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Sample records for multi-national general paediatric

  1. Resuscitation of general paediatrics in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wacogne, I; Scott-Jupp, R; Chambers, T

    2006-12-01

    "The report of my death was an exaggeration", said Mark Twain. For a dying specialty, general paediatrics has certainly been looking very healthy recently. It is timely to examine why our specialty was thought to be at such risk, and to explore why, although in many cases shocked and confused, it is well on the way to recovery. This article explores what is needed to keep it healthy to ensure that the general paediatrician is at the centre of the delivery of paediatrics in the UK. PMID:17119078

  2. Continuous positive airway pressure for bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward; a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is commonly used to relieve respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis, but has mostly been studied in an intensive care setting. Our prime aim was to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward, and secondary to assess capillary PCO2 (cPCO2) levels before and during treatment. Methods From May 1st 2008 to April 30th 2012, infants with bronchiolitis at Stavanger University Hospital were treated with CPAP in a general paediatric ward, but could be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU) when needed, according to in-house guidelines. Levels of cPCO2 were prospectively registered before the start of CPAP and at approximately 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours of treatment as long as CPAP was given. We had a continuous updating program for the nurses and physicians caring for the infants with CPAP. The study was population based. Results 672 infants (3.4%) were hospitalized with bronchiolitis. CPAP was initiated in 53 infants (0.3%; 7.9% of infants with bronchiolitis), and was well tolerated in all but three infants. 46 infants were included in the study, the majority of these (n = 33) were treated in the general ward only. These infants had lower cPCO2 before treatment (8.0; 7.7, 8.6)(median; quartiles) than those treated at the ICU (n = 13) (9.3;8.5, 9.9) (p < 0.001). The level of cPCO2 was significantly reduced after 4 h in both groups; 1.1 kPa (paediatric ward) (p < 0.001) and 1.3 kPa (ICU) (p = 0.002). Two infants on the ICU did not respond to CPAP (increasing cPCO2 and severe apnoe) and were given mechanical ventilation, otherwise no side effects were observed in either group treated with CPAP. Conclusion Treatment with CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis may be feasible in a general paediatric ward, providing sufficient staffing and training, and the possibility of referral to an ICU when needed. PMID:24886569

  3. Paediatric palliative home care by general paediatricians: a multimethod study on perceived barriers and incentives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-specialist palliative care, as it is delivered by general practitioners, is a basic component of a comprehensive palliative care infrastructure for adult patients with progressive and far advanced disease. Currently palliative care for children and adolescents is recognized as a distinct entity of care, requiring networks of service providers across different settings, including paediatricians working in general practice. In Germany, the medical home care for children and adolescents is to a large extent delivered by general paediatricians working in their own practice. However, these are rarely confronted with children suffering from life-limiting diseases. The aim of this study was therefore to examine potential barriers, incentives, and the professional self-image of general paediatricians with regard to paediatric palliative care. Methods Based on qualitative expert interviews, a questionnaire was designed and a survey among general paediatricians in their own practice (n = 293) was undertaken. The survey has been developed and performed in close cooperation with the regional professional association of paediatricians. Results The results showed a high disposition on part of the paediatricians to engage in palliative care, and the majority of respondents regarded palliative care as part of their profile. Main barriers for the implementation were time restrictions (40.7%) and financial burden (31.6%), sole responsibility without team support (31.1%), as well as formal requirements such as forms and prescriptions (26.6%). Major facilitations were support by local specialist services such as home care nursing service (83.0%), access to a specialist paediatric palliative care consultation team (82.4%), as well as an option of exchange with colleagues (60.1%). Conclusions Altogether, the high commitment to this survey reflects the relevance of the issue for paediatricians working in general practice. Education in basic palliative care competence and

  4. Paediatric manpower.

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, M M; Bellman, M H

    1982-01-01

    Two investigations of paediatric manpower in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland were carried out, each using a different method. The first survey located registrars and senior registrars and checked on their occupational status 3 years later in order to see which ones had been promoted. Loss factors--such as emigration, retirement for personal reasons, part-time training, or transfer to general practice, community paediatrics, or other medical specialties--were examined closely. The second survey was a cross-sectional analysis of the entire paediatric establishment. It examined in particular the distribution of consultants and registrars. Using figures from survey 2 and loss factors from survey 1, a model of the paediatric career structure could be constructed. This showed that the present career pyramid would be unable to absorb the current number of registrars in training. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive registration scheme for registrars, especially those with honorary contracts, who are not currently included in official records. Paediatrics is unique in having a high proportion of women for whom there is little opportunity of reconciling career aspirations with family commitments. PMID:7125690

  5. An audit of paediatric day care surgery in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Jolliffe, D M

    1997-01-01

    At a 620 bed District General Hospital, questionnaires were issued to the patients of 142 consecutive paediatric day surgery cases and the nurses involved in the care of these children. Most of the children were not upset by day case surgery, although nearly a quarter were distressed by changing into a theatre gown. Postoperatively, pain was more of a problem than nausea and vomiting. Relatively minor problems occurred at home. The majority of the 93 parents who replied were happy with the overall care of their child. They valued being present for induction of anaesthesia and would have liked to be present in recovery when their child was awake, although the nurses felt this would not have been helpful. Nonclinical matters also influenced their assessment of the quality of care. PMID:9243690

  6. Fathers' encounter of support from paediatric diabetes teams; the tension between general recommendations and personal experience.

    PubMed

    Boman, Ase; Povlsen, Lene; Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth; Hanas, Ragnar; Borup, Ina

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this grounded theory study was to explore and discuss how fathers involved in caring for a child with type 1 diabetes experienced support from Swedish paediatric diabetes teams (PDTs) in everyday life with their child. Eleven fathers of children with type 1 diabetes, living in Sweden and scoring high on involvement on the Parental Responsibility Questionnaire, participated. Data were collected from January 2011 to August 2011, initially through online focus group discussions in which 6 of 19 invited fathers participated. Due to high attrition, the data collection continued in eight individual interviews. A semi-structured interview guide was used, and the fathers were asked to share experiences of their PDT's support in everyday life with their child. A simultaneous and constant comparison approach to data collection and analysis allowed the core category to emerge: the tension between general recommendations and personal experience. This core category illuminates how the fathers experienced tension between managing their unique everyday life with their child and balancing this to meet their PDT's expectations with regard to blood glucose levels. The core category was supported by two categories: the tension between the fathers'and their PDT's knowledge, whereby fathers reported discrepancies between their PDT's medical knowledge and their own unique knowledge of their child; and the tension between the fathers'and their PDT's goals, whereby the fathers identified differences between the family's and their PDT's goals. As a dimension of the core category, fathers felt trust or distrust in their PDT. We conclude that to achieve high-quality support for children with diabetes and to enhance their health and well-being, involved fathers' knowledge of their unique family situation needs to be integrated into the diabetes treatment. PMID:23190009

  7. A new tool for the paediatric HIV research: general data from the Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There are approximately from 1,100 to 1,200 HIV-infected children in a follow-up in Spain. In 2008 an open, multicentral, retrospective and prospective Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe) was founded. The CoRISpe is divided into the node 1 and node 2 representing geographically almost the whole territory of Spain. Since 2008 seventy-five hospitals have been participating in the CoRISpe. All the retrospective data of the HIV-infected children have been kept in the CoRISpe since 1995 and prospective data since 2008. In this article we are going to present the notion of CoRISpe, its role, the structure, how the CoRISpe works and the process how a child is transferred from Paediatric to Adults Units. The main objective of the CoRISpe is to contribute to furthering scientific knowledge on paediatric HIV infection by providing demographic, sociopsychological, clinical and laboratory data from HIV-infected paediatric patients. Its aim is to enable high-quality research studies on HIV-infected children. PMID:23282073

  8. A new tool for the paediatric HIV research: general data from the Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe).

    PubMed

    de Jose, Ma Isabel; Jiménez de Ory, Santiago; Espiau, Maria; Fortuny, Claudia; Navarro, Ma Luisa; Soler-Palacín, Pere; Muñoz-Fernandez, Ma Angeles

    2013-01-01

    There are approximately from 1,100 to 1,200 HIV-infected children in a follow-up in Spain. In 2008 an open, multicentral, retrospective and prospective Cohort of the Spanish Paediatric HIV Network (CoRISpe) was founded. The CoRISpe is divided into the node 1 and node 2 representing geographically almost the whole territory of Spain. Since 2008 seventy-five hospitals have been participating in the CoRISpe. All the retrospective data of the HIV-infected children have been kept in the CoRISpe since 1995 and prospective data since 2008. In this article we are going to present the notion of CoRISpe, its role, the structure, how the CoRISpe works and the process how a child is transferred from Paediatric to Adults Units. The main objective of the CoRISpe is to contribute to furthering scientific knowledge on paediatric HIV infection by providing demographic, sociopsychological, clinical and laboratory data from HIV-infected paediatric patients. Its aim is to enable high-quality research studies on HIV-infected children. PMID:23282073

  9. Paediatric diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes does not spare any section of society, and its prevalence in the paediatric and adolescent age group is rising. This review highlights the etiological and clinical features of childhood diabetes, including secular changes in epidemiology. It discusses the aspects of non pharmacological and pharmacological therapy which are unique to the paediatric age group, and explores current use of novel therapeutic modalities. The article calls for modulation of the psychological environment of the child with diabetes, to help improve his or her quality of life, and sensitizes physicians to take proactive, affirmative action to address the special needs of children with type1 diabetes. PMID:24601207

  10. Emergency management of the paediatric patient with generalized convulsive status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, JN

    2011-01-01

    The present guideline paper addresses the emergency management of generalized convulsive status epilepticus (CSE) in children and infants older than one month of age. It replaces the previous statement from 1996, and includes a new treatment algorithm and table of recommended medications, reflecting new evidence and the evolution of clinical practice over the past 15 years. The document focuses on the acute pharmacological management of CSE, but some issues regarding supportive care, diagnostic approach and treatment of refractory CSE are discussed. PMID:22294869

  11. Penile block for paediatric urological surgery: A comparative evaluation with general anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Aparajita; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Sen, Subroto; Parmar, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Peri-operative pain relief in children can be provided by conventional general anaesthesia or by regional nerve blocks. The present study was carried out to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of penile block for penile surgery with the standard technique of general anaesthesia (GA) of short duration of less than two hours, and also to evaluate the postoperative pain relief obtained by penile block. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in the department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive care of our hospital, on 60 children in the age group of 1-10 years, belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grades I and II, and divided randomly into two groups: Group B and group G, comprising of 30 patients each. Group B children received a penile block whereas group G children underwent a standard general anaesthetic procedure. Baseline, intra-operative and post-operative heart rate (HR), electrocardiogram (ECG), non-invasive blood pressure (NIBP) (systolic and diastolic) and pulse oximeter oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded at regular intervals. The duration of post-operative pain relief, time to rescue analgesia and time to first feed were also evaluated and recorded. Statistical analysis was carried out using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) 11 version for windows and employing analysis of variance (ANOVA), unpaired student t test, Chi-square test and Mann Whitney U test for various parameters. Value of P<0.05 was considered as significant and P<0.0001 as highly significant. Results: The demographic characteristics were comparable in both the groups. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and pulse oximetry showed remarkable differences at various time intervals during intra-operative and post-operative period, which were statistically significant on comparison (P<0.05 and P<0.0001). Post-operative pain relief, time to first rescue analgesia and time to first feed also showed statistically

  12. Paediatric palliative home care in areas of Germany with low population density and long distances: a questionnaire survey with general paediatricians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2007, the patient’s right to specialised palliative home care became law in Germany. However, childhood palliative care in territorial states with low patient numbers and long distances requires adapted models to ensure an area-wide maintenance. Actually, general paediatricians are the basic care providers for children and adolescents. They also provide home care. The aim of this study was to improve the knowledge about general paediatrician’s involvement in and contribution to palliative care in children. Findings To evaluate the current status of palliative home care provided by general paediatricians and their cooperation with other paediatric palliative care providers, a questionnaire survey was disseminated to general paediatricians in Lower Saxony, a German federal state with nearly eight million inhabitants and a predominantly rural infrastructure. Data analysis was descriptive. One hundred forty one of 157 included general paediatricians completed the questionnaire (response rate: 89.8%). A total of 792 children and adolescents suffering from life-limiting conditions were cared for by these general paediatricians in 2008. Severe cerebral palsy was the most prevalent diagnosis. Eighty-nine per cent of the general paediatricians stated that they had professional experience with paediatric palliative care. Collaboration of general paediatricians and other palliative care providers was stated as not well developed. The support by a specialised team including 24-hour on-call duty and the intensification of educational programs were emphasised. Conclusions The current regional infrastructure of palliative home care in Lower Saxony can benefit from the establishment of a coordinated network of palliative home care providers. PMID:22967691

  13. Paediatric Interventional Uroradiology

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M.; Wilkinson, A. Graham; Roebuck, Derek J.

    2011-04-15

    Paediatric interventional uroradiology lies at the intersection of the disciplines of paediatric interventional radiology and paediatric endourology. Interdisciplinary collaboration has led to the development of new techniques and refinement of procedures adopted from adult practice. This article reviews the major procedures used in paediatric interventional uroradiology, with emphasis on nephrostomy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, balloon-burst pyeloplasty, and antegrade ureteric stenting.

  14. Paediatric anaesthesia: an overview.

    PubMed

    Langton, Helen Elizabeth

    2015-10-28

    This article provides an overview of the nursing considerations for paediatric anaesthesia. It is aimed at newly qualified operating department practitioners and anaesthetic nurses, and those with limited experience in the care of paediatric patients. It explores the ways in which paediatric anatomy and physiology differ from those of adults and looks at the implications for treatment in the anaesthetic environment. It also discusses the equipment required and the rationale for its use. PMID:26508256

  15. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intensive care and oncology units. Infection rates are the highest in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (where bloodstream infections are the most frequent), and are usually associated with intravascular devices. On general paediatric wards, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections predominate, reflecting the occurrence in the community. The surveillance of nosocomial infections identifies priorities for infection control activities and permits evaluation of interventions. The prevention of transmission between patients and to personnel requires that certain measures be taken with all patients, and that additional precautions be taken with some infections, based on the route of transmission. The prevention of transmission from personnel involves ensuring that personnel are appropriately immunized and counselled about working with infections. The prevention of nosocomial infection also involves control of visitors, appropriate management of invasive procedures and devices, sterilization and disinfection of equipment, provision of a clean environment and adequate staffing. Severely immunocompromised children require extra protection, including ventilation systems that reduce the risk of exposure to filamentous fungi. Infection control in paediatrics is an evolving field that must adapt to changes in the paediatric patient population and in health care technology. PMID:20084127

  16. Neurodevelopmental and behavioural paediatrics.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the notable shifts in Paediatrics across the last 50 years has been towards disorders that are chronic and qualitative in nature. In addition to physical health, these impact on childhood development, behaviour and wellbeing. Understanding and management of these problems extends the traditional biological toolkit of paediatrics into the complexities of uncertainties of psychological and social context. In Australasia, the profession has responded with the development of Community Paediatrics as a recognised sub-specialty, of which Neurodevelopmental and Behavioural Paediatrics is an important component. These developments are reviewed along with consideration of future challenges for this field of health care. PMID:25586854

  17. Evidence-based paediatric nursing: paediatric early warning systems.

    PubMed

    Gawronski, Orsola

    2016-05-01

    In hospital cardiac arrest are rare events in paediatrics. Most children receive appropriate care without experiencing undetected severe clinical deterioration during hospital admission. Outcomes of paediatric cardiac arrests are however generally poor, with high mortality rates and neurological damage at survival. A review of child mortality in the UK showed that a high proportion of unexpected deaths were preventable ( Pearsons 2008 ). Several studies of patient records of children who suffered cardiac arrests showed the presence of clear signs of clinical deterioration up to 24 hours before (Tume 2006). Appropriate recognition of clinical deterioration could have led to timely intervention to stabilise the patient. Missed deterioration may be due to lack of staff situational awareness, communication failure among professionals or between staff and families and other human factors ( Brady 2014 ). PMID:27214413

  18. Where should paediatric surgery be performed?

    PubMed

    Arul, G S; Spicer, R D

    1998-07-01

    We have tried to review the evidence for the organisation of paediatric surgical care. Difficulties arise because of the lack of published data from district general hospitals concerning paediatric surgical conditions. Hence much of the debate about the surgical management of children is based on anecdotal evidence. However, at a time when the provision of health care is being radically reorganised to an internal market based on a system of purchasers and providers it is more important than ever to understand the issues at stake. Two separate issues have been discussed: the role of the specialist paediatric centre and the provision of non-specialist paediatric surgery in district general hospitals. There are arguments for and against large regional specialist paediatric centres. The benefits of centralisation include concentration of expertise, more appropriate consultant on call commitment, development of support services, and junior doctor training. The disadvantages include children and their families having to travel long distances for care, and the loss of expertise at a local level. If specialist paediatric emergency transport is available the benefits of centralisation far outweigh the adverse effects of having to take children to a regional paediatric intensive care centre. Specialist paediatric centres are aware of the importance of treating children and their parents as a family unit as highlighted by the Platt committee; this is an important challenge and enormous improvements have occurred to provide proper accommodation for families while their children are treated in hospital. To keep these arguments of large distances and separation from the home in context, one paediatric intensive care unit in Victoria, Australia, providing a centralised service to a region larger in are than England and with a similar admission rate, has a lower mortality rate than the decentralised paediatric intensive care provided in the Trent region of the UK. There is clear

  19. Standardized Evaluation for Multi-National Development Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, W. Timothy

    This paper takes the position that standardized evaluation formats and procedures for multi-national development programs are not only desirable but possible in diverse settings. The key is the localization of standard systems, which involves not only the technical manipulation of items and scales, but also the contextual interpretation of…

  20. Paediatric asthma and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sean R; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E

    2006-12-01

    None of the explanations proposed for the increase in paediatric asthma have been adequate. It is becoming apparent that the cause of the increase in asthma must be multi-factorial. Increasing attention has been focused on the role of lifestyle in the development of asthma. Lifestyle changes that have occurred in children are those in diet and decreased physical activity, with obesity being the product of these changes. The increase in asthma, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have occurred together. However, a temporal relationship between asthma, obesity and decreased physical activity has not been determined in the paediatric literature. Limited data suggest that decreased physical activity could be playing a role in the aetiology of asthma independent of obesity. Furthermore, there has been substantial research on the benefits of exercise programmes for paediatric patients with asthma. Longitudinal trials monitoring physical activity, obesity and the development of asthma are needed. PMID:17098637

  1. The Paediatric Board of the Royal College of Physicians of London: its role in the college.

    PubMed

    Chambers, T

    1992-01-01

    Conscious of its responsibilities to its Fellows and Members who are paediatricians, the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) is anxious to play its part, along with others, in maintaining and improving standards in paediatrics. Recognising the importance and prominence of the specialty within the generality of specialist medicine, and alongside general internal medicine, it has established a Paediatric Board, reporting directly to Council, which will deal with and advise on all matters concerning paediatrics and child health, and thus enhance the autonomy and influence of the specialty both within the College and on medical affairs in general. It will do this in close association with the British Paediatric Association (BPA) which will nominate members of the Board. In particular the RCP will continue to set standards in paediatrics through examinations, accreditation, representatives on consultant advisory appointment committees, and its membership of the GMC and the Conference of Medical Royal Colleges and their Faculties, to which the Paediatric Board will make a substantial contribution. The network of regional paediatric advisers to the RCP will ensure that the Board is kept in touch with paediatric opinion throughout England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Relationships with Scottish paediatrics and paediatricians will be important, for example, in the organisation and development of the MRCP(UK) examination and its paediatric Part II. Links with paediatricians in the Irish Republic exist through the Joint Committee on Higher Medical Training. PMID:1573597

  2. Recent developments in paediatric neuraxial blocks

    PubMed Central

    Ponde, Vrushali Chandrashekhar

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric anaesthesia and paediatric regional anaesthesia are intertwined. Almost all surgeries unless contradicted could be and should be supplemented with a regional block. The main objective of this review is to elaborate on the recent advances of the central neuraxial blocks, such as application of ultrasound guidance and electrical stimulation in the pursuit of safety and an objective end point. This review also takes account of the traditional technique and understand the benefits as well the risk of each as compared with the recent technique. The recent trends in choosing the most appropriate peripheral block for a given surgery thereby sparing the central neuroaxis is considered. A penile block for circumcision or a sciatic block for unilateral foot surgery, rather than caudal epidural would have a better risk benefit equation. Readers will find a special mention on the recent thoughts on continuous epidural analgesia in paediatrics, especially its rise and fall, yet its unique importance. Lastly, the issue of block placements under sedation or general anaesthesia with its implication in this special population is dealt with. We conducted searches in MEDLINE (PubMed) and assessed the relevance of the abstracts of citations identified from literature searches. The search was carried out in English, for last 10 years, with the following key words: Recent advances in paediatric regional anaesthesia; ultrasound guidance for central neuraxial blocks in children; role of electrical stimulation in neuraxial blocks in children; complications in neuraxial block. Full-text articles of potentially relevant abstracts were retrieved for further review. PMID:23293386

  3. Immunity to hepatitis A in paediatric and nursery nurses.

    PubMed

    Poole, C J; Shakespeare, A T

    1996-10-01

    A cross-sectional epidemiological survey of immunity to the hepatitis A virus (HAV) was undertaken in paediatric and nursery nurses to ascertain whether these occupational groups were at an increased risk of infection with the virus. Seropositivity to HAV was measured in 33 surgical (control), 36 paediatric, 55 nursery and 29 specialist paediatric nurses in a district general hospital, community clinics and a children's hospital in the West Midlands. IgG antibodies to HAV were found in 27% of surgical (control), 31% of paediatric (relative risk [RR] = 1.19, 95% confidence interval [Cl] = 0.56-2.51), 26% of nursery nurses (RR = 0.99, Cl = 0.48-2.04) and 10% of specialist paediatric nurses (RR = 0.40, Cl = 0.12-1.35). These data are comparable to immunity to HAV for this age group in the general population of this country and do not support routine immunization of paediatric or nursery nurses against HAV. PMID:8918151

  4. [New analgesics in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Avez-Couturier, Justine; Wood, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of different types of analgesics in paediatrics. They must be used in accordance with the situation, the type of pain and the characteristics of the child. In all cases, strict compliance with the posology and the instructions for use is essential to avoid any risk of error. Finally, pharmacological, physical and psychological treatments are employed in a complementary manner, for the biopsychosocial management of the child's care. PMID:27177483

  5. Paediatric case of a large gastric rupture after a blunt abdominal trauma: Report of a case in a District General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pafitanis, Georgios; Koulas, Spiros; Bikos, Stavros; Tsimoyiannis, Evangelos

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Isolated gastric rupture after blunt abdominal trauma is rare. In current literature gastric rupture from blunt abdominal trauma ranges between 0.02% and 1.7%. This document reports the first non-motor-vehicle case of an isolated gastric rapture after blunt abdominal injury, which repaired after early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 14-year-old boy attended our emergency surgical department after sustained a blunt abdominal trauma following a fall from his bicycle. He presented with pain and left para-umbilical abdominal ecchymoses. Examination revealed subcutaneous emphysema and a palpable abdominal wall dimple. DISCUSSION Radiological examination with CT scan determined the need for exploratory laparotomy. Operation revealed, extensive rupture of the left lateral border of the rectus abdominus muscle, free intra-peritoneal position of the nasogastric tube with gross spillage of gastric contents and pneumo-peritoneum observed with 7-8cm full thickness rupture of anterior stomach wall, from the lesser towards the greater curvature. Primary, two-layer closure was performed. On the 5th post-operative day he developed gastrorrhagia. He was discharged on the 15th postoperative day. CONCLUSION We present this case report focusing on the paediatric patient to illustrate isolated gastric injury in terms of mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, and immediate surgical management. PMID:23295382

  6. Theatre of paediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    McBride, Craig A; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    In the 50 years since the first edition of this journal, operative paediatric surgery has undergone radical change. Many of the most common instruments are unchanged, both as a testament to their utility and in recognition of past surgeons remembered eponymously. Surrounding that basic core of instruments, theatre has changed radically as new tools and techniques have arisen. Surgeons have come down from their pedestals, recognising surgery as a team sport rather than a solo performance. More than half of the current paediatric surgical trainees are women, a higher proportion than in any other craft group of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. The appearance, and rapid development, of laparoscopy is to many observers the most notable change in surgery over the last 50 years. Placed in its context though, it is simply the most prominent example of a frameshift in surgical thinking. The patient as a whole is now the focus, rather than just the disease. Recent developments are as much about minimising harm to normal tissues as they are about extirpating pathology. As a surgical maxim, 'Primum non nocere' is even more in evidence in 2015 than it was in 1965. PMID:25586851

  7. [Toxicology screening in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Algar, Óscar; Cuadrado González, Ainoha; Falcon, María

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse in paediatric patients, from the neonatal period to adolescence, is not well established as most cases go unnoticed. Regardless of clinical cases of acute poisoning leading to visits to emergency room, the exposure is usually detected by a questionnaire to the parents or children. In the last few years, new validated analytical methodologies have been developed in order to detect parent drugs and their metabolites in different biological matrices. These biological matrices have different time windows for detection of the exposure: acute (i.e., urine, blood, oral fluid), and chronic (i.e., hair, meconium or teeth). The aim of this paper was to review the scenarios where the use of biological matrices is indicated for the detection of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse. PMID:26458521

  8. Diagnostic paediatric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.M.; Lingam, S.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a case study teaching manual presenting radiographs and examples of other imaging modalities from 100 paediatric patients. The material comes from the radiological teaching collection at the Hospital for Sick Children at Great Ormond Street in London and was compiled over a ten year period. With each case a short clinical history is given and a series of questions posed, similar to those encountered in postgraduate medical examinations. Sample answers with comments and more illustrations are presented on the following page. The last decade has seen a rapid expansion in the range and sophistication of diagnostic imaging modalities which are available to clinicians. Since it is impossible to achieve comprehensive coverage in a book of this size, the authors have selected examples of cases which illustrate the range of imaging modalities currently available and which may be encountered in both clinical practice and in examinations.

  9. Paediatric Blunt Torso Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Khalid M.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Harthy, Ahmed Z. S.; Hamid, Rana S.; Al-Balushi, Zainab N.; Sankhla, Dilip K.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Trauma is the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric/adolescent populations worldwide. This study aimed to describe trauma mechanisms, patterns and outcomes among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) in Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective single-centre study involved all children ≤12 years old with blunt torso trauma admitted for paediatric surgical care at SQUH between January 2009 and December 2013. Medical records were analysed to collect demographic and clinical data. Results: A total of 70 children were admitted with blunt torso trauma during the study period, including 39 (55.7%) male patients. The mean age was 5.19 ± 2.66 years. Of the cohort, 35 children (50.0%) received their injuries after having been hit by cars as pedestrians, while 19 (27.1%) were injured by falls, 12 (17.1%) during car accidents as passengers and four (5.7%) by falling heavy objects. According to computed tomography scans, thoracic injuries were most common (65.7%), followed by abdominal injuries (42.9%). The most commonly involved solid organs were the liver (15.7%) and spleen (11.4%). The majority of the patients were managed conservatively (92.9%) with a good outcome (74.3%). The mortality rate was 7.1%. Most deaths were due to multisystem involvement. Conclusion: Among children with blunt torso trauma admitted to SQUH, the main mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accidents. As a result, parental education and enforcement of infant car seat/child seat belt laws are recommended. Conservative management was the most successful approach. PMID:27226913

  10. Influence of Food on Paediatric Gastrointestinal Drug Absorption Following Oral Administration: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah K.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to review existing information regarding food effects on drug absorption within paediatric populations. Mechanisms that underpin food–drug interactions were examined to consider potential differences between adult and paediatric populations, to provide insights into how this may alter the pharmacokinetic profile in a child. Relevant literature was searched to retrieve information on food–drug interaction studies undertaken on: (i) paediatric oral drug formulations; and (ii) within paediatric populations. The applicability of existing methodology to predict food effects in adult populations was evaluated with respect to paediatric populations where clinical data was available. Several differences in physiology, anatomy and the composition of food consumed within a paediatric population are likely to lead to food–drug interactions that cannot be predicted based on adult studies. Existing methods to predict food effects cannot be directly extrapolated to allow predictions within paediatric populations. Development of systematic methods and guidelines is needed to address the general lack of information on examining food–drug interactions within paediatric populations. PMID:27417362

  11. Drug discovery in paediatric oncology: roadblocks to progress

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter C.; Houghton, Peter J.; Perilongo, Giorgio; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Approval of new cancer drugs for paediatric patients generally occurs after their development and approval for treating adult cancers. As most drug development occurs in the industry setting, the relatively small market of paediatric oncology does not provide the financial incentives for companies to actively pursue paediatric oncology solutions. Indeed, between 1948 and January 2003 the FDA approved 120 new cancer drugs, of which only 30 have been used in children. This slow rate of development must be addressed in a meaningful way if we are to make progress in the most pressing settings in childhood cancer. In this Viewpoint article, the key opinion leaders in the field weigh in and offer practical advice on how to address this issue. PMID:25223555

  12. Paediatric personnel extremity dose study.

    PubMed

    Gallet, J M C; Reed, M H

    2002-03-01

    Concern has been expressed in paediatric radiology regarding the magnitude of the extremity dose received by attending personnel during routine fluoroscopic procedures and CT. Common procedures that may be of short duration in adults can be quite the opposite in paediatric patients. The extremities of attending personnel are more likely to be exposed to the primary beam and for a longer period of time owing to a variety of reasons such as assisting in the procedure or physically restraining the patient during the examination. During the period mid 1998 to mid 2000, two paediatric radiologists, four senior radiographers and two paediatric nurses were monitored using ring thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Each participant wore the ring TLD on either the left or right ring finger, depending on which hand the individual favoured. Left/right asymmetrical studies were not conducted, nor were records kept of whether an examination used a grid or gridless technique. Initial apprehension about higher paediatric fluoroscopic and CT extremity doses was dispelled as a result of this quantitative dosimetric study. PMID:11932219

  13. Management of paediatric GERD.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2014-03-01

    Paediatric GERD is complicated to manage, as symptoms are diverse and often difficult to interpret. In infants, regurgitation is a common physiological condition. Nevertheless, when it occurs frequently (>4 times per day) and causes the infant distress, parents often seek medical help. In children 2-10 years of age, GERD is often considered to cause extra-oesophageal symptoms, despite the absence of hard evidence. Diagnostic investigations often lack solid validation and the signs and symptoms of GERD overlap with those of cow's milk protein allergy and eosinophillic oesophagitis. Reassurance, dietary treatment and positional adaptations are recommended for troublesome infant reflux. Anti-acid medication, mainly PPIs, is over-used in infants even though, in many children, reflux is not an acid-related condition. Moreover, evidence is increasing that PPIs cause adverse events such as gastroenteritis and respiratory tract infections. Management in children older than 10 years is similar to that in adults. Using prokinetics to treat nonerosive reflux disease remains only a promising theoretical concept, as no such molecule is currently available. Today, the adverse effects of each prokinetic molecule largely outweigh its potential benefit. Laparoscopic surgery is indicated in children who have life-threatening symptoms or in cases of drug dependence. PMID:24126561

  14. Are children carrying the burden of broad-spectrum antibiotics in general practice? Prescription pattern for paediatric outpatients with respiratory tract infections in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Fossum, Guro Haugen; Lindbæk, Morten; Gjelstad, Svein; Dalen, Ingvild; Kværner, Kari J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the antibiotic prescription pattern and factors that influence the physicians’ choice of antibiotic. Design Observational study. Setting Primary healthcare in Norway, December 2004 through November 2005. Participants 426 general practitioners, GPs, in Norway, giving 24 888 respiratory tract infection episodes with 19 938 children aged 0–6 years. Outcome measures Assess antibiotic prescription details and patient and GP characteristics associated with broad-spectrum and narrow-spectrum antibiotic use. Results Of the 24 888 episodes in the study, 26.2% (95% CI 25.7% to 26.8%) included an antibiotic prescription. Penicillin V accounted for 42% and macrolide antibiotics for 30%. The prescription rate varied among the physicians, with a mean of 25.5% (95% CI 24.2% to 26.7%). Acute tonsillitis gave the highest odds for a prescription, OR 33.6 (95% CI 25.7% to 43.9%), compared to ‘acute respiratory tract infections and symptoms’ as a reference group. GPs with a prescription rate of 33.3% or higher had the larger probability for broad-spectrum antibiotic prescriptions, OR 3.33 (95% CI 2.01% to 5.54%). Antibiotic prescriptions increased with increasing patient age. Conclusions We found a low antibiotic prescription rate for childhood respiratory tract infections. However, our figures indicate an overuse of macrolide antibiotics and penicillins with extended spectrum, more so than in the corresponding study including the adult population. Palatability of antibiotic suspensions and other administrative challenges affect medication compliance in children. To help combat antibiotic resistance, guidelines need to be followed, in particular for our youngest patients. Trial registration number (clinicaltrials.org) NCT00272155. PMID:23299114

  15. Usage of unpublished paediatric data.

    PubMed

    Saint-Raymond, Agnès; Pelle, Benjamin; Zaccaria, Cosimo; Sennwitz, Matthias; Branch, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The European Paediatric Regulation (EC No 1901/2006) has three main objectives: increasing the number of appropriate medicines for children, increasing information on these medicines and stimulating high-quality ethical research with children. To contribute to the information, pharmaceutical companies were required under article 45 of the Regulation to submit existing paediatric studies to regulatory authorities for review and update of the product information. Nearly, 19 000 study reports have been identified for a thousand active substances. The data are being assessed by member states' competent authorities in collaboration with European Medicines Agency (EMA). After 7 years, 262 active substances have been assessed, all of the 62 centrally approved and nearly 200 nationally approved medicines. The review so far has led to 16 new paediatric indications, of importance in addressing previously unmet needs, in particular, in younger age groups. The information is being made publicly available in an EMA database accessible directly or through the public face of the European Clinical Trials Register. This will increase awareness of existing data that are useful to researchers and other healthcare professionals, and contribute to avoiding unnecessary duplication of paediatric trials. PMID:26543071

  16. Paediatric blood pressure and anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Mather, C M

    1991-05-01

    One percent of children have appreciably and consistently raised arterial blood pressure. A 7-year-old girl admitted for routine tonsillectomy, had unrecognised hypertension which put her at increased risk. Should anaesthetic practice take more note of paediatric blood pressures? PMID:2035786

  17. Paediatric Preputial Pathology: Are we Circumcising Enough?

    PubMed Central

    Yardley, IE; Cosgrove, C; Lambert, AW

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Preputial problems are a common reason for referral to the paediatric surgical out-patient department. Many boys referred do not need surgical intervention. One indication for intervention is balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO), a potentially serious condition previously considered rare in childhood. PATIENTS AND METHODS Consecutive boys referred to a paediatric general surgical out-patient department with problems relating to their prepuce during a period of 4 years were included. The out-patient diagnosis and management was recorded. All foreskins excised were sent for histological analysis. RESULTS A total of 422 boys were referred, median age 6 years 2 months (range, 3 months to 16 years). Over half the boys referred simply required re-assurance that all was normal with their penis. However, 186 boys (44.1%) were listed for surgical procedures – 148 circumcision, 33 preputial adhesiolysis, and 5 frenuloplasty. There were histological abnormalities in 110 specimens (84.8%); chronic inflammation (n = 69; 46.6%), BXO (n = 51; 34.5%), and fibrosis(n = 4; 2.7%). Nineteen (12.8%) specimens were reported as histologically normal. The overall prevalence of BXO in the boys referred was 12.1%. CONCLUSIONS In this series, the percentage of boys circumcised and the prevalence of BXO were both higher than in other published series. BXO may be more common and present at a younger age than previously thought. PMID:17316525

  18. Systems for Paediatric Sepsis: A Global Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kang, KT; Chandler, HK; Espinosa, V; Kissoon, N

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate the resources available for early diagnosis and treatment of paediatric sepsis at hospitals in developing and developed countries. Methods: This was a voluntary online survey involving 101 hospitals from 41 countries solicited through the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies contact list and website. The survey was designed to assess the spectrum of sepsis epidemiology, patterns of applied therapies, availability of resources and barriers to optimal sepsis treatment. Results: Ninety per cent of respondents represented a tertiary or general hospital with paediatric intensive care facilities, including 63% from developed countries. Adequate triage services were absent in more than 20% of centres. Insufficiently trained personnel and lack of a sepsis protocol was reported in 40% of all sites. While there were specific guidelines for sepsis management in 78% of centres (n = 100), protocols for assessing sepsis patients were not applied in nearly 70% of centres. Lack of parental recognition of sepsis and failure of referring centres to diagnose sepsis were identified as major barriers by more than 50% of respondents. Conclusions: Even among centres with no significant resource constraints and advanced medical systems, significant deficits in sepsis care exist. Early recognition and management remains a key issue and may be addressed through improved triage, augmented support for referring centres and public awareness. Focussed research is necessary at the institutional level to identify and address specific barriers. PMID:25867557

  19. [General concepts of epigenetics: Projections in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Krause, Bernardo J; Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence supports the notion that alterations in intrauterine growth and during the first years of life have a substantial effect on the risk for the development of chronic disease, which in some cases is even higher than those due to genetic factors. The persistence and reproducibility of the phenotypes associated with altered early development suggest the participation of mechanisms that would record environmental cues, generating a cellular reprogramming (i.e., epigenetic mechanisms). This review is an introduction to a series of five articles focused on the participation of epigenetic mechanisms in the development of highly prevalent chronic diseases (i.e., cardiovascular, metabolic, asthma/allergies and cancer) and their origins in the foetal and neonatal period. This series of articles aims to show the state of the art in this research area and present the upcoming clues and challenges, in which paediatricians have a prominent role, developing strategies for the prevention, early detection and follow-up. PMID:26872716

  20. Inequality of Paediatric Workforce Distribution in China.

    PubMed

    Song, Peige; Ren, Zhenghong; Chang, Xinlei; Liu, Xuebei; An, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Child health has been addressed as a priority at both global and national levels for many decades. In China, difficulty of accessing paediatricians has been of debate for a long time, however, there is limited evidence to assess the population- and geography-related inequality of paediatric workforce distribution. This study aimed to analyse the inequality of the distributions of the paediatric workforce (including paediatricians and paediatric nurses) in China by using Lorenz curve, Gini coefficient, and Theil L index, data were obtained from the national maternal and child health human resource sampling survey conducted in 2010. In this study, we found that the paediatric workforce was the most inequitable regarding the distribution of children <7 years, the geographic distribution of the paediatric workforce highlighted very severe inequality across the nation, except the Central region. For different professional types, we found that, except the Central region, the level of inequality of paediatric nurses was higher than that of the paediatricians regarding both the demographic and geographic distributions. The inner-regional inequalities were the main sources of the paediatric workforce distribution inequality. To conclude, this study revealed the inadequate distribution of the paediatric workforce in China for the first time, substantial inequality of paediatric workforce distribution still existed across the nation in 2010, more research is still needed to explore the in-depth sources of inequality, especially the urban-rural variance and the inner- and inter-provincial differences, and to guide national and local health policy-making and resource allocation. PMID:27420083

  1. Inequality of Paediatric Workforce Distribution in China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Peige; Ren, Zhenghong; Chang, Xinlei; Liu, Xuebei; An, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Child health has been addressed as a priority at both global and national levels for many decades. In China, difficulty of accessing paediatricians has been of debate for a long time, however, there is limited evidence to assess the population- and geography-related inequality of paediatric workforce distribution. This study aimed to analyse the inequality of the distributions of the paediatric workforce (including paediatricians and paediatric nurses) in China by using Lorenz curve, Gini coefficient, and Theil L index, data were obtained from the national maternal and child health human resource sampling survey conducted in 2010. In this study, we found that the paediatric workforce was the most inequitable regarding the distribution of children <7 years, the geographic distribution of the paediatric workforce highlighted very severe inequality across the nation, except the Central region. For different professional types, we found that, except the Central region, the level of inequality of paediatric nurses was higher than that of the paediatricians regarding both the demographic and geographic distributions. The inner-regional inequalities were the main sources of the paediatric workforce distribution inequality. To conclude, this study revealed the inadequate distribution of the paediatric workforce in China for the first time, substantial inequality of paediatric workforce distribution still existed across the nation in 2010, more research is still needed to explore the in-depth sources of inequality, especially the urban-rural variance and the inner- and inter-provincial differences, and to guide national and local health policy-making and resource allocation. PMID:27420083

  2. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  3. Clostridium difficile in paediatric populations

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Upton D

    2014-01-01

    An increase in Clostridium difficile infection incidence has been observed among hospitalized children in the United States. The present statement, targeted at clinicians caring for infants and children in community and institutional settings, summarizes the relevant information relating to the role of C difficile in childhood diarrhea and provides recommendations for diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Significant differences between adult and paediatric risk factors and disease are discussed, along with emerging therapies. The relationship between age and disease severity in children with a newly emergent and more fluoroqinolone-resistant strain of C difficile (North American Pulse-field type-1 [NAP1]) remains unknown. The importance of antimicrobial stewardship as a preventive strategy is highlighted. This statement replaces a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement on C difficile published in 2000. PMID:24627655

  4. Azithromycin use in paediatrics: A practical overview

    PubMed Central

    Ovetchkine, Philippe; Rieder, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin is an antibiotic that is commonly prescribed for upper and lower respiratory tract infections in children. While it has proven benefits, some concerns regarding azithromycin use have arisen in recent years. This practice point considers azithromycin therapy for acute respiratory infections in otherwise healthy children. Pharmacokinetics, spectrum of activity, the problem of resistant bacteria and clinical aspects are considered, along with recommendations for use and contraindications. Azithromycin should be avoided in patients with a significant risk of bacteremia. It is associated with pneumococcal resistance and, with stated exceptions, is generally not recommended for the treatment of acute pharyngitis, acute otitis media or pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia in the paediatric population. PMID:24421702

  5. What Evidence Underlies Clinical Practice in Paediatric Surgery? A Systematic Review Assessing Choice of Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Allin, Benjamin; Knight, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identify every paediatric surgical article published in 1998 and every paediatric surgical article published in 2013, and determine which study designs were used and whether they were appropriate for robustly assessing interventions in surgical conditions. Methods A systematic review was conducted according to a pre-specified protocol (CRD42014007629), using EMBASE and Medline. Non-English language studies were excluded. Studies were included if meeting population criteria and either condition or intervention criteria. Population: Children under the age of 18, or adults who underwent intervention for a condition managed by paediatric surgeons when they were under 18 years of age. Condition: One managed by general paediatric surgeons. Intervention: Used for treatment of a condition managed by general paediatric surgeons. Main Outcome Measure Studies were classified according to whether the IDEAL collaboration recommended their design for assessing surgical interventions or not. Change in proportions between 1998 and 2013 was calculated. Results 1581 paediatric surgical articles were published in 1998, and 3453 in 2013. The most commonly used design, accounting for 45% of studies in 1998 and 46.8% in 2013, was the retrospective case series. Only 1.8% of studies were RCTs in 1998, and 1.9% in 2013. Overall, in 1998, 9.8% of studies used a recommended design. In 2013, 11.9% used a recommended design (proportion increase 2.3%, 95% confidence interval 0.5% increase to 4% increase, p = 0.017). Conclusions and Relevance A low proportion of published paediatric surgical manuscripts utilise a design that is recommended for assessing surgical interventions. RCTs represent fewer than 1 in 50 studies. In 2013, 88.1% of studies used a less robust design, suggesting the need for a new way of approaching paediatric surgical research. PMID:26959824

  6. Taxonicity of anxiety sensitivity: a multi-national analysis.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Amit; Zvolensky, Michael J; Kotov, Roman; Arrindell, Willem A; Taylor, Steven; Sandin, Bonifacio; Cox, Brian J; Stewart, Sherry H; Bouvard, Martine; Cardenas, Samuel Jurado; Eifert, Georg H; Schmidt, Norman B

    2006-01-01

    Taxometric coherent cut kinetic analyses were used to test the latent structure of anxiety sensitivity in samples from North America (Canada and United States of America), France, Mexico, Spain, and The Netherlands (total n = 2741). Anxiety sensitivity was indexed by the 36-item Anxiety Sensitivity Index--Revised (ASI-R; [J. Anxiety Disord. 12(5) (1998) 463]). Four manifest indicators of anxiety sensitivity were constructed using the ASI-R: fear of cardiovascular symptoms, fear of respiratory symptoms, fear of publicly observable anxiety reactions, and fear of mental incapacitation. Results from MAXCOV-HITMAX, internal consistency tests, analyses of simulated Monte Carlo data, and a MAMBAC external consistency test indicated that the latent structure of anxiety sensitivity was taxonic in each of the samples. The estimated base rate of the anxiety sensitivity taxon differed slightly between nations, ranging from 11.5 to 21.5%. In general, the four ASI-R based manifest indicators showed high levels of validity. Results are discussed in relation to the conceptual understanding of anxiety sensitivity, with specific emphasis on theoretical refinement of the construct. PMID:16325111

  7. Gene therapy for paediatric leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, R F; Bollard, C M; Heslop, H E

    2001-07-01

    Improvements in the chemotherapeutic and transplant regimens have had a significant impact in improving survival rates for paediatric leukaemia. However, there are still important problems to address including what options are available for patients with chemoresistant disease and what strategies are available to avoid the concerns regarding the toxicity associated with highly cytotoxic treatment regimens. Gene therapy and immunotherapy protocols hold great promise. Using gene transfer of a marker gene, a number of biological issues in the therapy of leukaemia have been addressed. For example, by gene marking autologous bone marrow grafts it has been possible to demonstrate that infused marrow contributes to relapse in acute and chronic myeloid leukaemias. In the allogeneic transplant setting, genetically modified T-cells have proven valuable for the prophylaxis and treatment of viral diseases and may have an important role in preventing or treating disease relapse. Gene transfer is also being used to modify tumour function, enhance immunogenicity, and confer drug-resistance to normal haematopoietic stem cells. With the continued scientific advancements in this field, gene therapy will almost certainly have a major impact on the treatment of paediatric leukaemia in the future. PMID:11727502

  8. JACIE accreditation in paediatric haemopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Cornish, J M

    2008-10-01

    The Joint Accreditation Committee of the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) and European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), known as JACIE, is a nonprofit body established for the purposes of assessment and accreditation in the field of haemopoietic SCT (HSCT). The committee was established in 1999 with the aim of creating a standardized system of accreditation officially recognized across Europe and based on the accreditation standards established by the US-based Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT). The major objectives of JACIE are to improve the quality of HSCT in Europe by providing a means whereby transplant centres, cell collection facilities and processing facilities can demonstrate high-quality practice. JACIE launched its official inspection programme in January 2004, and since then more than 35 centres in Europe have been inspected. The history of paediatric-specific accreditation guidelines has lagged behind the overall development but is now incorporated within the standards. There is now acknowledgement that a paediatric transplant team will be headed by a paediatric programme director, that an independent paediatric unit will perform no less than 10 allogeneic transplants in children under the age of 18 per year, be looked after by nurses and junior doctors specifically trained in paediatric practice and have access to paediatric subspecialties with an intensive care unit on site. Paediatric units will be examined by a paediatric-trained inspector. Remaining issues of difference with the guidelines relate to the numbers required for accreditation in combined units. Overall, the paediatric community in Europe has embraced the JACIE guidelines. JACIE is working more closely with other international organizations in cellular therapy to develop international standards for all aspects of SCT. The recent implementation of Directive 2004/23/EC has provided an impetus for the implementation of JACIE in

  9. Conflict escalation in paediatric services: findings from a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Forbat, Liz; Teuten, Bea; Barclay, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore clinician and family experiences of conflict in paediatric services, in order to map the trajectory of conflict escalation. Design Qualitative interview study, employing extreme-case sampling. Interviews were analysed using an iterative thematic approach to identify common themes regarding the experience and escalation of conflict. Participants Thirty-eight health professionals and eight parents. All participants had direct experience of conflict, including physical assault and court proceedings, at the interface of acute and palliative care. Setting Two teaching hospitals, one district general hospital and two paediatric hospices in England, in 2011. Results Conflicts escalate in a predictable manner. Clearly identifiable behaviours by both clinicians and parents are defined as mild, moderate and severe. Mild describes features like the insensitive use of language and a history of unresolved conflict. Moderate involves a deterioration of trust, and a breakdown of communication and relationships. Severe marks disintegration of working relationships, characterised by behavioural changes including aggression, and a shift in focus from the child's best interests to the conflict itself. Though conflicts may remain at one level, those which escalated tended to move sequentially from one level to the next. Conclusions Understanding how conflicts escalate provides clinicians with a practical, evidence-based framework to identify the warning signs of conflict in paediatrics. PMID:25940425

  10. [The electrocardiogram in the paediatric age group].

    PubMed

    Sanches, M; Coelho, A; Oliveira, E; Lopes, A

    2014-09-01

    A properly interpreted electrocardiogram (ECG) provides important information and is an inexpensive and easy test to perform. It continues to be the method of choice for the diagnosis of arrhythmias. Although the principles of cardiac electrophysiology are the same, there are anatomical and physiological age-dependent changes which produce specific alterations in the paediatric ECG, and which may be misinterpreted as pathological. The intention of this article is to address in a systematic way the most relevant aspects of the paediatric ECG, to propose a possible reading scheme of the ECG and to review the electrocardiograph tracings most frequently found in the paediatric age group. PMID:24907888

  11. Paediatric exercise training in prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pieles, Guido E; Horn, Richard; Williams, Craig A; Stuart, A Graham

    2014-04-01

    Exercise training is an underused intervention in paediatric healthcare. This is surprising, since initial evidence demonstrates its effectiveness and safety; furthermore it confers socioeconomic benefits for healthcare systems. Pilot studies have assessed and confirmed the feasibility of exercise training in many paediatric disease settings. However, more research is needed to understand the pathophysiology, quantify treatment effects and monitor outcomes. A concerted effort from researchers, health professionals and police makers will be necessary to make exercise training an evidence-based and cost-effective intervention in paediatric care. PMID:24351606

  12. Impact of the European paediatric legislation in paediatric rheumatology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Vesely, Richard; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Martini, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Conducting clinical trials in paediatric rheumatology has been difficult mainly because of the lack of funding for academic studies and the lack of interest by pharmaceutical companies in the small and non-rewarding paediatric market. The situation changed dramatically a few years ago with the introduction of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act in the USA and of specific legislation for the development of paediatric medicines (Paediatric Regulation) in the European Union (EU). The EU Paediatric Regulation had a positive impact in paediatric rheumatology-in particular, on the development of new treatments for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Some problems remain, however, such as greater harmonisation of the regulatory aspects of medicines, how to handle me-too agents, how to conduct adequate pharmacokinetic studies and develop age-appropriate formulations, ethical problems in study review and implementation, and a change in the current JIA classification. The introduction of specific legislation, coupled with the existence of large international networks such as the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG at http://www.prcsg.org), covering North America, and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO at http://www.printo.it), covering more than 50 countries, has led to great advances in paediatric rheumatology. Future changes might increase the possibility of conducting trials with similar approaches in other paediatric rheumatological conditions and provide evidence-based treatments for children affected by rheumatic diseases. PMID:23962457

  13. Sedation/anaesthesia in paediatric radiology

    PubMed Central

    Arlachov, Y; Ganatra, R H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In this article we will give a comprehensive literature review on sedation/general anaesthesia (S/GA) and discuss the international variations in practice and options available for S/GA for imaging children. Methods The key articles were obtained primarily from PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, NHS Evidence and The Cochrane Library. Results Recently, paediatric radiology has seen a surge of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, some of which require children to be still and compliant for up to 1 h. It is difficult and sometimes even impossible to obtain quick and high-quality images without employing sedating techniques in certain children. As with any medical procedure, S/GA in radiological practice is not without risks and can have potentially disastrous consequences if mismanaged. In order to reduce any complications and practice safety in radiological units, it is imperative to carry out pre-sedation assessments of children, obtain parental/guardian consent, monitor them closely before, during and after the procedure and have adequate equipment, a safe environment and a well-trained personnel. Conclusion Although the S/GA techniques, sedative drugs and personnel involved vary from country to country, the ultimate goal of S/GA in radiology remains the same; namely, to provide safety and comfort for the patients. Advances in knowledge Imaging children under general anaesthesia is becoming routine and preferred by operators because it ensures patient conformity and provides a more controlled environment. PMID:22898157

  14. Popliteal vasculature injuries in paediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, S A; Roberts, D C; Clarke, N M P

    2012-10-01

    Popliteal-artery injuries in the paediatric-trauma patient are uncommon, difficult to diagnose and with prolonged ischaemia lead to substantial complications. We report three cases of popliteal-vasculature injury in paediatric-trauma patients with diverse mechanisms of injury: blunt trauma, penetrating injury and a Salter-Harris I fracture. We present a range of the significant sequelae that can result from paediatric popliteal-artery injury, both physically and psychologically. It is imperative that clinicians have a high index of suspicion when confronted with paediatric patients with trauma around the knee and that popliteal-vasculature injuries are diagnosed early. If insufficiencies are detected, further imaging should be considered, but surgical exploration should not be delayed in the presence of ischaemia. PMID:22776610

  15. Surgical strategies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Colin T; Smith, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two distinct but related chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions affecting different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s disease is characterised by a patchy transmural inflammation affecting both small and large bowel segments with several distinct phenotypic presentations. Ulcerative colitis classically presents as mucosal inflammation of the rectosigmoid (distal colitis), variably extending in a contiguous manner more proximally through the colon but not beyond the caecum (pancolitis). This article highlights aspects of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of IBD that have relevance for paediatric practice with particular emphasis on surgical considerations. Since 25% of IBD cases present in childhood or teenage years, the unique considerations and challenges of paediatric management should be widely appreciated. Conversely, we argue that the organizational separation of the paediatric and adult healthcare worlds has often resulted in late adoption of new approaches particularly in paediatric surgical practice. PMID:26034347

  16. Paediatric cardiac nursing education: a national collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kerry; Daniels, Amanda; Sheehan, Karen; Langton, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Educational courses for staff working in paediatric specialties may not be financially viable because of the small numbers involved and the difficulties that potential students have in getting released from their units. The UK Paediatric Cardiac Nurses Association worked with other groups to explore the feasibility of a national multi-professional paediatric cardiac education pathway. Three options were identified, including the continuation of local in-house provision with its associated variation in standards. The relative benefits and resource implications of each option were explored and approaches made to educational institutions for support in developing the pathway. A university with an established reputation for e-learning undertook this development and a post graduate certificate in Paediatric Cardiothoracic Practice will soon be available. PMID:16518954

  17. Steroid Assays in Paediatric Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274330

  18. Paediatrics: the etymology of a name.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2011-08-01

    Within the history of paediatrics is the history of the name used to describe it. The etymology of the word 'paediatrics' dates from its first written use, recorded as 'pädiatrik' in the German literature and as 'paediatric', later 'pediatric' in the USA, both first in 1850. Professor Robley Dunglison (1788-1869), the British and American medical lexicographer, first defined 'paediatria' as 'the treatment of the diseases of children' in 1855. 'Pediatric medicine' was promoted as a specialty in the USA in 1880. The oldest monumental inscription defining the specialty of 'paediatrics' in the UK is to be found on a plaque added (in 1950) to the memorial to Dr George Armstrong (1719-1789), a founder of the specialty of paediatrics, in Castleton Cemetery, Scottish Borders, Roxburghshire. 'Paediatrics' and 'child health', with subtle semantic distinctions, had become well established in the English-speaking world by the middle of the 20th century. This paper presents an interpretative chronology of the etymology of the descriptors of the specialty that enjoins all who care for children. PMID:21646328

  19. Paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Shumer, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Medical intervention for transgender adolescents is a controversial issue but a recently published article describing long-term psychological outcomes using ‘the Dutch model’ of care should help to silence critics and reassure the growing number of clinicians treating this patient population. PMID:25403246

  20. Arctic Collaborative Environment: A New Multi-National Partnership for Arctic Science and Decision Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A,; Kress, Martin P.; McCracken, Jeff E.; Spehn, Stephen L.; Tanner, Steve

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic Collaborative Environment (ACE) project is a new international partnership for information sharing to meet the challenges of addressing Arctic. The goal of ACE is to create an open source, web-based, multi-national monitoring, analysis, and visualization decision-support system for Arctic environmental assessment, management, and sustainability. This paper will describe the concept, system architecture, and data products that are being developed and disseminated among partners and independent users through remote access.

  1. Paediatric Extracranial Spinal Accessory Nerve Schwannoma: An Extremely Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sunil; Bhargava, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Schwannoma in head and neck region are quiet common and generally arise from last four cranial nerves. Spinal accessory nerve involvement is very rare. We are hereby presenting an extremely rare case of paediatric XI nerve schwannoma hitherto unreported in English medical literature till date.

  2. MRI of paediatric liver tumours: How we review and report.

    PubMed

    Shelmerdine, Susan C; Roebuck, Derek J; Towbin, Alexander J; McHugh, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Liver tumours are fortunately rare in children. Benign tumours such as haemangiomas and cystic mesenchymal hamartomas are typically seen in infancy, often before 6 months of age. After that age, malignant hepatic tumours increase in frequency. The differentiation of a malignant from benign lesion on imaging can often negate the need for biopsy. Ultrasound is currently the main screening tool for suspected liver pathology, and is ideally suited for evaluation of hepatic lesions in children due to their generally small size. With increasing research, public awareness and parental anxiety regarding radiation dosage from CT imaging, MRI is now unquestionably the modality of choice for further characterisation of hepatic mass lesions.Nevertheless the cost, length of imaging time and perceived complexity of a paediatric liver MR study can be intimidating to the general radiologist and referring clinician. This article outlines standard MR sequences utilised, reasons for their utilisation, types of mixed hepatocyte specific/extracellular contrast agents employed and imaging features that aid the interpretation of paediatric liver lesions. The two commonest paediatric liver malignancies, namely hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma are described. Differentiation of primary hepatic malignancies with metastatic disease and mimickers of malignancy such as focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and hepatic adenomas are also featured in this review..Imaging should aim to clarify the presence of a lesion, the likelihood of malignancy and potential for complete surgical resection. Reviewing and reporting the studies should address these issues in a systematic fashion whilst also commenting upon background liver parenchymal appearances. Clinical information and adequate patient preparation prior to MR imaging studies help enhance the diagnostic yield. PMID:27526937

  3. Can linking databases answer questions about paediatric heart failure?

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sara K; Schumacher, Kurt R; Davies, Ryan R

    2015-08-01

    Numerous data sets collect information on patients with paediatric cardiovascular disease, including paediatric heart failure and transplant patients. This review discusses methodologies available for linking and integrating information across data sets, which may help facilitate answering important questions in the field of paediatric heart failure and transplant that cannot be answered with individual data sets or single-centre data alone. PMID:26377723

  4. Paediatric use of mycophenolate mofetil

    PubMed Central

    Downing, Heather J; Pirmohamed, Munir; Beresford, Michael W; Smyth, Rosalind L

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications do not have a licence, or label, for use in the paediatric age group nor for the specific indication for which they are being used in children. Over recent years, mycophenolate mofetil has increasingly been used off-label (i.e. off-licence) in adults for a number of indications, including autoimmune conditions; progressively, this wider use has been extended to children. This review summarizes current use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in children, looking at how MMF works, the pharmacokinetics, the clinical conditions for which it is used, the advantages it has when compared with other immunosuppressants and the unresolved issues remaining with use in children. The review aims to focus on off-label use in children so as to identify areas that require further research and investigation. The overall commercial value of MMF is limited because it has now come off patent in adults. Given the increasing knowledge of the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics demonstrating the clinical benefits of MMF, new, formal, investigator-led studies, including trials focusing on the use of MMF in children, would be of immense value. PMID:22519685

  5. What kinds of cases do paediatricians refer to clinical ethics? Insights from 184 case referrals at an Australian paediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Rosalind J; Notini, Lauren

    2016-09-01

    Clinical ethics has been developing in paediatric healthcare for several decades. However, information about how paediatricians use clinical ethics case consultation services is extremely limited. In this project, we analysed a large set of case records from the clinical ethics service of one paediatric hospital in Australia. We applied a paediatric-specific typology to the case referrals, based on the triadic doctor-patient-parent relationship. We reviewed the 184 cases referred to the service in the period 2005-2014, noting features including the type of case, the referring department(s) and the patient's age at referral. The two most common types of referral involved clinician uncertainty about the appropriate care pathway for the child (26% of total referrals) and situations where the child's parents disagreed with the doctors' recommendations for the child's care (22% of total referrals). Referrals came from 28 different departments. Cancer, cardiology/cardiac surgery and general medicine referred the highest numbers of cases. The most common patient age groups were children under 1, and 14-15 years old. For three controversial areas of paediatric healthcare, clinicians had initiated processes of routine review of cases by the clinical ethics service. These insights into the way in which one very active paediatric clinical ethics service is used further our understanding of the work of paediatric clinical ethics, particularly the kinds of ethically challenging cases that paediatricians view as appropriate to refer for clinical ethics support. PMID:27317508

  6. Guidelines for paediatric life support. Paediatric Life Support Working Party of the European Resuscitation Council.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The paediatric life support working party of the European Resuscitation Council was set up in 1992 with the aim of producing guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric resuscitation that would be acceptable throughout Europe. The commonest cause of cardiac arrest in children is problems with the airway. The resulting difficulties in breathing and the associated hypoxia rapidly cause a severe bradycardia or asystole. In contrast, adults have primary cardiac events resulting in ventricular fibrillation. This important difference in the pathogenesis of paediatric and adult cardiac arrest is reflected in these European Resuscitation Council guidelines, which complement those already published for adults. PMID:8019227

  7. Hot tonsillectomy for paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Paula; Marzouk, Sherief Deya; Gerolympou, Margarita; Marais, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is a common presentation in paediatric ear, nose and tongue (ENT) outpatients. The use of sleep studies is controversial however once a diagnosis has been made, frequently treatment is surgery. Should these patients be operated on as urgent cases? A 5-year-old boy was admitted under the paediatric team with difficultly breathing and desaturations to 77%. The patient had previously been seen by ENT as an outpatient with an 8-month history of obstructive sleep apnoea and was listed for an adenotonsillectomy with the standard waiting time. During this admission he had an emergency adenotonsillectomy. The patient improved immediately with no large desaturations in recovery and normal observations throughout his stay. It is never ideal to do a paediatric emergency operation and we have reviewed the evidence base to answer the question: Should these patients be treated urgently when seen in outpatients? PMID:24907212

  8. Disease Activity Measures in Paediatric Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Nadia J.; Feldman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Disease activity refers to potentially reversible aspects of a disease. Measurement of disease activity in paediatric rheumatic diseases is a critical component of patient care and clinical research. Disease activity measures are developed systematically, often involving consensus methods. To be useful, a disease activity measure must be feasible, valid, and interpretable. There are several challenges in quantifying disease activity in paediatric rheumatology; namely, the conditions are multidimensional, the level of activity must be valuated in the context of treatment being received, there is no gold standard for disease activity, and it is often difficult to incorporate the patient's perspective of their disease activity. To date, core sets of response variables are defined for juvenile idiopathic arthritis, juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, and juvenile dermatomyositis, as well as definitions for improvement in response to therapy. Several specific absolute disease activity measures also exist for each condition. Further work is required to determine the optimal disease activity measures in paediatric rheumatology. PMID:24089617

  9. Growth in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Cezard, J P; Touati, G; Alberti, C; Hugot, J P; Brinon, C; Czernichow, P

    2002-01-01

    Growth failure (GF) is one of the major complications affecting children with inflammatory bowel disease. The faltering is temporary in 40-50% of cases and prolonged in 10-20% in Crohn's disease (CD). Such failure is rare in children with ulcerative colitis (5%). This complication is often associated with retarded bone development and delayed onset of sexual maturation. The delayed linear growth has a variety of causes including insufficient intake due to anorexia and the inflammatory process with increased energy and protein expenditure. Other factors are increased intestinal loss, secondary hypopituitarism and treatment with steroids. Therapeutic strategies of CD in children have changed this last decade by introducing new therapeutic agents such as topic steroids, immunosuppressors, anti-TNF (antibody and notably in children enteral nutrition which has shown its efficacy in inducing remissions of active CD, restoring nutritional status and stimulation of linear growth. The results of a recent prospective multicentric study over 2 years in 82 CD show that severe GF (-2 SD) is initially present in 15% (n = 12), among them 11 remain < -2SD after 2 years of follow-up. Six patients who were on the normal range initially increased their GF during the follow-up (< -2SD) (total 21% < -2SD (n = 17) at 2 years). At inclusion in this group there was no difference in growth velocity, used of steroids, enteral nutrition or severity of CD as compared to the group with no GF. It suggests that new treatment strategy should be developed in the future for this specific complication of paediatric CD. PMID:12373007

  10. [The medicine use pathway in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Didelot, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The medicine use pathway is a process which is constantly evolving in order to comply with intangible rules. As in other therapeutic fields, the drug regimen in paediatrics must tolerate no error and must be able to detect all warning signs, however minor, in order to optimise this approach. PMID:27177481

  11. Measuring the Expertise of Paediatric Rehabilitation Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Gillian; Bartlett, Doreen J.; Currie, Melissa; Gilpin, Michelle; Baxter, Donna; Willoughby, Colleen; Tucker, Mary Ann; Strachan, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development of a classification system to measure the expertise levels of practicing paediatric rehabilitation therapists. Seventy-five therapists from five disciplines (physical, occupational, speech-language, behaviour, and recreational therapy) were involved, along with 170 peers, and 188 parents of children with…

  12. Paediatric pituitary adenomas: a decade of change.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Federica; Storr, Helen L; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Ghigo, Ezio; Savage, Martin O

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas, although rare in the paediatric age range and mostly benign, represent very challenging disorders for diagnosis and management. The recent identification of genetic alterations in young individuals with pituitary adenomas has broadened the scope of molecular investigations and contributed to the understanding of mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Recent identification of causative mutations of genes such as GNAS, PRKAR1A, MEN1 and AIP has introduced the concept of molecular screening of young apparently healthy family members. Population-based studies have reported a significantly higher number of affected subjects and genetic variations than expected. Radiological techniques have advanced, yet many microadenomas remain undetectable on scanning. However, experience with transsphenoidal and endoscopic pituitary surgery has led to higher rates of cure. Prolactinomas, corticotroph and somatotroph adenomas remain the most prevalent, with each diagnosis presenting its own challenges. As paediatric pituitary adenomas occur very infrequently within the paediatric age range, paediatric endocrine units cannot provide expert management in isolation. Consequently, close co-operation with adult endocrinology colleagues with experience of pituitary disease is strongly recommended. PMID:24525527

  13. Recent advances in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Andrew; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M

    2016-02-01

    This review highlights important advances in paediatric respiratory medicine since 2014, excluding cystic fibrosis. It focuses mainly on the more common conditions, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, bronchiolitis and preschool wheezing, asthma, pneumonia and sleep, and highlights some of the rarer conditions such as primary ciliary dyskinesia and interstitial lung disease (ILD). PMID:26289061

  14. Use of smartphone apps by paediatric trainees.

    PubMed

    Jyothi, Srinivas; Halton, Fiona; Goodyear, Helen

    2015-08-01

    Over 70% of the population owns a smartphone and there are now millions of apps available. This study looks at smartphone and app use among paediatric trainees, in particular whether they are accessing medical apps to help with clinical practice. PMID:26255919

  15. Primary disease recurrence—effects on paediatric renal transplantation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bacchetta, Justine; Cochat, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Primary disease recurrence after renal transplantation is mainly diagnosed by examination of biopsy samples, but can also be associated with clinical symptoms. In some patients, recurrence can lead to graft loss (7-8% of all graft losses). Primary disease recurrence is generally associated with a high risk of graft loss in patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, membranous proliferative glomerulonephritis, primary hyperoxaluria or atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. By contrast, disease recurrence is associated with a limited risk of graft loss in patients with IgA nephropathy, renal involvement associated with Henoch-Schönlein purpura, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated glomerulonephritis or lupus nephritis. The presence of systemic diseases that affect the kidneys, such as sickle cell anaemia and diabetes mellitus, also increases the risk of delayed graft loss. This Review provides an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of primary disease recurrence in paediatric renal graft recipients, and describes the overall effect on graft survival of each of the primary diseases listed above. With appropriate management, few paediatric patients should be excluded from renal transplantation programmes because of an increased risk of recurrence. PMID:25917555

  16. Bounded rationality alters the dynamics of paediatric immunization acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Oraby, Tamer; Bauch, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between disease dynamics and vaccinating behavior have been explored in many coupled behavior-disease models. Cognitive effects such as risk perception, framing, and subjective probabilities of adverse events can be important determinants of the vaccinating behaviour, and represent departures from the pure “rational” decision model that are often described as “bounded rationality”. However, the impact of such cognitive effects in the context of paediatric infectious disease vaccines has received relatively little attention. Here, we develop a disease-behavior model that accounts for bounded rationality through prospect theory. We analyze the model and compare its predictions to a reduced model that lacks bounded rationality. We find that, in general, introducing bounded rationality increases the dynamical richness of the model and makes it harder to eliminate a paediatric infectious disease. In contrast, in other cases, a low cost, highly efficacious vaccine can be refused, even when the rational decision model predicts acceptance. Injunctive social norms can prevent vaccine refusal, if vaccine acceptance is sufficiently high in the beginning of the vaccination campaign. Cognitive processes can have major impacts on the predictions of behaviour-disease models, and further study of such processes in the context of vaccination is thus warranted. PMID:26035413

  17. Paediatric head injuries in the Kwazulu-Natal Province of South Africa: a developing country perspective.

    PubMed

    Okyere-Dede, Ebenezer K; Nkalakata, Munyaradzi C; Nkomo, Tshepo; Hadley, G P; Madiba, Thandinkosi E

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the causes, management and outcome of head injuries in paediatric patients admitted to the paediatric surgery unit at King Edward VIII Hospital over a 3-year period, from 1999 to 2001. There were 506 patients (331 male; M:F ratio 2:1) and the mean age was 71.99 +36.8 months (2 weeks to 180 months). The injuries were due to: motor vehicle crashes (324); falls (121); assault (30); inadvertent injury (23); and unknown (11). Forty-nine patients (9%) were admitted with a Glasgow Coma Scale ≤8. The most common intracranial pathology on computed tomography was: intracranial haematoma/haemorrhage (44); contusion (16); and brain oedema (10). Nineteen patients (3.4%) underwent neurosurgical intervention and the rest were managed conservatively. Eighteen died in hospital (3.6%). The mean hospital stay was 5 ± 12 days. Twenty-three patients (4.5%) were discharged with neurological sequelae. Few paediatric patients are admitted with severe head injury: the majority from blunt injury caused by motor vehicle crashes. Management mainly requires simple neurological observation in a general ward with a surprisingly good prognosis. Specific protocols for paediatric head injuries have been proposed based on these findings. PMID:23550196

  18. How to handle multidisciplinary, multi-national and multi-sectoral projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, Anja; Wallmann, Klaus; Visbeck, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Collaborative research projects funded by the European Commission are by nature multi-national. Often they bring together different scientific communities as the questions raised in EU project calls can typically only be addressed through the convergence of these previously separated disciplines in one research consortium. Some work programmes even necessitate to team up as different disciplines as natural sciences, social science, legal science and economic science. Examples for such multi- national, -disciplinary and - sectoral projects are the EU projects ECO2 (FP7, concluded) and AtlantOS (H2020). Project managers of such projects need to develop skills beyond the common technical and management skills namely go into the domain of partners and stakeholders psychology and be able to maintain different perspectives on communication and interaction needs regarding cultural-, discipline- and sectoral background. Accordingly, the project manager has besides his technical role as manager at least three further roles: that of a communicator, that of a mediator and that of a person convincing partners of the necessary and selling the project products to the stakeholders. As the typical project manager has not too much power and authority by his position he has to use the power of smart communication and persuasion to overcome potential dissension between disciplines, national reservation or potential conflicts regarding different sectoral views. Accordingly, the project manager of such a complex project would try to arrange the ideal working environment by considering cultural feel, the cooperation of disciplines, information and the control of resources. The way he develops such ideal working environment is by reflection of past, present and future experiences/needs.

