Science.gov

Sample records for multi-party numerical computation

  1. Secure Multi-party Computation Protocol for Defense Applications in Military Operations Using Virtual Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Rohit; Joshi, Satyadhar

    With the advent into the 20th century whole world has been facing the common dilemma of Terrorism. The suicide attacks on US twin towers 11 Sept. 2001, Train bombings in Madrid Spain 11 Mar. 2004, London bombings 7 Jul. 2005 and Mumbai attack 26 Nov. 2008 were some of the most disturbing, destructive and evil acts by terrorists in the last decade which has clearly shown their evil intent that they can go to any extent to accomplish their goals. Many terrorist organizations such as al Quaida, Harakat ul-Mujahidin, Hezbollah, Jaish-e-Mohammed, Lashkar-e-Toiba, etc. are carrying out training camps and terrorist operations which are accompanied with latest technology and high tech arsenal. To counter such terrorism our military is in need of advanced defense technology. One of the major issues of concern is secure communication. It has to be made sure that communication between different military forces is secure so that critical information is not leaked to the adversary. Military forces need secure communication to shield their confidential data from terrorist forces. Leakage of concerned data can prove hazardous, thus preservation and security is of prime importance. There may be a need to perform computations that require data from many military forces, but in some cases the associated forces would not want to reveal their data to other forces. In such situations Secure Multi-party Computations find their application. In this paper, we propose a new highly scalable Secure Multi-party Computation (SMC) protocol and algorithm for Defense applications which can be used to perform computation on encrypted data. Every party encrypts their data in accordance with a particular scheme. This encrypted data is distributed among some created virtual parties. These Virtual parties send their data to the TTP through an Anonymizer layer. TTP performs computation on encrypted data and announces the result. As the data sent was encrypted its actual value can’t be known by TTP

  2. Experimental realization of an entanglement access network and secure multi-party computation.

    PubMed

    Chang, X-Y; Deng, D-L; Yuan, X-X; Hou, P-Y; Huang, Y-Y; Duan, L-M

    2016-01-01

    To construct a quantum network with many end users, it is critical to have a cost-efficient way to distribute entanglement over different network ends. We demonstrate an entanglement access network, where the expensive resource, the entangled photon source at the telecom wavelength and the core communication channel, is shared by many end users. Using this cost-efficient entanglement access network, we report experimental demonstration of a secure multiparty computation protocol, the privacy-preserving secure sum problem, based on the network quantum cryptography. PMID:27404561

  3. Experimental realization of an entanglement access network and secure multi-party computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, X.-Y.; Deng, D.-L.; Yuan, X.-X.; Hou, P.-Y.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Duan, L.-M.

    2016-07-01

    To construct a quantum network with many end users, it is critical to have a cost-efficient way to distribute entanglement over different network ends. We demonstrate an entanglement access network, where the expensive resource, the entangled photon source at the telecom wavelength and the core communication channel, is shared by many end users. Using this cost-efficient entanglement access network, we report experimental demonstration of a secure multiparty computation protocol, the privacy-preserving secure sum problem, based on the network quantum cryptography.

  4. Experimental realization of an entanglement access network and secure multi-party computation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, X.-Y.; Deng, D.-L.; Yuan, X.-X.; Hou, P.-Y.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Duan, L.-M.

    2016-01-01

    To construct a quantum network with many end users, it is critical to have a cost-efficient way to distribute entanglement over different network ends. We demonstrate an entanglement access network, where the expensive resource, the entangled photon source at the telecom wavelength and the core communication channel, is shared by many end users. Using this cost-efficient entanglement access network, we report experimental demonstration of a secure multiparty computation protocol, the privacy-preserving secure sum problem, based on the network quantum cryptography. PMID:27404561

  5. Understanding the Dynamics of Collaborative Multi-Party Discourse

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Bruce, Joseph R.; Haack, Jereme N.; Love, Douglas V.; Rose, Stuart J.; Andrew, Adrienne H.

    2006-12-01

    In this manuscript, we discuss the efforts underway at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in understanding the dynamics of multi-party discourse across a number of communication mo-dalities, such as email, instant messaging traffic and meeting data. Two prototype systems are dis-cussed. The Conversation Analysis Tool (ChAT) is an experimental test-bed for the development of computational linguistic components, and provides users with the ability to easily identify top-ics or persons of interest within multi-party conversations, including who talked to whom, when, entities that were discussed, etc. The Retrospective Analysis of Communication Events (RACE) prototype, leveraging many of the ChAT components, is an application built specifically for knowledge workers and focuses on merging different types of communications data so that the underlying message can be discovered in an efficient, timely fashion.

  6. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-01-01

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network. PMID:26644289

  7. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-12-01

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network.

  8. W-state Analyzer and Multi-party Measurement-device-independent Quantum Key Distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changhua; Xu, Feihu; Pei, Changxing

    2015-01-01

    W-state is an important resource for many quantum information processing tasks. In this paper, we for the first time propose a multi-party measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol based on W-state. With linear optics, we design a W-state analyzer in order to distinguish the four-qubit W-state. This analyzer constructs the measurement device for four-party MDI-QKD. Moreover, we derived a complete security proof of the four-party MDI-QKD, and performed a numerical simulation to study its performance. The results show that four-party MDI-QKD is feasible over 150 km standard telecom fiber with off-the-shelf single photon detectors. This work takes an important step towards multi-party quantum communication and a quantum network. PMID:26644289

  9. Retrospective Analysis of Communication Events - Understanding the Dynamics of Collaborative Multi-Party Discourse

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Haack, Jereme N.; McColgin, Dave W.

    2006-06-08

    This research is aimed at understanding the dynamics of collaborative multi-party discourse across multiple communication modalities. Before we can truly make sig-nificant strides in devising collaborative communication systems, there is a need to understand how typical users utilize com-putationally supported communications mechanisms such as email, instant mes-saging, video conferencing, chat rooms, etc., both singularly and in conjunction with traditional means of communication such as face-to-face meetings, telephone calls and postal mail. Attempting to un-derstand an individual’s communications profile with access to only a single modal-ity is challenging at best and often futile. Here, we discuss the development of RACE – Retrospective Analysis of Com-munications Events – a test-bed prototype to investigate issues relating to multi-modal multi-party discourse.

  10. Quantum Steganography for Multi-party Covert Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Tang, Guang-Ming; Sun, Yi-Feng; Yan, Shu-Fan

    2016-01-01

    A novel multi-party quantum steganography protocol based on quantum secret sharing is proposed in this paper. Hidden channels are built in HBB and improved HBB quantum secret sharing protocols for secret messages transmitting, via the entanglement swapping of GHZ states and Bell measurement. Compared with the original protocol, there are only a few different GHZ sates transmitted in the proposed protocol, making the hidden channel with good imperceptibility. Moreover, the secret messages keep secure even when the hidden channel is under the attack from the dishonest participators, for the sub-secretmessages distributed randomly to different participators. With good imperceptibility and security, the capacity of proposed protocol is higher than previous multi-party quantum steganography protocol.

  11. Numerical Optimization Using Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosset, Michael W.; Torczon, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    Engineering design optimization often gives rise to problems in which expensive objective functions are minimized by derivative-free methods. We propose a method for solving such problems that synthesizes ideas from the numerical optimization and computer experiment literatures. Our approach relies on kriging known function values to construct a sequence of surrogate models of the objective function that are used to guide a grid search for a minimizer. Results from numerical experiments on a standard test problem are presented.

  12. Strong polygamy of quantum correlations in multi-party quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong San

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new type of polygamy inequality for multi-party quantum entanglement. We first consider the possible amount of bipartite entanglement distributed between a fixed party and any subset of the rest parties in a multi-party quantum system. By using the summation of these distributed entanglements, we provide an upper bound of the distributed entanglement between a party and the rest in multi-party quantum systems. We then show that this upper bound also plays as a lower bound of the usual polygamy inequality, therefore the strong polygamy of multi-party quantum entanglement. For the case of multi-party pure states, we further show that the strong polygamy of entanglement implies the strong polygamy of quantum discord.

  13. Multi-Party Privacy-Preserving Set Intersection with Quasi-Linear Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Jung Hee; Jarecki, Stanislaw; Seo, Jae Hong

    Secure computation of the set intersection functionality allows n parties to find the intersection between their datasets without revealing anything else about them. An efficient protocol for such a task could have multiple potential applications in commerce, health care, and security. However, all currently known secure set intersection protocols for n>2 parties have computational costs that are quadratic in the (maximum) number of entries in the dataset contributed by each party, making secure computation of the set intersection only practical for small datasets. In this paper, we describe the first multi-party protocol for securely computing the set intersection functionality with both the communication and the computation costs that are quasi-linear in the size of the datasets. For a fixed security parameter, our protocols require O(n2k) bits of communication and Õ(n2k) group multiplications per player in the malicious adversary setting, where k is the size of each dataset. Our protocol follows the basic idea of the protocol proposed by Kissner and Song, but we gain efficiency by using different representations of the polynomials associated with users' datasets and careful employment of algorithms that interpolate or evaluate polynomials on multiple points more efficiently. Moreover, the proposed protocol is robust. This means that the protocol outputs the desired result even if some corrupted players leave during the execution of the protocol.

  14. Numerical computation of Pop plot

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-03-23

    The Pop plot — distance-of-run to detonation versus initial shock pressure — is a key characterization of shock initiation in a heterogeneous explosive. Reactive burn models for high explosives (HE) must reproduce the experimental Pop plot to have any chance of accurately predicting shock initiation phenomena. This report describes a methodology for automating the computation of a Pop plot for a specific explosive with a given HE model. Illustrative examples of the computation are shown for PBX 9502 with three burn models (SURF, WSD and Forest Fire) utilizing the xRage code, which is the Eulerian ASC hydrocode at LANL. Comparison of the numerical and experimental Pop plot can be the basis for a validation test or as an aid in calibrating the burn rate of an HE model. Issues with calibration are discussed.

  15. Numerical Package in Computer Supported Numeric Analysis Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tezer, Murat

    2007-01-01

    At universities in the faculties of Engineering, Sciences, Business and Economics together with higher education in Computing, it is stated that because of the difficulty, calculators and computers can be used in Numerical Analysis (NA). In this study, the learning computer supported NA will be discussed together with important usage of the…

  16. Interpreters' Involvement in Multi-Party Interactions: The Nature of Participation as Listener and Speaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takimoto, Masato

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates two naturally occurring business interpreting situations where there are a number of participants. Unlike dialogue interpreting situations where there are only two primary interlocutors, the overall interaction shows more complexity in these multi-party situations. This, in turn, means that the interpreters' functions and…

  17. A History of Computer Numerical Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggen, Gilbert L.

    Computer numerical control (CNC) has evolved from the first significant counting method--the abacus. Babbage had perhaps the greatest impact on the development of modern day computers with his analytical engine. Hollerith's functioning machine with punched cards was used in tabulating the 1890 U.S. Census. In order for computers to become a…

  18. Object-oriented numerical computing C++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1994-01-01

    An object oriented language is one allowing users to create a set of related types and then intermix and manipulate values of these related types. This paper discusses object oriented numerical computing using C++.

  19. Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Richard John; Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Peterson, Charles Glen

    2015-01-06

    Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.

  20. Secure multi-party communication with quantum key distribution managed by trusted authority

    DOEpatents

    Nordholt, Jane Elizabeth; Hughes, Richard John; Peterson, Charles Glen

    2013-07-09

    Techniques and tools for implementing protocols for secure multi-party communication after quantum key distribution ("QKD") are described herein. In example implementations, a trusted authority facilitates secure communication between multiple user devices. The trusted authority distributes different quantum keys by QKD under trust relationships with different users. The trusted authority determines combination keys using the quantum keys and makes the combination keys available for distribution (e.g., for non-secret distribution over a public channel). The combination keys facilitate secure communication between two user devices even in the absence of QKD between the two user devices. With the protocols, benefits of QKD are extended to multi-party communication scenarios. In addition, the protocols can retain benefit of QKD even when a trusted authority is offline or a large group seeks to establish secure communication within the group.

