI and DI engine combustion. The results show that the present multi-component combustion model gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements through the use of reduced mechanism for multi-dimensional CFD simulations. (author)

  6. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. PMID:27258213

  7. NOBLE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Noble Gases symposium, on which this report is based, provided comprehensive coverage of the noble gases. The coverage included, but was not limited to, the properties, biokinetics, bioeffects, production and release to the environment, detection techniques, standards, and ap...

  8. DESIGN, SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF MULTI-COMPONENT AND INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR LIGHT-DRIVEN HYDROGEN GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Richard Eisenberg

    2012-07-18

    successful in the development of synthetic methodologies to make multi-component systems designed so as to maintain electronic communication between components held in a defined spatial arrangement. Systems effective for light driven H2 generation were examined by photophysical methods including transient absorption spectroscopy to observe charge-separated states and chart their dynamics. Quantum yields for hydrogen production were also measured. Additional studies examined the effectiveness of these systems for H2 generation and involved the development of new catalysts and systems based thereon. From these studies, a better understanding of initial steps in the light driven generation of hydrogen were obtained.

  9. Multi-component boron coatings on low carbon steel AISI 1018

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwattananont, Naruemon

    Boronizing and metalizing are thermo-chemical surface hardening treatments in which boron and metal atoms diffuse into the metal substrate forming metallic boride layers, providing complex properties of B-Me-Fe system. To study multi-component boron coatings on low carbon steel AISI 1018, the simultaneous powder pack method of boronizing and metalizing was selected to perform the coatings. One B-Fe system and eight boron-metal (B-Me-Fe) systems from transition metals group IVB (Ti, Zr, HO, group VB (Nb, Ta), and group VIB (Cr, Mo, W) were studied. The system specimens were thereto-chemically treated at 950°C for 4 hours in a crucible containing powder mixture of boron source, transition metal powder, and activator. After the heat treatment process, the multi-component boron coatings were characterized by using optical microscope, microhardness tester, TGA, XRD, and Synchrotron microdiffraction. The coating morphology was observed and the coating thickness was measured as well as the microhardness across the depth of coating. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated by the continuous weighting method. The high temperature oxidation was also detected by isothermal method at a temperature range of 400-800°C for 24 hours. The Rietveld refinement method was used to examine the quantitative phase analysis, crystalline size, microstrain and lattice parameters of the multi-component boron coatings. The results have shown that adding transition metals into the B-Fe system caused the formation of solid solution of transition-metal borides. The distortion of crystal lattice parameters generated microstrain in the boride phase. The Synchrotron microdiffraction confirmed the presence of about 5-10 microns of transition-metal boride phase at the surface. Moreover, the additional transition metal can provide better corrosion and high temperature oxidation resistance to the B-Fe system, preventing the deboronizing and stabilizing the boride phases.

  10. AEROFROSH: a shock condition calculator for multi-component fuel aerosol-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. F.; Haylett, D. R.; Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K.

    2015-08-01

    This article introduces an algorithm that determines the thermodynamic conditions behind incident and reflected shocks in aerosol-laden flows. Importantly, the algorithm accounts for the effects of droplet evaporation on post-shock properties. Additionally, this article describes an algorithm for resolving the effects of multiple-component-fuel droplets. This article presents the solution methodology and compares the results to those of another similar shock calculator. It also provides examples to show the impact of droplets on post-shock properties and the impact that multi-component fuel droplets have on shock experimental parameters. Finally, this paper presents a detailed uncertainty analysis of this algorithm's calculations given typical experimental uncertainties.

  11. An analysis method for multi-component airfoils in separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. M.; Duorak, F. A.; Maskew, B.

    1980-01-01

    The multi-component airfoil program (Langley-MCARF) for attached flow is modified to accept the free vortex sheet separation-flow model program (Analytical Methods, Inc.-CLMAX). The viscous effects are incorporated into the calculation by representing the boundary layer displacement thickness with an appropriate source distribution. The separation flow model incorporated into MCARF was applied to single component airfoils. Calculated pressure distributions for angles of attack up to the stall are in close agreement with experimental measurements. Even at higher angles of attack beyond the stall, correct trends of separation, decrease in lift coefficients, and increase in pitching moment coefficients are predicted.

  12. Influence of Natural Convection and Thermal Radiation Multi-Component Transport in MOCVD Reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, S.; Krishnan, A.; Clark, I.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of Grashof and Reynolds number in Metal Organic Chemical Vapor (MOCVD) reactors is being investigated under a combined empirical/numerical study. As part of that research, the deposition of Indium Phosphide in an MOCVD reactor is modeled using the computational code CFD-ACE. The model includes the effects of convection, conduction, and radiation as well as multi-component diffusion and multi-step surface/gas phase chemistry. The results of the prediction are compared with experimental data for a commercial reactor and analyzed with respect to the model accuracy.

  13. A semi-discrete integrable multi-component coherently coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hai-qiong; Yuan, Jinyun

    2016-07-01

    A new integrable semi-discrete version is proposed for the multi-component coherently coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The integrability of the semi-discrete system is confirmed by existence of Lax pair and infinite number of conservation laws. With the aid of gauge transformations, explicit formulas for N-fold Darboux transformations are derived whereby some physically important solutions of the system are presented. Furthermore, the theory of the semi-discrete system including Lax pair, Darboux transformations, exact solutions and infinite number of conservation laws are shown for their continuous counterparts in the continuous limit.