  19. Quality in paediatric emergency medicine: Measurement and reporting.

    PubMed

    Borland, Meredith L; Shepherd, Mike

    2016-02-01

    There is a clear demand for quality in the delivery of health care around the world; paediatric emergency medicine is no exception to this movement. It has been identified that gaps exist in the quality of acute care provided to children. Regulatory bodies in Australia and New Zealand are moving to mandate the implementation of quality targets and measures. Within the paediatric emergency department (ED), there is a lack of research into paediatric specific indicators. The existing literature regarding paediatric acute care quality measures has been recently summarised, and expert consensus has now been reported. It is clear that there is much work to be performed to generalise this work to ED. We review suggestions from the current literature relating to feasible indicators within the paediatric acute care setting. We propose options to develop a quality 'scorecard' that could be used to assist Australian and New Zealand EDs with quality measurement and benchmarking for their paediatric patients. PMID:27062615

  20. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS) cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years) to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS) is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA), allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS) is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st September 2009. There is

  1. Current views and advances on Paediatric Virology: An update for paediatric trainees

    PubMed Central

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; GREENOUGH, ANNE; THEODORIDOU, MARIA; KRAMVIS, ANNA; CHRISTAKI, ILIANA; KOUTSAFTIKI, CHRYSSIE; KOUTSAKI, MARIA; PORTALIOU, DIMITRA M.; KOSTAGIANNI, GEORGIA; PANAGOPOULOU, PARASKEVI; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric Virology is a bold new scientific field, which combines Paediatrics with Virology, Epidemiology, Molecular Medicine, Evidence-based Medicine, Clinical Governance, Quality Improvement, Pharmacology and Immunology. The Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which took place on Saturday October 10, 2015 in Athens, Greece, provided an overview of recent views and advances on viral infections occurring in neonates and children. It was included in the official programme of the 20th World Congress on Advances in Oncology and the 18th International Symposium on Molecular Medicine, which attracted over 500 delegates from the five continents. During the Workshop, the topics covered included the challenges of vaccine implementation against human papillomaviruses in countries under financial crisis, strategies for eradicating poliomyelitis and its 60th vaccine anniversary, as well as the debate on the association between autism and vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. Among the non-vaccine related topics, emphasis was given to viral infections in prematurely born infants and their long-term outcomes, new paediatric intensive care management options for bronchiolitis related to respiratory syncytial virus, the clinical implications of hepatitis B virus and cytomegalovirus genotyping, the Ebola virus threat and preparedness in Paediatric Emergency Departments, oral, oropharynx, laryngeal, nasal and ocular viral infections and Merkel cell polyomavirus as a novel emerging virus of infancy and childhood. In this review, we provide selected presentations and reports discussed at the Workshop. PMID:26889211

  2. The use of nalbuphine in paediatric anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kubica-Cielińska, Anna; Zielińska, Marzena

    2015-01-01

    Nalbuphine is an agonist-antagonist opioid. It causes analgesic and sedative effect and because of ceiling effect it does not cause a respiratory depression. In a perioperative therapy of paediatric patients it may be used for premedication, sedation during diagnostic procedures as well as for postoperative pain treatment. It reverses adverse reactions of other opioids such as itch or urinary retention, not significantly influencing its analgetic properties. After sevoflurane anaesthesia of small children, it reduces the incidences of emergence agitation. Nalbuphine is considered a safe drug, which causes nausea and vomiting less frequently than other opioids. Analgesic effect, the ability to provide moderate sedation and a large margin of safety make that analgesic often used for paediatric patients. PMID:26165241

  3. Effects of anaesthesia on paediatric lung function.

    PubMed

    Trachsel, D; Svendsen, J; Erb, T O; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory adverse events are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in paediatric anaesthesia. Aside from predisposing conditions associated with an increased risk of respiratory incidents in children such as concurrent infections and chronic airway irritation, there are adverse respiratory events directly attributable to the impact of anaesthesia on the respiratory system. Anaesthesia can negatively affect respiratory drive, ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) matching and tidal breathing, all resulting in potentially devastating hypoxaemia. Understanding paediatric respiratory physiology and its changes during anaesthesia will enable anaesthetists to anticipate, recognize and prevent deterioration that can lead to respiratory failure. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of the effects of anaesthesia on respiration in children. It focuses on the impact of the different components of anaesthesia, patient positioning and procedure-related changes on respiratory physiology. PMID:27440626

  4. Ciprofloxacin safety in paediatrics: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Adefurin, Abiodun; Sammons, Helen; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Choonara, Imti

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety of ciprofloxacin in paediatric patients in relation to arthropathy, any other adverse events (AEs) and drug interactions. Methods A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL and bibliographies of relevant articles was carried out for all published articles, regardless of design, that involved the use of ciprofloxacin in any paediatric age group ≤17 years. Only articles that reported on safety were included. Results 105 articles met the inclusion criteria and involved 16 184 paediatric patients. There were 1065 reported AEs (risk 7%, 95% CI 3.2% to 14.0%). The most frequent AEs were musculoskeletal AEs, abnormal liver function tests, nausea, changes in white blood cell counts and vomiting. There were six drug interactions (with aminophylline (4) and methotrexate (2)). The only drug related death occurred in a neonate who had an anaphylactic reaction. 258 musculoskeletal events occurred in 232 paediatric patients (risk 1.6%, 95% CI 0.9% to 2.6%). Arthralgia accounted for 50% of these. The age of occurrence of arthropathy ranged from 7 months to 17 years (median 10 years). All cases of arthropathy resolved or improved with management. One prospective controlled study estimated the risk of arthropathy as 9.3 (OR 95% CI 1.2 to 195). Pooled safety data of controlled trials in this review estimated the risk of arthropathy as 1.57 (OR 95% CI 1.26 to 1.97). Conclusion Musculoskeletal AEs occur due to ciprofloxacin use. However, these musculoskeletal events are reversible with management. It is recommended that further prospective controlled studies should be carried out to evaluate the safety of ciprofloxacin, with particular focus on the risk of arthropathy. PMID:21785119

  5. Sleep · 8: Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Brouillette, R

    2005-01-01

    In the past 25 years there has been increasing recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) as a common condition of childhood. Morbidity includes impairment of growth, cardiovascular complications, learning impairment, and behavioural problems. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition in children differs in many respects from that in adults. We review here the key features of paediatric OSA, highlighting differences from adult OSA, and suggest future directions for research. PMID:15923253

  6. Paediatric infectious diseases: the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Starr, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Many advances and challenges have occurred in the field of paediatric infectious diseases during the past 50 years. It is impossible to cover all of these in a short review, but a few highlights and lowlights will be covered. These include virtual disappearance of some infectious diseases, emergence of new ones, infections in the immunocompromised, antimicrobial resistance, development of new and improved antimicrobials, improved diagnostic tests and the Human Microbiome Project. PMID:25557805

  7. Emergency department overcrowding - implications for paediatric emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been an international phenomenon for more than 10 years. It is important to understand that ED overcrowding is a measure of health system efficiency and is not strictly related to ED volumes or capacity. ED overcrowding is defined as a situation in which the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time. The major factor resulting in ED overcrowding is the presence of admitted patients in the ED for prolonged periods of time, not a high volume of low-acuity patients. While limited data are available for paediatric EDs, winter respiratory illnesses set the stage for ED overcrowding, which are epidemic in adult or general EDs. Prehospital-, ED- and hospital-related factors are described in the present article, and these may help prevent or manage this important patient safety problem. PMID:19030415

  8. Emergency department overcrowding – implications for paediatric emergency medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been an international phenomenon for more than 10 years. It is important to understand that ED overcrowding is a measure of health system efficiency and is not strictly related to ED volumes or capacity. ED overcrowding is defined as a situation in which the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time. The major factor resulting in ED overcrowding is the presence of admitted patients in the ED for prolonged periods of time, not a high volume of low-acuity patients. While limited data are available for paediatric EDs, winter respiratory illnesses set the stage for ED overcrowding, which are epidemic in adult or general EDs. Prehospital-, ED- and hospital-related factors are described in the present article, and these may help prevent or manage this important patient safety problem. PMID:19030415

  9. Paediatric suicidal burns: A growing concern.

    PubMed

    Segu, Smitha; Tataria, Rachana

    2016-06-01

    An alarming rise in rates of paediatric population committing self-immolation acts is a growing social and medical problem. In recent times there seems to be a rising concern in paediatric population. A study was conducted at a government tertiary care burn centre over 5 years in paediatric age group of <18 years who had committed self-immolation. Demographic data, aetiology, burn severity, associated illnesses, treatment and outcomes of the patients were collected with preventive strategies. Of total 89 patients, 12 patients were below 12 years (children) and 77 between 12-18 years (adolescent) with female preponderance. Majority belonged to lower middle and upper lower class families. Most had deep partial thickness burns. Psychiatric and personality disorder were found in 24.03% and 31.46% patients respectively. Kerosene was the main agent chosen to inflict injury. The average length of hospital stay was 19.8 days. The crude mortality rate observed was 38.2%. With cultural and socio-economic changes children and adolescents are exposed to increased levels of stress and peer pressure leaving them vulnerable. A multidisciplinary care involving medical, psychological and social support is required. Identifying children at risk and proper counselling and support can form an important strategy at prevention rather than cure. PMID:26803366

  10. Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Dekking, Sara A S; Van Der Graaf, Rieke; Van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for research is compromised in these two scenarios, and if so whether this is also morally problematic. For this, we employ the account of voluntary consent from Nelson and colleagues, who assert that voluntary consent requires substantial freedom from controlling influences. We argue that, in the absence of persuasion or manipulation, inclusion by the treating physician does not compromise voluntariness. However, it may function as a risk factor for controlling influence as it narrows the scope within which parents make decisions. Furthermore, physician appeal to reciprocity is not controlling as it constitutes persuasion. In addition, framing information is a form of informational manipulation and constitutes a controlling influence. In the second scenario, treatments confined to the research context qualify as controlling if the available options are restricted through manipulation of options. Although none of the influences is morally problematic in itself, a combination of influences may create morally problematic instances of involuntary informed consent. Therefore, safeguards should be implemented to establish an optimal environment for parents to provide voluntary informed consent in an integrated research-care context. PMID:26686529

  11. Paediatric airway management: What is new?

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, S; Jayanthi, R; Archana, SR

    2012-01-01

    Airway management plays a pivotal role in Paediatric Anaesthesia. Over the last two decades many improvements in this area have helped us to overcome this final frontier. From an era where intubation with a conventional laryngoscope or blind nasal intubation was the only tool for airway management, we have come a long way. Today supraglottic airway devices have pride of place in the Operating Room and are becoming important airway devices used in routine procedures. Direct and indirect fibreoptic laryngoscopes and transtracheal devices help us overcome difficult and previously impossible airway situations. These developments mean that we need to update our knowledge on these devices. Also much of our basic understanding of the physiology and anatomy of the paediatric airway has changed. This article attempts to shed light on some of the most important advances/opinions in paediatric airway management like, cuffed endotracheal tubes, supraglottic airway devices, video laryngoscopes, rapid sequence intubation, the newly proposed algorithm for difficult airway management and the role of Ex Utero Intrapartum Treatment (EXIT) procedure in the management of the neonatal airway. PMID:23293383

  12. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  13. Paediatric day-case neurosurgery in a resource challenged setting: Pattern and practice

    PubMed Central

    Owojuyigbe, Afolabi Muyiwa; Komolafe, Edward O.; Adenekan, Anthony T.; Dada, Muyiwa A.; Onyia, Chiazor U.; Ogunbameru, Ibironke O.; Owagbemi, Oluwafemi F.; Talabi, Ademola O.; Faponle, Fola A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been generally observed that children achieve better convalescence in the home environment especially if discharged same day after surgery. This is probably due to the fact that children generally tend to feel more at ease in the home environment than in the hospital setting. Only few tertiary health institutions provide routine day-case surgery for paediatric neurosurgical patients in our sub-region. Objective: To review the pattern and practice of paediatric neurosurgical day-cases at our hospital. Patients and Methods: A prospective study of all paediatric day-case neurosurgeries carried out between June 2011 and June 2014. Results: A total of 53 patients (34 males and 19 females) with age ranging from 2 days to 14 years were seen. Majority of the patients (77.4%) presented with congenital lesions, and the most common procedure carried out was spina bifida repair (32%) followed by ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion (26.4%) for hydrocephalus. Sixty-eight percentage belonged to the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class 2, whereas the rest (32%) belonged to class 1. General anaesthesia was employed in 83% of cases. Parenteral paracetamol was used for intra-operative analgesia for most of the patients. Two patients had post-operative nausea and vomiting and were successfully managed. There was no case of emergency re-operation, unplanned admission, cancellation or mortality. Conclusion: Paediatric day-case neurosurgery is feasible in our environment. With careful patient selection and adequate pre-operative preparation, good outcome can be achieved. PMID:27251657

  14. Exciting times: towards a totally minimally invasive paediatric urology service.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, John

    2011-02-01

    Following on from the first paediatric laparoscopic nephrectomy in 1992, the growth of minimally invasive ablative and reconstructive procedures in paediatric urology has been dramatic. This article reviews the literature related to laparoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty, optimising posterior urethral valve ablation and intravesical laparoscopic ureteric reimplantation. PMID:21933475

  15. Eltrombopag: A Review in Paediatric Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Burness, Celeste B; Keating, Gillian M; Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2016-05-01

    Eltrombopag (Promacta(®); Revolade(®)) is an orally active thrombopoietin receptor agonist recently approved in the USA and the EU for use in paediatric patients aged ≥1 year with chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) who have had an insufficient response or are refractory to other ITP treatments (e.g. corticosteroids, immunoglobulins or splenectomy). The efficacy of 7 or 13 weeks' therapy with oral eltrombopag (up to 75 mg/day) was compared with that of placebo in patients aged 1-17 years with previously treated chronic ITP in randomized, double-blind, multicentre phase II and III trials (PETIT and PETIT-2). In these trials, the platelet response rate (primary endpoint of PETIT) and the sustained platelet response rate (primary endpoint of PETIT-2) were significantly higher with eltrombopag than with placebo. A clinical benefit was shown by a reduction in the need for rescue therapy with eltrombopag versus placebo in both trials and a reduction of clinically significant bleeding in PETIT. During longer-term therapy (open-label treatment period for ≥24 weeks), eltrombopag maintained platelet counts above 50 × 10(9)/L in the majority of patients and approximately one-half of patients were able to reduce or discontinue concurrent ITP drugs. Eltrombopag was generally well tolerated. Current evidence suggests that eltrombopag is a valuable addition to the limited treatment options available for the management of chronic ITP in paediatric patients with an inadequate response to first-line therapies. PMID:27151255

  16. LAT gel, a powerful tool underused in the repair of paediatric lacerations.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Hill, V K P; Wilson, M H; Felstead, A M

    2014-08-01

    Paediatric lacerations presenting to emergency departments are a common cause of referral to surgical specialties in the UK. LAT gel (lidocaine, adrenaline, and tetracaine) is a safe and effective topical anaesthetic that can aid with the closure of uncomplicated lacerations, particularly in the paediatric trauma setting. The benefits to both the patient and management in terms of the avoidance of a general anaesthetic and the freeing up of hospital resources (e.g. beds, staffing, emergency theatre) make it an invaluable tool in the arsenal of the emergency department. The authors describe a reliable method of anaesthetizing lacerations with LAT gel and question its underuse within the emergency departments in the South West region of the UK. PMID:24861471

  17. Children with dermatological conditions admitted to paediatric intensive care: analysis of a national clinical audit database.

    PubMed

    George, S M C; Sen, S M; Harrison, D A; McShane, P; Patel, K; Darley, C R

    2016-06-01

    There is little published literature about dermatological conditions in paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). The aim of this study was to describe the range of skin disorders in children admitted to PICUs in the UK and Ireland using data from a national audit. An analysis was conducted using data for 2002 - 2010 from the Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network (PICANet). In total, 999 admissions of 882 children were identified, representing 0.8% of all PICU admissions. The most frequent dermatological conditions were skin infections, including cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis, and inflammatory conditions. In 28% of cases, the dermatological diagnosis was considered the reason for PICU admission, in 35% it was a manifestation of systemic disease and in 37% it was considered incidental. Overall mortality was similar to the general PICU population, with 52 deaths (5.2%), but was greater in children with vascular/haematological conditions. PMID:26684929

  18. Media Coverage of Youth Suicides and Its Impact on Paediatric Mental Health Emergency Department Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Stephanie L.; Cloutier, Paula; BéLair, Marc-André; Cappelli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Background: To examine mental health (MH) presentations to the emergency department (ED) of a paediatric hospital following two highly publicized local teen suicides. Methods: Youths aged 12–18 years with a MH chief complaint and/or diagnosis were included. Differences in frequencies were analyzed using chi-square tests, and relative risks were evaluated using generalized linear modelling. Results: Significant increases in the number of ED presentations were found within the months of the publicized suicides compared to the same months of previous years. No differences were found in symptom acuity, suicidal status and psychiatric hospitalization rates. Significant increases were found in relative risk of presenting to the ED 28 and 90 days post both publicized suicides. Conclusions: Results suggest there was an association between highly publicized suicides and an increase in the number of MH presentations to the local paediatric ED. Considerations of media's potentially positive role in MH awareness are needed. PMID:25410699

  19. Predictors of Mortality in Paediatric Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Mohammed Junaid; Mittal, Mahima; Kushwaha, K.P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric myocarditis can present as mild flu like symptoms to fulminent form. Early identification of the severity of illness and prioritization of intensive care is helpful especially in developing countries with limited resources. Aim To know the factors at admission that can predict mortality in paediatric myocarditis. Materials and Methods This was an observational study which enrolled children who presented with fever of acute onset (less than 15 days in duration), and were diagnosed as suspected myocarditis on the basis of clinical features, Troponin I and echocardiography, according to Expanded criteria for myocarditis in Paediatric ward at our institute over a period from August 2014 to December 2015. Their clinical features, cardiac biomarkers and echocardiography findings were compared between survivors and non-survivors. Statistical Analysis All statistical analysis was done using graphpad Prism 5 and SPSS statistical software. A Fisher exact p-value <0.05 was regarded as significant. Multivariate Logistic Regression was carried out to quantify the relationship between cardiac death and other predictor variables. The logistic coefficients for the predictor variables and their exponents, that is, log odds were calculated. Statistical significance of these predictor variables was interpreted by p-values. Results A 17.7% (n=11/62) patients of paediatric myocarditis died in this study. New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV dyspnea (p=0.0115) and hypotension (p=0.0174) were more in patients who did not survive. The mean value of Troponin I was more in the non-survivor group (0.958 ± 1.13ng/ml); (p=0.0074). More number of patients who died had Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) levels increased in their plasma (p=0.0087) with higher mean value (p=0.0175). LV ejection fraction was decreased markedly in non survivor group with mean value of 37±8.09 % as compared to survivor group with mean value of 46.6±10.5%, (p=0.0115). On multivariate

  20. Paediatric travel medicine: vaccines and medications

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric aspects of travel medicine can be complex, and individual advice is often required. Nonetheless, children are much more likely to acquire common infections than exotic tropical diseases whilst travelling. Important exceptions are malaria and tuberculosis, which are more frequent and severe in children. Overall, travellers' diarrhoea is the most common illness affecting travellers. This review discusses vaccines and medications that may be indicated for children who are travelling overseas. It focuses on immunizations that are given as part of the routine schedule, as well as those that are more specific to travel. Malaria and travellers' diarrhoea are also discussed. PMID:23163285

  1. Infection control in paediatric office settings

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of infection in the paediatric office is of increasing concern. The present document discusses routes of transmission of infection and the principles of current infection control measures. Prevention includes appropriate office design and administrative policies, triage, routine practices for the care of all patients (eg, hand hygiene; use of gloves, masks, eye protection and gowns for specific procedures; adequate cleaning, disinfection and sterilization of surfaces and equipment including toys, and aseptic technique for invasive procedures), and additional precautions for specific infections. Personnel should be adequately immunized, and those infected should follow work-restriction policies. PMID:19412374

  2. Salbutamol in paediatrics: pharmacology, prescribing and controversies.

    PubMed

    Andrzejowski, Paul; Carroll, Will

    2016-08-01

    Salbutamol has become a key drug in respiratory medicine since it was first developed by Sir David Jack et al in 1968, 5000 years after the β agonist ephedrine was first used in its raw form, as the Ma Huang herb in Chinese medicine to treat asthma. It is one of the most commonly encountered medicines in paediatric practice and the authors have found that an understanding of its pharmacology in clinical practice is incredibly helpful. In this article, we discuss its pharmacology and pharmacodynamics, practical prescribing points and some unresolved issues surrounding its use, which should serve to provide an essential working knowledge for the busy paediatrician. PMID:27059284

  3. The impact of paediatric early warning systems.

    PubMed

    Naddy, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    The child who is ill enough to be admitted to a children's ward has the potential to deteriorate rapidly. If this deterioration is not recognised and acted on in a timely manner, such children may require cardiopulmonary resuscitation, high dependency or intensive care. A paediatric early warning tool used with routine nursing observations will alert staff to the need for increased monitoring, the support of an associated outreach team or emergency medical attention. If the tool is used, a nurse can provide objective, transparent evidence of the child's condition to experienced clinicians. Appropriate education and supervision of staff should be ensured through the use of an outreach team. PMID:23167014

  4. Paediatric procedural sedation within the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Krieser, David; Kochar, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia in children requires the use of non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches to facilitate the management of painful procedures. The development of skills in such techniques has mirrored the development of paediatric emergency medicine as a subspecialty. Governance, education and credentialing must facilitate safe sedation practice, using a structured approach, as sedating children in the busy environment of an emergency department is not without risk. Emergency clinicians, patients and caregivers all have a role to play in developing a safe, effective sedation plan. PMID:27062624

  5. Paediatric emergency department utilisation: is it necessary an educational intervention?

    PubMed

    De Tina, Annalisa; Quattrin, Rosanna; Montina, Laura; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years there has been a progressive increase in accesses to services for paediatric emergency room, documented in Italy and abroad. The aim of the study is describe the sociodemographic, cultural, subjective and objective factors for non-urgent access to paediatric emergency service in an Italian region. It was adopted a descriptive survey of a sample of non-urgent accesses to two paediatric emergency room services in an Italian region during the period from February-March 2009, through the administration of questionnaires and the consultation of facilities databases. Half of the accesses to the paediatric emergency room are not urgent and are to be referred to the paediatric primary care. 80% of the users do not call for advice before coming to the emergency room. The convenience of the service, which accounts for more than 50% of the case, and the proximity from home are reasons to go to the emergency room. Approximately half of the accesses to the paediatric emergency department could be managed by primary care services. The convenience of the service, the self-referred and the proximity to home are emerging as the only influential factors reported by literature. In the future it should become crucial providing strategies for education/health information focused on non-urgent paediatric problems and offering people a call center phone service in order to filter and prevent the inappropriate accesses. PMID:25008221

  6. Developing paediatric medicines: identifying the needs and recognizing the challenges.

    PubMed

    Ernest, Terry B; Elder, David P; Martini, Luigi G; Roberts, Matthew; Ford, James L

    2007-08-01

    There is a significant need for research and development into paediatric medicines. Only a small fraction of the drugs marketed and utilized as therapeutic agents in children have been clinically evaluated. The majority of marketed drugs are either not labelled, or inadequately labelled, for use in paediatric patients. The absence of suitable medicines or critical safety and efficacy information poses significant risks to a particularly vulnerable patient population. However, there are many challenges associated with developing medicines for the paediatric population and this review paper is intended to highlight these. The paediatric population is made up of a wide range of individuals of substantially varied physical size, weight and stage of physiological development. Experimentation on children is considered by many to be unethical, resulting in difficulties in obtaining critical safety data. Clinical trials are subject to detailed scrutiny by the various regulatory bodies who have recently recognized the need for pharmaceutical companies to invest in paediatric medicines. The costs associated with paediatric product development could result in poor or negative return on investment and so incentives have been proposed by the EU and US regulatory bodies. Additionally, some commonly used excipients may be unsuitable for use in children; and some dosage forms may be undesirable to the paediatric population. PMID:17725846

  7. Clinical practice: immune thrombocytopenia in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Labarque, Veerle; Van Geet, Chris

    2014-02-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a disease affecting both children and adults. It is defined as acquired isolated thrombocytopenia caused by the autoimmune production of anti-platelet antibodies. Childhood ITP most frequently occurs in young children who have been previously well, although a viral respiratory tract infection often precedes thrombocytopenia. A benign and self-limiting course is common, but major bleeding complications such as intracranial haemorrhage may occur. Yet one cannot predict which child will have a prolonged course of thrombocytopenia and who will develop an intracranial haemorrhage. In children without atypical characteristics, only minimal diagnostic investigations are needed, and most paediatric ITP patients do not need platelet-enhancing therapy even though various treatment options are available. A "watch and wait" strategy should be considered in paediatric patients with mild disease. Steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin G or anti-D immunoglobulin are the current first-line therapeutic measures for children at risk for severe bleeding. When life-threatening bleeding occurs, a combination of therapies is needed. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge on primary ITP in children and adolescents. PMID:24390128

  8. Osteoporosis in paediatric patients with spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Marreiros, Humberto Filipe; Loff, Clara; Calado, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence and morbidity associated with osteoporosis and fractures in patients with spina bifida (SB) highlight the importance of osteoporosis prevention and treatment in early childhood; however, the issue has received little attention. The method for the selection of appropriate patients for drug treatment has not been clarified. Objective To review the literature concerning fracture risks and low bone density in paediatric patients with SB. We looked for studies describing state-of-the-art treatments and for prevention of secondary osteoporosis. Methods Articles were identified through a search in the electronic database (PUBMED) supplemented with reviews of the reference lists of selected papers. The main outcome measures were incidence of fractures and risk factors for fracture, an association between bone mineral density (BMD) and occurrence of fracture, risk factors of low BMD, and effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments on BMD and on the incidence of fractures. We considered as a secondary outcome the occurrence of fractures in relation to the mechanism of injury. Results Results indicated that patients with SB are at increased risk for fractures and low BMD. Risk factors that may predispose patients to fractures include higher levels of neurological involvement, non-ambulatory status, physical inactivity, hypercalciuria, higher body fat levels, contractures, and a previous spontaneous fracture. Limitations were observed in the number and quality of studies concerning osteoporosis prevention and treatment in paediatric patients with SB. The safety and efficiency of drugs to treat osteoporosis in adults have not been evaluated satisfactorily in children with SB. PMID:22330186

  9. Paediatric pandemic planning: children's perspectives and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Koller, Donna; Nicholas, David; Gearing, Robin; Kalfa, Ora

    2010-07-01

    Children, as major stakeholders in paediatric hospitals, have remained absent from discussions on important healthcare issues. One critical area where children's voices have been minimised is in the planning for future pandemics. This paper presents a subset of data from a programme of research which examined various stakeholder experiences of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreaks of 2003. These data also generated recommendations for future pandemic planning. Specifically, this paper will examine the perspectives and recommendations of children hospitalised during SARS in a large paediatric hospital in Canada. Twenty-one (n = 21) child and adolescent participants were interviewed from a variety of medical areas including cardiac (n = 2), critical care (n = 2), organ transplant (n = 4), respiratory medicine (n = 8) and infectious diseases (patients diagnosed with suspected or probable SARS; n = 5). Data analyses exposed a range of children's experiences associated with the outbreaks as well as recommendations for future pandemic planning. Key recommendations included specific policies and guidelines concerning psychosocial care, infection control, communication strategies and the management of various resources. This paper is guided by a conceptual framework comprised of theories from child development and literature on children's rights. The authors call for greater youth participation in healthcare decision-making and pandemic planning. PMID:20180866

  10. Selective lung intubation during paediatric thoracic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mixa, V; Nedomova, B; Rygl, M

    2016-01-01

    Selective lung intubation is a necessary prerequisite for the completion of most interventions comprising thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. In paediatric care, our site uses Univent tubes for children up to the age of three years and double-lumen tubes (DLT) for children from 6-8 years of age. In younger children, we usually use regular endotracheal intubation, with the lung being held in the hemithorax position being operated on using a surgical retractor. The article presents the analysis of 860 thoracic surgeries, of which 491 comprised selective intubation (Univent 57 cases, DLT 434 cases). The use of the aforementioned devices is connected with certain complications. Univent tube can be connected with intraoperative dislocation of the obturating balloon (29.8%) and balloon perforation (5.2%). DLT insertion may be connected with failure of tube fitting. In 84 cases we had to repeat DLT insertion (20.6%). In 8 cases we were not able to insert DLT at all (1.8%). Standard use of selective intubation methods in paediatric patients from two years of age improved the conditions for surgical interventions (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 19). PMID:27546541

  11. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26229655

  12. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart.

    PubMed

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies - body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior-posterior (AP)/posterior-anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26229655

  13. Recent advances in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Vakamudi, Mahesh; Ravulapalli, Harish; Karthikeyan, Ranjith

    2012-09-01

    Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia involves anaesthetizing very small children with complex congenital heart disease for major surgical procedures. The unique nature of this patient population requires considerable expertise and in-depth knowledge of the altered physiology. There have been several developments in the last decade in this subspecialty that has contributed to better care and improved outcome in this vulnerable group of patients. The purpose of this review is to present some of the recent advances in the anesthetic management of these children from preoperative evaluation to postoperative care. This article reviews the role of magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in preoperative evaluation, the use of ultrasound to secure vascular access, the use of cuffed endotracheal tubes, the optimal haematocrit and the role of blood products, including the use of recombinant factor VIIa. It also deals with the advances in technology that have led to improved monitoring, the newer developments in cardiopulmonary bypass, the use of centrifugal pumps and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the role of DHCA. The role of new drugs, especially the α-2 agonists in paediatric cardiac anesthetic practice, fast tracking and effective postoperative pain management have also been reviewed. PMID:23293388

  14. A paediatric X-ray exposure chart

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Stephen P

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this review was to develop a radiographic optimisation strategy to make use of digital radiography (DR) and needle phosphor computerised radiography (CR) detectors, in order to lower radiation dose and improve image quality for paediatrics. This review was based on evidence-based practice, of which a component was a review of the relevant literature. The resulting exposure chart was developed with two distinct groups of exposure optimisation strategies – body exposures (for head, trunk, humerus, femur) and distal extremity exposures (elbow to finger, knee to toe). Exposure variables manipulated included kilovoltage peak (kVp), target detector exposure and milli-ampere-seconds (mAs), automatic exposure control (AEC), additional beam filtration, and use of antiscatter grid. Mean dose area product (DAP) reductions of up to 83% for anterior–posterior (AP)/posterior–anterior (PA) abdomen projections were recorded postoptimisation due to manipulation of multiple-exposure variables. For body exposures, the target EI and detector exposure, and thus the required mAs were typically 20% less postoptimisation. Image quality for some distal extremity exposures was improved by lowering kVp and increasing mAs around constant entrance skin dose. It is recommended that purchasing digital X-ray equipment with high detective quantum efficiency detectors, and then optimising the exposure chart for use with these detectors is of high importance for sites performing paediatric imaging. Multiple-exposure variables may need to be manipulated to achieve optimal outcomes.

  15. Psychological consultation in a paediatric setting: A qualitative analysis of staff experiences of a psychosocial forum.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Jessica L; Benson, Sally

    2015-07-01

    The use of psychosocial forums in paediatric settings has been recommended as a means of providing psychological consultancy. However, no research has explored staff perceptions of these meetings or whether they have a positive impact on patient care. In this study, six members of a paediatric gastroenterology multidisciplinary team were interviewed about their experience of a weekly psychosocial forum using a qualitative approach. The data revealed that staff regarded the forum as an essential and useful part of the service. Staff reported a number of benefits to their clinical work as a result of attending the forum, in addition to the general benefits of having a clinical psychologist available to see patients. However, staff also made recommendations for improving the forum. The results suggest that psychosocial forums may provide an efficient means of delivering specialist psychological consultation for patients with psychological difficulties, in line with Department of Health recommendations for paediatric services. Future research should aim to investigate the effectiveness of psychosocial forums in different settings and to establish the cost-effectiveness of these meetings. PMID:24711586

  16. Paediatric formulations of second-line anti-tuberculosis medications: challenges and considerations.

    PubMed

    Taneja, R; Garcia-Prats, A J; Furin, J; Maheshwari, H K

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing number of children worldwide accessing second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB); however, there are very few child-friendly formulations. For paediatric use, dispersible tablets offer distinct advantages over liquid formulations and other approaches. This is particularly relevant for TB, where stability, long shelf-life and reduced manufacturing, transport and storage costs are all critical to ensuring that drugs are accessible and affordable. In addition, fixed-dose combinations that reduce the pill burden and provide adequate taste masking may promote long-term adherence to anti-tuberculosis treatment and prevention regimens likely to last many months in children. Partial adherence may result in treatment failure and the further selection and spread of resistant mycobacteria. Unfortunately, no second-line TB paediatric drugs exist in dispersible formulations. We discuss here the main obstacles to developing such tablets and present strategies for overcoming them. We also advocate for timely anticipation of paediatric use when new TB drugs are being developed, and for the development of child-friendly anti-tuberculosis formulations in general. PMID:26564545

  17. Clinical predictors of radiographic abnormalities among infants with bronchiolitis in a paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute viral respiratory exacerbation is one of the most common conditions encountered in a paediatric emergency department (PED) during winter months. We aimed at defining clinical predictors of chest radiography prescription and radiographic abnormalities, among infants with bronchiolitis in a paediatric emergency department. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children less than 2 years of age with clinical bronchiolitis, who presented for evaluation at the paediatric emergency department of an urban general hospital in France. Detailed information regarding historical features, examination findings, and management were collected. Clinical predictors of interest were explored in multivariate logistic regression models. Results Among 410 chest radiographs blindly interpreted by two experts, 40 (9.7%) were considered as abnormal. Clinical predictors of chest radiography achievement were age (under three months), feeding difficulties, fever over 38°C, hypoxia under than 95% of oxygen saturation, respiratory distress, crackles, and bronchitis rales. Clinical predictors of radiographic abnormalities were fever and close to significance hypoxia and conjunctivitis. Conclusion Our study provides arguments for reducing chest radiographs in infants with bronchiolitis. For infants with clinical factors such as age less than three months, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress without hypoxia, isolated crackles or bronchitis rales, careful clinical follow-up should be provided instead of chest radiography. PMID:24906343

  18. Conflict in a paediatric hospital: a prospective mixed-method study

    PubMed Central

    Forbat, Liz; Sayer, Charlotte; McNamee, Phillip; Menson, Esse; Barclay, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflict in healthcare is a well-recognised but under-examined phenomenon. Little is known about the prevalence and causes of conflict across paediatric specialties. Objective To report the frequency and characteristics of conflict in a paediatric hospital. Design and setting An explanatory sequential mixed-method approach was adopted. A bespoke questionnaire recorded frequency, severity, cause and staff involved in conflict prospectively. Data were recorded for the same two 12-week periods in 2013 and 2014, in one UK children's teaching hospital. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and correlation, the findings of which informed the construction of a semistructured interview schedule. Qualitative interviews were conducted with six key informant healthcare professionals to aid data interpretation; interviews were analysed thematically. Results 136 individual episodes of conflict were reported. The three most common causes were ‘communication breakdown’, ‘disagreements about treatment’ and ‘unrealistic expectations’. Over 448 h of healthcare professional time was taken up by these conflicts; most often staff nurses, consultants, doctors in training and matrons. The mean severity rating was 4.9 out of 10. Qualitative interviews revealed consensus regarding whether conflicts were ranked as low, medium or high severity, and explanations regarding why neurology recorded the highest number of conflicts in the observed period. Conclusions Conflict is prevalent across paediatric specialties, and particularly in neurology, general paediatrics and neonatology. Considerable staff time is taken in managing conflict, indicating a need to focus resources on supporting staff to resolve conflict, notably managing communication breakdown. PMID:26553912

  19. A multi-national report on methods for institutional credentialing for spine radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    all institutions have more than one specialist trained to perform spine radiosurgery. All centers believed that credentialing should also be device specific, and all believed that professional societies should formulate guidelines for institutions on the requirements for spine radiosurgery credentialing. Finally, in 4 institutions radiation therapists were required to attend corporate-sponsored device specific training for credentialing, and in only 1 institution were radiation therapists required to also attend academic society training for credentialing. Conclusions This study represents the first multi-national report of the current practice of institutional credentialing for spine radiosurgery. Key methodologies for safe implementation and credentialing of spine radiosurgery have been identified. There is strong agreement among experienced centers that credentialing is an important component of the safe and effective implementation of a spine radiosurgery program. PMID:23806078

  20. HACEK Infective Endocarditis: Characteristics and Outcomes from a Large, Multi-National Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Stephen T.; Murdoch, David; Morris, Arthur; Holland, David; Pappas, Paul; Almela, Manel; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Forno, Davide; del Rio, Ana; Hannan, Margaret M.; Harkness, John; Kanafani, Zeina A.; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Lang, Selwyn; Raymond, Nigel; Read, Kerry; Vinogradova, Tatiana; Woods, Christopher W.; Wray, Dannah; Corey, G. Ralph; Chu, Vivian H.

    2013-01-01

    The HACEK organisms (Haemophilus species, Aggregatibacter species, Cardiobacterium hominis, Eikenella corrodens, and Kingella species) are rare causes of infective endocarditis (IE). The objective of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with HACEK endocarditis (HE) in a large multi-national cohort. Patients hospitalized with definite or possible infective endocarditis by the International Collaboration on Endocarditis Prospective Cohort Study in 64 hospitals from 28 countries were included and characteristics of HE patients compared with IE due to other pathogens. Of 5591 patients enrolled, 77 (1.4%) had HE. HE was associated with a younger age (47 vs. 61 years; p<0.001), a higher prevalence of immunologic/vascular manifestations (32% vs. 20%; p<0.008) and stroke (25% vs. 17% p = 0.05) but a lower prevalence of congestive heart failure (15% vs. 30%; p = 0.004), death in-hospital (4% vs. 18%; p = 0.001) or after 1 year follow-up (6% vs. 20%; p = 0.01) than IE due to other pathogens (n = 5514). On multivariable analysis, stroke was associated with mitral valve vegetations (OR 3.60; CI 1.34–9.65; p<0.01) and younger age (OR 0.62; CI 0.49–0.90; p<0.01). The overall outcome of HE was excellent with the in-hospital mortality (4%) significantly better than for non-HE (18%; p<0.001). Prosthetic valve endocarditis was more common in HE (35%) than non-HE (24%). The outcome of prosthetic valve and native valve HE was excellent whether treated medically or with surgery. Current treatment is very successful for the management of both native valve prosthetic valve HE but further studies are needed to determine why HE has a predilection for younger people and to cause stroke. The small number of patients and observational design limit inferences on treatment strategies. Self selection of study sites limits epidemiological inferences. PMID:23690995

  1. Paediatric patient family engagement with clinical research at a tertiary care paediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Carson; Ansermino, Mark J; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Mulpuri, Kishore; Doan, Quynh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subject recruitment is essential for conducting clinical research; however, there are very few studies evaluating research uptake by families in a paediatric setting. OBJECTIVES: To determine how frequently paediatric patients and their families receiving care at a tertiary paediatric hospital participated in research. The secondary objectives were to explore factors that influence patient families’ decisions to participate in research and how they perceived their experiences. METHODS: A cross-sectional study surveying families of children receiving care in a sample of clinical areas at a tertiary care paediatric hospital in British Columbia was conducted. A self-administered questionnaire was used, and was facilitated by trained interviewers. Descriptive statistics were used to report the proportion of patient families that have previously been invited to participate in research and, among these, the proportion who had agreed to participate. Patient families’ perceptions of research and their past experiences therein were also reported. RESULTS: A total of 657 families were approached, of which 543 were enrolled (82.6% response rate). Among the 439 families that had visited the hospital previously, 114 (26.0%) had been invited to participate in research and 99 (87%) had consented to participate. Of these 99 families, only one had a negative experience, and 84 (85%) of these participant families were at least somewhat likely to participate in research again in the future. CONCLUSIONS: Only one-quarter of families that had previously visited the hospital had been invited to participate in a research project. Of the families approached previously, there was a high rate of participation and willingness to participate in future research. PMID:25587233

  2. Medicolegal issues in paediatric practice: proceedings of the 4th Northern Regional Paediatric Colloquium.

    PubMed

    Cousins, D A; Barrett, I; Kaplan, C A

    2004-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas frequently arise in paediatric practice. Given the nature of the speciality, these issues are pertinent to both the medical and legal professions. It is of potential benefit for the professions to meet and discuss such cases outwith the immediate clinical setting. A series of such meetings have been held in the Northern region. We report the proceedings of the fourth meeting. Four cases were presented and the issues arising were debated. The key points from each discussion are described. PMID:14984219

  3. pGALS – paediatric Gait Arms Legs and Spine: a simple examination of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We describe pGALS (paediatric Gait, Arms, Legs and Spine) – a simple quick musculoskeletal assessment to distinguish abnormal from normal joints in children and young people. The use of pGALS is aimed at the non-specialist in paediatric musculoskeletal medicine as a basic clinical skill to be used in conjunction with essential knowledge about red flags, normal development and awareness of patterns of musculoskeletal pathologies. pGALS has been validated in school-aged children and also in the context of acute general paediatrics to detect abnormal joints. We propose that pGALS is an important part of basic clinical skills to be acquired by all doctors who may be involved in the care of children. The learning of pGALS along with basic knowledge is a useful way to increase awareness of joint disease, facilitate early recognition of joint problems and prompt referral to specialist teams to optimise clinical outcomes. We have compiled this article as a resource that can be used by the paediatric rheumatology community to facilitate teaching. PMID:24219838

  4. Paediatric obesity and renal transplantation: current challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Terrace, John D; Oniscu, Gabriel C

    2016-04-01

    The increased incidence of obesity in the paediatric population poses significant challenges to renal transplantation. Whilst the body mass index appears to be widely used as a measure of obesity in adults, there are no standardised definitions in the paediatric population, making comparative analyses difficult. In the paediatric transplant population, obesity is associated with an increased incidence of surgical complications, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and cardiovascular morbidity, leading to diminished graft function and impacting patient and graft survival. Management of obesity in renal transplantation requires multiple interventions starting with life-style and behavioural modification combined with medical and possibly surgical therapies, representing a unique challenge in the childhood setting. In this review we discuss the current challenges of obesity and potential solutions in the setting of paediatric transplantation. PMID:26018121

  5. Tracing Sydenham's chorea: historical documents from a British paediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Martino, D; Tanner, A; Defazio, G; Church, A J; Bhatia, K P; Giovannoni, G; Dale, R C

    2005-05-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) became a well defined nosological entity only during the second half of the nineteenth century. Such progress was promoted by the availability of large clinical series provided by newly founded paediatric hospitals. This paper analyses the demographic and clinical features of patients with chorea admitted to the first British paediatric hospital (the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London) between 1852 and 1936. The seasonal and demographic characteristics of SC during this time appear strikingly similar to those observed today, and witness the introduction of modern "statistically averaging" techniques in the approach to complex paediatric syndromes. Great Ormond Street (GOS) hospital case notes provide detailed descriptions of the "typical cases" of SC, and show that British physicians working in the early age of paediatric hospitals succeeded in recognising the most distinctive clinical features of this fascinating condition. PMID:15851434

  6. Management of Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunts in the Paediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Low, David; Drake, James M; Seow, Wan Tew; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of hydrocephalus is a challenging one. The development of shunt devices have greatly improved the survival and quality of life of paediatric patients with hydrocephalus; however, shunt dysfunction is a common problem which represents a significant scope of work for paediatric neurosurgeons with shunt failures occuring in up to 40 to 50% of patients during the first two years after shunt surgery. Numerous pathologies ranging from congenital to acquired conditions can result in the development of hydrocephalus in the paediatric population. Obstruction of proximal or distal catheter ends, misplacement, infections and over drainage are some of the common problems accounting for shunt failures. We discussed some of the pertinent problems and nuances involved in treatment of paediatric hydrocephalus with VPS as well as to review the role of endoscopic procedures as an alternative to VPS. PMID:22028738

  7. Aspects of deceased organ donation in paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Brierley, J; Hasan, A

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation offers children in acute or chronic severe organ failure similar opportunities to adults. However, while the number who might benefit is relatively low, significantly fewer cadaveric donors exist for any given child compared with an adult. Incompatible organ size and relatively low donation rates mean that despite living parental donation and innovations to reduce donated organ size, children die before organs become available. The severity of the UK situation is compounded by restrictions on paediatric living donation, uncertainties over the application of brain death criteria, and ethical concerns about the use of donation after circulatory death. The UK Department of Health's Organ Donation Task Force suggested the means by which the adult donor pool might be increased, recommending that outstanding ethical and legal issues be resolved, but made no specific recommendations about children. PMID:22194438

  8. Retinal haemorrhages associated with fatal paediatric infections.

    PubMed

    Salvatori, Marcus C; Lantz, Patrick E

    2015-04-01

    For many physicians, retinal haemorrhages (RHs) in infants and young children remain highly diagnostic of non-accidental (abusive) head trauma. Because clinicians have applied indirect ophthalmoscopy selectively to cases of suspected child abuse, the association between RH and other conditions such as infection, coagulopathy and accidental trauma has encountered habitual bias, creating the potential for iatrogenic misdiagnosis of child abuse. We present an autopsy case series of four children, aged three years old or younger, in whom RHs were detected by post-mortem monocular indirect ophthalmoscopy after the patients had died from infections. We discuss the laterality, number, type and location of RHs in these cases, and summarize proposed mechanisms of RH formation in fatalities from paediatric infection. We demonstrate that many of the ophthalmological findings that have been considered diagnostic of abusive head trauma can also occur in association with infective processes. PMID:24644226

  9. Paediatric nursing in Europe: influencing policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Fiona

    2007-12-01

    The WHO European Health Report 2005 called for significant efforts from all countries to protect and promote children's health. Nurses across Europe have a major role to play in this effort but in many countries they lack the appropriate education and organisational support to make a meaningful contribution. A network of paediatric nursing associations in Europe was formed in 2003 to strengthen nurses' voices in child health policy and improve the potential of nurses to contribute to protecting and promoting the health of children and young people. Based on a consensus definition of the European paediatric nurse, the Paediatric Nursing Associations of Europe has developed consensus position statements on issues such as regulation and educational preparation. These have been used to lobby at national levels with positive results such as new mechanisms for identifying paediatric nurses on some national nursing registers, legislation to protect the use of the title 'paediatric nurse' and consideration of the reintroduction of specific programmes at both pre and post registration level for preparation of paediatric nurses. PMID:18196854

  10. Our surgical heritage: the role of the Department of Paediatric Surgery in the development of paediatric surgery in Cape Town, in Africa, and around the world.

    PubMed

    Rode, Heinz; Millar, Alastair J W

    2012-06-01

    The Department of Paediatric Surgery at the University of Cape Town has made a remarkable contribution to the academic body of knowledge of Paediatric Surgery both in South Africa and around the world. It has played a key role in the development of the specialty in South Africa and through the South African diaspora has trained many paediatric surgeons who have made their mark internationally. More recently it has become a major focus of teaching and training for African paediatric surgeons. This article traces this legacy through its origins in the early 1920s to its current prominent position in the world paediatric surgical community. PMID:22668921

  11. A Retrospective Analysis of Spontaneous Adverse Drug Reactions Reports Relating to Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rosli, Rosliana; Abd Aziz, Noorizan; Manan, Mohamed Mansor

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous reporting on adverse drug reactions (ADR) has been established in Malaysia since 1987, and although these reports are monitored by the Malaysia drug monitoring authority, the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau, information about ADRs in the paediatric patient population still remains unexplored. The aims of this study, therefore, were to characterize the ADRs reported in respect to the Malaysian paediatric population and to relate the data to specific paediatric age groups. Methods Data on all ADRs reported to the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau between 2000 and 2013 for individuals aged from birth to 17 years old were analysed with respect to age and gender, type of reporter, suspected medicines (using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification), category of ADR (according to system organ class) as well as the severity of the ADR. Results In total, 11,523 ADR reports corresponding to 22,237 ADRs were analysed, with half of these reporting one ADR per report. Vaccines comprised 55.7% of the 11,523 ADR reports with the remaining being drug related ADRs. Overall, 63.9% of ADRs were reported for paediatric patients between 12 and 17 years of age, with the majority of ADRs reported in females (70.7%). The most common ADRs reported were from the following system organ classes: application site disorders (32.2%), skin and appendages disorders (20.6%), body as a whole general disorders (12.8%) and central and peripheral nervous system disorders (11.2%). Meanwhile, ADRs in respect to anti-infectives for systemic use (2194/5106; 43.0%) were the most frequently reported across all age groups, followed by drugs from the nervous system (1095/5106; 21.4%). Only 0.28% of the ADR cases were reported as fatal. A large proportion of the reports were received from healthcare providers in government health facilities. Discussion ADR reports concerning vaccines and anti-infectives were the most commonly reported in children, and are mainly

  12. Vaccinations in paediatric rheumatology: an update on current developments.

    PubMed

    Groot, Noortje; Heijstek, Marloes W; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2015-07-01

    In 2011, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) published recommendations regarding the vaccination of children with rheumatic diseases. These recommendations were based on a systematic literature review published in that same year. Since then, the evidence body on this topic has grown substantially. This review provides an update of the systematic literature study of 2011, summarizing all the available evidence on the safety and immunogenicity of vaccination in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases. The current search yielded 21 articles, in addition to the 27 articles described in the 2011 review. In general, vaccines are immunogenic and safe in this patient population. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on the immunogenicity of vaccines was not detrimental for glucocorticosteroids and methotrexate. Biologicals could accelerate a waning of antibody levels over time, although most patients were initially protected adequately. Overall, persistence of immunological memory may be reduced in children with rheumatic diseases, which shows the need for (booster) vaccination. This update of the 2011 systematic literature review strengthens the evidence base for the EULAR recommendations, and it must be concluded that vaccinations in patients with rheumatic diseases should be advocated. PMID:26025339

  13. Paediatric immunisation: special emphasis on measles and MMR vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Das, M K; Bhattacharyya, N

    2002-05-01

    The dictum, 'prevention is better than cure', is applicable to all ailments but it can be most easily followed for infectious diseases, increasing numbers of which are being contained by specific vaccinations since the first discovery of smallpox vaccine by Edward Jenner in 1796. Advances in immunology and laboratory techniques including cell culture, genetic engineering and animal experiments have contributed significantly to the production of more and more vaccines, used successfully in preventive programmes. Infectious diseases are widely prevalent in the developing countries. The child population is specially vulnerable to many of them. These infections contribute to high morbidity and mortality and immunisation programmes have been undertaken as preventive measures against them at the national level. Paediatricians and experts are actively engaged in formulating and improving these programmes as problems are faced in their implementation. Much new information is continuously being available in the literature, mostly in specialised journals. The general practitioners, particularly those serving in the remote and vast rural areas, are not likely to have access to these recent developments which they need for self-motivation in initiating the parents with confident advice to have their children properly immunised and also for tackling effectively any problem arising out of immunisation. This paper attempts to discuss the subject of paediatric immunisation with special emphasis being laid on measles and MMR vaccinations. PMID:12418635

  14. Assessing the burden of paediatric influenza in Europe: the European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project

    PubMed Central

    Paget, W. John; Casas, Inmaculada; Donker, Gé; Edelman, Laurel; Fleming, Douglas; Larrauri, Amparo; Meijer, Adam; Puzelli, Simona; Rizzo, Caterina; Simonsen, Lone

    2010-01-01

    The European Paediatric Influenza Analysis (EPIA) project is a multi-country project that was created to collect, analyse and present data regarding the paediatric influenza burden in European countries, with the purpose of providing the necessary information to make evidence-based decisions regarding influenza immunisation recommendations for children. The initial approach taken is based on existing weekly virological and age-specific influenza-like illness (ILI) data from surveillance networks across Europe. We use a multiple regression model guided by longitudinal weekly patterns of influenza virus to attribute the weekly ILI consultation incidence pattern to each influenza (sub)type, while controlling for the effect of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemics. Modelling the ILI consultation incidence during 2002/2003–2008 revealed that influenza infections that presented for medical attention as ILI affected between 0.3% and 9.8% of children aged 0–4 and 5–14 years in England, Italy, The Netherlands and Spain in an average season. With the exception of Spain, these rates were always higher in children aged 0–4 years. Across the six seasons analysed (five seasons were analysed from the Italian data), the model attributed 47–83% of the ILI burden in primary care to influenza virus infection in the various countries, with the A(H3N2) virus playing the most important role, followed by influenza viruses B and A(H1N1). National season averages from the four countries studied indicated that between 0.4% and 18% of children consulted a physician for ILI, with the percentage depending on the country and health care system. Influenza virus infections explained the majority of paediatric ILI consultations in all countries. The next step will be to apply the EPIA modelling approach to severe outcomes indicators (i.e. hospitalisations and mortality data) to generate a complete range of mild and severe influenza burden estimates needed for decision making

  15. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: recent advances in paediatric pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    May, Diane E; Kratochvil, Christopher J

    2010-01-01

    Throughout this decade, there has been significant research into pharmacotherapies for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This article considers the efficacy and safety of five of the more novel long-acting pharmacological treatments recently approved by the FDA for marketing in the US for paediatric ADHD, along with an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist in preparation. Reviewed treatments include the non-stimulant atomoxetine, three novel extended-release (XR) stimulant preparations: dexmethylphenidate, lisdexamfetamine dimesylate and the methylphenidate transdermal system (TDS), and the recently approved XR alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, guanfacine. Dexmethylphenidate XR is a stimulant treatment in a single isomer form, and has an efficacy and tolerability similar to two doses of immediate-release (IR) dexmethylphenidate when taken 4 hours apart, but is dosed at half of the usual d,l-methylphenidate dose. Dexmethylphenidate XR utilizes a beaded bimodal release, with 50% initially released and another 50% released 4 hours later to provide benefit lasting up to 10-12 hours. Lisdexamfetamine was the first stimulant treatment approved as a prodrug, whereby the single isomer d-amfetamine remains pharmacologically inactive until activated by cleaving the lysine. Its efficacy and tolerability are generally consistent with that of XR mixed amfetamine salts, with this activation method and more consistent absorption generally resulting in up to an 11- to 13-hour benefit. The methylphenidate TDS patch utilizes skin absorption to provide predictable and uniform delivery of methylphenidate when worn for 9 hours/day. The efficacy and tolerability of the methylphenidate TDS patch is generally consistent with that of osmotic-controlled release oral system (OROS) methylphenidate, providing benefit for about 11-12 hours. Because of their formulation, lisdexamfetamine and methylphenidate each have an onset of effect at about 2 hours after administration. An adjustable

  16. Clowning as a supportive measure in paediatrics - a survey of clowns, parents and nursing staff

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hospital clowns, also known as clown doctors, can help paediatric patients with the stress of a hospitalization and to circumvent the accompanying feelings of fear, helplessness and sadness, thus supporting the healing process. The objectives of the present study were to clarify the structural and procedural conditions of paediatric clowning in Germany and to document the evaluations of hospital clowns, parents and hospital staff. Methods A nationwide online survey of hospital clowns currently active in paediatric departments and an accompanying field evaluation in Hamburg hospitals with surveys of parents and hospital staff were conducted. In addition to items developed specifically for the study regarding general conditions, procedures, assessments of effects and attitudes, the Work Satisfaction Scale was used. The sample included n = 87 hospital clowns, 37 parents and 43 hospital staff members. Results The online survey showed that the hospital clowns are well-trained, motivated and generally satisfied with their work. By their own estimate, they primarily boost morale and promote imagination in the patients. However, hospital clowns also desire better interdisciplinary collaboration and financial security as well as more recognition of their work. The Hamburg field study confirmed the positive results of the clown survey. According to the data, a clown intervention boosts morale and reduces stress in the patients. Moreover, there are practically no side effects. Both parents and hospital staff stated that the patients as well as they themselves benefited from the intervention. Conclusions The results match those of previous studies and give a very positive picture of hospital clowning, so that its routine use and expansion thereof can be recommended. Furthermore, the intervention should be subject to the rules of evidence-based medicine like other medical treatments. PMID:24112744

  17. Potential of hydrogel-forming and dissolving microneedles for use in paediatric populations.

    PubMed

    Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Tuan-Mahmood, Tuan-Mazlelaa; McElnay, James C; McCarthy, Helen O; Mooney, Karen; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2015-07-15

    Development of formulations and drug delivery strategies for paediatric use is challenging, partially due to the age ranges within this population, resulting in varying requirements to achieve optimised patient outcomes. Although the oral route of drug delivery remains the preferred option, there are problematic issues, such as difficulty swallowing and palatability of medicines specific to this population. The parenteral route is not well accepted by children due to needle-related fear and pain. Accordingly, a plethora of alternative routes of drug administration have been investigated. Microneedles (MN) breach the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of skin, increasing the number of drug substances amenable to transdermal delivery. This strategy involves the use of micron-sized needles to painlessly, and without drawing blood, create transient aqueous conduits in the SC. In this study, polymeric dissolving MN and hydrogel-forming MN were fabricated incorporating two model drugs commonly used in paediatric patients (caffeine and lidocaine hydrochloride). The potential efficacy of these MN for paediatric dosing was investigated via in vitro and in vivo studies. Views pertaining to MN technology were sought amongst school children in Northern Ireland, members of the UK general public and UK-based paediatricians, to determine perceived benefits, acceptance, barriers and concerns for adoption of this technology. In this study, polymeric MN were shown to substantially enhance skin permeability of the model therapeutic molecules in vitro and in vivo. In particular, hydrogel-forming MN led to a 6.1-fold increase in caffeine delivery whilst lidocaine HCl delivery was increased by 3.3-fold using dissolving MN in vitro. Application of caffeine-loaded MN led to a caffeine plasma concentration of 23.87 μg/mL in rats at 24 h. This research also highlighted a strong consensus regarding MN technology amongst schoolchildren, paediatricians and the general public, regarding

  18. A review of paediatric telehealth for pre- and post-operative surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anthony C; Garner, Lisa; Caffery, Liam J; McBride, Craig A

    2014-10-01

    The Queensland Telepaediatric Service (QTS) was established in the year 2000 to deliver a broad range of paediatric specialist health services from the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) in Brisbane, mainly via videoconference. During a 13-year study period, the QTS facilitated 18,949 video consultations, comprising Mental Health (42%), Medicine (30%), Surgery (21%) and Other (8%). We reviewed the surgical services provided through the QTS. There were 3880 video consultations with a paediatric surgeon. Most of these (91%) used fixed videoconferencing units, 8% were delivered via mobile units (robots) and 1% were delivered using Skype. Surgical consultations were provided by telehealth to 106 sites: 89% in Queensland and the rest to other states. The main surgical specialties were burns (50%), ear, nose and throat (19%), general surgery (21%), orthopaedics (9%) and vascular anomalies (2%). During a 12-month audit period, there were 224 teleconsultations in general surgery; the most common reason for referral was for undescended testes (17%). During the study period there was a significant growth in all surgical telehealth activity: linear regression showed an annual increase of 17 cases per year (P < 0.02). In the last four years of the study, there was a substantial growth in the general surgical component, although there was also a reduction in the burns component. Telehealth has potential for other specialist consultations which require periodic assessment and review. PMID:25400001

  19. Understanding the responsibilities and obligations of the modern paediatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Spencer W

    2015-02-01

    The modern paediatric surgeon needs to be competent in multiple domains that extend well beyond their clinical and technical expertise. This article, based on the Journal of Pediatric Surgery Lecture at the BAPS Congress (2014), explores some of these less well understood responsibilities and obligations, including professionalism, leadership, effective clinical teaching, and research. The consequence of falling short in these areas includes risks to our profession as a whole as well as compromising our ability to provide our patients with the best clinical care. Paediatric surgeons have a responsibility to influence the configuration of services to improve the quality of care and equity of access to specialist services for all children in their region. Evidence presented shows how a well-organised and funded regional paediatric surgical service allows children to receive quality treatment closer to home and is reflected in better clinical outcomes, less unnecessary surgery, and fewer complications. A paradigm for support to emerging countries as they increase the capacity and infrastructure of their paediatric surgical services is proposed. The way we judge ourselves and others should relate to our performance across the full scope of roles that a responsible and committed paediatric surgeon is expected to display. PMID:25638607

  20. [Paediatric simulation today and tomorrow. Perspectives and concepts].

    PubMed

    Jordi Ritz, E-M; Eich, C; Gisin, S; Heinzel, O; Hüpfl, M; Erb, T O

    2009-12-01

    The confrontation with critically ill newborns, infants and small children is rare and poses a particular challenge for the medical team. Confident technical and non-technical skills are essential for successful emergency treatment. Paediatric simulators facilitate a didactic infrastructure, linking textbook theory with experience-based practice. To summarize the current status of paediatric simulation in Germany, Austria and Switzerland an online survey of all associated centres was conducted. Paediatric simulation is currently available at 24 centres, which have 39 paediatric simulators available, including 8 for newborns, 26 for infants and 5 for children. A certain congruence of standards is detectable among these centres and most instructors have completed a specialized instructor training. Of the instructors 26% are specialized nursing personnel and 67% are physicians of which most are paediatricians and anaesthesiologists. Many centres (38%) operate solely by means of the enthusiastic dedication of the employees who organize various activities during their free time. Nearly all centres (92%) place particular emphasis on non-technical skills which include the interpersonal aspects of crisis resource management. Video-supported debriefing is considered to be the basis for effective training. Within the scope of the recently established PaedSim project the curricula of paediatric simulation courses should be more structured and internationally standardized, thereby increasing both efficacy and sustainability of these training programs. PMID:20012246

  1. [Strategies for paediatric spleen and liver injuries].