  1. Probabilistic numerics and uncertainty in computations

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Philipp; Osborne, Michael A.; Girolami, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We deliver a call to arms for probabilistic numerical methods: algorithms for numerical tasks, including linear algebra, integration, optimization and solving differential equations, that return uncertainties in their calculations. Such uncertainties, arising from the loss of precision induced by numerical calculation with limited time or hardware, are important for much contemporary science and industry. Within applications such as climate science and astrophysics, the need to make decisions on the basis of computations with large and complex data have led to a renewed focus on the management of numerical uncertainty. We describe how several seminal classic numerical methods can be interpreted naturally as probabilistic inference. We then show that the probabilistic view suggests new algorithms that can flexibly be adapted to suit application specifics, while delivering improved empirical performance. We provide concrete illustrations of the benefits of probabilistic numeric algorithms on real scientific problems from astrometry and astronomical imaging, while highlighting open problems with these new algorithms. Finally, we describe how probabilistic numerical methods provide a coherent framework for identifying the uncertainty in calculations performed with a combination of numerical algorithms (e.g. both numerical optimizers and differential equation solvers), potentially allowing the diagnosis (and control) of error sources in computations. PMID:26346321

  2. Security analysis of multi-party quantum private comparison protocol by model checking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Guowu; Hao, Yujie; Luo, Qingbin; Wang, Yuqi

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis method for quantum information protocols based on model checking, with special focus on the quantum privacy comparison (QPC). The security properties of these protocols can be proved but in ways with much difficulty. Here we will discuss a probabilistic model checking tool — PRISM to verify specific properties of QPC protocol with multi-body and PRISM to verify specific properties of quantum private comparison (QPC) protocol with multi-party and d-dimensional entangled states.

  3. Numerical computation of aeroelastically corrected transonic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R.; Waters, C.; Mackenzie, D.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical scheme is presented for the computation of transonic aerodynamic loads on flexible wings. The method consists of iteratively applying the loads computed by a 3D transonic aerodynamics code to a structural model to obtain elastic twist, and then recomputing the loads. Because this iteration is performed concurrently with the iterations performed in computing the aerodynamics, flexible loads are obtained in roughly the same amount of computing time as required to obtain rigid loads. Applications of this method to a flexible supercritical transonic transport wing are presented and compared with model test data.

  4. Numerical Computation of Diffusion on a Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Peter; Adalsteinsson, David; Colella, Phillip; Arkin, Adam Paul; Onsum, Matthew

    2005-02-24

    We present a numerical method for computing diffusive transport on a surface derived from image data. Our underlying discretization method uses a Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for computing the volume transport in region consisting of all points a small distance from the surface. We obtain a representation of this region from image data using a front propagation computation based on level set methods for solving the Hamilton-Jacobi and eikonal equations. We demonstrate that the method is second-order accurate in space and time, and is capable of computing solutions on complex surface geometries obtained from image data of cells.

  5. Multiaxis Computer Numerical Control Internship Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper was to examine the issues associated with bringing new technology into the classroom, in particular, the vocational/technical classroom. (Methodology) A new Haas 5 axis vertical Computer Numerical Control machining center was purchased to update the CNC machining curriculum at a community college and the process…

  6. Adapting Inspection Data for Computer Numerical Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchison, E. E.

    1986-01-01

    Machining time for repetitive tasks reduced. Program converts measurements of stub post locations by coordinate-measuring machine into form used by numerical-control computer. Work time thus reduced by 10 to 15 minutes for each post. Since there are 600 such posts on each injector, time saved per injector is 100 to 150 hours. With modifications this approach applicable to machining of many precise holes on large machine frames and similar objects.

  7. Fusing Symbolic and Numerical Diagnostic Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2007-01-01

    X-2000 Anomaly Detection Language denotes a developmental computing language, and the software that establishes and utilizes the language, for fusing two diagnostic computer programs, one implementing a numerical analysis method, the other implementing a symbolic analysis method into a unified event-based decision analysis software system for realtime detection of events (e.g., failures) in a spacecraft, aircraft, or other complex engineering system. The numerical analysis method is performed by beacon-based exception analysis for multi-missions (BEAMs), which has been discussed in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The symbolic analysis method is, more specifically, an artificial-intelligence method of the knowledge-based, inference engine type, and its implementation is exemplified by the Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE) software. The goal in developing the capability to fuse numerical and symbolic diagnostic components is to increase the depth of analysis beyond that previously attainable, thereby increasing the degree of confidence in the computed results. In practical terms, the sought improvement is to enable detection of all or most events, with no or few false alarms.

  8. Ferrofluids: Modeling, numerical analysis, and scientific computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Ignacio

    This dissertation presents some developments in the Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) describing the behavior of ferrofluids. The most widely accepted PDE model for ferrofluids is the Micropolar model proposed by R.E. Rosensweig. The Micropolar Navier-Stokes Equations (MNSE) is a subsystem of PDEs within the Rosensweig model. Being a simplified version of the much bigger system of PDEs proposed by Rosensweig, the MNSE are a natural starting point of this thesis. The MNSE couple linear velocity u, angular velocity w, and pressure p. We propose and analyze a first-order semi-implicit fully-discrete scheme for the MNSE, which decouples the computation of the linear and angular velocities, is unconditionally stable and delivers optimal convergence rates under assumptions analogous to those used for the Navier-Stokes equations. Moving onto the much more complex Rosensweig's model, we provide a definition (approximation) for the effective magnetizing field h, and explain the assumptions behind this definition. Unlike previous definitions available in the literature, this new definition is able to accommodate the effect of external magnetic fields. Using this definition we setup the system of PDEs coupling linear velocity u, pressure p, angular velocity w, magnetization m, and magnetic potential ϕ We show that this system is energy-stable and devise a numerical scheme that mimics the same stability property. We prove that solutions of the numerical scheme always exist and, under certain simplifying assumptions, that the discrete solutions converge. A notable outcome of the analysis of the numerical scheme for the Rosensweig's model is the choice of finite element spaces that allow the construction of an energy-stable scheme. Finally, with the lessons learned from Rosensweig's model, we develop a diffuse-interface model describing the behavior of two-phase ferrofluid flows and present an energy-stable numerical scheme for this model. For a

  9. Numerical uncertainty in computational engineering and physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining a solution that approximates ordinary or partial differential equations on a computational mesh or grid does not necessarily mean that the solution is accurate or even 'correct'. Unfortunately assessing the quality of discrete solutions by questioning the role played by spatial and temporal discretizations generally comes as a distant third to test-analysis comparison and model calibration. This publication is contributed to raise awareness of the fact that discrete solutions introduce numerical uncertainty. This uncertainty may, in some cases, overwhelm in complexity and magnitude other sources of uncertainty that include experimental variability, parametric uncertainty and modeling assumptions. The concepts of consistency, convergence and truncation error are overviewed to explain the articulation between the exact solution of continuous equations, the solution of modified equations and discrete solutions computed by a code. The current state-of-the-practice of code and solution verification activities is discussed. An example in the discipline of hydro-dynamics illustrates the significant effect that meshing can have on the quality of code predictions. A simple method is proposed to derive bounds of solution uncertainty in cases where the exact solution of the continuous equations, or its modified equations, is unknown. It is argued that numerical uncertainty originating from mesh discretization should always be quantified and accounted for in the overall uncertainty 'budget' that supports decision-making for applications in computational physics and engineering.

  10. Integrating multiple HD video services over tiled display for advanced multi-party collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sangwoo; Kim, Jaeyoun; Choi, Kiho; Kim, JongWon

    2006-10-01

    Multi-party collaborative environments based on AG (Access Grid) are extensively utilized for distance learning, e-science, and other distributed global collaboration events. In such environments, A/V media services play an important role in providing QoE (quality of experience) to participants in collaboration sessions. In this paper, in order to support high-quality user experience in the aspect of video services, we design an integration architecture to combine high-quality video services and a high-resolution tiled display service. In detail, the proposed architecture incorporates video services for DV (digital video) and HDV (high-definition digital video) streaming with a display service to provide methods for decomposable decoding/display for a tiled display system. By implementing the proposed architecture on top of AG, we verify that high-quality collaboration among a couple of collaboration sites can be realized over a multicast-enabled network testbed with improved media quality experience.

  11. Robust target localization with multi-party cooperation in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liang; Wang, Xue; Bi, Daowei

    2008-10-01

    Fault tolerant target localization is an important issue in wireless sensor networks. Faulty sensor nodes generate arbitrary data, which make the cooperation result untrustworthy. In this paper, multi-party cooperation between sensor nodes is used to estimate the target location robustly and accurately. We assign each sensor node a reliability level (RL) to qualify its data fidelity. A RL-weighted scheme is used to select the sensor node nearest to the target to perform as a processing node, which executes a particle swarm optimization algorithm to solve the maximum likelihood function of target location distribution. Each sensor node's RL is then updated according to the current data quality determined by the estimated target location. Experimental results show that although more than 50% sensor nodes are faulty, target localization error decreases over time and ultimately achieve a low level.

  12. Multi-Party Quantum Key Agreement by an Entangled Six-Qubit State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Zhang, Cai; Wang, Ping; Yu, Jianping; Zhang, Yong; Long, Dongyang

    2016-03-01

    Since the first quantum key agreement protocol based on Bell state was presented by Zhou et al., much attention has focused on it, which is based on entangled states and product states. In this paper, we propose a multi-party quantum key agreement protocol, in which the genuinely maximally entangled six-qubit states are used. The presented protocol allows participants to share a secret key and preserves the following advantages. First, the outcome of the protocol is influenced by all parties; Second, the presented protocol is fairness, i.e., no one can determine the shared key alone; Third, outside eavesdroppers cannot gain the generated key without introducing any error. The security analysis shows that our protocol can resist both outside attacks and inside attacks.

  13. Numerical computation of guided electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    McCartin, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    A computational procedure is presented for the determination of the propagating modes of cylindrical electromagnetic waveguides. The geometrical cross-section of the waveguide is completely arbitrary and may be filled with any homogeneous isotropic material, either dielectric or magnetic or both. A modal decomposition is employed thus reducing the problem to uncoupled Helmholtz equations for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes. The discretization of these two-dimensional Helmholtz equations is accomplished by application of the Control Region Approximation. This is a generalized finite-difference procedure involving the tessellation of the cross-section by dual Dirichlet and Delaunay regions. The discrete propagation constants and modes are determined by an inverse power iteration. Power flow, wall loss, and dielectric loss are then calculated. Numerical results indicating the efficacy of this approach are represented.

  14. Integrated optical circuits for numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verber, C. M.; Kenan, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    The development of integrated optical circuits (IOC) for numerical-computation applications is reviewed, with a focus on the use of systolic architectures. The basic architecture criteria for optical processors are shown to be the same as those proposed by Kung (1982) for VLSI design, and the advantages of IOCs over bulk techniques are indicated. The operation and fabrication of electrooptic grating structures are outlined, and the application of IOCs of this type to an existing 32-bit, 32-Mbit/sec digital correlator, a proposed matrix multiplier, and a proposed pipeline processor for polynomial evaluation is discussed. The problems arising from the inherent nonlinearity of electrooptic gratings are considered. Diagrams and drawings of the application concepts are provided.