  14. Novel multi-component hybrids through double luminescent lanthanide unit functionalized zeolite L and titania.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yan, Bing

    2015-12-01

    Zeolite L (ZL) is functionalized with inside-outside double modification paths (gas disperse ("ship in bottle") and covalently grafting) with two kinds of luminescent lanthanide species (Tb(3+) complex of acetylacetone (AA), lanthanide polyoxometalate (NaLnW10O36·32H2O, abbreviated as LnW10, Ln=Eu, Tb)) to prepare the hybrid materials. The prepared hybrids show the red and green luminescence, which provides a useful path to obtain multi-component lanthanide hybrids. PMID:26125989

  15. Line of critical points in 2+1 dimensions: quantum critical loop gases and non-Abelian gauge theory.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Michael; Nayak, Chetan; Shtengel, Kirill

    2005-04-15

    In this Letter, we (1) construct a one-parameter family of lattice models of interacting spins; (2) obtain their exact ground states; (3) derive a statistical-mechanical analogy which relates their ground states to O(n) loop gases; (4) show that the models are critical for d

  16. Multi-component Wronskian solution to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Sun, Fu-Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Juan

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation can be decomposed into the first two members of the coupled Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur (AKNS) hierarchy by the binary non-linearization of Lax pairs. In this paper, we construct the N-th iterated Darboux transformation (DT) for the second- and third-order m-coupled AKNS systems. By using together the N-th iterated DT and Cramer's rule, we find that the KPII equation has the unreduced multi-component Wronskian solution and the KPI equation admits a reduced multi-component Wronskian solution. In particular, based on the unreduced and reduced two-component Wronskians, we obtain two families of fully-resonant line-soliton solutions which contain arbitrary numbers of asymptotic solitons as y → ∓∞ to the KPII equation, and the ordinary N-soliton solution to the KPI equation. In addition, we find that the KPI line solitons propagating in parallel can exhibit the bound state at the moment of collision.

  17. Upscaling multi-component reactive transport in presence of connected subsurface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmann, M.; Mañé, R.; Tyukhova, A.

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneity in hydraulic conductivity leads to incomplete mixing. Upscaling using the dispersion tensor in the advection-dispersion equation overestimates local mixing. Modelling multi-component reactive transport leads to an overestimation of reaction rates and overall reactions. Multi-rate mass transfer was shown previously to better represent mixing. But it is still unclear under what conditions this linear model is able to represent the underlying non-linear process. We study explicit multi-component transport in heterogeneous aquifers for the example of calcite-dissolution. We compare different types of heterogeneity from intermediately well connected (multigaussian) fields to very well connected fields. The fundamental difference stems from their connectivity structure. We observe for the well connected field different dominating channels with an almost uniform advective velocity while the multigaussian fields show dominating channels with a varying advective velocity. Then, we compare our results with an effective reactive mass transfer model where the distribution of exchanges rates or the memory function are derived from information of the hydraulic conductivity field only. We see that reactive multi-rate models show a good agreement for the well connected fields where the connected channels are more or less homogeneous and the immobile inclusions are of more or less equal size. We find connectivity important for upscaling reactive transport in highly heterogeneous conductivity fields.

  18. Removal of bacterial indicators and pathogens from dairy wastewater by a multi-component treatment system.

    PubMed

    Karpiscak, M M; Sanchez, L R; Freitas, R J; Gerba, C P

    2001-01-01

    Microbial removal by a multi-component treatment system for dairy and municipal wastewater is being studied in Arizona, USA. The system consists of paired solids separators, anaerobic lagoons, aerobic ponds and constructed wetlands cells. The organisms under study include: total coliform, fecal coliform, enterovirus, Listeria monocytogenes, Clostridium perfringens, coliphage, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. Organism removal rates from dairy wastewater varied from 13.2 per cent for fecal coliform to 94.9 per cent for coliphage. It appears that the much higher turbidity of the dairy wastewater, nearly 1,300 NTU, decreased the treatment systems' ability to remove some microbial indicators and pathogens. Information from this study can be used to determine the adequacy of multi-component treatment systems for the control of wastewater-borne pathogens, both in municipal treatment systems as well as in confined animal feeding operations (CAFO). This information also can assist municipalities and the CAFO industry in the implementation of rational and efficient treatment strategies for appropriate reuse of wastewaters. PMID:11804092

  19. A Robust MEMS Based Multi-Component Sensor for 3D Borehole Seismic Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsson Geophysical Services

    2008-03-31

    The objective of this project was to develop, prototype and test a robust multi-component sensor that combines both Fiber Optic and MEMS technology for use in a borehole seismic array. The use such FOMEMS based sensors allows a dramatic increase in the number of sensors that can be deployed simultaneously in a borehole seismic array. Therefore, denser sampling of the seismic wave field can be afforded, which in turn allows us to efficiently and adequately sample P-wave as well as S-wave for high-resolution imaging purposes. Design, packaging and integration of the multi-component sensors and deployment system will target maximum operating temperature of 350-400 F and a maximum pressure of 15000-25000 psi, thus allowing operation under conditions encountered in deep gas reservoirs. This project aimed at using existing pieces of deployment technology as well as MEMS and fiber-optic technology. A sensor design and analysis study has been carried out and a laboratory prototype of an interrogator for a robust borehole seismic array system has been assembled and validated.