    PubMed

    Zundel, S; Lieber, J; Tsiflikas, I; Henk, A-K; Schmittenbecher, P

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injuries of the spleen and liver are typically caused by age-related falls or sports and traffic accidents. Today, the non-operative management for isolated injuries is established and evidence-based guidelines are available. The intact abdominal wall and the limited space within the peritoneum produce a compression which is the pathophysiological explanation for the limitation of the haemorrhage. Precondition for the non-operative therapy is the radiology-based classification of the injury (organ injury scale) and a haemodynamically stable patient. Haemodynamic stability is, if necessary maintained with blood transfusion, volume substitutes and the administration of catecholamines. In cases of hilar vascular injury and devascularisation or haemodynamic instability of the patient, despite utilisation of the measures mentioned above, urgent operative therapy needs to be performed. Organ sparing surgery is the therapy of choice for both liver and spleen. The spleen is required for the development of a competent immune system in the growing organism. Liver injuries can be further complicated by injury to the bile system, which might require operative reconstruction. If a patient suffers from multiple injuries and spleen or liver are involved, the decision on the management needs to be taken individually, no guidelines exist but the rate for operative therapy increases. Independent of the dimensions of injury, an experienced paediatric surgeon with his multidisciplinary team, considering the anatomic and age specific characteristics of a child, achieves the best therapeutic results. PMID:25531632

  2. Satisfaction and attrition in paediatric weight management.

    PubMed

    Skelton, J A; Martin, S; Irby, M B

    2016-04-01

    Paediatric obesity treatment experiences unacceptably high rates of attrition. Few studies have explored parent and child perspectives on dropout. This study sought to capture child and parent experience in treatment and expressed contributors to attrition. Children and parents enrolled in a single family-based weight management programme participated in semi-structured interviews, conducted either upon completion of the first intensive phase of treatment or program dropout. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and coded using a multistage inductive approach. Interviews were obtained from 57 parents and 30 children, nearly equal between 'completers' or 'dropouts'. Five themes emerged: overall positive experience with programme; logistical challenges of participation; improved health; discrepancies between child and parent experience and perception, and importance of structure and expectations of weight loss. Primary reasons given for dropout were time commitment; distance from clinic; missed school and work; lack of dedicated adolescent programme; clinic hours; and stress. Few parents or children expressed dissatisfaction. Children reportedly enjoyed 'having someone to talk to' about weight, and spending increased time with family. Children and parents overall reported positive experiences in this weight management programme. Attrition appears more related to logistical issues than low satisfaction. Innovative approaches to help overcome logistical challenges and preserve positive aspects may help in decreasing programme attrition. PMID:27008068

  3. Parental involvement in paediatric cancer treatment decisions

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, K; Collier, J; Hewitt, M; Blake, H

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated parents' information needs and involvement in decision-making processes affecting the care of children diagnosed with cancer. Interviews and questionnaires were used to assess parental satisfaction in 50 mothers and 16 fathers responsible for 58 children in an English Paediatric Oncology Unit. Parents reported that doctors contributed almost twice as much to the decision-making process as they did, but parental satisfaction was positively correlated with the amount of information provided when giving informed consent. Satisfaction about their involvement in this process relied heavily upon the level of support received from others. Parents consenting to their child's involvement in non-randomised trials perceived themselves to be under greater pressure from others during the decision-making process while those whose children were further along the treatment trajectory were more uncertain about decisions previously made. Findings indicate that the accessibility, support, information and degree of control afforded to parents by healthcare professionals impacts upon their satisfaction with both the decision-making process and their confidence in the decisions thus made. Information and support tailored to parents' specific needs may therefore enhance satisfaction with clinical decision making and reassure parents about decisions made in the long-term interest of their child's health. PMID:19807776

  4. Recent pharmacological advances in paediatric analgesics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B J; Palmer, G M

    2006-08-01

    Growth and development are two linked processes that distinguish children from adults. The use of size as the primary covariate during pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses allows exploration of the effects of age. Allometric scaling models have assisted understanding of the developmental clearance changes in common analgesic drugs such as paracetamol, morphine, tramadol and local anaesthetics agents. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (pharmacogenomics [PG]) and their impact on hepatic drug metabolism for opioids, tramadol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and drug receptor responses are increasingly reported. Altered chemical structure or formulations of common analgesics alter pharmacodynamic (PD) effects enhancing safety and efficacy for NSAIDs by stereoselectivity and the addition of nitric oxide, for intravenous paracetamol by formulation and structural difference from propacetamol and for local anaesthetics through stereoselectivity. This article focuses upon recent data for analgesics used in paediatric pain management including paracetamol, NSAIDs, morphine, tramadol, amide local anaesthetics and ketamine. It centres on PK and clinical studies in neonates, infants and children. PG studies are acknowledged as potentially allowing individual drug therapy tailoring through a decrease in between-patient population variability, although the impact of PG in the very young is less certain. There are few data describing age-related PD changes in children despite recognition that the number, affinity and type of receptors or the availability of natural ligands changes with age. PMID:16854558

  5. Paediatrics and the doctor-soldier.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John H

    2012-08-01

    Sick and injured children, like combatants wounded by shot and shell in war, are disproportionately represented in the tallies of both man-made and national disasters. Paediatricians have a particularly proud heritage of military service, a nexus dating in Australia from the early 19th century. This paper traces this link between service to children in peacetime and the care of servicemen, women and children in times of war and disaster. The extraordinary record of Australian 'paediatric' doctors who also served in the Gallipoli Campaign (1915) is documented as an illustration of this duality. Paediatricians who serve in the Defence Reserves and in civilian non-government organisations which respond to disasters and civil wars have special credentials in their advocacy for the protection of children enmeshed in conflict or disaster. Such applies particularly to the banning of the recruitment and use of child soldiers; support for children caught up in refugee and illegal immigrant confrontations; and continued advocacy for greater international compliance with the Ottawa Convention to ban the use of anti-personnel landmines. Volunteering for such service must occur in cold 'down time', ensuring that paediatricians are trained in disaster and conflict response, when such challenges inevitably confront the paediatricians of the future. PMID:22471873

  6. Whole-body MRI in paediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Littooij, Annemieke S

    2016-05-01

    Imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and follow-up of paediatric malignancies. Until recently, computed tomography (CT) has been the imaging technique of choice in children with cancer, but nowadays there is an increasing interest in the use of functional imaging techniques like positron emission tomography and single-photon emission tomography. These later techniques are often combined with CT allowing for simultaneous acquisition of image data on the biological behaviour of tumour, as well as the anatomical localisation and extent of tumour spread. Because of the small but not negligible risk of radiation induced secondary cancers and the significantly improved overall survival rates of children with cancer, there is an increasing interest in the use of alternative imaging techniques that do not use ionising radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging tool that allows for acquiring images with a high spatial resolution and excellent soft tissue contrast throughout the body. Moreover, recent technological advances have resulted in fast diagnostic sequences for whole-body MR imaging (WB-MRI), including functional techniques such as diffusion weighted imaging. In this review, the current status of the technique and major clinical applications of WB-MRI in children with cancer will be discussed. PMID:26631075

  7. Paediatric radiation oncology in the care of childhood cancer: A position paper by the International Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS).

    PubMed

    Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Freeman, Carolyn; Marcus, Karen; Claude, Line; Dieckmann, Karin; Halperin, Edward; Esiashvili, Natia; Paulino, Arnold; Mahajan, Anita; Seiersen, Klaus; Ahern, Verity; Ricardi, Umberto; Carrie, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Paediatric malignancies are a challenge for the radiation oncologist due to their rarity, the great variety of histological types, and the complexity of treatment concepts that evolve over time. The Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS) is the only internationally operating society for paediatric radiation oncology. The objectives of PROS are to set a world-wide standard of excellence with respect to radiation oncology aspects in curing children and adolescents with cancer, to provide a forum for communication between radiation oncologists, and to exchange information with all professionals involved in the management of paediatric and adolescent cancer. Challenges include the need to promote education and support practice in low and middle income countries (LMIC) as well as the cost and availability of modern treatment technologies for all but most especially these countries. Collaborations with other societies that include for example the education programmes provided jointly with ESTRO, and the upgraded technical platform of the PROS web site offer new possibilities to enhance the efficacy of PROS in education and support of paediatric radiation oncology practice world-wide. PROS has made an important contribution to the management of childhood malignancies over the past decade and new and developing collaborations between PROS and other societies or organizations will ultimately lead to a reduction in world-wide health care inequalities. PMID:27106553

  8. Laparoscopic pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy in paediatric age for solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of head of the pancreas - case report.

    PubMed

    Senthilnathan, P; Patel, Nikunj; Nalankilli, V P; Palanivelu, C; Parthasarthi, R; Praveenraj, P

    2014-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is a rare tumour commonly seen in young women without significant clinical features. SPN is usually a lowgrade malignant neoplasm which warrants resection. Recurrence and metastasis is seen rarely after complete resection. Pancreaticoduodenectomy is indicated for SPN situated in head of the pancreas which is generally performed by open approach. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy (LPD) is difficult to perform for this condition because of smaller size of pancreatic and hepatic ducts more so in paediatric population. We report a case of 12 years old girl having SPN arising from head of the pancreas. She underwent laparoscopic pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Post-operative period was uneventful. Histological examination of resected specimen confirmed diagnosis of SPN. At 6 months follow up, she was doing well without any recurrence. To best of our knowledge, no case of LPD in paediatric patients is reported in literature available to us. PMID:25459567

  9. Impact of 24 hour critical care physician staffing on case-mix adjusted mortality in paediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Goh, A Y; Lum, L C; Abdel-Latif, M E

    2001-02-10

    The 24 h availability of intensive care consultants (intensivists) has been shown to improve outcomes in adult intensive care units (ICU) in the UK. We tested whether such availability would improve standardised mortality ratios when compared to out-of-hours cover by general paediatricians in the paediatric ICU setting of a medium-income developing country. The standardised mortality ratio (SMR) improved significantly from 1.57 (95%CI 1.25-1.95) with non-specialist care to 0.88 (95%CI 0.63-1.19) with intensivist care (rate ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.47-0.67). Mortality odds ratio decreased by 0.234, 0.246 and 0.266 in the low, moderate and high-risk patients. 24 h availability of intensivists was associated with improved outcomes and use of resources in paediatric intensive care in a developing country. PMID:11273070

  10. Negative pressure pulmonary oedema following tracheal tube obstruction in a paediatric patient: a preventable anaesthesia related morbidity.

    PubMed

    Imarengiaye, C O; Ogunsakin, A

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe negative pressure pulmonary oedema due to undetected tracheal tube obstruction in a paediatric patient. A healthy 6 week-old scheduled for release of tongue-tie under general anaesthesia was noticed to be diagnosed at the preparation of the surgical site. The patient was quickly assessed, and ventilation with 100% oxygen was commenced. The heart sounds were still present. Two minutes later, pink frothy secretion was noticed in the lumen of the tracheal tube. Assisted manual ventilation was continued for about 3 hours in the intensive care unit (ICU). Clinical examination after 8 hours of oxygen therapy indicated stable vital signs and was discharged to the ward. Undetected tracheal obstruction due to unsupervised patient positioning may result in negative pressure pulmonary oedema in a paediatric patient. Improved communication between the surgical and the anaesthetic teams may prevent this morbidity. PMID:14692058

  11. Basics, principles, techniques and modern methods in paediatric ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is the mainstay of paediatric Radiology. This review aims at revisiting basic US principles, to list specific needs throughout childhood, and to discuss the application of new and modern US methods. The various sections elude to basic US physics, technical requisites and tips for handling, diagnostically valuable applications of modern techniques, and how to properly address hazards, risks and limitations. In conclusion, US holds vast potential throughout childhood in almost all body regions and many childhood specific queries - helping to reduce the need for or to optimize more invasive or irradiating imaging. Make the most of US and offerings a dedicated paediatric US service throughout the day, the week and the year thus is and will stay a major task of Paediatric Radiology. PMID:24932845

  12. Estimation of risks associated with paediatric cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J Cyne; Smith, Andrée Durieux; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Annette; Angus, Douglas; Benzies, Karen; Schramm, David

    2010-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the rates of complications associated with paediatric cochlear implantation use: a) at one Canadian cochlear implant (CI) centre, and b) in the published literature. It comprised a retrospective hospital-based chart review and a concurrent review of complications in the published literature. There were 224 children who had undergone surgery from 1994 to June 2007. Results indicate that the rates of complications at the local Canadian paediatric CI centre are not significantly different from the literature rates for all examined complication types. This hospital-based retrospective chart review and review of the literature provide readers with an estimation of the risks to aid in evidence-based decision-making surrounding paediatric cochlear implantation. PMID:19655302

  13. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie C.I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain. Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity. There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems. Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain. Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies. PMID:26525515

  14. Potential for optimisation of paediatric chest X-ray examination.

    PubMed

    Kostova-Lefterova, D; Taseva, D; Ingilizova, K; Hristova-Popova, J; Vassileva, J

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the important aspects of paediatric radiological practice and the patient doses from chest X-ray examinations performed in three hospitals in Bulgaria. Data from 163 paediatric patients were recorded using a standardised form. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to patient was calculated from the air-kerma air product (KAP) and field size measurements. Large variations were found for KAP and ESAK. Inappropriate film size and insufficient collimation were often used. Inappropriate use of automatic exposure control and antiscatter grid was found. In most cases, no attention was paid to reduce dose to sensitive organs by means of shielding or proper collimation. Recommendations were given to the hospitals on how to reduce patient doses in paediatric chest radiography. PMID:21824872

  15. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-09-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies. PMID:26525515

  16. Neonatal circumcision revisited. Fetus and Newborn Committee, Canadian Paediatric Society.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assist physicians in providing guidance to parents regarding neonatal circumcision. OPTIONS: Whether to recommend the routine circumcision of newborn male infants. OUTCOMES: Costs and complications of neonatal circumcision, the incidence of urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and cancer of the penis in circumcised and uncircumcised males, and of cervical cancer in their partners, and the costs of treating these diseases. EVIDENCE: The literature on circumcision was reviewed by the Fetus and Newborn Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society. During extensive discussion at meetings of the committee over a 24-month period, the strength of the evidence was carefully weighed and the perspective of the committee developed. VALUES: The literature was assessed to determine whether neonatal circumcision improves the health of boys and men and is a cost-effective approach to preventing penile problems and associated urinary tract conditions. Religious and personal values were not included in the assessment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: The effect of neonatal circumcision on the incidence of urinary tract infection, sexually transmitted diseases, cancer of the penis, cervical cancer and penile problems; the complications of circumcision; and estimates of the costs of neonatal circumcision and of the treatment of later penile conditions, urinary tract infections and complications of circumcision. RECOMMENDATION: Circumcision of newborns should not be routinely performed. VALIDATION: This recommendation is in keeping with previous statements on neonatal circumcision by the Canadian Paediatric Society and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The statement was reviewed by the Infectious Disease Committee of the Canadian Paediatric Society. The Board of Directors of the Canadian Paediatric Society has reviewed its content and approved it for publication. SPONSOR: This is an official statement of the Canadian Paediatric Society. No external

  17. Oral Medicines for Children in the European Paediatric Investigation Plans

    PubMed Central

    van Riet – Nales, Diana A.; Römkens, Erwin G. A. W.; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Kozarewicz, Piotr; Schobben, Alfred F. A. M.; Egberts, Toine C. G.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pharmaceutical industry is no longer allowed to develop new medicines for use in adults only, as the 2007 Paediatric Regulation requires children to be considered also. The plans for such paediatric development called Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs) are subject to agreement by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and its Paediatric Committee (PDCO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the key characteristics of oral paediatric medicines in the PIPs and the changes implemented as a result of the EMA/PDCO review. Methods All PIPs agreed by 31 December 2011 were identified through a proprietary EMA-database. PIPs were included if they contained an agreed proposal to develop an oral medicine for children 0 to 11 years. Information on the therapeutic area (EMA classification system); target age range (as defined by industry) and pharmaceutical characteristics (active substance, dosage form(s) as listed in the PIP, strength of each dosage form, excipients in each strength of each dosage form) was extracted from the EMA website or the EMA/PDCO assessment reports. Results A hundred and fifty PIPs were included corresponding to 16 therapeutic areas and 220 oral dosage forms in 431 strengths/compositions. Eighty-two PIPs (37%) included tablets, 44 (20%) liquids and 35 (16%) dosage forms with a specific composition/strength that were stored as a solid but swallowed as a liquid e.g. dispersible tablets. The EMA/PDCO review resulted in an increase of 13 (207 to 220) oral paediatric dosage forms and 44 (387 to 431) dosage forms with a specific composition/strength. For many PIPs, the target age range was widened and the excipient composition and usability aspects modified. Conclusion The EMA/PDCO review realized an increase in the number of requirements for the development of oral dosage forms and a larger increase in the number of dosage forms with a specific composition/strength, both targeting younger children. Changes to their pharmaceutical design were

  18. The design of a multicentre Canadian surveillance study of sedation safety in the paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Maala; Roback, Mark G; Joubert, Gary; Farion, Ken J; Ali, Samina; Beno, Suzanne; McTimoney, C Michelle; Dixon, Andrew; Dubrovsky, Alexander Sasha; Barrowman, Nick; Johnson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Procedural sedation and analgesia have become standard practice in paediatric emergency departments worldwide. Although generally regarded as safe, serious adverse events such as bradycardia, asystole, pulmonary aspiration, permanent neurological injury and death have been reported, but their incidence is unknown due to the infrequency of their occurrence and lack of surveillance of sedation safety. To improve our understanding of the safety, comparative effectiveness and variation in care in paediatric procedural sedation, we are establishing a multicentre patient registry with the goal of conducting regular and ongoing surveillance for adverse events in procedural sedation. Methods This multicentre, prospective cohort study is enrolling patients under 18 years of age from six paediatric emergency departments across Canada. Data collection is fully integrated into clinical care and is performed electronically in real time by the healthcare professionals caring for the patient. The primary outcome is the proportion of patients who experience a serious adverse event as a result of their sedation. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients who experience an adverse event that could lead to a serious adverse event, proportion of patients who receive a significant intervention in response to an adverse event, proportion of patients who experience a successful sedation, and proportion of patients who experience a paradoxical reaction to sedation. There is no predetermined end date for data collection. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from participating sites. Results will be disseminated using a multifaceted knowledge translation strategy by presenting at international conferences, publication in peer-reviewed journals, and through established networks. PMID:26024999

  19. Whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients—UF Series B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-09-01

    Following the previous development of the head and torso voxel phantoms of paediatric patients for use in medical radiation protection (UF Series A), a set of whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients (9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male and 14-year male) has been developed through the attachment of arms and legs from segmented CT images of a healthy Korean adult (UF Series B). Even though partial-body phantoms (head-torso) may be used in a variety of medical dose reconstruction studies where the extremities are out-of-field or receive only very low levels of scatter radiation, whole-body phantoms play important roles in general radiation protection and in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Inclusion of the arms and legs is critical for dosimetry studies of paediatric patients due to the presence of active bone marrow within the extremities of children. While the UF Series A phantoms preserved the body dimensions and organ masses as seen in the original patients who were scanned, comprehensive adjustments were made for the Series B phantoms to better match International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) age-interpolated reference body masses, body heights, sitting heights and internal organ masses. The CT images of arms and legs of a Korean adult were digitally rescaled and attached to each phantom of the UF series. After completion, the resolutions of the phantoms for the 9-month, 4-year, 8-year, 11-year and 14-year were set at 0.86 mm × 0.86 mm × 3.0 mm, 0.90 mm × 0.90 mm × 5.0 mm, 1.16 mm × 1.16 mm × 6.0 mm, 0.94 mm × 0.94 mm × 6.00 mm and 1.18 mm × 1.18 mm × 6.72 mm, respectively.

  20. Whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients--UF Series B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Jonathan L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2006-09-21

    Following the previous development of the head and torso voxel phantoms of paediatric patients for use in medical radiation protection (UF Series A), a set of whole-body voxel phantoms of paediatric patients (9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male and 14-year male) has been developed through the attachment of arms and legs from segmented CT images of a healthy Korean adult (UF Series B). Even though partial-body phantoms (head-torso) may be used in a variety of medical dose reconstruction studies where the extremities are out-of-field or receive only very low levels of scatter radiation, whole-body phantoms play important roles in general radiation protection and in nuclear medicine dosimetry. Inclusion of the arms and legs is critical for dosimetry studies of paediatric patients due to the presence of active bone marrow within the extremities of children. While the UF Series A phantoms preserved the body dimensions and organ masses as seen in the original patients who were scanned, comprehensive adjustments were made for the Series B phantoms to better match International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) age-interpolated reference body masses, body heights, sitting heights and internal organ masses. The CT images of arms and legs of a Korean adult were digitally rescaled and attached to each phantom of the UF series. After completion, the resolutions of the phantoms for the 9-month, 4-year, 8-year, 11-year and 14-year were set at 0.86 mm x 0.86 mm x 3.0 mm, 0.90 mm x 0.90 mm x 5.0 mm, 1.16 mm x 1.16 mm x 6.0 mm, 0.94 mm x 0.94 mm x 6.00 mm and 1.18 mm x 1.18 mm x 6.72 mm, respectively. PMID:16953048

  1. Global Challenges in the Development and Delivery of Paediatric Antiretrovirals

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Asha; Palasanthiran, Pamela; Sohn, Annette H.

    2008-01-01

    By the end of 2006, compared with 28% coverage for adults, only 15% of children with HIV who needed antiretroviral treatment were receiving it. Major challenges in delivering treatment include the lack of paediatric antiretrovirals that can be dosed in small children and limited studies examining safety and efficacy for existing antiretroviral formulations. The high costs of treatment have been reduced through the use of generic, fixed-dose combination drugs. Evidence-based strategies for managing resistance and the scale-up of pharmacological trials for children in low- and middle-income countries are critical to the success and future development of paediatric antiretrovirals. PMID:18549980

  2. Challenges in paediatric procedural sedation: political, economic, and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Mason, K P

    2014-12-01

    Paediatric sedation has expanded in volume and demand over the past decade. In parallel with the increasing demand for and delivery of sedation by multi-specialty providers, conflicting political agendas have surfaced. With a limited selection of sedatives and few new sedatives to market over the past decade, some providers utilize agents that formerly were considered exclusive for administration by anaesthesiologists. This review highlights the important contributions to paediatric sedation over the past century. Considerations include the barriers and politics that impede progress and also future advances and contributions that may lie ahead. PMID:25498582

  3. Clinical competence in developmental-behavioural paediatrics: raising the bar.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Mick

    2014-01-01

    For our specialist paediatric workforce to be suitably equipped to deal with current childhood morbidity, a high level of competence in developmental-behavioural paediatrics (DBP) is necessary. New models of training and assessment are required to meet this challenge. An evolution of training in DBP, built around the centrepiece of competency-based medical education, is proposed. Summative assessment based upon entrustable professional activities, and a menu of formative workplace-based assessments specific to the DBP context are key components. A pilot project to develop and implement these changes is recommended. PMID:23714394

  4. Dermatological Findings in Turkish Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Uksal, Umit; Ozturk, Pinar; Colgecen, Emine; Taslidere, Nazan; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Borlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diagnoses of skin, mucosae, hair and nail manifestations in malignant diseases are often challenging because of life-threatening drug reactions, opportunistic infections or skin involvement of primary processes. Description of morphology, configuration and distribution of lesions is important in order to differentiate the self-healing eruptions from serious side effects of chemotherapy. There are case reports from Turkey including dermatological manifestations of malignancies and case series in adult patients but there are no published large group studies assessing all manifestations in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological features of dermatological findings in children with haemato-oncological diseases. Materials and Methods: The study was performed at the Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic, Turkey. Three dermatologists daily consulted all patients admitted to the clinic during a one-year period. Results: The study group comprised of 157 children (79 female/78 male) aged 1–16 years (mean 7.19±4.63). Detailed dermatological examinations were performed, including oral-genital mucosae, hair and nails. Thorough skin examination revealed that 70% of the patients exhibited at least one dermatological finding. Generalized xerosis and hyperpigmentation were the most common findings among patients undergoing chemotherapy (24.19%). Multiple nevi on at least 10 covered areas were very frequent among patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy (18.47%). Three were identified as dysplastic nevus, but malignant transformation was not observed during the one-year study period. Conclusion: Regular dermatological consultation may help resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic problems in paediatric haemato-oncology clinics. PMID:27551173

  5. Opportunities for improving the efficiency of paediatric HIV treatment programmes

    PubMed Central

    Revill, Paul A.; Walker, Simon; Mabugu, Travor; Nathoo, Kusum J.; Mugyenyi, Peter; Kekitinwa, Adeodata; Munderi, Paula; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Mutsawashe; Musiime, Victor; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Nahirya-Ntege, Patricia; Walker, A. Sarah; Sculpher, Mark J.; Gibb, Diana M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct two economic analyses addressing whether to: routinely monitor HIV-infected children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinically or with laboratory tests; continue or stop cotrimoxazole prophylaxis when children become stabilized on ART. Design and methods: The ARROW randomized trial investigated alternative strategies to deliver paediatric ART and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in 1206 Ugandan/Zimbabwean children. Incremental cost-effectiveness and value of implementation analyses were undertaken. Scenario analyses investigated whether laboratory monitoring (CD4+ tests for efficacy monitoring; haematology/biochemistry for toxicity) could be tailored and targeted to be delivered cost-effectively. Cotrimoxazole use was examined in malaria-endemic and non-endemic settings. Results: Using all trial data, clinical monitoring delivered similar health outcomes to routine laboratory monitoring, but at a reduced cost, so was cost-effective. Continuing cotrimoxazole improved health outcomes at reduced costs. Restricting routine CD4+ monitoring to after 52 weeks following ART initiation and removing toxicity testing was associated with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $6084 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) across all age groups, but was much lower for older children (12+ years at initiation; incremental cost-effectiveness ratio = $769/QALY). Committing resources to improve cotrimoxazole implementation appears cost-effective. A healthcare system that could pay $600/QALY should be willing to spend up to $12.0 per patient-year to ensure continued provision of cotrimoxazole. Conclusion: Clinically driven monitoring of ART is cost-effective in most circumstances. Routine laboratory monitoring is generally not cost-effective at current prices, except possibly CD4+ testing amongst adolescents initiating ART. Committing resources to ensure continued provision of cotrimoxazole in health facilities is more likely to represent an efficient use of

  6. Are paediatric burns more common in asylum seekers? An analysis of paediatric burn admissions.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, M P; Orr, D J A

    2006-03-01

    The number of asylum seekers in Ireland has increased dramatically over the last 10 years. Based on our impression that the number of children admitted to our burn unit was disproportionately represented by children of asylum seekers we performed an audit to establish (1) what proportion of admissions are from this subgroup and (2) the characteristics of their burns. All paediatric burn admissions from May 2003 to April 2004 were reviewed. Data collected from a retrospective chart review included patient demographics and details of the burn injuries. The National Census of 2002 and the Office of the Refugee Applications Commissioner were consulted for population statistics. Total burn admissions for the period were 126: Irish nationals (n=107), non-national residents (n=2), asylum seekers (n=14) and patients of unknown asylum status (n=3, excluded from study). In the asylum seeker group, the median age was 18.6 months (range 10 months-5.3 years) with the majority less than 2 years (n=11). All burns occurred in the domestic setting. Scalds accounted for 13 cases, one contact burn occurred from a hot grill. The median total body surface area burned was 5.7% (range 1.5-26%). The National Census of 2002 recorded a population of 3,917,203. With less than 12,000 asylum seekers in the country, they comprise only approximately 0.3% of the population yet they account for 11.4% of the burn patients admitted to our unit, p<0.0001. Children of asylum seekers are over-represented in our series of paediatric admissions for burns and are more likely than Irish children to sustain a burn at a younger age and in the domestic setting. This may indicate an increased risk of injury and warrants further investigation. PMID:16448770

  7. Near infrared spectroscopy and process analytical technology to master the process of busulfan paediatric capsules in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Paris, I; Janoly-Dumenil, A; Paci, A; Mercier, L; Bourget, P; Brion, F; Chaminade, P; Rieutord, A

    2006-06-16

    The prescription of unlicensed oral medicines in paediatrics leads the hospital pharmacists to compound hard capsules, such as busulfan, an alkylating agent prescribed in preparative regimens for bone marrow transplantation. In this study, we have investigated how the general principle of process analytical technology (PAT) can be implemented at the small size of our hospital pharmacy manufacturing unit. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was calibrated for raw material identification, blend uniformity analysis and final content uniformity of busulfan hard capsules of 11 different strengths. Measurements were performed on capsules from 2 to 40 mg (n=440). After optimisation, accuracy and linearity of the NIRS quantitative method was demonstrated after comparison with a previously validated quantitative high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method. Such a comparison led to attractive NIRS precision: +/-0.7 to +/-1.0 mg for capsules from 2 to 40 mg, respectively. As NIRS is a rapid and non-destructive technique, the individual control of a whole batch of busulfan paediatric capsules intended to be administrated is possible. Actually, mastering the process of busulfan paediatric capsules with the NIRS integrated into the notion of PAT is a powerful analytical tool to assess the process quality and to perform content uniformity of at least 5mg busulfan-containing capsules. PMID:16621419

  8. Aetiology of Intellectual Disability in Paediatric Outpatients in Northern India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jauhari, Prashant; Boggula, Raju; Bhave, Anupama; Bhargava, Roli; Singh, Chandrakanta; Kohli, Neera; Yadav, Rajesh; Kumar, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To study the aetiology of intellectual disability in patients presenting to hospital and the diagnostic yield of a standardized examination. Method: Over a 1-year period, the first three children presenting to the paediatric outpatients department (OPD) on 2 selected weekdays with developmental delay, suspected intellectual disability, or…

  9. A review of nutrient treatments for paediatric depression.

    PubMed

    Lopresti, Adrian L

    2015-08-01

    Paediatric depression is estimated to affect 15-20% of youths prior to adulthood and is associated with significant social, educational and physical impairment. Current treatments comprise moderately efficacious psychological therapies and pharmaceutical antidepressants. However, nutritional therapies are also available and are regularly sought by people with depressive illnesses and parents of depressed youths. In this narrative review, studies examining the antidepressant effects of individual nutritional supplements in child and adolescent populations are appraised. Epidemiological studies examining the relationship between nutritional status and paediatric depression, or depressive symptoms are also reviewed. Nutrients covered in this article include: omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, s-adenosylmethionine, vitamin C, vitamin D, zinc, iron and B-vitamins. Although several of these nutrients present as promising treatments for paediatric depression, there is a lack of high-quality studies examining the antidepressant effects of all the aforementioned ingredients. Before nutritional treatments are accepted as validated treatments for paediatric depression, further high-quality studies are required. PMID:25913919

  10. Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society: building an international paediatric electrophysiology organisation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Stephenson, Elizabeth; Skinner, Jon; Drago, Fabrizio; Davis, Andrew; Janousek, Jan; Rosenthal, Eric; Collins, Kathryn K; Triedman, John

    2016-05-01

    The Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) is a non-profit organisation comprised of individuals dedicated to improving the care of children and young adults with cardiac rhythm disturbances. Although PACES is a predominantly North American-centric organisation, international members have been a part of PACES for the last two decades. This year, PACES expanded its North American framework into a broadly expansive international role. On May 12, 2015, paediatric electrophysiology leaders from within the United States of America and Canada met with over 30 international paediatric electrophysiologists from 17 countries and five continents discussing measures to (1) expand PACES' global vision, (2) address ongoing challenges such as limited resource allocation that may be present in developing countries, (3) expand PACES' governance to include international representation, (4) promote joint international sessions at future paediatric EP meetings, and (5) facilitate a global multi-centre research consortium. This meeting marked the inception of a formal international collaborative spirit in PACES. This editorial addresses some solutions to breakdown the continental silos paediatric electrophysiologists have practiced within; however, there remain ongoing limitations, and future discussions will be needed to continue to move the PACES global international vision forward. PMID:27090729

  11. [Assessing and making safe the medicine use pathway in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Didelot, Nicolas; Guerrier, Catherine; Didelot, Anne; Fritsch, Sandrine; Pelte, Jean-Pierre; Socha, Marie; Javelot, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Based on an assessment of adverse events in a follow-up care and rehabilitation unit in paediatrics, audits were carried out of the medicine use pathway. The evaluation grid taken from this study today serves as a basis for the audits carried out on the medicine use pathway on a national level. PMID:27177486

  12. [The nurse consultation in a Swiss university paediatric emergency department].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Corinne; Hemme, Denis; Gehri, Mario; Pittet, Anne; Rey-Bellet Gasser, Céline

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, overcrowding in tertiary emergency departments is a frequent problem, resulting in lengthy waiting times, lower satisfaction on the part of families and a risk for patient's safety. The setting up of a nurse consultation in a university paediatric emergency centre has helped to improve the quality of care in this context. PMID:26573404

  13. Maintenance Intravenous Fluid Prescribing Practices Among Paediatric Residents

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael A; Ayus, Juan C; Moritz, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the sodium composition of maintenance intravenous fluids used by paediatric residents throughout the United States in common clinical scenarios of arginine vasopressin excess. Methods We distributed an online survey to paediatric residency programs asking what type of maintenance intravenous fluids (0.2%, 0.45%, 0.9% NaCl or Lactated Ringers) they would administer in four common clinical scenarios of arginine vasopressin excess (gastroenteritis, pneumonia, meningitis and post-operative) in both a 6-month-old (mo) and a 13-year-old (yo) child. Results We had 472 responses, representing 5% of the total paediatric residency population in the US. Hypotonic maintenance intravenous fluids were selected in 78% of children (88.2% of 6 mo and 68.5% of 13 yo). Isotonic maintenance intravenous fluids were selected approximately twice as often for patients with meningitis as for those without (21.4% vs 8.7% 6 mo and 42.8% vs 27.7% 13 yo; p <.0.001). Conclusions The majority of US paediatric residents would prescribe hypotonic maintenance intravenous fluids in disease states associated with arginine vasopressin excess. However, a significant number of residents are using isotonic maintenance intravenous fluids. Isotonic fluids are more likely to be prescribed in older children and children with meningitis. PMID:22765308

  14. The Infancy of an International Paediatric Pharmacy Network

    PubMed Central

    Knoppert, David; Arenas-Lopez, Sara; McArtney, Rowena

    2008-01-01

    There are several pharmacy and clinical pharmacology organizations in which pediatrics is one of many special interest groups and a few whose focus is entirely pediatric drug therapy. Recently the foundation for the establishment of an International Network of Paediatric Pharmacists has been laid. This paper describes that network. PMID:23055865

  15. Surveillance biopsies after paediatric kidney transplantation: A review.

    PubMed

    Rose, Edward M; Kennedy, Sean E; Mackie, Fiona E

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective means of treating children with end-stage kidney disease, and yet, there continues to be a limited "life span" of transplanted kidneys in paediatric recipients. Early graft monitoring, using the surveillance biopsy, has the potential to extend renal allograft survival in paediatric recipients. The surveillance biopsy provides important and timely information about acute and chronic graft pathology, particularly SCR and calcineurin inhibitor-induced nephrotoxicity, which can subsequently guide management decisions and improve long-term graft survival. The ostensible value of the surveillance biopsy is furthered by the limitations of conventional renal functional studies. However, there is still much debate surrounding the surveillance biopsy in paediatric recipients, particularly in regard to its overall utility, safety and timing. This review discusses the current literature regarding the utility, safety, and potential predictive value of surveillance biopsies for guiding post-transplant management in paediatric renal allograft recipients, as well as the viability of other potentially newer non-invasive strategies for renal allograft monitoring. PMID:27306873

  16. [The management of an adverse event in a paediatric unit].

    PubMed

    Cruz, Emmanuelle; Dubrulle, Aurélie

    2016-04-01

    Adverse events remain a major issue in care services. The mission of hospital authorities is to analyse them in order to put in place corrective and preventive measures. The objective is to prevent them reoccurring and to ensure the sustainable improvement of the quality and safety of care. This article presents an example in paediatrics with parenteral nutrition. PMID:27085928

  17. Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society: building an international paediatric electrophysiology organisation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Stephenson, Elizabeth; Skinner, Jon; Drago, Fabrizio; Davis, Andrew; Janousek, Jan; Rosenthal, Eric; Collins, Kathryn K; Triedman, John

    2016-08-01

    The Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES) is a non-profit organisation comprised of individuals dedicated to improving the care of children and young adults with cardiac rhythm disturbances. Although PACES is a predominantly North American-centric organisation, international members have been a part of PACES for the last two decades. This year, PACES expanded its North American framework into a broadly expansive international role. On 12 May, 2015, paediatric electrophysiology leaders from within the United States of America and Canada met with over 30 international paediatric electrophysiologists from 17 countries and five continents discussing measures to (1) expand PACES' global vision, (2) address ongoing challenges such as limited resource allocation that may be present in developing countries, (3) expand PACES' governance to include international representation, (4) promote joint international sessions at future paediatric EP meetings, and (5) facilitate a global multi-centre research consortium. This meeting marked the inception of a formal international collaborative spirit in PACES. This editorial addresses some solutions to breakdown the continental silos paediatric electrophysiologists have practiced within; however, there remain ongoing limitations, and future discussions will be needed to continue to move the PACES global international vision forward. PMID:27075202

  18. Epidemiology of pertussis-related paediatric intensive care unit (ICU) admissions in Australia, 1997–2013: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Robert S; McEniery, Julie A; Coulthard, Mark G; Lambert, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the epidemiology of pertussis-related intensive care unit (ICU) admissions across Australia, over a 17-year period. Design Retrospective descriptive study. Setting Australian ICUs contributing data to the Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) Registry. The number of contributing ICUs increased over the study period, from 8 specialist paediatric ICUs in 1997 to 8 specialist paediatric and 13 general ICUs in 2013. Participants All paediatric (<16 years) ICU admissions, coded as pertussis-related, between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2013. Results A total of 373 pertussis-coded ICU admissions were identified in the ANZPIC Registry over the study period. Of these cases, 52.8% occurred during the 4 years of the recent Australian epidemic (2009–2012). ICU admissions were most likely to occur in infants aged younger than 6 weeks (41.8%, n=156) and aged 6 weeks to 4 months (42.9%, n=160). The median length of stay for pertussis-related ICU admissions was 3.6 days, with 77.5% of cases staying in ICU for <7 days. Approximately half of all admissions (54.8%) required some form of respiratory support, with 32.7% requiring invasive respiratory support. Over the study period, 23 deaths were recorded (6.2% of pertussis-related ICU admissions), of which 20 (87.0%) were infants <4 months old. Conclusions Pertussis-related ICU admissions occur primarily in infants too young to be fully protected from active immunisation. More needs to be done to protect these high-risk infants, such as maternal immunisation. PMID:27053270

  19. A review of epidemiology of paediatric elbow injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Magra, Merzesh; Caine, Dennis; Maffulli, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    The elbow is a common site of orthopaedic injury in the paediatric population. The number of these injuries continues to rise following increased levels of participation in paediatric recreational and competitive sport. Injuries to the paediatric elbow can be classified as either overuse or acute. Delineating injury patterns to the elbow in children can be challenging, given the cartilaginous composition of the distal humerus and the multiple secondary ossification centres that appear and unite with the epiphysis at defined ages. Pitching in baseball, serving in tennis, spiking in volleyball, passing in American football and launching in javelin-throwing can all produce elbow pathology by forceful valgus stress, with medial stretching, lateral compression and posterior impingement. In children and adolescents, the epiphyseal plate is weaker than the surrounding ligaments, predisposing them to epiphyseal plate injuries. On the other hand, post-pubescent or skeletally mature athletes are more prone to tendinous or ligamentous injury. Injuries may cause significant impact on the athlete, parents and healthcare system. With the exception of baseball, there are few prospective cohort studies on the epidemiological trends of childhood elbow injuries in other sports. This paper aims to describe the epidemiological trends in paediatric elbow injuries related to sports, suggests prevention strategies and discusses the scope for further research. A web-based search of existing articles pertaining to paediatric elbow injuries in sports was performed. The implications of acute and overuse injuries and the possibility of permanent damage should be understood by parents, coaches and the athletes. Proper understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors that could lead to elbow injuries is thus required. Measures to prevent elbow injuries should include proper coaching, warm-up, officiation, legislation, medical expertise and protective gear. There are still many

  20. Minor illness and injury: factors influencing attendance at a paediatric accident and emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, S; Beattie, T; Heaney, D

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To gather information on children with minor illness or injury presenting to a paediatric accident and emergency (A&E) department and the decision making process leading to their attendance. Methods: Prospective questionnaire based survey of 465 children selected by systematic sampling from A&E attenders allocated to the lowest triage category. Results: The study population was statistically representative of the total population of A&E attenders. The lower deprivation categories were over represented. Educational attainment, childcare experience, and parental coping skills were important in relation to A&E attendance. More children attended with injury as opposed to illness. There were no significant demographic differences between those children who presented directly to A&E and those who made prior contact with a GP. Just under half the study population had made contact with a general practitioner (GP) before attending A&E. The majority of those children were directly referred to A&E at that point. GPs referred equivalent numbers of children with illness and injury. Conclusions: Parents and GPs view paediatric A&E departments as an appropriate place to seek treatment for children with minor illness or injury. PMID:15908631

  1. An Interesting Association of Cystic Hygroma of the Neck and Lymphangioma Causing a Paediatric Swollen Tongue

    PubMed Central

    Beech, A. N.; Farrier, J. N.

    2016-01-01

    Up to 75% of lymphatic malformations occur in the head and neck region. Of these, cystic hygromas and lymphangiomas have been widely reported; however they rarely occur in the same patient. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl who presented to the Department of Paediatrics of a district general hospital with a short history of recurrent, painful swelling of the anterior one-third of her tongue. She was reviewed under the joint care of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Otolaryngology Teams. Relevant past medical history included a previously excised cystic hygroma from her right neck when she was aged 2 years. Diagnosis of lymphangioma was made and of the potential management options available active monitoring was favoured due to the patient's age. To our knowledge the occurrence of both tongue lymphangioma and cystic hygroma has not been previously reported in a paediatric patient. This case report therefore shows a rare association between a cystic hygroma of the neck and lymphangioma of the tongue. PMID:27069707

  2. The church and paediatric HIV care in rural South Africa: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Norder, Wilma A J; Peters, Remco P H; Kok, Maarten O; van Elsland, Sabine L; Struthers, Helen E; Tutu, Mpho A; van Furth, A Marceline

    2015-01-01

    Religion has substantial - positive and negative - influence on South Africa's HIV context. This qualitative study explored possibilities for positive church engagement in paediatric HIV care in a rural district in Limpopo Province, South Africa. Opinions, attitudes and experiences of various stakeholders including religious leaders, healthcare workers and people infected/affected with/by HIV were investigated through participant observation, semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions. During the research the original focus on paediatric HIV care shifted to HIV care in general in reaction to participant responses. Participants identified three main barriers to positive church engagement in HIV care: (a) stigma and disclosure; (b) sexual associations with HIV and (c) religious beliefs and practices. All participant groups appreciated the opportunity and relevance of strengthening church involvement in HIV care. Opportunities for positive church engagement in HIV care that participants identified included: (a) comprehensive and holistic HIV care when churches and clinics collaborate; (b) the wide social reach of churches and (c) the safety and acceptance in churches. Findings indicate that despite barriers great potential exists for increased positive church engagement in HIV care in rural South Africa. Recommendations include increased medical knowledge and dialogue on HIV/AIDS within church settings, and increased collaboration between churches and the medical sector. PMID:26679269

  3. Use of growth charts in Canada: A National Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program survey

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Sarah; Cummings, Elizabeth; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Metzger, Daniel; Palmert, Mark; Sharma, Aul; Rodd, Celia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2010, the WHO Growth Charts for Canada were recommended for use in Canada, while the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Georgia, USA) charts remained in active use. OBJECTIVE: To assess the availability, utilization of and satisfaction with growth charts in clinical practice in Canada. METHODS: In October 2012, a one-time survey was sent through the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program (CPSP) to 2544 paediatricians and 280 family physicians with a stated interest in paediatrics. RESULTS: The response rate was 24% (63% general paediatricians, 36% subspecialists, 1% family physicians). Of these respondents, 68% preferred the WHO charts for infants and 49% for children and youth. Regarding the WHO charts, 49.7% of respondents reported concerns with their inability to assess weight for children >10 years of age, and many believed that there were too few percentile lines between the third and 97th percentiles for infant (24%) and for child and youth measures (19%). The addition of extreme percentiles (0.1 and 99.9), shading on charts and lack of availability with electronic medical record providers were other concerns mentioned by 10% to 13% of respondents. CONCLUSION: There is support for the use of the WHO data for monitoring the growth of Canadian children. Concerns regarding the design of the charts were raised. These survey results lend support to the redesign of the WHO Growth Charts for Canada, as was recently completed in 2014. PMID:26038634

  4. Leukotriene receptor antagonists--risks and benefits for use in paediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Spahr, Jonathan E; Krawiec, Marzena E

    2004-05-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are important mediators of the pathophysiology of asthma, specifically, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation and oedema and mucus hypersecretion. The LT receptor antagonists (LTRAs) inhibit these potent effects by selectively blocking the cysteinyl LT 1 receptor. These are the first novel therapies for asthma since the introduction of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in 1972. Unlike generalised inhibition of airway inflammation by ICS, the LTRAs target inhibition of specific mediators. In general, paediatric data concerning these agents remain quite limited. However, they have demonstrated efficacy against allergen- and exercise-induced bronchospasm in both adults and children. Recently, their potential role for the treatment of viral-induced wheeze in young children has been explored. In multiple, placebo-controlled trials, the LTRAs have demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of mild persistent asthma, additive benefit in the management of symptomatic moderate asthmatics on maintenance ICS and evidence of significant steroid-sparing. Findings from these clinical trials and real-world experience support the use of the LTRAs as controller agents for persistent asthma. Based on their excellent safety profiles, tolerance and ease of administration (including once daily dosing with montelukast), this drug class may offer several important features for use as controller therapy, particularly in asthmatic children as young as 1 year of age, however, this must continue to be reviewed as new paediatric data become available. PMID:15155146

  5. Candida speciation, antifungal treatment and adverse events in pediatric invasive candidiasis: results from 441 infections in a prospective, multi-national study.

    PubMed

    Palazzi, Debra L; Arrieta, Antonio; Castagnola, Elio; Halasa, Natasha; Hubbard, Sydney; Brozovich, Ava A; Fisher, Brian T; Steinbach, William J

    2014-12-01

    A multi-national prospective study of pediatric patients with invasive candidiasis between August 2007 and September 2012 was performed and included 441 infections. Variation in infecting Candida species and antifungals used was noted between US and non-US sites. Antifungal-associated adverse events were most common with polyene use. PMID:24892850

  6. Virtual support for paediatric HIV treatment decision making

    PubMed Central

    Le Doare, Kirsty; Mackie, N E; Kaye, S; Bamford, A; Walters, S; Foster, C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to review clinical outcomes of recommendations made by a multidisciplinary paediatric virtual clinic (PVC) for complex case management of paediatric HIV as a model of care within a tertiary network. Design A retrospective review of the clinical outcomes of paediatric and adolescent (0–21 years) referrals to the PVC at St. Mary's Hospital, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London was performed between October 2009 and November 2013. Results 234 referrals were made for 182 children from 37 centres, discussed in 42 meetings (median age 13 years, IQR 10–15 years). Reasons for referral included virological failure (44%), simplification of the current regimen (24%) and antiretroviral drug complications (24%). At latest follow-up, PVC advice had been instituted in 80% of referrals. Suppression following virological failure was achieved in 48% following first referral and 57% following subsequent discussions and was maintained in 95% of children referred for regimen simplification. Following advice, dyslipidaemia resolved in 42% and liver function normalised in 73% with biochemical hepatitis. Adherence support aided resolution of viraemia in nine children and 12% of referrals resulted in additional support, including psychology, social services and mental health input. Conclusions Combined multidisciplinary virtual input with adult expertise in resistance and newer agents, paediatric knowledge of pill swallowing, childhood formulations/weight banding and parental support, assists complex treatment decision making in paediatric HIV infection. The Virtual Clinic model could be applied to the management of other rare complex diseases of childhood within a clinical network. PMID:25549664

  7. Licensing and labelling of drugs in a paediatric oncology ward

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Henk; Tak, Nanda

    2011-01-01

    AIM Paediatric drug prescriptions are known for their high percentages of off-label and unlicensed use. In paediatric oncology data available are scarce. The aim of this paper is an analysis of the licensing and labelling status of all prescribed medication over a 2 week period in a Dutch paediatric oncology centre. METHODS An analysis of the delivery of medication by the hospital pharmacy to patients admitted to the paediatric oncology centre was carried out. RESULTS In total 268 precriptions were filed for 39 patients. In 87% of children unlicensed medication was used. Fifty-nine per cent of the children received at least two unlicensed drugs. In total 72% of the drugs were used licensed and on-label was found in 57% of the prescriptions. There was a trend that in younger children percentages were lower. International and local guidelines necessitated in many cases unlicensed use, e.g. intrathecal prednisolone, low dose medication such as heparin, ethanol and vancomycin for locking intravenous devices and higher intravenous vancomycin dosages. There were no major differences with respect to type of malignancy. CONCLUSION Our figures are substantially higher than the figures reported from adult oncology. Comparison with other paediatric reports are cumbersome, due to different percentages of diseases in the reports and other rules to dispense medication in the outpatient setting. Our data are in line with reports mentioning the higher percentages of unlicensed and off-label use. Our data further underpin the need for more research on suitable formulations, dosages, safety and efficacy in these children. PMID:21453298

  8. Paediatric entrance doses from exposure index in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Martinez, D.; Fernandez, J. M.; Ordiales, J. M.; Prieto, C.; Floriano, A.; Ten, J. I.

    2008-06-01

    Over the last two years we have evaluated paediatric patient doses in projection radiography derived from exposure level (EL) in computed radiography (CR) in a large university hospital. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) for 3501 paediatric examinations was calculated from the EL, which is a dose index parameter related to the light emitted by the phosphor-stimulable plate, archived in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) header of the images and automatically transferred to a database using custom-built dedicated software. Typical mean thicknesses for several age bands of paediatric patients was estimated to calculate ESAK from the EL values, using results of experimental measurements with phantoms for the typical x-ray beam qualities used in paediatric examinations. Mean/median ESAK values (in µGy) for the age bands of <1 year, 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years have been obtained for chest without a bucky: 51/41, 57/34, 91/54 and 122/109; chest with a bucky (for only the last three age bands): 114/87, 129/105 and 219/170; abdomen: 119/91, 291/225, 756/600 and 1960/1508 and pelvis: 65/48, 455/314, 943/707 and 2261/1595. Sample sizes of clinical images used for the (indirect) measurements were 1724 for chest without a bucky, 799 for chest with a bucky, 337 for abdomen and 641 for pelvis. The methodology we describe could be applicable to other centres using CR as an imaging modality for paediatrics. Presently, this method is the only practical approach to automatically extract parameters contained in the DICOM header, for the calculation of patient dose values for the CR modality.

  9. European cardiovascular magnetic resonance (EuroCMR) registry – multi national results from 57 centers in 15 countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The EuroCMR registry sought to evaluate indications, image quality, safety and impact on patient management of clinical routine CMR in a multi-national European setting. Furthermore, interim analysis of the specific protocols should underscore the prognostic potential of CMR. Methods Multi-center registry with consecutive enrolment of patients in 57 centers in 15 countries. More than 27000 consecutive patients were enrolled. Results The most important indications were risk stratification in suspected CAD/Ischemia (34.2%), workup of myocarditis/cardiomyopathies (32.2%), as well as assessment of viability (14.6%). Image quality was diagnostic in more than 98% of cases. Severe complications occurred in 0.026%, always associated with stress testing. No patient died during or due to CMR. In 61.8% CMR findings impacted on patient management. Importantly, in nearly 8.7% the final diagnosis based on CMR was different to the diagnosis before CMR, leading to a complete change in management. Interim analysis of suspected CAD and risk stratification in HCM specific protocols revealed a low rate of adverse events for suspected CAD patients with normal stress CMR (1.0% per year), and for HCM patients without LGE (2.7% per year). Conclusion The most important indications in Europe are risk stratification in suspected CAD/Ischemia, work-up of myocarditis and cardiomyopathies, as well as assessment of viability. CMR imaging is a safe procedure, has diagnostic image quality in more than 98% of cases, and its results have strong impact on patient management. Interim analyses of the specific protocols underscore the prognostic value of clinical routine CMR in CAD and HCM. Condensed abstract The EuroCMR registry sought to evaluate indications, image quality, safety and impact on patient management of clinical routine CMR in a multi-national European setting in a large number of cases (n > 27000). Based on our data CMR is frequently performed in European

  10. Alcohol Control Policies and Alcohol Consumption by Youth: A Multi-National Study

    PubMed Central

    Paschall, Mallie J.; Grube, Joel W.; Kypri, Kypros

    2009-01-01

    Aims The study examined relationships between alcohol control policies and adolescent alcohol use in 26 countries. Design Cross-sectional analyses of alcohol policy ratings based on the Alcohol Policy Index (API), per capita consumption, and national adolescent survey data. Setting Data are from 26 countries. Participants Adolescents (15-17 years old) who participated in the 2003 ESPAD (European countries) or national secondary school surveys in Spain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the USA. Measurements Alcohol control policy ratings based on the API; prevalence of alcohol use, heavy drinking, and first drink by age 13 based on national secondary school surveys; per capita alcohol consumption for each country in 2003. Analysis Correlational and linear regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between alcohol control policy ratings and past-30-day prevalence of adolescent alcohol use, heavy drinking, and having first drink by age 13. Per capita consumption of alcohol was included as a covariate in regression analyses. Findings More comprehensive API ratings and alcohol availability and advertising control ratings were inversely related to the past-30-day prevalence of alcohol use and prevalence rates for drinking 3-5 times and 6 or more times in the past 30 days. Alcohol advertising control was also inversely related to the prevalence of past-30-day heavy drinking and having first drink by age 13. Most of the relationships between API, alcohol availability and advertising control and drinking prevalence rates were attenuated and no longer statistically significant when controlling for per capita consumption in regression analyses, suggesting that alcohol use in the general population may confound or mediate observed relationships between alcohol control policies and youth alcohol consumption. Several of the inverse relationships remained statistically significant when controlling for per capita consumption. Conclusions More comprehensive and

  11. An examination of health selection among U.S. immigrants using multi-national data.

    PubMed

    Ro, Annie; Fleischer, Nancy L; Blebu, Bridgette

    2016-06-01

    While migrants are widely believed to be positively selected on health, there has been very little empirical exploration of the actual health differential between migrants and non-migrants. This paper explored: 1) the extent of health selection by comparing US immigrants from 19 sending countries to their non-migrating counterparts still residing in the countries of origin; 2) country-level correlates of health selection; and 3) whether country-level health selection accounted for differences in self-rated health between immigrants and US-born Whites. We combined nationally-representative international data with data from US immigrants from the 2003-2007 Current Population Survey. The health selectivity measure was the Net Difference Index (NDI), which compares the distribution of self-rated health between migrants and non-migrants. We calculated Spearman correlation and bivariate regression coefficients between the NDI and economic, health, distance, and migration characteristics of the sending countries. We used generalized estimating equation models to examine the association between country-level health selection and immigrants' current self-rated health. We found immigrants from South America to show the most positive health selection. Health selection was significantly correlated with visa mode of entry, where family networks decrease, but work-related networks increase health selection. There was little evidence that country-level health selection explained differences in the self-rated health of US immigrants relative to US-born Whites. Our findings do not support the idea that country-level health selection underlies the "healthy immigrant effect". PMID:27132066

  12. How small is small enough? Role of robotics in paediatric urology.

    PubMed

    Ganpule, Arvind P; Sripathi, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    The well-known advantages of robotic surgery include improved dexterity, three-dimensional operating view and an improved degree of freedom. Robotic surgery is performed for a wide range of surgeries in urology, which include radical prostatectomy, radical cystectomy, and ureteric reimplantation. Robotic paediatric urology is evolving. The major hindrance in the development of paediatric robotics is, first, the differences in practice patterns in paediatric urology compared with adult urology thereby making development of expertise difficult and secondly it is challenging to conduct proper studies in the paediatric population because of the paucity of cases. The difficulties in conducting these studies include difficulty in designing a proper randomised study, difficulties with blinding, and finally, the ethical issues involved, finally the instruments although in the phase of evolution require a lot of improvement. In this article, we review the relevant articles for paediatric robotic surgery. We emphasise on the technical aspects and results in contemporary paediatric robotic case series. PMID:25598599

  13. How small is small enough? Role of robotics in paediatric urology

    PubMed Central

    Ganpule, Arvind P.; Sripathi, Venkat

    2015-01-01

    The well-known advantages of robotic surgery include improved dexterity, three-dimensional operating view and an improved degree of freedom. Robotic surgery is performed for a wide range of surgeries in urology, which include radical prostatectomy, radical cystectomy, and ureteric reimplantation. Robotic paediatric urology is evolving. The major hindrance in the development of paediatric robotics is, first, the differences in practice patterns in paediatric urology compared with adult urology thereby making development of expertise difficult and secondly it is challenging to conduct proper studies in the paediatric population because of the paucity of cases. The difficulties in conducting these studies include difficulty in designing a proper randomised study, difficulties with blinding, and finally, the ethical issues involved, finally the instruments although in the phase of evolution require a lot of improvement. In this article, we review the relevant articles for paediatric robotic surgery. We emphasise on the technical aspects and results in contemporary paediatric robotic case series. PMID:25598599

  14. Paediatric cardiac surgery in a patient with cold agglutinins.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomomi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maruo, Ayako; Matsuhisa, Hironori

    2012-03-01

    Cold agglutinins (CAs) lead to organ thrombosis or haemolysis due to increased blood viscosity and red blood cell clumping when blood temperature drops below the thermal amplitude for haemagglutination. Although it is well known that CAs are particularly relevant to adult cardiac surgery with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), paediatric cardiac surgery with congenital heart disease and with CAs has been reported very rarely. We present here a case of paediatric cardiac surgery to repair atrial septal defect with pulmonary stenosis in an 11-month old infant with a family history of CAs. She was detected to have a high titre of CAs preoperatively, and underwent an intracardiac repair with normothermic CPB using temporary electrical fibrillation for added safety. Her post-operative course was uneventful without any complications. PMID:22184466

  15. The evolving role of laparoscopic surgery in paediatric urology

    PubMed Central

    Hidas, Guy; Watts, Blake; Khoury, Antoine E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We review the various applications of laparoscopic and robotic-assisted laparoscopy in paediatric urology, as the laparoscopic and robotic approach in this population is gradually being recognised. Methods We searched PubMed for human studies in English that were published between 1990 and the present, focusing on laparoscopic nephrectomies and partial nephrectomies, laparoscopic and robotic pyeloplasties and ureteric reimplantation, laparoscopic orchidopexy and varicocelectomy. We also reviewed robotic-assisted laparoscopic urological major reconstructions. Key articles were reviewed, extracting the indications, techniques, and the advantages and disadvantages. Results and conclusions Laparoscopy has a defined place in modern paediatric urological surgery. Laparoscopic nephrectomies, pyeloplasties and abdominal exploration for the evaluation and management of impalpable undescended testicles have become the standard of care. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery is developing as a safe and effective option even for infant patients. PMID:26558007

  16. Epidemiology of paediatric metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    De Ferranti, Sarah D; Osganian, Stavroula K

    2007-12-01

    The epidemic in childhood obesity is a driving force behind the increase in paediatric metabolic syndrome, a collection of abnormalities that is associated in adults with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although there is no clear consensus about the paediatric definition for metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of this syndrome is clearly rising. Children with metabolic syndrome are at increased risk for metabolic syndrome in adulthood. A late consequence of metabolic syndrome is type 2 diabetes, which increasingly affects adolescents. The rise in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in children is almost sure to lead to an increase in associated complications in young adulthood, including early cardiovascular disease. This epidemic will bear fruit in forthcoming decades, putting further stress on the healthcare system and probably leading to increased morbidity and a shorter lifespan for future generations. PMID:18158698

  17. Incorporating educative environments into the holistic care of paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Susan E; Green, Julie B; Zazryn, Tsharni R

    2012-08-01

    Hospital settings can, and should, create educative spaces and learning opportunities as part of their holistic care for young patients. The purpose of this paper is to examine the evidence for creating high quality, child-centred learning environments within paediatric settings. We explore the impact of physical spaces on learning; the literature on developmental stages of learning for children and young people as it relates to learning environments; and the literature on learning in out-of-school settings, particularly as this applies to children who are separated from their daily communities. As all paediatric settings can create opportunities for the ongoing educational development of their patients, this paper presents a way forward for this approach to holistic care. PMID:22935113

  18. Concepts from paediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for adult intensivists.

    PubMed

    Butt, Warwick; MacLaren, Graeme

    2016-12-01

    Over the last 5 years, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adult patients with severe respiratory or cardiac failure. This contrasts to the use of the technology in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units, where it has been regarded as a standard of care for a number of conditions for over 25 years. Many innovations in ECMO circuitry or clinical management evolve first in one particular discipline and it may be helpful for individual clinicians to keep abreast of developments in ECMO across the entire age range, from neonatology to older adults. This review addresses nine concepts in ECMO that are better studied or established in paediatric medicine and considers their application in adult patients. PMID:26940318

  19. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in paediatric melanoma. A case series.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Aguilar, M; Álvarez Pérez, R M; García Gómez, F J; Fernández Ortega, P; Borrego Dorado, I

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma in children is uncommon, being particularly rare in children under 10 years-old. However, this disease is increasing by a mean of 2% per year. As in adults, the lymph node status is the most important prognostic factor, crucial to performing the selective sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). We report 3 cases of paediatric patients of 3, 4 and 8 years-old, in which SLNB was performed for malignant melanoma. Paediatric age implies greater technical difficulty to the scintigraphy scan due to poor patient cooperation, with mild sedation required in some cases, and only being able to acquire planar images in other cases. SPECT/CT was only performed in the oldest patient. In our cases, SLNB was useful for selecting the least invasive surgery in order to reduce morbidity. PMID:25595513

  20. Proceedings of the seventh Northern region paediatric colloquium.

    PubMed

    Barkla, Xanthe; Kaplan, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Ethical and legal dilemmas frequently arise in paediatric practice. Given the nature of the speciality, these issues are relevant to both the medical and legal professions. To this end, senior figures from the medical and legal professions in the Northern region have met on a regular basis in order to discuss anonymised case material. We report on the proceedings of the seventh such meeting. Six cases are described and key points arising from the subsequent discussion are presented. PMID:23864488

  1. Utility of double inversion recovery MRI in paediatric epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno P; Porter, Samuel G; Saindane, Amit M; Dehkharghani, Seena; Desai, Nilesh K

    2016-01-01

    Detecting focal abnormalities in MRI examinations of children with epilepsy can be a challenging task given the frequently subtle appearance of cortical dysplasia, mesial temporal sclerosis and similar lesions. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of double inversion recovery MRI in the detection of paediatric epileptogenic abnormalities, promoted primarily by increased lesion conspicuity due to complementary suppression of both cerebrospinal fluid and normal white matter signal. PMID:26529229

  2. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  3. Paediatric ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection caused by Actinomyces neuii

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ian A; Jarral, Fazain; Sethi, Kavita; Chumas, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    We present the first reported case of ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection secondary to Actinomyces neuii in a paediatric patient. Our patient was managed with temporary shunt removal, intrathecal antibiotics and a prolonged course of intravenous and then oral antibiotics. She went on to make a complete recovery. Subsequent cerebrospinal fluid analysis at 5 months post-treatment demonstrated no evidence of residual infection. PMID:24859562

  4. Varicella paediatric hospitalisations in Belgium: a 1-year national survey

    PubMed Central

    Blumental, Sophie; Sabbe, Martine; Lepage, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Varicella universal vaccination (UV) has been implemented in many countries for several years. Nevertheless, varicella UV remains debated in Europe and few data are available on the real burden of infection. We assessed the burden of varicella in Belgium through analysis of hospitalised cases during a 1-year period. Methods Data on children admitted to hospital with varicella were collected through a national network from November 2011 to October 2012. Inclusion criteria were either acute varicella or related complications up to 3 weeks after the rash. Results Participation of 101 hospitals was obtained, covering 97.7% of the total paediatric beds in Belgium. 552 children were included with a median age of 2.1 years. Incidence of paediatric varicella hospitalisations reached 29.5/105 person-years, with the highest impact among those 0–4 years old (global incidence and odds of hospitalisation: 79/105 person-years and 1.6/100 varicella cases, respectively). Only 14% (79/552) of the cohort had an underlying chronic condition. 65% (357/552) of children had ≥1 complication justifying their admission, 49% were bacterial superinfections and 10% neurological disorders. Only a quarter of children (141/552) received acyclovir. Incidence of complicated hospitalised cases was 19/105 person-years. Paediatric intensive care unit admission and surgery were required in 4% and 3% of hospitalised cases, respectively. Mortality among Belgian paediatric population was 0.5/106 and fatality ratio 0.2% among our cohort. Conclusions Varicella demonstrated a substantial burden of disease in Belgian children, especially among the youngest. Our thorough nationwide study, run in a country without varicella UV, offers data to support varicella UV in Belgium. PMID:26130380

  5. Distribution of branchial anomalies in a paediatric Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Neville Wei Yang; Ibrahim, Shahrul Izham; Tan, Kun Kiaang Henry

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of the present study was to review the distribution and incidence of branchial anomalies in an Asian paediatric population and highlight the challenges involved in the diagnosis of branchial anomalies. METHODS This was a retrospective chart review of all paediatric patients who underwent surgery for branchial anomalies in a tertiary paediatric hospital from August 2007 to November 2012. The clinical notes were correlated with preoperative radiological investigations, intraoperative findings and histology results. Branchial anomalies were classified based on the results of the review. RESULTS A total of 28 children underwent surgery for 30 branchial anomalies during the review period. Two children had bilateral branchial anomalies requiring excision. Of the 30 branchial anomalies, 7 (23.3%) were first branchial anomalies, 5 (16.7%) were second branchial anomalies, 3 (10.0%) were third branchial anomalies, and 4 (13.3%) were fourth branchial anomalies (one of the four patients with fourth branchial anomalies had bilateral branchial anomalies). In addition, seven children had 8 (26.7%) branchial anomalies that were thought to originate from the pyriform sinus; however, we were unable to determine if these anomalies were from the third or fourth branchial arches. There was inadequate information on the remaining 3 (10.0%) branchial anomalies for classification. CONCLUSION The incidence of second branchial anomalies appears to be lower in our Asian paediatric population, while that of third and fourth branchial anomalies was higher. Knowledge of embryology and the related anatomy of the branchial apparatus is crucial in the identification of the type of branchial anomaly. PMID:25917471

  6. Grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy and paediatric allergic rhinitis: A patient-oriented decision.

    PubMed

    Miceli Sopo, Stefano; Battista, Andrea; Greco, Monica; Monaco, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines and systematic review report that allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is, in general, effective in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. However, experts suggest not generalising the results of different clinical studies: for example, it would not be advisable to translate the results found in an adult population to a paediatric population or the results on the efficacy of AIT against a specific allergen to the AIT against a different allergen. Moreover, according to Evidence Based Medicine (EBM), clinical decisions are individualised and should derive from the "integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values". Taking into account the high specificity of the AIT and EBM principles, we tried to answer the question on how advisable it is to prescribe the AIT for the management of grass allergic rhinitis in children. To do this, we revised the scientific literature in order to solve a specific case scenario. PMID:26321601

  7. RADIATION DOSE IN PAEDIATRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY: RISKS AND BENEFITS

    PubMed Central

    Ogbole, G.I.