  15. Numerical methods for problems in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jodi Lorraine

    1998-12-01

    A goal of computational aeroacoustics is the accurate calculation of noise from a jet in the far field. This work concerns the numerical aspects of accurately calculating acoustic waves over large distances and long time. More specifically, the stability, efficiency, accuracy, dispersion and dissipation in spatial discretizations, time stepping schemes, and absorbing boundaries for the direct solution of wave propagation problems are determined. Efficient finite difference methods developed by Tam and Webb, which minimize dispersion and dissipation, are commonly used for the spatial and temporal discretization. Alternatively, high order pseudospectral methods can be made more efficient by using the grid transformation introduced by Kosloff and Tal-Ezer. Work in this dissertation confirms that the grid transformation introduced by Kosloff and Tal-Ezer is not spectrally accurate because, in the limit, the grid transformation forces zero derivatives at the boundaries. If a small number of grid points are used, it is shown that approximations with the Chebyshev pseudospectral method with the Kosloff and Tal-Ezer grid transformation are as accurate as with the Chebyshev pseudospectral method. This result is based on the analysis of the phase and amplitude errors of these methods, and their use for the solution of a benchmark problem in computational aeroacoustics. For the grid transformed Chebyshev method with a small number of grid points it is, however, more appropriate to compare its accuracy with that of high- order finite difference methods. This comparison, for an order of accuracy 10-3 for a benchmark problem in computational aeroacoustics, is performed for the grid transformed Chebyshev method and the fourth order finite difference method of Tam. Solutions with the finite difference method are as accurate. and the finite difference method is more efficient than, the Chebyshev pseudospectral method with the grid transformation. The efficiency of the Chebyshev

  16. Integrating Numerical Computation into the Modeling Instruction Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caballero, Marcos D.; Burk, John B.; Aiken, John M.; Thoms, Brian D.; Douglas, Scott S.; Scanlon, Erin M.; Schatz, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical computation (the use of a computer to solve, simulate, or visualize a physical problem) has fundamentally changed the way scientific research is done. Systems that are too difficult to solve in closed form are probed using computation. Experiments that are impossible to perform in the laboratory are studied numerically. Consequently, in…

  17. Collusive attacks to "circle-type" multi-party quantum key agreement protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Xiao, Di; Jia, Heng-Yue; Liu, Run-Zong

    2016-05-01

    We find that existing multi-party quantum key agreement (MQKA) protocols designed for fairness of the key are, in fact, unfair. Our analysis shows that these protocols are sensitive to collusive attacks; that is, dishonest participants can collaborate in predetermining the key without being detected. In fact, the transmission structures of the quantum particles in those unfair MQKA protocols, three of which have already been analyzed, have much in common. We call these unfair MQKA protocols circle-type MQKA protocols. Likewise, the transmission structures of the quantum particles in MQKA protocols that can resist collusive attacks are also similar. We call such protocols complete-graph-type MQKA protocols. A MQKA protocol also exists that can resist the above attacks but is still not fair, and we call it the tree-type MQKA protocol. We first point out a common, easily missed loophole that severely compromises the fairness of present circle-type MQKA protocols. Then we show that two dishonest participants at special positions can totally predetermine the key generated by circle-type MQKA protocols. We anticipate that our observations will contribute to secure and fair MQKA protocols, especially circle-type protocols.

  18. Research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized and abstracts of published reports are presented. The major categories of the ICASE research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  19. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  20. Numerical computation of homogeneous slope stability.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuangshuang; Li, Kemin; Ding, Xiaohua; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    To simplify the computational process of homogeneous slope stability, improve computational accuracy, and find multiple potential slip surfaces of a complex geometric slope, this study utilized the limit equilibrium method to derive expression equations of overall and partial factors of safety. This study transformed the solution of the minimum factor of safety (FOS) to solving of a constrained nonlinear programming problem and applied an exhaustive method (EM) and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) to this problem. In simple slope examples, the computational results using an EM and PSO were close to those obtained using other methods. Compared to the EM, the PSO had a small computation error and a significantly shorter computation time. As a result, the PSO could precisely calculate the slope FOS with high efficiency. The example of the multistage slope analysis indicated that this slope had two potential slip surfaces. The factors of safety were 1.1182 and 1.1560, respectively. The differences between these and the minimum FOS (1.0759) were small, but the positions of the slip surfaces were completely different than the critical slip surface (CSS). PMID:25784927

  1. Computing abstraction hierarchies by numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, A.; Giunchiglia, F.; Sebastiani, R.; Walsh, T.

    1996-12-31

    We present a novel method for building ABSTRIPS-style abstraction hierarchies in planning. The aim of this method is to minimize the amount of backtracking between abstraction levels. Previous approaches have determined the criticality of operator preconditions by reasoning about plans directly. Here, we adopt a simpler and faster approach where we use numerical simulation of the planning process. We demonstrate the theoretical advantages of our approach by identifying some simple properties lacking in previous approaches but possessed by our method. We demonstrate the empirical advantages of our approach by a set of four benchmark experiments using the ABTWEAK system. We compare the quality of the abstraction hierarchies generated with those built by the ALPINE and HIGHPOINT algorithms.

  2. Numerical computation for teaching quantum statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Tyson; Swendsen, Robert H.

    2013-11-01

    The study of ideal quantum gases reveals surprising quantum effects that can be observed in macroscopic systems. The properties of bosons are particularly unusual because a macroscopic number of particles can occupy a single quantum state. We describe a computational approach that supplements the usual analytic derivations applicable in the thermodynamic limit. The approach involves directly summing over the quantum states for finite systems and avoids the need for doing difficult integrals. The results display the unusual behavior of quantum gases even for relatively small systems.

  3. Numerical Computation of Sensitivities and the Adjoint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the numerical computation of sensitivities via the adjoint approach in optimization problems governed by differential equations. We focus on the adjoint problem in its weak form. We show how one can avoid some of the problems with the adjoint approach, such as deriving suitable boundary conditions for the adjoint equation. We discuss the convergence of numerical approximations of the costate computed via the weak form of the adjoint problem and show the significance for the discrete adjoint problem.

  4. Dynamics of Numerics & Spurious Behaviors in CFD Computations. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen C.; Sweby, Peter K.

    1997-01-01

    The global nonlinear behavior of finite discretizations for constant time steps and fixed or adaptive grid spacings is studied using tools from dynamical systems theory. Detailed analysis of commonly used temporal and spatial discretizations for simple model problems is presented. The role of dynamics in the understanding of long time behavior of numerical integration and the nonlinear stability, convergence, and reliability of using time-marching approaches for obtaining steady-state numerical solutions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is explored. The study is complemented with examples of spurious behavior observed in steady and unsteady CFD computations. The CFD examples were chosen to illustrate non-apparent spurious behavior that was difficult to detect without extensive grid and temporal refinement studies and some knowledge from dynamical systems theory. Studies revealed the various possible dangers of misinterpreting numerical simulation of realistic complex flows that are constrained by available computing power. In large scale computations where the physics of the problem under study is not well understood and numerical simulations are the only viable means of solution, extreme care must be taken in both computation and interpretation of the numerical data. The goal of this paper is to explore the important role that dynamical systems theory can play in the understanding of the global nonlinear behavior of numerical algorithms and to aid the identification of the sources of numerical uncertainties in CFD.

  5. Technical Note: Computing numerator relationships between any pair of animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple method is described to compute the numerator relationship between any or all pairs of animals in the numerator relationship matrix. The method depends on output of the MTDFNRM program from the MTDFREML set of programs. An option of the MTDFNRM program creates a file including the inbreeding...

  6. Numerical simulation of polymer flows: A parallel computing approach

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, R.; Keunings, R.; Roux, F.X.

    1993-12-31

    We present a parallel algorithm for the numerical simulation of viscoelastic fluids on distributed memory computers. The algorithm has been implemented within a general-purpose commercial finite element package used in polymer processing applications. Results obtained on the Intel iPSC/860 computer demonstrate high parallel efficiency in complex flow problems. However, since the computational load is unknown a priori, load balancing is a challenging issue. We have developed an adaptive allocation strategy which dynamically reallocates the work load to the processors based upon the history of the computational procedure. We compare the results obtained with the adaptive and static scheduling schemes.

  7. Computational methods for aerodynamic design using numerical optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Five methods to increase the computational efficiency of aerodynamic design using numerical optimization, by reducing the computer time required to perform gradient calculations, are examined. The most promising method consists of drastically reducing the size of the computational domain on which aerodynamic calculations are made during gradient calculations. Since a gradient calculation requires the solution of the flow about an airfoil whose geometry was slightly perturbed from a base airfoil, the flow about the base airfoil is used to determine boundary conditions on the reduced computational domain. This method worked well in subcritical flow.

  8. Numerical simulation of supersonic wake flow with parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Soetrisno, M.

    1995-07-01

    Simulating a supersonic wake flow field behind a conical body is a computing intensive task. It requires a large number of computational cells to capture the dominant flow physics and a robust numerical algorithm to obtain a reliable solution. High performance parallel computers with unique distributed processing and data storage capability can provide this need. They have larger computational memory and faster computing time than conventional vector computers. We apply the PINCA Navier-Stokes code to simulate a wind-tunnel supersonic wake experiment on Intel Gamma, Intel Paragon, and IBM SP2 parallel computers. These simulations are performed to study the mean flow in the near wake region of a sharp, 7-degree half-angle, adiabatic cone at Mach number 4.3 and freestream Reynolds number of 40,600. Overall the numerical solutions capture the general features of the hypersonic laminar wake flow and compare favorably with the wind tunnel data. With a refined and clustering grid distribution in the recirculation zone, the calculated location of the rear stagnation point is consistent with the 2D axisymmetric and 3D experiments. In this study, we also demonstrate the importance of having a large local memory capacity within a computer node and the effective utilization of the number of computer nodes to achieve good parallel performance when simulating a complex, large-scale wake flow problem.

  9. Multi-Party Quantum Private Comparison Protocol with an Almost-Dishonest Third Party using GHZ States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng-Liang; Hwang, Tzonelih; Gope, Prosanta

    2016-06-01

    This article proposes an innovative quantum private comparison (QPC) protocol for n users using GHZ states, where an almost-dishonest third party (TP) is introduced to assist the participants for comparing their secrets. It is argued that as compared to the existing QPC protocols our proposed scheme has some considerable advantages. First, in the existing QPC protocols, the TP can only to determine whether all participants' secrets are equal or not. Instead of that, in our proposed scheme a TP can even compare the secrets between any subsects of users. Second, since our proposed scheme is based on GHZ state; hence it can ensure higher efficiency as compared to other existing multi-party QPC protocols on d-dimension photons.

  10. Computer-Numerical-Control and the EMCO Compact 5 Lathe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Frank M.

    This laboratory manual is intended for use in teaching computer-numerical-control (CNC) programming using the Emco Maier Compact 5 Lathe. Developed for use at the postsecondary level, this material contains a short introduction to CNC machine tools. This section covers CNC programs, CNC machine axes, and CNC coordinate systems. The following…

  11. Computer numerical control grinding of spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, H. Wayne

    1991-01-01

    The development of Computer Numerical Control (CNC) spiral bevel gear grinding has paved the way for major improvement in the production of precision spiral bevel gears. The object of the program was to decrease the setup, maintenance of setup, and pattern development time by 50 percent of the time required on conventional spiral bevel gear grinders. Details of the process are explained.

  12. Computer used to program numerically controlled milling machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, T. C.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program automatically directs a numerically controlled milling machine through a series of cutting and trimming actions. It accepts engineering data points, passes smooth curve segments through the points, breaks the resulting curves into a series of closely spaced points, and transforms these points into the form required by the mechanism.

  13. Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Chritsopher K. W.; Kurbatskii, Konstantin A.; Fang, Jun

    1997-01-01

    Category 1, Problems 1 and 2, Category 2, Problem 2, and Category 3, Problem 2 are solved computationally using the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme. All these problems are governed by the linearized Euler equations. The resolution requirements of the DRP scheme for maintaining low numerical dispersion and dissipation as well as accurate wave speeds in solving the linearized Euler equations are now well understood. As long as 8 or more mesh points per wavelength is employed in the numerical computation, high quality results are assured. For the first three categories of benchmark problems, therefore, the real challenge is to develop high quality numerical boundary conditions. For Category 1, Problems 1 and 2, it is the curved wall boundary conditions. For Category 2, Problem 2, it is the internal radiation boundary conditions inside the duct. For Category 3, Problem 2, they are the inflow and outflow boundary conditions upstream and downstream of the blade row. These are the foci of the present investigation. Special nonhomogeneous radiation boundary conditions that generate the incoming disturbances and at the same time allow the outgoing reflected or scattered acoustic disturbances to leave the computation domain without significant reflection are developed. Numerical results based on these boundary conditions are provided.