  20. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C. PMID:22559543

  1. Numerical investigation of spray ignition of a multi-component fuel surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, Lara; Narayanaswamy, Krithika; Pepiot, Perrine

    2014-11-01

    Simulating turbulent spray ignition, an important process in engine combustion, is challenging, since it combines the complexity of multi-scale, multiphase turbulent flow modeling with the need for an accurate description of chemical kinetics. In this work, we use direct numerical simulation to investigate the role of the evaporation model on the ignition characteristics of a multi-component fuel surrogate, injected as droplets in a turbulent environment. The fuel is represented as a mixture of several components, each one being representative of a different chemical class. A reduced kinetic scheme for the mixture is extracted from a well-validated detailed chemical mechanism, and integrated into the multiphase turbulent reactive flow solver NGA. Comparisons are made between a single-component evaporation model, in which the evaporating gas has the same composition as the liquid droplet, and a multi-component model, where component segregation does occur. In particular, the corresponding production of radical species, which are characteristic of the ignition of individual fuel components, is thoroughly analyzed.

  2. Multi-component molecular-level body composition reference methods: evolving concepts and future directions.

    PubMed

    Heymsfield, S B; Ebbeling, C B; Zheng, J; Pietrobelli, A; Strauss, B J; Silva, A M; Ludwig, D S

    2015-04-01

    Excess adiposity is the main phenotypic feature that defines human obesity and that plays a pathophysiological role in most chronic diseases. Measuring the amount of fat mass present is thus a central aspect of studying obesity at the individual and population levels. Nevertheless, a consensus is lacking among investigators on a single accepted 'reference' approach for quantifying fat mass in vivo. While the research community generally relies on the multi-component body volume class of 'reference' models for quantifying fat mass, no definable guide discerns among different applied equations for partitioning the four (fat, water, protein and mineral mass) or more quantified components, standardizes 'adjustment' or measurement system approaches for model-required labelled water dilution volumes and bone mineral mass estimates, or firmly establishes the body temperature at which model physical properties are assumed. The resulting differing reference strategies for quantifying body composition in vivo leads to small, but under some circumstances, important differences in the amount of measured body fat. Recent technological advances highlight opportunities to expand model applications to new subject groups and measured components such as total body protein. The current report reviews the historical evolution of multi-component body volume-based methods in the context of prevailing uncertainties and future potential. PMID:25645009

  3. A level set simulation of dendritic solidification of multi-component alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lijian; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    A level set method combining features of front tracking methods and fixed domain methods is presented to model microstructure evolution in the solidification of multi-component alloys. Phase boundaries are tracked by solving the multi-phase level set equations. Diffused interfaces are constructed from these tracked phase boundaries using the level set functions. Based on the assumed diffused interfaces, volume-averaging techniques are applied for energy, species and momentum transport. Microstructure evolution in multi-component alloy systems is predicted using realistic material parameters. The methodology avoids the difficulty of parameter identification needed in other diffused interface models, and allows easy application to various practical alloy systems. Techniques including fast marching, narrow band computing and adaptive meshing are utilized to speed up computations. Several numerical examples are considered to validate the method and examine its potential for modeling solidification of practical alloy systems. These examples include two- and three-dimensional solidification of a binary alloy in an undercooled melt, a study of planar/cellular/dendritic transition in the solidification of a Ni-Cu alloy, and eutectic and peritectic solidification of an Fe-C system. Adaptive mesh refinement in the rapidly varying interface region makes the method practical for coupling the microstructure evolution at the meso-scale with buoyancy driven flow in the macro-scale, which is shown in the solidification of a Ni-Al-Ta ternary alloy.

  4. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra-efficient and low-emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttria based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  5. Advanced Multi-Component Defect Cluster Oxide Doped Zirconia-Yttria Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The advantages of using ceramic thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engine hot sections include increased fuel efficiency and improved engine reliability. However, current thermal barrier coatings will not have the low thermal conductivity and necessary sintering resistance under higher operating temperatures and thermal gradients required by future advanced ultra efficient and low emission aircraft engines. In this paper, a novel oxide defect cluster design approach is described for achieving low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal stability of the thermal barrier coating systems. This approach utilizes multi-component rare earth and other metal cluster oxide dopants that are incorporated in the zirconia-yttna based systems, thus significantly reducing coating thermal conductivity and sintering resistance by effectively promoting the formation of thermodynamically stable, essentially immobile defect clusters and/or nanoscale phases. The performance of selected plasma-sprayed cluster oxide thermal barrier coating systems has been evaluated. The advanced multi-component thermal barrier coating systems were found to have significantly lower initial and long-term thermal conductivities, and better high temperature stability. The effect of oxide cluster dopants on coating thermal conductivity, sintering resistance, oxide grain growth behavior and durability will be discussed.