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a powerful tool for the accurate and effective diagnosis and treatment of a variety of conditions because it allows high-resolution three-dimensional images to be acquired very quickly. However as the number of CT procedures performed globally have continued to increase; with growing concerns about patient protection. Currently, no system is in place to track patient doses and the lifetime cumulative dose from medical sources. The widespread use of CT even in developing countries has raised questions regarding the possible threat to public health especially in children. The best available risk estimates suggest that paediatric CT will result in significantly increased lifetime radiation risk over adult CT. Studies have shown that lower milliampere-second (mAs) settings can be used for children without significant loss of information. Although the risk–benefit balance is still strongly tilted toward benefit, there is still need for caution. Furthermore since the frequency of paediatric CT examinations is rapidly increasing, and estimates suggest that quantitative lifetime radiation risks for children are not negligible, efforts should be made toward more active reduction of CT exposure settings in paediatric patients. This article hopes to address this concerns and draw attention to the fact that children are not ‘small adults ’ and should therefore be treated differently. PMID:25161479

  8. Safety of Levetiracetam in Paediatrics: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Egunsola, Oluwaseun; Choonara, Imti; Sammons, Helen Mary

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify adverse events (AEs) associated with Levetiracetam (LEV) in children. Methods Databases EMBASE (1974-February 2015) and Medline (1946-February 2015) were searched for articles in which paediatric patients (≤18 years) received LEV treatment for epilepsy. All studies with reports on safety were included. Studies involving adults, mixed age population (i.e. children and adults) in which the paediatric subpopulation was not sufficiently described, were excluded. A meta-analysis of the RCTs was carried out and association between the commonly reported AEs or treatment discontinuation and the type of regimen (polytherapy or monotherapy) was determined using Chi2 analysis. Results Sixty seven articles involving 3,174 paediatric patients were identified. A total of 1,913 AEs were reported across studies. The most common AEs were behavioural problems and somnolence, which accounted for 10.9% and 8.4% of all AEs in prospective studies. 21 prospective studies involving 1120 children stated the number of children experiencing AEs. 47% of these children experienced AEs. Significantly more children experienced AEs with polytherapy (64%) than monotherapy (22%) (p<0.001). Levetiracetam was discontinued in 4.5% of all children on polytherapy and 0.9% on monotherapy (p<0.001), the majority were due to behavioural problems. Conclusion Behavioural problems and somnolence were the most prevalent adverse events to LEV and the most common causes of treatment discontinuation. Children on polytherapy have a greater risk of adverse events than those receiving monotherapy. PMID:26930201

  9. Paediatric nurses' attitudes towards the promotion of healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Blake, Holly; Patterson, Joanna

    This study assessed paediatric nurses' attitudes towards promoting healthy eating and their opinions regarding nurses as role models for health. In all, 67 nurses from 14 wards at an acute hospital trust completed questionnaires on weight, diet, physical activity, self-efficacy and attitudes towards nurses as role models for health. Forty-eight percent felt that they could incorporate health promotion into their patient care better, and 84% believed that nurses should present themselves as role models for health. Nurses felt that their own health behaviours influenced the quality of their care: 77% reported that patients and families would heed advice better from those who appeared to follow it themselves, and 48% reported difficulties in promoting health behaviours they did not adhere to themselves. These views were inconsistent with their own lifestyle choices, since one third of respondents did not meet physical-activity guidelines, almost half were an unhealthy weight, and the majority did not consume five portions of fruits/vegetables per day. Paediatric nurses identified barriers and facilitators to promoting healthy eating. Education, training and access to evidence-based resources may help to increase paediatric nurses' confidence to promote healthy eating to children and their families. Hospital workplaces should make provision to support nurses who seek to improve their own health. PMID:25615996

  10. Marketing paediatric influenza vaccination: results of a major metropolitan trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Buynder, Paul G.; Carcione, Dale; Rettura, Vince; Daly, Alison; Woods, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Van Buynder et al. (2010) Marketing paediatric influenza vaccination: results of a major metropolitan trial. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 33–38. Objectives  After a cluster of rapidly fulminant influenza related toddler deaths in a Western Australian metropolis, children aged six to 59 months were offered influenza vaccination in subsequent winters. Some parental resistance was expected and previous poor uptake of paediatric influenza vaccination overseas was noted. A marketing campaign addressing barriers to immunization was developed to maximise uptake. Design  Advertising occurred in major statewide newspapers, via public poster displays and static ‘eye‐lite’ displays, via press releases, via a series of rolling radio advertisements, via direct marketing to child care centres, and via a linked series of web‐sites. Parents were subsequently surveyed to assess reasons for vaccination. Main Outcome Results  The campaign produced influenza vaccination coverage above that previously described elsewhere and led to a proportionate reduction in influenza notifications in this age group compared to previous seasons. Conclusions  Influenza in children comes with significant morbidity and some mortality. Paediatric influenza vaccination is safe, well tolerated and effective if two doses are given. A targeted media campaign can increase vaccine uptake if it reinforces the seriousness of influenza and addresses community ‘myths’ about influenza and influenza vaccine. The lessons learned enabling enhancements of similar programs elsewhere. PMID:21138538

  11. Thyroid abnormalities in paediatric patients with vitiligo: retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Borlu, Murat; Çınar, Salih Levent; Kesikoğlu, Ayten; Utaş, Serap

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association between vitiligo and thyroid disease is not fully investigated especially in paediatric patients. Aim To determine the incidence of vitiligo and thyroid disorders in children. This is the first report from middle Anatolia and the second report from Turkey. Material and methods A retrospective chart review was performed to examine the presence of thyroid abnormalities in paediatric patients who had been admitted to the dermatology department with vitiligo. Results A total of 155 paediatric patients, including 80 (52%) male and 75 (48%) female patients were included. The mean age was 8.6 years. Non segmental vitiligo was the most common type of the disease in 140 (90%) reviewed patients, while segmental vitiligo appeared only in 15 (10%) patients. The mean onset of vitiligo was 5.6 ±0.9 years. A family history of vitiligo was found in 14 (9%) children. Thirty-four (22%) patients had thyroid function tests and/or thyroid autoantibody abnormality. All of these patients had non segmental vitiligo. It was statistically significant (p < 0.05) in types of vitiligo and thyroid disease parameters. Conclusions Our results show that it may be useful to screen thyroid in children with non segmental vitiligo. PMID:27512360

  12. Paediatric x-ray examinations in Rio de Janeiro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, A. C. P.; Osibote, O. A.; Boechat, M. C. B.

    2006-08-01

    This work presents the results of a dose survey performed for paediatric patients and carried out in two large paediatric public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro city. The entrance surface dose (ESD) and the effective dose (ED) were evaluated for chest, skull, abdomen, lumbar spine, cervical spine and pelvis in antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA) and lateral (LAT) projections. For each examination, four age groups 0-1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 years were studied. The DoseCal software was used to calculate these doses. Wide variations for the same type of examination and projection have been detected. These variations were evident, in Brazil, from previous work. In spite of the present results being still preliminary, they can give an idea of what paediatric ESDs are like in Brazil. Also, with respect to the entrance surface dose, some of the results are above the reference levels, which cause high ED, as well. On the other hand, the wide range of ESD reflects the disparity of radiographic techniques and demonstrates that the ALARA principle is not being applied in Brazilian hospitals and becomes a concern in terms of public health.

  13. Thomas Willis's practice of paediatric neurology and neurodisability.

    PubMed

    Williams, A N

    2003-12-01

    Thomas Willis (1621-1675) is regarded as a founder of modern clinical neuroscience. He conceived the word "neurology" and left a body of work that defined mid-seventeenth-century medicine. Recent interpretations of Willis's work have led to a growing appreciation of his significant contributions to paediatric neurology, a speciality founded properly some three centuries after his death. This paper presents abstracts and plates taken from Willis's major published works, together with student notes by John Locke (1632-1704) and Robert Boyle (1627-1691) taken from lectures delivered by Willis in Oxford in the 1660s. The material embraces a wide variety of conditions now managed within modern paediatric neurology and neurodisability. In several cases, these are the first descriptions recorded in the medical literature. Willis fused astute history taking and clinical observation (sometimes supported by subsequent post-mortem studies) into a structured medical intervention. Willis's practice was state of the art, being based on acceptance of Harvey, a traditional Galenic infrastructure, iatrochemistry and Gassendi's "psychology". Although Willis's discoveries became a cornerstone of modern medical science, his medical practice did not lead to any therapeutic advances. However, up to the mid-eighteenth century his works were internationally accepted for their practical usefulness. The corpus of material left by Willis affords a fascinating insight into the clinical rationale of a seventeenth century physician in his management of paediatric cases. PMID:15069866

  14. Noddings's caring ethics theory applied in a paediatric setting.

    PubMed

    Lundqvist, Anita; Nilstun, Tore

    2009-04-01

    Since the 1990s, numerous studies on the relationship between parents and their children have been reported on in the literature and implemented as a philosophy of care in most paediatric units. The purpose of this article is to understand the process of nurses' care for children in a paediatric setting by using Noddings's caring ethics theory. Noddings's theory is in part described from a theoretical perspective outlining the basic idea of the theory followed by a critique of her work. Important conceptions in her theory are natural caring (reception, relation, engrossment, motivational displacement, reciprocity) and ethical caring (physical self, ethical self, and ethical ideal). As a nurse one holds a duty of care to patients and, in exercising this duty, the nurse must be able to develop a relationship with the patient including giving the patient total authenticity in a 'feeling with' the patient. Noddings's theory is analysed and described in three examples from the paediatrics. In the first example, the nurse cared for the patient in natural caring while in the second situation, the nurse strived for the ethical caring of the patient. In the third example, the nurse rejected the impulse to care and deliberately turned her back to ethics and abandoned her ethical caring. According to the Noddings's theory, caring for the patient enables the nurse to obtain ethical insights from the specific type of nursing care which forms an important contribution to an overall increase of an ethical consciousness in the nurse. PMID:19291199

  15. The changing epidemiology of group B streptococcus bloodstream infection: a multi-national population-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Mark S; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Dryden, Matthew; Kennedy, Karina J; Valiquette, Louis; Pinholt, Mette; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Laupland, Kevin B

    2016-05-01

    Background Population-based studies conducted in single regions or countries have identified significant changes in the epidemiology of invasive group B streptococcus (GBS) infection. However, no studies have concurrently compared the epidemiology of GBS infections among multiple different regions and countries over time. The study objectives were to define the contemporary incidence and determinants of GBS bloodstream infection (BSI) and assess temporal changes in a multi-national population. Methods Population-based surveillance for GBS BSI was conducted in nine regions in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Sweden, Finland and the UK during 2000-2010. Incidence rates were age- and gender-standardised to the EU population. Results During 114 million patient-years of observation, 3464 cases of GBS BSI were identified for an overall annual incidence of 3.4 patients per 100 000 persons. There were marked differences in the overall (range = 1.8-4.1 per 100 000 person-year) and neonatal (range = 0.19-0.83 per 1000 live births) incidences of GBS BSI observed among the study regions. The overall incidence significantly (p = 0.05) increased. Rates of neonatal disease were stable, while the incidence in individuals older than 60 years doubled (p = 0.003). In patients with detailed data (n = 1018), the most common co-morbidity was diabetes (25%). During the study period, the proportion of cases associated with diabetes increased. Conclusions While marked variability in the incidence of GBS BSI was observed among these regions, it was consistently found that rates increased among older adults, especially in association with diabetes. The burden of this infection may be expected to continue to increase in ageing populations worldwide. PMID:26759190

  16. The influence of immigrant background on the choice of sedation method in paediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Dahlander, Andreas; Jansson, Leif; Carlstedt, Kerstin; Grindefjord, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The effects of immigration on the demographics of the Swedish population have changed the situation for many dental care providers, placing increased demand on cultural competence. The aim of this investigation was to study the choice of sedation method among children with immigrant background, referred to paediatric dentistry specialists, because of behaviour management problems or dental fear in combination with treatment needs. The material consisted of dental records from children referred to two clinics for paediatric dentistry: 117 records from children with an immigrant background and 106 from children with a non-immigrant background. Information about choice of sedation method (conventional treatment, conscious sedation with midazolam, nitrous oxide, or general anaesthesia) and dental status was collected from the records. The number of missed appointments (defaults) was also registered. Binary logistic regression analyses were used to calculate the influence of potential predictors on choice of sedation method. The mean age of the patients in the immigrant group was 4.9 yrs, making them significantly younger than the patients in the non-immigrant group (mean 5.7 yrs). In the immigrant group, 26% of the patients defaulted from treatments, while the corresponding frequency was significantly lower for the reference group (7%). The numbers of primary teeth with caries and permanent teeth with caries were positively and significantly correlated with the choice of treatment under general anaesthesia. Conscious sedation was used significantly more often in younger children and in the non-immigrant group, while nitrous oxide was preferred in the older children. In conclusion, conscious sedation was more frequently used in the non-immigrant group. The choice of sedation was influenced by caries frequency and the age of the child. PMID:26529840

  17. Survey of unlicensed and off label drug use in paediatric wards in European countries

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Sharon; Choonara, Imti; Impicciatore, Piero; Mohn, Angelika; Arnell, Henrik; Rane, Anders; Knoeppel, Carmen; Seyberth, Hannsjoerg; Pandolfini, Chiara; Raffaelli, Maria Pia; Rocchi, Francesca; Bonati, Maurizio; Jong, Geert ‘t; de Hoog, Matthijs; van den Anker, John

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of use of unlicensed and off label drugs in children in hospital in five European countries. Design Prospective study of drugs administered to children in general paediatric medical wards over four weeks. Setting Children’s wards in five hospitals (one each in the United Kingdom, Sweden, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands). Subjects Children aged 4 days to 16 years admitted to general paediatric medical wards. Main outcome measure Proportion of drugs that were used in an unlicensed or off label manner. Results 2262 drug prescriptions were administered to 624 children in the five hospitals. Almost half of all drug prescriptions (1036; 46%) were either unlicensed or off label. Of these 1036, 872 were off label and 164 were unlicensed. Over half of the patients (421; 67%) received an unlicensed or off label drug prescription. Conclusions Use of off label or unlicensed drugs to treat children is widespread. This problem is likely to affect children throughout Europe and requires European action. Key messagesMany drugs are not tested in children, which means that they are not specifically licensed for use in childrenLicensed drugs are often prescribed outside the terms of the product license (off label) in relation to age, indication, dose of frequency, route of administration, or formulationOver two thirds (67%) of 624 children admitted to wards in five European hospitals received drugs prescribed in an unlicensed or off label manner39% of the 2262 drug prescriptions given to children were off labelThe problem of off label and unlicensed drug prescribing in children is a European problem that requires European action PMID:10625257

  18. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  19. Auditing paediatric diabetes care and the impact of a specialist nurse trained in paediatric diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, F; Warner, J; Lowes, L; Riberio, J; Gregory, J

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 13 May 1997
 AIMS—To define outcome measures for auditing the clinical care of children and adolescents with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and to assess the benefit of appointing a dedicated paediatric trained diabetes specialist nurse (PDSN).
METHODS—Retrospective analysis of medical notes and hospital records. Glycaemic control, growth, weight gain, microvascular complications, school absence, and the proportion of children undergoing an annual clinical review and diabetes education session were assessed. The effect of the appointment of a PDSN on the frequency of hospital admission, length of inpatient stay, and outpatient attendance was evaluated.
RESULTS—Children with IDDM were of normal height and grew well for three years after diagnosis, but grew suboptimally thereafter. Weight gain was above average every year after diagnosis. Glycaemic control was poor at all ages with only 16% of children having an acceptable glycated haemoglobin. Eighty five per cent of patients underwent a formal annual clinical review, of whom 16% had background retinopathy and 20% microalbuminuria in one or more samples. After appointing the PDSN the median length of hospital stay for newly diagnosed patients decreased from five days to one day, with 10of 24 children not admitted. None of the latter was admitted during the next year. There was no evidence of the PDSN affecting the frequency of readmission or length of stay of children with established IDDM. Non-attendance at the outpatient clinic was reduced from a median of 19 to 10%.
CONCLUSIONS—Outcome measures for evaluating the care of children with IDDM can be defined and evaluated. Specialist nursing support markedly reduces the length of hospital stay of newly diagnosed patients without sacrificing the quality of care.

 PMID:9301347

  20. Malaria paediatric hospitalization between 1999 and 2008 across Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Intervention coverage and funding for the control of malaria in Africa has increased in recent years, however, there are few descriptions of changing disease burden and the few reports available are from isolated, single site observations or are of reports at country-level. Here we present a nationwide assessment of changes over 10 years in paediatric malaria hospitalization across Kenya. Methods Paediatric admission data on malaria and non-malaria diagnoses were assembled for the period 1999 to 2008 from in-patient registers at 17 district hospitals in Kenya and represented the diverse malaria ecology of the country. These data were then analysed using autoregressive moving average time series models with malaria and all-cause admissions as the main outcomes adjusted for rainfall, changes in service use and populations-at-risk within each hospital's catchment to establish whether there has been a statistically significant decline in paediatric malaria hospitalization during the observation period. Results Among the 17 hospital sites, adjusted paediatric malaria admissions had significantly declined at 10 hospitals over 10 years since 1999; had significantly increased at four hospitals, and remained unchanged in three hospitals. The overall estimated average reduction in malaria admission rates was 0.0063 cases per 1,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per month representing an average percentage reduction of 49% across the 10 hospitals registering a significant decline by the end of 2008. Paediatric admissions for all-causes had declined significantly with a reduction in admission rates of greater than 0.0050 cases per 1,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per month at 6 of 17 hospitals. Where malaria admissions had increased three of the four sites were located in Western Kenya close to Lake Victoria. Conversely there was an indication that areas with the largest declines in malaria admission rates were areas located along the Kenyan coast and some sites in

  1. Clinical Profile of Children and Adolescents Attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit OPD in a Tertiary Care Set up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayaprakash, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are limited studies on the clinical profile of children attending child guidance clinic under Paediatric background. Aims: To study clinical profile of Children & adolescents attending the Behavioural Paediatrics Unit (BPU) OPD under department of Paediatrics in a tertiary care set up. Methods: Monthly average turnover in the OPD…

  2. How Much of the Paediatric Core Curriculum Do Medical Students Remember?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Peter B.; Gregg, Nicky; Adams, Emily; Rodgers, Caroline; Hull, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Few educational studies have investigated how well information learned by medical students is retained over time. The primary aim of this study was to investigate how much of the paediatric core curriculum undergraduates remembered a year after originally passing their paediatrics examination. In addition, we looked at whether students'…

  3. A Clinical Study of Phenomenology and Comorbidity of Paediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Pavan Kumar; T., Sivakumar; Agarwal, Vivek; Sitholey, Prabhat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Considerable controversy exists regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, and comorbidities especially with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), in paediatric Bipolar Disorder (BPD). Aims and objectives: To describe phenomenology and comorbidities of paediatric BPD. Method: 78 Subjects (6-16 years) attending child and…

  4. Paediatric Low-Vision Assessment and Management in a Specialist Clinic in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennon, Julie; Harper, Robert; Biswas, Sus; Lloyd, Chris

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a survey of the demographical, educational and visual functional characteristics of children attending a specialist paediatric low-vision assessment clinic at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital. Comprehensive data were collected retrospectively from children attending the paediatric low-vision clinic between January 2003 and…

  5. [Consensus document by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the advisory committee on vaccines of the Spanish Paediatrics Association on vaccination in immunocompromised children].

    PubMed

    Mellado Peña, M J; Moreno-Pérez, D; Ruíz Contreras, J; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2011-12-01

    Vaccination in immunocompromised infants, children and adolescents is a major aspect in the follow-up of this complex pathology in specific Paediatric Units. Vaccination is also an important prevention tool, as this can, to a certain extent, determine the morbidity and mortality in these patients. This consensus document was jointly prepared by Working Groups of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Paediatric Association, who are usually involved in updating the management of vaccinations in immunocompromised children, and reflects their opinions. The consensus specifically summarises indications for vaccination in the following special paediatric populations: Solid organ and haematopoietic transplant-recipients; primary immunodeficiency; asplenic children; non-previously transplanted immunocompromised patients; chronically ill patients; HIV-infected children and also the vaccines recommended for immunodeficient children who travel. PMID:21963606

  6. Paediatric heart failure research: role of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kristin M

    2015-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, of the National Institutes of Health, is committed to supporting research in paediatric heart failure. The Institute's support of paediatric heart failure research includes both investigator-initiated grants and Institute initiatives. There were 107 funded grants in paediatric heart failure over the past 20 years in basic, translational and clinical research, technology development, and support of registries. Such research includes a broad diversity of scientific topics and approaches. The Institute also supports several initiatives for paediatric heart failure, including the Pediatric Circulatory Support Program, the Pumps for Kids, Infants, and Neonates (PumpKIN) Program, PediMACS, and the Pediatric Heart Network. This review article describes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's past, present, and future efforts to promote a better understanding of paediatric heart failure, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes. PMID:26377724

  7. MicroRNAs: a new piece in the paediatric cardiovascular disease puzzle

    PubMed Central

    Omran, Ahmed; Elimam, Dalia; Webster, Keith A.; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Yin, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases in children comprise a large public health problem. The major goals of paediatric cardiologists and paediatric cardiovascular researchers are to identify the cause(s) of these diseases to improve treatment and preventive protocols. Recent studies show the involvement of microRNAs (miRs) in different aspects of heart development, function, and disease. Therefore, miR-based research in paediatric cardiovascular disorders is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease, and unravelling novel, efficient, preventive, and therapeutic means. The ultimate goal of such research is to secure normal cardiac development and hence decrease disabilities, improve clinical outcomes, and decrease the morbidity and mortality among children. This review focuses on the role of miRs in different paediatric cardiovascular conditions in an effort to encourage miR-based research in paediatric cardiovascular disorders. PMID:23443043

  8. Playing hide and seek with poorly tasting paediatric medicines: do not forget the excipients.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer; Cram, Anne; Woertz, Katharina; Breitkreutz, Joerg; Winzenburg, Gesine; Turner, Roy; Tuleu, Catherine

    2014-06-01

    The development of paediatric medicines can be challenging since this is a diverse patient population with specific needs. For example, the toxicity of excipients may differ in children compared to adults and children have different taste preferences. Acceptable palatability of oral paediatric medicinal products is of great importance to facilitate patient adherence. This has been recognised by regulatory authorities and so is becoming a key aspect of paediatric pharmaceutical development studies. Many active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) have aversive taste characteristics and so it is necessary to utilise taste masking techniques to improve the palatability of paediatric oral formulations. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of different approaches to taste masking APIs in paediatric oral dosage forms, with a focus on the tolerability of excipients used. In addition, where possible, the provision of examples of some marketed products is made. PMID:24614069

  9. MicroRNAs: a new piece in the paediatric cardiovascular disease puzzle.

    PubMed

    Omran, Ahmed; Elimam, Dalia; Webster, Keith A; Shehadeh, Lina A; Yin, Fei

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases in children comprise a large public health problem. The major goals of paediatric cardiologists and paediatric cardiovascular researchers are to identify the cause(s) of these diseases to improve treatment and preventive protocols. Recent studies show the involvement of microRNAs (miRs) in different aspects of heart development, function, and disease. Therefore, miR-based research in paediatric cardiovascular disorders is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease, and unravelling novel, efficient, preventive, and therapeutic means. The ultimate goal of such research is to secure normal cardiac development and hence decrease disabilities, improve clinical outcomes, and decrease the morbidity and mortality among children. This review focuses on the role of miRs in different paediatric cardiovascular conditions in an effort to encourage miR-based research in paediatric cardiovascular disorders. PMID:23443043

  10. Migrant-friendly hospitals: a paediatric perspective - improving hospital care for migrant children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The European Union (EU) Migrant-Friendly Hospital (MFH) Initiative, introduced in 2002, promotes the adoption of care approaches adapted to meet the service needs of migrants. However, for paediatric hospitals, no specific recommendations have been offered for MFH care for children. Using the Swiss MFH project as a case study, this paper aims to identify hospital-based care needs of paediatric migrants (PMs) and good service approaches. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with principal project leaders of five paediatric hospitals participating in the Swiss MFH project. A review of the international literature on non-clinical hospital service needs and service responses of paediatric MFHs was conducted. Results Paediatric care can be complex, usually involving both the patient and the patient’s family. Key challenges include differing levels of acculturation between parents and children; language barriers; cultural differences between patient and provider; and time constraints. Current service and infrastructural responses include interpretation services for PMs and parents, translated information material, and special adaptations to ensure privacy, e.g., during breastfeeding. Clear standards for paediatric migrant-friendly hospitals (P-MFH) are lacking. Conclusions International research on hospital care for migrant children is scarce. The needs of paediatric migrants and their families may differ from guidance for adults. Paediatric migrant needs should be systematically identified and used to inform paediatric hospital care approaches. Hospital processes from admission to discharge should be revised to ensure implementation of migrant-sensitive approaches suitable for children. Staff should receive adequate support, such as training, easily available interpreters and sufficient consultation time, to be able to provide migrant-friendly paediatric services. The involvement of migrant groups may be helpful. Improving the quality of care

  11. Clinical, radiological, histological, and molecular characteristics of paediatric epithelioid glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Broniscer, Alberto; Tatevossian, Ruth G.; Sabin, Noah D.; Klimo, Paul; Dalton, James; Lee, Ryan; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Aims A few case series in adults have described the characteristics of epithelioid glioblastoma (e-GB), one of the rarest variants of this cancer. We evaluated clinical, radiological, histological, and molecular characteristics in the largest series to date of paediatric e-GB. Methods Review of clinical characteristics and therapy, imaging studies, and histology was performed in patients younger than 22 years with e-GB seen at our institution over 15 years. Sequencing of hotspot mutations and FISH of relevant genes were undertaken. Results Median age at diagnosis of six patients was 7.6 years. Tumours originated in the cerebral cortex (n=2) or diencephalon (n=4). Three patients presented with acute, massive haemorrhage and three had leptomeningeal dissemination at diagnosis. Paediatric e-GB had the typical histological characteristics seen in adult tumours. Universal immunoreactivity for INI1 and lack of diverse protein expression were seen in all cases. One tumour had a chromosome 22q loss. Three tumours (50%) harboured a BRAF: p.V600E. One thalamic tumour had an H3F3A p.K27M. All patients received radiation therapy with (n=3) or without chemotherapy (n=3). All patients experienced tumour progression with a median survival of 169 days. One patient with non-metastatic disease had early leptomeningeal progression. Two patients had symptomatic tumour spread outside the central nervous system (CNS) through a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. One additional patient had widespread metastases outside the CNS identified at autopsy. Conclusions Paediatric e-GBs are rare cancers with an aggressive behaviour that share histological and genetic characteristics with their adult counterparts. BRAF inhibition is a potential treatment for these tumours. PMID:24127995

  12. Forecasting paediatric malaria admissions on the Kenya Coast using rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Karuri, Stella Wanjugu; Snow, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria is a vector-borne disease which, despite recent scaled-up efforts to achieve control in Africa, continues to pose a major threat to child survival. The disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium and requires mosquitoes and humans for transmission. Rainfall is a major factor in seasonal and secular patterns of malaria transmission along the East African coast. Objective The goal of the study was to develop a model to reliably forecast incidences of paediatric malaria admissions to Kilifi District Hospital (KDH). Design In this article, we apply several statistical models to look at the temporal association between monthly paediatric malaria hospital admissions, rainfall, and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures. Trend and seasonally adjusted, marginal and multivariate, time-series models for hospital admissions were applied to a unique data set to examine the role of climate, seasonality, and long-term anomalies in predicting malaria hospital admission rates and whether these might become more or less predictable with increasing vector control. Results The proportion of paediatric admissions to KDH that have malaria as a cause of admission can be forecast by a model which depends on the proportion of malaria admissions in the previous 2 months. This model is improved by incorporating either the previous month's Indian Ocean Dipole information or the previous 2 months’ rainfall. Conclusions Surveillance data can help build time-series prediction models which can be used to anticipate seasonal variations in clinical burdens of malaria in stable transmission areas and aid the timing of malaria vector control. PMID:26842613

  13. Evaluating an outreach service for paediatric burns follow up.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Chesney, Amy; Brown, Liz; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2015-09-01

    Complications following paediatric burns are well documented and care needs to be taken to ensure the appropriate follow up of these patients. Historically this has meant follow up into adulthood however this is often not necessary. The centralisation of burns services in the UK means that patients and their parents may have to travel significant distances to receive this follow up care. To optimise our burns service we have introduced a burns outreach service to enable the patients to be treated closer to home. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of the introduction of the burns outreach service and within this environment define the optimum length of time needed to follow up these patients. A retrospective analysis was carried out of 100 consecutive paediatric burns patients who underwent surgical management of their burn. During the follow up period there were 43 complications in 32 patients (32%). These included adverse scarring (either hypertrophic or keloid), delayed healing (taking >1 month to heal) and contractures (utilising either splinting or surgical correction). Fifty-nine percent of these complications occurred within 6 months of injury and all occurred within 18 months. Size of burn was directly correlated to the risk of developing a complication. The outreach service reduced the distance the patient needs to travel for follow up by more than 50%. There was also a significant financial benefit for the service as the follow up clinics were on average 50% cheaper with burns outreach than burns physician. Burns outreach is a feasible service that not only benefits the patients but also is cheaper for the burns service. The optimum length of follow up for paediatric burns in 18 months, after which if there have not been any complications they can be discharged. PMID:26036205

  14. The challenge of paediatric obesity: more rhetoric than action.

    PubMed

    Grant, Bevan C; Bassin, Stan

    2007-01-01

    A growing body of knowledge clearly shows a rapid increase in the prevalence of childhood obesity. But in spite of the many empirically-driven research projects and more laissez-faire initiatives intent on finding ways to ensure the healthy development of our young people, translating what we know into appropriate behaviour in the home, school, and community is more difficult than it sounds. It is, therefore, not surprising this concern is attracting the attention of politicians, health professionals, and educators. This article reflects on the paediatric obesity research and argues for a more coordinated effort in addressing what could (but need not) become a major public health issue. PMID:17726498

  15. A pictorial review of imaging in paediatric stroke.

    PubMed

    Johns, Christopher; Kolla, S; Hart, A; Sinha, S; Batty, R; Connolly, D J A

    2016-09-01

    Stroke is recognised as an important disease in adults. Paediatric stroke is less understood, yet still an important cause of morbidity and mortality, with an incidence of 5 per 100 000 children and is one of the top 10 leading causes of death in children. In adults the vast majority of strokes are ischaemic, whereas in children haemorrhage makes up half the cases. The incidence of neonatal stroke is much higher, at up to 45 per 100 000 population; however, the underlying causes are less understood. This paper acts as a guide to the different causes of stroke with the key differences on imaging discussed. PMID:27354547

  16. [Paediatric gynaecological outpatient department--a report on 600 patients].

    PubMed

    Grünberger, W; Fischl, F

    1982-11-26

    Problems arising during the examination and treatment of paediatric gynaecological patients are described. 387 out of 600 girls seen at the outpatient department for infants and juveniles of the 1st Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the University of Vienna were premenarchal and 213 were post-menarchal (average age 7.45 years). The most frequent diagnosis was vulvovaginitis (43%), followed by pathological vaginal bleeding (12%), vulval disorders (6%) and pubertas praecox (5%); about twenty additional conditions were diagnosed. Absolute and extended indications for gynaecological and vaginoscopic examinations are demonstrated. PMID:7164465

  17. Transition of care from paediatric to adult services in haematology

    PubMed Central

    Bolton‐Maggs, Paula H B

    2007-01-01

    The need for adequate preparation for transition for young people with health care needs who require long term follow‐up in the adult sector has long been recognised and is a required part of the national service framework for children. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health and the Royal College of Nursing have endorsed this need for improvement in services for adolescents. In 2006 the Department of Health launched guidelines with a wealth of recommendations. Despite these initiatives only slow progress has been made (usually by enthusiasts) and much work is needed to develop good programmes in many specialties, including non‐malignant haematology. PMID:17715443

  18. Cystic change in primary paediatric optic nerve sheath meningioma.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Daniel; Rajak, Saul; Patel, Sandy; Selva, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (PONSM) are rare in children. Cystic meningiomas are an uncommon subgroup of meningiomas. We report a case of paediatric PONSM managed using observation alone that underwent cystic change and radiological regression. A 5-year-old girl presented with visual impairment and proptosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a PONSM. The patient was left untreated and followed up with regular MR imaging. Repeat imaging at 16 years of age showed the tumour had started to develop cystic change. Repeat imaging at 21 years of age showed the tumour had decreased in size. PMID:27310300

  19. Weaning from mechanical ventilation in paediatrics. State of the art.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Jorge; Araneda, Patricio; Cruces, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    Weaning from mechanical ventilation is one of the greatest volume and strength issues in evidence-based medicine in critically ill adults. In these patients, weaning protocols and daily interruption of sedation have been implemented, reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation and associated morbidity. In paediatrics, the information reported is less consistent, so that as yet there are no reliable criteria for weaning and extubation in this patient group. Several indices have been developed to predict the outcome of weaning. However, these have failed to replace clinical judgement, although some additional measurements could facilitate this decision. PMID:23542044

  20. Paediatric Electrophysiologic Studies: How and What With?

    PubMed Central

    Sreeram, N; Emmel, M; Trieschmann, U; de Haan, E

    2008-01-01

    Catheter ablation of arrhythmias in children has become standard practice virtually worldwide. Successful and safe ablation has been made possible by a combination of factors. These include increased operator experience, a better understanding of the natural history of a wide variety of arrhythmias, advances in technology such as smaller catheters, the routine use of various three-dimensional mapping systems, and the development of alternative energy sources. It is also not uncommon to perform multiple catheter intervention procedures (ablation ± intravascular stent implantation ± device closure of residual shunts ± elective pacemaker or device implantation) during a single session. It is important to bear in mind that arrhythmia recurrence is commoner in children in general, and that this is particularly the case with postoperative (scar-related arrhythmias). Despite acute success, long-term follow-up is mandated for this subgroup of patients. PMID:18478065

  1. Investigating the stationarity of paediatric aspiration signals.

    PubMed

    Chau, Tom; Chau, Doug; Casas, Michael; Berall, Glenn; Kenny, David J

    2005-03-01

    An aspiration signal is the time-varying anterior-posterior acceleration measured infero-anterior to the thyroid notch when foreign material enters the airway during inspiration. The hypothesis of weak stationarity is tested on aspiration signals by the reverse arrangements test. Results indicate that aspiration signals cannot be uniformly regarded as weakly stationary. Forty-five percent of the examined signals violated the stationarity hypothesis. For these signals, time-varying variance and spectral density structure are identified as major sources of nonstationarity. Stationarity test results generally corroborate qualitative clinical descriptions of aspiration. However, stationarity analysis indicates that aspiration signals are highly heterogenous, a finding which poses significant challenges to the automatic detection of aspirations by accelerometry. PMID:15813411

  2. The HOPE (Helping to Outline Paediatric Eating Disorders) Project: development and debut of a paediatric clinical eating disorder registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The HOPE (Helping to Outline Paediatric Eating Disorders) Project is an ongoing registry study made up of a sequential cross-sectional sample prospectively recruited over 17 years, and is designed to answer empirical questions about paediatric eating disorders. This paper introduces the HOPE Project, describes the registry sample to-date, and discusses future directions and challenges and accomplishments. The project and clinical service were established in a tertiary academic hospital in Western Australia in 1996 with a service development grant. Research processes were inbuilt into the initial protocols and data collection was maintained in the following years. Recognisable progress with the research agenda accelerated only when dedicated research resources were obtained. The registry sample consists of consecutive children and adolescents assessed at the eating disorder program from 1996 onward. Standardised multidisciplinary data collected from family intake interview, parent and child clinical interviews, medical review, parent, child and teacher psychometric assessments, and inpatient admission records populate the HOPE Project database. Results The registry database to-date contains 941 assessments, of whom 685 met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder at admission. The majority of the sample were females (91%) from metropolitan Perth (83%). The cases with eating disorders consist of eating disorders not otherwise specified (68%), anorexia nervosa (25%) and bulimia nervosa (7%). Among those with eating disorders, a history of weight loss since illness onset was almost universal (96%) with fear of weight gain (71%) common, and the median duration of illness was 8 months. Conclusions Over the next five years and more, we expect that the HOPE Project will make a strong scientific contribution to paediatric eating disorders research and will have important real-world applications to clinical practice and policy as the research unfolds

  3. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  4. What Do We Know about Knowledge Brokers in Paediatric Rehabilitation? A Systematic Search and Narrative Summary

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Molly C.; Landry, Michel D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To conduct a systematic review of the literature related to the use of knowledge brokers within paediatric rehabilitation, and specifically to determine (1) how knowledge brokers are defined and used in paediatric rehabilitation and (2) whether knowledge brokers in paediatric rehabilitation have demonstrably improved the performance of health care providers or organizations. Methods: The MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and AMED databases were systematically searched to identify studies relating to knowledge brokers or knowledge brokering within paediatric rehabilitation, with no restriction on the study design or primary aim. Following review of titles and abstracts, those studies identified as potentially relevant were assessed based on the inclusion criteria that they: (1) examined some aspect of knowledge brokers/brokering in paediatric rehabilitation; (2) included sufficient descriptive detail on how knowledge brokers/brokering were used; and(3) were peer-reviewed and published in English. Results: Of 1513 articles retrieved, 4 met the inclusion criteria, 3 of which referenced the same knowledge broker initiative. Two papers used mixed methods, one qualitative methodology, and one case presentation. Because of the different methods used in the included studies, the findings are presented in a narrative summary. Conclusions: This study provides an overview of the limited understanding of knowledge brokers within paediatric rehabilitation. Knowledge broker initiatives introduced within paediatric rehabilitation have been anchored in different theoretical frameworks, and no conclusions can be drawn as to the optimum combination of knowledge brokering activities and methods, nor about optimal duration, for sustained results. PMID:24799751

  5. Proposals for model-based paediatric medicinal development within the current European Union regulatory framework

    PubMed Central

    Manolis, Efthymios; Pons, Gérard

    2009-01-01

    The new paediatric European Union (EU) regulation and the consequent demand for paediatric studies on one hand and the ethical need for minimizing the burden of studies in children on the other hand necessitate optimal techniques in the assessment of safety/efficacy and use of drugs in children. Modelling and simulation (M&S) is one way to circumvent some difficulties in developing medicinal products in children. M&S allows the quantitative use of sparse sampling, characterization and prediction of pharmacokinetics/ pharmacodynamics (PK/PD), extrapolation from adults to children, interpolation between paediatric age subsets, optimal use of scientific literature and in vitro/preclinical data. Together, industry, academia and regulators recognize the usefulness of modelling and simulation in this setting. However, even if M&S is an emerging science, its integration in the EU regulatory decision making is for the time being deficient and M&S expertise is concentrated in big pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions. The European Medicines Agency, acknowledging all the above conditions, organized and hosted a Workshop on Modelling in Paediatric Medicines. The article presents the personal views of the authors on the issues presented and discussed in the workshop. We attempt to identify the regulatory framework for the use of M&S in paediatric medicinal development and to make proposals for model-based paediatric medicinal development. The objective is to open the discussion between industry, academia, paediatricians and regulators on the optimal use of M&S in paediatric medicinal development. PMID:19843052

  6. The emerging global epidemic of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease--causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Malmborg, P; Hildebrand, H

    2016-03-01

    Two decades ago, paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) drew only modest interest from the international paediatric community. Since then, dramatically globally increasing incidence rates have made childhood-onset IBD a priority for most paediatric gastroenterologists. The emerging pandemia of paediatric IBD has fuelled a quest to identify the recent changes in early life exposures that could explain the increasing risk for IBD amongst today's children. Treatment of children with IBD should aim for symptom control but should also target restoration of growth and prevention of pubertal delay. The paediatric IBD phenotype seems to be characterized by more extensive disease location, and some comparative studies have suggested that childhood-onset IBD also represents a more severe phenotype than the adult-onset IBD form. In this review, we analyse recent global incidence trends of paediatric IBD. We present an update on the known and suggested risk factors that could explain the emerging global epidemia of paediatric IBD. We also draw attention to differences in treatment between children and adults with IBD. Finally, we highlight latest follow-up studies that question the proposed dynamic and aggressive nature of childhood-onset IBD. PMID:26355194

  7. Cell migration in paediatric glioma; characterisation and potential therapeutic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cockle, J V; Picton, S; Levesley, J; Ilett, E; Carcaboso, A M; Short, S; Steel, L P; Melcher, A; Lawler, S E; Brüning-Richardson, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric high grade glioma (pHGG) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) are highly aggressive brain tumours. Their invasive phenotype contributes to their limited therapeutic response, and novel treatments that block brain tumour invasion are needed. Methods: Here, we examine the migratory characteristics and treatment effect of small molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, lithium chloride (LiCl) and the indirubin derivative 6-bromoindirubin-oxime (BIO), previously shown to inhibit the migration of adult glioma cells, on two pHGG cell lines (SF188 and KNS42) and one patient-derived DIPG line (HSJD-DIPG-007) using 2D (transwell membrane, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging) and 3D (migration on nanofibre plates and spheroid invasion in collagen) assays. Results: All lines were migratory, but there were differences in morphology and migration rates. Both LiCl and BIO reduced migration and instigated cytoskeletal rearrangement of stress fibres and focal adhesions when viewed by immunofluorescence. In the presence of drugs, loss of polarity and differences in cellular movement were observed by live cell imaging. Conclusions: Ours is the first study to demonstrate that it is possible to pharmacologically target migration of paediatric glioma in vitro using LiCl and BIO, and we conclude that these agents and their derivatives warrant further preclinical investigation as potential anti-migratory therapeutics for these devastating tumours. PMID:25628092

  8. Paediatric brainstem: A comprehensive review of pathologies on MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Chandan; Kakkar, Shruti; Saggar, Kavita; Goraya, Jatinder S; Ahluwalia, Archana; Arora, Ankur

    2016-08-01

    The brainstem is a midline structure formed by the midbrain, pons and medulla and is a home for various vital neurological centres of the human body. A diverse spectrum of disease entities can involve the brainstem, which includes infections, metabolic disorders, demyelination, vascular conditions, neurodegenerative disorders and tumours. Brainstem involvement can be primary or secondary, i.e., as part of systemic disorders. Due to the overlapping clinical presentation and symptomatology, imaging plays a decisive role in the detection, localisation and characterisation of brainstem pathologies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice and the use of advanced MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy can be especially helpful in providing a tenable diagnoses. This article is a compilation of the MR imaging manifestations of a spectrum of common and uncommon brainstem pathologies that can be encountered in the paediatric age group. Teaching Points • The paediatric brainstem can be afflicted by many pathologies that may overlap clinico-radiologically. • MRI is the best modality for the localisation and diagnosis of brainstem pathologies. • Diffusion-weighted imaging is useful in the diagnosis of vascular and metabolic disorders. • Occasionally, demyelination and neoplasms can be indistinguishable on imaging. PMID:27216793

  9. The Extent of Consumer Product Involvement in Paediatric Injuries.

    PubMed

    Catchpoole, Jesani; Walker, Sue; Vallmuur, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in utilising health sector injury data for Product Safety purposes is that clinically coded data have limited ability to inform regulators about product involvement in injury events, given data entry is bound by a predefined set of codes. Text narratives collected in emergency departments can potentially address this limitation by providing relevant product information with additional accompanying context. This study aims to identify and quantify consumer product involvement in paediatric injuries recorded in emergency department-based injury surveillance data. A total of 7743 paediatric injuries were randomly selected from Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit database and associated text narratives were manually reviewed to determine product involvement in the injury event. A Product Involvement Factor classification system was used to categorise these injury cases. Overall, 44% of all reviewed cases were associated with consumer products, with proximity factor (25%) being identified as the most common involvement of a product in an injury event. Only 6% were established as being directly due to the product. The study highlights the importance of utilising injury data to inform product safety initiatives where text narratives can be used to identify the type and involvement of products in injury cases. PMID:27399744

  10. Global health: A lasting partnership in paediatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lakhoo, Kokila; Msuya, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: To emphasise the value of on-going commitment in Global Health Partnerships. Materials and Methods: A hospital link, by invitation, was set up between United Kingdom and Tanzania since 2002. The project involved annual visits with activities ranging from exchange of skill to training health professionals. Furthermore, the programme attracted teaching and research activities. For continuity, there was electronic communication between visits. Results: Six paediatric surgeons are now fully trained with three further in training in Africa. Paediatric surgery services are now separate from adult services. Seven trainee exchanges have taken place with four awarded fellowships/scholarships. Twenty-three clinical projects have been presented internationally resulting in eight international publications. The programme has attracted other health professionals, especially nursing and engineering. The Tropical Health and Education Trust prize was recently achieved for nursing and radiography. National Health Service has benefited from volunteering staff bringing new cost-effective ideas. A fully funded medical student elective programme has been achieved since 2008. Conclusion: Global Health Partnerships are an excellent initiative in establishing specialist services in countries with limited resources. In the future, this will translate into improved patient care as long as it is sustained and valued by long term commitment. PMID:26168748

  11. Paediatric nurses' attitudes to massage and aromatherapy massage.

    PubMed

    Hunt, V; Randle, J; Freshwater, D

    2004-08-01

    Complementary therapies have continued to increase in popularity in healthcare and it is widely accepted that they can be incorporated into the nursing role. However, this acceptance does not necessarily mean that the introduction of therapies into the nursing arena has been without confusion and without professional and legal implications. Consequently, this small-scale, qualitative study aimed to explore the perceptions and lived experiences of paediatric nurses of two therapies, namely massage and aromatherapy massage. There is a dearth of literature exploring nurses' perceptions to the incorporation of these therapies, especially in the arena of paediatric nursing where massage and aromatherapy massage are common practice. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with qualified nurses and revealed the themes of 'benefit', 'family centred care', 'nursing care' and 'being held back'. It was found that at some stage during their professional career each nurse had performed massage and/or aromatherapy massage. All nurses were able to recall certain benefits of the therapies for the children that they had observed and many discussed the importance of involving the family as a way of including them in to the care of their child. However, for the nurses in this study, it was evident that the incorporation of complementary therapies into the nursing role was determined by the context in which they practised. Due to the dominance of the medical model, nurses faced pressures and conflicts in the realities of their nursing work, which meant they were often unable to carry out these therapies. PMID:15279861

  12. Caring and curing: paediatric cancer services since 1960.

    PubMed

    Barnes, E

    2005-09-01

    This paper traces the history of the specialist meanings of 'cure' in paediatric oncology in the UK, how they have changed with increasing organization of the discipline, ever-rising survival rates for all childhood cancers, and with feedback from patients and families. It examines the differing ways in which those involved in researching, treating, and raising funds for work on childhood cancers have understood and used the language of cure, and speculates as to why talking about the 'cure' of survivors of childhood cancers is so problematic. The paper discusses the particular importance of holistic care in the development of paediatric oncology. Psychosocial support is delivered alongside surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The focus for support is the patient's whole family, building a tenet of palliative care into curative treatment. The concept of the 'truly cured child' is argued to have been crucial in the discipline's decision in the 1970s and 1980s to make the psychosocial needs of patients and their families central in the programme of curing children with cancer. PMID:16098123

  13. Social paediatrics and early child development: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Ford-Jones, Elizabeth Lee; Williams, Robin; Bertrand, Jane

    2008-11-01

    Diseases of modernism, rather than infectious diseases and chronic medical conditions, increasingly cause childhood morbidity and mortality. Thus, the goal of enhancing life outcomes for all children has become imperative. Paediatricans may begin with a renewed interest in social paediatrics - the care of the disadvantaged child in Canada, requiring a focus on all the complex factors that impact families and the community. New paediatricians need the tools to impact both social determinants of health and political policies to support health for all. Such interest is as old as the field of paediatrics (social medicine began with the great pathologist, Virchow, in the 1800s). The new neuroscience of experience-based brain and biological development has caught up with the social epidemiology literature. It is now known from both domains that a child's poor developmental and health outcomes are a product of early and ongoing socioeconomic and psychological experiences. In the era of epigenetics, it is now understood that both nature and nurture control the genome. Future paediatricians need to understand the science of experience-based brain development, and the interventions demonstrated to improve life trajectories. A challenge is to connect the traditional population health approach with traditional primary care responsibilities. New and enhanced collaborative interdisciplinary networks with, for example, public health, primary care, community resources, education and justice systems are required. PMID:19436534

  14. Correlation of Clinicohaematological Parameters in Paediatric Dengue: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pai Jakribettu, Ramakrishna; Boloor, Rekha; Thaliath, Andrew; Yesudasan George, Sharanya; George, Thomas; Ponadka Rai, Manoj; Rafique Sheikh, Umran; Avabratha, Kadke Shreedhara; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is one of the arthropod-borne (arbo) viral diseases transmitted by female mosquito Aedes aegypti. Dengue fever has a wide spectrum of clinical presentation ranging from flu-like illness to severe complicated stage of dengue hemorrhagic fever leading to mortality. This was a retrospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Coastal Karnataka, South India, to know the correlation between the clinical presentation and haematological parameters in the paediatric cases presented with dengue symptoms. A total of 163 paediatric cases who presented fever and dengue-like illness were included in the study. Of which, 69 were confirmed dengue patients. Critical analysis showed that there was a significant difference in the haematological parameters like total leucocyte count, percent differential leucocyte count, and platelets count, in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P < 0.05 to 0.0001). Additionally, when compared to nondengue patients, even the liver function and renal function parameters were significantly deranged (P < 0.05 to 0.0001). Stratification based on NS1, IgG, and IgM showed significant alterations in the haematological, hepatic, and renal parameters. With respect to the treatment a small percentage of patients, that is, 8% (4 patients), required platelet transfusion as their counts went below 20,000/μL. Two patients succumbed to their illness while three required ICU stay. PMID:26819620

  15. [Paediatric emergencies; example of the management of winter epidemics].

    PubMed

    Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Bellettre, Xavier; Lejay, Émilie; Desmarest, Marie; Titomanlio, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Every year, epidemics of viral bronchiolitis and gastroenteritis occur with a significant increase in the number of visits (by a factor 1.8) and hospitalisations that can over-exceed bed capacity leading to transfer sick children to other hospitals. This kind of hospital 'crisis' is not limited to paediatrics, big cities or western nations. It is a worldwide worrying problem. Because our hospital sits in the Northern districts of Paris where a large community of m.ncants lives in poverty, our number of visits is high (mean 250 per day), and winter epidemics further jeopardise the difficult equilibrium achieved between quality management and waiting times. Thus, we have taken various initiatives in terms of organisation of the paediatric emergency department and other wards, including a "fast track" clinic, the opening of beds dedicated to winter epidemics, the institution of a "bed manager" in order to more easily find a bed, and a larger use of home hospitalisations. Furthermore, we created a specific committee which may decide on various indicators of tension whether it is necessary to cancel programmed hospitalisations or surgery.in order to resolve the emergency crisis. This kind of organisation can serve as a model for other hospitals facing winter epidemics crises. PMID:25842428

  16. Paediatric drug development: the impact of evolving regulations.

    PubMed

    Turner, M A; Catapano, M; Hirschfeld, S; Giaquinto, C

    2014-06-01

    Children deserve medicines that are adapted to their needs. The need to include children in drug development has been recognised increasingly over the past few decades. Legal and regulatory frameworks are well established in the EU and US. The amount of work done to study medicines for children is significantly greater than it was 10 years go. Proof-of-concept has been demonstrated for all segments of the paediatric drug development pipeline. It is now time to examine how the practice of developing medicines for children has evolved within those frameworks and to determine how that work should be generalised. This review describes the development of medicines for children and critically appraises the work that has been done within those frameworks. Significant effort is needed to realize the potential provided by the current regulatory framework. Using the work programme of the Global Research in Paediatrics (GRiP) Network of Excellence as a template we outline current work and future growing points. PMID:24556465

  17. Genetic differences between paediatric and adult Burkitt lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Havelange, Violaine; Pepermans, Xavier; Ameye, Geneviève; Théate, Ivan; Callet-Bauchu, Evelyne; Barin, Carole; Penther, Dominique; Lippert, Eric; Michaux, Lucienne; Mugneret, Francine; Dastugue, Nicole; Raphaël, Martine; Vikkula, Miikka; Poirel, Hélène A

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of MYC is the genetic hallmark of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) but it is encountered in other aggressive mature B-cell lymphomas. MYC dysregulation needs other cooperating events for BL development. We aimed to characterize these events and assess the differences between adult and paediatric BLs that may explain the different outcomes in these two populations. We analysed patterns of genetic aberrations in a series of 24 BLs: 11 adults and 13 children. We looked for genomic imbalances (copy number variations), copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) and mutations in TP53, CDKN2A, ID3 (exon 1), TCF3 (exon17) and CCND3 (exon 6). Young patients displayed more frequent 13q31.3q32.1 amplification, 7q32q36 gain and 5q23.3 CN-LOH, while 17p13 and 18q21.3 CN-LOH were only detected in adult BLs. ID3 mutations were present in all adult samples, but only in 42% of childhood cases. CCND3 and ID3 double-hit mutations, as well as 18q21 CN-LOH, seemed to be associated with poorer outcome. For the first time, we report different genetic anomalies between adult and paediatric BLs, suggesting age-related heterogeneity in Burkitt lymphomagenesis. This may explain the poorer prognosis of adult BLs. Additional studies are needed to confirm these results in the setting of clinical trials. PMID:26887776

  18. The Extent of Consumer Product Involvement in Paediatric Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Catchpoole, Jesani; Walker, Sue; Vallmuur, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in utilising health sector injury data for Product Safety purposes is that clinically coded data have limited ability to inform regulators about product involvement in injury events, given data entry is bound by a predefined set of codes. Text narratives collected in emergency departments can potentially address this limitation by providing relevant product information with additional accompanying context. This study aims to identify and quantify consumer product involvement in paediatric injuries recorded in emergency department-based injury surveillance data. A total of 7743 paediatric injuries were randomly selected from Queensland Injury Surveillance Unit database and associated text narratives were manually reviewed to determine product involvement in the injury event. A Product Involvement Factor classification system was used to categorise these injury cases. Overall, 44% of all reviewed cases were associated with consumer products, with proximity factor (25%) being identified as the most common involvement of a product in an injury event. Only 6% were established as being directly due to the product. The study highlights the importance of utilising injury data to inform product safety initiatives where text narratives can be used to identify the type and involvement of products in injury cases. PMID:27399744

  19. Global child health priorities: what role for paediatric oncologists?

    PubMed

    Kellie, Stewart J; Howard, Scott C

    2008-11-01

    Despite increasing globalisation, international mobility and economic interdependence, 9.7 million children aged less than 5 years in low income countries will die this year, almost all from preventable or treatable diseases. Diarrhoea, pneumonia and malaria account for 5 million of these deaths each year, compared to about 150,000 deaths from childhood cancer in low- and middle-income countries. In high-income countries, 80% of the 50,000 children diagnosed with cancer each year survive, yet cancer remains the leading disease-related cause of childhood death. In low- and middle-income countries, where 80% of children live, the 200,000 children diagnosed with cancer each year have limited access to curative treatment, and only about 25% survive. Some might argue that death from paediatric cancer in poor countries is insignificant compared to death from other causes, and that scarce health resources may be better used in other areas of public health. Is there a role for the treatment of children with cancer in these regions? Do international partnerships or 'twinning' programmes enhance local health care or detract from other public health priorities? What is ethical and what is possible? This review examines the health challenges faced by infants and children in low-income countries, and assesses the role and impact of international paediatric oncology collaboration to improve childhood cancer care worldwide. PMID:18799306

  20. Introducing paediatric grommet "rapid turnover" lists. A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Easto, Rachel; Shukla, Rishi; Rowland, Charlie; Williams, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric grommet insertions are a common ENT procedure which is typically carried out as a daycase procedure. National guidelines exist (NICE CG60) outlining the criteria for grommet insertions. At our institution it was noted that children were experiencing long waits for their grommet surgery with 78% breaching the national 18 week RTT target by time of surgery in the preceding 6 months. 38% of children were attending for surgery with out of date audiograms and as a consequence, due to children no longer meeting the NICE criteria for grommet insertions, 8% of children were being cancelled on the day of surgery. To improve our waiting times and reduce on the day cancellations we introduced a pilot scheme of "rapid turnover" paediatric day case theatre lists. These lists were accompanied by a pre-operative consent clinic, enabling children not requiring surgery to be cancelled. The theatre lists were run by a senior ENT registrar and had two anaesthetic "pods" i.e. two anaesthetists and two ODPs. This enabled faster turnover of patients and consequently more patients could be operated on per theatre list. Following our pilot there are no longer any children on the grommet waiting list in breach of the 18 week RTT time. Furthermore, there were no on the day cancellations due to surgery not being indicated. All staff and patients involved were satisfied with the "rapid turnover" lists and subsequently the idea is to be introduced on a regular, 2 monthly basis, to keep waiting times down. PMID:27158497

  1. [The Appointment of Paediatric Professorships in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the early GDR. The Impact of the Political System Change after 1945].

    PubMed

    Hinz-Wessels, Annette

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the political system change after 1945 on the appointment of paediatric professorships in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the GDR up until the time the Wall was built in 1961. It can be demonstrated that the political purge in the post-war period had only minor impact on the appointment of professorships and the National Socialist past no longer mattered after the conclusion of denazification. In 1957, the proportion of former NSDAP members among East German university professors of paediatrics was 100 per cent. When it came to new appointments, both members of the "bourgeois" academic non-professorial teaching staff from the GDR as well as paediatricians from West Germany, who had largely gained their scientifically qualifications under National Socialism, were in the running. A politically-controlled elite exchange did not take place until the construction of the Wall. State and party organs generally followed the personnel proposals of the universities since an insufficient number of qualified candidates was available for the systematic appointment of ,,progressive" paediatricians. Given the lack of staff, the SED personnel policy was aimed at the integration of previous elites, as long as they behaved loyally towards the new state. Since the East German faculties continued to make the questioning of the professionally competent professors in West Germany and East Germany the basis for their appointment lists, West German university paediatricians were able to exert considerable influence on the appointment of East German paediatric professorship until 1960s. PMID:27476257

  2. Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis: Update on Diagnostic Criteria, Imaging, Histopathology and Treatment Choices.

    PubMed

    Chou, I-Jun; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Whitehouse, William P; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2016-07-01

    Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) represents less than 5 % of the MS population, but patients with paediatric-onset disease reach permanent disability at a younger age than adult-onset patients. Accurate diagnosis at presentation and optimal long-term treatment are vital to mitigate ongoing neuroinflammation and irreversible neurodegeneration. However, it may be difficult to early differentiate paediatric MS from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), as they often have atypical presentation that differs from that of adult-onset MS. The purpose of this review is to summarize the updated views on diagnostic criteria, imaging, histopathology and treatment choices. PMID:27271748

  3. Barriers and needs in paediatric palliative home care in Germany: a qualitative interview study with professional experts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In North-Rhine Westphalia (Germany) a pilot project for an extensive service provision of palliative care for children and adolescents has been implemented. Accompanying research was undertaken with the aim to assess the status quo of service delivery at the outset of the project and to evaluate the effects of the pilot project. As part of the research, barriers and needs with respect to paediatric palliative home care in the target region were explored. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 24 experts in the field of paediatrics, palliative and hospice care have been conducted and were analysed by qualitative content analysis. Results Four main categories emerged from the interviews: (1) specific challenges and demands in palliative care for children and adolescents, (2) lack of clear legal and financial regulations, (3) gaps in the existing care delivery, and (4) access to services. Generally the interviews reflected the observation that the whole field is currently expanding and that certain deficits are temporary barriers that will be resolvable in the medium-term perspective. Conclusions Predominant barriers were seen in the lack of clear legal and financial regulations which take into account the specific challenges of palliative care in children and adolescents, as well as in a shortcoming of specialist services for a local based care provision throughout the federal country. PMID:20525166

  4. Creating a unique, multi-stakeholder Paediatric Oncology Platform to improve drug development for children and adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Vassal, Gilles; Rousseau, Raphaël; Blanc, Patricia; Moreno, Lucas; Bode, Gerlind; Schwoch, Stefan; Schrappe, Martin; Skolnik, Jeffrey; Bergman, Lothar; Bradley-Garelik, Mary Brigid; Saha, Vaskar; Pearson, Andy; Zwierzina, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Seven years after the launch of the European Paediatric Medicine Regulation, limited progress in paediatric oncology drug development remains a major concern amongst stakeholders - academics, industry, regulatory authorities, parents, patients and caregivers. Restricted increases in early phase paediatric oncology trials, legal requirements and regulatory pressure to propose early Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs), missed opportunities to explore new drugs potentially relevant for paediatric malignancies, lack of innovative trial designs and no new incentives to develop drugs against specific paediatric targets are some unmet needs. Better access to new anti-cancer drugs for paediatric clinical studies and improved collaboration between stakeholders are essential. The Cancer Drug Development Forum (CDDF), previously Biotherapy Development Association (BDA), with Innovative Therapy for Children with Cancer Consortium (ITCC), European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE) and European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents (ENCCA) has created a unique Paediatric Oncology Platform, involving multiple stakeholders and the European Union (EU) Commission, with an urgent remit to improve paediatric oncology drug development. The Paediatric Oncology Platform proposes to recommend immediate changes in the implementation of the Regulation and set the framework for its 2017 revision; initiatives to incentivise drug development against specific paediatric oncology targets, and repositioning of drugs not developed in adults. Underpinning these changes is a strategy for mechanism of action and biology driven selection and prioritisation of potential paediatric indications rather than the current process based on adult cancer indications. Pre-competitive research and drug prioritisation, early portfolio evaluation, cross-industry cooperation and multi-compound/sponsor trials are being explored, from which guidance for innovative trial designs will be

  5. Medical thermography (digital infrared thermal imaging - DITI) in paediatric forearm fractures - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ćurković, S; Antabak, A; Halužan, D; Luetić, T; Prlić, I; Šiško, J

    2015-11-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of hospitalisation in children, and forearm fractures comprise 35% of all paediatric fractures. One-third of forearm fractures are distal forearm fractures, which are the most common fractures in the paediatric population. This type of fracture represents an everyday problem for the paediatric surgeon. The three phases of fracture healing in paediatric trauma are associated with skin temperature changes that can be measured and then compared with standard plain radiographs of visible callus formation, and eventually these methods can be used in everyday practice. Thermographic assessment of temperature distribution within the examined tissues enables a quick, non-contact, non-invasive measurement of their temperature. Medical thermography is used as a screening method in other parts of medicine, but the use of this method in traumatology has still not been researched. PMID:26603613

  6. Paediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Gross, Thomas G; Biondi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Great advances have been made in the treatment of paediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In high-income countries (HIC), cure rates now exceed 85%. However, in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), cure rates remain less than 50%. It is estimated that over 90% of paediatric NHL worldwide occur in LMIC; therefore, even modest improvements in outcome would have significant impact in reducing the burden of paediatric NHL globally. This article will discuss some of the issues required to improve the outcome of paediatric NHL in LMIC using data presented at the Fifth International Symposium on Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma held in Varese, Italy, 2015 to illustrate these issues. Additionally, potential bi-directional benefits for patients in both LMIC and HIC from future collaborations will be discussed. PMID:27098084

  7. The influence of the European paediatric regulation on marketing authorisation of orphan drugs for children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug development for rare diseases is challenging, especially when these orphan drugs (OD) are intended for children. In 2007 the EU Paediatric Drug Regulation was enacted to improve the development of high quality and ethically researched medicines for children through the establishment of Paediatric Investigation Plans (PIPs). The effect of the EU Paediatric Drug Regulation on the marketing authorisation (MA) of drugs for children with rare diseases was studied. Methods Data on all designated orphan drugs, their indication, MA, PIPs and indication group (adult or child) were obtained from the European Medicines Agency (EMA). The outcome and duration of the process from orphan drug designation (ODD) to MA, was compared, per indication, by age group. The effect of the Paediatric Drug Regulation, implemented in 2007, on the application process was assessed with survival analysis. Results Eighty-one orphan drugs obtained MA since 2000 and half are authorised for (a subgroup of) children; another 34 are currently undergoing further investigations in children through agreed PIPs. The Paediatric Drug Regulation did not significantly increase the number of ODDs with potential paediatric indications (58% before vs 64% after 2007 of ODDs, p = 0.1) and did not lead to more MAs for ODs with paediatric indications (60% vs 43%, p = 0.22). ODs authorised after 2007 had a longer time to MA than those authorised before 2007 (Hazard ratio (95% CI) 2.80 (1.84-4.28), p < 0.001); potential paediatric use did not influence the time to MA (Hazard ratio (95% CI) 1.14 (0.77-1.70), p = 0.52). Conclusions The EU Paediatric Drug Regulation had a minor impact on development and availability of ODs for children, was associated with a longer time to MA, but ensured the further paediatric development of drugs still off-label to children. The impact of the Paediatric Drug Regulation on research quantity and quality in children through PIPs is not yet clear. PMID

  8. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-03-01

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  9. [Child health and international cooperation: A paediatric approach].

    PubMed

    Sobrino Toro, M; Riaño Galan, I; Bassat, Q; Perez-Lescure Picarzo, J; de Aranzabal Agudo, M; Krauel Vidal, X; Rivera Cuello, M

    2015-05-01

    The international development cooperation in child health arouses special interest in paediatric settings. In the last 10 10 years or so, new evidence has been presented on factors associated with morbidity and mortality in the first years of life in the least developed countries. This greater knowledge on the causes of health problems and possible responses in the form of interventions with impact, leads to the need to disseminate this information among concerned professional pediatricians. Serious efforts are needed to get a deeper insight into matters related to global child health and encourage pediatricians to be aware and participate in these processes. This article aims to provide a social pediatric approach towards international cooperation and child health-related matters. PMID:25529375

  10. Benign (non-paroxysmal) familial chorea. Paediatric perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Sleigh, G; Lindenbaum, R H

    1981-01-01

    We describe a non-progressive choreo-athetoid disorder of early onset, present in three families. There were no appreciable abnormalities in pregnancy, during the perinatal period, or in infancy. In each case the family history suggested transmission as an autosomal dominant trait, the gene showing diminished penetrance. Other families have been reported with the disorder and such titles as benign familial chorea, familial essential (benign chorea, or hereditary non-progressive chorea of early onset have been given to it. Our experience suggests that this is not a rare disorder, and that it is one likely to present in the paediatric age group; correct diagnosis is important so that unnecessary investigations are not undertaken, genetic counselling can be given, and proper management advice offered to families and schools. PMID:6455970

  11. PANDAS (Paediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection).

    PubMed

    Lynch, N E; Deiratany, S; Webb, D W; McMenamin, J B

    2006-05-01

    PANDAS (Paediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection) is a rare condition first described in 1998. It describes the presence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or tics with an episodic course, and a temporal relationship to Group A beta haemolytic streptococcal infection (GABHS). Recurrent episodes can be disruptive and upsetting for a child, but the best way to treat the condition has yet to be established. Penicillin prophylaxis has not proved effective, and other therapies are experimental. There is some evidence in the literature to support the role of tonsillectomy in improving the condition. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with tic and hemi-chorea associated with GABHS throat infection. He had a recurrence of his symptoms associated with a further GABHS infection, but has had no further symptoms following tonsillectomy. This case report lends further evidence to the role of tonsillectomy in the management of PANDAS. PMID:16892924

  12. Research in paediatric neuropsychology--past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Reviews of the research literature in a range of neurodevelopmental disorders and acquired brain injury reveal a remarkably consistent historical transition through three phases, here termed structural, theoretical and dynamic neuropsychology. Of course, any attempt to summarize such a complex and rich history using a simplistic heuristic will inevitably fail to capture the wide diversity of the research effort. Nevertheless, it is argued that looking at three distinct phases in the history of research helps to organize the field and points to possible future directions for applied research. Using examples from an eclectic range of disorders including childhood obsessive compulsive disorder, congenital hemiplegia and disorders implicating mutation of neurodevelopmental control genes, the implications for future efforts in paediatric neurorehabilitation are considered. PMID:14744672

  13. Beyond the guidelines of paediatric septic shock: A focused review

    PubMed Central

    Temsah, Mohamad-Hani

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock continue to cause major morbidity and mortality among children, especially in the resource-limited areas. Guidelines that focus on these entities, such as “Surviving Sepsis” and “Paediatric Advanced Life Support” guidelines, are revised and updated on regular basis to incorporate new evidence based medicine. There is ongoing need to review these updated guidelines, and address potentially best available solutions for adapting them into suitable practical steps for paediatricians worldwide, especially those working in resource-limited areas. The available recommendations may help to improve sepsis management in middle- and low-income countries; however, guidelines must be wisely implemented according to the available resources, with follow up auditing to ensure appropriate implementation.