  14. Dynamical Approach Study of Spurious Numerics in Nonlinear Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The last two decades have been an era when computation is ahead of analysis and when very large scale practical computations are increasingly used in poorly understood multiscale complex nonlinear physical problems and non-traditional fields. Ensuring a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of these numerical simulations could play a major role in furthering the design, understanding, affordability and safety of our next generation air and space transportation systems, and systems for planetary and atmospheric sciences, and in understanding the evolution and origin of life. The need to guarantee PAR becomes acute when computations offer the ONLY way of solving these types of data limited problems. Employing theory from nonlinear dynamical systems, some building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in PAR of numerical simulations have been revealed by the author and world expert collaborators in relevant fields. Five building blocks with supporting numerical examples were discussed. The next step is to utilize knowledge gained by including nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation and chaos theories as an integral part of the numerical process. The third step is to design integrated criteria for reliable and accurate algorithms that cater to the different multiscale nonlinear physics. This includes but is not limited to the construction of appropriate adaptive spatial and temporal discretizations that are suitable for the underlying governing equations. In addition, a multiresolution wavelets approach for adaptive numerical dissipation/filter controls for high speed turbulence, acoustics and combustion simulations will be sought. These steps are corner stones for guarding against spurious numerical solutions that are solutions of the discretized counterparts but are not solutions of the underlying governing equations.

  15. Numerical computations of faceted pattern formation in snow crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Faceted growth of snow crystals leads to a rich diversity of forms with remarkable sixfold symmetry. Snow crystal structures result from diffusion-limited crystal growth in the presence of anisotropic surface energy and anisotropic attachment kinetics. It is by now well understood that the morphological stability of ice crystals strongly depends on supersaturation, crystal size, and temperature. Until very recently it was very difficult to perform numerical simulations of this highly anisotropic crystal growth. In particular, obtaining facet growth in combination with dendritic branching is a challenging task. We present numerical simulations of snow crystal growth in two and three spacial dimensions using a computational method recently introduced by the present authors. We present both qualitative and quantitative computations. In particular, a linear relationship between tip velocity and supersaturation is observed. In our computations, surface energy effects, although small, have a pronounced effect on crystal growth. We compute solid plates, solid prisms, hollow columns, needles, dendrites, capped columns, and scrolls on plates. Although all these forms appear in nature, it is a significant challenge to reproduce them with the help of numerical simulations for a continuum model. PMID:23005427

  16. Numerical computation of transient coaxial entry tube flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieber, P. R.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical program was developed to compute transient laminar flows in two dimensions including multicomponent mixing and chemical reaction. The program can compute both incompressible flows and compressible flows at all speeds, and it is applied to describe transient and steady state solutions for low subsonic, coaxial entry, tue flows. Single component, nonreacting flows comprise most of the solutions, but one steady state solution is presented for trace concentration constituents engaging in a second order reaction. Numerical stability was obtained by adding at each calculation point a correction for numerical diffusion errors caused by truncation of the Taylor series used to finite difference the conservation equations. Transient computations were made for fluids initially at rest, then subjected to step velocity inputs that were uniform across each region of the entry plane and were held constant throughout the computation period. For center tube to annulus velocity ratios of 0.5 and 2.0, the bulk fluid in the tube initially moved in plug flow, but strong radial flows developed near the injection plane which moved the fluid into the high shear region between the jets and away from the tube wall.

  17. Numerical computations of faceted pattern formation in snow crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, John W.; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Faceted growth of snow crystals leads to a rich diversity of forms with remarkable sixfold symmetry. Snow crystal structures result from diffusion-limited crystal growth in the presence of anisotropic surface energy and anisotropic attachment kinetics. It is by now well understood that the morphological stability of ice crystals strongly depends on supersaturation, crystal size, and temperature. Until very recently it was very difficult to perform numerical simulations of this highly anisotropic crystal growth. In particular, obtaining facet growth in combination with dendritic branching is a challenging task. We present numerical simulations of snow crystal growth in two and three spacial dimensions using a computational method recently introduced by the present authors. We present both qualitative and quantitative computations. In particular, a linear relationship between tip velocity and supersaturation is observed. In our computations, surface energy effects, although small, have a pronounced effect on crystal growth. We compute solid plates, solid prisms, hollow columns, needles, dendrites, capped columns, and scrolls on plates. Although all these forms appear in nature, it is a significant challenge to reproduce them with the help of numerical simulations for a continuum model.

  18. Computation of precise satellite orbits by analytical and numerical computer programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, P.

    The computer program, used for computation of precise satellite orbits by analytical method had been modified to increase its accuracy. The modification consists mainly in implementation of orbit generator based on numerical intergration of perturbations in spherical coordinates. Besides the theoretical background given, both methods are compared on the real case of Lageos observations obtained during pre-Merit campaign in 1980.

  19. Validation of Numerical Codes to Compute Tsunami Runup And Inundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velioğlu, Deniz; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet; Kian, Rozita; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    FLOW 3D and NAMI DANCE are two numerical codes which can be applied to analysis of flow and motion of long waves. Flow 3D simulates linear and nonlinear propagating surface waves as well as irregular waves including long waves. NAMI DANCE uses finite difference computational method to solve nonlinear shallow water equations (NSWE) in long wave problems, specifically tsunamis. Both codes can be applied to tsunami simulations and visualization of long waves. Both codes are capable of solving flooding problems. However, FLOW 3D is designed mainly to solve flooding problem from land and NAMI DANCE is designed to solve flooding problem from the sea. These numerical codes are applied to some benchmark problems for validation and verification. One useful benchmark problem is the runup of solitary waves which is investigated analytically and experimentally by Synolakis (1987). Since 1970s, solitary waves have commonly been used to model tsunamis especially in experimental and numerical studies. In this respect, a benchmark problem on runup of solitary waves is a relevant choice to assess the capability and validity of the numerical codes on amplification of tsunamis. In this study both codes have been tested, compared and validated by applying to the analytical benchmark problem of solitary wave runup on a sloping beach. Comparison of the results showed that both codes are in good agreement with the analytical and experimental results and thus can be proposed to be used in inundation of long waves and tsunami hazard analysis.

  20. Computational aeroacoustics and numerical simulation of supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Philip J.; Long, Lyle N.

    1996-01-01

    The research project has been a computational study of computational aeroacoustics algorithms and numerical simulations of the flow and noise of supersonic jets. During this study a new method for the implementation of solid wall boundary conditions for complex geometries in three dimensions has been developed. In addition, a detailed study of the simulation of the flow in and noise from supersonic circular and rectangular jets has been conducted. Extensive comparisons have been made with experimental measurements. A summary of the results of the research program are attached as the main body of this report in the form of two publications. Also, the report lists the names of the students who were supported by this grant, their degrees, and the titles of their dissertations. In addition, a list of presentations and publications made by the Principal Investigators and the research students is also included.

  1. Numerical analysis of boosting scheme for scalable NMR quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    SaiToh, Akira; Kitagawa, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    Among initialization schemes for ensemble quantum computation beginning at thermal equilibrium, the scheme proposed by Schulman and Vazirani [in Proceedings of the 31st ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing (STOC'99) (ACM Press, New York, 1999), pp. 322-329] is known for the simple quantum circuit to redistribute the biases (polarizations) of qubits and small time complexity. However, our numerical simulation shows that the number of qubits initialized by the scheme is rather smaller than expected from the von Neumann entropy because of an increase in the sum of the binary entropies of individual qubits, which indicates a growth in the total classical correlation. This result--namely, that there is such a significant growth in the total binary entropy--disagrees with that of their analysis.

  2. Numerical Technology for Large-Scale Computational Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, R; Champagne, N; White, D; Stowell, M; Adams, R

    2003-01-30

    The key bottleneck of implicit computational electromagnetics tools for large complex geometries is the solution of the resulting linear system of equations. The goal of this effort was to research and develop critical numerical technology that alleviates this bottleneck for large-scale computational electromagnetics (CEM). The mathematical operators and numerical formulations used in this arena of CEM yield linear equations that are complex valued, unstructured, and indefinite. Also, simultaneously applying multiple mathematical modeling formulations to different portions of a complex problem (hybrid formulations) results in a mixed structure linear system, further increasing the computational difficulty. Typically, these hybrid linear systems are solved using a direct solution method, which was acceptable for Cray-class machines but does not scale adequately for ASCI-class machines. Additionally, LLNL's previously existing linear solvers were not well suited for the linear systems that are created by hybrid implicit CEM codes. Hence, a new approach was required to make effective use of ASCI-class computing platforms and to enable the next generation design capabilities. Multiple approaches were investigated, including the latest sparse-direct methods developed by our ASCI collaborators. In addition, approaches that combine domain decomposition (or matrix partitioning) with general-purpose iterative methods and special purpose pre-conditioners were investigated. Special-purpose pre-conditioners that take advantage of the structure of the matrix were adapted and developed based on intimate knowledge of the matrix properties. Finally, new operator formulations were developed that radically improve the conditioning of the resulting linear systems thus greatly reducing solution time. The goal was to enable the solution of CEM problems that are 10 to 100 times larger than our previous capability.

  3. Numerical computation of modulated factor in measuring D*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiangrong; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yani; Tang, Hengjing

    2009-07-01

    The "direct current" radiation is turned to periodic "alternating current" radiation by the modulate tray, then, the periodic "alternating current" radiation is received by photoelectric detector in one constant frequency during measuring D*. The ratio is called modulated factor, which the ratio is the fundamental virtual factor of "alternating current" radiant power to "direct current" radiant power. The modulated factor is an important parameter in measuring D*. The modulated factor could be gained by analytic method or numerical computation method. In this paper, by the method of numerical computation and Matlab program, the authors give out modulated factor of a light-spot modulated by a fan-shaped modulate tray. The modulated factor is different from r, R, n. Some conclusions that we are using in measuring D* are testified. When the light-spot and the detector are at the same axis and L>=10 √Ab (Ab is the area of the light-spot), the diameter of the light-spot is 0.87 of the width of fan-shaped modulate tray dentition, the modulated factor is 0.3536.

  4. Numerical Methods of Computational Electromagnetics for Complex Inhomogeneous Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wei

    2014-05-15

    Understanding electromagnetic phenomena is the key in many scientific investigation and engineering designs such as solar cell designs, studying biological ion channels for diseases, and creating clean fusion energies, among other things. The objectives of the project are to develop high order numerical methods to simulate evanescent electromagnetic waves occurring in plasmon solar cells and biological ion-channels, where local field enhancement within random media in the former and long range electrostatic interactions in the latter are of major challenges for accurate and efficient numerical computations. We have accomplished these objectives by developing high order numerical methods for solving Maxwell equations such as high order finite element basis for discontinuous Galerkin methods, well-conditioned Nedelec edge element method, divergence free finite element basis for MHD, and fast integral equation methods for layered media. These methods can be used to model the complex local field enhancement in plasmon solar cells. On the other hand, to treat long range electrostatic interaction in ion channels, we have developed image charge based method for a hybrid model in combining atomistic electrostatics and continuum Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatics. Such a hybrid model will speed up the molecular dynamics simulation of transport in biological ion-channels.

  5. Numerical computation of travelling breathers in Klein Gordon chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sire, Yannick; James, Guillaume

    2005-05-01

    We numerically study the existence of travelling breathers in Klein-Gordon chains, which consist of one-dimensional networks of nonlinear oscillators in an anharmonic on-site potential, linearly coupled to their nearest neighbors. Travelling breathers are spatially localized solutions having the property of being exactly translated by p sites along the chain after a fixed propagation time T (these solutions generalize the concept of solitary waves for which p=1). In the case of even on-site potentials, the existence of small amplitude travelling breathers superposed on a small oscillatory tail has been proved recently [G. James, Y. Sire, Travelling breathers with exponentially small tails in a chain of nonlinear oscillators, Commun. Math. Phys., 2005, in press (available online at http://www.springerlink.com)], the tail being exponentially small with respect to the central oscillation size. In this paper, we compute these solutions numerically and continue them into the large amplitude regime for different types of even potentials. We find that Klein-Gordon chains can support highly localized travelling breather solutions superposed on an oscillatory tail. We provide examples where the tail can be made very small and is difficult to detect at the scale of central oscillations. In addition, we numerically observe the existence of these solutions in the case of non-even potentials.