  6. Directing folding pathways for multi-component DNA origami nanostructures with complex topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marras, A. E.; Zhou, L.; Kolliopoulos, V.; Su, H.-J.; Castro, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular self-assembly has become a well-established technique to design complex nanostructures and hierarchical mesoscale assemblies. The typical approach is to design binding complementarity into nucleotide or amino acid sequences to achieve the desired final geometry. However, with an increasing interest in dynamic nanodevices, the need to design structures with motion has necessitated the development of multi-component structures. While this has been achieved through hierarchical assembly of similar structural units, here we focus on the assembly of topologically complex structures, specifically with concentric components, where post-folding assembly is not feasible. We exploit the ability to direct folding pathways to program the sequence of assembly and present a novel approach of designing the strand topology of intermediate folding states to program the topology of the final structure, in this case a DNA origami slider structure that functions much like a piston-cylinder assembly in an engine. The ability to program the sequence and control orientation and topology of multi-component DNA origami nanostructures provides a foundation for a new class of structures with internal and external moving parts and complex scaffold topology. Furthermore, this work provides critical insight to guide the design of intermediate states along a DNA origami folding pathway and to further understand the details of DNA origami self-assembly to more broadly control folding states and landscapes.

  7. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: Scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.; Jansen, M.; Fuente, G. F. de la

    2012-04-15

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 deg. C.

  8. Bloch oscillation, dynamical localization, and optical probing of electron gases in quantum-dot superlattices in high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Danhong; Lyo, S. K.; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we present numerical results for steady-state and time-dependent currents as well as for a long-time average current in strong nonlinear dc and ac electric fields for an electron gas in a one-dimensional (1D) quantum-dot superlattice. A microscopic model is employed for the scattering of electrons by phonons and static impurities by means of the Boltzmann equation method. The dc results are favorably compared with recent exact analytic results based on a relaxation-time model for electron-phonon scattering. Our results demonstrate the different roles played by elastic and inelastic scattering on the damped Bloch oscillations as well as the nonlinear steady-state current and their opposite roles on the damped dynamical localization. We also find a suppression of dynamical localization by strong Bloch oscillations and features in the Esaki-Tsu peaks in the presence of an ac electric field when electron scattering is included. On the basis of a nonequilibrium electron distribution obtained from the Boltzmann equation, a self-consistent-field approach is employed to establish a general formalism for the optical response of current-driven electrons in both the linear and nonlinear regimes to a 1D quantum-dot superlattice. The dc-field dependences of both the peak energy and peak strength in the absorption spectrum for a 1D quantum-dot superlattice are calculated, from which we find: (1) both the peak energy and its strength are significantly reduced with increasing dc electric field; and (2) the peak energy and peak strength are anomalously enhanced by raising the temperature for the nonlinear transport of electrons when a strong dc electric field is applied.

  9. Optically trapped quasi-two-dimensional Bose gases in a random environment: Quantum fluctuations and superfluid density

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Kezhao; Liang Zhaoxin; Zhang Zhidong; Hu Ying

    2010-10-15

    We investigate a dilute Bose gas confined in a tight one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice plus a superimposed random potential at zero temperature. Accordingly, the ground-state energy, quantum depletion, and superfluid density are calculated. The presence of the lattice introduces a crossover to the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) regime, where we analyze asymptotically the 2D behavior of the system, particularly the effects of disorder. We thereby offer an analytical expression for the ground-state energy of a purely 2D Bose gas in a random potential. The obtained disorder-induced normal fluid density n{sub n} and quantum depletion n{sub d} both exhibit a characteristic 1/ln(1/n{sub 2D}a{sub 2D}{sup 2}) dependence. Their ratio n{sub n}/n{sub d} increases to 2 compared to the familiar 4/3 in lattice-free three-dimensional (3D) geometry, signifying a more pronounced contrast between superfluidity and Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensions. The conditions for possible experimental realization of our scenario are also proposed.

  10. Sensitive detection of CO2 concentration and temperature for hot gases using quantum-cascade laser absorption spectroscopy near 4.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kuijun; Li, Faquan; Cheng, Xuewu; Yang, Yong; Lin, Xin; Xia, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Mid-infrared quantum-cascade laser (QCL) absorption spectroscopy of CO2 near 4.2 μm has been developed for measurement of temperature and concentration in hot gases. With stronger absorption line-strengths than transitions near 1.5, 2.0, and 2.7 μm used previously, the fundamental band (0001-0000) of CO2 near 4.2 μm provides greatly enhanced sensitivity and accuracy to sense CO2 in high-temperature gases. Line R(74) and line R(96) are chosen as optimum pair for sensitive temperature measurements due to their high-temperature sensitivity, equal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), weak interference of H2O transitions, as well as relatively strong line-strengths in high temperature and weak absorption in room temperature. The high-resolution absorption spectrum of the far wings of the R-branch (R56-R100) in the fundamental vibrational band of CO2 is measured in a heated cell over the range 2,384-2,396 cm-1 at different temperatures from 700 to 1,200 K. Taking three factors into consideration, including SNR, concentration detectability, and uncertainty sensitivity, the absorption line R(74) is selected to calculate CO2 concentration. The tunable QCL absorption sensor is validated in mixtures of CO2 and N2 in a static cell for temperature range of 700-1,200 K, achieving an accuracy of ±6 K for temperature and ±5 % for concentration measurements.