  14. Forensic web watch--medicolegal aspects of paediatric pathology.

    PubMed

    Liggett, A; Swift, B

    2003-09-01

    The trials over the deaths of Matthew Eappen and Victoria Climbie have highlighted the importance of forensic evidence in cases of suspected child abuse. The debate as to whether bruises, fractures or head injuries have been sustained as a result of previous trauma or non-accidental injury is central to these, and other, cases. A variety of subjects are encountered in forensic paediatric pathology, including Shaken Baby Syndrome, non-accidental injury, retinal haemorrhage, skeletal injury, Sudden Infant Death, sexual abuse and Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy. The coverage of these areas on the internet was assessed using two search engines (Google and the meta-search engine Mamma) and revealed patchy coverage. The majority of sites uncovered were, unsurprisingly, aimed at the layperson concerned by such issues; however, several sites containing useful information for the professional are available. PMID:15275022

  15. The Difficult Paediatric Airway: Two Cases of large Cystic Hygroma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Aditya; Mehrotra, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of a two cases of difficult intubation experienced in paediatric surgical cases. Both the infants, aged one and three-month-old respectively, had very large cystic hygroma of the neck area. Prior hematological and radiological investigations (USG and CT scan of the swelling) and preanaesthesia check up was done and cases were posted for surgical excision. Case I had difficult airway due to pressure of the tumour/cystic hygroma over the airway and posed difficulty for intubation, but was managed well. Case II had respiratory distress during preoperative period. She had been postponed for surgical excision of the cystic hygroma of neck twice due to the difficulties experienced during intubation. Needle aspiration of hygroma fluid helped to reduce the respiratory distress, and the size of the tumour as well, which further helped in the smooth intubation after a week. The postoperative period was uneventful in both the infants. PMID:26894158

  16. Evaluation and audit in a paediatric disability service.

    PubMed

    Cass, H D; Kugler, B T

    1993-03-01

    Parental and professional responses to questionnaires evaluating a paediatric disability service are reported and the viability of auditing structural, process, and outcome aspects of clinical practice are discussed. Expectations of waiting time to first appointment (met for only 52% of consumers) illustrate structural issues. Process issues are reflected in consumer reactions to outreach work (for example, 94% of parents and 84% of professionals found this supportive). Outcome measures such as consumer satisfaction with the service (76% of consumers reported being 'very satisfied' and 20% 'fairly satisfied') suggest that service aims are being met. Good concurrence of service aims with consumer needs is indicated by parental reasons for referral (for example, 75% for diagnostic help, 73% for a better understanding of the disorder, 88% for practical help), referrers' reasons (for example, 55% for a second diagnostic opinion, 45% due to lack of local expertise), and reports from most other professionals involved with the case that a similar service was not provided locally. PMID:8466242

  17. Unusual presentations of osteoarticular tuberculosis in two paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ho, Kenneth Wai Yip; Lam, Ying Lee; Shek, Tony Wai Hung

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a universal mimicker and thus could be a differential diagnosis of any osteolytic lesion. Bone biopsy is crucial in these cases for culture and histological proof of tuberculous infection. This is a case report of two paediatric patients with unusual presentations of tuberculosis. One patient presented with knee pain and had imaged findings of an osteolytic lesion at the epiphysis. Interval scan showed spread of the lesion through the physis to the metaphyseal region. The second patient presented with hip pain and an osteolytic lesion of the acetabulum. He was subsequently found to have involvement of the brain and spine as well. Both patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis by bone biopsy for culture and pathological examination. They were treated successfully with antituberculous medications without chronic sequelae. These two patients showed that early recognition and prompt treatment are critical for management of tuberculosis to avoid chronic sequelae. PMID:23087272

  18. Paediatric unplanned reattendance rate: A&E clinical quality indicators.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Kate; Hacking, Katie A; Simmons, Naomi; Christian, William; Syahanee, R; Shamekh, Ahmed; Prince, Nicholas J

    2013-03-01

    The new accident and emergency (A&E) unplanned reattendance rate clinical quality indicator is intended to drive reduction of avoidable reattendances. Validation data for reattendance rates in children are awaited. The aim of this three site observational study is to establish the rate and reasons for unplanned reattendance to UK paediatric A&Es. Each centre undertook retrospective case note review of children attending at least twice within 7 days. Unplanned reattendance rates at the three centres were 5.1%, 5.2% and 4.4%. Reducing unnecessary unplanned reattendances is beneficial for patients, service capacity and efficacy. This study has identified two groups for targeting reattendance reduction: parents of children returning with the same diagnosis, severity unchanged and parents who bypass primary care resources. Clear communication and early involvement of experienced clinicians are paramount. This study has indicated that a 1%-5% unplanned reattendance rate is realistic, achievable and can drive improvement in children's services. PMID:23287643

  19. Paediatric and adult glioblastoma: multiform (epi)genomic culprits emerge

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Dominik; Bender, Sebastian; Jones, David T.W.; Lichter, Peter; Grill, Jacques; Becher, Oren; Hawkins, Cynthia; Majewski, Jacek; Jones, Chris; Costello, Joseph F.; Iavarone, Antonio; Aldape, Kenneth; Brennan, Cameron W.; Jabado, Nada; Pfister, Stefan M.

    2014-01-01

    Preface We have extended our understanding of the molecular biology underlying adult glioblastoma over many years. In contrast, high-grade gliomas in children and adolescents have remained a relatively under-investigated disease. The latest large-scale genomic and epigenomic profiling studies have yielded an unprecedented abundance of novel data and revealed deeper insights into gliomagenesis across all age groups, highlighting key distinctions, but also some commonalities. As we are on the verge of dissecting glioblastomas into meaningful biological subgroups, this Review summarizes the hallmark genetic alterations associated with distinct epigenetic features and patient characteristics in both paediatric and adult disease, and examines the complex interplay between the glioblastoma genome and epigenome. PMID:24457416

  20. Paediatric male circumcision and penile hygiene: a Japanese mothers' view.

    PubMed

    Castro-Vázquez, Genaro

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the views of 20 Japanese mothers concerning paediatric male circumcision and penile hygiene. In Japan, routine male circumcision has never been implemented for newborns and children, and adult males are mostly circumcised at aesthetic clinics. However, media reports indicate a trend of Japanese mothers willing to have their sons circumcised. In discussing penile hygiene and male circumcision, the construct of a 'sexual script' becomes relevant to understanding how linguistic and gender barriers made references to male genitalia and penile hygiene largely appear as 'vulgar' and 'unfeminine' in daily life conversations. Peers were often identified as the main source of information and only mothers who have struggled with their children's penile infections have learnt about male genital hygiene, a domain of knowledge largely transmitted by men. Male circumcision becomes a double-edged sword that could help prevent penile infections but also an embarrassing conversational topic that could elicit discrimination because most Japanese children are uncircumcised. PMID:24152018

  1. [Use of inflammatory markers for monitoring paediatric asthma].

    PubMed

    Vidal G, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of asthma control takes into account the symptoms, quality of life, lung function, and inflammatory markers. In the last few years, there has been a large increase in the number of publications related to the study of biomarkers in the management of paediatric asthma. Despite the large variety of inflammatory markers described in research studies, only a small group has shown to be useful in monitoring the disease. Induced sputum eosinophils offer the most solid evidence in assessing asthma control. Exhaled breath condensate and urinary leucotrienes could be useful in the future if there is standardisation in their procedures and interpretation of the results. Nitric oxide, basic eosinophil cationic protein, and bronchial biopsy with bronchoalveolar lavage, only appeared to be useful in a reduced group of patients. PMID:26363862

  2. Diclofenac or paracetamol for analgesia in paediatric myringotomy outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tay, C L M; Tan, S

    2002-02-01

    This prospective, randomized, double-blind study compared the analgesic efficacy of oral diclofenac resinate 0.5 mg.kg(-1) with paracetamol 15 mg/kg(-1) for control of postoperative pain in paediatric patients for outpatient bilateral myringotomy and tube insertion. Paracetamol, the most commonly used oral analgesic for paediatric patients, was compared with a new palatable syrup formulation of diclofenac. Sixty-three ASA 1 orA SA 2 children aged one year and above were randomly assigned to receive diclofenac (Group A) or paracetamol (Group B). The study drug was given 30 to 60 minutes before induction of anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with either inhalational sevoflurane or intravenous thiopentone. All subjects received intravenous fentanyl 1 microg/kg(-1) intraoperatively. Postoperative pain was assessed by a blinded observer using the CHEOPS score on eye-opening, and then at 10, 30 and 60 minutes. Children with a CHEOPS score > 7 received further fentanyl 1 microg x kg(-1). The number of cases requiring this "rescue" analgesia was recorded. Both groups were comparable in demographics, induction technique, duration of anaesthesia and time between premedication and induction of anaesthesia. Overall, CHEOPS scores were low for both groups at all times and did not differ between the groups at any time. Twenty per cent of the diclofenac group and 27% of the paracetamol group required rescue analgesia (not statistically significant). The efficacy of diclofenac 0.5 mg x kg(-1) and paracetamol 15 mg x kg(-1) as oral analgesic premedication for BMT was comparable in children receiving an anaesthetic which included intraoperative administration of fentanyl 1 microg x kg(-1). PMID:11939442

  3. Paediatric femur fractures at the emergency department: accidental or not?

    PubMed

    Hoytema van Konijnenburg, Eva M M; Vrolijk-Bosschaart, Thekla F; Bakx, Roel; Van Rijn, Rick R

    2016-01-01

    Only a small proportion of all paediatric fractures is caused by child abuse or neglect, especially in highly prevalent long bone fractures. It can be difficult to differentiate abusive fractures from non-abusive fractures. This article focuses on femoral fractures in young children. Based on three cases, this article presents a forensic evidence-based approach to differentiate between accidental and non-accidental causes of femoral fractures. We describe three cases of young children who were presented to the emergency department because of a suspected femur fracture. Although in all cases, the fracture had a similar location and appearance, the clinical history and developmental stage of the child led to three different conclusions. In the first two cases, an accidental mechanism was a plausible conclusion, although in the second case, neglect of parental supervision was the cause for concern. In the third case, a non-accidental injury was diagnosed and appropriate legal prosecution followed. Any doctor treating children should always be aware of the possibility of child abuse and neglect in children with injuries, especially in young and non-mobile children presenting with an unknown trauma mechanism. If a suspicion of child abuse or neglect arises, a thorough diagnostic work-up should be performed, including a full skeletal survey according to the guidelines of the Royal College of Radiologists and the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. In order to make a good assessment, the radiologist reviewing the skeletal survey needs access to all relevant clinical and social information. PMID:26642309

  4. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  5. Application of in vitro biopharmaceutical methods in development of immediate release oral dosage forms intended for paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Hannah K; Kendall, Richard; Desset-Brethes, Sabine; Alex, Rainer; Ernest, Terry B

    2013-11-01

    Biopharmaceutics is routinely used in the design and development of medicines to generate science based evidence to predict in vivo performance; the application of this knowledge specifically to paediatric medicines development is yet to be explored. The aim of this review is to present the current status of available biopharmaceutical tools and tests including solubility, permeability and dissolution that may be appropriate for use in the development of immediate release oral paediatric medicines. The existing tools used in adults are discussed together with any limitations for their use within paediatric populations. The results of this review highlight several knowledge gaps in current methodologies in paediatric biopharmaceutics. The authors provide recommendations based on existing knowledge to adapt tests to better represent paediatric patient populations and also provide suggestions for future research that may lead to better tools to evaluate paediatric medicines. PMID:23665448

  6. Examining Interrater Reliability and Validity of a Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy Discharge Tool

    PubMed Central

    Pellow, Vanessa; Sproule, Jeannine; Brooks, Dina; Ellerton, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the interrater reliability (IRR) of the individual items in the Paediatric Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy (CPT) Discharge Tool. This tool identifies six critical items that physiotherapists should consider when determining a paediatric patient's readiness for discharge from CPT after upper-abdominal, cardiac, or thoracic surgery: oxygen saturation, mobility, secretion retention, discharge planning, auscultation, and signs of respiratory distress. Methods: A total of 33 paediatric patients (ages 2 to <19 years) who received at least 1 day of CPT following cardiac, thoracic, or upper-abdominal surgery were independently assessed using the Paediatric CPT Discharge Tool by two designated assessors, who assessed each patient within 4 hours of each other. Results: Kappa analysis showed the following levels of interrater agreement for the six items of the Paediatric CPT Discharge Tool: Oxygen Saturation, excellent (κ=0.80); Mobility, substantial (κ=0.62); Secretion Clearance, moderate (κ=0.39); Discharge Planning, fair (κ=0.37); and Auscultation and Respiratory Distress, poor (κ=0.24 and κ=−0.08, respectively). Conclusion: Several of the items in the Paediatric CPT Discharge Tool demonstrate good IRR. The discharge tool is ready for further psychometric testing, specifically validity testing. PMID:24799752

  7. Model-based approaches for ivabradine development in paediatric population, part I: study preparation assessment.

    PubMed

    Peigné, Sophie; Bouzom, François; Brendel, Karl; Gesson, Charlotte; Fouliard, Sylvain; Chenel, Marylore

    2016-02-01

    The main objective was to help design a paediatric study for ivabradine, a compound already marketed in adults, focusing on: the paediatric formulation evaluation, the doses to be administered, the sampling design and the sampling technique. A secondary objective was to perform a comparison of the prediction of ivabradine pharmacokinetics (PK) in children using a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) approach and allometric scaling of a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model. A study was conducted in order to assess the relative bioavailability (Frel) of the paediatric formulation and a similar Frel was observed between the paediatric formulation and the adult marketed tablet. PBPK modelling was used to predict initial doses to be administered in the paediatric study and to select the most appropriate sample time collections. The dried blood spot technique was recommended in the clinical trial in children. Simulations obtained by both the PBPK approach and allometric scaling of a PPK model were compared a posteriori to the paediatric study observations. Both PPK and PBPK approaches allowed an adequate prediction of the PK of ivabradine and its metabolite in children. PMID:26563503

  8. Paediatric endoscopy by adult gastroenterologists in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A viable option to increase the access to paediatric endoscopy in low resource countries

    PubMed Central

    Alatise, Olusegun I.; Anyabolu, Henry Chineme; Sowande, Oludayo; Akinola, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is a service delivery model that increases the access of children to endoscopy in countries where paediatric gastroenterologists with endoscopy skills are scarce. However, studies on the usefulness of this model in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. We aimed to evaluate the indications, procedures, diagnostic yield and safety of paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists in a Nigerian tertiary health facility. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study that evaluated the records of paediatric (≤18 years old) endoscopies carried out in the endoscopy suite of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex Ile-Ife, Nigeria from January 2007 to December 2014. Results: A total of 63 procedures were successfully completed in children of whom 4 were repeat procedures which were excluded. Thus, 59 endoscopies performed on children were analysed. Most (49; 83.1%) of these procedures on the children were diagnostic with oesophagogastroduodenoscopy being the commonest (43; 72.9%). Epigastric pain (22; 37.3%), haematemesis (17; 28.8%) and dysphagia (9; 15.3%) were the predominant indication for upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy while haematochezia (9; 15.3%) and rectal protrusion (2; 3.4%) were the indications for colonoscopy. Injection sclerotherapy (3; 5.1%) and variceal banding (2; 3.4%) were the therapeutic upper GI endoscopic procedures conducted while polypectomies were performed during colonoscopy in 5 children (8.5%). Abnormal endoscopy findings were observed in 53 out of the 59 children making the positive diagnostic yield to be 89.8%. No complication, either from the procedure or anaesthesia was observed. Conclusion: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is useful, feasible and safe. It is being encouraged as a viable option to fill the gap created by dearth of skilled paediatric gastroenterologists. PMID:26712292

  9. Effectiveness and Comparison of Various Audio Distraction Aids in Management of Anxious Dental Paediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Johri, Nikita; Khan, Suleman Abbas; Singh, Rahul Kumar; Chadha, Dheera; Navit, Pragati; Sharma, Anshul; Bahuguna, Rachana

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental anxiety is a widespread phenomenon and a concern for paediatric dentistry. The inability of children to deal with threatening dental stimuli often manifests as behaviour management problems. Nowadays, the use of non-aversive behaviour management techniques is more advocated, which are more acceptable to parents, patients and practitioners. Therefore, this present study was conducted to find out which audio aid was the most effective in the managing anxious children. Aims and Objectives The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of audio-distraction aids in reducing the anxiety of paediatric patients while undergoing various stressful and invasive dental procedures. The objectives were to ascertain whether audio distraction is an effective means of anxiety management and which type of audio aid is the most effective. Materials and Methods A total number of 150 children, aged between 6 to 12 years, randomly selected amongst the patients who came for their first dental check-up, were placed in five groups of 30 each. These groups were the control group, the instrumental music group, the musical nursery rhymes group, the movie songs group and the audio stories group. The control group was treated under normal set-up & audio group listened to various audio presentations during treatment. Each child had four visits. In each visit, after the procedures was completed, the anxiety levels of the children were measured by the Venham’s Picture Test (VPT), Venham’s Clinical Rating Scale (VCRS) and pulse rate measurement with the help of pulse oximeter. Results A significant difference was seen between all the groups for the mean pulse rate, with an increase in subsequent visit. However, no significant difference was seen in the VPT & VCRS scores between all the groups. Audio aids in general reduced anxiety in comparison to the control group, and the most significant reduction in anxiety level was observed in the audio stories group

  10. Paediatric and congenital cardiac surgery in emerging economies: surgical 'safari' versus educational programmes.

    PubMed

    Corno, Antonio F

    2016-07-01

    To attract the interest of all people potentially involved in humanitarian activities in the emerging economies, in particular giving attention to the basic requirements of the organization of paediatric cardiac surgery activities, the requirements for a successful partnership with the local existing organizations and the basic elements of a patient-centred multidisciplinary integrated approach. Unfortunately, for many years, the interventions in the low and middle income countries were largely limited to short-term medical missions, not inappropriately nicknamed 'surgical safari', because of negative general and specific characteristics. The negative aspects and the limits of the short-term medical missions can be overcome only by long-term educational programmes. The most suitable and consistent models of long-term educational programmes have been combined and implemented with the personal experience to offer a proposal for a long-term educational project, with the following steps: (i) site selection; (ii) demographic research; (iii) site assessment; (iv) organization of surgical educational teams; (v) regular frequency of surgical educational missions; (vi) programme evolution and maturation; (vii) educational outreach and interactive support. Potential limits of a long-term educational surgical programme are: (i) financial affordability; (ii) basic legal needs; (iii) legal support; (iv) non-profit indemnification. The success should not be measured by the number of successful operations of any given mission, but by the successful operations that our colleagues perform after we leave. Considering that the children in need outnumber by far the people able to provide care, in this humanitarian medicine there should be plenty of room for cooperation rather than competition. The main goal should be to provide teaching to local staff and implement methods and techniques to support the improvement of the care of the patients in the long run. This review focuses on the

  11. The world's longest surviving paediatric practices: some themes of Aboriginal medical ethnobotany in Australia.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2005-01-01

    Contemporary paediatric practices of Australian Aboriginal men and women, in more than 100 Aboriginal Language Groups, comprise a living discipline whose origins predate Western medicine by tens of millennia. The history of paediatrics acknowledges this surviving continuum of the world's oldest child-care practices. Because of the inextricable nexus between Aboriginal men and women and the land in which they live, medical ethnobotany forms a major part of the medical aspects of Aboriginal child care. Traditional tribal healers, called 'Nungungi' in some language groups of Central Australia, are identified as such whilst still young children and are given special education in the healing arts, especially that of medical ethnobotany, by older healers. Distinct from this specialized role, all Aboriginal men and women (and in particular grandmothers) in traditional communities use a sophisticated botanical materia medica in the treatment of sick and injured children. In cultures in transition, medical ethnobotanical practices may persist long after the local use of flora as sources of traditional food, weaponry, totemic identity and religious rites have disappeared. Some selected botanical 'cures' were adopted by early European settlers and a number of such relict uses have become part of mainstream Western life today, particularly as this applies to self-medication. Drugs and medicaments used in the treatment of children are obtained from leaves, bark, roots and flowers, usually as fresh preparations. They are prepared as infusions, decoctions and macerations and may be enjoined with emollients such as emu or kangaroo fat for topical application. Botanical drugs and medicaments are usually prepared fresh for each administration and are rarely stored. Contemporary Australian ethnobotany exploits the medicinal properties of more than 100 genera - using such extracts as antiseptics, analgesics, astringents, antipyretics, sedatives, hypnotics, expectorants and

  12. Parental Perceptions of Giardiasis: A Study in an Outpatient Paediatric Hospital Setting in Havana, Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Pedro; Escobedo, Angel A.; Salazar, Yohana; Alfonso, Maydel; Ávila, Ivonne; Cimerman, Sergio; Dawkins, Isabel V.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Giardia lamblia is an important cause of diarrhoeal disease throughout the world. Giardiasis— a mild and self-limiting disease that this protozoan causes— is perceived as a harmful disease. Aim. To explore the general level of awareness about giardiasis, clinical features, mode of transmission, prevention, and consequences and describe the sources and channels of information caregivers would prefer using to be informed about this disease. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among caregivers attending to the outpatient paediatric hospital setting in Havana. Results. A total of 202 caregivers were interviewed. Nearly 73% considered giardiasis as a modern problem, and 39% considered that it could be a fatal disease. Although 76.7% were aware that small intestine is the organ affected, other localizations were cited. Abdominal pain and diarrhoea were recognized as the commonest symptoms. Around one-third could identify that giardiasis may spread through drinking unboiled water and unwashed vegetables other incorrect ways were mentioned; respondents with more than 12 years of formal education were more likely to have better knowledge. Discussion. Strategies to control giardiasis need to be through an integrated approach aiming at boosting caregivers' knowledge and encouraging healthcare workers to act as a readily available source for health information. PMID:24967134

  13. Sequencing paediatric antiretroviral therapy in the context of a public health approach

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Ragna S; Boender, T Sonia; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Sigaloff, Kim CE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As access to prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) efforts has increased, the total number of children being born with HIV has significantly decreased. However, those children who do become infected after PMTCT failure are at particular risk of HIV drug resistance, selected by exposure to maternal or paediatric antiretroviral drugs used before, during or after birth. As a consequence, the response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in these children may be compromised, particularly when non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are used as part of the first-line regimen. We review evidence guiding choices of first- and second-line ART. Discussion Children generally respond relatively well to ART. Clinical trials show the superiority of protease inhibitor (PI)- over NNRTI-based treatment in young children, but observational reports of NNRTI-containing regimens are usually favourable as well. This is reassuring as national guidelines often still recommend the use of NNRTI-based treatment for PMTCT-unexposed young children, due to the higher costs of PIs. After failure of NNRTI-based, first-line treatment, the rate of acquired drug resistance is high, but HIV may well be suppressed by PIs in second-line ART. By contrast, there are currently no adequate alternatives in resource-limited settings (RLS) for children failing either first- or second-line, PI-containing regimens. Conclusions Affordable salvage treatment options for children in RLS are urgently needed. PMID:26639116

  14. Genetic sharing and heritability of paediatric age of onset autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun R.; Zhao, Sihai D.; Li, Jin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Mohebnasab, Maede; Steel, Laura; Kobie, Julie; Abrams, Debra J.; Mentch, Frank D.; Glessner, Joseph T.; Guo, Yiran; Wei, Zhi; Connolly, John J.; Cardinale, Christopher J.; Bakay, Marina; Li, Dong; Maggadottir, S. Melkorka; Thomas, Kelly A.; Qui, Haijun; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Wang, Fengxiang; Snyder, James; Flatø, Berit; Førre, Øystein; Denson, Lee A.; Thompson, Susan D.; Becker, Mara L.; Guthery, Stephen L.; Latiano, Anna; Perez, Elena; Resnick, Elena; Strisciuglio, Caterina; Staiano, Annamaria; Miele, Erasmo; Silverberg, Mark S.; Lie, Benedicte A.; Punaro, Marilynn; Russell, Richard K.; Wilson, David C.; Dubinsky, Marla C.; Monos, Dimitri S.; Annese, Vito; Munro, Jane E.; Wise, Carol; Chapel, Helen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Orange, Jordan S.; Behrens, Edward M.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Kugathasan, Subra; Griffiths, Anne M.; Satsangi, Jack; Grant, Struan F. A.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Finkel, Terri H.; Polychronakos, Constantin; Baldassano, Robert N.; Luning Prak, Eline T.; Ellis, Justine A.; Li, Hongzhe; Keating, Brendan J.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are polygenic diseases affecting 7–10% of the population in the Western Hemisphere with few effective therapies. Here, we quantify the heritability of paediatric AIDs (pAIDs), including JIA, SLE, CEL, T1D, UC, CD, PS, SPA and CVID, attributable to common genomic variations (SNP-h2). SNP-h2 estimates are most significant for T1D (0.863±s.e. 0.07) and JIA (0.727±s.e. 0.037), more modest for UC (0.386±s.e. 0.04) and CD (0.454±0.025), largely consistent with population estimates and are generally greater than that previously reported by adult GWAS. On pairwise analysis, we observed that the diseases UC-CD (0.69±s.e. 0.07) and JIA-CVID (0.343±s.e. 0.13) are the most strongly correlated. Variations across the MHC strongly contribute to SNP-h2 in T1D and JIA, but does not significantly contribute to the pairwise rG. Together, our results partition contributions of shared versus disease-specific genomic variations to pAID heritability, identifying pAIDs with unexpected risk sharing, while recapitulating known associations between autoimmune diseases previously reported in adult cohorts. PMID:26450413

  15. Paediatric and adult colonic manometry: A tool to help unravel the pathophysiology of constipation

    PubMed Central

    Dinning, Philip G; Benninga, Marc A; Southwell, Bridget R; Scott, S Mark

    2010-01-01

    Colonic motility subserves large bowel functions, including absorption, storage, propulsion and defaecation. Colonic motor dysfunction remains the leading hypothesis to explain symptom generation in chronic constipation, a heterogeneous condition which is extremely prevalent in the general population, and has huge socioeconomic impact and individual suffering. Physiological testing plays a crucial role in patient management, as it is now accepted that symptom-based assessment, although important, is unsatisfactory as the sole means of directing therapy. Colonic manometry provides a direct method for studying motor activities of the large bowel, and this review provides a contemporary understanding of how this technique has enhanced our knowledge of normal colonic motor physiology, as well as helping to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms underlying constipation. Methodological approaches, including available catheter types, placement technique and recording protocols, are covered, along with a detailed description of recorded colonic motor activities. This review also critically examines the role of colonic manometry in current clinical practice, and how manometric assessment may aid diagnosis, classification and guide therapeutic intervention in the constipated individual. Most importantly, this review considers both adult and paediatric patients. Limitations of the procedure and a look to the future are also addressed. PMID:21049550

  16. Paediatric Rehabilitation Treatment Standards: A Method for Quality Assurance in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Ahnert, Jutta; Löffler, Stefan; Müller, Jochen; Lukasczik, Matthias; Brüggemann, Silke; Vogel, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, the German Pension Insurance has implemented a new method of quality assurance for inpatient rehabilitation of children and adolescents diagnosed with bronchial asthma, obesity, or atopic dermatitis: the so-called rehabilitation treatment standards (RTS). They aim at promoting a comprehensive and evidence-based care in rehabilitation. Furthermore, they are intended to make the therapeutic processes in medical rehabilitation as well as potential deficits more transparent. The development of RTS was composed of five phases during which current scientific evidence, expert knowledge, and patient expectations were included. Their core element is the specification of evidence-based treatment modules that describe a good rehabilitation standard for children diagnosed with bronchial asthma, obesity, or atopic dermatitis. Opportunities and limitations of the RTS as a tool for quality assurance are discussed. Significance for public health The German pension insurance’s rehabilitation treatment standards (RTS) for inpatient rehabilitation of children and adolescents aim at contributing to a comprehensive and evidence-based care in paediatric rehabilitation. As a core element, they comprise evidence-based treatment modules that describe a good rehabilitation standard for children diagnosed with bronchial asthma, obesity, or atopic dermatitis. Although the RTS have been developed for the specific context of the German health care system, they may be referred to as a more general starting point regarding the development of health care and quality assurance standards in child/adolescent medical rehabilitative care. PMID:25343137

  17. Parental quality of life in complex paediatric neurologic disorders of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    van Nimwegen, K J M; Kievit, W; van der Wilt, G J; Schieving, J H; Willemsen, M A A P; Donders, A R T; Verhaak, C M; Grutters, J P C

    2016-09-01

    Complex paediatric neurology (CPN) patients generally present with non-specific symptoms, such as developmental delay, impaired movement and epilepsy. The diagnostic trajectory in these disorders is usually complicated and long-lasting, and may be burdensome to the patients and their parents. Additionally, as caring for a chronically ill child can be stressful and demanding, parents of these patients may experience impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study aims to assess parental HRQoL and factors related to it in CPN. Physical and mental HRQoL of 120 parents was measured and compared to the general population using the SF-12 questionnaire. Parents also completed this questionnaire for the measurement of patient HRQoL. Additional questionnaires were used to measure parental uncertainty (Visual Analogue Scale) and worry phenomena (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), and to obtain socio-demographic data. A linear mixed model with random effect was used to investigate which of these variables were associated with parental HRQoL. As compared to the general population, HRQoL of these parents appeared diminished. Fathers showed both lowered physical (51.76, p < 0.05) and mental (49.41, p < 0.01) HRQoL, whereas mothers only showed diminished mental (46.46, p < 0.01) HRQoL. Patient HRQoL and parental worry phenomena were significantly correlated with overall and mental parental HRQoL. The reduction in parental mental HRQoL is alarming, also because children strongly rely on their parents and parental mental health is known to influence children's health. Awareness of these problems among clinicians, and supportive care if needed are important to prevent exacerbation of the problems. PMID:27321953

  18. Population pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride in paediatric patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Tatami, Shinji; Yamamura, Norio; Tadayasu, Yusuke; Sarashina, Akiko; Liesenfeld, Karl-Heinz; Staab, Alexander; Schäfer, Hans-Günter; Ieiri, Ichiro; Higuchi, Shun

    2010-01-01

    AIMS The main objective of this study was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin hydrochloride (HCl) in paediatric patients with neuropathic and non-neuropathic bladder. A secondary objective was to compare the pharmacokinetics in paediatric patients and adults. METHODS Tamsulosin HCl plasma concentrations in 1082 plasma samples from 189 paediatric patients (age range 2–16 years) were analyzed with NONMEM, applying a one compartment model with first-order absorption. Based on the principles of allometry, body weight was incorporated in the base model, along with fixed allometric exponents. Covariate analysis was performed by means of a stepwise forward inclusion and backward elimination procedure. Simulations based on the final model were used to compare the pharmacokinetics with those in adults. RESULTS Beside the priori-implemented body weight, only α1-acid glycoprotein had an effect on both apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution. No other investigated covariates, including gender, age, race, patient population and concomitant therapy with anti-cholinergics, significantly affected the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin HCl (P < 0.001). The results of simulations indicated that the exposure in 12.5 kg paediatric patients was 3.5–4.3 fold higher than that in 70.0 kg adults. After a weight-based dose administration, the exposure in paediatric patients was comparable with that in healthy adults. CONCLUSIONS A population pharmacokinetic model of tamsulosin HCl in paediatric patients was established and it described the data well. There was no major difference in the pharmacokinetics of tamsulosin HCl between paediatric patients (age range 2–16 years) and adults when the effect of body weight was taken into consideration. PMID:20642551

  19. Study motives, career choices and interest in paediatric dentistry among final year dental students in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Students’ motives for studying Dentistry have been a subject of interest for years because of the potential for understanding the psychological makeup and subsequent job satisfaction for the dentist. It is also useful in identifying expectations of the profession. This study therefore tried to identify study motives and career preferences of dental students especially with respect to the practice of paediatric dentistry. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire. The final year students in six dental schools in Nigeria were required to fill the questionnaire. Students were asked to rank their motives and career preferences on a Likert like scale with points ranging from 0–5 where 0 represented a factor that had no influence on their decision and 5 represented a very influential factor. The underlying dimensions for study motives, career preference, impression about and motive for interest in the practice of paediatric dentistry were identified using factor analysis. Results One hundred and seventy nine of 223 students (80.3%) participated in this study. Motives for the practice of dentistry included characteristics of the profession, altruism and intellectual challenges, existence of artistic theme in dentistry and parent’s recommendation. Overall, 67.1% of respondents indicated interest in postgraduate studies and 50.8% were interested in paediatric dentistry practice. The main motives for showing interest in the practice of paediatric dentistry were ‘personal interest, professional interest and interest of significant others in children’, and ‘family influence’. Significantly more males than females were interested in the practice of paediatric dentistry though the motives for interest in the practice of paediatric dentistry did not differ significantly by sex or age. Conclusion The non-significant sex difference in the motives for interest in the practice of paediatric dentistry is a possible

  20. A search for improved technique factors in paediatric fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tapiovaara, M J; Sandborg, M; Dance, D R

    1999-02-01

    A Monte Carlo computational model of a fluoroscopic imaging chain was used for deriving optimal technique factors for paediatric fluoroscopy. The optimal technique was defined as the one that minimizes the absorbed dose (or dose rate) in the patient with a constraint of constant image quality. Image quality was assessed for the task of detecting a detail in the image of a patient-simulating phantom, and was expressed in terms of the ideal observer's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for static images and in terms of the accumulating rate of the square of SNR for dynamic imaging. The entrance air kerma (or air kerma rate) and the mean absorbed dose (or dose rate) in the phantom quantified radiation detriment. The calculations were made for homogeneous phantoms simulating newborn, 3-, 10- and 15-year-old patients, barium and iodine contrast material details, several x-ray spectra, and for imaging with or without an antiscatter grid. The image receptor was modelled as a CsI x-ray image intensifier (XRII). For the task of detecting low- or moderate-contrast iodine details, the optimal spectrum can be obtained by using an x-ray tube potential near 50 kV and filtering the x-ray beam heavily. The optimal tube potential is near 60 kV for low- or moderate-contrast barium details, and 80-100 kV for high-contrast details. The low-potential spectra above require a high tube load, but this should be acceptable in paediatric fluoroscopy. A reasonable choice of filtration is the use of an additional 0.25 mm Cu, or a suitable K-edge filter. No increase in the optimal tube potential was found as phantom thickness increased. With the constraint of constant low-contrast detail detectability, the mean absorbed doses obtained with the above spectra are approximately 50% lower than those obtained with the reference conditions of 70 kV and 2.7 mm Al filter. For the smallest patient and x-ray field size, not using a grid was slightly more dose-efficient than using a grid, but when the patient

  1. A search for improved technique factors in paediatric fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiovaara, Markku J.; Sandborg, Michael; Dance, David R.

    1999-02-01

    A Monte Carlo computational model of a fluoroscopic imaging chain was used for deriving optimal technique factors for paediatric fluoroscopy. The optimal technique was defined as the one that minimizes the absorbed dose (or dose rate) in the patient with a constraint of constant image quality. Image quality was assessed for the task of detecting a detail in the image of a patient-simulating phantom, and was expressed in terms of the ideal observer's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for static images and in terms of the accumulating rate of the square of SNR for dynamic imaging. The entrance air kerma (or air kerma rate) and the mean absorbed dose (or dose rate) in the phantom quantified radiation detriment. The calculations were made for homogeneous phantoms simulating newborn, 3-, 10- and 15-year-old patients, barium and iodine contrast material details, several x-ray spectra, and for imaging with or without an antiscatter grid. The image receptor was modelled as a CsI x-ray image intensifier (XRII). For the task of detecting low- or moderate-contrast iodine details, the optimal spectrum can be obtained by using an x-ray tube potential near 50 kV and filtering the x-ray beam heavily. The optimal tube potential is near 60 kV for low- or moderate-contrast barium details, and 80-100 kV for high-contrast details. The low-potential spectra above require a high tube load, but this should be acceptable in paediatric fluoroscopy. A reasonable choice of filtration is the use of an additional 0.25 mm Cu, or a suitable K-edge filter. No increase in the optimal tube potential was found as phantom thickness increased. With the constraint of constant low-contrast detail detectability, the mean absorbed doses obtained with the above spectra are approximately 50% lower than those obtained with the reference conditions of 70 kV and 2.7 mm Al filter. For the smallest patient and x-ray field size, not using a grid was slightly more dose-efficient than using a grid, but when the patient

  2. Development of a database of organ doses for paediatric and young adult CT scans in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K. P.; Berrington de González, A.; Pearce, M. S.; Salotti, J. A.; Parker, L.; McHugh, K.; Craft, A. W.; Lee, C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite great potential benefits, there are concerns about the possible harm from medical imaging including the risk of radiation-related cancer. There are particular concerns about computed tomography (CT) scans in children because both radiation dose and sensitivity to radiation for children are typically higher than for adults undergoing equivalent procedures. As direct empirical data on the cancer risks from CT scans are lacking, the authors are conducting a retrospective cohort study of over 240 000 children in the UK who underwent CT scans. The main objective of the study is to quantify the magnitude of the cancer risk in relation to the radiation dose from CT scans. In this paper, the methods used to estimate typical organ-specific doses delivered by CT scans to children are described. An organ dose database from Monte Carlo radiation transport-based computer simulations using a series of computational human phantoms from newborn to adults for both male and female was established. Organ doses vary with patient size and sex, examination types and CT technical settings. Therefore, information on patient age, sex and examination type from electronic radiology information systems and technical settings obtained from two national surveys in the UK were used to estimate radiation dose. Absorbed doses to the brain, thyroid, breast and red bone marrow were calculated for reference male and female individuals with the ages of newborns, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 y for a total of 17 different scan types in the pre- and post-2001 time periods. In general, estimated organ doses were slightly higher for females than males which might be attributed to the smaller body size of the females. The younger children received higher doses in pre-2001 period when adult CT settings were typically used for children. Paediatric-specific adjustments were assumed to be used more frequently after 2001, since then radiation doses to children have often been smaller than those to adults. The

  3. Access to Paediatric Essential Medicines: A Survey of Prices, Availability, Affordability and Price Components in Shaanxi Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Fang, Yu; Yang, Shimin; Jiang, Minghuan; Yan, Kangkang; Wu, Lina; Lv, Bing; Shen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prices and availability of paediatric essential medicines in Shaanxi Province, China. Methods Price and availability data for 28 paediatric essential medicines were collected from 60 public hospitals and 60 retail pharmacies in six areas of Shaanxi Province using a standardised methodology developed by the World Health Organization and Health Action International, during November to December 2012. Affordability was measured as the number of days’ wages required for the lowest-paid unskilled government worker to purchase standard treatments for common conditions. Data on medicine price components were collected from hospitals, wholesalers and distributors to obtain price mark-ups. Findings The mean availabilities of originator brands (OBs) and lowest-priced generics (LPGs) were 10.8% and 27.3% in the public hospitals and 11.9% and 20.6% in the private pharmacies. The public procurement and retail prices were 2.25 and 2.59 times the international reference prices (IRPs) for three OBs, and 0.52 and 0.93 times for 20 LPGs. In the private sector, the final prices for OBs and LPGs were 3.89 and 1.25 times their IRPs. The final price in the private sector was 2.7% lower than in the public sector for OBs, and 14.1% higher for LPGs. Generally, standard treatments cost less than 1 day’s wages in both sectors. Distribution mark-ups applied to brand salbutamol in Xi'an was 65.5%, and up to 185.3% for generic. Cumulative mark-ups for LPGs in Ankang were also high, from 33% to 50%. The manufacturer’s selling price is the largest contributor to the final price in both areas. Conclusions The government should approve a list of national paediatric essential medicines. The availability, price and affordability of these should be improved in both public hospitals and private pharmacies to enable children to obtain effective treatment. Measures should be taken to improve the efficiency of the centralised medicine purchasing system. PMID:24595099

  4. Understanding decisions leading to nonurgent visits to the paediatric emergency department: caregivers’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kua, Phek Hui Jade; Wu, Li; Ong, E-Lin Tessa; Lim, Zi Ying; Yiew, Jinmian Luther; Thia, Xing Hui Michelle; Sung, Sharon Cohan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A significant percentage of paediatric emergency department (ED) attendances worldwide are nonurgent, adversely affecting patient outcomes and healthcare systems. This study aimed to understand the reasons behind nonurgent ED visits, in order to develop targeted and effective preventive interventions. METHODS In-depth interviews were conducted with 49 caregivers to identify the decision-making factors related to taking children to the ED of KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore. Interviews were carried out in the emergency room of the hospital after the children had been diagnosed with nonurgent conditions by the attending physician. Interview transcripts were analysed based on grounded theory principles. RESULTS The demographics of our study cohort were representative of the target population. The main reasons given by the caregivers for attending paediatric EDs included perceived severity of the child’s symptoms, availability of after-hours care, perceived advantage of a paediatric specialist hospital and mistrust of primary care physicians’ ability to manage paediatric conditions. Insurance or welfare was a contributing factor for only a small portion of caregivers. CONCLUSION The reasons provided by Singaporean caregivers for attending paediatric EDs were similar to those reported in studies conducted in Western countries. However, the former group had a unique understanding of the local healthcare system. The study’s findings may be used to develop interventions to change the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of caregivers in Singapore. PMID:26805668

  5. Visualising difference, similarity and belonging in paediatric genetics

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Janice; Clavering, Emma K

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric genetics is increasingly playing a role in explorations of why a child may not be reaching developmental milestones, while experiencing various health concerns and displaying unusual physical characteristics. The diagnostic processes include close analyses of a child’s body in order to identify ‘clues’ to possible genetic variation. When the genetic variation identified is new and complex there is significant uncertainty about what relationship that variation has to childhood development and what it will mean for a child’s future. This paper, drawing from an ethnographic study of a genetics clinic, explores what versions of childhood difference and normality are produced by genetic explorations marked by uncertainty. The focus is on the significance of visual dynamics within the consultation, in family stories or photographs, and in the images found on websites which catalogue genetic syndromes. Our argument is that inside and outside the clinic the visual interpretations create understandings of the child that at times position him or her as ‘other’, while at other times recognise the child as normal and ‘one of us’. The uncertainty embedded in identifying rare genetic variations enables multiple interpretations to emerge which do not ‘fix’ the child into the category of the ‘genetically other’. PMID:22050692

  6. Local allergic rhinitis: A critical reappraisal from a paediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Arasi, Stefania; Pajno, Giovanni Battista; Lau, Susanne; Matricardi, Paolo Maria

    2016-09-01

    The so-called local allergic rhinitis (LAR) has been proposed as a phenotype of rhinitis with Th2-driven prominent local allergic inflammation, nasal synthesis of specific IgE and a positive response to a nasal allergen provocation test, in the absence of 'systemic' atopy (negative skin prick test and serum allergen-specific IgE antibodies). To date, available data on LAR are mostly focused on adults. The purpose of this 'Rostrum' was to critically discuss data and implications of the 'LAR concept' in paediatrics. In the natural history of rhinitis due to IgE-mediated reactions triggered by exposure to allergens, a 'LAR' can be either the initial, transient stage of classical allergic rhinitis or a stable phenotype never evolving to 'systemic' IgE sensitization. Given the present difficulties in performing routinely nasal allergen provocation test in children, the development of sensitive and specific tests to detect IgE in the child's nasal secretions is a research priority. We suggest also the hypothetical role of allergen immunoprophylaxis or immunotherapy in LAR. Last, the term 'local allergic rhinitis' may be inappropriate, as rhinitis is always 'local', while IgE sensitization can be either 'local' or 'systemic'. PMID:27098888

  7. An inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Green, C; Kelly, I P

    2012-06-01

    The need for emergent management of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures is being questioned in the literature. Open reduction rates of up to 46% have been reported in the non-emergent management of these injuries. At our institution these fractures are managed as operative emergencies by senior personnel. To examine the ongoing need for this policy we reviewed our results. All patients managed over a five year period with Gartland type IIB or III paeditric supracondylar humeral fractures were identified and a comprehensive chart and radiographic review undertaken. The mean time from injury to fracture reduction and stabilization was 6.6 h. Consultants performed or supervised 90% of cases. Open reduction was necessary in 5% of cases. Complications included a perioperative nerve injury rate of 6% and a superficial pin site infection rate of 3%. This study suggests that, despite the challenge to trauma on-call rostering, the emergency management of these injuries is advantageous to patients in units of our size. Based on the data presented here we continue our practice of emergent management. We suggest that units of a similar size to our own would show a benefit from an analogous policy albeit an inconvenient truth. PMID:22525415

  8. [Vaccination schedule of the Spanish association of paediatrics: recommendations 2010].

    PubMed

    Marès Bermúdez, J; van Esso Arbolave, D; Arístegui Fernández, J; Ruiz Contreras, J; González Hachero, J; Merino Moína, M; Barrio Corrales, F; Alvarez García, F J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Moreno Pérez, D

    2010-06-01

    The Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics updates annually, the immunization schedule, taking into account epidemiological data, as well as evidence of the effectiveness and efficiency of vaccines. This vaccination schedule includes grades of recommendation. The committee has graded as universal vaccines those that all children should receive, as recommended those with a profile of universal vaccination in childhood and which are desirable that all children receive, but that can be prioritized based on resources for its public funding and for risk groups those targeting groups of people in situations of epidemiological risk. The Committee considers as a priority to achieve a common immunization schedule. The Committee reaffirms the recommendation to include pneumococcal vaccination in the routine vaccination schedule. Vaccination against varicella in the second year of life is an effective strategy and therefore a desirable goal. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended for all infants given the morbidity and high burden on the health care system. The Committee adheres to the recommendations of the Interterritorial Council of the National Health Care System in reference to routine vaccination against HPV for all girls aged 11 to 14 years and stresses the need to vaccinate against influenza and hepatitis A all patients with risk factors for these diseases. Finally, it stresses the need to update incomplete immunization schedules using accelerated immunization schedules. PMID:20457016

  9. Spectrum of Paediatric Lysosomal Storage Disorders in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Almundher A; Joshi, Surendra N; Koul, Roshan L; Al-Maawali, Ali A; Al-Sedari, Hilal S; Al-Amri, Bader M; Al-Futaisi, Amna M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to look at the spectrum of paediatric lysosomal disorders in Oman. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic diseases. Few studies on the birth prevalence and prevalence of LSDs have been reported from the Arabian Peninsula. Methods: We studied 86 children with LSDs diagnosed over a period of nine years, from June 1998 to May 2007. Detailed clinical data, including age of onset, sex, age and mode of first presentation, and presence of consanguinity were collected. Results: Our data showed the combined birth prevalence for all LSDs in Oman to be around 1 in 4,700 live births. Sphingolipidoses was the most common group of disorder encountered (47.7%), followed by neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) (23.2%) and mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) (23.2%). The proportion of consanguineous marriages in our series was found to be 87.5%. Conclusion: Our data represent the birth prevalence and clinical spectrum of such disorders in Oman, one of the highly consanguineous societies in the Middle East. PMID:22912921

  10. Pharmaceutical development and optimization of azithromycin suppository for paediatric use.

    PubMed

    Kauss, Tina; Gaubert, Alexandra; Boyer, Chantal; Ba, Boubakar B; Manse, Muriel; Massip, Stephane; Léger, Jean-Michel; Fawaz, Fawaz; Lembege, Martine; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; Lindegardh, Niklas; White, Nicholas J; Olliaro, Piero; Millet, Pascal; Gaudin, Karen

    2013-01-30

    Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing process optimization work was undertaken in order to propose a potential paediatric rectal formulation of azithromycin as an alternative to existing oral or injectable formulations. The target product profile was to be easy-to-use, cheap and stable in tropical conditions, with bioavailability comparable to oral forms, rapidly achieving and maintaining bactericidal concentrations. PEG solid solution suppositories were characterized in vitro using visual, HPLC, DSC, FTIR and XRD analyses. In vitro drug release and in vivo bioavailability were assessed; a study in rabbits compared the bioavailability of the optimized solid solution suppository to rectal solution and intra-venous product (as reference) and to the previous, non-optimized formulation (suspended azithromycin suppository). The bioavailability of azithromycin administered as solid solution suppositories relative to intra-venous was 43%, which compared well to the target of 38% (oral product in humans). The results of 3-month preliminary stability and feasibility studies were consistent with industrial production scale-up. This product has potential both as a classical antibiotic and as a product for use in severely ill children in rural areas. Industrial partners for further development are being sought. PMID:23220079

  11. Pharmaceutical development and optimization of azithromycin suppository for paediatric use

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Tina; Gaubert, Alexandra; Boyer, Chantal; Ba, Boubakar B.; Manse, Muriel; Massip, Stephane; Léger, Jean-Michel; Fawaz, Fawaz; Lembege, Martine; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Lafarge, Xavier; Lindegardh, Niklas; White, Nicholas J.; Olliaro, Piero; Millet, Pascal; Gaudin, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical development and manufacturing process optimization work was undertaken in order to propose a potential paediatric rectal formulation of azithromycin as an alternative to existing oral or injectable formulations. The target product profile was to be easy-to-use, cheap and stable in tropical conditions, with bioavailability comparable to oral forms, rapidly achieving and maintaining bactericidal concentrations. PEG solid solution suppositories were characterized in vitro using visual, HPLC, DSC, FTIR and XRD analyses. In vitro drug release and in vivo bioavailability were assessed; a study in rabbits compared the bioavailability of the optimized solid solution suppository to rectal solution and intra-venous product (as reference) and to the previous, non-optimized formulation (suspended azithromycin suppository). The bioavailability of azithromycin administered as solid solution suppositories relative to intra-venous was 43%, which compared well to the target of 38% (oral product in humans). The results of 3-month preliminary stability and feasibility studies were consistent with industrial production scale-up. This product has potential both as a classical antibiotic and as a product for use in severely ill children in rural areas. Industrial partners for further development are being sought. PMID:23220079

  12. Pharmacokinetics of anti-infective agents in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Butler, D R; Kuhn, R J; Chandler, M H

    1994-05-01

    Various differences in drug disposition exist between children and adults. For example, the volume of distribution (Vd) for many drugs is larger in children than in adults. Other parameters, including excretion and elimination may be altered in children compared with adults. The penicillins and cephalosporins are used commonly for the treatment of infection in paediatric patients. The increased Vd in children contributes to the increased elimination half-life of these agents. Clearance of the acylureido-penicillins is increased in children with cystic fibrosis, a disease that decreases the elimination half-life for these drugs. Aminoglycosides distribute into extracellular fluid and their pharmacokinetic profile is affected by changes in Vd. The Vd for aminoglycosides is slightly higher in children than in adults. Children with cystic fibrosis, burns, or cancer have higher clearance rates and larger Vd values for aminoglycosides. Few data in the literature address the pharmacokinetics of other anti-infective agents, including vancomycin, teicoplanin, erythromycin, metronidazole, chloramphenicol, and cotrimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), in children. Similarly, there is little information regarding the pharmacokinetic profile of antivirals and antifungals in children. Dosage guidelines are available to enable the clinician to initiate anti-infective therapy in children. Subsequent dosage requirements may change based on the patient's current clinical condition. Although several studies have investigated the pharmacokinetics of anti-infectives in neonates and adults, data for children are limited. Therefore, further studies are required so that the ever growing arsenal of anti-infectives can be administered appropriately to children. PMID:8055682

  13. Lost among the trees? The autonomic nervous system and paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Rees, Corinne A

    2014-06-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been strikingly neglected in Western medicine. Despite its profound importance for regulation, adjustment and coordination of body systems, it lacks priority in training and practice and receives scant attention in numerous major textbooks. The ANS is integral to manifestations of illness, underlying familiar physical and psychological symptoms. When ANS activity is itself dysfunctional, usual indicators of acute illness may prove deceptive. Recognising the relevance of the ANS can involve seeing the familiar through fresh eyes, challenging assumptions in clinical assessment and in approaches to practice. Its importance extends from physical and psychological well-being to parenting and safeguarding, public services and the functioning of society. Exploration of its role in conditions ranging from neurological, gastrointestinal and connective tissue disorders, diabetes and chronic fatigue syndrome, to autism, behavioural and mental health difficulties may open therapeutic avenues. The ANS offers a mechanism for so-called functional illnesses and illustrates the importance of recognising that 'stress' takes many forms, physical, psychological and environmental, desirable and otherwise. Evidence of intrauterine and post-natal programming of ANS reactivity suggests that neonatal care and safeguarding practice may offer preventive opportunity, as may greater understanding of epigenetic change of ANS activity through, for example, accidental or psychological trauma or infection. The aim of this article is to accelerate recognition of the importance of the ANS throughout paediatrics, and of the potential physical and psychological cost of neglecting it. PMID:24573884

  14. Adult and paediatric cough guidelines: Ready for an overhaul?

    PubMed

    Birring, Surinder S; Kavanagh, Joanne; Lai, Kefang; Chang, Anne B

    2015-12-01

    Cough is one of the most common reasons that patients seek medical attention. Cough guidelines from numerous countries and societies are available to assist the clinician to investigate and manage patients with cough. We review some of the recent progress in the field of cough that may lead to revision of these guidelines. In adults with chronic cough, new causes such as obstructive sleep apnoea have been identified. A new terminology, cough hypersensitivity syndrome (CHS), has been proposed for patients with chronic cough, which emphasises cough reflex hypersensitivity as a key feature. New therapeutic options are now available, particularly for patients with refractory or idiopathic chronic cough, which include gabapentin, speech pathology management and morphine. There has been great progress in the assessment of cough with the development of validated quality of life questionnaires and cough frequency monitoring tools. In children, common aetiologies differ from adults and those managed according to guidelines have better outcomes compared to usual care. New diagnostic entities such as protracted bacterial bronchitis have been described. Paediatric-specific cough assessment tools such as the Parent/Child Quality of Life Questionnaire will help improve the assessment of patients. Further research is necessary to improve the evidence base for future clinical guideline recommendations. Guidelines in future should also aim to reach a wider audience that includes primary care physicians, non-specialists and patients. PMID:25681276

  15. Novel gene expression model for outcome prediction in paediatric medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Grešner, Sylwia M; Zakrzewski, Krzysztof; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Liberski, Pawel P

    2013-10-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most frequent type of embryonal tumour in the paediatric population. The disease progression in patients with this tumour may be connected with the presence of stem/tumour-initiating cells, but the precise source and characteristics of such cells is still a subject of debate. Thus, we tried to analyse biomarkers for which a connection with the presence of stem/tumour-initiating cells was suggested. We evaluated the transcriptional level of the ATOH1, FUT4, NGFR, OTX1, OTX2, PROM1 and SOX1 genes in 48 samples of medulloblastoma and analysed their usefulness in the prediction of disease outcome. The analyses showed a strong correlation of PROM1, ATOH1 and OTX1 gene expression levels with the outcome (p ≤ 0.2). On the basis of the multivariate Cox regression analysis, we propose a three-gene model predicting risk of the disease, calculated as follows: RS(risk score) =( 0:81 x PROM1) + (0:18 x OTX1) + (0:02 x ATOH1). Survival analysis revealed a better outcome among standard-risk patients, with a 5-year survival rate of 65 %, compared to the 40 % rate observed among high-risk patients. The most promising advantage of such molecular analysis consists in the identification of molecular markers influencing clinical behaviour, which may in turn be useful in therapy optimization. PMID:23649504

  16. A 360-degree overview of paediatric NAFLD: recent insights.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Valerio; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Alisi, Anna; Miele, Luca; Valenti, Luca; Vajro, Pietro

    2013-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multi-faceted disorder, which ranges from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with/without fibrosis. The effects of specific risk factors, such as obesity and sedentary lifestyle, on predisposing genetic settings eventually lead to the development of NAFLD in children. The complex interplay between genes and environment in NAFLD pathogenesis is sustained by multiple mechanisms that involve liver crosstalk with other organs and tissues, especially gut and adipose tissue. Unfortunately, natural history of paediatric NAFLD is lacking, and the etiopathogenesis is still in the process of being defined. Potential early predictors and suitable non-invasive diagnostic tools can be discovered based on the pathogenetic mechanisms and histological patterns. This will also help design novel treatments and a comprehensive and successful management strategy for patients. In this review, we discuss the recent advances made in genetics, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapeutic management of NAFLD, focusing especially on the obesity-related steatotic liver condition. PMID:23238106

  17. Suitability of ivy extract for the treatment of paediatric cough.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Thomsen, M; Schmidt, U

    2012-12-01

    Two galenical formulations of an ivy herbal extract, syrup and cough drops, were tested for their efficacy and safety in the paediatric treatment of cough and bronchitis in two independent open, non-interventional studies with identical design. Two-hundred and sixty-eight children aged 0-12 yr were treated with one of the two preparations for up to 14 days. The effects on cough-related symptoms were addressed on a verbal rating scale. At the end of the study the major symptoms rhinitis, cough and viscous mucus, were found to be only mildly expressed or absent in 93, 94.2 and 97.7% of cases. The global effect was rated as 'good' or 'very good' in 96.5% of cases. Tolerability and compliance were found 'good' to 'very good' in 99% (syrup) and 100% (drops) of patients on completion of the study. A subgroup analysis according to four different age and dosing groups did not reveal differences in treatment response. Safety was confirmed and corresponded to literature findings. Five adverse events classified as mild and non-serious were reported (1.9%). In conclusion, ivy leaf extract in the form of syrup and of cough drops was confirmed as an effective and safe treatment of cough in children. PMID:22532491

  18. Accounting for care: Healthcare Resource Groups for paediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Janet; Morris, Kevin

    2008-02-01

    Healthcare Resource Groups are a way of grouping patients in relation to the amount of healthcare resources they consume. They are the basis for implementation of Payment by Results by the Department of Health in England. An expert working group was set up to define a dataset for paediatric critical care that would in turn support the derivation of Healthcare Resource Groups. Three relevant classification systems were identified and tested with data from ten PICUs, including data about diagnoses, number of organ systems supported, interventions and nursing activity. Each PICU provided detailed costing for the financial year 2005/2006. Eighty-three per cent of PICU costs were found to be related to staff costs, with the largest cost being nursing costs. The Nursing Activity Score system was found to be a poor predictor of staff resource use, as was the adult HRG model based on the number of organ systems supported. It was decided to develop the HRGs based on a 'levels of care' approach; 32 data items were defined to support HRG allocation. From October 2007, data have been collected daily to identify the HRGs for each PICU patient and are being used by the Department of Health to estimate reference costs for PICU services. The data can also be used to support improved audit of PICU activity nationally as well as comparison of workload across different units and modelling of staff requirements within a unit. PMID:18335904

  19. Paediatric emergency and acute care in resource poor settings.

    PubMed

    Duke, Trevor; Cheema, Baljit

    2016-02-01

    Acute care of seriously ill children is a global public health issue, and there is much scope for improving quality of care in hospitals at all levels in many developing countries. We describe the current state of paediatric emergency and acute care in the least developed regions of low and middle income countries and identify gaps and requirements for improving quality. Approaches are needed which span the continuum of care: from triage and emergency treatment, the diagnostic process, identification of co-morbidities, treatment, monitoring and supportive care, discharge planning and follow-up. Improvements require support and training for health workers and quality processes. Effective training is that which is ongoing, combining good technical training in under-graduate courses and continuing professional development. Quality processes combine evidence-based guidelines, essential medicines, appropriate technology, appropriate financing of services, standards and assessment tools and training resources. While initial emergency treatment is based on common clinical syndromes, early differentiation is required for specific treatment, and this can usually be carried out clinically without expensive tests. While global strategies are important, it is what happens locally that makes a difference and is too often neglected. In rural areas in the poorest countries in the world, public doctors and nurses who provide emergency and acute care for children are revered by their communities and demonstrate daily that much can be carried out with little. PMID:27062627

  20. Health-e-Child: a grid platform for european paediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaburskas, K.; Estrella, F.; Shade, J.; Manset, D.; Revillard, J.; Rios, A.; Anjum, A.; Branson, A.; Bloodsworth, P.; Hauer, T.; McClatchey, R.; Rogulin, D.

    2008-07-01

    The Health-e-Child (HeC) project [1], [2] is an EC Framework Programme 6 Integrated Project that aims to develop a grid-based integrated healthcare platform for paediatrics. Using this platform biomedical informaticians will integrate heterogeneous data and perform epidemiological studies across Europe. The resulting Grid enabled biomedical information platform will be supported by robust search, optimization and matching techniques for information collected in hospitals across Europe. In particular, paediatricians will be provided with decision support, knowledge discovery and disease modelling applications that will access data in hospitals in the UK, Italy and France, integrated via the Grid. For economy of scale, reusability, extensibility, and maintainability, HeC is being developed on top of an EGEE/gLite [3] based infrastructure that provides all the common data and computation management services required by the applications. This paper discusses some of the major challenges in bio-medical data integration and indicates how these will be resolved in the HeC system. HeC is presented as an example of how computer science (and, in particular Grid infrastructures) originating from high energy physics can be adapted for use by biomedical informaticians to deliver tangible real-world benefits.

  1. Epidemiology of paediatric visceral leishmaniasis in Hebron district, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Amro, Ahmad; Azmi, Kifaya; Schönian, Gabriele; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Alsharabati, Mohamed Barakat; Sawalha, Samer; Hamarsheh, Omar; Ereqat, Suhair; Abdeen, Ziad

    2009-07-01

    Seventy-six cases of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) were reported from the Hebron district of the West Bank, Palestine between 1993 and 2007. All cases were in children less than 9 years old (median age 2 years). The average number of cases was 5.06/year and the average annual incidence was 3.02/100000 children. Ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) PCR-RFLP was performed using DNA extracted from two cultures and 36 archived Giemsa-stained slides from VL patients. Leishmania infantum was revealed as the causative agent of VL in the focus. Isoenzyme analysis identified two isolates as zymodeme MON-1. A serological survey of 455 children screened for serum anti-Leishmania antibodies revealed 8.4% seropositivity. Seropositivity was highest for children in households of previous VL cases [odds ratio (OR) 7.5; 95% CI 3.17-17.61; P<0.001] and among people who had domestic dogs and/or other animals (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.19-4.68; P=0.017). No difference was seen between males and females (P=0.073). A preliminary survey of sand fly distribution showed the abundance of two putative vector species: Phlebotomus syriacus (45%) and Ph. tobbi (10%). The focus of VL in Hebron district was shown to follow the epidemiological pattern of paediatric disease characteristic of the Mediterranean region. PMID:19022464

  2. Migraine management: How do the adult and paediatric migraines differ?

    PubMed Central

    Sonal Sekhar, M.; Sasidharan, Shalini; Joseph, Siby; Kumar, Anand

    2011-01-01

    Migraine is one of the common causes of severe and recurring headache. It may be difficult to manage in primary care settings, where it is under diagnosed and medically treated. Migraine can occur in children as well as in adults and it is three times more common in women than in men. Migraine in children is different from adults in various ways. Migraine management depends on the various factors like duration and severity of pain, associated symptoms, degree of disability, and initial response to treatment. The therapy of children and adolescents with migraines includes treatment modalities for acute attacks, prophylactic medications when the attacks are frequent, and biobehavioural modes of treatment to aid long-term management of the disorder. The long lasting outcome of childhood headaches and progression into adult headaches remains largely unknown. However, it has been suggested that adult migraine may represent a progressive disorder. In children, the progressive nature is uncertain and further investigations into longitudinal outcome and phenotypic changes in childhood headaches have yet to be recognized. Even though paediatric and adult migraines seem to be slightly different from one another, but not enough to categorize either as sole. PMID:23960771

  3. Recommended Nordic paediatric reference intervals for 21 common biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Hilsted, Linda; Rustad, Pål; Aksglæde, Lise; Sørensen, Kaspar; Juul, Anders

    2013-02-01

    Paediatric reference intervals based on samples from healthy children are difficult to establish and consequently data are often from hospitalized children. Furthermore, biases may present in published data due to differences in the analytical methods employed. Blood samples from 1429 healthy Danish children were collected for establishing reference intervals for 21 common biochemical properties (Alanine transaminase, Albumin, Alkaline phosphatase, Aspartate transaminase, Bilirubin, Calcium, Cholesterol, Creatinine, Creatine kinase, HDL-Cholesterol, Iron, Lactate dehydrogenase, LDL- Cholesterol, Magnesium, Phosphate, Potassium, Protein, Sodium, Transferrin, Triglycerides and Urate). Samples were analyzed on a Roche-Modular-P/ISE-system. The NORIP reference material (NFKK Reference Serum X) was included in all the analytical runs. Reference values were recalculated according to the target values of X for the properties and statistical calculations carried out as performed in the NORIP study. Thus commutable (regarding analytical method) reference intervals for 20 properties were established and for LDL-Cholesterol reference intervals were reported for the specific analytical method employed. The data were compared to previous studies and to those obtained from the youngest age group in the NORIP study. Marked age differences were observed for most of the properties. Several properties also showed gender-related differences, mainly at the onset of puberty. Data are presented as suggested intervals for combined age groups, but can be accessed via the NORIP home page if more detailed division according to age or gender is desired. PMID:23013046

  4. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, N P; Björk-Eriksson, T; Birk Christensen, C; Kiil-Berthelsen, A; Aznar, M C; Hollensen, C; Markova, E; Munck af Rosenschöld, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of including fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in the planning of paediatric radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Target volumes were first delineated without and subsequently re-delineated with access to 18F-FDG PET scan information, on duplicate CT sets. RT plans were generated for three-dimensional conformal photon RT (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The results were evaluated by comparison of target volumes, target dose coverage parameters, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). Results: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target volumes, target dose coverage, irradiated volumes, estimated NTCP or SC risk, neither for IMPT nor 3DCRT. Conclusion: Our results imply that the inclusion of PET/CT scans in the RT planning process could have considerable impact for individual patients. There were no general trends of increasing or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. Advances in knowledge: 18F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11 patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT. PMID:25494657

  5. [Potential neurotoxicity of general anaesthetics to the developing brain].