  6. Numerical computation of transonic flow about wing-fuselage configurations on a vector computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S. D.; Holst, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    The transonic wing analysis code TWING, which uses the AF2 relaxation algorithm, has been vectorized to run on the Cray-1S computer. Vectorization of this code improved computational efficiency over that of the CDC 7600 computer by factors of 11 to 13. The improvement compares favorably with the prediction of a theoretical performance model. A convenient generalization now permits the treatment of rudimentary wing-fuselage combinations. Flow predictions for a transport configuration in both isolated-wing and wing-fuselage modes show the expected trends in shock strength and position when compared with wind-tunnel results. An isolated fighter wing is examined in terms of execution time on three different computers and in comparison with experimental data. The computational fluid dynamics code produced during this study is a careful union of an efficient three-dimensional, transonic, numerical algorithm and the vector features presently available on modern computers.

  7. Computer Numerical Control: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinn, John W.

    This instructional manual contains five learning activity packets for use in a workshop on computer numerical control for computer-aided manufacturing. The lessons cover the following topics: introduction to computer-aided manufacturing, understanding the lathe, using the computer, computer numerically controlled part programming, and executing a…

  8. Numerical computation of viscous flow about unconventional airfoil shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    A new two-dimensional computer code was developed to analyze the viscous flow around unconventional airfoils at various Mach numbers and angles of attack. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved using an implicit, upwind, finite-volume scheme. Both laminar and turbulent flows can be computed. A new nonequilibrium turbulence closure model was developed for computing turbulent flows. This two-layer eddy viscosity model was motivated by the success of the Johnson-King model in separated flow regions. The influence of history effects are described by an ordinary differential equation developed from the turbulent kinetic energy equation. The performance of the present code was evaluated by solving the flow around three airfoils using the Reynolds time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Excellent results were obtained for both attached and separated flows about the NACA 0012 airfoil, the RAE 2822 airfoil, and the Integrated Technology A 153W airfoil. Based on the comparison of the numerical solutions with the available experimental data, it is concluded that the present code in conjunction with the new nonequilibrium turbulence model gives excellent results.

  9. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The major categories of current ICASE research programs addressed include: numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; computational problems in engineering and physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  10. On accuracy conditions for the numerical computation of waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Goldstein, C. I.; Turkel, E.

    1984-01-01

    The Helmholtz equation (Delta + K(2)n(2))u = f with a variable index of refraction n, and a suitable radiation condition at infinity serves as a model for a wide variety of wave propagation problems. Such problems can be solved numerically by first truncating the given unbounded domain and imposing a suitable outgoing radiation condition on an artificial boundary and then solving the resulting problem on the bounded domain by direct discretization (for example, using a finite element method). In practical applications, the mesh size h and the wave number K, are not independent but are constrained by the accuracy of the desired computation. It will be shown that the number of points per wavelength, measured by (Kh)(-1), is not sufficient to determine the accuracy of a given discretization. For example, the quantity K(3)h(2) is shown to determine the accuracy in the L(2) norm for a second-order discretization method applied to several propagation models.

  11. On accuracy conditions for the numerical computation of waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Goldstein, C. I.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The Helmholtz equation (Delta + K(2)n(2))u = f with a variable index of refraction n, and a suitable radiation condition at infinity serves as a model for a wide variety of wave propagation problems. Such problems can be solved numerically by first truncating the given unbounded domain and imposing a suitable outgoing radiation condition on an artificial boundary and then solving the resulting problem on the bounded domain by direct discretization (for example, using a finite element method). In practical applications, the mesh size h and the wave number K, are not independent but are constrained by the accuracy of the desired computation. It will be shown that the number of points per wavelength, measured by (Kh)(-1), is not sufficient to determine the accuracy of a given discretization. For example, the quantity K(3)h(2) is shown to determine the accuracy in the L(2) norm for a second-order discretization method applied to several propagation models.

  12. Numerical computation of pulsatile flow through a locally constricted channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Layek, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the numerical solution of a pulsatile laminar flow through a locally constricted channel. A finite difference technique has been employed to solve the governing equations. The effects of the flow parameters such as Reynolds number, flow pulsation in terms of Strouhal number, constriction height and length on the flow behaviour have been studied. It is found that the peak value of the wall shear stress has significantly changed with the variation of Reynolds numbers and constriction heights. It is also noted that the Strouhal number and constriction length have little effect on the peak value of the wall shear stress. The flow computation reveals that the peak value of the wall shear stress at maximum flow rate time in pulsatile flow situation is much larger than that due to steady flow. The constriction and the flow pulsation produce flow disturbances at the vicinity of the constriction of the channel in the downstream direction.

  13. Numerical computational of fluid flow through a detached retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiann, Lim Yeou; Ismail, Zuhaila; Shafie, Sharidan; Fitt, Alistair

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of fluid flow through a detached retina is studied. Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment happens when vitreous humour flow through a detached retina. The exact mechanism of Rhegmatogeneous retinal detachment is complex and remains incomplete. To understand the fluid flow, a paradigm mathematical model is developed and is approximated by the lubrication theory. The numerical results of the velocity profile and pressure distribution are computed by using Finite Element Method. The effects of fluid mechanical on the retinal detachment is discussed and analyzed. Based on the analysis, it is found that the retinal detachment deformation affects the pressure distribution. It is important to comprehend the development of the retinal detachment so that a new treatment method can be developed.

  14. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles.

    PubMed

    Barrett, John W; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behavior of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier-)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier-)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite-element method to solve this complex free boundary problem and present the first three-dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier-)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature, and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosity contrast between the bulk fluids, the tank treading to tumbling transition can be obtained by increasing the membrane viscosity. Besides the classical tank treading and tumbling motions, another mode (called the transition mode in this paper, but originally called the vacillating-breathing mode and subsequently also called trembling, transition, and swinging mode) separating these classical modes appears and is studied by us numerically. We also study how features of equilibrium shapes in the ADE and spontaneous curvature models, like budding behavior or starfish forms, behave in a shear flow. PMID:26651720

  15. Numerical computations of the dynamics of fluidic membranes and vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, John W.; Garcke, Harald; Nürnberg, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Vesicles and many biological membranes are made of two monolayers of lipid molecules and form closed lipid bilayers. The dynamical behavior of vesicles is very complex and a variety of forms and shapes appear. Lipid bilayers can be considered as a surface fluid and hence the governing equations for the evolution include the surface (Navier-)Stokes equations, which in particular take the membrane viscosity into account. The evolution is driven by forces stemming from the curvature elasticity of the membrane. In addition, the surface fluid equations are coupled to bulk (Navier-)Stokes equations. We introduce a parametric finite-element method to solve this complex free boundary problem and present the first three-dimensional numerical computations based on the full (Navier-)Stokes system for several different scenarios. For example, the effects of the membrane viscosity, spontaneous curvature, and area difference elasticity (ADE) are studied. In particular, it turns out, that even in the case of no viscosity contrast between the bulk fluids, the tank treading to tumbling transition can be obtained by increasing the membrane viscosity. Besides the classical tank treading and tumbling motions, another mode (called the transition mode in this paper, but originally called the vacillating-breathing mode and subsequently also called trembling, transition, and swinging mode) separating these classical modes appears and is studied by us numerically. We also study how features of equilibrium shapes in the ADE and spontaneous curvature models, like budding behavior or starfish forms, behave in a shear flow.

  16. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations. PMID:24525420

  17. Numerical computation on massively parallel hypercubes. [Connection machine

    SciTech Connect

    McBryan, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    We describe numerical computations on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel hypercube architecture with 65,536 single-bit processors and 32 Mbytes of memory. A parallel extension of COMMON LISP, provides access to the processors and network. The rich software environment is further enhanced by a powerful virtual processor capability, which extends the degree of fine-grained parallelism beyond 1,000,000. We briefly describe the hardware and indicate the principal features of the parallel programming environment. We then present implementations of SOR, multigrid and pre-conditioned conjugate gradient algorithms for solving partial differential equations on the Connection Machine. Despite the lack of floating point hardware, computation rates above 100 megaflops have been achieved in PDE solution. Virtual processors prove to be a real advantage, easing the effort of software development while improving system performance significantly. The software development effort is also facilitated by the fact that hypercube communications prove to be fast and essentially independent of distance. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Numerical computations of transport coefficients for nonsymmetric plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshman, S.P.; Shaing, K.C.; Beasley, C.O. Jr.; Crume, E.C.; Van Rij, W.I.

    1985-11-01

    The linearized drift kinetic equation is solved numerically to obtain the Onsager transport matrix for a three-dimensional toroidal plasma confinement geometry. Local transport coefficients relating the cross-field fluxes to the thermodynamic forces are computed as continuous functions of the collision frequency. In particular, in the low-collision-frequency regime (..nu.. < ..omega../sub b/), the transport resulting from the nonconservation of the longitudinal adiabatic invariant J (due to particle transitions from helically trapped to toroidally trapped) is obtained. The boundary layer in velocity space resulting from these transition particles can be accurately treated using a Legendre polynomial representation for the pitch angle dependence of the distribution function. Magnetic coordinates are used so that finite-beta effects are included. The disparity in the time scales between collisionless particle orbits and collisional dynamics is treated efficiently to obtain steady-state fluxes and viscosity coefficients. This yields significant improvements in the precision and computational effort in comparison with Monte Carlo methods. The effect of a radial electric field in the ..nu.. < ..omega../sub D/ regime is studied. Applications to Advanced Transition Facility (ATF) and heliac configurations are given.

  19. Numerical Computations of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer over Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Surface irregularities such as protuberances inside a hypersonic boundary layer may lead to premature transition on the vehicle surface. Early transition in turn causes large localized surface heating that could damage the thermal protection system. Experimental measurements as well as numerical computations aimed at building a knowledge base for transition Reynolds numbers with respect to different protuberance sizes and locations have been actively pursued in recent years. This paper computationally investigates the unsteady wake development behind large isolated cylindrical roughness elements and the scaled wind-tunnel model of the trip used in a recent flight measurement during the reentry of space shuttle Discovery. An unstructured mesh, compressible flow solver based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for the flow past a roughness element under several wind-tunnel conditions. For a cylindrical roughness element with a height to the boundary-layer thickness ratio from 0.8 to 2.5, the wake flow is characterized by a mushroom-shaped centerline streak and horse-shoe vortices. While time-accurate solutions converged to a steady-state for a ratio of 0.8, strong flow unsteadiness is present for a ratio of 1.3 and 2.5. Instability waves marked by distinct disturbance frequencies were found in the latter two cases. Both the centerline streak and the horse-shoe vortices become unstable downstream. The oscillatory vortices eventually reach an early breakdown stage for the largest roughness element. Spectral analyses in conjunction with the computed root mean square variations suggest that the source of the unsteadiness and instability waves in the wake region may be traced back to possible absolute instability in the front-side separation region.