  11. Spin-orbit coupling in GaxIn1-xAs/InP two-dimensional electron gases and quantum wire structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäpers, Th; Guzenko, V. A.; Bringer, A.; Akabori, M.; Hagedorn, M.; Hardtdegen, H.

    2009-06-01

    In this work, the effect of spin-orbit coupling in two-dimensional electron gases and quantum wire structures is discussed. First, the theoretical framework is introduced including spin-orbit coupling due to structural inversion asymmetry, the so-called Rashba effect, as well as the Dresselhaus term. The latter originates from bulk inversion asymmetry. With regard to wire structures, special attention is devoted to the influence of the particular shape of the confinement potential on the energy spectrum. As a model system GaxIn1-xAs/InP heterostructures are chosen, where different thicknesses of the strained Ga0.23In0.77As channel layer were introduced, in order to adjust the strength of the spin-orbit coupling. Hall bar structures as well as sets of identical wires with different widths were prepared. In two-dimensional electron gases, the strength of the spin-orbit coupling was extracted by analyzing the characteristic beating pattern in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. In addition, the weak antilocalization was utilized to obtain information on the spin-orbit coupling. It is shown that for decreasing width of the strained layer the Rashba effect, which dominates in our layer systems, is increased. This behavior is attributed to the larger interface contribution if the electron wavefunction is strongly confined. The measurements on the wire structures revealed a transition from weak antilocalization to weak localization if the wire width is decreased. This effect is attributed to an enhanced spin diffusion length for strongly confined systems.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo method for pairing phenomena: Supercounterfluid of two-species Bose gases in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgoe, Takahiro; Kawashima, Naoki

    2011-02-15

    We study the supercounterfluid (SCF) states in the two-component hard-core Bose-Hubbard model on a square lattice, using the quantum Monte Carlo method based on the worm (directed-loop) algorithm. Since the SCF state is a state of a pair condensation characterized by {ne}0,=0, and =0, where a and b are the order parameters of the two components, it is important to study behaviors of the pair-correlation function . For this purpose, we propose a choice of the worm head for calculating the pair-correlation function. From this pair correlation, we confirm the Kosterlitz-Thouless character of the SCF phase. The simulation efficiency is also improved in the SCF phase.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo method for pairing phenomena: Supercounterfluid of two-species Bose gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgoe, Takahiro; Kawashima, Naoki

    2011-02-01

    We study the supercounterfluid (SCF) states in the two-component hard-core Bose-Hubbard model on a square lattice, using the quantum Monte Carlo method based on the worm (directed-loop) algorithm. Since the SCF state is a state of a pair condensation characterized by ≠0,=0, and =0, where a and b are the order parameters of the two components, it is important to study behaviors of the pair-correlation function . For this purpose, we propose a choice of the worm head for calculating the pair-correlation function. From this pair correlation, we confirm the Kosterlitz-Thouless character of the SCF phase. The simulation efficiency is also improved in the SCF phase.

  14. A finite element method based microwave heat transfer modeling of frozen multi-component foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy

    Microwave heating is fast and convenient, but is highly non-uniform. Non-uniform heating in microwave cooking affects not only food quality but also food safety. Most food industries develop microwavable food products based on "cook-and-look" approach. This approach is time-consuming, labor intensive and expensive and may not result in optimal food product design that assures food safety and quality. Design of microwavable food can be realized through a simulation model which describes the physical mechanisms of microwave heating in mathematical expressions. The objective of this study was to develop a microwave heat transfer model to predict spatial and temporal profiles of various heterogeneous foods such as multi-component meal (chicken nuggets and mashed potato), multi-component and multi-layered meal (lasagna), and multi-layered food with active packages (pizza) during microwave heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed by solving electromagnetic and heat transfer equations using finite element method in commercially available COMSOL Multiphysics v4.4 software. The microwave heat transfer model included detailed geometry of the cavity, phase change, and rotation of the food on the turntable. The predicted spatial surface temperature patterns and temporal profiles were validated against the experimental temperature profiles obtained using a thermal imaging camera and fiber-optic sensors. The predicted spatial surface temperature profile of different multi-component foods was in good agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles in terms of hot and cold spot patterns. The root mean square error values of temporal profiles ranged from 5.8 °C to 26.2 °C in chicken nuggets as compared 4.3 °C to 4.7 °C in mashed potatoes. In frozen lasagna, root mean square error values at six locations ranged from 6.6 °C to 20.0 °C for 6 min of heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed to include susceptor assisted microwave heating of a

  15. Multi-component nanofibrous scaffolds with tunable properties for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Moncy V.