    PubMed

    Clausen, Nicola G; Venø, Søren; Astvad, Mads; Henneberg, Steen W; Christensen, Kaare; Hansen, Tom G

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies (including non-human primates) have shown that most general anaesthetics cause enhanced neuroapoptosis with subsequent long-term neurocognitive deficits later in life. Some human cohort studies have indicated an association between anaesthesia/surgery and adverse neurocognitive outcome whereas other studies have not. Overall, the data do not justify any change in paediatric anaesthetic clinical practice. Naturally, the risks and benefits of a procedure should always be carefully considered before exposing a child to general anaesthesia. PMID:25293561

  6. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels in computed tomography for paediatric patients in Sudan: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, A

    2015-07-01

    Paediatric patients are recognised to be at higher risk of developing radiation-induced cancer than adults. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the radiation doses to paediatric patients during computed tomography (CT) procedures in order to propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). A total of 296 patients (aged 6-10 y) were investigated in 8 hospitals equipped with 64-, 16- and dual-slice CT machines. The mean dose length product values were 772, 446 and 178 mGy cm for head, abdomen and chest, respectively. Imaging protocols were not adapted to the patient's weight in certain CT machines. The results confirmed that paediatric patients are exposed to an unnecessary radiation dose. The established DRLs were higher than those available in other countries. This study showed the need for harmonisation of the practice in CT departments and radiation dose optimisation. PMID:25836694

  7. The experience of paediatric residents participating in a child protection rotation: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lewington, Laura; Unruh, Anita; Ornstein, Amy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practitioners working in the field of child maltreatment are at risk for vicarious traumatization. For Canadian paediatric residents, exposure to child abuse during training is limited. OBJECTIVE: To explore how paediatric residents experience a mandatory rotation within a hospital-based child protection team (CPT) from an emotional and professional development standpoint. METHOD: Eight paediatric residents were interviewed following their CPT rotation and transcripts were analyzed using a phenomenological approach. Exemplar quotes were then highlighted. RESULTS: Four major themes were identified: baseline experiences; individual resident factors; intrinsic CPT rotation factors; and overall rotation assessment. The themes and their subthemes were used to inform a conceptual model of residents’ experiences. CONCLUSIONS: The knowledge provided through residents’ accounts can be applied to strengthen future educational opportunities in the field of child maltreatment and offer insight to help guide the development of support systems and debriefing processes that are important in this challenging field. PMID:24421681

  8. Stress and paediatric obesity: what we know and where to go.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Shana M; Sato, Amy F

    2014-04-01

    Childhood obesity is a public health epidemic and is associated with substantial negative physical and psychosocial health consequences. Stress is thought to be one contributor to the development and maintenance of obesity in children and adolescents, yet the linkage between stress and paediatric obesity is a poorly understood phenomenon. This paper furthers the understanding of stress in the context of paediatric obesity by firstly presenting a focused review of what is known about links between chronic and acute stress and paediatric obesity risk and then synthesizing important areas from the literature. These critical areas of focus include the following: (1) physiological stress reactivity; (2) stress-induced eating; (3) stress and physical activity; (4) parent and family influences; and (5) stress in at-risk populations. This review is geared toward facilitating future research on the stress-obesity connection in youth. PMID:23818395

  9. Cognitive impairment in paediatric multiple sclerosis patients is not related to cortical lesions.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Maria A; De Meo, Ermelinda; Amato, Maria P; Copetti, Massimiliano; Moiola, Lucia; Ghezzi, Angelo; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Capra, Ruggero; Fiorino, Agnese; Pippolo, Lorena; Pera, Maria C; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the contribution of cortical lesions to cognitive impairment in 41 paediatric MS patients. Thirteen (32%) paediatric MS patients were considered as cognitively impaired. T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense white matter lesion volumes did not differ between cognitively impaired and cognitively preserved MS patients. Cortical lesions number, cortical lesions volume and grey matter volume did not differ between cognitively impaired and cognitively preserved patients, whereas white matter volume was significantly lower in cognitively impaired versus cognitively preserved MS patients (p=0.01). Contrary to adult MS, cortical lesions do not seem to contribute to cognitive impairment in paediatric MS patients, which is likely driven by white matter damage. PMID:25392332

  10. The role of research for sustainable paediatric cardiac programmes in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine D; Mavroudis, Constantine; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Siegel, Allison

    2012-12-01

    Significant challenges face developing countries as a result of the maldistribution of access to healthcare throughout the world, specifically access to paediatric cardiac care. Sustainable paediatric cardiac programmes must be established in developing countries to provide care to all children with congenital heart disease. Education and research are essential components to sustainable paediatric cardiac programmes in developing countries to define local problems and the incidence of disease, and to generate solutions thereto related. Research can contribute to developing local expertise, improving technology, providing opportunities for local talent, generating financial resources, enhancing the dignity of people, and the facilitating resolution of health problems throughout the world. Clinical trials conducted in developing countries should meet the same ethical standards as trials based in developed countries. PMID:23331603

  11. Paediatric leptospirosis: A population based case-control study from Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, R; Sumathi, G; Prabhakaran, S G; Shanmughapriya, S; Natarajaseenivasan, K

    2016-01-01

    The surveillance in Chennai identified 134 children and 443 adults clinically suspected for leptospirosis. Of these, 35 (26.1%) children and 118 (26.6%) adults had laboratory confirmed diagnosis for leptospirosis. The paediatric leptospirosis exhibited a higher frequency of classic features of Weil's disease. The prevalent serovar encountered was Icterohaemorrhagiae with no difference in the pattern of infecting serovars between the two groups. Further, confirmation of diagnosis was achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a positivity of 28.4% (specificity 96%). Univariate analysis showed significant association of paediatric leptospirosis with rat infestation (odds ratio 87.4). Thus, PCR facilitates early diagnosis of febrile illness among paediatric cases. PMID:27080780

  12. Comparative analysis of trends in paediatric trauma outcomes in New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Curtis, Kate; Chong, Shanley; Holland, Andrew J A; Soundappan, S V S; Wilson, Kellie L; Cass, Daniel T

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric trauma centres seek to optimise the care of injured children. Trends in state-wide paediatric care and outcomes have not been examined in detail in Australia. This study examines temporal trends in paediatric trauma outcomes and factors influencing survival and length of stay. A retrospective review was conducted using data from the NSW Trauma Registry during 2003-2008 for children aged 15 years and younger who were severely injured (injury severity score >15). To examine trauma outcomes descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic and linear regression were conducted. There were 1138 children severely injured. Two-thirds were male. Road trauma and falls were the most common injury mechanisms and over one-third of incidents occurred in the home. Forty-eight percent of violence-related injuries were experienced by infants aged less than 1 year. For the majority of children definitive care was provided at a paediatric trauma centre, but less than one-third of children were taken directly to a paediatric trauma centre post-injury. Children who received definitive treatment at a paediatric trauma centre had between 3 and 6 times higher odds of having a survival advantage than if treated at an adult trauma centre. The number of severe injury presentations to the 14 major trauma centres in NSW remains constant. It is possible that injury prevention measures are having a limited effect on severe injury in NSW. This research provides stimulus for change in the provision and co-ordination in the delivery of trauma care for injured children. PMID:22153117

  13. The incidence, spectrum and outcome of paediatric trauma managed by the Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service

    PubMed Central

    Manchev, V; Bruce, JL; Oosthuizen, GV; Laing, GL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service (PMTS) has run a systematic quality improvement programme since 2006. A key component included the development and implementation of an effective surveillance system in the form of an electronic surgical registry (ESR). This study used data from the ESR to review the incidence, spectrum and outcome of paediatric trauma in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Methods The ESR was reviewed, and all cases of paediatric trauma managed between 1 January 2012 and 30 July 2014 were retrieved for analysis. Results During the study period, 1,041 paediatric trauma patients (724 male, 69.5%) were managed by the PMTS, averaging a monthly admission of 36. The mean age was 10.9 years (standard deviation: 5.4 years). The mechanism of injury (MOI) was blunt trauma in 753 patients (72.3%) and penetrating trauma in 170 (16.3%). Pedestrian vehicle collisions accounted for 21% of cases and motor vehicle collisions for a further 11%. Intentional trauma accounted for 282 patients (27.1%) and self-inflicted trauma for 14 cases (1.3%). Ninety patients admitted to the intensive care unit and fifty-one required high dependency unit admission. There were 17 deaths, equating to an in-hospital mortality rate of 1.7%. A total of 172 children died on the scene of an incident. There were 35 road traffic related deaths, 26 suicides by hanging, 27 deaths from blunt assault and 23 deaths from penetrating assault. The overall mortality rate for paediatric trauma was 18.2%. Conclusions The ESR has proved to be an effective surveillance system and has enabled the accurate quantification of the burden of paediatric trauma in Pietermaritzburg. This has improved our understanding of the mechanisms and patterns of injury, and has identified a high incidence of intentional and penetrating trauma as well as road traffic collisions. These data can be used to guide strategies to reduce the burden of paediatric trauma in our environment. PMID:26263934

  14. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Philippa S.; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E.; Desai, Ashish P.; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J. Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management. PMID:26703719

  15. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Philippa S; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E; Desai, Ashish P; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H

    2015-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management. PMID:26703719

  16. Off-label use of maraviroc in HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Claudia; Gómez, María Luisa Navarro; Soler-Palacín, Pere; González-Tomé, María Isabel; De Ory, Santiago J; Espiau, María; Hoyos, Santiago Pérez; León-Leal, Juan Antonio; Méndez, María; Moreno-Pérez, David; Guasch, Claudia Fortuny; Sierra, Antoni Mur; Guruceta, Itziar Pocheville; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; Briz, Verónica

    2015-10-23

    Maraviroc (MVC) is not approved for HIV-1-infected paediatric patients. This is the first assessment of the use of MVC-based salvage therapy in vertically HIV-1-infected paediatric patients in clinical settings. The results suggest that MVC-based salvage therapy is useful in children and adolescents with extensive resistance profile leading to maintained virological suppression in up to 88% of the patients with CCR5-tropic virus. The likelihood of treatment success might increase when MVC is combined with other active drugs. PMID:26544580

  17. Beyond counting cases: public health impacts of national Paediatric Surveillance Units

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, D; Elliott, E J; Zurynski, Y; Pereira, R Rodrigues; Preece, M; Lynn, R; von Kries, R; Zimmermann, H; Dickson, N P; Virella, D

    2007-01-01

    Paediatric Surveillance Units (PSUs) have been established in 14 countries and facilitate national, prospective, active surveillance for a range of conditions, with monthly reporting by child health specialists. The International Network of Paediatric Surveillance Units (INoPSU) was established in 1998 and facilitates international collaboration among member PSUs and allows for sharing of resources, simultaneous data collection and hence comparison of data from different geographical regions. The impact of data collected by PSUs, both individually and collectively as members of INoPSU, on public health outcomes, clinical care and research is described. PMID:17158859

  18. Perinatal and paediatric post-mortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMR): sequences and technique.

    PubMed

    Norman, Wendy; Jawad, Noorulhuda; Jones, Rod; Taylor, Andrew M; Arthurs, Owen J

    2016-06-01

    As post-mortem MRI (PMMR) becomes more widely used for investigation following perinatal and paediatric deaths, the best possible images should be acquired. In this article, we review the most widely used published PMMR sequences, together with outlining our acquisition protocol and sequence parameters for foetal, perinatal and paediatric PMMR. We give examples of both normal and abnormal appearances, so that the reader can understand the logic behind each acquisition step before interpretation, as a useful day-to-day reference guide to performing PMMR. PMID:26916282

  19. Progress review of the European Paediatric Regulatory Framework after six years of implementation.

    PubMed

    Mentzer, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    The EU regulation (EU 1901/2006 Paediatric Regulation) that entered into force in 2007 has changed the field of medicinal drug development for children in the EU. Five years after its implementation a large number changes due to this regulation have been incorporated by Pharmaceutical Industry considering the development of new candidate drug. This report is a review of changes already implemented and the aspects of paediatric drug development, which still needs to be addressed in future working in the fields to provide better medicines for children. PMID:24613178

  20. The paediatric flat foot and general anthropometry in 140 Australian school children aged 7 - 10 years

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many studies have found a positive relationship between increased body weight and flat foot posture in children. Methods From a study population of 140 children aged seven to 10 years, a sample of 31 children with flat feet was identified by screening with the FPI-6. Basic anthropometric measures were compared between subjects with and without flat feet as designated. Results The results of this study, in contrast to many others, question the association of flat feet and heavy children. A significant relationship between foot posture and weight (FPI (L) r = -0.186 (p < 0.05), FPI(R) r = -0.194 (p < 0.05), waist girth (FPI (L) r = -0.213 (p < 0.05), FPI(R) r = -0.228 (p < 0.01) and BMI (FPI (L) r = -0.243 (p < 0.01), FPI(R) r = -0.263 (p < 0.01) was identified, but was both weak and inverse. Conclusions This study presents results which conflict with those of many previous investigations addressing the relationship between children's weight and foot posture. In contrast to previous studies, the implication of these results is that heavy children have less flat feet. Further investigation is warranted using a standardized approach to assessment and a larger sample of children to test this apparent contradiction. PMID:21513507

  1. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  2. Observational gait assessment tools in paediatrics--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, Chandrasekar; Bateman, Andrew; Peirson, Janet; Skinner, Jane

    2014-06-01

    Instrumented gait analysis (IGA) is an expensive technique used to objectively detect gait abnormalities in children. Observational gait assessment is considered as a cost effective alternate for IGA in regular clinical practice. This article is aimed at systematically reviewing the available paediatric gait analysis tools and examines their reliability and validity compared to IGA. This review also examines the structure of these tools, their clinical use and limitations. Articles were searched from PubMed, CINHL, AMED, BNI, EMBASE, PEDro and Cochrane library from the earliest record on the database to December 2012. Hand searches were carried out in a few journals. Studies that examined children's gait using a structured assessment tool were included and analysed for their quality, reliability and validity. Pre-established criteria were used to judge the quality of methodology and reliability and validity. Five observational gait tools for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and one for children with Downs Syndrome were identified. Nine studies related to children with CP were enrolled for this review. None of the tools have accomplished the level of IGA's consistency. Edinburgh Visual Gait Score (EVGS) was found to have better reliability and validity than the other tools. Very limited studies were available for most of the gait assessment tools therefore their clinical use cannot be judged based on the existing evidence. EVGS was found to have better concurrent validity and reliability and it should be considered to assess CP gait in regular practice. Future work to investigate the use of low cost technology to improve observers' accuracy of EVGS is suggested. PMID:24798609

  3. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2015 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Álvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; García Sánchez, N; Hernández Merino, A; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2015-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics updates the immunisation schedule every year, taking into account epidemiological data as well as evidence on the safety, effectiveness and efficiency of current vaccines, including levels of recommendation. In our opinion, this is the optimal vaccination calendar for all children resident in Spain. Regarding the vaccines included in the official unified immunization schedule, the Committee emphasizes the administration of the first dose of hepatitis B either at birth or at 2 months of life; the recommendation of the first dose of MMR and varicella vaccine at the age of 12 months, with the second dose at the age of 2-3 years; DTaP or Tdap vaccine at the age of 6 years, followed by another Tdap booster dose at 11-12 years old; Tdap strategies for pregnant women and household contacts of the newborn, and immunization against human papillomavirus in girls aged 11-12 years old with a 2 dose scheme (0, 6 months). The Committee reasserts its recommendation to include vaccination against pneumococcal disease in the routine immunisation schedule, the same as it is being conducted in Western European countries. The recently authorised meningococcal B vaccine, currently blocked in Spain, exhibits the profile of a universal vaccine. The Committe insists on the need of having the vaccine available in communitary pharmacies. It has also proposed the free availability of varicella vaccines. Their efectiveness and safety have been confirmed when they are administred from the second year of life. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants. The Committee stresses the need to vaccinate population groups considered at risk against influenza and hepatitis A. PMID:25554656

  4. [Vaccination schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: recommendations 2011].

    PubMed

    Marès Bermúdez, J; van Esso Arbolave, D; Moreno-Pérez, D; Merino Moína, M; Alvarez García, F J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Ortigosa del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J; Barrio Corrales, F; González-Hachero, J

    2011-02-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Paediatric Association updates annually the immunization schedule, taking into account epidemiological data as well as evidence of the effectiveness and efficiency of vaccines. This vaccination schedule includes grades of recommendation. The committee has graded as universal vaccines those that all children should receive, as recommended, those with a profile of universal vaccines of childhood and as are desirable those that all children may receive, but that can be prioritized based on public funding resources and for risk groups, targeting those groups of people in epidemiological situations of risk. The Committee considers as a priority to achieve a common immunization schedule for Spain. The Committee reaffirms the recommendation to include pneumococcal vaccination in the routine vaccination schedule. Vaccination against varicella in the second year of life is an effective strategy and therefore a desirable goal. Given the morbidity and high burden on the health care system, vaccination against rotavirus is recommended for all infants. Due to the current problems of availability of both vaccines, associated with the recent finding of circovirus, the committee urges that rotavirus vaccination is restarted as soon as possible as it is considered a desirable health benefit for all children in our country. The Committee adheres to the recommendations of the National Health Coordination Council in reference to routine vaccination against HPV for all girls aged 11 to 14 years and stresses the need to vaccinate all patients with risk factors for these diseases against influenza and hepatitis A. Finally, it stresses the need to update incomplete immunizations using accelerated immunization schedules. PMID:21215719

  5. Computed tomographic evaluation of mouth breathers among paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Farid, MM; Metwalli, N

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Mouth breathing causes many serious problems in the paediatric population. It has been maintained that enlarged adenoids are principally responsible for mouth breathing. This study was designed to evaluate whether other mechanical obstacles might predispose the child to mouth breathing. Methods 67 children with ages ranging from 10 to 15 years were studied and grouped into mouth-breathers and nose-breathers. The children first underwent axial CT scans of the brain for which they were originally referred. In addition, they were subjected to a limited coronal CT examination of the paranasal sinuses. Congenital anatomical variations as well as inflammatory changes were assessed. Results 87% of mouth-breathing children had hypertrophied adenoids, 77% had maxillary sinusitis, 74% had pneumatized middle concha, 55% had a deviated nasal septum, 55% had hypertrophied inferior conchae, 45% had ethmoidal sinusitis and 23% showed frontal sinusitis. Such changes were significantly less prevalent in nose-breathers. 12.9% of mouth-breathing children did not have adenoids. Of these children, only 3.3% had one or more congenital or inflammatory change whereas the other 9.6% showed a completely normal CT scan signifying the incidence of habitual non-obstructive mouth breathing. Conclusions It is clear that adenoids have a dominant role in causing mouth breathing. Yet, we recommend that paediatricians should assess other mechanical obstacles if mouth breathing was not corrected after adenoidectomy. Further research should be performed to test the validity of correction of such factors in improving the quality of life of mouth-breathing children. PMID:20089737

  6. Current issues in the management of paediatric viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Latifa T F; Roberts, Eve A

    2010-01-01

    Viral hepatitis poses important problems for children. In preschoolers, hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection frequently causes acute liver failure. Vaccinating toddlers against HAV in countries with high endemicity is expected to decrease mortality. HAV vaccine demonstrates efficacy (comparable to immunoglobulin) as post-exposure prophylaxis. A recently developed vaccine against hepatitis E virus (HEV) may benefit fetal health, because pregnant women are most prone to acute liver failure as a result of HEV. Hepatitis B vaccine continues to demonstrate value and versatility for preventing serious liver disease. With chronic infection, undetectable levels of serum HBV DNA complement e-seroconversion as the preferred outcome measure; suppressed viral load correlates with long-term complications better than HBeAg status. Among Taiwanese children, low pretreatment HBV DNA (<2 x 10(8) copies/ml) strongly predicted response to interferon-alpha. Future paediatric studies must incorporate HBV DNA levels. The rationale for routine treatment of immunotolerant hepatitis B during childhood remains uncertain. Any treatment of chronic hepatitis B in childhood requires consideration of the risks and benefits. Childhood hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results mainly from mother-to-infant transmission. Babies of HCV-infected women should be tested for serum HCV RNA at 1 month of age. If negative, confirmatory anti-HCV antibody testing may be performed between 12 and 15 months of age. Children with chronic hepatitis C may develop progressive fibrosis/cirrhosis, particularly in the setting of obesity and insulin resistance. Treatment of children chronically infected with genotype 2 or 3 is highly successful: combination therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is well tolerated and superior to pegylated interferon-alpha alone. PMID:19840256

  7. [Relevance of early paediatric care for boys with severe haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Chambost, H; Meunier, S

    2006-11-01

    Major molecular and genetic findings over the last decades and subsequent applications for diagnosis and therapeutic concerns have dramatically improved the evolution of severe haemophilia in countries with high economic resources. Another major factor of progress consisted in the setting of comprehensive care centres coordinating the care at a regional level. The early involvement of paediatricians for this rare and potentially serious chronic disease, which may be symptomatic from birth, is relevant in this context. Indeed, the early diagnosis of severe haemophilia and the involvement of expert caregivers in a multidisciplinary approach, are essential to make the acceptance of the disease easier. The diagnosis announcement should go together with a therapeutic project, which is nowadays based on long-term prophylaxis. Awaiting for likely curative treatments in the future, such as gene therapy, early implementation of prophylaxis and observance of this gold standard treatment during all the period of growth are critical to prevent the haemophilic arthropathy, to favour the future social and work-related integration and overall to improve the quality of life. The occurrence of an inhibitor represents the major residual complication of replacement therapy, especially for young children with severe haemophilia A. Even though new therapeutic resources brought substantial improvements for inhibitor patients, a better understanding of risk factors is a key issue since more accurate replacement regimen might induce tolerance during the first exposures and subsequently might prevent this complication. Prophylaxis and inhibitors that represent major concerns in paediatric care of severe haemophilia are included as main research objectives for the national registry " FranceCoag Network". PMID:16928435

  8. International Paediatric Stroke Study: stroke associated with cardiac disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Michael M.; Hynan, Linda S.; Lo, Warren; Licht, Daniel J.; McClure, Chalmer; Yager, Jerome Y.; Dlamini, Nomazulu; Kirkham, Fenella J.; deVeber, Gabrielle; Pavlakis, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Background and hypothesis The aetiologies of arterial ischaemic stroke in children are diverse and often multi-factorial. A large proportion occurs in children with cardiac disorders. We hypothesized that the clinical and radiographic features of children with arterial ischaemic stroke attributed to cardiac disorders would differ from those with other causes. Methods Using the large population collected in the prospective International Paediatric Stroke Study, we analysed the characteristics, clinical presentations, imaging findings, and early outcomes of children with and without cardiac disorders. Results Aetiological data were available for 667 children with arterial ischaemic stroke (ages 29 days to 19 years). Cardiac disorders were indentified in 204/667 (30·6%), congenital defects in 121/204 (59·3%), acquired in 40/204 (19·6%), and isolated patent foramen ovale in 31/204 (15·2%). Compared to other children with stroke, those with cardiac disorders were younger (median age 3·1 vs. 6·5 years; P < 0·001) and less likely to present with headache (25·6% vs. 44·6%; P < 0·001), but were similar in terms of gender and presentation with focal deficits, seizures, or recent infection. Analysis of imaging data identified significant differences (P = 0·005) in the vascular distribution (anterior vs. posterior circulation or both) between groups. Bilateral strokes and haemorrhagic conversion were more prevalent in the cardiac disorders group. Conclusions Cardiac disorders were identified in almost one-third of children with arterial ischaemic stroke. They had similar clinical presentations to those without cardiac disorders but differed in age and headache prevalence. Children with cardiac disorders more frequently had a ‘cardioembolic stroke pattern’ with a higher prevalence of bilateral strokes in both the anterior and posterior circulations, and a greater tendency to haemorrhagic transformation. PMID:23231361

  9. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2016 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Álvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; García Sánchez, N; Hernández Merino, A; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2016-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) annually publishes the immunisation schedule which, in our opinion, estimates optimal for children resident in Spain, considering available evidence on current vaccines. We acknowledge the effort of the Ministry of Health during the last year in order to optimize the funded unified Spanish vaccination schedule, with the recent inclusion of pneumococcal and varicella vaccination in early infancy. Regarding the funded vaccines included in the official unified immunization schedule, taking into account available data, CAV-AEP recommends 2+1 strategy (2, 4 and 12 months) with hexavalent (DTPa-IPV-Hib-HB) vaccines and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Administration of Tdap and poliomyelitis booster dose at the age of 6 is recommended, as well as Tdap vaccine for adolescents and pregnant women, between 27-36 weeks gestation. The two-dose scheme should be used for MMR (12 months and 2-4 years) and varicella (15 months and 2-4 years). Coverage of human papillomavirus vaccination in girls aged 11-12 with a two dose scheme (0, 6 months) should be improved. Information for male adolescents about potential beneficial effects of this immunisation should be provided as well. Regarding recommended unfunded immunisations, CAV-AEP recommends the administration of meningococcal B vaccine, due to the current availability in Spanish communitary pharmacies, with a 3+1 scheme (3, 5, 7 and 13-15 months). CAV-AEP requests the incorporation of this vaccine in the funded unified schedule. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants. Annual influenza immunisation and vaccination against hepatitis A are indicated in population groups considered at risk. PMID:26589473

  10. The impact of electronic cigarettes on the paediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Durmowicz, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the impact of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) on children. Methods Five electronic databases were searched through 31 December 2013. Studies in English that included data for children younger than 18 years of age were included. In addition, relevant data from articles identified during searches of the e-cigarette literature, relevant state survey data and paediatric voluntary adverse event reports submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were reviewed and included. Results Use of e-cigarettes by youth is increasing and is not limited to traditional cigarette smokers. Data regarding the reasons for youth e-cigarette initiation and ongoing use are limited. The effects of e-cigarette marketing and the availability of flavoured e-liquids on youth use are unknown. The abuse liability of e-cigarettes in youth is also not known. Unintentional exposures to e-cigarettes and e-liquids have been reported in children. The number of e-cigarette-related reports received by poison centres is increasing. No data are available on secondhand and thirdhand e-cigarette aerosol exposures in children. Conclusions Data on the impact of e-cigarettes on children are extremely limited. The available data indicate that youth awareness is high and use is increasing rapidly. The extent to which e-cigarette use in youth will result in nicotine dependence and subsequent use of other tobacco products is unknown. e-cigarettes present risks of unintentional nicotine exposure and are potential choking hazards. A greater understanding of the impact of e-cigarettes on children is needed and will be important in the evaluation of the effects of these products on the public health. PMID:24732163

  11. Supplementary enteral nutrition maintains remission in paediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilschanski, M; Sherman, P; Pencharz, P; Davis, L; Corey, M; Griffiths, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Liquid diets given enterally combined with "bowel rest' are efficacious in the treatment of active Crohn's disease, but rapid recrudescence of gastrointestinal symptoms after resumption of a normal diet is common. AIMS--This study examined whether continuation of enteral nutrition as a nocturnal supplement to an ad libitum daytime intake of a normal diet increased the length of remission of Crohn's disease in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS--Children and adolescents with active Crohn's disease treated successfully with exclusive enteral nutrition were classified retrospectively according to whether they continued supplementary enteral nutrition or not. Time to relapse and linear growth were compared between the two cohorts. RESULTS--Between January 1986 and December 1992, 65 patients aged 7-17 years (mean (SD) 13.6 (2.1) years) (36 males, 29 females) with Crohn's disease in exacerbation were treated for > or = four weeks by bowel rest and nasogastric tube feeding of an oligopeptide or amino acid based formula. At first follow up visit, remission (fall in Paediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index, PCDAI to < or = 20) was achieved in 47 of 65 (72%) patients. Subsequently, 20 of these 47 (43%) relapsed by six months and 28 of 47 (60%) by 12 months. Patients who continued nasogastric supplementary feeding (n = 28) after resumption of an otherwise normal diet remained well longer than those who discontinued nocturnal supplements completely (n = 19) (p < 0.02). Furthermore, continued use of nasogastric supplements before completion of puberty was associated with improved linear growth. CONCLUSION--After successful treatment of active Crohn's disease by exclusive enteral nutrition, supplementary enteral nutrition without restriction of normal diet is associated with prolongation of remission and improved linear growth in children and adolescents. PMID:8707085

  12. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed. PMID:27277901

  13. Facilitators and Barriers to Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Trial Participation: Multi-National Perspective of People Living with Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kim D; Cowan, Rachel E; Horsewell, Jane

    2016-03-01

    These are exciting times for the translation of promising interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) into testing with clinical trials. These interventions include acute surgical decompression, neuroprotection, neural repair, cell replacement, activity-based rehabilitation, and medical devices, including devices requiring surgical implantation. By nature, clinical trials can have strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, which narrow down the pool of potential participants. Meeting enrollment numbers for properly powered trials is a daunting task. Therefore, it is important that trials are designed in a manner that facilitates participation. The purpose of this research study was to learn more about the factors that encourage or interfere with the decision to participate in clinical trials from the perspective of people living with SCI. A multi-national survey was conducted, primarily online, in which 802 participants with SCI ranked 32 factors as facilitators or barriers, using a Likert-type scale. There were 13 universal facilitators, five universal barriers, and three universally neutral factors. The number one facilitator was possible improvement in functionality and the number one barrier was possible decline in functionality-as may be expected. However, many unexpected facilitators and barriers were identified. There also were certain factors that were strong barriers or facilitators to certain sub-groups of people living with SCI. All of these factors should be taken into careful consideration when designing clinical trials so as to promote enrollment and enable adherence to different protocols. PMID:26414175

  14. Community paediatric respiratory infection surveillance study protocol: a feasibility, prospective inception cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Emma C; Ingle, Suzanne Marie; Muir, Peter; Beck, Charles; Finn, Adam; Leeming, John Peter; Cabral, Christie; Kesten, Joanna May; Hay, Alastair D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paediatric respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are common reasons for primary care consultations and antibiotic prescribing. Locally relevant syndromic and microbiological surveillance information has the potential to improve the care of children with RTIs by normalising illness (parents) and reducing uncertainty (clinicians). Currently, most RTI studies are conducted at the point of healthcare service consultation, leaving the community burden, microbiology, symptom duration and proportion consulting largely unknown. This study seeks to establish the feasibility of (mainly online) participant recruitment and retention, and the acceptability/comparability of parent versus nurse-collected microbiological sampling, to inform the design of a future surveillance intervention study. Evidence regarding consultation rates and symptom duration is also sought. Methods and analysis A community-based, feasibility prospective inception cohort study, recruiting children aged ≥3 months and <16 years and their parents via general practitioner surgery invitation letter, aiming to collect data on 300 incident RTIs by July 2016. Following informed consent, parents provide baseline (demographic) data online, and respond to weekly emails to confirm the absence/presence of new RTI symptoms. Once symptomatic, parents provide daily data online (RTI symptoms, school/day-care attendance, time off work, health service use, medication), and a research nurse visits to collect clinical examination data and microbiological (nasal and saliva) swabs. Parents are invited to provide symptomatic (at nurse visit, but without nurse assistance) and asymptomatic (alone) swabs on recovery. A review of primary care medical notes will gather medical history, health service utilisation, referral and antibiotic prescribing rates. Feasibility will be assessed using recruitment and retention rates, data completeness; and acceptability by quantitative survey and qualitative interviews

  15. Implementation of smart pump technology in a paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Rodríguez, Silvia; Sánchez-Galindo, Amelia C; de Lorenzo-Pinto, Ana; González-Vives, Leticia; López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo-Álvarez, Ángel; Sanjurjo-Sáez, María; Fernández-Llamazares, Cecilia M

    2015-09-01

    Patient safety is a matter of major concern that involves every health professional. Nowadays, emerging technologies such as smart pumps can diminish medication errors as well as standardise and improve clinical practice with the subsequent benefits for patients. The aim of this paper was to describe the smart pump implementation process in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and to present the most relevant infusion-related programming errors that were prevented. This was a comparative study between CareFusion Alaris Guardrails(®) and Hospira MedNet(®) systems, as well as a prospective and intervention study with analytical components carried out in the PICU of Gregorio Marañón General and Teaching Hospital. All intravenous infusions programmed with a pump in the eleven beds of the unit were analyzed. A drug library was developed and subsequently loaded into CareFusion and Hospira pumps that were used during a three month period each. The most suitable system for implementation was selected according to their differences in features and users' acceptance. Data stored in the pumps were analyzed to assess user compliance with the technology, health care setting and type of errors intercepted. The implementation process was carried out with CareFusion systems. Compliance with the technology was 92% and user acceptance was high. Vacation substitution and drug administration periods were significantly associated with a greater number of infusion-related programming errors. High risk drugs were involved in 48% of intercepted errors. Based on these results we can conclude that implementation of smart pumps proved effective in intercepting infusion-related programming errors from reaching patients. User awareness of the importance of programming infusions with the drug library is the key to succeed in the implementation process. PMID:24496443

  16. Psychosocial Predictors of Non-Adherence and Treatment Failure in a Large Scale Multi-National Trial of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV: Data from the ACTG A5175/PEARLS Trial

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; Biello, Katie B.; Smeaton, Laura; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Walawander, Ann; Lama, Javier R.; Rana, Aadia; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Kayoyo, Virginia M.; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Joglekar, Anjali; Celentano, David; Martinez, Ana; Remmert, Jocelyn E.; Nair, Aspara; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James; Campbell, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Background PEARLS, a large scale trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV (n = 1,571, 9 countries, 4 continents), found that a once-daily protease inhibitor (PI) based regimen (ATV+DDI+FTC), but not a once-daily non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor/nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI/NRTI) regimen (EFV+FTC/TDF), had inferior efficacy compared to a standard of care twice-daily NNRTI/NRTI regimen (EFV+3TC/ZDV). The present study examined non-adherence in PEARLS. Methods Outcomes: non-adherence assessed by pill count and by self-report, and time to treatment failure. Longitudinal predictors: regimen, quality of life (general health perceptions  =  QOL-health, mental health  =  QOL-mental health), social support, substance use, binge drinking, and sexual behaviors. “Life-Steps” adherence counseling was provided. Results In both pill-count and self-report multivariable models, both once-a-day regimens had lower levels of non-adherence than the twice-a-day standard of care regimen; although these associations attenuated with time in the self-report model. In both multivariable models, hard-drug use was associated with non-adherence, living in Africa and better QOL-health were associated with less non-adherence. According to pill-count, unprotected sex was associated with non-adherence. According to self-report, soft-drug use was associated with non-adherence and living in Asia was associated with less non-adherence. Both pill-count (HR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.15, 2.09, p<.01) and self-report (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.13, p<.01) non-adherence were significant predictors of treatment failure over 72 weeks. In multivariable models (including pill-count or self-report nonadherence), worse QOL-health, age group (younger), and region were also significant predictors of treatment failure. Conclusion In the context of a large, multi-national, multi-continent, clinical trial there were variations in adherence over time, with more

  17. The prioritisation of paediatrics and palliative care in cancer control plans in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, M S; Yao, A J J; Renner, L A; Harif, M; Lam, C G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the burden of childhood cancer and palliative care need in Africa, this paper investigated the paediatric and palliative care elements in cancer control plans. Methods: We conducted a comparative content analysis of accessible national cancer control plans in Africa, using a health systems perspective attentive to context, development, scope, and monitoring/evaluation. Burden estimates were derived from World Bank, World Health Organisation, and Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance. Results: Eighteen national plans and one Africa-wide plan (10 English, 9 French) were accessible, representing 9 low-, 4 lower-middle-, and 5 upper-middle-income settings. Ten plans discussed cancer control in the context of noncommunicable diseases. Paediatric cancer was mentioned in 7 national plans, representing 5127 children, or 13% of the estimated continental burden for children aged 0–14 years. Palliative care needs were recognised in 11 national plans, representing 157 490 children, or 24% of the estimated Africa-wide burden for children aged 0–14 years; four plans specified paediatric palliative needs. Palliative care was itemised in four budgets. Sample indicators and equity measures were identified, including those highlighting contextual needs for treatment access and completion. Conclusions: Recognising explicit strategies and funding for paediatric and palliative services may guide prioritised cancer control efforts in resource-limited settings. PMID:26042935

  18. Inequalities in the Provision of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapy Services across London Boroughs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The inverse-care law suggests that fewer healthcare resources are available in deprived areas where health needs are greatest. Aims: To examine the provision of paediatric speech and language services across London boroughs and to relate provision to the level of deprivation of the boroughs. Methods & Procedures: Information on the…

  19. Non-operative advances: what has happened in the last 50 years in paediatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew J A; McBride, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric surgeons remain paediatric clinicians who have the unique skill set to treat children with surgical problems that may require operative intervention. Many of the advances in paediatric surgical care have occurred outside the operating theatre and have involved significant input from medical, nursing and allied health colleagues. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units, especially those focusing on the care of surgical infants, has greatly enhanced the survival rates and long-term outcomes of those infants with major congenital anomalies requiring surgical repair. Educational initiatives such as the advanced trauma life support and emergency management of severe burns courses have facilitated improved understanding and clinical care. Paediatric surgeons have led with the non-operative management of solid organ injury following blunt abdominal trauma. Nano-crystalline burn wound dressings have enabled a reduced frequency of painful dressing changes in addition to effective antimicrobial efficacy and enhanced burn wound healing. Burns care has evolved so that many children may now be treated almost exclusively in an ambulatory care setting or as day case-only patients, with novel technologies allowing accurate prediction of burn would outcome and planning of elective operative intervention to achieve burn wound closure. PMID:25588791

  20. Movie making as a cognitive distraction for paediatric patients receiving radiotherapy treatment: qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Shrimpton, Bradley J M; Willis, David J; Tongs, Cáthal D; Rolfo, Aldo G

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To establish the outcomes achieved by using an innovative movie-making programme designed to reduce fear of radiotherapy among paediatric patients. Design Qualitative descriptive evaluation based on semistructured, qualitative interviews with purposeful sampling and thematic analysis. Setting Tertiary Cancer Centre. Participants 20 parents of paediatric patients who had produced a movie of their radiation therapy experience and were in a follow-up phase of cancer management. Results Participants attributed a broad range of outcomes to the movie-making program. These included that the programme had helped reduce anxiety and distress exhibited by paediatric patients and contributed to a willingness to receive treatment. Other outcomes were that the completed movies had been used in school reintegration and for maintaining social connections. Conclusions Allowing children to create a video of their experience of radiotherapy provided a range of benefits to paediatric patients that varied according to their needs. For some patients, movie-making offered a valuable medium for overcoming fear of the unknown as well as increasing understanding of treatment processes. For others, the development of a personalised video offered an important cognitive/attentional distraction through engaging with an age-appropriate activity. Together these outcomes helped children maintain self-control and a positive outlook. PMID:23328308

  1. Professional and organizational commitment in paediatric occupational therapists: the influence of practice setting.

    PubMed

    Seruya, Francine M; Hinojosa, Jim

    2010-09-01

    The professional and organizational commitment of paediatric occupational therapists working in two distinct practice settings, schools and medically based settings, was investigated. A web-based survey program was used to administer a questionnaire to occupational therapists employed in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. The study employed social identity theory as a guiding perspective in understanding therapists' professional and organizational commitment. One hundred and fifty-seven paediatric therapists responded to the Professional Commitment Questionnaire and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire to gauge their commitment to both the profession and their employing organizations. Results indicated that paediatric therapists, regardless of employment setting, have high professional commitment. Paediatric occupational therapists employed in medically based settings indicated statistically significant higher organizational commitment than their school-based counterparts. For therapists that work in school settings, the presence of a professional cohort did not influence professional commitment scores. As the study employed a web-based survey methodology, only individuals who were members of associations and had access to a computer and the Internet were able to participate. Further study might include widening the participant pool as well as adding additional instruments to explore both professional and organizational commitment on a more national scale. PMID:20806287

  2. Paediatric cardiology programs in countries with limited resources: how to bridge the gap

    PubMed Central

    Sulafa, K.M. Ali

    2010-01-01

    Establishing paediatric cardiology service in a country with limited resources like Sudan is a challenging task. A paediatric cardiac team was formed then the services in different disciplines were gradually established. Echocardiography (echo) clinics were founded in tertiary and peripheral hospitals. Cardiac catheterization (cath) was established at the Sudan Heart Centre (SHC) in 2004 and over 400 procedures had been performed including interventional catheterization like pulmonary valve dilatation, patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defect device closure. Congenital heart surgery started in 2001, currently 200 cases are done each year including closed procedures as well as open heart procedures for patients weighing more than 8 kg. Cardiology-cardiac surgery as well as adult congenital heart disease meetings were held and contributed positively to the services. The cardiology-cardiac surgery scientific club meeting was founded as a forum for academic discussions. A fellowship program was established in 2004 and included seven candidates trained in paediatric cardiology and intensive care. Two training courses had been established: congenital heart disease echo and paediatric electrocardiogram interpretation. Links with regional and international cardiac centres had important roles in consolidating our program. Significant obstacles face our service due to the small number of trained personnel, high cost of procedures, the lack of regular supplies and lack of cardiac intensive care facilities for young infants. Bridging the huge gap needs extensive official as well as non-governmental efforts, training more staff, supporting families and collaboration with regional and international centres. PMID:23960607

  3. Survey of Oxygen Delivery Practices in UK Paediatric Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Administration of supplemental oxygen is common in paediatric intensive care. We explored the current practice of oxygen administration using a case vignette in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the united kingdom. Methods. We conducted an online survey of Paediatric Intensive Care Society members in the UK. The survey outlined a clinical scenario followed by questions on oxygenation targets for 5 common diagnoses seen in critically ill children. Results. Fifty-three paediatric intensive care unit members from 10 institutions completed the survey. In a child with moderate ventilatory requirements, 21 respondents (42%) did not follow arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) targets. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, there was a trend to aim for lower PaO2 as the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) increased. Conversely, in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension, respondents aimed for normal PaO2 even as the FiO2 increased. Conclusions. In this sample of clinicians PaO2 targets were not commonly used. Clinicians target lower PaO2 as FiO2 increases in acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis whilst targeting normal range irrespective of FiO2 in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27516901

  4. Systemic exposure to menthol following administration of peppermint oil to paediatric patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peppermint oil (PMO) has been used to treat abdominal ailments dating to ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Despite its increasing paediatric use, as in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) treatment, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of menthol in children given PMO has not been explored. Single-site, exploratory p...

  5. Case report: paediatric intramuscular haemangiomata--don't overlook the phlebolith!

    PubMed

    Morris, S J; Adams, H

    1995-02-01

    Three children presented with soft tissue masses which were clinically suspected to be soft tissue sarcomas. The identification of phleboliths on initial radiological studies should have suggested the correct diagnosis of benign intramuscular haemangiomata. Subsequent referral to a paediatric oncological unit, and the unnecessary parental anxiety so generated, could have been avoided. PMID:7735755

  6. The Self-Directed Learning Experience of Mothers Whose Child Has Had a Paediatric Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Kenda S.

    2014-01-01

    This study employed qualitative research methodology to explore the experiences of mothers who self-directed their learning following their child's stroke diagnosis. Paediatric stroke, although rare, is among the top 10 causes of death in children in the USA, but information about the cause, treatment and long-term impact are difficult to…

  7. Paediatric cardiology programs in countries with limited resources: how to bridge the gap.

    PubMed

    Sulafa, K M Ali

    2010-07-01

    Establishing paediatric cardiology service in a country with limited resources like Sudan is a challenging task. A paediatric cardiac team was formed then the services in different disciplines were gradually established. Echocardiography (echo) clinics were founded in tertiary and peripheral hospitals. Cardiac catheterization (cath) was established at the Sudan Heart Centre (SHC) in 2004 and over 400 procedures had been performed including interventional catheterization like pulmonary valve dilatation, patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defect device closure. Congenital heart surgery started in 2001, currently 200 cases are done each year including closed procedures as well as open heart procedures for patients weighing more than 8 kg. Cardiology-cardiac surgery as well as adult congenital heart disease meetings were held and contributed positively to the services. The cardiology-cardiac surgery scientific club meeting was founded as a forum for academic discussions. A fellowship program was established in 2004 and included seven candidates trained in paediatric cardiology and intensive care. Two training courses had been established: congenital heart disease echo and paediatric electrocardiogram interpretation. Links with regional and international cardiac centres had important roles in consolidating our program. Significant obstacles face our service due to the small number of trained personnel, high cost of procedures, the lack of regular supplies and lack of cardiac intensive care facilities for young infants. Bridging the huge gap needs extensive official as well as non-governmental efforts, training more staff, supporting families and collaboration with regional and international centres. PMID:23960607

  8. Paediatric necrotizing fasciitis complicating third molar extraction: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, P; Engroff, S L; Jansisyanont, P; Ord, R A

    2004-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon but well-described entity. In the paediatric population compromising risk factors are frequently absent. We describe the successful treatment of a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in a healthy 14-year-old male following routine extraction of an uninfected wisdom tooth for orthodontic purposes. PMID:15145048

  9. Paediatric CT optimisation utilising Catphan® 600 and age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana; Batista, Maria do Carmo; Foley, Shane; Paulo, Graciano; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study is to perform phantom-based optimisation of paediatric computed tomography (CT) protocols and quantify the impact upon radiation dose and image noise levels. The study involved three Portuguese paediatric centres. Currently employed scanning protocols for head and chest examinations and combinations of exposure parameters were applied to a Catphan(®)600 phantom to review the CT dose impact. Contrast-noise ratio (CNR) was quantified using Radia Diagnostic(®) tool. Imaging parameters, returning similar CNRs (<1) and dose savings were applied to three paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms. OsiriX software based on standard deviation pixel values facilitated image noise analysis. Currently employed protocols and age categorisation varied between centres. Manipulation of exposure parameters facilitated mean dose reductions of 33 and 28 % for paediatric head and chest CT examinations, respectively. The majority of the optimised CT examinations resulted in image noise similar to currently employed protocols. Dose reductions of up to 33 % were achieved with image quality maintained. PMID:24567497

  10. Filtration to reduce paediatric dose for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray machine.

    PubMed

    Perks, T D; Dendere, R; Irving, B; Hartley, T; Scholtz, P; Lawson, A; Trauernicht, C; Steiner, S; Douglas, T S

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes modelling, application and validation of a filtration technique for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray system to reduce radiation dose to paediatric patients while preserving diagnostic image quality. A dose prediction model was implemented, which calculates patient entrance doses using variable input parameters. Effective dose is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation. An added filter of 1.8-mm aluminium was predicted to lower the radiation dose significantly. An objective image quality study was conducted using detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The PTW Normi 4FLU test phantom was used for quantitative assessment, showing that image contrast and spatial resolution were maintained with the proposed filter. A paediatric cadaver full-body imaging trial assessed the diagnostic quality of the images and measured the dose reduction using a 1.8-mm aluminium filter. Assessment by radiologists indicated that diagnostic quality was maintained with the added filtration, despite a reduction in DQE. A new filtration technique for full-body paediatric scanning on the Lodox Statscan has been validated, reducing entrance dose for paediatric patients by 36 % on average and effective dose by 27 % on average, while maintaining image quality. PMID:25433049

  11. Reduced N400 Semantic Priming Effects in Adult Survivors of Paediatric and Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knuepffer, C.; Murdoch, B. E.; Lloyd, D.; Lewis, F. M.; Hinchliffe, F. J.

    2012-01-01

    The immediate and long-term neural correlates of linguistic processing deficits reported following paediatric and adolescent traumatic brain injury (TBI) are poorly understood. Therefore, the current research investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited during a semantic picture-word priming experiment in two groups of highly functioning…

  12. An Overview of a UK Paediatric Visual Impaired Population and Low Vision Aid Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodorou, Nana; Shipman, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out to evaluate the paediatric visual impaired population attending the Low Vision Clinic at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, over a period of 14 years. Data were collected and analysed for children less than 17 years for prevalence, demographics, registration status, aetiologies, and types of…

  13. V.A.C. Therapy in the management of paediatric wounds: clinical review and experience.

    PubMed

    Baharestani, Mona; Amjad, Ibrahim; Bookout, Kim; Fleck, Tatjana; Gabriel, Allen; Kaufman, David; McCord, Shannon Stone; Moores, Donald C; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Salazar, Jorge D; Song, David H; Teich, Steven; Gupta, Subhas

    2009-08-01

    Usage of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of acute and chronic wounds has grown exponentially in the past decade. Hundreds of studies have been published regarding outcomes and methods of therapy used for adult wounds. This treatment is increasingly being used to manage difficult-to-treat paediatric wounds arising from congenital defects, trauma, infection, tumour, burns, pressure ulceration and postsurgical complications in children, although relatively few studies have been aimed at this population. Given the anatomical and physiological differences between adults and children, a multidisciplinary expert advisory panel was convened to determine appropriate use of NPWT with reticulated open cell foam (NPWT/ROCF) as delivered by Vacuum Assisted Closure (V.A.C. Therapy, KCI Licensing, Inc., San Antonio, TX) for the treatment of paediatric wounds. The primary objectives of the expert advisory panel were to exchange state-of-practice information on paediatric wound care, review the published data regarding the use of NPWT/ROCF in paediatric wounds, evaluate the strength of the existing data and establish guidelines on best practices with NPWT/ROCF for the paediatric population. The proposed paediatrics-specific clinical practice guidelines are meant to provide practitioners an evidence base from which decisions could be made regarding the safe and efficacious selection of pressure settings, foam type, dressing change frequency and use of interposing contact layer selections. The guidelines reflect the state of knowledge on effective and appropriate wound care at the time of publication. They are the result of consensus reached by expert advisory panel members based on their individual clinical and published experiences related to the use of NPWT/ROCF in treating paediatric wounds. Best practices are described herein for novice and advanced users of NPWT/ROCF. Recommendations by the expert panel may not be appropriate for use in all

  14. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2014 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Alvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; García Sánchez, N; Hernández Merino, A; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2014-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) updates the immunisation schedule every year, taking into account epidemiological data as well as evidence on safety, effectiveness and efficiency of vaccines. The present schedule includes levels of recommendation. We have graded, as routine vaccinations, those that the CAV-AEP consider all children should receive; as recommended those that fit the profile for universal childhood immunisation and would ideally be given to all children, but that can be prioritised according to the resources available for their public funding; and as risk group vaccinations those that specifically target individuals in special situations. Immunisation schedules tend to be dynamic and adaptable to ongoing epidemiological changes. Based on the latest epidemiological trends, CAV-AEP recommends the administration of the first dose of MMR and varicella vaccines at age 12 months, with the second dose at age 2-3 years; the administration of DTaP or Tdap vaccine at age 4-6 years, always followed by another Tdap dose at 11-12 years; and the three meningococcal C scheme at 2 months, 12 months and 12 years of age. It reasserts its recommendation to include vaccination against pneumococcal disease in the routine immunisation schedule. The CAV-AEP believes that the coverage of vaccination against human papillomavirus in girls aged 11-12 years must be increased. Universal vaccination against varicella in the second year of life is an effective strategy, and the immediate public availability of the vaccine is requested in order to guarantee the right of healthy children to be vaccinated. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants due to the morbidity and elevated healthcare burden of the virus. The Committee stresses the need to vaccinate population groups considered at risk against influenza and hepatitis A. The recently authorised meningococcal B vaccine has opened a chapter of hope in the

  15. [Immunisation schedule of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics: 2013 recommendations].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Álvarez García, F J; Arístegui Fernández, J; Barrio Corrales, F; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Corretger Rauet, J M; González-Hachero, J; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Merino Moína, M; Ortigosa Del Castillo, L; Ruiz-Contreras, J

    2013-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) updates the immunisation schedule every year, taking into account epidemiological data as well as evidence on the safety, effectiveness and efficiency of vaccines. The present schedule includes levels of recommendation. We have graded as routine vaccinations those that the CAV-AEP consider all children should receive; as recommended those that fit the profile for universal childhood immunisation and would ideally be given to all children, but that can be prioritised according to the resources available for their public funding; and as risk group vaccinations those that specifically target individuals in situations of risk. Immunisation schedules tend to be dynamic and adaptable to ongoing epidemiological changes. Nevertheless, the achievement of a unified immunisation schedule in all regions of Spain is a top priority for the CAV-AEP. Based on the latest epidemiological trends, CAV-AEP follows the innovations proposed in the last year's schedule, such as the administration of the first dose of the MMR and the varicella vaccines at age 12 months and the second dose at age 2-3 years, as well as the administration of the Tdap vaccine at age 4-6 years, always followed by another dose at 11-14 years of age, preferably at 11-12 years. The CAV-AEP believes that the coverage of vaccination against human papillomavirus in girls aged 11-14 years, preferably at 11-12 years, must increase. It reasserts its recommendation to include vaccination against pneumococcal disease in the routine immunisation schedule. Universal vaccination against varicella in the second year of life is an effective strategy and therefore a desirable objective. Vaccination against rotavirus is recommended in all infants due to the morbidity and elevated healthcare burden of the virus. The Committee stresses the need to vaccinate population groups considered at risk against influenza and hepatitis A. Finally, it

  16. Promoting a Combination Approach to Paediatric HIV Psychosocial Support

    PubMed Central

    Amzel, Anouk; Toska, Elona; Lovich, Ronnie; Widyono, Monique; Patel, Tejal; Foti, Carrie; Dziuban, Eric J.; Phelps, B. Ryan; Sugandhi, Nandita; Mark, Daniella; Altschuler, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Ninety percent of the 3.4 million HIV-infected children live in sub-Saharan Africa. Their psychosocial well being is fundamental to establishing and maintaining successful treatment outcomes and overall quality of life. With the increased roll-out of antiretroviral treatment, HIV infection is shifting from a life-threatening to a chronic disease. However, even for paediatric patients enrolled in care and treatment, HIV can still be devastating due to the interaction of complex factors, particularly in the context of other household illness and overextended healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa. This article explores the negative effect of several interrelated HIV-specific factors on the psychosocial well being of HIV-infected children: disclosure, stigma and discrimination, and bereavement. However, drawing on clinical studies of resilience, it stresses the need to move beyond a focus on the individual as a full response to the needs of a sick child requires support for the individual child, caregiver-child dyads, extended families, communities, and institutions. This means providing early and progressive age appropriate interventions aimed at increasing the self-reliance and self-acceptance in children and their caregivers and promoting timely health-seeking behaviours. Critical barriers that cause poorer biomedical and psychosocial outcomes among children and caregiver must also be addressed as should the causes and consequences of stigma and associated gender and social norms. This article reviews interventions at different levels of the ecological model: individual-centred programs, family-centred interventions, programs that support or train healthcare providers, community interventions for HIV-infected children, and initiatives that improve the capacity of schools to provide more supportive environments for HIV-infected children. Although experience is increasing in approaches that address the psychosocial needs of vulnerable and HIV-infected children

  17. Promoting a combination approach to paediatric HIV psychosocial support.

    PubMed

    Amzel, Anouk; Toska, Elona; Lovich, Ronnie; Widyono, Monique; Patel, Tejal; Foti, Carrie; Dziuban, Eric J; Phelps, B Ryan; Sugandhi, Nandita; Mark, Daniella; Altschuler, Jenny

    2013-11-01

    Ninety percent of the 3.4 million HIV-infected children live in sub-Saharan Africa. Their psychosocial well being is fundamental to establishing and maintaining successful treatment outcomes and overall quality of life. With the increased roll-out of antiretroviral treatment, HIV infection is shifting from a life-threatening to a chronic disease. However, even for paediatric patients enrolled in care and treatment, HIV can still be devastating due to the interaction of complex factors, particularly in the context of other household illness and overextended healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa.This article explores the negative effect of several interrelated HIV-specific factors on the psychosocial well being of HIV-infected children: disclosure, stigma and discrimination, and bereavement. However, drawing on clinical studies of resilience, it stresses the need to move beyond a focus on the individual as a full response to the needs of a sick child requires support for the individual child, caregiver-child dyads, extended families, communities, and institutions. This means providing early and progressive age appropriate interventions aimed at increasing the self-reliance and self-acceptance in children and their caregivers and promoting timely health-seeking behaviours. Critical barriers that cause poorer biomedical and psychosocial outcomes among children and caregiver must also be addressed as should the causes and consequences of stigma and associated gender and social norms.This article reviews interventions at different levels of the ecological model: individual-centred programs, family-centred interventions, programs that support or train healthcare providers, community interventions for HIV-infected children, and initiatives that improve the capacity of schools to provide more supportive environments for HIV-infected children. Although experience is increasing in approaches that address the psychosocial needs of vulnerable and HIV-infected children, there

  18. Wartime paediatric extremity injuries: experience from the Kabul International Airport Combat support hospital.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Laurent; Bertani, Antoine; Rongiéras, Frédéric; Chaudier, Philippe; Mary, Pierre; Versier, Gilbert

    2015-05-01

    Since the beginning of Operation Enduring Freedom, management of Afghan military or civilian casualties including children is a priority of the battlefield medical support. The aim of this study is to describe the features of paediatric wartime extremities injuries and to analyse their management in the Kabul International Airport Combat Support Hospital. A retrospective review was carried out using the French surgical database OPEX (Service de Santé des Armées) from June 2009 to January 2013. Paediatric patients were defined as those younger than 16 years old. Of the 220 injured children operated on, 155 (70%) sustained an extremity injury and were included. The mean age of the children was 9.1 ± 3.8 years. Among these children, 77 sustained combat-related injuries (CRIs) and 78 sustained noncombat-related injuries (NCRIs), with a total of 212 extremities injuries analysed. All CRIs were open injuries, whereas NCRIs were dominated by blunt injuries. Multiple extremities injuries and associated injuries were significantly more frequent in children with CRIs, whose median Injury Severity Score was higher than those with NCRIs. Debridement and irrigation was significantly predominant in the CRIs group, as well as internal fracture fixation in the NCRIs group. There were four deaths, yielding a global mortality rate of 2.6%. This study is the first to analyse specifically paediatric extremities trauma and their management at level 3 of battlefield medical facilities in recent conflicts. Except for severe burns and polytrauma, treatment of paediatric extremities injuries can be readily performed in Combat Support Hospitals by orthopaedic surgeons trained in paediatric trauma. PMID:25811919

  19. Paediatric admissions to the British military hospital at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Arul, GS; Reynolds, J; DiRusso, S; Scott, A; Bree, S; Templeton, P; Midwinter, MJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION International humanitarian law requires emergency medical support for both military personnel and civilians, including children. Here we present a detailed review of paediatric admissions with the pattern of injury and the resources they consume. METHODS All paediatric admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion between 1 January and 29 April 2011 were analysed prospectively. Data collected included time and date of admission, patient age and weight, mechanism of injury, extent of wounding, treatment, length of hospital stay and discharge destination. RESULTS Eighty-five children (65 boys and 17 girls, median age: 8 years, median weight: 20kg) were admitted. In 63% of cases the indication for admission was battle related trauma and in 31% non-battle trauma. Of the blast injuries, 51% were due to improvised explosive devices. Non-battle emergencies were mainly due to domestic burns (46%) and road traffic accidents (29%). The most affected anatomical area was the extremities (44% of injuries). Over 30% of patients had critical injuries. Operative intervention was required in 74% of cases. The median time to theatre for all patients was 52 minutes; 3 patients with critical injuries went straight to theatre in a median of 7 minutes. A blood transfusion was required in 27 patients; 6 patients needed a massive transfusion. Computed tomography was performed on 62% of all trauma admissions and 40% of patients went to the intensive care unit. The mean length of stay was 2 days (range: 1–26 days) and there were 7 deaths. CONCLUSIONS Paediatric admissions make up a small but significant part of admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion. The proportion of serious injuries is very high in comparison with admissions to a UK paediatric emergency department. The concentration of major injuries means that lessons learnt in terms of teamwork, the speed of transfer to theatre and massive transfusion protocols could be applied to UK paediatric practice. PMID:22524930

  20. Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Agata; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Romeo, Anna Claudia; Dipasquale, Valeria; Chirico, Valeria; Arrigo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-01-01

    Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency) has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy) due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric) CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by adrenal

  1. Similar outcome of upfront-unrelated and matched sibling stem cell transplantation in idiopathic paediatric aplastic anaemia. A study on behalf of the UK Paediatric BMT Working Party, Paediatric Diseases Working Party and Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party of EBMT.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Carlo; Veys, Paul; Carraro, Elisa; Bhatnagar, Neha; Pillon, Marta; Wynn, Rob; Gibson, Brenda; Vora, Ajay J; Steward, Colin G; Ewins, Anna M; Hough, Rachael E; de la Fuente, Josu; Velangi, Mark; Amrolia, Persis J; Skinner, Roderick; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Risitano, Antonio M; Socie, Gerard; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Passweg, Jakob; Rovo, Alicia; Tichelli, André; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Hochsmann, Britta; Bader, Peter; van Biezen, Anja; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Marsh, Judith C; Samarasinghe, Sujith

    2015-11-01

    We explored the feasibility of unrelated donor haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) upfront without prior immunosuppressive therapy (IST) in paediatric idiopathic severe aplastic anaemia (SAA). This cohort was then compared to matched historical controls who had undergone first-line therapy with a matched sibling/family donor (MSD) HSCT (n = 87) or IST with horse antithymocyte globulin and ciclosporin (n = 58) or second-line therapy with unrelated donor HSCT post-failed IST (n = 24). The 2-year overall survival in the upfront cohort was 96 ± 4% compared to 91 ± 3% in the MSD controls (P = 0·30) and 94 ± 3% in the IST controls (P = 0·68) and 74 ± 9% in the unrelated donor HSCT post-IST failure controls (P = 0·02).The 2-year event-free survival in the upfront cohort was 92 ± 5% compared to 87 ± 4% in MSD controls (P = 0·37), 40 ± 7% in IST controls (P = 0·0001) and 74 ± 9% in the unrelated donor HSCT post-IST failure controls (n = 24) (P = 0·02). Outcomes for upfront-unrelated donor HSCT in paediatric idiopathic SAA were similar to MSD HSCT and superior to IST and unrelated donor HSCT post-IST failure. Front-line therapy with matched unrelated donor HSCT is a novel treatment approach and could be considered as first-line therapy in selected paediatric patients who lack a MSD. PMID:26223288

  2. Practising what we preach: A look at healthy active living policy and practice in Canadian paediatric hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Solh, Ziad; Adamo, Kristi B; Platt, Jennica L; Ambler, Kathryn; Boyd, Erin; Orrbine, Elaine; Cummings, Elizabeth; LeBlanc, Claire MA

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the past 30 years, the rate of obesity has risen considerably among Canadian children. Paediatric hospitals are in a unique position to model healthy environments to Canadian children. OBJECTIVE: To obtain an overview of healthy active living (HAL) policy and practice in Canadian paediatric hospitals. METHODS: Working in partnership with the local Canadian Paediatric Society HAL champions and the Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres liaisons, a nationwide survey was conducted in 2006/2007 to identify healthy eating, physical activity and smoking cessation practices in all 16 Canadian paediatric academic hospitals. RESULTS: Policies addressing healthy eating and/or physical activity promotion were present in 50% of hospitals with a greater focus on nutrition. Wellness committees were created in 50% of the hospitals, most of which were recently established. Healthy food options were available in cafeterias, although they were often more expensive. Fast food outlets were present in 75% of hospitals. Although inpatient meals were designed by dietitians, 50% offered less nutritious replacement kids meals (ie, meal substitutions) on request. Options for play available to inpatients and outpatients were primarily sedentary, with screen-based activities and crafts predominating over active play. Physical activity promotion for staff focused on reduced membership fees to fitness centres and classes. CONCLUSION: Canadian paediatric hospitals do not adequately promote HAL for patients and staff. The present study findings suggest further effort is required to create necessary healthy lifestyle modifications in these institutions through Canadian Paediatric Society/Canadian Association of Paediatric Health Centres-led policy development and implementation initiatives. A national-level policy framework is required to regulate interhospital variability in policies and practices. PMID:22131867

  3. Paediatric drug use with focus on off-label prescriptions at Swedish hospitals – a nationwide study

    PubMed Central

    Kimland, E; Nydert, P; Odlind, V; Böttiger, Y; Lindemalm, S

    2012-01-01

    Aim To perform a nationwide investigation of paediatric drug use at Swedish hospitals, including an analysis of off-label drug use. Methods All paediatric hospitals in Sweden were invited to register all prescriptions to children, aged between 0 and 18, during two separate 2-day-periods in 2008. Data were reported and analysed with respect to licence status and proportion of and reasons for off-label drug use. Results Data on 11 294 prescriptions to 2947 paediatric patients were received. Drugs associated with pain relief, infection, prematurity, nutrition and surgery or anaesthesia were most commonly used. Paracetamol was the most frequently used drug on-label and also among the most commonly used off-label drugs. Nearly half (49%) of all administered prescriptions concerned unlicensed drugs, off-label drugs or extemporaneously prepared drugs. The corresponding rate among neonates was 69%. Lack of paediatric information in the Summary of Product Characteristics was the main reason for off-label classification. Conclusions Paediatric off-label drug use is common at Swedish hospitals, and nearly half of all prescriptions were not documented for use in children. The findings emphasize a need for paediatric clinical studies as well as compilation of existing clinical experience and scattered evidence, particularly for drug treatment in infants and neonates. PMID:22404126

  4. Paediatric Orbital Fractures: The Importance of Regular Thorough Eye Assessment and Appropriate Referral

    PubMed Central

    Kassam, Karim; Rahim, Ishrat; Mills, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric orbital fracture should always raise alarm bells to all clinicians working in an emergency department. A delay or failure in diagnosis and appropriate referral can result in rapidly developing and profound complications. We present a boy of childhood age who sustained trauma to his eye during a bicycle injury. Acceptance of the referral was based on no eye signs; however, on examination in our unit the eye had reduction in visual acuity, no pupillary reaction, and ophthalmoplegia. CT scan suggested bone impinging on the globe and the child was rushed to theatre for removal of the bony fragment. Postoperatively no improvement was noted and a diagnosis of traumatic optic neuropathy was made. An overview of factors complicating paediatric orbital injuries, their associated “red flags”, and appropriate referral are discussed in this short paper. PMID:24349804

  5. Paediatric CT protocol optimisation: a design of experiments to support the modelling and optimisation process.

    PubMed

    Rani, K; Jahnen, A; Noel, A; Wolf, D

    2015-07-01

    In the last decade, several studies have emphasised the need to understand and optimise the computed tomography (CT) procedures in order to reduce the radiation dose applied to paediatric patients. To evaluate the influence of the technical parameters on the radiation dose and the image quality, a statistical model has been developed using the design of experiments (DOE) method that has been successfully used in various fields (industry, biology and finance) applied to CT procedures for the abdomen of paediatric patients. A Box-Behnken DOE was used in this study. Three mathematical models (contrast-to-noise ratio, noise and CTDI vol) depending on three factors (tube current, tube voltage and level of iterative reconstruction) were developed and validated. They will serve as a basis for the development of a CT protocol optimisation model. PMID:25848116

  6. Paediatric orbital fractures: the importance of regular thorough eye assessment and appropriate referral.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Karim; Rahim, Ishrat; Mills, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    The paediatric orbital fracture should always raise alarm bells to all clinicians working in an emergency department. A delay or failure in diagnosis and appropriate referral can result in rapidly developing and profound complications. We present a boy of childhood age who sustained trauma to his eye during a bicycle injury. Acceptance of the referral was based on no eye signs; however, on examination in our unit the eye had reduction in visual acuity, no pupillary reaction, and ophthalmoplegia. CT scan suggested bone impinging on the globe and the child was rushed to theatre for removal of the bony fragment. Postoperatively no improvement was noted and a diagnosis of traumatic optic neuropathy was made. An overview of factors complicating paediatric orbital injuries, their associated "red flags", and appropriate referral are discussed in this short paper. PMID:24349804

  7. A low energy paediatric clavicle fracture associated with acute brachial plexus injury and subclavian artery compression.