  20. Numerical observer for atherosclerotic plaque classification in spectral computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lorsakul, Auranuch; Fakhri, Georges El; Worstell, William; Ouyang, Jinsong; Rakvongthai, Yothin; Laine, Andrew F; Li, Quanzheng

    2016-07-01

    Spectral computed tomography (SCT) generates better image quality than conventional computed tomography (CT). It has overcome several limitations for imaging atherosclerotic plaque. However, the literature evaluating the performance of SCT based on objective image assessment is very limited for the task of discriminating plaques. We developed a numerical-observer method and used it to assess performance on discrimination vulnerable-plaque features and compared the performance among multienergy CT (MECT), dual-energy CT (DECT), and conventional CT methods. Our numerical observer was designed to incorporate all spectral information and comprised two-processing stages. First, each energy-window domain was preprocessed by a set of localized channelized Hotelling observers (CHO). In this step, the spectral image in each energy bin was decorrelated using localized prewhitening and matched filtering with a set of Laguerre-Gaussian channel functions. Second, the series of the intermediate scores computed from all the CHOs were integrated by a Hotelling observer with an additional prewhitening and matched filter. The overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were obtained, yielding an overall discrimination performance metric. The performance of our new observer was evaluated for the particular binary classification task of differentiating between alternative plaque characterizations in carotid arteries. A clinically realistic model of signal variability was also included in our simulation of the discrimination tasks. The inclusion of signal variation is a key to applying the proposed observer method to spectral CT data. Hence, the task-based approaches based on the signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly (SKE/BKE) framework and the clinical-relevant signal-known-statistically/background-known-exactly (SKS/BKE) framework were applied for analytical computation of figures of merit (FOM). Simulated data of a

  1. Numerical simulations of the thermoacoustic computed tomography breast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, William Lester, Jr.

    A thermoacoustic wave is produced when an object absorbs energy and experiences a subsequent thermal expansion. We have developed a Thermoacoustic Computed Tomography (TACT) breast imaging system to exploit the thermoacoustic phenomena as a method of soft tissue imaging. By exposing the breast to short pulses of 434 MHz microwaves, ultrasonic pulses are generated and detected with a hemispherical transducer array submersed in a water bath. Filtering and back projecting the transducer signals generates a 3-D image that maps the localized microwave absorption properties of the breast. In an effort to understand the factors limiting image quality, the TACT system was numerically simulated. The simulations were used to generate the transducer signals that would be collected by the TACT system during a scan of an object. These simulated data streams were then fed into the system image reconstruction software to provide images of simulated phantoms. The effects of transducer diameter, transducer response, transducer array geometry and stimulating pulse width on the spatial and contrast resolution of the system were quantified using the simulations. The spatial resolution was highly dependent upon location in the imaging volume. This was due to the off axis response of transducers of finite aperture. Simulated data were compared with experimental data, obtained by imaging a parallel-piped resolution phantom, to verify the accuracy of the simulation code. A contrast-detail phantom was numerically simulated to determine the ability of the system to image spheres of diameters <1 cm with absorption values on the order of physiologic saline, when located in a background of noise. The results of the contrast-detail analysis were dependent on the location of the spheres in the imaging volume and the diameter of the simulated transducers. This work sets the foundation for the initial image quality studies of the TACT system. Improvements to the current imaging system, based on

  2. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April l, 1988 through September 30, 1988.

  3. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1986 through March 31, 1987 is summarized.

  4. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April, 1986 through September 30, 1986 is summarized.

  5. Design of a new high precision computer numerical control

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.J.; Weinert, G.F.

    1988-06-23

    The purpose of this project is to produce a generic high precision computer numerical controller (CNC) for use on microinch- and sub-microinch-resolution machine tools at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In order to fully utilize the potential of these machine tools, the CNC must include the ability to use multiple feedback sensors on each machine axis, incorporate corrections for quasistatic geometric errors (such as straightness, and squareness), be able to function over a relatively large range of motion (in excess of 60 inches per axis), and be able to produce motion updates at a rate sufficient to take advantage of the high bandwidth of the servo systems. At present, no commercially available CNC can presently meet all of the resolution, feed rate, and length of travel requirements of these machines. In order to minimize the complexity of the system, and thereby increase its reliability and maintainability, the programming was done in a high level language. The number of processors was kept as small as possible while still maintaining the performance requirements. We also used commercially available hardware in preference to building, in order to increase both reliability and maintainability. Special emphasis was given to making the CNC's operator interface as friendly as possible. We have completed a prototype control. We plan to install and test it in 1988. 4 figs.

  6. Estimating uncertainties in statistics computed from direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Todd A.; Malaya, Nicholas; Ulerich, Rhys; Moser, Robert D.

    2014-03-01

    Rigorous assessment of uncertainty is crucial to the utility of direct numerical simulation (DNS) results. Uncertainties in the computed statistics arise from two sources: finite statistical sampling and the discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations. Due to the presence of non-trivial sampling error, standard techniques for estimating discretization error (such as Richardson extrapolation) fail or are unreliable. This work provides a systematic and unified approach for estimating these errors. First, a sampling error estimator that accounts for correlation in the input data is developed. Then, this sampling error estimate is used as part of a Bayesian extension of Richardson extrapolation in order to characterize the discretization error. These methods are tested using the Lorenz equations and are shown to perform well. These techniques are then used to investigate the sampling and discretization errors in the DNS of a wall-bounded turbulent flow at Reτ ≈ 180. Both small (Lx/δ × Lz/δ = 4π × 2π) and large (Lx/δ × Lz/δ = 12π × 4π) domain sizes are investigated. For each case, a sequence of meshes was generated by first designing a "nominal" mesh using standard heuristics for wall-bounded simulations. These nominal meshes were then coarsened to generate a sequence of grid resolutions appropriate for the Bayesian Richardson extrapolation method. In addition, the small box case is computationally inexpensive enough to allow simulation on a finer mesh, enabling the results of the extrapolation to be validated in a weak sense. For both cases, it is found that while the sampling uncertainty is large enough to make the order of accuracy difficult to determine, the estimated discretization errors are quite small. This indicates that the commonly used heuristics provide adequate resolution for this class of problems. However, it is also found that, for some quantities, the discretization error is not small relative to sampling error, indicating that the

  7. Reliable numerical computation in an optimal output-feedback design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a reliable algorithm for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters. The algorithm is part of a design algorithm for optimal linear dynamic output-feedback controller that minimizes a finite-time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control-law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed-loop eigensystem. The algorithm has been included in a control design package for optimal robust low-order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm has been demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed-loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  8. Reliable numerical computation in an optimal output-feedback design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansteenwyk, Brett; Ly, Uy-Loi

    1991-01-01

    A reliable algorithm is presented for the evaluation of a quadratic performance index and its gradients with respect to the controller design parameters. The algorithm is a part of a design algorithm for optimal linear dynamic output-feedback controller that minimizes a finite-time quadratic performance index. The numerical scheme is particularly robust when it is applied to the control-law synthesis for systems with densely packed modes and where there is a high likelihood of encountering degeneracies in the closed-loop eigensystem. This approach through the use of an accurate Pade series approximation does not require the closed-loop system matrix to be diagonalizable. The algorithm was included in a control design package for optimal robust low-order controllers. Usefulness of the proposed numerical algorithm was demonstrated using numerous practical design cases where degeneracies occur frequently in the closed-loop system under an arbitrary controller design initialization and during the numerical search.

  9. Numerical computation of nonlinear normal modes in mechanical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renson, L.; Kerschen, G.; Cochelin, B.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reviews the recent advances in computational methods for nonlinear normal modes (NNMs). Different algorithms for the computation of undamped and damped NNMs are presented, and their respective advantages and limitations are discussed. The methods are illustrated using various applications ranging from low-dimensional weakly nonlinear systems to strongly nonlinear industrial structures.

  10. Condition and Error Estimates in Numerical Matrix Computations

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, M. M.; Petkov, P. H.

    2008-10-30

    This tutorial paper deals with sensitivity and error estimates in matrix computational processes. The main factors determining the accuracy of the result computed in floating--point machine arithmetics are considered. Special attention is paid to the perturbation analysis of matrix algebraic equations and unitary matrix decompositions.

  11. Base Numeration Systems and Introduction to Computer Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, K. Ed.; And Others

    This teaching guide is for the instructor of an introductory course in computer programming using FORTRAN language. Five FORTRAN programs are incorporated in this guide, which has been used as a FORTRAN IV SELF TEACHER. The base eight, base four, and base two concepts are integrated with FORTRAN computer programs, geoblock activities, and related…

  12. Numerical computation of space shuttle orbiter flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A new parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) code has been developed to compute the hypersonic, viscous chemically reacting flow fields around 3-D bodies. The flow medium is assumed to be a multicomponent mixture of thermally perfect but calorically imperfect gases. The new PNS code solves the gas dynamic and species conservation equations in a coupled manner using a noniterative, implicit, approximately factored, finite difference algorithm. The space-marching method is made well-posed by special treatment of the streamwise pressure gradient term. The code has been used to compute hypersonic laminar flow of chemically reacting air over cones at angle of attack. The results of the computations are compared with the results of reacting boundary-layer computations and show excellent agreement.

  13. A Computer-Based Intelligent Assessment System for Numeric Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Ashok; Kinshuk; Russell, David

    1998-01-01

    Describes an intelligent assessment system for numeric disciplines that works in conjunction with the intelligent tutoring tools developed by Teaching and Learning Technology (TLTP) Byzantium, a consortium of six U.K. universities. Topics include intelligent tutoring tools based on cognitive apprenticeship framework, a history of computerized…

  14. Laser beam scintillation beyond the turbulent atmosphere A numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.; Taylor, L. S.

    1976-01-01

    The extended Huygens-Fresnel formulation for propagation through turbulence is used to examine scintillation of a finite laser beam. The method is demonstrated analytically for propagation beyond a weak Gaussian phase screen. A numerical integration technique is used to extend the results to a more realistic turbulence model. Results are compared with existing Gaussian beam propagation theory.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics. [numerical methods and algorithm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This collection of papers was presented at the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at Ames Research Center in California on March 12 through 14, 1991. It is an overview of CFD activities at NASA Lewis Research Center. The main thrust of computational work at Lewis is aimed at propulsion systems. Specific issues related to propulsion CFD and associated modeling will also be presented. Examples of results obtained with the most recent algorithm development will also be presented.

  16. Review of numerical procedures for computational surface thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Models and equations for surface thermochemistry and near-surface thermophysics of aerodynamically heated thermal protection materials are reviewed, with particular emphasis on computational boundary conditions for surface mass and energy transfer. The surface energy and mass balances, coupled with an appropriate ablation or surface catalysis model, provide complete thermochemical boundary conditions for a true multidisciplinary solution of the fully coupled fluid-dynamics/solid mechanics problem. Practical approximate solutions can be obtained by using a detailed model with full thermophysics for either the solid or fluid phase and a semianalytic method for the other half of the problem. A significant increase in the state-of-the-art in aerothermal computational fluid dynamics is possible by uniting computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methodology with surface thermochemistry boundary conditions and the heat-balance-integral method.

  17. Computing numerically the access resistance of a pore.

    PubMed

    Aguilella-Arzo, Marcel; Aguilella, Vicente M; Eisenberg, R S

    2005-06-01

    The access resistance (AR) of a channel is an important component of the conductance of ion channels, particularly in wide and short channels, where it accounts for a substantial fraction of the total resistance to the movement of ions. The AR is usually calculated by using a classical and simple expression derived by Hall from electrostatics (J.E. Hall 1975 J. Gen. Phys. 66:531-532), though other expressions, both analytical and numerical, have been proposed. Here we report some numerical results for the AR of a channel obtained by solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations at the entrance of a circular pore. Agreement is found between numerical calculations and analytical results from Hall's equation for uncharged pores in neutral membranes. However, for channels embedded in charged membranes, Hall's expression overestimates the AR, which is much lower and can even be neglected in some cases. The weak dependence of AR on the pore radius for charged membranes at low salt concentration can be exploited to separate the channel and the access contributions to the measured conductance. PMID:15756588

  18. Numerical procedures for three-dimensional computational surface thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    Models and equations for surface thermochemistry and near-surface thermophysics of aerodynamically-heated thermal protection materials are reviewed, with particular emphasis on computational boundary conditions for surface mass and energy transfer. The surface energy and mass balances, coupled with an appropriate ablation or surface catalysis model, provide complete thermochemical boundary conditions for a true multidisciplinary solution of the fully coupled fluid-dynamics/solid mechanics problem. Practical approximate solutions can be obtained by using a detailed model with full thermophysics for either the solid or fluid phase amd a semianalytic method for the other half of the problem. A significant increase in the state-of-the-art in aerothermal computational fluid dynamics is possible by uniting CFD methodology with surface thermochemistry boundary conditions and the heat-balance-integral method.