    Bone is a highly complex tissue which is an integral part of vertebrates and hence any damage has a major negative effect on the quality of life. Tissue engineering is regarded as an ideal route to resolve the issues related to the scarcity of tissue and organ for transplantation. Apart from cell line and growth factors, the choice of materials and fabrication technique for scaffold are equally important. The goal of this work was to develop a multi-component nanofibrous scaffold based on a synthetic polymer (poly(lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA)), a biopolymer (collagen) and a biomineral (nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA)) by electrospinning technique, which mimics the nanoscopic, chemical, and anisotropic features of bone. Preliminary studies involved fabrication of nanocomposite scaffolds based on PLGA and nano-HA. Morphological and mechanical characterizations revealed that at low concentrations, nano-HA acted as reinforcements, whereas at higher concentrations the presence of aggregation was detrimental to the scaffold. Hydrolytic degradation studies revealed the scaffold had a little mass loss and the mechanical property was maintained for a period of 6 weeks. This study was followed by evaluation of a blend system based on PLGA and collagen. Collagen addition provides hydrophilicity and the necessary cell binding sites in PLGA. The structural characterization revealed that the blend had limited interactions between the two components. The mechanical characterization revealed that with increasing collagen concentration, there was a decline in mechanical properties. However, crosslinking of the blend system, with carbodiimide (EDC) resulted in improving the mechanical properties of the scaffolds. A multi-component system was developed by adding different concentrations of nano-HA to a fixed PLGA/collagen blend composition (80/20). Morphological and mechanical characterizations revealed properties similar to the PLGA/HA system. Cyto-compatibility studies revealed

  16. Effectiveness of multi-component non-pharmacologic delirium interventions: A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hshieh, Tammy T.; Yue, Jirong; Oh, Esther; Puelle, Margaret; Dowal, Sarah; Travison, Thomas; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Delirium, an acute disorder with high morbidity and mortality, is often preventable through multi-component non-pharmacologic strategies. The efficacy of these strategies for preventing subsequent adverse outcomes has been limited to small studies. Objective Evaluate available evidence on multi-component non-pharmacologic delirium interventions in reducing incident delirium and preventing poor outcomes associated with delirium. Data Sources PubMed, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from January 1, 1999–December 31, 2013. Study Selection Studies examining the following outcomes were included: delirium incidence, falls, length of stay, rate of discharge to a long-term care institution, change in functional or cognitive status. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two experienced physician reviewers independently and blindly abstracted data on outcome measures using a standardized approach. The reviewers conducted quality ratings based on the Cochrane Risk of Bias criteria for each study. Main Outcomes and Measures We identified 14 interventional studies. Results for outcomes of delirium, falls, length of stay and institutionalization data were pooled for meta-analysis but heterogeneity limited meta-analysis of results for outcomes of functional and cognitive decline. Overall, eleven studies demonstrated significant reductions in delirium incidence (Odds Ratio 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval 0.38–0.58). The four randomized or matched (RMT) studies reduced delirium incidence by 44% (95% CI 0.42–0.76). Rate of falls decreased significantly among intervention patients in four studies (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.25–0.60); in the two RMTs, the fall rate was reduced by 64% (95% CI 0.22–0.61). Lengths of stay and institutionalization rates also trended towards decreases in the intervention groups, mean difference −0.16 days shorter (95% CI −0.97–0.64) and odds of institutionalization 5% lower (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.71–1

  17. Multi-component dark matter in the light of new AMS-02 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chang; Huang, Da; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2015-10-01

    We study the possible positron/electron excesses within the multi-component leptonically decaying dark matter (DM) scenario by fitting the most recent AMS-02 data on the positron fraction and total e+ + e- flux. We show that both the single- and two-component DM models are able to fit the two AMS-02 datasets. However, the single-component DM model favors the e+/e- energy cutoff from the DM decay less than 1 TeV through the τ-channel, which is already well constrained by the diffuse γ-ray spectrum measured by Fermi-LAT. For the two-component case with closing the τ-mode for the heavy DM particle, we find that the new AMS-02 data allows the heavy DM cutoff larger than 1 TeV, providing a good description of the high-energy behavior of the total e+ + e- flux and satisfying the diffuse γ-ray constraint.

  18. Unsupervised color image segmentation using graph cuts with multi-components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Jin, Lianghai; Song, Enmin; Dong, Zhuoli

    2013-10-01

    A novel unsupervised color image segmentation method based on graph cuts with multi-components is proposed, which finds an optimal segmentation of an image by regarding it as an energy minimization problem. First, L*a*b* color space is chosen as color feature, and the multi-scale quaternion Gabor filter is employed to extract texture feature of the given image. Then, the segmentation is formulated in terms of energy minimization with an iterative process based on graph cuts, and the connected regions in each segment are considered as the components of the segment in each iteration. In addition, canny edge detector combined with color gradient is used to remove weak edges in segmentation results with the proposed algorithm. In contrast to previous algorithms, our method could greatly reduce computational complexity during inference procedure by graph cuts. Experimental results demonstrate the promising performance of the proposed method.

  19. Exact solution of Smoluchowski's continuous multi-component equation with an additive kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Díaz, J. M.; Gómez-García, G. J.

    2007-06-01

    Smoluchowski's equation is used to analyse the dynamics of particulate systems under aggregation processes in aerosol physics, atmospheric physics, astrophysics, polymer chemistry, colloidal chemistry, etc. Here we provide an exact analytical solution for Smoluchowski's general, continuous, multi-component equation with additive kernel, for any initial particle size distribution (PSD). Once obtained the general solution, we apply it to a case with initial gamma PSD, which can be used to test numerical methods developed for solving more general cases. We have analysed the behaviour for large sizes and time, and a scaling approximation has been obtained as Vigil and Ziff conjectured. For bi-component mixtures we prove that as time increases, for the additive kernel, we cannot use the scaling solution to describe the behaviour of the number PSD on the whole. This fact contradicts a recent affirmation on the subject done by Matsoukas et al.