    PubMed

    Gill, I; Quayle, J; Fox, M

    2013-03-01

    Paediatric clavicle fractures are common injuries presenting to orthopaedic surgeons. The majority of these represent midshaft low energy fractures, which in the vast majority of cases are treated non-operatively and recover rapidly. The main indications to consider operative intervention include high energy of injury, >2 cm shortening, open fractures and associated vascular or neurological injuries. Brachial plexus (BP) injuries are uncommon with variable outcomes. They often result from high energy motorcycle related accidents with potentially fatal associated injuries such as vascular disruption. Their management is complex, requiring expertise, and they are therefore usually managed in supraregional centres. We present a unique case of a low energy midshaft clavicle fracture in a paediatric patient in whom there was an acute BP injury and subclavian artery compression that has not been described previously. PMID:23484977

  8. Radiation exposure during X-ray examinations in a large paediatric hospital in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Gavrilovic, Marijana; Arandjic, Danijela; Vujovic, Milan; Bozovic, Predrag

    2015-07-01

    Objective of this work is to evaluate radiation exposure from X-ray examinations in a large paediatric hospital in Serbia, including radiographic, fluoroscopic and computed tomography (CT) examinations in four age groups: 0-1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 y. Incident air kerma was assessed for the following radiographies: chest (AP, PA, LAT), spine (AP, LAT), pelvis (AP), urinary tract (AP, PA) and skull (AP, PA, LAT). Kerma-area product was measured for the fluoroscopy examinations: barium swallow, barium meal, barium enema and micturating cystography. Dose in CT was assessed in terms of volume CT dose index and dose-length product for examinations of the head, chest and abdomen. The collected data were compared with other similar studies, which indicated a need to expand such survey to other paediatric hospitals in Serbia. PMID:25821208

  9. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, M. R.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-11

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de Mexico 'Dr. Federico Gomez.' We measured the entrance surface air kerma (K{sub P}) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  10. Child health in low-resource settings: pathways through UK paediatric training.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Anu; Magnus, Dan; Rehman, Tanya; Williams, Bhanu; Long, Andrew; Allen, Steve J

    2013-11-01

    UK doctors training in paediatrics benefit from experience of child health in low-resource settings. Institutions in low-resource settings reciprocally benefit from hosting UK trainees. A wide variety of opportunities exist for trainees working in low-resource settings including clinical work, research and the development of transferable skills in management, education and training. This article explores a range of pathways for UK trainees to develop experience in low-resource settings. It is important for trainees to start planning a robust rationale early for global child health activities via established pathways, in the interests of their own professional development as well as UK service provision. In the future, run-through paediatric training may include core elements of global child health, as well as designated 'tracks' for those wishing to develop their career in global child health further. Hands-on experience in low-resource settings is a critical component of these training initiatives. PMID:23899919

  11. Reduced N400 semantic priming effects in adult survivors of paediatric and adolescent traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Knuepffer, C; Murdoch, B E; Lloyd, D; Lewis, F M; Hinchliffe, F J

    2012-10-01

    The immediate and long-term neural correlates of linguistic processing deficits reported following paediatric and adolescent traumatic brain injury (TBI) are poorly understood. Therefore, the current research investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited during a semantic picture-word priming experiment in two groups of highly functioning individuals matched for various demographic variables and behavioural language performance. Participants in the TBI group had a recorded history of paediatric or adolescent TBI involving injury mechanisms associated with diffuse white matter pathology, while participants in the control group never sustained any insult to the brain. A comparison of N400 Mean Amplitudes elicited during three experimental conditions with varying semantic relatedness between the prime and target stimuli (congruent, semantically related, unrelated) revealed a significantly smaller N400 response in the unrelated condition in the TBI group, indicating residual linguistic processing deviations when processing demands required the quick detection of a between-category (unrelated) violation of semantic expectancy. PMID:22819620

  12. Dosimetry and Image Quality in Control Studies in Computerised Tomography Realized to Paediatric Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, M. R.; Dies, P.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Rickards, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2008-08-01

    Computerised tomography (CT) is a favourite method of medical diagnosis. Its use has thus increased rapidly throughout the world, particularly in studies relating to children. However to avoid administering unnecessarily high doses of radiation to paediatric patients it is important to have correct dose reference levels to minimize risk. The research is being developed within the public health sector at the Hospital Infantil de México "Dr. Federico Gómez." We measured the entrance surface air kerma (KP) in paediatric patients, during the radiological studies of control in CT (studies of head, thorax and abdomen). Phantom was used to evaluate image quality as the tomograph requires a high resolution image in order to operate at its optimum level.

  13. Patterns of paediatric facial fractures in a hospital of São Paulo, Brazil: a retrospective study of 3 years.

    PubMed

    Nardis, Amanda da Costa; Costa, Sabrina Araújo Pinho; da Silva, Rogério Almeida; Kaba, Shajadi Carlos Pardo

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze patterns of facial fractures in children treated at the Service of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the Vila Penteado General Hospital (HGVP), in São Paulo, Brazil, in a period of 3 years. Between May 2008 and April 2011 the authors reviewed 110 records of patients under 12 years old with facial fractures. The following parameters were evaluated: age and sex distribution, aetiology of trauma, incidence and type of fractures, monthly distribution and treatment modality. Male-to-female ratio was 1.8:1, and the mean age was 8.13. The majority of the involved patients were aged between 6 and 12 years. The most prevalent cause was fall (58%) and nasal fractures were the most common type of fracture (69%). Monthly distribution was similar in all seasons. Of 110 patients, 69 (62%) were treated conservatively. The incidence of facial fractures in the area of study is high. The high incidence of nasal fractures should be a warning to maxillofacial surgeons, so that they are not overlooked. Safety programs should be installed in Brazil to increase public awareness and to decrease morbidity resulting from paediatric trauma. PMID:23062741

  14. External iliac artery occlusion in a paediatric patient following handlebar trauma.

    PubMed

    Singla, Animesh A; McPherson, Danielle; Singla, Apresh A; Cross, Jane; Leslie, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Arterial occlusion following blunt trauma is an uncommon occurrence. We report an unusual case of delayed external iliac artery occlusion in a young male following blunt abdominal injury. He was successfully treated with thromboendarterectomy and saphenous vein patch repair. There have only been a handful of documented cases occurring in the paediatric population. All patients presenting with groin injury from this mechanism should be carefully investigated and monitored for risk of vascular injury. PMID:25733671

  15. Use of Scrambler Therapy in Acute Paediatric Pain: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Spadini, Silvia; De Tommasi, Valentina; Benini, Franca

    2016-01-01

    We report our clinical experience on the effect of Scrambler Therapy (ST) for a child with acute mixed pain refractory to pharmacological treatment. ST, recently proposed as an alternative treatment for chronic neuropathic pain in adults, is a noninvasive approach to relieve pain, by changing pain perception at brain level. It is safe and has no side effects. Further research is needed to assess its efficacy for acute pain and for paediatric population. PMID:26977329

  16. A prospective surveillance of paediatric head injuries in Singapore: a dual-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shu-Ling; Chew, Su Yah; Feng, Jasmine Xun Yi; Teo, Penny Yun Lin; Chin, Sock Teng; Liu, Nan; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the causes of head injuries among the paediatric population in Singapore, and the association between causes and mortality, as well as the need for airway or neurosurgical intervention. Design This is a prospective observational study utilising data from the trauma surveillance system from January 2011 to March 2015. Setting Paediatric emergency departments (EDs) of KK Women's and Children's Hospital and the National University Health System. Participants We included children aged <16 years presenting to the paediatric EDs with head injuries who required a CT scan, admission for monitoring of persistent symptoms, or who died from the head injury. We excluded children who presented with minor mechanisms and those whose symptoms had spontaneously resolved. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary composite outcome was defined as death or the need for intubation or neurosurgical intervention. Secondary outcomes included length of hospital stay and type of neurosurgical intervention. Results We analysed 1049 children who met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 6.7 (SD 5.2) years. 260 (24.8%) had a positive finding on CT. 17 (1.6%) children died, 52 (5.0%) required emergency intubation in the ED and 58 (5.5%) underwent neurosurgery. The main causes associated with severe outcomes were motor vehicle crashes (OR 7.2, 95% CI 4.3 to 12.0) and non-accidental trauma (OR 5.8, 95% CI 1.8 to 18.6). This remained statistically significant when we stratified to children aged <2 years and performed a multivariable analysis adjusting for age and location of injury. For motor vehicle crashes, less than half of the children were using restraints. Conclusions Motor vehicle crashes and non-accidental trauma causes are particularly associated with poor outcomes among children with paediatric head injury. Continued vigilance and compliance with injury prevention initiatives and legislature are vital. PMID:26908533

  17. Clostridium difficile infection diagnosis in a paediatric population: comparison of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Hart, J; Putsathit, P; Knight, D R; Sammels, L; Riley, T V; Keil, A

    2014-09-01

    The increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in paediatric hospitalised populations, combined with the emergence of hypervirulent strains, community-acquired CDI and the need for prompt treatment and infection control, makes the rapid, accurate diagnosis of CDI crucial. We validated commonly used C. difficile diagnostic tests in a paediatric hospital population. From October 2011 to January 2012, 150 consecutive stools were collected from 75 patients at a tertiary paediatric hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Stools were tested using: C. Diff Quik Chek Complete, Illumigene C. difficile, GeneOhm Cdiff, cycloserine cefoxitin fructose agar (CCFA) culture, and cell culture cytotoxin neutralisation assay (CCNA). The reference standard was growth on CCFA or Cdiff Chromagar and PCR on isolates to detect tcdA, tcdB, cdtA, and cdtB. Isolates were PCR ribotyped. The prevalence of CDI was high (43 % of patients). Quik Chek Complete glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) demonstrated a low negative predictive value (NPV) (93 %). Both CCNA and Quik Chek Complete toxin A/B had poor sensitivity (33 % and 29 % respectively). Molecular methods both had 89 % sensitivity. Algorithms using GDH + Illumigene or GeneOhm reduced the sensitivity to 85 % and 83 % respectively. Ribotype UK014/20 predominated. GDH NPV and GeneOhm and Illumigene sensitivities were reduced compared with adult studies. Quik Chek Complete and CCNA cannot reliably detect toxigenic CDI. A GDH first algorithm showed reduced sensitivity. In a high prevalence paediatric population, molecular methods alone are recommended over the use of GDH algorithm or culture and CCNA, as they demonstrate the best test performance characteristics. PMID:24781004

  18. Disseminated mucormycosis in a paediatric patient: Lichthemia corymbifera successfully treated with combination antifungal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Anita; Cooper, Celia; Davis, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a severe fungal infection that largely affects immunocompromised individuals. It carries a high morbidity and mortality rate and is characterised by extensive angioinvasion and necrosis of host tissue. This case report details success in treating disseminated mucormycosis in a paediatric patient with an underlying haematological malignancy. Treatment included institution of combination antifungal therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and caspofungin, aggressive surgical debridement of infected tissue and reversal of underlying immunosuppression. PMID:25379392

  19. Alternative technique in atypical spinal decompression: the use of the ultrasonic scalpel in paediatric achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Woodacre, Timothy; Sewell, Matthew; Clarke, Andrew J; Hutton, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Spinal stenosis can be a very disabling condition. Surgical decompression carries a risk of dural tear and neural injury, which is increased in patients with severe stenosis or an atypical anatomy. We present an unusual case of symptomatic stenosis secondary to achondroplasia presenting in a paediatric patient, and highlight a new surgical technique used to minimise the risk of dural and neural injury during decompression. PMID:27288205

  20. External iliac artery occlusion in a paediatric patient following handlebar trauma

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Animesh A.; McPherson, Danielle; Singla, Apresh A; Cross, Jane; Leslie, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Arterial occlusion following blunt trauma is an uncommon occurrence. We report an unusual case of delayed external iliac artery occlusion in a young male following blunt abdominal injury. He was successfully treated with thromboendarterectomy and saphenous vein patch repair. There have only been a handful of documented cases occurring in the paediatric population. All patients presenting with groin injury from this mechanism should be carefully investigated and monitored for risk of vascular injury. PMID:25733671

  1. Understanding and evaluating the effects of implementing an electronic paediatric prescribing system on care provision and hospital work in paediatric hospital ward settings: a qualitatively driven mixed-method study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Farre, Albert; Cummins, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Electronic prescribing systems can improve the quality and safety of healthcare services, but their implementation is not straightforward and may create unexpected change. However, the added complexity of paediatric prescribing (eg, dose calculations, dilutions, manipulations) may pose additional challenges. This study will aim to (1) understand the complex organisational reality of a paediatric hospital in which a new electronic paediatric prescribing (ePP) system will be introduced; (2) describe ePP-related change, over time, in paediatric hospital ward settings; (3) explore staff perspectives in relation to currently established practices and processes; and (4) assess the impact of ePP on care provision and hospital work from the perspective of paediatricians, paediatric nurses and managers. Methods and analysis A qualitatively driven mixed-method approach will be adopted, including 3 inter-related substudies. The core component of the study will be qualitative (substudy 1): we will use ethnographic research methods, including non-participant observation in wards and informal conversational interviews with members of staff. In addition, the design will include 2 embedded supplementary components: a qualitative 1 (substudy 2) based on in-depth interviews and/or focus groups with paediatricians, paediatric nurses, paediatric pharmacists/pharmacy technicians and managers; and a quantitative 1 (substudy 3) in which a staff survey will be developed and administered before and after the ePP implementation. Analytic themes will be identified from ethnographic field notes and interview data. Survey data will be analysed using descriptive statistics and baseline and follow-up data compared to establish impact evaluation measures. Ethics and dissemination A favourable ethical opinion has been obtained from a National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee (15/SS/0157). NHS research governance approval has been obtained at the relevant hospital site

  2. Appropriateness of hospital admissions in general hospitals in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Tehewy, M; Shehad, E; Al Gaafary, M; Al-Houssiny, M; Nabih, D; Salem, B

    2009-01-01

    We measured the rate of inappropriate admissions, and associated factors, in 3 general hospitals in Egypt. A total of 1191 admissions were reviewed using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol for adult patients and the Pediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol for paediatric patients. Inappropriate admissions were 66.3% and 78.9% of admissions in the surgery departments of 2 hospitals compared with 1.9% in the 3rd hospital that followed a specific admission protocol for elective surgery. The paediatrics department had the lowest rates of inappropriate admissions in all hospitals (0%, 1.0% and 1.9%). On logistic regression analysis, the route of admission was the only factor significantly associated with inappropriate admissions in the departments of surgery, obstetrics/gynaecology and internal medicine. PMID:20214126

  3. Subgroups of Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Might Differ Significantly in Genetic Predisposition to Asparaginase Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kutszegi, Nóra; Semsei, Ágnes F; Gézsi, András; Sági, Judit C; Nagy, Viktória; Csordás, Katalin; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Gábor, Krisztina Míta; Kovács, Gábor T; Erdélyi, Dániel J; Szalai, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase (ASP) is a key element in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to ASP are major challenges in paediatric patients. Our aim was to investigate genetic variants that may influence the risk to Escherichia coli-derived ASP hypersensitivity. Sample and clinical data collection was carried out from 576 paediatric ALL patients who were treated according to protocols from the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Study Group. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GRIA1 and GALNT10 genes were genotyped. Patients with GRIA1 rs4958351 AA/AG genotype showed significantly reduced risk to ASP hypersensitivity compared to patients with GG genotype in the T-cell ALL subgroup (OR = 0.05 (0.01-0.26); p = 4.70E-04), while no such association was found in pre-B-cell ALL. In the medium risk group two SNPs of GRIA1 (rs2055083 and rs707176) were associated significantly with the occurrence of ASP hypersensitivity (OR = 0.21 (0.09-0.53); p = 8.48E-04 and OR = 3.02 (1.36-6.73); p = 6.76E-03, respectively). Evaluating the genders separately, however, the association of rs707176 with ASP HSRs was confined only to females. Our results suggest that genetic variants of GRIA1 might influence the risk to ASP hypersensitivity, but subgroups of patients can differ significantly in this respect. PMID:26457809

  4. [Consensus on paediatric parenteral nutrition: a document approved by SENPE/SEGHNP/SEFH].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, P Gomis; López, L Gómez; Costa, C Martínez; Villares, J M Moreno; Giner, C Pedrón; Maristany, C Pérez-Portabella; del Río, M T Pozas

    2007-01-01

    In current medical practice, standardization of procedures has become a desirable objective. The Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) has undertaken a considerable effort to create clinical practice guidelines or documents of consensus and quality gold standards in artificial nutrition. As a result the SENPE group of standardization has put together a document called "Consensus of Paediatric Parenteral Nutrition" supported by the Spanish Society of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (SEGHNP) and by the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacies (SEFH). This is a reduced version of our work. The complete version is available at www.nutricionhospitalaria.com and www.senpe.com. This document covers many aspects such as paediatric patient indications, vascular access, macro and micro nutrients needs; also preparation in special situations, components, forms of prescription, possibilities for standardization of the elaboration and prescription, elaboration, administration, monitoring, complications and side effects. Much research has been done, incorporating current publications, books and clinical practice guidelines such as those published by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) and by the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) in collaboration with the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN). PMID:18051997

  5. Tinea capitis outbreak among paediatric refugee population, an evolving healthcare challenge.

    PubMed

    Mashiah, Jacob; Kutz, Ana; Ben Ami, Ronen; Savion, Mihal; Goldberg, Ilan; Gan Or, Tamar; Zidan, Omri; Sprecher, Eli; Harel, Avikam

    2016-09-01

    Outbreaks of tinea capitis (TC) represent a major medical and economic burden. Population migrations have become a phenomenon of increasing relevance for medical conditions management. Given the recent massive arrival of immigrants, we sought to determine epidemiologic trends for TC among paediatric populations at the Tel Aviv Medical Center. We conducted a retrospective study of all TC cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2014 in a paediatric dermatology unit of a tertiary medical centre, serving as a referral centre for the paediatric refugee population from the great Tel Aviv area. Epidemiologic, clinical and treatment data including effectiveness and safety were reviewed. In all, 145 children met the inclusion criteria. Trend analyses showed increases in TC rates over the study period. Incidence rates were higher in boys than in girls. Children of African origin had the highest TC incidence rates as compared with other ethnic groups. Trichophyton violaceum and Microsporum audouinii were the predominant causative organisms. Treatment with griseofulvin was satisfactory in all cases. There was a significant increase in TC incidence rates in the Tel Aviv area over the study period. TV and MA were the predominant organisms. These trends may be a result of poor living conditions and crowded school premises. PMID:27061446

  6. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling approaches in paediatric infectious diseases and immunology☆

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Charlotte I.S.; Germovsek, Eva; Hoare, Rollo L.; Lestner, Jodi M.; Lewis, Joanna; Standing, Joseph F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modelling is used to describe and quantify dose–concentration–effect relationships. Within paediatric studies in infectious diseases and immunology these methods are often applied to developing guidance on appropriate dosing. In this paper, an introduction to the field of PKPD modelling is given, followed by a review of the PKPD studies that have been undertaken in paediatric infectious diseases and immunology. The main focus is on identifying the methodological approaches used to define the PKPD relationship in these studies. The major findings were that most studies of infectious diseases have developed a PK model and then used simulations to define a dose recommendation based on a pre-defined PD target, which may have been defined in adults or in vitro. For immunological studies much of the modelling has focused on either PK or PD, and since multiple drugs are usually used, delineating the relative contributions of each is challenging. The use of dynamical modelling of in vitro antibacterial studies, and paediatric HIV mechanistic PD models linked with the PK of all drugs, are emerging methods that should enhance PKPD-based recommendations in the future. PMID:24440429

  7. Interventions for impaired bladders in paediatric renal transplant recipients with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Al-Khudairi, Naji; Riley, Paul; Desai, Divyesh Y; Reid, Christopher; Marks, Stephen D; Mamode, Nizam

    2013-04-01

    Dysfunctional bladders in paediatric patients were thought to be a contraindication for renal transplantation, but advances in surgical techniques have meant that surgical correction can allow safe transplantation. This study compares the outcomes of renal transplantation for different interventions, and the timing of such interventions, in relation to transplantation. We identified all paediatric renal transplant recipients with LUTD that received intervention for their impaired bladders at two hospitals between 2002 and 2010. Outcome measures included patient and graft survival, perioperative complications, UTI incidence, acute rejection episodes and serum creatinine levels. A total of 288 allografts were transplanted, 77 were in 75 children with LUTD, of which 46 received intervention. Patient survival was 100% in the intervention group and 97% in the nonintervention group (P = 0.815). Death-censored graft survival was 96% and 100% respectively (P = 0.688). In the groups receiving intervention pretransplant or post-transplant, graft survival rates were 95% and 100% respectively (P = 0.476). The follow-up serum creatinine levels were higher in the pretransplant intervention group (P < 0.001). Interventions for dysfunctional bladders can be performed safely in paediatric renal transplant recipients. The mode of intervention and timing of intervention, in relation to transplant, do not influence outcomes if guided by careful assessment and investigation. PMID:23350943

  8. Targeting survivin with YM155 (Sepantronium Bromide): a novel therapeutic strategy for paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda M; Little, Erica B; Zivanovic, Andjelija; Hong, Priscilla; Liu, Alfred K S; Burow, Rachel; Stinson, Caedyn; Hallahan, Andrew R; Moore, Andrew S

    2015-04-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy, approximately one-third of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) relapse. More effective treatments are urgently needed. Survivin is an inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein with key roles in regulating cell division, proliferation and apoptosis. Furthermore, high expression of Survivin has been associated with poor clinical outcome in AML. The survivin suppressant YM155 (Sepantronium Bromide) has pre-clinical activity against a range of solid cancers and leukemias, although data in AML is limited. Therefore, we undertook a comprehensive pre-clinical evaluation of YM155 in paediatric AML. YM155 potently inhibited cell viability in a diverse panel of AML cell lines. All paediatric cell lines were particularly sensitive, with a median IC50 of 0.038 μM. Cell cycle analyses demonstrated concentration-dependent increases in a sub-G1 population with YM155 treatment, suggestive of apoptosis that was subsequently confirmed by an increase in annexin-V positivity. YM155-mediated apoptosis was confirmed across a panel of 8 diagnostic bone marrow samples from children with AML. Consistent with the proposed mechanism of action, YM155 treatment was associated with down-regulation of survivin mRNA and protein expression and induction of DNA damage. These data suggest that YM155-mediated inhibition of survivin is a potentially beneficial therapeutic strategy for AML, particularly paediatric disease, and warrants further evaluation. PMID:25659731

  9. The role of Clostridium difficile in the paediatric and neonatal gut - a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lees, E A; Miyajima, F; Pirmohamed, M; Carrol, E D

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important nosocomial pathogen in adults. Its significance in children is less well defined, but cases of C. difficile infection (CDI) appear to be increasingly prevalent in paediatric patients. This review aims to summarize reported Clostridium difficile carriage rates across children of different age groups, appraise the relationship between CDI and factors such as method of delivery, type of infant feed, antibiotic use, and co-morbidities, and review factors affecting the gut microbiome in children and the host immune response to C. difficile. Searches of PubMed and Google Scholar using the terms 'Clostridium difficile neonates' and 'Clostridium difficile children' were completed, and reference lists of retrieved publications screened for further papers. In total, 88 papers containing relevant data were included. There was large inter-study variation in reported C. difficile carriage rates. There was an association between CDI and recent antibiotic use, and co-morbidities such as immunosuppression and inflammatory bowel disease. C. difficile was also found in stools of children with diarrhoea attributed to other pathogens (e.g. rotavirus). The role of C. difficile in the paediatric gut remains unclear; is it an innocent bystander in diarrhoeal disease caused by other organisms, or a pathogen causing subclinical to severe symptoms? Further investigation of the development of serological and local host response to C. difficile carriage may shed new light on disease mechanisms. Work is underway on defining a framework for diagnosis and management of paediatric CDI. PMID:27107991

  10. Development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Yamauchi, M; Narai, K; Aoyama, T; Katsu, T; Obara, S; Imai, K; Ikeda, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the authors developed age-specific physical head phantoms simulating the physique of Japanese children for dose evaluation in paediatric head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Anatomical structures at 99 places in 0-, 0.5-, 1- and 3-y-old Japanese patients were measured using DICOM viewer software from CT images, and the head phantom of each age was designed. For trial manufacture, a 3-y-old head phantom consisting of acrylic resin and gypsum was produced by machine processing. Radiation doses for the head phantom were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters and Si-pin photodiode dosemeters. To investigate whether the phantom shape was suitable for dose evaluation, organ doses in the same scan protocol were compared between the 3-y-old head and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms having approximately the same head size. The doses of organs in both phantoms were equivalent. The authors' designed paediatric head phantom will be useful for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations. PMID:24821932

  11. Radiation assessment to paediatric with F-18-FDG undergo whole-body PET/CT examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhalisa, H.; Mohamad, A. S.; Rafidah, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out on wholebody radiation dose assessment to paediatrics patient who undergo PET/CT scanner at Institut Kanser Negara. Consist of 68 patients with varies of malignancies and epilepsy disease case covering age between 2 years to 12 years old. This is a retrospective study from 2010-2014. The use of PET/CT scanner as an advanced tool has been proven to give an extra radiation dose to the patient. It is because of the radiation exposure from the combination of both CT and PET scans rather than a single CT or PET scan. Furthermore, a study on radiation dose to paediatric patient undergoing PET/CT is rare in Malaysia. So, the aim of this study is to estimate the wholebody effective dose to paediatric patient in Malaysia. Effective dose from PET scan was calculated based on the activity of F18 FDG and dose coefficient reported in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 106. Effective dose from CT was determined using k coefficient as reported in ICRP publication 102 and Dose Length Product (DLP) value. The average effective dose from PET and CT were found to be 7.05mSv and 5.77mSv respectively. The mean wholebody effective dose received by a patient with combined PETCT examination was 12.78mSv. These results could be used as reference for dosimetry of a patient undergoing PETCT examination in Malaysia.

  12. Achieving 90–90–90 in paediatric HIV: adolescence as the touchstone for transition success

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sonia; Hazra, Rohan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The number of children less than 15 years estimated to be living with HIV globally approximated 3.2 million in 2013. Young people aged 15 to 24 years living with HIV approximated 4 million. The survival of these children and adolescents into adulthood poses new and urgent challenges of transition from the paediatric to adolescent to adult healthcare settings due to emerging developmental, psychosocial and comorbid issues. In order to achieve treatment targets of 90–90–90 across the continuum of care for paediatric HIV by 2020, focused efforts on the implementation of appropriate healthcare transition plans across the lifespan, with a focus on adolescence, should be prioritized. Discussion Published data or empirical evidence examining implementation of transition models and association with clinical outcomes are limited. While some guidelines do exist that offer recommendations about how to promote seamless transitions, very few data are available to assess the adequacy of these guidelines and whether they are effectively adhered to in clinical care settings globally. Furthermore, paediatric and adolescent HIV infection, either acquired perinatally or behaviourally, is set apart from other chronic illnesses as a highly stigmatizing disease that disproportionately affects poor, minority and often marginalized populations. Focused efforts on adolescence as the touchstone for transition practices and policies need to be implemented. Conclusions Optimal healthcare for these vulnerable populations, particularly in resource-limited settings, will require HIV-specific transitional care services and programmes that are coordinated, collaborative, integrated and, importantly, evidence-based. PMID:26639113

  13. Validation of a paediatric thyroid phantom using different multidetector computed tomography models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsabbagh, M.; Ng, L. Y.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Manap, M. A.; Zainon, R.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attenuation values of a fabricated paediatric thyroid phantom material using different MDCT models. A paediatric thyroid phantom was designed to mimic the shape and size of a paediatric patient with an age of 9 years using high- density Polyethylene as the phantom material. The fabricated phantom was scanned using two different multidetector CT scanners (16- and 128-row detectors). The CT numbers were evaluated and the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the phantom material were obtained at each applied energy from each scanner. The results were compared with the tables of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The CTs of 16- and 128-row detectors showed that the obtained attenuation values are very similar to the NIST's values. However, the CT of the 128-row detectors showed a slightly much closer match to the NIST's values. This refers to the type and quality of the electronic connections between the detectors. Furthermore, the type and number of detectors (16- and 128-detectors) could affect the details and quality of the output images. The results show that different multidetector CTs can be used to validate the phantom and determine the mass attenuation coefficients of its material.

  14. Patient grouping for dose surveys and establishment of diagnostic reference levels in paediatric computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, J; Rehani, M

    2015-07-01

    There has been confusion in literature on whether paediatric patients should be grouped according to age, weight or other parameters when dealing with dose surveys. The present work aims to suggest a pragmatic approach to achieve reasonable accuracy for performing patient dose surveys in countries with limited resources. The analysis is based on a subset of data collected within the IAEA survey of paediatric computed tomography (CT) doses, involving 82 CT facilities from 32 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa and Latin America. Data for 6115 patients were collected, in 34.5 % of which data for weight were available. The present study suggests that using four age groups, <1, >1-5, >5-10 and >10-15 y, is realistic and pragmatic for dose surveys in less resourced countries and for the establishment of DRLs. To ensure relevant accuracy of results, data for >30 patients in a particular age group should be collected if patient weight is not known. If a smaller sample is used, patient weight should be recorded and the median weight in the sample should be within 5-10 % from the median weight of the sample for which the DRLs were established. Comparison of results from different surveys should always be performed with caution, taking into consideration the way of grouping of paediatric patients. Dose results can be corrected for differences in patient weight/age group. PMID:25836695

  15. Orally disintegrating mini-tablets (ODMTs)--a novel solid oral dosage form for paediatric use.

    PubMed

    Stoltenberg, I; Breitkreutz, J

    2011-08-01

    The new European regulations on paediatric medicines and recent WHO recommendations have induced an increased need for research into novel child-appropriate dosage forms. The aim of this study was the development of orally disintegrating mini-tablets (ODMTs) as a suitable dosage form for paediatric patients. The suitability of five commercially available ready-to-use tableting excipients, Ludiflash, Parteck ODT, Pearlitol Flash, Pharmaburst 500 and Prosolv ODT, to be directly compressed into mini-tablets, with 2 mm in diameter, was examined. All of the excipients are based on co-processed mannitol. Drug-free ODMTs and ODMTs with a child-appropriate dose of hydrochlorothiazide were investigated. ODMTs could be produced with all investigated excipients. ODMTs with a sufficient crushing strength >7 N and a low friability <1% could be obtained, as well as ODMTs with a short simulated wetting test-time <5 s. ODMTs made of Ludiflash showed the best results with crushing strengths from 7.8 N up to 11.8 N and excellent simulated wetting test-times from 3.1 s to 5.0 s. For each excipient, ODMTs with accordance to the pharmacopoeial specification content uniformity could be obtained. The promising results indicate that orally disintegrating mini-tablets may serve as a novel platform technology for paediatrics in future. PMID:21324357

  16. Paediatric radiology seen from Africa. Part I: providing diagnostic imaging to a young population.

    PubMed

    Andronikou, Savvas; McHugh, Kieran; Abdurahman, Nuraan; Khoury, Bryan; Mngomezulu, Victor; Brant, William E; Cowan, Ian; McCulloch, Mignon; Ford, Nathan

    2011-07-01

    Paediatric radiology requires dedicated equipment, specific precautions related to ionising radiation, and specialist knowledge. Developing countries face difficulties in providing adequate imaging services for children. In many African countries, children represent an increasing proportion of the population, and additional challenges follow from extreme living conditions, poverty, lack of parental care, and exposure to tuberculosis, HIV, pneumonia, diarrhoea and violent trauma. Imaging plays a critical role in the treatment of these children, but is expensive and difficult to provide. The World Health Organisation initiatives, of which the World Health Imaging System for Radiography (WHIS-RAD) unit is one result, needs to expand into other areas such as the provision of maintenance servicing. New initiatives by groups such as Rotary and the World Health Imaging Alliance to install WHIS-RAD units in developing countries and provide digital solutions, need support. Paediatric radiologists are needed to offer their services for reporting, consultation and quality assurance for free by way of teleradiology. Societies for paediatric radiology are needed to focus on providing a volunteer teleradiology reporting group, information on child safety for basic imaging, guidelines for investigations specific to the disease spectrum, and solutions for optimising imaging in children. PMID:21656276

  17. Developing a culture to facilitate research capacity building for clinical nurse consultants in generalist paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Lesley; Cummings, Joanne; McKay, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a research capacity building exercise with a group of CNCs practicing in the speciality of paediatrics in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. It explores the first step in building a research culture, through identifying the research priorities of members of the NSW Child Health Networks Paediatric Clinical Nurse Consultant group, and this forms the major focus of this paper. A nominal group technique (NGT) was utilised with sixteen members to identify research topics for investigation which were considered a priority for improving children's health care. The group reviewed and prioritised 43 research topics in children's health which were identified in the literature. As a result of conducting this research prioritisation exercise, the group chose two research topics to investigate: reasons for children representing to the Emergency Department and a comparison of the use of high-flow and low-flow nasal prongs in children with bronchiolitis. The research team will continue to mentor the nurses throughout their research projects which resulted from the NGT. One bridge to leadership development in enhancing patient care is translating knowledge to practice and policy development. This study leads the way for a group of CNCs in paediatric nursing to combine their research capacity and influence clinical knowledge. PMID:23956854

  18. The establishment of a nurse consultant role in paediatric intensive care: a reflective analysis.

    PubMed

    Haines, Caroline

    2002-01-01

    Through a review of literature and research, together with reflection on clinical practice, this article reflectively analyses and evaluates the concept of the establishment and development of a nurse consultant post in paediatric intensive care. Manley's (1997) conceptual framework is used as a structure for the reflection, which has enabled a detailed and logical approach and allowed both reflection and analysis of the role in relation to the speciality. It is evident that nurse consultant posts have been developed in a variety of clinical specialities and are providing a real opportunity to improve patient care, progress nursing as a profession and provide a clinical career framework for nurses. The concept of the nurse consultant in paediatric intensive care is both innovative and strategic: Manley has identified many sub-roles, skills and processes necessary to influence and develop the role. The elements of 'transformational leadership', 'change agent' and 'collaborator' identified by Manley appear to hold the key to the ability to influence and develop paediatric intensive care nursing from a practice perspective. PMID:12035326

  19. Social media in paediatric heart disease: professional use and opportunities to improve cardiac care.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Lee, Joyce M; Pasquali, Sara K

    2015-12-01

    Social media is any type of communication utilising electronic technology that follows two guiding principles: free publishing or sharing of content and ideas and group collaboration and inter-connectedness. Over the last 10 years, social media technology has made tremendous inroads into all facets of communication. Modalities such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are no longer viewed as new communication technologies. Owing to their tremendous usage, they are now common ways to conduct a dialogue with individuals and groups. Greater than 91% of teenagers and 89% of young adults routinely use social media. Further, 24% of teenagers reported being online "almost constantly". These forms of communication are readily used by individuals cared for in the field of paediatric cardiology; thus, they should carry significant interest for cardiology care providers; however, social media's influence on medicine extends beyond use by patients. It directly affects all medical providers, both users and non-users. Further, social media has the ability to improve care for patients with paediatric heart disease. This article details social media's current influence on paediatric cardiology, including considerations for professional use of social media and potential opportunities to improve cardiac care. PMID:26675608

  20. The STEP (Safety and Toxicity of Excipients for Paediatrics) database: part 2 - the pilot version.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Smita; Brandys, Barbara; Giacoia, George; Tuleu, Catherine

    2013-11-30

    The screening and careful selection of excipients is a critical step in paediatric formulation development as certain excipients acceptable in adult formulations, may not be appropriate for paediatric use. While there is extensive toxicity data that could help in better understanding and highlighting the gaps in toxicity studies, the data are often scattered around the information sources and saddled with incompatible data types and formats. This paper is the second in a series that presents the update on the Safety and Toxicity of Excipients for Paediatrics ("STEP") database being developed by Eu-US PFIs, and describes the architecture data fields and functions of the database. The STEP database is a user designed resource that compiles the safety and toxicity data of excipients that is scattered over various sources and presents it in one freely accessible source. Currently, in the pilot database data from over 2000 references/10 excipients presenting preclinical, clinical, regulatory information and toxicological reviews, with references and source links. The STEP database allows searching "FOR" excipients and "BY" excipients. This dual nature of the STEP database, in which toxicity and safety information can be searched in both directions, makes it unique from existing sources. If the pilot is successful, the aim is to increase the number of excipients in the existing database so that a database large enough to be of practical research use will be available. It is anticipated that this source will prove to be a useful platform for data management and data exchange of excipient safety information. PMID:24070789

  1. Dental Awareness among Parents and Oral Health of Paediatric Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, Mohita; Bansal, Kalpana; Sachdeva, Anupam; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental care is often overlooked by the parents of children receiving treatment for cancer including chemotherapy who are in a phase of severe immunosuppression. Aim (i) To study dental attitudes of parents of children receiving chemotherapy towards importance of dental care. (ii) To evaluate oral hygiene status and compare it with healthy controls. Materials and Methods A questionnaire assessing the awareness towards dental care was given to the parents of 47 paediatric patients suffering from cancer receiving chemotherapy and to parents of 47 paediatric patients reporting to outpatient Department of Pedodontics at SGT Dental College. Oral examination was also carried out for both the groups and DMFT/dmft, plaque and gingival index were noted. Results Parents had a varying opinion regarding dental health of their child. The caries status of children in the control group was greater than children in the study group. The mean plaque index of children in the control group (1.40) was greater than children in the study group (1.34) which was statistically significant according to Mann-Whitney U test. The gingival health of children in the study group was better than children in the control group which was also not statistically significant. Conclusion This study highlights need for a periodic referral of the child cancer patients to the paediatric dental clinic in hospitals for the timely dental care. PMID:27437369

  2. Epidemiology of paediatric surgical admissions to a government referral hospital in the Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Bickler, S. W.; Sanno-Duanda, B.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a paucity of published data on the type of conditions that require surgery among children in sub-Saharan Africa. Such information is necessary for assessing the impact of such conditions on child health and for setting priorities to improve paediatric surgical care. METHODS: Described in the article is a 29-month prospective study of all children aged < 15 years who were admitted to a government referral hospital in the Gambia from January 1996 to May 1998. RESULTS: A total of 1726 children were admitted with surgical problems. Surgical patients accounted for 11.3% of paediatric admissions and 34,625 total inpatient days. The most common admission diagnoses were injuries (46.9%), congenital anomalies (24.3%), and infections requiring surgery (14.5%). The diagnoses that accounted for the greatest number of inpatient days were burns (18.8%), osteomyelitis (15.4%), fractures (12.7%), soft tissue injuries (3.9%), and head injuries (3.4%). Gambian children were rarely admitted for appendicitis and never admitted for hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. The leading causes of surgical deaths were burns, congenital anomalies, and injuries other than burns. DISCUSSION: Prevention of childhood injuries and better trauma management, especially at the primary and secondary health care levels, should be the priorities for improving paediatric surgical care in sub-Saharan Africa. Surgical care of children should be considered an essential component of child health programmes in developing countries. PMID:11143193

  3. Diagnostics, monitoring and outpatient care in children with suspected pulmonary hypertension/paediatric pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease. Expert consensus statement on the diagnosis and treatment of paediatric pulmonary hypertension. The European Paediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Network, endorsed by ISHLT and DGPK.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Astrid E; Apitz, Christian; Zartner, Peter; Hager, Alfred; Dubowy, Karl-Otto; Hansmann, Georg

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a condition of multiple aetiologies with underestimated prevalence and incidence. Indeed, despite access to modern therapies, pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) remains a progressive, usually life-limiting condition, severely impacting on the patients' well-being. We herein provide practical, expert consensus recommendations on the initial diagnostic work-up, clinical management and follow-up of children and adolescents with PH/PHVD, including a diagnostic algorithm. The major topics and methods that need to be tailored and put into context of the individual patient include PH classification, clinical signs and symptoms, basic diagnostic and advanced imaging measures (ECG, chest X-ray, transthoracic echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, chest CT angiography, cardiac catheterisation, ventilation-perfusion lung scan, abdominal ultrasound), lung function tests, 6 min walk and cardiopulmonary exercise testing, sleep study (polysomnography), laboratory/immunological tests, considerations for elective surgery/ general anaesthesia, physical education and exercise, flying on commercial airplanes, vaccinations, care of central intravenous lines and palliative care. Due to the complexity of PH/PHVD, the clinical care has to be multidisciplinary and coordinated by a dedicated specialist paediatric PH centre, not only to decrease mortality but to allow children with PH/PHVD to reach a reasonable quality of life. PMID:27053692

  4. Paediatric trauma on the Last Frontier: an 11-year review of injury mechanisms, high-risk injury patterns and outcomes in Alaskan children

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Christopher W.; Muensterer, Oliver J.; Sacco, Frank; Safford, Shawn D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Paediatric trauma system development in Alaska is complicated by a vast geographic coverage area, wide regional variations in environment and culture, and a lack of available published data. Objective To provide a detailed description of paediatric trauma mechanisms, high-risk injury patterns and outcomes in Alaska. Design This retrospective study included all children aged 17 years or younger in the State of Alaska Trauma Registry database admitted with traumatic injury between 2001 and 2011. Each injury record was reviewed individually and assigned a mechanism based on Centers for Disease Control E-codes. Geographic definitions were based on existing Emergency Medical Services regions. Mechanisms were compared by geographic region, patient demographics, injury characteristics and outcome. Subgroup analysis of fatal injuries was performed to identify causes of death. Results Of 5,547 patients meeting inclusion criteria, the most common mechanisms of injury were falls (39%), motor vehicle collisions (10%) and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) accidents (9%). The overall case fatality rate was 2%. Mechanisms with the greatest risk of death were gunshot wounds (21%), pedestrians struck by motorized vehicles (9%) and motor vehicle collisions (5%). These 3 mechanisms accounted for 15% of injuries but 60% of deaths in the overall cohort. Injury patterns involving combined central nervous system (CNS) and torso injuries were unusual but especially lethal, occurring in 3% of patients but carrying a case fatality rate of 18%. Although the distribution of mechanisms was generally similar for each geographic region, ATV and snowmobile injuries were significantly more common in remote areas (23% remote vs. 7% non-remote, p < 0.0001). Conclusions Mechanisms of paediatric trauma in Alaska have widely varying impacts on outcome and show some variation by region. Highest-risk mechanisms include gunshot wounds and motorized vehicle-related accidents. Prevention efforts should

  5. Meteorological factors and El Nino Southern Oscillation are associated with paediatric varicella infections in Hong Kong, 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y C; Lin, H L; Tian, L W

    2014-07-01

    Varicella accounts for substantial morbidities and remains a public health issue worldwide, especially in children. Little is known about the effect of meteorological variables on varicella infection risk for children. This study described the epidemiology of paediatric varicella notifications in Hong Kong from 2004 to 2010, and explored the association between paediatric varicella notifications in children aged <18 years and various meteorological factors using a time-stratified case-crossover model, with adjustment of potential confounding factors. The analysis found that daily mean temperature, atmospheric pressure and Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) were positively associated with paediatric varicella notifications. We found that an interquartile range (IQR) increase in temperature (8·38°C) at lag 1 day, a 9·50 hPa increase in atmospheric pressure for the current day, and a 21·91 unit increase in SOI for the current day may lead to an increase in daily cases of 5·19% [95% confidence interval (CI) 1·90-8·58], 5·77% (95% CI 3·01-8·61), and 4·32% (95% CI 2·98-5·68), respectively. An IQR increase in daily relative humidity (by 11·96%) was associated with a decrease in daily paediatric varicella (-2·79%, 95% CI -3·84 to -1·73). These findings suggest that meteorological factors might be important predictors of paediatric varicella infection in Hong Kong. PMID:24074377

  6. Information Seeking Behaviour of Parents of Paediatric Patients for Clinical Decision Making: The Central Role of Information Literacy in a Participatory Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kostagiolas, Petros; Martzoukou, Konstantina; Georgantzi, Georgia; Niakas, Dimitris

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated the information seeking behaviour and needs of parents of paediatric patients and their motives for seeking Internet-based information. Method: A questionnaire survey of 121 parents was conducted in a paediatric clinic of a Greek university hospital. Analysis: The data were analysed using SPSS; descriptive…

  7. Management of paediatric Lyme disease in non-endemic and endemic areas: data from the Registry of the Italian Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Esposito, S; Baggi, E; Villani, A; Norbedo, S; Pellegrini, G; Bozzola, E; Palumbo, E; Bosis, S; Nigro, G; Garazzino, S; Principi, N

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine how specialists in paediatric infectious diseases (PIDs) manage children with suspected Lyme disease (LD) by comparing their approaches in Italian endemic and non-endemic areas. A cross-sectional survey of the PID specialists participating in the Italian Society for Pediatric Infectious Disease (SITIP) Registry of LD was carried out between 1 January and 30 April 2012. A total of 160 children (80 living in endemic areas and 80 living in non-endemic areas) were diagnosed as having LD between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2011. The clinical manifestations were erythema migrans in 130 cases (81.3 %), arthritis in 24 (15.0 %) and neuroborreliosis in six (3.8 %). Significant differences from the recommendations concerning serology and the tests to undertake were mainly observed in the children with erythema migrans, especially those living in non-endemic areas (p < 0.05). The children with erythema migrans who lived in non-endemic areas were treated with antibiotics significantly less frequently than those living in endemic areas (p < 0.05), and significantly fewer children with erythema migrans or arthritis living in non-endemic areas were treated with amoxicillin in comparison with those living in endemic regions (p < 0.05). The duration of antimicrobial therapy was significantly shorter than recommended in the children with erythema migrans or arthritis, especially those living in non-endemic areas (p < 0.05). Paediatric LD is also present in areas of Italy in which it is not considered endemic, but knowledge concerning its management is generally poor among PID specialists and characterised by enormous gaps in non-endemic areas. PMID:23109197

  8. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of a new aluminium-free paediatric alginate preparation and placebo in infants with recurrent gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Miller, S

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy and safety of a new aluminium-free formulation of alginate with placebo in infants with recurrent gastro-oesophageal reflux. This was a double-blind, randomised, parallel-group study conducted at 25 centres in the UK. Of the 90 paediatric patients recruited in a general practice setting, 42 were randomised to receive alginate and 48 to receive placebo. Infants were assessed before treatment and again after seven and 14 days of treatment. Analyses were based on the last, valid, non-missing observation for each variable for the intent-to-treat (ITT) population of 42 alginate and 46 placebo patients. For the primary efficacy measure (number of vomitting/regurgitation episodes), alginate was significantly superior to placebo (p = 0.009). For the secondary efficacy measure (severity of vomiting), a trend in favour of alginate was observed (p = 0.061). Patients receiving alginate achieved superior assessments of treatment outcome by both investigators (p = 0.008) and parent/guardians (p = 0.002) alike. In addition, alginate achieved a significantly greater reduction in the mean severity of vomiting episodes recorded in a daily diary compared with placebo (p = 0.027) and resulted in more patients having at least 10% symptom-free days (p = 0.027). For none of the variables measured did placebo have a superior effect. More than one-half of all patients experienced some adverse event, although no statistically significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups (p > 0.1), and adverse events accounted for withdrawal in only 12.5% of the patients (alginate, n = 4; placebo, n = 7). Aluminium-free alginate demonstrated superior efficacy over placebo in treating recurrent gastro-oesophageal reflux in paediatric patients. The safety profile of alginate was similar to that of placebo. PMID:10621922

  9. The evolution of paediatrics from archaeological times to the mid-nineteenth century and the historical influence on present day practice.

    PubMed

    Rangroo, Vinita

    2008-05-01

    The history of childcare dates back to the beginning of time. This article critically analyses the history of paediatrics from its roots to mid-nineteenth century with the view to examine its evolution and influence on today's practice. Paediatrics as a sub-speciality of medicine only began in the fifteenth century when the Four Incunabula were published in the West. This was the first attempt at producing a comprehensive and accessible reference paediatric text. However, long before the Incunabula, early traces of childcare are found in different cultures like Egyptian, Indian and Chinese. Modern paediatrics is a highly advanced field of medicine that relies on many recent technological innovations. In spite of these, this paper concludes that paediatrics today is very much based on concepts, such as observation and clinical skills, introduced many centuries ago. The basic approach used in everyday clinical practice owes more to century-old ideas of scientists. PMID:18394119

  10. E-mail communication in paediatrics: Ethical and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Albersheim, S

    2010-01-01

    E-mail has become a commonplace ‘procedure’ in medical practice because it is efficient and inexpensive. However, there are potential misuses and abuses of this form of written communication, with clinical and ethical implications. Common uses of e-mail in paediatics include general communication with colleagues in a professional setting; electronic formal consultation, in which patient confidentiality is paramount; electronic ‘curb-side’ consultation, which may be perceived as a formal consultation; electronic discussion groups, which lack peer review; communication with current patients or their parents, which should be limited to simple, nonurgent issues; and communication with individuals seeking medical advice who are not patients, which is generally ill-advised. The present practice point offers a few practical suggestions including e-mail etiquette, security measures to ensure confidentiality, development of an e-mail policy for patients and parents, and separation of personal from professional e-mail. PMID:21358897

  11. An mHealth system for toxicity monitoring of paediatric oncological patients using Near Field Communication technology.

    PubMed

    Duregger, Katharina; Hayn, Dieter; Morak, Jürgen; Ladenstein, Ruth; Schreier, Gunter

    2015-08-01

    Home-based monitoring might be useful to reduce the burden of long-lasting oncological treatment for children. Current telemonitoring applications focus on chronic diseases or elderly people. Based on the workflow for different stakeholders and the identification of parameters important in paediatric oncology, we developed a prototype of a smartphone-based telehealth system using Near Field Communication technology for monitoring paediatric neuroblastoma patients at home. The parameters blood pressure, heart rate, temperature, body weight, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, wellbeing, pain level, nausea level and skin alterations could be monitored using a smartphone, a designated app, point-of-care measurement devices and a smart-poster containing RFID tags. The system has been designed to increase the quality of life for paediatric cancer patients. As a future step, a clinical trial is currently being planned to evaluate the system in clinical setting. PMID:26737866

  12. XI. Management of paediatric and adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma: what lessons can each teach the other?

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Birgit; Lenz, Georg

    2015-06-01

    Is there anything that we can learn from each other regarding paediatric and adult non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) management? Do we treat the same patients? Are there differences in lymphoma biology in the different age groups? Are the procedures of decision making and the infrastructure comparable? Is the weighing of toxicity and outcome aspects in the benefit and risk assessments prior to treatment decisions comparable? Interestingly, the proportional distribution of the NHL subtypes and the spectrum of NHL occurring in children and adolescents differs significantly from that in adults. This observation might motivate biological studies aiming to elucidate the pathomechanisms of lymphomagenesis. Concerning NHL diagnosis and staging, the comparison of outcome data reported for paediatric and adult patient series is often impaired by the use of different staging systems. However, the impact of reference laboratories supporting correct subtyping and the advantages of population-based patient recruitment are experiences that might be transferable between paediatric and adult oncologists. Interestingly, the process of implementing new drugs into current treatment strategies and making these drugs available to patients varies substantially across patient's age groups. The far lower absolute number of patients, especially of relapsed patients, and the favorable outcome with current standard treatment may contribute to the marked differences in the kinetic of implementing new compounds comparing adult with paediatric NHL patients. Also, the basis for the conduction of cooperative clinical trials with pharmaceutical companies needs to be strengthened in paediatric clinical trial groups. In conclusion, both paediatric and adult oncologists benefit from the interdisciplinary discussion with each other, not only concerning results and experiences in clinical trials but also with respect to critical aspects of infrastructure. PMID:26062057

  13. Brugada syndrome in the paediatric population: a comprehensive approach to clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Corcia, M Cecilia; de Asmundis, Carlo; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; Brugada, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited arrhythmogenic disorder, characterised by coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads, and is associated with increased risk of sudden death. It is genetically and clinically heterogeneous, presenting typically in the fourth or fifth decade of life. The prevalence of Brugada syndrome in the paediatric population is low compared with the adult population. Interestingly, over the last several years, there has been growing evidence in the literature of onset of the disease during childhood. Most of the paediatric cases reported in the literature consist of asymptomatic Brugada syndrome; however, some patients manifest the disease at different regions of the cardiac conduction system at a young age. Early expression of the disease can be affected by multiple factors, including genetic substrate, hormonal changes, and still unknown environmental exposures. The initial manifestation of Brugada syndrome in children can include sinus node dysfunction and atrial arrhythmias. Brugada syndrome can also manifest as ventricular arrhythmias leading to sudden death at an early age. In symptomatic children, performance of the ajmaline test by an experienced team can be safely used as a diagnostic tool to unmask latent Brugada syndrome. Defining indications for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator in children with the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome remains challenging. Given the rarity of the syndrome in children, most paediatric cardiologists will only rarely see a young patient with Brugada syndrome and there is still no universal consensus regarding the optimal management approach. Care should be individualised according to the specific clinical presentation, taking into account the family history, genetic data, and the family's specific preferences. PMID:27151277

  14. Effectiveness of a publicly funded clinical paediatric weight management program on obesity outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Serodio, Kristin J; Berall, Glenn B; Flanders, Daniel I; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a publicly funded, paediatric weight management clinic in decreasing obesity. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients four to 16 years of age, from 2006 to 2009, was performed at a medically supervised weight management clinic (n=121). Patients participated in monthly visits and were educated about the cognitive behavioural and nutritional aspects of weight management. RESULTS: The sample included 51 male and 70 female patients with a mean (± SD) initial age of 11.7±3.0 years. Patients participated in 6.4±6.5 visits (range one to 31 visits) over 13.7±15.5 months and 7.4% of patients discontinued treatment after their initial visit. Of the patients who attended the clinic >1 time, 66.1% attended for at least four months, 48.2% attended for >8 months and 33.0% attended for >1 year. Over the course of their treatment, patients experienced a weight gain of 3.8±9.5 kg, but a reduction in body mass index (BMI) percentile (−1.1±3.6%). Post-treatment, the prevalence of obesity decreased from 96.7% to 87.5%. Patients with longer treatment times (>12 months) attained significantly lower final BMI percentiles than patients with shorter treatment times; however, there was no difference in the rate of reduction. Initial treatment age, sex and medical conditions were not related to BMI percentile change. CONCLUSIONS: This paediatric weight management program effectively reduced the prevalence of obesity. Patients who had longer treatment times experienced greater reductions in obesity. Overall, the present study highlights that long-term patient attendance may be needed to better support paediatric weight management patients. PMID:26744553

  15. From Transmission to Transition: Lessons Learnt from the Thai Paediatric Antiretroviral Programme

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Olivia; Theobald, Sally; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chasombat, Sanchai; Kosalaraksa, Pope; Jirawattanapisal, Thidaporn; Lakonphon, Sudrak; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Taegtmeyer, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Background The Thai HIV programme is a leader in the public health approach to HIV treatment. Starting at transmission of HIV and ending with transition to adult services this paper assesses the paediatric HIV treatment continuum from three perspectives: service-user, provider and policy maker, to understand what works well and why. Methods A qualitative research design was used to assess and triangulate the stakeholder perspectives. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ART service-users (n = 35), policy actors (n = 20); telephone interviews with prior caregivers of orphans (n = 10); and three focus group discussions with service-providers (hospital staff and volunteers) from a district, provincial and a university hospital. Findings Children accessing HIV care were often orphaned, cared for by elderly relatives and experiencing multiple vulnerabilities. Services were divided into three stages, 1. Diagnosis and linkage: Despite strong policies there were supply and demand-side gaps in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission ‘cascade’ preventing early diagnosis and/or treatment. 2. Maintenance on ART - Children did well on treatment; caregivers took adherence seriously and valued the quality of services. Drug resistance, adherence and psychosocial issues were important concerns from all perspectives. 3. Adolescents and transition: Adolescent service-users faced greater complexity in their physical and emotional lives for which providers lacked skills; transition from the security of paediatric clinic was a daunting prospect. Dedicated healthcare providers felt they struggled to deliver services that met service-users' diverse needs at all stages. Child- and adolescent-specific elements of HIV policy were considered low priority. Conclusions Using the notion of the continuum of care a number of strengths and weaknesses were identified. Features of paediatric services need to evolve alongside the changing needs of service users. Peer

  16. Paediatric models in motion: requirements for model-based decision support at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Optimal paediatric pharmacotherapy is reliant on a detailed understanding of the individual patient including their developmental status and disease state as well as the pharmaceutical agents he/she is receiving for treatment or management of side effects. Our appreciation for size and maturation effects on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) phenomenon has improved to the point that we can develop predictive models that permit us to individualize therapy, especially in the situation where we are monitoring drug effects or therapeutic concentrations. The growth of efforts to guide paediatric pharmacotherapy via model-based decision support necessitates a coordinated and systematic approach to ensuring reliable and robust output to caregivers that represents the current standard of care and adheres to governance imposed by the host institution or coalition responsible. Model-based systems which guide caregivers on dosing paediatric patients in a more comprehensive manner are in development at several institutions. Care must be taken that these systems provide robust guidance with the current best practice. These systems must evolve as new information becomes available and ultimately are best constructed from diverse data representing global input on demographics, ethnic / racial diversity, diet and other lifestyle factors. Multidisciplinary involvement at the project team level is key to the ultimate clinical valuation. Likewise, early engagement of clinical champions is also critical for the success of model-based tools. Adherence to regulatory requirements as well as best practices with respect to software development and testing are essential if these tools are to be used as part of the routine standard of care. PMID:24251868

  17. Factors influencing nurses' use of nonpharmacological pain alleviation methods in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Pölkki, Tarja; Laukkala, Helena; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the factors promoting and hindering nurses' use of nonpharmacological methods in children's surgical pain relief, and demographic variables related to this. The data were collected by a Likert-type questionnaire, which was completed by nurses (n = 162) who were working in one of the paediatric surgical wards located in university hospitals in Finland. The response rate was 99%. Factor analysis was used to analyse the data. According to the results, five promoting factors (nurse's competence, versatile use of pain alleviation methods, workload/time, child's age/ability to cooperate, and parental participation), as well as five hindering factors (nurse's insecurity, beliefs regarding parental roles/child's ability to express pain, heavy workload/lack of time, limited use of pain alleviation methods, and work organizational model/patient turnover rate) were found to influence the nurses' use of nonpharmacological methods. Almost all of the nurses (98%) hoped to make progress in their career and to learn different pain alleviation methods, but less than half of them (47%) agreed that they had obtained sufficient education regarding these methods. Demographic variables such as the nurse's age, education, and work experience were significantly related to certain factors influencing the use of nonpharmacological methods. In conclusion, paediatric patients' surgical pain relief in the hospital was affected more by the nurses' personal characteristics, than by work-related factors or characteristics of the child or the child's parents. The nurses had positive attitudes towards learning different pain alleviation methods, which constitute the basis for the development of pain management in paediatric patients. PMID:14629640

  18. Down syndrome and postoperative complications after paediatric cardiac surgery: a propensity-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Roland; Szántó, Péter; Prodán, Zsolt; Lex, Daniel J; Sápi, Erzsébet; Szatmári, András; Gál, János; Szántó, Tamás; Székely, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The incidence of congenital heart disease is ∼50%, mostly related to endocardial cushion defects. The aim of our study was to investigate the postoperative complications that occur after paediatric cardiac surgery. METHODS Our perioperative data were analysed in paediatric patients with Down syndrome undergoing cardiac surgery. We retrospectively analysed the data from 2063 consecutive paediatric patients between January 2003 and December 2008. After excluding the patients who died or had missing data, the analysed database (before propensity matching) contained 129 Down patients and 1667 non-Down patients. After propensity matching, the study population comprised 222 patients and 111 patients had Down syndrome. RESULTS Before propensity matching, the occurrences of low output syndrome (21.2 vs 32.6%, P = 0.003), pulmonary complication (14 vs 28.7%, P < 0.001) and severe infection (11.9 vs 22.5%, P = 0.001) were higher in the Down group. Down patients were more likely to have prolonged mechanical ventilation [median (interquartile range) 22 (9–72) h vs 49 (24–117) h, P = 0.007]. The total intensive care unit length of stay [6.9 (4.2–12.4) days vs 8.3 (5.3–13.2) days, P = 0.04] and the total hospital length of stay [17.3 (13.3–23.2) days vs 18.3 (15.1–23.6) days, P = 0.05] of the Down patients were also longer. Mortality was similar in the two groups before (3.58 vs 3.88%, P = 0.86) and after (5.4 vs 4.5%, P = 1.00) propensity matching. After propensity matching, there was no difference in the occurrence of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS After propensity matching Down syndrome was not associated with increased mortality or complication rate following congenital cardiac surgery. PMID:23832837

  19. Outcomes and patients’ perspectives of transition from paediatric to adult care in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alice L; Moore, David; Bampton, Peter A; Bryant, Robert V; Andrews, Jane M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the disease and psychosocial outcomes of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) transition cohort and their perspectives. METHODS: Patients with IBD, aged > 18 years, who had moved from paediatric to adult care within 10 years were identified through IBD databases at three tertiary hospitals. Participants were surveyed regarding demographic and disease specific data and their perspectives on the transition process. Survey response data were compared to contemporaneously recorded information in paediatric service case notes. Data were compared to a similar age cohort who had never received paediatric IBD care and therefore who had not undergone a transition process. RESULTS: There were 81 returned surveys from 46 transition and 35 non-transition patients. No statistically significant differences were found in disease burden, disease outcomes or adult roles and responsibilities between cohorts. Despite a high prevalence of mood disturbance (35%), there was a very low usage (5%) of psychological services in both cohorts. In the transition cohort, knowledge of their transition plan was reported by only 25/46 patients and the majority (54%) felt they were not strongly prepared. A high rate (78%) of discussion about work/study plans was recorded prior to transition, but a near complete absence of discussion regarding sex (8%), and other adult issues was recorded. Both cohorts agreed that their preferred method of future transition practices (of the options offered) was a shared clinic appointment with all key stakeholders. CONCLUSION: Transition did not appear to adversely affect disease or psychosocial outcomes. Current transition care processes could be optimised, with better psychosocial preparation and agreed transition plans. PMID:26937149

  20. Clinical implications of reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones in paediatric Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri infections

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Corinne N.; Thieu, Nga Tran Vu; Vinh, Phat Voong; Duc, Anh Nguyen; Wolbers, Marcel; Vinh, Ha; Campbell, James I.; Ngoc, Dung Tran Thi; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Thanh, Tuyen Ha; The, Hao Chung; Nguyen, To Nguyen Thi; Lan, Nguyen Phu Huong; Parry, Christopher M.; Chau, Nguyen Van Vinh; Thwaites, Guy; Thanh, Duy Pham; Baker, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to quantify the impact of fluoroquinolone resistance on the clinical outcome of paediatric shigellosis patients treated with fluoroquinolones in southern Vietnam. Such information is important to inform therapeutic management for infections caused by this increasingly drug-resistant pathogen, responsible for high morbidity and mortality in young children globally. Methods Clinical information and bacterial isolates were derived from a randomized controlled trial comparing gatifloxacin with ciprofloxacin for the treatment of paediatric shigellosis. Time–kill experiments were performed to evaluate the impact of MIC on the in vitro growth of Shigella and Cox regression modelling was used to compare clinical outcome between treatments and Shigella species. Results Shigella flexneri patients treated with gatifloxacin had significantly worse outcomes than those treated with ciprofloxacin. However, the MICs of fluoroquinolones were not significantly associated with poorer outcome. The presence of S83L and A87T mutations in the gyrA gene significantly increased MICs of fluoroquinolones. Finally, elevated MICs and the presence of the qnrS gene allowed Shigella to replicate efficiently in vitro in high concentrations of ciprofloxacin. Conclusions We found that below the CLSI breakpoint, there was no association between MIC and clinical outcome in paediatric shigellosis infections. However, S. flexneri patients had worse clinical outcomes when treated with gatifloxacin in this study regardless of MIC. Additionally, Shigella harbouring the qnrS gene are able to replicate efficiently in high concentrations of ciprofloxacin and we hypothesize that such strains possess a competitive advantage against fluoroquinolone-susceptible strains due to enhanced shedding and transmission. PMID:26679253

  1. Association between annual river flood pulse and paediatric hospital admissions in the Mekong Delta area.

    PubMed

    Phung, Dung; Huang, Cunrui; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia; Wang, Xiaoming; Nguyen, Minh

    2014-11-01

    The Mekong Delta is the most vulnerable region to extreme climate and hydrological conditions however the association between these conditions and children's health has been little studied. We examine the association between annual river flood pulse and paediatric hospital admissions in a Vietnam Mekong Delta city. Daily paediatric hospital admissions (PHA) were collected from the City Paediatric Hospital, and daily river water level (RWL) and meteorological data were retrieved from the Southern Regional Hydro-Meteorological Centre from 2008 to 2011. We evaluated the association between annual river flood pulse (>=90th percentile of RWL) and PHA using the Poisson distributed lag model, controlling for temperature, relative humidity, day of week, seasonal and long-term trends. The seasonal pattern of PHA was examined using harmonic and polynomial regression models. The cumulative risk ratios estimated for a 15-day period following an extreme RWL was 1.26 (95%CI, 1.2-1.38) for all age groups, 1.27 (95%CI, 1.23-1.30) for under five-years and 1.15 (95%CI, 1.07-1.20) for school-aged children, 1.24 (95%CI, 1.21-1.27) for all-causes, 1.18 (95%CI, 1.12-1.21) for communicable infection, 1.66 (95%CI, 1.57-1.74) for respiratory infection and 1.06 (95%CI, 1.01-1.1) for other diseases. The peak PHA risk is in the September-October period corresponding to the highest RWL, and the PHA-RWL association was modified by temperature. An increase in PHA is significantly associated with annual river flood, and the pattern of PHA is seasonally correspondent to the RWL. These findings combined with projected changes in climate conditions suggest important implications of climate change for human health in the Mekong Delta region. PMID:25282279

  2. Paediatric out-of-hospital resuscitation in an area with scattered population (Galicia-Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Pilar Blanco-Ons; Sánchez-Santos, Luis; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; Iglesias-Vázquez, José Antonio; Cegarra-García, María; Barreiro-Díaz, Maria Victoria