  19. Convergence rate for numerical computation of the lattice Green's function.

    PubMed

    Ghazisaeidi, M; Trinkle, D R

    2009-03-01

    Flexible boundary-condition methods couple an isolated defect to bulk through the bulk lattice Green's function. Direct computation of the lattice Green's function requires projecting out the singular subspace of uniform displacements and forces for the infinite lattice. We calculate the convergence rates for elastically isotropic and anisotropic cases for three different techniques: relative displacement, elastic Green's function correction, and discontinuity correction. The discontinuity correction has the most rapid convergence for the general case. PMID:19392089

  20. Coordinate Systems, Numerical Objects and Algorithmic Operations of Computational Experiment in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Khramushin, Vasily

    2016-02-01

    The paper deals with the computer implementation of direct computational experiments in fluid mechanics, constructed on the basis of the approach developed by the authors. The proposed approach allows the use of explicit numerical scheme, which is an important condition for increasing the effciency of the algorithms developed by numerical procedures with natural parallelism. The paper examines the main objects and operations that let you manage computational experiments and monitor the status of the computation process. Special attention is given to a) realization of tensor representations of numerical schemes for direct simulation; b) realization of representation of large particles of a continuous medium motion in two coordinate systems (global and mobile); c) computing operations in the projections of coordinate systems, direct and inverse transformation in these systems. Particular attention is paid to the use of hardware and software of modern computer systems.

  1. Numerical computation of space shuttle heating and surface streamlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakich, J. V.; Lanfranco, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    Exact inviscid flow-field codes are used together with a quasi-three-dimensional boundary-layer analysis to provide estimates of the windward surface heating and streamline patterns of the shuttle orbiter vehicle. The accuracy and limitations of the methods are established by comparison with available wind-tunnel experiments and with more exact numerical solutions for simple flows. Flight predictions are presented showing the effects of finite-rate (nonequilibrium) chemical reactions, and the effects of varying boundary-layer edge conditions due to the growth of the boundary-layer into the inviscid flow (entropy layer swallowing). Differences between flow-field predictions at wind-tunnel and nominal flight conditions are discussed.

  2. Numerical computations of natural convection heat transfer in irregular geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glakpe, E. K.

    1987-01-01

    This report explains the determination of buoyancy driven flow characteristics and heat transfer in enclosures of complex geometrical shapes. Applications of buoyancy driven flows can be found in solar collector devices, energy conservation technologies, cooling of micro-electronic chips, and nuclear reactor spent fuel shipping configurations. The problem is further complicated when three dimensional effects, non-Boussinesq effects, turbulence, and heat transfer by radiation are accounted for in the overall balance of energy transfer. This study developed a capability to model and predict the heat transfer and flow characteristics in shipping cask configurations involving light water and fast reactor fuel assemblies. We explored the complex flow phenomena involved in these configurations to develop numerical prediction capabilities to obtain data for the design and/or thermal analysis of such shipping casks.

  3. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  4. Cosmic Reionization on Computers: Numerical and Physical Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper I show that simulations of reionization performed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project do converge in space and mass, albeit rather slowly. A fully converged solution (for a given star formation and feedback model) can be determined at a level of precision of about 20%, but such a solution is useless in practice, since achieving it in production-grade simulations would require a large set of runs at various mass and spatial resolutions, and computational resources for such an undertaking are not yet readily available. In order to make progress in the interim, I introduce a weak convergence correction factor in the star formation recipe, which allows one to approximate the fully converged solution with finite-resolution simulations. The accuracy of weakly converged simulations approaches a comparable, ~20% level of precision for star formation histories of individual galactic halos and other galactic properties that are directly related to star formation rates, such as stellar masses and metallicities. Yet other properties of model galaxies, for example, their H i masses, are recovered in the weakly converged runs only within a factor of 2.

  5. Cosmic Reionization On Computers: Numerical and Physical Convergence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper I show that simulations of reionization performed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers (CROC) project do converge in space and mass, albeit rather slowly. A fully converged solution (for a given star formation and feedback model) can be determined at a level of precision of about 20%, but such a solution is useless in practice, since achieving it in production-grade simulations would require a large set of runs at various mass and spatial resolutions, and computational resources for such an undertaking are not yet readily available. In order to make progress in the interim, I introduce amore » weak convergence correction factor in the star formation recipe, which allows one to approximate the fully converged solution with finite resolution simulations. The accuracy of weakly converged simulations approaches a comparable, ~20% level of precision for star formation histories of individual galactic halos and other galactic properties that are directly related to star formation rates, like stellar masses and metallicities. Yet other properties of model galaxies, for example, their HI masses, are recovered in the weakly converged runs only within a factor of two.« less

  6. Cosmic Reionization on Computers: Numerical and Physical Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper I show that simulations of reionization performed under the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project do converge in space and mass, albeit rather slowly. A fully converged solution (for a given star formation and feedback model) can be determined at a level of precision of about 20%, but such a solution is useless in practice, since achieving it in production-grade simulations would require a large set of runs at various mass and spatial resolutions, and computational resources for such an undertaking are not yet readily available. In order to make progress in the interim, I introduce a weak convergence correction factor in the star formation recipe, which allows one to approximate the fully converged solution with finite-resolution simulations. The accuracy of weakly converged simulations approaches a comparable, ~20% level of precision for star formation histories of individual galactic halos and other galactic properties that are directly related to star formation rates, such as stellar masses and metallicities. Yet other properties of model galaxies, for example, their H I masses, are recovered in the weakly converged runs only within a factor of 2.

  7. Computed microtomography and numerical study of porous rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielecki, J.; Jarzyna, J.; Bożek, S.; Lekki, J.; Stachura, Z.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    Measurement of physical properties of porous geological materials is a crucial issue in oil and gas recovery industry. A conventional experimental way to obtain information on porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and permeability are the intrusion porosimetry and permeameter measurement. However, in this approach Washburn's equation is usually used, thus approximation of cylindrical pore shapes is made. However, in recent times the computed microtomography (CMT) technique is more widely used in geoscience (Appoloni et al., 2007). We have already reported preliminary results of investigation of elemental content, microporosity, and specific surface area of porous rocks by means of the CMT technique based on a laboratory source (Bielecki et al., 2012). In this paper, results of complex study of porous rock samples with the use of X-ray CMT (laboratory-source-based facility and synchrotron radiation source) combined with permeability tensor computation by means of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) are presented. Moreover, the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) method was additionally used for elemental content determination of pores-filling substance.

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Numerical Relativity: Solving Einstein's Equations on the Computer Numerical Relativity: Solving Einstein's Equations on the Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Numerical relativity is one of the major fields of contemporary general relativity and is developing continually. Yet three years ago, no textbook was available on this subject. The first textbook devoted to numerical relativity, by Alcubierre, appeared in 2008 [1] (cf the CQG review [2]). Now comes the second book, by Baumgarte and Shapiro, two well known players in the field. Inevitably, the two books have some common aspects (otherwise they would not deal with the same topic!). For instance the titles of the first four chapters of Baumgarte and Shapiro are very similar to those of Alcubierre. This arises from some logic inherent to the subject: chapter 1 recaps basic GR, chapter 2 introduces the 3+1 formalism, chapter 3 focuses on the initial data and chapter 4 on the choice of coordinates for the evolution. But there are also many differences between the two books, which actually make them complementary. At first glance the differences are the size (720 pages for Baumgarte and Shapiro vs 464 pages for Alcubierre) and the colour figures in Baumgarte and Shapiro. Regarding the content, Baumgarte and Shapiro address many topics which are not present in Alcubierre's book, such as magnetohydrodynamics, radiative transfer, collisionless matter, spectral methods, rotating stars and post-Newtonian approximation. The main difference regards binary systems: virtually absent from Alcubierre's book (except for binary black hole initial data), they occupy not less than five chapters in Baumgarte and Shapiro's book. In contrast, gravitational wave extraction, various hyperbolic formulations of Einstein's equations and the high-resolution shock-capturing schemes are treated in more depth by Alcubierre. In the first four chapters mentioned above, some distinctive features of Baumgarte and Shapiro's book are the beautiful treatment of Oppenheimer-Snyder collapse in chapter 1, the analogy with Maxwell's equations when discussing the constraints and the evolution equations in

  9. Numerical solutions of acoustic wave propagation problems using Euler computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports solution procedures for problems arising from the study of engine inlet wave propagation. The first problem is the study of sound waves radiated from cylindrical inlets. The second one is a quasi-one-dimensional problem to study the effect of nonlinearities and the third one is the study of nonlinearities in two dimensions. In all three problems Euler computations are done with a fourth-order explicit scheme. For the first problem results are shown in agreement with experimental data and for the second problem comparisons are made with an existing asymptotic theory. The third problem is part of an ongoing work and preliminary results are presented for this case.

  10. Numerical method for computing flow through partially saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, R. R.

    This paper discusses the development of the finite element computer code SAGUARO which calculates the two-dimensional flow of mass and energy through porous media. The media may be saturated or partially saturated. SAGUARO solves the parabolic time-dependent mass transport equation which accounts for the presence of partially saturated zones through the use of highly non-linear material characteristic curves. The energy equation accounts for the possibility of partially-saturated regions by adjusting the thermal capacitances and thermal conductivities according to the volume fraction of water present in the local pores. The code capabilities are demonstrated through the presentation of a sample problem involving the one dimensional calculation of simultaneous energy transfer and water infiltration into partially saturated hard rock.

  11. Numerical computation of three-dimensional turbulent flow in tightly curved ducts and spiral turbine casings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang-Ho

    Three-dimensional computation of turbulent flow in curved ducts and spiral turbine casings is performed. Mathematical models are described by basic equations resolved by a developed numerical partial parabolic computation procedure. Effect of turbulent oscillations on friction force is analyzed by Prandtl mixing length flow theory. Computational procedure is tested on a 90 deg curved channel. Main flow characteristics, secondary flow, double vortex formation, retroaction, and outlet boundary conditions are considered. Mathematical and experimental results are concordant.

  12. Geometric invariants for initial data sets: analysis, exact solutions, computer algebra, numerics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiente Kroon, Juan A.

    2011-09-01

    A personal perspective on the interaction of analytical, numerical and computer algebra methods in classical Relativity is given. This discussion is inspired by the problem of the construction of invariants that characterise key solutions to the Einstein field equations. It is claimed that this kind of ideas will be or importance in the analysis of dynamical black hole spacetimes by either analytical or numerical methods.

  13. Vectorization on the star computer of several numerical methods for a fluid flow problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    A reexamination of some numerical methods is considered in light of the new class of computers which use vector streaming to achieve high computation rates. A study has been made of the effect on the relative efficiency of several numerical methods applied to a particular fluid flow problem when they are implemented on a vector computer. The method of Brailovskaya, the alternating direction implicit method, a fully implicit method, and a new method called partial implicitization have been applied to the problem of determining the steady state solution of the two-dimensional flow of a viscous imcompressible fluid in a square cavity driven by a sliding wall. Results are obtained for three mesh sizes and a comparison is made of the methods for serial computation.

  14. Some remarks on the numerical computation of integrals on an unbounded interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capobianco, M.; Criscuolo, G.

    2007-08-01

    An account of the error and the convergence theory is given for Gauss?Laguerre and Gauss?Radau?Laguerre quadrature formulae. We develop also truncated models of the original Gauss rules to compute integrals extended over the positive real axis. Numerical examples confirming the theoretical results are given comparing these rules among themselves and with different quadrature formulae proposed by other authors (Evans, Int. J. Comput. Math. 82:721?730, 2005; Gautschi, BIT 31:438?446, 1991).