  20. Dispersion relation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-component magneto-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Vibhooti Ahirwar, G.

    2015-07-31

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi component plasma composed of electrons (denoted by e{sup −}), hydrogen ions (denoted by H{sup +}), helium ions (denoted by He{sup +}) and positively charged oxygen ions (denoted by O{sup +})in magnetized cold plasma. The wave is assumed to propagate perpendicular to the static magnetic field. It is found that the addition of heavy ions in the plasma dispersion modified the lower hybrid mode and also allowed an ion-ion mode. The frequencies of the lower hybrid and ion- ion hybrid modes are derived using cold plasma theory. It is observed that the effect of multi-ionfor different plasma densities on electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is to enhance the wave frequencies. The results are interpreted for the magnetosphere has been applied parameters by auroral acceleration region.

  1. Single-pulse Multi-point Multi-component Interferometric Rayleigh Scattering Velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Danehy, Paul M.; Lee, Joseph W.; Gaffney, Richard L., Jr.; Cutler, Andrew W.

    2006-01-01

    A simultaneous multi-point, multi-component velocimeter using interferometric detection of the Doppler shift of Rayleigh, Mie, and Rayleigh-Brillouin scattered light in supersonic flow is described. The system uses up to three sets of collection optics and one beam combiner for the reference laser light to form a single collimated beam. The planar Fabry-Perot interferometer used in the imaging mode for frequency detection preserves the spatial distribution of the signal reasonably well. Single-pulse multi-points measurements of up to two orthogonal and one non-orthogonal components of velocity in a Mach 2 free jet were performed to demonstrate the technique. The average velocity measurements show a close agreement with the CFD calculations using the VULCAN code.

  2. [Fluorescence emission spectra of petroleumsulfonate and OP-10 in multi-components aqueous solutions].

    PubMed

    Bi, Z; Ye, J; Yu, J

    1998-06-01

    The determination of surfactant(s) in the alkaline/surfactant/polymer flooding solutions was an uneasy job. For this purpose, the method of fluorescence emission by phenoxy-containing surfactants in dilute solutions is suggested. The fluorescence emission intensity changes linearly with in the extent of low surfactant concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and is not influenced by the presence of alkali, polymer PHPAM and salts. Under certain conditions the fluorescence emission by petroleum sulfonate and OP-10 in a multi-components aqueous solution can be detected independently. This method is high-selective, sensitive (the lowest detectable concentration 10(-7) mol/L) and microanalytical (the amount of test solution 2-3 microL). PMID:15810288

  3. Assessing the state of environmental quality in cities - A multi-component urban performance (EMCUP) index.

    PubMed

    Stossel, Zeev; Kissinger, Meidad; Meir, Avinoam

    2015-11-01

    Urban environmental quality indices can provide policy makers and the public with valuable information. However, common assessment tools have several shortcomings: most indices do leave out some important components of the state of urban environmental quality; they use a relative assessment in which urban environmental performance is evaluated relative to other cities, not against established environmental benchmarks; and only a few assessment tools compare urban performance to environmental quality standards. This paper presents a new multi component urban performance (EMCUP) index aiming to tackle those shortcomings. It analyses the overall state of urban environmental quality by using a list of indicators to evaluate key urban environmental quality topics such as air, water, open space, sanitation and solid waste. It presents an absolute score calculated in relation to both the standard and desired optimum levels. The use of the index is demonstrated by three Israeli cities. PMID:26334706

  4. SCOUSE: Semi-automated multi-COmponent Universal Spectral-line fitting Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henshaw, J. D.; Longmore, S. N.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Davies, B.; Bally, J.; Barnes, A.; Battersby, C.; Burton, M.; Cunningham, M. R.; Dale, J. E.; Ginsburg, A.; Immer, K.; Jones, P. A.; Kendrew, S.; Mills, E. A. C.; Molinari, S.; Moore, T. J. T.; Ott, J.; Pillai, T.; Rathborne, J.; Schilke, P.; Schmiedeke, A.; Testi, L.; Walker, D.; Walsh, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-01-01

    The Semi-automated multi-COmponent Universal Spectral-line fitting Engine (SCOUSE) is a spectral line fitting algorithm that fits Gaussian files to spectral line emission. It identifies the spatial area over which to fit the data and generates a grid of spectral averaging areas (SAAs). The spatially averaged spectra are fitted according to user-provided tolerance levels, and the best fit is selected using the Akaike Information Criterion, which weights the chisq of a best-fitting solution according to the number of free-parameters. A more detailed inspection of the spectra can be performed to improve the fit through an iterative process, after which SCOUSE integrates the new solutions into the solution file.

  5. A solid-state NMR method to determine domain sizes in multi-component polymer formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Tang, Mingxue; Baias, Maria; Richardson, Sara; Schantz, Staffan; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-12-01

    Polymer domain sizes are related to many of the physical properties of polymers. Here we present a solid-state NMR experiment that is capable of measuring domain sizes in multi-component mixtures. The method combines selective excitation of carbon magnetization to isolate a specific component with proton spin diffusion to report on domain size. We demonstrate the method in the context of controlled release formulations, which represents one of today's challenges in pharmaceutical science. We show that we can measure domain sizes of interest in the different components of industrial pharmaceutical formulations at natural isotopic abundance containing various (modified) cellulose derivatives, such as microcrystalline cellulose matrixes that are film-coated with a mixture of ethyl cellulose (EC) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC).