    2007-01-01

    Background Cardiorespiratory arrest (CRA) is a rare event in childhood. Our objective was to determine the characteristics of paediatric CRA and the immediate results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in Galicia, a community with a very scattered population. Methods All children (aged from newborn to 16 years old) who suffered an out-of-hospital CRA in Galicia and were assisted by the Public Foundation Medical Emergencies of Galicia-061 staff, from June 2002 to February 2005, were included in the study. Data were prospectively recorded following the Utstein's style guidelines. Results Thirty-one cases were analyzed (3.4 CRA annual cases per 100.000 paediatric population). The arrest was respiratory in 16.1% and cardiac in 83.9% of cases. CRA occurred at home in 58.1% of instances. Time CRA to initiation of CPR was shorter than 10 minutes in 32.2% and longer than 20 minutes in 29.0% of cases. 22.6% of children received bystander CPR. The first recorded rhythm was asystole in 67.7% of cases. Bag-mask ventilation was used in 67.7% and in 83.8% oro-tracheal intubation was done. A peripheral venous access was achieved in 67.7% and intraosseous access was used in 16.1% of patients. 93.5% of children were treated with adrenaline. After initial CPR, sustained restoration of spontaneous circulation was achieved in 38.7% of cases. Six children (19.4%) survived until hospital discharge. Four of 5 children with respiratory arrest survived, whereas only 2 of 26 children with cardiac arrest survived until hospital discharge. Conclusion Despite the handicap of a highly disseminated population, paediatric CRA characteristics and CPR results in Galicia are comparable to references from other communities. Programs to increase bystander CPR, equip laypeople with basic CPR skills and to update life support knowledge of health staff are needed to improve outcomes. PMID:17501988

  3. Subgroups of Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Might Differ Significantly in Genetic Predisposition to Asparaginase Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kutszegi, Nóra; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Gézsi, András; Sági, Judit C.; Nagy, Viktória; Csordás, Katalin; Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Lautner-Csorba, Orsolya; Gábor, Krisztina Míta; Kovács, Gábor T.; Erdélyi, Dániel J.; Szalai, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase (ASP) is a key element in the treatment of paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). However, hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to ASP are major challenges in paediatric patients. Our aim was to investigate genetic variants that may influence the risk to Escherichia coli-derived ASP hypersensitivity. Sample and clinical data collection was carried out from 576 paediatric ALL patients who were treated according to protocols from the Berlin—Frankfurt—Münster Study Group. A total of 20 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GRIA1 and GALNT10 genes were genotyped. Patients with GRIA1 rs4958351 AA/AG genotype showed significantly reduced risk to ASP hypersensitivity compared to patients with GG genotype in the T-cell ALL subgroup (OR = 0.05 (0.01–0.26); p = 4.70E-04), while no such association was found in pre-B-cell ALL. In the medium risk group two SNPs of GRIA1 (rs2055083 and rs707176) were associated significantly with the occurrence of ASP hypersensitivity (OR = 0.21 (0.09–0.53); p = 8.48E-04 and OR = 3.02 (1.36–6.73); p = 6.76E-03, respectively). Evaluating the genders separately, however, the association of rs707176 with ASP HSRs was confined only to females. Our results suggest that genetic variants of GRIA1 might influence the risk to ASP hypersensitivity, but subgroups of patients can differ significantly in this respect. PMID:26457809

  4. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (<7 mm wide) silicon photodiode dosemeters (34 in total), which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within adult and 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantoms. Output signals from photodiode dosemeters were read on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8–35 mGy and 7–18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12–33 mGy and 10–21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4–17 mGy and 3–7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5–14 mGy and 3–9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose–length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSv⋅mGy−1⋅cm−1 and 0.019 mSv⋅mGy−1⋅cm−1 for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively. PMID:19934069

  5. PENTA 2009 guidelines for the use of antiretroviral therapy in paediatric HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Welch, Steve; Sharland, Mike; Lyall, E G Hermione; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Niehues, Tim; Wintergerst, Uwe; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Hainaut, Marc; Della Negra, Marinella; Pena, Maria José Mellado; Amador, José Tomas Ramos; Gattinara, Guido Castelli; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Faye, Albert; Giaquinto, Carlo; Gibb, Diana M; Gandhi, Kate; Forcat, Silvia; Buckberry, Karen; Harper, Lynda; Königs, Christoph; Patel, Deepak; Bastiaans, Diane

    2009-11-01

    PENTA Guidelines aim to provide practical recommendations for treating children with HIV infection in Europe. Changes to guidance since 2004 have been informed by new evidence and by expectations of better outcomes following the ongoing success of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Participation in PENTA trials of simplifying treatment is encouraged. The main changes are in the following sections: 'When to start ART': Treatment is recommended for all infants, and at higher CD4 cell counts and percentages in older children, in line with changes to adult guidelines. The number of age bands has been reduced to simplify and harmonize with other paediatric guidelines. Greater emphasis is placed on CD4 cell count in children over 5 years, and guidance is provided where CD4% and CD4 criteria differ. 'What to start with': A three-drug regimen of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) with either a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or a boosted protease inhibitor (PI) remains the first choice combination. Lamivudine and abacavir are the NRTI backbone of choice for most children, based on long-term follow-up in the PENTA 5 trial. Stavudine is no longer recommended. Whether to start with an NNRTI or PI remains unclear, but PENPACT 1 trial results in 2009 may help to inform this. All PIs should be ritonavir boosted. Recommendations on use of resistance testing, therapeutic drug monitoring and HLA testing draw from data in adults and from European paediatric cohort studies. Recently updated US and WHO paediatric guidelines provide more detailed review of the evidence base. Differences between guidelines are highlighted and explained. PMID:19878352

  6. Paediatric models in motion: requirements for model-based decision support at the bedside

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Optimal paediatric pharmacotherapy is reliant on a detailed understanding of the individual patient including their developmental status and disease state as well as the pharmaceutical agents he/she is receiving for treatment or management of side effects. Our appreciation for size and maturation effects on the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) phenomenon has improved to the point that we can develop predictive models that permit us to individualize therapy, especially in the situation where we are monitoring drug effects or therapeutic concentrations. The growth of efforts to guide paediatric pharmacotherapy via model-based decision support necessitates a coordinated and systematic approach to ensuring reliable and robust output to caregivers that represents the current standard of care and adheres to governance imposed by the host institution or coalition responsible. Model-based systems which guide caregivers on dosing paediatric patients in a more comprehensive manner are in development at several institutions. Care must be taken that these systems provide robust guidance with the current best practice. These systems must evolve as new information becomes available and ultimately are best constructed from diverse data representing global input on demographics, ethnic / racial diversity, diet and other lifestyle factors. Multidisciplinary involvement at the project team level is key to the ultimate clinical valuation. Likewise, early engagement of clinical champions is also critical for the success of model-based tools. Adherence to regulatory requirements as well as best practices with respect to software development and testing are essential if these tools are to be used as part of the routine standard of care. PMID:24251868

  7. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (<7 mm wide) silicon photodiode dosemeters (34 in total), which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within adult and 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantoms. Output signals from photodiode dosemeters were read on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8-35 mGy and 7-18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12-33 mGy and 10-21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4-17 mGy and 3-7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5-14 mGy and 3-9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDI(vol)), dose-length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) and 0.019 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively. PMID:19934069

  8. Driver mutations in histone H3.3 and chromatin remodelling genes in paediatric glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Korshunov, Andrey; Liu, Xiao-Yang; Jones, David T W; Pfaff, Elke; Jacob, Karine; Sturm, Dominik; Fontebasso, Adam M; Quang, Dong-Anh Khuong; Tönjes, Martje; Hovestadt, Volker; Albrecht, Steffen; Kool, Marcel; Nantel, Andre; Konermann, Carolin; Lindroth, Anders; Jäger, Natalie; Rausch, Tobias; Ryzhova, Marina; Korbel, Jan O; Hielscher, Thomas; Hauser, Peter; Garami, Miklos; Klekner, Almos; Bognar, Laszlo; Ebinger, Martin; Schuhmann, Martin U; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Pekrun, Arnulf; Frühwald, Michael C; Roggendorf, Wolfgang; Kramm, Christoph; Dürken, Matthias; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Lepage, Pierre; Montpetit, Alexandre; Zakrzewska, Magdalena; Zakrzewski, Krzystof; Liberski, Pawel P; Dong, Zhifeng; Siegel, Peter; Kulozik, Andreas E; Zapatka, Marc; Guha, Abhijit; Malkin, David; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas; Ichimura, Koichi; Collins, V Peter; Witt, Hendrik; Milde, Till; Witt, Olaf; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Lichter, Peter; Faury, Damien; Tabori, Uri; Plass, Christoph; Majewski, Jacek; Pfister, Stefan M; Jabado, Nada

    2012-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a lethal brain tumour in adults and children. However, DNA copy number and gene expression signatures indicate differences between adult and paediatric cases. To explore the genetic events underlying this distinction, we sequenced the exomes of 48 paediatric GBM samples. Somatic mutations in the H3.3-ATRX-DAXX chromatin remodelling pathway were identified in 44% of tumours (21/48). Recurrent mutations in H3F3A, which encodes the replication-independent histone 3 variant H3.3, were observed in 31% of tumours, and led to amino acid substitutions at two critical positions within the histone tail (K27M, G34R/G34V) involved in key regulatory post-translational modifications. Mutations in ATRX (α-thalassaemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked) and DAXX (death-domain associated protein), encoding two subunits of a chromatin remodelling complex required for H3.3 incorporation at pericentric heterochromatin and telomeres, were identified in 31% of samples overall, and in 100% of tumours harbouring a G34R or G34V H3.3 mutation. Somatic TP53 mutations were identified in 54% of all cases, and in 86% of samples with H3F3A and/or ATRX mutations. Screening of a large cohort of gliomas of various grades and histologies (n = 784) showed H3F3A mutations to be specific to GBM and highly prevalent in children and young adults. Furthermore, the presence of H3F3A/ATRX-DAXX/TP53 mutations was strongly associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres and specific gene expression profiles. This is, to our knowledge, the first report to highlight recurrent mutations in a regulatory histone in humans, and our data suggest that defects of the chromatin architecture underlie paediatric and young adult GBM pathogenesis. PMID:22286061

  9. The microtubule binding drug EM011 inhibits the growth of paediatric low grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ajeawung, Norbert F; Joshi, Harish C; Kamnasaran, Deepak

    2013-07-10

    Low grade gliomas are a heterogeneous group of tumours representing the most common form of neoplasms in the central nervous system among children. Although gross total resection remains the principal treatment, it is often impractical especially for the resection of tumours within eloquent regions of the brain. Instead Radiotherapy is utilised in such cases, but because of its associated toxicities, it is refrained from use among younger children. These limitations coupled with hypersensitivity and toxicities associated with some commonly used chemotherapeutic agents, have ignited the need to search for safer and more effective treatments for paediatric low grade gliomas. In this study, we investigated the EM011 drug on the growth of two pilocytic and one diffuse paediatric astrocytoma cell lines, using an assortment of cancer assays. We discovered that treatments of low grade gliomas with EM011 abrogated cell viability by inducing a decrease in cell proliferation and an arrest in the S and G2M cell cycle phases, followed by a converse increase in apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner. The cell migratory and invasion indices, as well as anchorage independent growth in soft agarose, were significantly attenuated. These findings were mechanistically associated with a transient release of AIF, a disruption of microtubule architecture, and a decline in the expression of key genes which drive cancer progression including EGFR, mTORC1, JUN and multiple MMPs. In fact, the activity of MMP2 was also perturbed by EM011. These findings, in conjunction with the insignificant adverse side effects established from other studies, make EM011 an appealing chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of paediatric low grade gliomas. PMID:23402815

  10. Optimization of image quality and patient dose in radiographs of paediatric extremities using direct digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, C; Jerrom, C; Honey, I D

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of beam quality on the image quality (IQ) of ankle radiographs of paediatric patients in the age range of 0–1 year whilst maintaining constant effective dose (ED). Methods: Lateral ankle radiographs of an infant foot phantom were taken at a range of tube potentials (40.0–64.5 kVp) with and without 0.1-mm copper (Cu) filtration using a Trixell Pixium 4600 detector (Trixell, Morains, France). ED to the patient was computed for the default exposure parameters using PCXMC v. 2.0 and was fixed for other beam qualities by modulating the tube current-time product. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was measured between the tibia and adjacent soft tissue. The IQ of the phantom images was assessed by three radiologists and a reporting radiographer. Four IQ criteria were defined each with a scale of 1–3, giving a maximum score of 12. Finally, a service audit of clinical images at the default and optimum beam qualities was undertaken. Results: The measured CNR for the 40 kVp/no Cu image was 12.0 compared with 7.6 for the default mode (55  0.1 mm Cu). An improvement in the clinical IQ scores was also apparent at this lower beam quality. Conclusion: Lowering tube potential and removing filtration improved the clinical IQ of paediatric ankle radiographs in this age range. Advances in knowledge: There are currently no UK guidelines on exposure protocols for paediatric imaging using direct digital radiography. A lower beam quality will produce better IQ with no additional dose penalty for infant extremity imaging. PMID:25816115

  11. Regional hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy in paediatric, adolescent and young adult patients: current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Georg; Budach, Volker; Keilholz, Ulrich; Wust, Peter; Eggert, Angelika; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2016-01-01

    Here we evaluate the current status of clinical research on regional hyperthermia (RHT) in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy in paediatric oncology.Data were identified in searches of MEDLINE, Current Contents, PubMed, and references from relevant articles using medical subject headings including hyperthermia, cancer, paediatric oncology, children, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Currently, only two RHT centres exist in Europe which treat children. Clinical RHT research in paediatric oncology has as yet been limited to children with sarcomas and germ cell tumours that respond poorly to or recur after chemotherapy. RHT is a safe and effective treatment delivering local thermic effects, which may also stimulate immunological processes via heat-shock protein reactions. RHT is used chiefly in children and adolescents with sarcomas or germ cell tumours located in the abdomino-pelvic region, chest wall or extremities to improve operability or render the tumour operable. It could potentially be combined with radiation therapy in a post-operative R1 setting where more radical surgery is not possible or combined with chemotherapy instead of radiation therapy in cases where the necessary radiation dose is impossible to achieve or would have mutilating consequences. RHT might also be an option for chemotherapy intensification in the neoadjuvant first-line treatment setting for children and adolescents, as was recently reflected in the promising long-term outcome data in adults with high-risk soft tissue sarcomas (EORTC 62961/ESHO trial).The limited data available indicate that combining RHT with chemotherapy is a promising option to treat germ cell tumours and, potentially, sarcomas. RHT may also be beneficial in first-line therapy in children, adolescents and young adults. The research should focus on optimising necessary technical demands and then initiate several clinical trials incorporating RHT into interdisciplinary treatment of children

  12. Early UK experience in the use of clofarabine in the treatment of relapsed and refractory paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David; Sibson, Keith; Caswell, Mark; Connor, Philip; Cummins, Michelle; Mitchell, Chris; Motwani, Jayashree; Taj, Mary; Vora, Ajay; Wynn, Robert; Kearns, Pamela R

    2011-08-01

    Clofarabine is a second-generation purine nucleoside analogue, which has shown promising activity in relapsed and refractory paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). This report summarizes the early United Kingdom experience of clofarabine for the treatment of paediatric ALL in 23 patients, outside of the context of a clinical trial. Our results demonstrated that clofarabine-based chemotherapy regimes were effective and well-tolerated in this heavily pre-treated group, with an overall response rate of 67% when used in combination regimes. Responses were seen in both B and T cell disease and in patients with adverse cytogenetics. PMID:21689087

  13. Identification of novel kinase fusion transcripts in paediatric B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with IKZF1 deletion.

    PubMed

    Yano, Mio; Imamura, Toshihiko; Asai, Daisuke; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Kenji; Deguchi, Takao; Hashii, Yoshiko; Honda, Yu-ko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Sasahara, Yoji; Ishii, Mutsuo; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Shima, Midori; Hori, Hiroki; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Hara, Junichi; Oda, Megumi; Horibe, Keizo; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    Activating tyrosine kinase mutations or cytokine receptor signalling alterations have attracted attention as therapeutic targets for high-risk paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We identified two novel kinase fusions, OFD1-JAK2 and NCOR1-LYN, in paediatric ALL patients with IKZF1 deletion, by mRNA sequencing. The patient with CSF2RA-CRLF2 also harboured IGH-EPOR. All these patients had high-risk features, such as high initial white blood cell counts and initial poor response to prednisolone. The functional analysis of these novel fusions is on-going to determine whether these genetic alterations can be targeted by drugs. PMID:26404892

  14. Concepts in local treatment of extensive paediatric burns

    PubMed Central

    Ungureanu, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is a wide variety of local therapeutical methods for extensive burns. This article aims to be a general overview of the most common methods used in the local treatment for extensive burns, both in our clinic and globally. Clinical examples are shown from our clinic; cases of the last 8 years. None of the less there is no such thing as the "perfect method of treatment" but a thin balance between the clinical experience of plastic surgeons, every case particularities and specified characteristics, meaning advantages, disadvantages and limited indications of local topics or methods of skin covering. PMID:25408723

  15. Autism Disorder (AD): An Updated Review for Paediatric Dentists

    PubMed Central

    J., Udhya; M.M, Varadharaja; J., Parthiban; Srinivasan, Ila

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been an explosion of interest in Autism Disorder (AD). Knowledge and awareness on the condition has grown exponentially at all levels among the general public, parents, health professionals, the research community and more recently, at parliamentary level. The world has begun to recognize the scope of this problem and act internationally and locally to improve the lives of the growing number of individuals and families affected by this devastating disorder. This article reviews the dental literature since 1969 and it summarizes characteristics of patients with AD, oral health status and dental management of patients with AD. PMID:24701555

  16. Concepts in local treatment of extensive paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, M

    2014-06-15

    There is a wide variety of local therapeutical methods for extensive burns. This article aims to be a general overview of the most common methods used in the local treatment for extensive burns, both in our clinic and globally. Clinical examples are shown from our clinic; cases of the last 8 years. None of the less there is no such thing as the "perfect method of treatment" but a thin balance between the clinical experience of plastic surgeons, every case particularities and specified characteristics, meaning advantages, disadvantages and limited indications of local topics or methods of skin covering. PMID:25408723

  17. Paediatric Obesity Research in Early Childhood and the Primary Care Setting: The TARGet Kids! Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Morinis, Julia; Maguire, Jonathon; Khovratovich, Marina; McCrindle, Brian W.; Parkin, Patricia C.; Birken, Catherine S.

    2012-01-01

    Primary paediatric health care is the foundation for preventative child health. In light of the recent obesity epidemic, paediatricians find themselves at the frontline of identification and management of childhood obesity. However, it is well recognized that evidence based approaches to obesity prevention and subsequent translation of this evidence into practice are critically needed. This paper explores the role of primary care in obesity prevention and introduces a novel application and development of a primary care research network in Canada—TARGet Kids!—to develop and translate an evidence-base on effective screening and prevention of childhood obesity. PMID:22690197

  18. Impacted Sharp Oesophageal Foreign Bodies--A Novel Technique of Removal with the Paediatric Bronchoscope.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Aparajita; Bajpai, Minu

    2016-04-01

    Sharp foreign bodies in the oesophagus may present as an entirely asymptomatic child with only radiological evidence but require emergent surgical management. Safety pins, razor blades and needles are a few of the commonly ingested sharp objects in developing countries. The open safety pin is a particularly interesting clinical problem, as the management depends on its location and orientation. Many methods and instruments have been used over the years to remove them from the upper digestive tract. We present a novel method using the rigid paediatric bronchoscope and alligator forceps for the extraction of this unusual foreign body from the oesophagus of a 6 year old girl. PMID:26851436

  19. 90-90-90 – Charting a steady course to end the paediatric HIV epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Elaine J; Strasser, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The new “90-90-90” UNAIDS agenda proposes that 90% of all people living with HIV will know their HIV status, 90% of all people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive sustained antiretroviral therapy and 90% of all people receiving antiretroviral therapy will have viral suppression by 2020. By focusing on children, the global community is in the unique position of realizing an end to the paediatric HIV epidemic. Discussion Despite vast scientific advances in the prevention and treatment of paediatric HIV infection over the last two decades, in 2014 there were an estimated 220,000 new paediatric infections attributed to mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT) and 150,000 HIV-related paediatric deaths. Furthermore, adolescents remain at particularly high risk for acquisition of new HIV infections, and HIV/AIDS remains the second leading cause of death in this age group. Among the estimated 2.6 million children less than 15 years of age living with HIV infection, only 32% were receiving life-saving antiretroviral treatment. After decades of languishing, good progress is now being made to prevent MTCT. Unfortunately, efforts to scale up HIV treatment services have been less robust for children and adolescents compared with adult populations. These discrepancies reflect substantial gaps in essential services and numerous missed opportunities to prevent HIV transmission and provide effective life-saving antiretroviral treatment to children, adolescents and families. The road to an AIDS-free generation will require bridging the gaps in HIV services and addressing the particular needs of children across the developmental spectrum from infancy through adolescence. To reach the ambitious new targets, innovations and service improvements will need to be rapidly escalated at each step along the prevention-treatment cascade. Conclusions Charting a successful course to reach the 90-90-90 targets will require sustained political and financial commitment as well

  20. The future potential of eicosanoids and their inhibitors in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T

    1998-08-01

    Eicosanoids may have many potential uses in paediatric practice. Since E-type prostaglandins were first applied to treat ductus-dependent congenital heart diseases in paediatric practice, many eicosanoid-related drugs have been examined for the treatment of pathophysiological conditions in children. Prostaglandins (PG), thromboxane (TX) and leukotrienes (LT), produced from arachidonic acid in the phospholipids of cell membranes, are considered to be biologically active eicosanoids. Corticosteroids reduce eicosanoid production by impairing phospholipase A2 activation, while cyclo-oxygenase inhibiting drugs such as the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) suppress PG and TX production. PGE1 (alprostadil) and PGE2 (dinoprostone) therapy has been shown to improve oxygenation in neonates whose pulmonary and systemic blood flow are dependent on a patent ductus arteriosus, while epoprostenol (prostacyclin, PGI2) and beraprost (beraprost sodium), another PGI2 analogue, are often effective as acute vasodilators in paediatric pulmonary hypertension. Synthetic PGE analogues such as misoprostol have gastric antisecretory and cytoprotective effects, and are effective in both prophylaxis and treatment of NSAID-induced gastroduodenal mucosal lesions. Both alprostadil and epoprostenol have been shown to be effective in treating peripheral vascular and skin diseases. Since TX, a platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor, has been implicated as a potential mediator of asthma, its inhibition by agents such as seratrodast (AA-2414) and ozagrel (OKY-046) has proven effective in the treatment of adult patients with asthma; studies of these agents in paediatric patients is awaited with interest. Developing the clinical use of eicosanoid-related drugs and assessing the potential use of these drugs requires a 3-phase approach: reducing the complications in the treatment of neonates with ductus-dependent congenital heart diseases and primary pulmonary hypertension requiring PGE1, PGE2

  1. Highlights of Children with Cancer UK's Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours.

    PubMed

    Nailor, Audrey; Walker, David A; Jacques, Thomas S; Warren, Kathy E; Brem, Henry; Kearns, Pamela R; Greenwood, John; Penny, Jeffrey I; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Carcaboso, Angel M; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Macarthur, Donald; Slavc, Irene; Meijer, Lisethe; Gill, Steven; Lowis, Stephen; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Pearl, Monica S; Clifford, Steven C; Morrissy, Sorana; Ivanov, Delyan P; Beccaria, Kévin; Gilbertson, Richard J; Straathof, Karin; Green, Jordan J; Smith, Stuart; Rahman, Ruman; Kilday, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The first Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours was hosted in London by the charity Children with Cancer UK. The goals of the workshop were to break down the barriers to treating central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children, leading to new collaborations and further innovations in this under-represented and emotive field. These barriers include the physical delivery challenges presented by the blood-brain barrier, the underpinning reasons for the intractability of CNS cancers, and the practical difficulties of delivering cancer treatment to the brains of children. Novel techniques for overcoming these problems were discussed, new models brought forth, and experiences compared. PMID:27110286

  2. Paediatric cardiac surgery in low-income and middle-income countries: a continuing challenge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyenvu; Leon-Wyss, Juan; Iyer, Krishna S; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in surgical and catheter-based treatment for congenital heart disease (CHD), there remain wide disparities across the globe. Ongoing international humanitarian and in-country programmes are working to address these issues with the ultimate goal to increase the quality and quantity of paediatric cardiac care, particularly in under-served regions of the world. This review aims to illustrate the reasons for these inequalities and suggests novel ways of improving access and sustainability of CHD programmes in low-income and middle-income countries. PMID:26359507

  3. Highlights of Children with Cancer UK’s Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Nailor, Audrey; Walker, David A; Jacques, Thomas S; Warren, Kathy E; Brem, Henry; Kearns, Pamela R; Greenwood, John; Penny, Jeffrey I; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Carcaboso, Angel M; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Macarthur, Donald; Slavc, Irene; Meijer, Lisethe; Gill, Steven; Lowis, Stephen; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Pearl, Monica S; Clifford, Steven C; Morrissy, Sorana; Ivanov, Delyan P; Beccaria, Kévin; Gilbertson, Richard J; Straathof, Karin; Green, Jordan J; Smith, Stuart; Rahman, Ruman; Kilday, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The first Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours was hosted in London by the charity Children with Cancer UK. The goals of the workshop were to break down the barriers to treating central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children, leading to new collaborations and further innovations in this under-represented and emotive field. These barriers include the physical delivery challenges presented by the blood–brain barrier, the underpinning reasons for the intractability of CNS cancers, and the practical difficulties of delivering cancer treatment to the brains of children. Novel techniques for overcoming these problems were discussed, new models brought forth, and experiences compared. PMID:27110286

  4. Kawasaki disease in a healthcare provider: an adult case in a paediatric resident.

    PubMed

    Garrido-García, Luis M; López-Amézquita, Martín; Villaverde-Rosas, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    Kawasaki disease is a small-to-medium-vessel vasculitis of unknown origin that predominantly affects children, although the disease can occur in adults. We report the case of a 26-year-old paediatric resident with fever, exanthema, ocular changes, arthralgia, and desquamation of palms and soles. Diagnosis was established after the fever resolved, and no treatment with intravenous gammaglobulin was administered. His echocardiogram showed normal coronary arteries. Acute Kawasaki disease in adults is a rare and under-recognised condition. It is important to consider the disease in patients with prolonged fever associated with unusual clinical features. PMID:26707505

  5. [The Moral Deliberation: The Clinical Ethics Method. Presentation of a Paediatric Case].

    PubMed

    Atuesta, Juana; Vásquez, Pablo; Roa, Juan David; Acuña, Hilda

    2016-01-01

    Decision-making is one of the most difficult tasks of medical judgment, especially when cases involve paediatric patients with different cultural characteristics. It is the obligation of clinical ethics, taking the interdisciplinary approach as a tool to comprehensively analyse the clinical, social, cultural and legal aspects, among other topics, when choosing the treatment options that will be more beneficial for the patient. A clinical case, should enable this process of analysis and teamwork to be understood in practical way in order to address difficult medical problems. PMID:27569017

  6. Diagnosis in developmental-behavioural paediatrics: the art of diagnostic formulation.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Mick; Macaulay, Caroline

    2012-02-01

    This paper considers diagnostic frameworks in developmental-behavioural paediatrics. The purpose of a diagnostic assessment is reviewed, and the use of categorical diagnoses is explored. A multi-level process of diagnostic formulation is outlined, highlighting the importance of a comprehensive focus on presenting symptoms, neuropsychological constructs, biological factors and environmental influences. The axis of time, developmental benchmarks and the enhancement of resilience are discussed as part of the diagnostic formulation framework. Limitations imposed on diagnostic practice by systemic and personal factors are reviewed. Implications for training and practice are discussed. PMID:21790830

  7. [Human hydatidosis: advances and report of four paediatric cases with unusual presentation].

    PubMed

    Giordano, S; Acierno, C; Milazzo, M; Nasta, R; Celauro, M C; Troia, G; Scarlata, F

    2004-09-01

    Human hydatid disease due to Echinococcus granulosus is frequently observed in Italy, especially in the central and southern areas and on the islands. In the last twenty years some major advances in the field of epidemiology as well as diagnostic and therapeutical approaches have changed our knowledge of this disease. In Italy, localization in the liver, kidney or peritoneum accounts for about 95% of cases. The authors describe four paediatric cases with unusual localization (kidney and muscle), highlighting difficulties in the diagnosis. PMID:15711133

  8. Giant Cell Fibroma in a Paediatric Patient: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Veera Kishore Kumar; Kumar, Naveen; Battepati, Prashant; Samyuktha, Lalitha; Nanga, Swapna Priya

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell fibroma is a form of fibrous tumour affecting the oral mucosa. Its occurrence is relatively rare in paediatric patients. Clinically it is presented as a painless, sessile, or pedunculated growth which is usually confused with other fibrous lesions like irritation fibromas. Here we are presenting a case where a seven-year-old male patient reported with a painless nodular growth in relation to lingual surface of 41 and 42. Considering the size and location of the lesion, excisional biopsy was performed and sent for histopathological analysis which confirmed the lesion as giant cell fibroma. PMID:26693359

  9. Immunoproteomic studies on paediatric opsoclonus-myoclonus associated with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Torres-Vega, Estefanía; Durán-Moreno, María; Sánchez Del Pino, Manuel; Yáñez, Yania; Cañete, Adela; Castel, Victoria; López-Cuevas, Rogelio; Vílchez, Juan Jesús; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc; García Verdugo, José Manuel; Bataller, Luis

    2016-08-15

    We aimed to identify new cell-membrane antigens implicated in opsoclonus-myoclonus with neuroblastoma. The sera of 3 out of 14 patients showed IgG electron-microscopy immunogold reactivity on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Immunoprecipitation experiments using rat brain synaptosomes and SH-SY5Y cells led to the identification of: (1) thirty-one nuclear/cytoplasmic proteins (including antigens HuB, HuC); (2) seven neuronal membrane proteins, including the Shaw-potassium channel Kv3.3 (KCNC3), whose genetic disruption in mice causes ataxia and generalized muscle twitching. Although cell-based assays did not demonstrate direct antigenicity, our findings point to Shaw-related subfamily of the potassium voltage-gated channels complexed proteins as hypothetical antigenic targets. PMID:27397082

  10. Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modelling to Gain Insights into the Effect of Physiological Factors on Oral Absorption in Paediatric Populations.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Angela; Stillhart, Cordula; Parrott, Neil; Kuentz, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Paediatric pharmaceutics has become an important topic, but currently, there is an incomplete knowledge of paediatric gastrointestinal physiology and adequate biopharmaceutical tools still have to be developed. The present study aimed to increase the understanding of oral drug absorption in paediatric populations by using physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling and in vitro dissolution testing. The oral absorption of two model compounds, sotalol and paracetamol, was studied by collection of reported pharmacokinetic profiles from adult and paediatric subjects. A PBPK model based on input parameters collected from the literature was first developed and validated in adults before being extrapolated to paediatric age groups. The accuracy of the model simulations was assessed by comparison to the observed pharmacokinetic profiles, and in the case of discrepancy, further investigations were made via parameter sensitivity analysis and in vitro dissolution testing. The PBPK models accurately predicted sotalol and paracetamol exposure in adult populations. An accurate simulation was also obtained after model extrapolation to children older than 2 years of age. However, the simulation in infants and newborns resulted in a discrepancy, which was further analysed. Dissolution testing suggested no significant difference in the drug release rate between paediatric and adult age groups. In contrast, mean gastric emptying time seemed to be underestimated in infants and newborns, and optimisation of this input parameter improved the prediction of the model. Considering age-specific differences in gastrointestinal tract physiology should improve prediction of drug absorption in paediatric patients. PMID:27060007

  11. Design and physicochemical stability studies of paediatric oral formulations of sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Provenza, N; Calpena, A C; Mallandrich, M; Halbaut, L; Clares, B

    2014-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a challenging research area in paediatric treatments. Elaborating new paediatric formulations when no commercial forms are available is a common practice in pharmacy laboratories; among these, oral liquid formulations are the most common. But due to the lack of specialized equipment, frequently studies to assure the efficiency and safety of the final medicine cannot be carried out. Thus the purpose of this work was the development, characterization and stability evaluation of two oral formulations of sildenafil for the treatment of neonatal persistent pulmonary hypertension. After the establishment of a standard operating procedure (SOP) and elaboration, the physicochemical stability parameters appearance, pH, particle size, rheological behaviour and drug content of formulations were evaluated at three different temperatures for 90 days. Equally, prediction of long term stability, as well as, microbiological stability was performed. Formulations resulted in a suspension and a solution slightly coloured exhibiting fruity odour. Formulation I (suspension) exhibited the best physicochemical properties including Newtonian behaviour and uniformity of API content above 90% to assure an exact dosification process. PMID:24231050

  12. The Impact and Successes of a Paediatric Endocrinology Fellowship Program in Africa.

    PubMed

    Odundo, Gordon Otieno; Ngwiri, Thomas; Otuoma, Olivia; Laigong, Paul; Mukhwana, Renson; Limbe, Mary Slessor; Chanzu, Nadia Musimbi

    2016-01-01

    Background. The prevalence and distribution of endocrine disorders in children in Africa are not well known because most cases are often undiagnosed or diagnosed too late. The awareness of this led to the launch of the Paediatric Endocrinology Training Center for Africa (PETCA) designed to improve quality and access to health care by training paediatricians from Africa in paediatric endocrinology. Methods. The fellowship is undertaken over an 18-month period: six months of clinical and theoretical training in Kenya, nine months of project research at the fellow's home country, and three months of consolidation in Kenya. Upon completion, certified paediatricians are expected to set up centers of excellence. Results. There have been two phases, phase I from January 2008 to October 2012 and phase II from January 2012 to April 2015. Fifty-four fellows from 12 African countries have been certified, 34 (phase I) and 20 (phase II). Over 1,000 patients with wide ranging diabetes and endocrine disorders have been diagnosed and treated and are being followed up at the centers of excellence. Conclusion. The successes of the PETCA initiative demonstrate the impact a capacity building and knowledge transfer model can have on people in resource-poor settings using limited resources. PMID:26904118

  13. Critical thresholds of intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure related to age in paediatric head injury

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, I R; Jones, P A; Lo, T Y M; Forsyth, R J; Fulton, B; Andrews, P J D; Mendelow, A D; Minns, R A

    2006-01-01

    Background The principal strategy for managing head injury is to reduce the frequency and severity of secondary brain insults from intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and hence improve outcome. Precise critical threshold levels have not been determined in head injured children. Objective To create a novel pressure–time index (PTI) measuring both duration and amplitude of insult, and then employ it to determine critical insult thresholds of ICP and CPP in children. Methods Prospective, observational, physiologically based study from Edinburgh and Newcastle, using patient monitored blood pressure, ICP, and CPP time series data. The PTI for ICP and CPP for 81 children, using theoretical values derived from physiological norms, was varied systematically to derive critical insult thresholds which delineate Glasgow outcome scale categories. Results The PTI for CPP had a very high predictive value for outcome (receiver operating characteristic analyses: area under curve = 0.957 and 0.890 for mortality and favourable outcome, respectively) and was more predictive than for ICP. Initial physiological values most accurately predicted favourable outcome. The CPP critical threshold values determined for children aged 2–6, 7–10, and 11–15 years were 48, 54, and 58 mm Hg. respectively. Conclusions The PTI is the first substantive paediatric index of total ICP and CPP following head injury. The insult thresholds generated are identical to age related physiological values. Management guidelines for paediatric head injuries should take account of these CPP thresholds to titrate appropriate pressor therapy. PMID:16103043

  14. Prevalence of and Reasons for Patients Leaving Against Medical Advice from Paediatric Wards in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghafri, Mohamed; Al-Bulushi, Abdullah; Al-Qasmi, Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of and reasons for patients leaving against medical advice (LAMA) in a paediatric setting in Oman. This retrospective study was carried out between January 2007 and December 2009 and assessed patients who left the paediatric wards at the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, against medical advice. Of 11,482 regular discharges, there were 183 cases of LAMA (prevalence: 1.6%). Dissatisfaction with treatment and a desire to seek a second opinion were collectively the most cited reasons for LAMA according to data from the hospital's electronic system (27.9%) and telephone conversations with patients' parents (55.0%). No reasons for LAMA were documented in the hospital's electronic system for 109 patients (59.6%). The low observed prevalence of LAMA suggests good medical practice at the Royal Hospital. This study indicates the need for thorough documentation of all LAMA cases to ensure the availability of high-quality data for healthcare workers involved in preventing LAMA. PMID:26909217

  15. Antibiotic prescription preferences in paediatric outpatient setting in Estonia and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lass, Jana; Odlind, Viveca; Irs, Alar; Lutsar, Irja

    2013-12-01

    Aims of the study were to compare the paediatric outpatient antibiotic use in two countries with low overall antibiotic consumption and antibacterial resistance levels - Sweden and Estonia - and to describe the adherence to Estonian treatment guideline. All prescriptions for systemic antibiotics for children less than 18 years during 2007 from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and Estonian Health Insurance Fund database were identified to conduct a descriptive drug utilisation study. The total paediatric antibiotic use was 616 and 353 per 1000 in Estonia and Sweden, respectively. The greatest between country differences occurred in the age group 2 to 6 years -Estonian children received 1184 and Swedish children 528 prescriptions per 1000. Extended spectrum penicillin amoxicillin (189 per 1000) or its combination with beta-lactamase inhibitor (81 per 1000) and a newer macrolide clarithromycin (127 per 1000) were prescribed most often in Estonia whereas narrow spectrum penicillin phenoxymethylpenicillin (169 per 1000) and older generation macrolide erythromycin (21 per 1000) predominated in Sweden. For acute bronchitis, 17 different antibiotics (most commonly clarithromycin) were prescribed in Estonia despite the guideline recommendation not to use antibiotics. The higher rate of antibiotic use especially of extended spectrum antibiotics in Estonia compared to Sweden emphasizes the need for national activities to promote appropriate use of antibiotics while treating children, even when the overall antibiotic consumption is low. PMID:23667800

  16. Effectiveness of thyroid gland shielding in dental CBCT using a paediatric anthropomorphic phantom

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J; Horner, K; Theodorakou, C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of thyroid shielding in dental CBCT examinations using a paediatric anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: An ATOM® 706-C anthropomorphic phantom (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems Inc., Norfolk, VA) representing a 10-year-old child was loaded with six thermoluminescent dosemeters positioned at the level of the thyroid gland. Absorbed doses to the thyroid were measured for five commercially available thyroid shields using a large field of view (FOV). Results: A statistically significant thyroid gland dose reduction was found using thyroid shielding for paediatric CBCT examinations for a large FOV. In addition, a statistically significant difference in thyroid gland doses was found depending on the position of the thyroid gland. There was little difference in the effectiveness of thyroid shielding when using a lead vs a lead-equivalent thyroid shield. Similar dose reduction was found using 0.25- and 0.50-mm lead-equivalent thyroid shields. Conclusions: Thyroid shields are to be recommended when undertaking large FOV CBCT examinations on young patients. PMID:25411710

  17. Paediatric liver transplantation for children treated at public health facilities in South Africa: time for change.

    PubMed

    Lala, S G; Britz, R; Botha, J; Loveland, J

    2014-11-01

    Paediatric liver transplantation (PLT) is the only therapeutic option for many children with end-stage chronic liver disease or irreversible fulminant hepatic failure, and is routinely considered as a therapy by paediatric gastroenterologists and surgeons working in developed countries. In South Africa (SA), a PLT programme has been available at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town since November 1991, and another has rapidly developed at the Wits Donald Gordon Medical Centre in Johannesburg over the past decade. However, for most children with progressive chronic liver disease who are reliant on the services provided at state facilities in SA, PLT is not an option because of a lack of resources in a mismanaged public health system. This article briefly outlines the services offered at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital--which is typical of state facilities in SA--and proposes that resources be allocated to establish an innovative, nationally funded centre that would enable greater numbers of children access to a PLT programme. PMID:26038799

  18. The impact of injury severity on long-term social outcome following paediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Muscara, Frank; Catroppa, Cathy; Eren, Senem; Anderson, Vicki

    2009-08-01

    Despite suggestions that paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) disrupts social skill development, few studies have investigated long-term social outcome following the transition into adulthood. The current study aimed to investigate long-term social outcome, in a sample of 36 survivors who suffered a mild, moderate or severe TBI between 8 and 12 years of age. At 7-10 years post-injury, the age of participants ranged between 16 and 22 years. Social outcome was assessed using a number of self-rated and parent-rated questionnaires, in order to obtain self- and other-rated accounts of the groups' current social functioning. Predictors of long-term social outcome were also explored, with findings suggesting that young people who suffered mild TBI during childhood tended to be functioning at a higher level on some measures of social functioning, compared to those that suffered a moderate and severe injury. Further, results suggested that pre-injury adaptive functioning and socio-economic status predicted long-term functioning for some measures of social outcome. Finally, social problem-solving skills predicted the success of social reintegration post-TBI. These preliminary findings indicate that there is a risk of social difficulties following paediatric TBI continuing into adulthood, and that a number of demographic, social, and neuropsychological variables continue to predict social outcome even at this late stage post-injury. PMID:18839384

  19. Mass spectrometry based data of the blister fluid proteome of paediatric burn patients.

    PubMed

    Zang, Tuo; Broszczak, Daniel A; Cuttle, Leila; Broadbent, James A; Tanzer, Catherine; Parker, Tony J

    2016-09-01

    The data presented here are associated with the article "The blister fluid proteome of paediatric burns" (Zang et al., 2016) [1]. Burn injury is a highly traumatic event for children. The degree of burn severity (superficial-, deep-, or full-thickness injury) often dictates the extent of later scar formation which may require long term surgical operation or skin grafting. The data were obtained by fractionating paediatric burn blister fluid samples, which were pooled according to burn depth and then analysed using data dependent acquisition LC-MS/MS. The data includes a table of all proteins identified, in which burn depth category they were found, the percentage sequence coverage for each protein and the number of high confidence peptide identifications for each protein. Further Gene Ontology enrichment analysis shows the significantly over-represented biological processes, molecular functions, and cellular components of the burn blister fluid proteome. In addition, tables include the proteins associated with the biological processes of "wound healing" and "response to stress" as examples of highly relevant processes that occur in burn wounds. PMID:27536711

  20. What the paediatrician should know about paediatric and adolescent gynecology: The perspective of a gynecologist

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Victoria Jane

    2003-01-01

    Gynecological problems are common in children but training in this subject is rare during paediatric postgraduate education. Knowledge in this area is important for providing comprehensive health care to children. The article explores the gynecological examination of the child and common gynecological disorders in the paediatric and adolescent age groups. Routine examination of the external genitalia as part of a well-child physical normalizes the examination for the child and helps to inform the physician about the large variations in normal genitals. Many complaints can be dealt with by reassurance, while most others respond to medical therapy and can be dealt with easily by paediatricians. Both young children and adolescents respond positively when allowed to have control over the tempo of the interview and the examination. A positive experience associated with a genital examination will help to open lines of trust. This along with nonjudgmental, open communication, will create educational opportunities to enhance a responsible transition from child to young adult. PMID:20019933

  1. Serum Metal Ion Concentrations in Paediatric Patients following Total Knee Arthroplasty Using Megaprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Friesenbichler, Jörg; Sadoghi, Patrick; Maurer-Ertl, Werner; Szkandera, Joanna; Glehr, Mathias; Ogris, Kathrin; Wolf, Matthias; Weger, Christian; Leithner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the concentrations of cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum in the serum of paediatric tumour patients after fixed hinge total knee arthroplasty. Further, these metal ion levels were compared with serum metal ion levels of patients with other orthopaedic devices such as hip and knee prostheses with metal-on-metal or metal-on-polyethylene articulation to find differences between anatomical locations, abrasion characteristics, and bearing surfaces. After an average follow-up of 108 months (range: 67 to 163) of 11 paediatric patients with fixed hinge total knee arthroplasty, the mean concentrations for Co and Cr were significantly increased while Mo was within the limits compared to the upper values from the reference laboratory. Furthermore, these serum concentrations were significantly higher compared to patients with a standard rotating hinge device (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001) and preoperative controls (P < 0.001). On the other hand, the serum levels of patients following MoM THA or rotating hinge arthroplasty using megaprostheses were higher. Therefore, periodic long-term follow-ups are recommended due to the rising concerns about systemic metal ion exposure in the literature. Upon the occurrence of adverse reactions to metal debris the revision of the fixed hinge implant should be considered. PMID:25276819

  2. Paediatric cancer stage in population-based cancer registries: the Toronto consensus principles and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Aitken, Joanne F; Bartels, Ute; Brierley, James; Dolendo, Mae; Friedrich, Paola; Fuentes-Alabi, Soad; Garrido, Claudia P; Gatta, Gemma; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Gross, Thomas; Howard, Scott C; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Moreno, Florencia; Pole, Jason D; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Ramirez, Oscar; Ries, Lynn A G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Shin, Hee Young; Steliarova-Foucher, Eva; Sung, Lillian; Supriyadi, Eddy; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Torode, Julie; Vora, Tushar; Kutluk, Tezer; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Population-based cancer registries generate estimates of incidence and survival that are essential for cancer surveillance, research, and control strategies. Although data on cancer stage allow meaningful assessments of changes in cancer incidence and outcomes, stage is not recorded by most population-based cancer registries. The main method of staging adult cancers is the TNM classification. The criteria for staging paediatric cancers, however, vary by diagnosis, have evolved over time, and sometimes vary by cooperative trial group. Consistency in the collection of staging data has therefore been challenging for population-based cancer registries. We assembled key experts and stakeholders (oncologists, cancer registrars, epidemiologists) and used a modified Delphi approach to establish principles for paediatric cancer stage collection. In this Review, we make recommendations on which staging systems should be adopted by population-based cancer registries for the major childhood cancers, including adaptations for low-income countries. Wide adoption of these guidelines in registries will ease international comparative incidence and outcome studies. PMID:27300676

  3. Violent behaviour from young adults and the parents of paediatric patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pich, Jacqueline; Hazelton, Michael; Kable, Ashley

    2013-07-01

    Violence in healthcare is a significant issue and one that is increasing in prevalence globally. Nurses have been identified as the professional group at most risk, with patients the main source of this violence. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of Australian ED nurses with episodes of patient-related violence from young adults (16-25years of age) and the parents of paediatric patients. Data analysis of semi-structured interviews led to the identification of antecedents to episodes of violence and behaviours specific to these two groups of interest. These behaviours included: "performing" and attention-seeking behaviours and violent behaviours including both verbal and physical abuse. Antecedents discussed by participants included: parental emotions and alcohol and substance abuse. Overall the results speak to a working environment where participants regularly feel unsafe. Violence in the ED is perceived to occur frequently and to such an extent that participants have become resigned to expect and accept it as part of their job. The role played by distinct groups such as young adults and the parents of paediatric patients must be acknowledged and this knowledge used along with other known risk factors to help identify patients at risk of potential violence. PMID:23063841

  4. The Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Pediatrics: A proposed clinical staging system for paediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Buchholz, Annick; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Jetha, Mary M; Gaboury, Laurie; Hamilton, Jill; Birken, Catherine; Morrison, Katherine M; Legault, Laurent; Bridger, Tracey; Cook, Stephen R; Lyons, John; Sharma, Arya M; Ball, Geoff Dc

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, clinical recommendations for assessing and managing paediatric obesity have relied on anthropometric measures, such as body mass index (BMI), BMI percentile and/or BMI z-score, to monitor health risks and determine weight management success. However, anthropometric measures do not always accurately and reliably identify children and youth with obesity-related health risks or comorbidities. The authors propose a new clinical staging system (the Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Pediatrics, EOSS-P), adapted from the adult-oriented EOSS. The EOSS-P is used to stratify patients according to severity of obesity-related comorbidities and barriers to weight management into four graded categories (0 to 3) within four main health domains: metabolic, mechanical, mental health and social milieu (the 4Ms). The EOSS-P is based on common clinical assessments that are widely available and routinely completed by clinicians, and has the potential to provide clinical and prognostic information to help evaluate and inform the management of paediatric obesity. PMID:26941556

  5. Paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with tonsil colonisation by Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Viciani, Elisa; Montagnani, Francesca; Tavarini, Simona; Tordini, Giacinta; Maccari, Silvia; Morandi, Matteo; Faenzi, Elisa; Biagini, Cesare; Romano, Antonio; Salerni, Lorenzo; Finco, Oretta; Lazzi, Stefano; Ruggiero, Paolo; De Luca, Andrea; Barocchi, Michèle A.; Manetti, Andrea G. O.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of pathogenic bacteria in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) has yet to be elucidated. We investigated the possible role of group A streptococcus (GAS) in OSAS pathogenesis. In 40 tonsillectomized patients affected by OSAS and 80 healthy controls, significant (p < 0.0001) association of GAS with paediatric OSAS was found. Supernatant from streptolysin O (SLO)-producing GAS induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) in tonsil mononuclear cells (TMCs). CysLTs-treated TMCs showed significant (p < 0.05) proliferation of CD4+ T, CD19+ and CD19+CD27+CD38+ B lymphocytes. We discovered a SLO-dependent activation of CysLTs production through a pathway involving TOLL-like receptor 4 (TLR4), TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), and p38 MAP Kinase. In conclusion, we hypothesise that GAS may contribute to paediatric tonsillar hyperplasia through CysLTs production induced by SLO, and this might explain its association with OSAS. PMID:26860261

  6. Design and evaluation of buccal films as paediatric dosage form for transmucosal delivery of ondansetron.

    PubMed

    Trastullo, Ramona; Abruzzo, Angela; Saladini, Bruno; Gallucci, Maria Caterina; Cerchiara, Teresa; Luppi, Barbara; Bigucci, Federica

    2016-08-01

    In the process of implementation and innovation of paediatric dosage forms, buccal films for transmucosal administration of drug represent one of the most interesting approach. In fact, films are able to provide an extended duration of activity allowing minimal dosage and frequency and offer an exact and flexible dose, associated with ease of handling. The objective of the present study was to develop polymeric films for the sustained release of ondansetron hydrochloride, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors indicated in paediatrics for the prevention and treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy or radiotherapy and postoperatively. Films were prepared by casting and drying of aqueous solutions containing different weight ratios of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) with chitosan (CH) or sodium hyaluronate (HA) or gelatin (GEL) and characterized for their physico-chemical and functional properties. The presence of HA, GEL and CH did not improve the mucoadhesive properties of HPMC film. The inclusion of GEL and CH in HPMC film increased in vitro drug release with respect to the inclusion of HA, although films containing HA showed the highest water uptake. Moreover in agreement with the release behaviour, the inclusion of CH and GEL provided higher drug permeation through porcine buccal mucosa with respect to HPMC film and ensured linear permeation profiles of drug. PMID:27267732

  7. Graft-versus-host disease in paediatric solid organ transplantation: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Green, Thomas; Hind, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    GvHD is a rare and serious complication of organ transplantation. The literature is sparse following solid organ transplantation. The aim of this report was to review the literature of GvHD in paediatric solid organ transplantation. We searched PubMed for English-language full-text manuscripts between 1990 and 2015 for eligible studies. A total of 28 publications were found pertaining to paediatric GvHD following solid organ transplantation. GvHD had a mean incidence of 11% (range 8.3-13.4%) following SBTx and 1.5% following liver transplantation. Where described, the most common sites for presentation of GvHD were the skin (87%), the native GI tract (43%), the lungs (7%), the eyes (4%), HA (4%), and the kidneys (1%). Diagnosis was confirmed with biopsy (93%) and/or chimerism (41%). Treatments used include steroids (80%), of which 75% showed partial or complete resolution. Mortality was 33.3% (range 0-100%). Novel therapies include ECP and MSC therapy. GvHD is a rare but serious disease with high mortality. Novel therapies may offer hope in the future, but currently there is limited evidence for their efficacy in the context of intestinal or liver transplantation. PMID:27198497

  8. The Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Pediatrics: A proposed clinical staging system for paediatric obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Buchholz, Annick; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Jetha, Mary M; Gaboury, Laurie; Hamilton, Jill; Birken, Catherine; Morrison, Katherine M; Legault, Laurent; Bridger, Tracey; Cook, Stephen R; Lyons, John; Sharma, Arya M; Ball, Geoff DC

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, clinical recommendations for assessing and managing paediatric obesity have relied on anthropometric measures, such as body mass index (BMI), BMI percentile and/or BMI z-score, to monitor health risks and determine weight management success. However, anthropometric measures do not always accurately and reliably identify children and youth with obesity-related health risks or comorbidities. The authors propose a new clinical staging system (the Edmonton Obesity Staging System for Pediatrics, EOSS-P), adapted from the adult-oriented EOSS. The EOSS-P is used to stratify patients according to severity of obesity-related comorbidities and barriers to weight management into four graded categories (0 to 3) within four main health domains: metabolic, mechanical, mental health and social milieu (the 4Ms). The EOSS-P is based on common clinical assessments that are widely available and routinely completed by clinicians, and has the potential to provide clinical and prognostic information to help evaluate and inform the management of paediatric obesity. PMID:26941556

  9. Troubles with the foreskin: one hundred consecutive referrals to paediatric surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Huntley, J S; Bourne, M C; Munro, F D; Wilson-Storey, D

    2003-01-01

    To assess the reasons for and outcomes of referrals concerning the foreskin, 100 consecutive patients seen in paediatric clinics were followed to discharge. 18 referrals were for circumcision on religious grounds. Of the other 82, the main reason for referral was non-retractability or phimosis. At clinic, 24 (29%) of these were deemed normal for age, 31 (38%) were treated with topical steroid (successfully in 25), 9 (11%) were listed for preputioplasty, 7 (9%) were listed for adhesiolysis, 7 (9%) were listed for circumcision, and 4 were listed for other forms of surgery. 6 patients were identified as having balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO), a condition that had not been suggested on referral. With the advent of new treatments for foreskin disorders, circumcision is decreasingly necessary. Knowledge of the natural history of the foreskin, and the use of topical steroids, could shift the management of paediatric foreskin problems from the hospital outpatient department to primary care. BXO is not sufficiently recognized as a form of phimosis that requires operation. PMID:12949201

  10. Troubles with the foreskin: one hundred consecutive referrals to paediatric surgeons.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J S; Bourne, M C; Munro, F D; Wilson-Storey, D

    2003-09-01

    To assess the reasons for and outcomes of referrals concerning the foreskin, 100 consecutive patients seen in paediatric clinics were followed to discharge. 18 referrals were for circumcision on religious grounds. Of the other 82, the main reason for referral was non-retractability or phimosis. At clinic, 24 (29%) of these were deemed normal for age, 31 (38%) were treated with topical steroid (successfully in 25), 9 (11%) were listed for preputioplasty, 7 (9%) were listed for adhesiolysis, 7 (9%) were listed for circumcision, and 4 were listed for other forms of surgery. 6 patients were identified as having balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO), a condition that had not been suggested on referral. With the advent of new treatments for foreskin disorders, circumcision is decreasingly necessary. Knowledge of the natural history of the foreskin, and the use of topical steroids, could shift the management of paediatric foreskin problems from the hospital outpatient department to primary care. BXO is not sufficiently recognized as a form of phimosis that requires operation. PMID:12949201

  11. A Novel Technique for Closed Reduction and Fixation of Paediatric Calcaneal Fracture Dislocation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Faroug, Radwane; Stirling, Paul; Ali, Farhan

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric calcaneal fractures are rare injuries usually managed conservatively or with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Closed reduction was previously thought to be impossible, and very few cases are reported in the literature. We report a new technique for closed reduction using Ilizarov half-rings. We report successful closed reduction and screwless fixation of an extra-articular calcaneal fracture dislocation in a 7-year-old boy. Reduction was achieved using two Ilizarov half-ring frames arranged perpendicular to each other, enabling simultaneous application of longitudinal and rotational traction. Anatomical reduction was achieved with restored angles of Bohler and Gissane. Two K-wires were the definitive fixation. Bony union with good functional outcome and minimal pain was achieved at eight-weeks follow up. ORIF of calcaneal fractures provides good functional outcome but is associated with high rates of malunion and postoperative pain. Preservation of the unique soft tissue envelope surrounding the calcaneus reduces the risk of infection. Closed reduction prevents distortion of these tissues and may lead to faster healing and mobilisation. Closed reduction and screwless fixation of paediatric calcaneal fractures is an achievable management option. Our technique has preserved the soft tissue envelope surrounding the calcaneus, has avoided retained metalwork related complications, and has resulted in a good functional outcome. PMID:23819090

  12. Sex bias in paediatric autoimmune disease - Not just about sex hormones?

    PubMed

    Chiaroni-Clarke, Rachel C; Munro, Jane E; Ellis, Justine A

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect up to 10% of the world's population, and approximately 80% of those affected are female. The majority of autoimmune diseases occur more commonly in females, although some are more frequent in males, while others show no bias by sex. The mechanisms leading to sex biased disease prevalence are not well understood. However, for adult-onset autoimmune disease, at least some of the cause is usually ascribed to sex hormones. This is because levels of sex hormones are one of the most obvious physiological differences between adult males and females, and their impact on immune system function is well recognised. While for paediatric-onset autoimmune diseases a sex bias is not as common, there are several such diseases for which one sex predominates. For example, the oligoarticular subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in approximately three times more girls than boys, with a peak age of onset well before the onset of puberty, and at a time when levels of androgen and oestrogen are low and not strikingly different between the sexes. Here, we review potential explanations for autoimmune disease sex bias with a particular focus on paediatric autoimmune disease, and biological mechanisms outside of sex hormone differences. PMID:26970680

  13. Access to prescribing information for paediatric medicines in the USA: post-modernization

    PubMed Central

    Young, Larissa; Lawes, Francis; Tordoff, June; Norris, Pauline; Reith, David

    2009-01-01

    AIMS The aims of the present study were to examine the Physicians’ Desk Reference (PDR) for changes in the listing of medicines licensed for children in the USA over a 10-year period (1998–2007). METHODS The USA PDR was used to identify products listed in 1998, 2002 and 2007. Information about generic name (active agent), salt, strength, brand name, suitability of formulation, paediatric licensing information and the lowest age of licensing was extracted. Prescription products were collapsed down to chemical entities/fixed-dose combinations. RESULTS Of the prescription entities listed in the PDR, 538 (55.9%), 488 (54.3%) and 394 (51.3%) were licensed for children in 1998, 2002 and 2007, respectively. There was a 39% decrease in the number of entities licensed for the newborn and a 34% decrease for children aged 2–6 years between 1998 and 2007. Formulations suitable for children were listed for 611 (63.4%), 550 (61.2%) and 430 (60.6%), respectively. Prescription entities with both a suitable oral formulation and licensing for children numbered 161 (16.7%), 148 (16.5%) and 100 (14.1%) in 1998, 2002 and 2007, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The listings in the PDR suggest that overall access to prescribing information about drugs in the paediatric population has not shown an increase over the decade. This particularly affected the neonatal age group. PMID:19220278

  14. Paediatric interventional cardiology: flat detector versus image intensifier using a test object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Martinez, L. C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2010-12-01

    Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values and image quality parameters were measured and compared for two biplane angiography x-ray systems dedicated to paediatric interventional cardiology, one equipped with image intensifiers (II) and the other one with dynamic flat detectors (FDs). Polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of different thicknesses, ranging from 8 to 16 cm, and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were used. The parameters of the image quality evaluated were noise, signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SdNR), high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and three figures of merit combining entrance doses and signal-to-noise ratios or HCSR. The comparisons showed a better behaviour of the II-based system in the low contrast region over the whole interval of thicknesses. The FD-based system showed a better performance in HCSR. The FD system evaluated would need around two times more dose than the II system evaluated to reach a given value of SdNR; moreover, a better spatial resolution was measured (and perceived in conventional monitors) for the system equipped with flat detectors. According to the results of this paper, the use of dynamic FD systems does not lead to an automatic reduction in ESAK or to an automatic improvement in image quality by comparison with II systems. Any improvement also depends on the setting of the x-ray systems and it should still be possible to refine these settings for some of the dynamic FDs used in paediatric cardiology.

  15. Organ dose and risk assessment in paediatric radiography using the PCXMC 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladia, A.; Messaris, G.; Delis, H.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    Abdominal and chest radiographs are the most common examinations in paediatric radiology. X-ray examination of children attracts particular interest, mainly due to the increased risk for the expression of delayed radiogenic cancers as they have many years of expected life remaining. This study aims to calculate the organ dose and estimate the radiation Risk of Exposure Induced cancer Death (REID) to paediatric patients, using the PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo code.Patient data and exposure parameters were recorded during examinations of 240 patients, separated in four age groups undergoing chest or abdomen examinations.The organs received the highest dose in all patient groups were liver, lungs, stomach, thyroid, pancreas, breast, spleen in chest radiographs and liver, lungs, colon, stomach and ovaries, uterus (for girls) and prostate (for boys) in abdomen radiographs. The effective dosefor the chest was 0.49×10-2- 1.07×10-2 mSv, while for the abdomen 1.85×10-2- 3.02×10-2 mSv. The mean REID value was 1.254×10-5 for the abdomen and 0.645×10-5 for the chest.

  16. Internet health information use and e‐mail access by parents attending a paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, R D; Macpherson, A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To document internet access and health related usage patterns by families of children in a large paediatric emergency department (ED), and to discover if parents want the internet to become a tool for transferring medical test results. Methods This was a pre‐tested, 21 item, interview conducted with parents at the paediatric ED in Toronto over 3 months. Descriptive statistics and frequency distributions were calculated and variables associated with parents wishing to access results electronically were examined. Results In total, 950 parents completed the interview (93%), of whom 87% reported routine internet access, 75% reported having an e‐mail account, and 60% accessed their e‐mail once or more a day. Over half (56%) reported searching the internet for health related information, with 8.5% of these searching immediately preceding their visit. Nearly three quarters (73%) indicated they would like to receive an e‐mail containing the results of tests conducted in the ED; 66% of all respondents and 89% of those with e‐mail indicated that they would like their child's primary care provider to receive information electronically. Conclusion The majority of families have internet access and most want to receive medical information electronically and to send it to the primary provider. The vast use of internet for health related information emphasises the need to guide parents regarding reliable resources online, possibly as part of their ED visit. PMID:16627833

  17. Misdiagnosis and Quality of Management in Paediatric Surgical Patients Referred to a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cazares-Rangel, Joel; Zalles-Vidal, Cristian; Davila-Perez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background: The literature on diagnosis and management prior to transfer paediatric surgical patients to a tertiary care center is scarce. In referral centers, it is common to receive patients previously subjected to inadequate or inappropriate health care. Aim: Analyze the prevalence of misdiagnosis and quality of management in patients before being referred and factors related to misdiagnosis and inadequate management. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, comparative study between patients with appropriate and inappropriate submission diagnosis and between patients with adequate or inadequate treatment. Setting: Third level care hospital, Mexico City. Participants: Newborn to adolescents referred to Paediatric Surgery Department. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Misdiagnosis and quality of management prior to being referred. Result: Two hundred patients were evaluated. Correlation between submission diagnosis and final diagnosis showed that 70% were correct and 30% incorrect; 48.5% were properly managed and 51.5% inappropriately managed. Incorrect diagnosis was more frequent when referred from first-or second-level hospitals and in inflammatory conditions. Patients referred by paediatricians had a higher rate of adequate management. Conclusion: We present the frequency of incorrect diagnosis and inadequate patient management in a highly selected population. Sample size should be increased as well as performing these studies in other hospital settings in order to determine whether the results are reproducible. PMID:24959495

  18. Paediatric phenotype of Kallmann syndrome due to mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1).

    PubMed

    Zenaty, Delphine; Bretones, Patricia; Lambe, Cécile; Guemas, Isabelle; David, Michel; Léger, Juliane; de Roux, Nicolas

    2006-07-25

    Kallmann syndrome characterised by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and anosmia is genetically heterogeneous with X-linked, autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive forms. The autosomal dominant form due to loss of function mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) accounts for about 10% of cases. We report here three paediatric cases of Kallmann syndrome with unusual phenotype in two unrelated patients with severe ear anomalies (hypoplasia or agenesis of external ear) associated with classical features, such as cleft palate, dental agenesis, syndactylia, micropenis and cryptorchidism. We found de novo mutation in these two patients (Cys178Ser and Arg622Gly, respectively), and one inherited Arg622Gln mutation with intrafamilial variable phenotype. These genotype-phenotype correlations indicate that paediatric phenotypic expression of FGFR1 loss of function mutations is highly variable, the severity of the oro-facial malformations at birth does not predict gonadotropic function at the puberty and that de novo mutations of FGFR1 are relatively frequent. PMID:16757108

  19. Mechanical behaviour of the in vivo paediatric and adult trunk during respiratory physiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yumin; Bruyère-Garnier, Karine; Mitton, David; Vajda, Emmanuel; Bermond, François

    2014-01-01

    The load-deflection response of the human trunk has been studied using various methods. The different shapes observed may be due to the methodology and the population. The purpose of this study is to quantify and explain the in vivo mechanical response of paediatric and adult trunks during respiratory physiotherapy. Eight children aged 5-15 months and eight healthy adult volunteers aged 30-87 years participated in this study. The force applied by the physiotherapist and the displacement of the targets on his hands were recorded. Parameters were also measured and calculated to compare against other studies. Time lags between force time histories and displacement time histories were observed on both children and adults. Different time lags resulted in different shapes of the force-displacement curves. Factors including respiration, muscle contraction and loading pattern are part of the assumptions used to explain this phenomenon. The maximum displacements of the paediatric and adult trunks were 18 and 44 mm, respectively, with a maximum load of 208 and 250 N, respectively. This study provides a better explanation of the peculiar force-displacement characteristics of both living and active children and adults under a non-injurious, low-rate compression condition. Complementary data (e.g. muscle activity and breathing) should be collected in the future to go towards in vivo human trunk modelling. PMID:24280228

  20. Epilepsy--giving the diagnosis. A survey of British paediatric neurologists.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cliff; Newton, Richard; Appleton, Richard; Hosking, Gwilym; Mckinlay, Ian

    2002-12-01

    Adult-centred studies continue to show poor information provision and understanding in people with epilepsy. This study explores whether paediatric neurologists work within a consultation framework designed to meet information needs. A questionnaire on how to give the diagnosis was sent to 32 UK Paediatric Neurologists. Consultation content was largely determined intuitively rather than on a shared knowledge of the process involved. Little consensus was identified in relation to analogy and the usefulness or awareness of available unevaluated literature; but most acknowledged the value of a specialist epilepsy nurse. Most responses were based on a typical medical agenda but less than 20% addressed emotional responses and adaptation. Three approaches were identified-'pro-active' (running the risk of overload but recognising the right of parents to information), 'reactive' (more individually tailored, but assumes doctors can judge parental reactions) and 'drip-feed' (protective and pre-selecting topics to meet the situation). Our aim to establish a guideline proved impossible. Further study should develop more detailed models of the disclosure process, and identify epilepsy explanations that can be consumer-tested. PMID:12464510