  6. Accurate design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Neil P.; Bale, Jacob B.; Sheffler, William; McNamara, Dan E.; Gonen, Shane; Gonen, Tamir; Yeates, Todd O.; Baker, David

    2014-06-01

    The self-assembly of proteins into highly ordered nanoscale architectures is a hallmark of biological systems. The sophisticated functions of these molecular machines have inspired the development of methods to engineer self-assembling protein nanostructures; however, the design of multi-component protein nanomaterials with high accuracy remains an outstanding challenge. Here we report a computational method for designing protein nanomaterials in which multiple copies of two distinct subunits co-assemble into a specific architecture. We use the method to design five 24-subunit cage-like protein nanomaterials in two distinct symmetric architectures and experimentally demonstrate that their structures are in close agreement with the computational design models. The accuracy of the method and the number and variety of two-component materials that it makes accessible suggest a route to the construction of functional protein nanomaterials tailored to specific applications.

  7. Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed MemoryComputer Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris

    2005-03-24

    A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflop scale computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the Community Climate System Model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice components. Each component is semi-independent and has been developed at a different institution. We study how this multi-component, multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory architectures. For the first time, we clearly identify five effective execution modes and develop the MPH library to support application development utilizing these modes. MPH performs component-name registration, resource allocation and initial component handshaking in a flexible way.

  8. Dynamic Multi-Component Covalent Assembly for the Reversible Binding of Secondary Alcohols and Chirality Sensing

    PubMed Central

    You, Lei; Berman, Jeffrey S.; Anslyn, Eric V.

    2011-01-01

    Reversible covalent bonding is often employed for the creation of novel supramolecular structures, multi-component assemblies, and sensing ensembles. In spite of remarkable success of dynamic covalent systems, the reversible binding of a mono-alcohol with high strength is challenging. Here we show that a strategy of carbonyl activation and hemiaminal ether stabilization can be embodied in a four-component reversible assembly that creates a tetradentate ligand and incorporates secondary alcohols with exceptionally high affinity. Evidence is presented that the intermediate leading to binding and exchange of alcohols is an iminium ion. Further, to demonstrate the use of this assembly process we explored chirality sensing and enantiomeric excess determinations. An induced twist in the ligand by a chiral mono-ol results in large Cotton effects in the circular dichroism spectra indicative of the alcohol’s handedness. The strategy revealed in this study should prove broadly applicable for the incorporation of alcohols into supramolecular architecture construction. PMID:22109274

  9. Recent advances on multi-component hybrid nanostructures for electrochemical capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Pan; Zhu, Junwu; Wang, Xin

    2015-10-01

    With the continuously growing energy demand and ever-escalating environmental problems, the great energy transition from conventional fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy is under way, and requires more efficient and reliable electrochemical energy storage devices, such as electrochemical capacitors (also called as supercapacitors). In order to achieve high energy and power densities of supercapacitors, numerous efforts are devoted to the development of advanced multi-component hybrid electrode materials for realizing high-performance. This review summarizes the most recent progress in the development of nanostructured electrode materials for energy storage, with a particular focus on these nanostructures that integrate carbon materials, metal oxides/hydroxides and conducting polymers for enhancing energy storage performances via taking advantage of each component's unique functionality and their synergetic effects. Finally, we give some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this intriguing field.

  10. Examining multi-component DNA-templated nanostructures as imaging agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaganathan, Hamsa

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the leading non-invasive tool for disease imaging and diagnosis. Although MRI exhibits high spatial resolution for anatomical features, the contrast resolution is low. Imaging agents serve as an aid to distinguish different types of tissues within images. Gadolinium chelates, which are considered first generation designs, can be toxic to health, while ultra-small, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have low tissue-targeting efficiency and rapid bio-distribution, resulting to an inadequate detection of the MRI signal and enhancement of image contrast. In order to improve the utility of MRI agents, the challenge in composition and structure needs to be addressed. One-dimensional (1D), superparamagnetic nanostructures have been reported to enhance magnetic and in vivo properties and therefore has a potential to improve contrast enhancement in MRI images. In this dissertation, the structure of 1D, multi-component NP chains, scaffolded on DNA, were pre-clinically examined as potential MRI agents. First, research was focused on characterizing and understanding the mechanism of proton relaxation for DNA-templated NP chains using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Proton relaxation and transverse relaxivity were higher in multi-component NP chains compared to disperse NPs, indicating the arrangement of NPs on a 1D structure improved proton relaxation sensitivity. Second, in vitro evaluation for potential issues in toxicity and contrast efficiency in tissue environments using a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner was performed. Cell uptake of DNA-templated NP chains was enhanced after encapsulating the nanostructure with layers of polyelectrolytes and targeting ligands. Compared to dispersed NPs, DNA-templated NP chains improved MRI contrast in both the epithelial basement membrane and colon cancer tumors scaffolds. The last part of the project was focused on developing a novel MRI agent that detects changes in DNA methylation