  15. Verifying the error bound of numerical computation implemented in computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Jun

    2013-03-12

    A verification tool receives a finite precision definition for an approximation of an infinite precision numerical function implemented in a processor in the form of a polynomial of bounded functions. The verification tool receives a domain for verifying outputs of segments associated with the infinite precision numerical function. The verification tool splits the domain into at least two segments, wherein each segment is non-overlapping with any other segment and converts, for each segment, a polynomial of bounded functions for the segment to a simplified formula comprising a polynomial, an inequality, and a constant for a selected segment. The verification tool calculates upper bounds of the polynomial for the at least two segments, beginning with the selected segment and reports the segments that violate a bounding condition.

  16. Numerical study of a quasi-hydrodynamic system of equations for flow computation at small mach numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, V. A.; Savenkov, E. B.

    2015-10-01

    The applicability of numerical algorithms based on a quasi-hydrodynamic system of equations for computing viscous heat-conducting compressible gas flows at Mach numbers M = 10-2-10-1 is studied numerically. The numerical algorithm is briefly described, and the results obtained for a number of two- and three-dimensional test problems are presented and compared with earlier numerical data.

  17. Technology and Jobs: Computer-Aided Design. Numerical-Control Machine-Tool Operators. Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Michael; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Three reports on the effects of high technology on the nature of work include (1) Stanton on applications and implications of computer-aided design for engineers, drafters, and architects; (2) Nardone on the outlook and training of numerical-control machine tool operators; and (3) Austin and Drake on the future of clerical occupations in automated…

  18. CNC Turning Center Advanced Operations. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-332.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.; Tatum, Kenneth

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to introduce the student to the operations and functions of a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 presents course expectations and syllabus, covers safety precautions, and describes the CNC turning center components, CNC…

  19. The Improvement of Efficiency in the Numerical Computation of Orbit Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, J.; Danchick, R.; Pierce, S.; Haney, R.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis, system design, programming, and evaluation of results are described for numerical computation of orbit trajectories. Evaluation of generalized methods, interaction of different formulations for satellite motion, transformation of equations of motion and integrator loads, and development of efficient integrators are also considered.

  20. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized. The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics in order to extend and improve problem solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space.

  1. CNC Turning Center Operations and Prove Out. Computer Numerical Control Operator/Programmer. 444-334.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronski, Steven D.

    This student guide provides materials for a course designed to instruct the student in the recommended procedures used when setting up tooling and verifying part programs for a two-axis computer numerical control (CNC) turning center. The course consists of seven units. Unit 1 discusses course content and reviews and demonstrates set-up procedures…

  2. Plans and resources required for a computer numerically controlled machine tool tester

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, L.E.; Burleson, R.R.; McCue, H.K.; Pomernacki, C.L.; Mansfield, A.R.; Childs, J.J.

    1982-07-19

    Precision computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine tools present unique and especially difficult problems in the areas of qualification and fault isolation. In this report, we examine and classify these problems, discuss methods to resolve them effectively, and present estimates of the resources needed to design and build a CNC/machine tool tester.

  3. CINDA-3G: Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer Program for Third-Generation Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaski, J. D.; Lewis, D. R.; Thompson, L. R.

    1970-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a new and versatile program to supplement or replace the original Chrysler Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (CINDA) thermal analyzer program in order to take advantage of the improved systems software and machine speeds of the third-generation computers.

  4. Numerical computation of 2D Sommerfeld integrals - Decomposition of the angular integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Steven L.; Kuester, Edward F.

    1992-02-01

    The computational efficiency of the 2D Sommerfeld integrals is shown to undergo improvement through the discovery of novel ways to compute the inner angular integral in polar representations. It is shown that the angular integral can be decomposed into a finite number of incomplete Lipschitz-Hankel integrals; these can in turn be calculated through a series of expansions, so that the angular integral can be computed by summing a series rather than applying a standard numerical integration algorithm. The technique is most efficient and accurate when piecewise-sinusoidal basis functions are employed to analyze a printed strip-dipole antenna in a layered medium.

  5. On the susceptibility of numerical methods to computational chaos and superstability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varsakelis, C.; Anagnostidis, P.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the susceptibility of the forward and the backward Euler methods to computational chaos and superstability is investigated via the means of both a theoretical analysis and numerical experiments. A linear stability analysis of the fixed points and the periodic orbits of the maps induced by these methods asserts that, for large enough time-steps Δt, these maps undergo bifurcations and as result the acquired solutions are spurious. More specifically, it is shown that the backward Euler method suppresses chaotic behavior, whereas the forward Euler renders all linearly stable fixed points and periodic orbits of its induced map linearly unstable. Numerical experiments that illustrate the validity of the theoretical analysis are also presented and discussed. For the forward Euler method, in particular, the computation of bifurcation diagrams, the Maximum Lyapunov exponent and the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy suggest that it can engender computational chaos.

  6. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period October 1, 1983 through March 31, 1984 is summarized.

  7. Summary of research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1988 through March 31, 1989 is summarized.

  8. A comparison of digital computer programs for the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    Recently the determination of the best technique for numerically solving systems of ordinary differential equations on a digital computer has received much attention. The use of these formulas in conjunction with a stepsize control developed is explained, and one of the formulas is chosen for comparison with other integration techniques. This comparison of one of the best of Fehlberg's formulas with the different numerical techniques described in previous studies on a variety of test problems clearly shows the superiority of Fehlberg's formula. That is, on each of the test problems, the chosen Fehlberg formula is able to achieve a given accuracy in less computer time than any of the other techniques tested. Also, the computer program for the chosen Fehlberg formula is less complex and easier to use than the computer programs for most of the other techniques. To illustrate the use of the chosen Fehlberg formula, a computer listing of its application to several example problems is included along with a sample of the computer output from these applications.

  9. Stochastic reduced order computational model of structures having numerous local elastic modes in low frequency dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, A.; Batou, A.; Soize, C.; Gagliardini, L.

    2013-08-01

    This paper is devoted to the construction of a stochastic reduced order computational model of structures having numerous local elastic modes in low frequency dynamics. We are particularly interested in automotive vehicles which are made up of stiff parts and flexible components. This type of structure is characterized by the fact that it exhibits, in the low frequency range, not only the classical global elastic modes but also numerous local elastic modes which cannot easily be separated from the global elastic modes. To solve this difficult problem, an innovative method has recently been proposed for constructing a reduced order computational dynamical model adapted to this particular situation for the low frequency range. Then a new adapted generalized eigenvalue problem is introduced and allows a global vector basis to be constructed for the global displacements space. This method requires to decompose the domain of the structure into sub-domains. Such a decomposition is carried out using the Fast Marching Method. This global vector basis is then used to construct the reduced order computational model. Since there are model uncertainties induced by modeling errors in the computational model, the nonparametric probabilistic approach of uncertainties is used and implemented in the reduced order computational model. The methodology is applied to a complex computational model of an automotive vehicle.

  10. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  11. Re-Computation of Numerical Results Contained in NACA Report No. 496

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Boyd, III

    2015-01-01

    An extensive examination of NACA Report No. 496 (NACA 496), "General Theory of Aerodynamic Instability and the Mechanism of Flutter," by Theodore Theodorsen, is described. The examination included checking equations and solution methods and re-computing interim quantities and all numerical examples in NACA 496. The checks revealed that NACA 496 contains computational shortcuts (time- and effort-saving devices for engineers of the time) and clever artifices (employed in its solution methods), but, unfortunately, also contains numerous tripping points (aspects of NACA 496 that have the potential to cause confusion) and some errors. The re-computations were performed employing the methods and procedures described in NACA 496, but using modern computational tools. With some exceptions, the magnitudes and trends of the original results were in fair-to-very-good agreement with the re-computed results. The exceptions included what are speculated to be computational errors in the original in some instances and transcription errors in the original in others. Independent flutter calculations were performed and, in all cases, including those where the original and re-computed results differed significantly, were in excellent agreement with the re-computed results. Appendix A contains NACA 496; Appendix B contains a Matlab(Reistered) program that performs the re-computation of results; Appendix C presents three alternate solution methods, with examples, for the two-degree-of-freedom solution method of NACA 496; Appendix D contains the three-degree-of-freedom solution method (outlined in NACA 496 but never implemented), with examples.

  12. Numerical characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems using parallel computing: The role of GPUS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazanaro, Filipe I.; Soriano, Diogo C.; Suyama, Ricardo; Madrid, Marconi K.; Oliveira, José Raimundo de; Muñoz, Ignacio Bravo; Attux, Romis

    2016-08-01

    The characterization of nonlinear dynamical systems and their attractors in terms of invariant measures, basins of attractions and the structure of their vector fields usually outlines a task strongly related to the underlying computational cost. In this work, the practical aspects related to the use of parallel computing - specially the use of Graphics Processing Units (GPUS) and of the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) - are reviewed and discussed in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems characterization. In this work such characterization is performed by obtaining both local and global Lyapunov exponents for the classical forced Duffing oscillator. The local divergence measure was employed by the computation of the Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSS), revealing the general organization of the flow according to the obtained separatrices, while the global Lyapunov exponents were used to characterize the attractors obtained under one or more bifurcation parameters. These simulation sets also illustrate the required computation time and speedup gains provided by different parallel computing strategies, justifying the employment and the relevance of GPUS and CUDA in such extensive numerical approach. Finally, more than simply providing an overview supported by a representative set of simulations, this work also aims to be a unified introduction to the use of the mentioned parallel computing tools in the context of nonlinear dynamical systems, providing codes and examples to be executed in MATLAB and using the CUDA environment, something that is usually fragmented in different scientific communities and restricted to specialists on parallel computing strategies.

  13. A numerical method for computing initial conditions of Lagrangian invariant tori using the frequency map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Alejandro; Villanueva, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    We present a numerical method for computing initial conditions of Lagrangian quasi-periodic invariant tori of Hamiltonian systems and symplectic maps. Such initial conditions are found by solving, using the Newton method, a nonlinear system obtained by imposing suitable conditions on the frequency map. The basic tool is a newly developed methodology to perform the frequency analysis of a discrete quasi-periodic signal, allowing to compute frequencies and their derivatives with respect to parameters. Roughly speaking, this method consists in computing suitable weighted averages of the iterates of the signal and using the Richardson extrapolation method. The proposed approach performs with high accuracy at a moderate computational cost. We illustrate the method by considering a discrete FPU model and the vicinity of the point L4 in a RTBP.

  14. Computational flow development for unsteady viscous flows: Foundation of the numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Spehert, T.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure is presented for effective consideration of viscous effects in computational development of high Reynolds number flows. The procedure is based on the interpretation of the Navier-Stokes equations as vorticity transport equations. The physics of the flow was represented in a form suitable for numerical analysis. Lighthill's concept for flow development for computational purposes was adapted. The vorticity transport equations were cast in a form convenient for computation. A statement for these equations was written using the method of weighted residuals and applying the Galerkin criterion. An integral representation of the induced velocity was applied on the basis of the Biot-Savart law. Distribution of new vorticity, produced at wing surfaces over small computational time intervals, was assumed to be confined to a thin region around the wing surfaces.

  15. Human-computer interfaces applied to numerical solution of the Plateau problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias Fabris, Antonio; Soares Bandeira, Ivana; Ramos Batista, Valério

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present a code in Matlab to solve the Problem of Plateau numerically, and the code will include human-computer interface. The Problem of Plateau has applications in areas of knowledge like, for instance, Computer Graphics. The solution method will be the same one of the Surface Evolver, but the difference will be a complete graphical interface with the user. This will enable us to implement other kinds of interface like ocular mouse, voice, touch, etc. To date, Evolver does not include any graphical interface, which restricts its use by the scientific community. Specially, its use is practically impossible for most of the Physically Challenged People.

  16. FREQFIT: Computer program which performs numerical regression and statistical chi-squared goodness of fit analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hofland, G.S.; Barton, C.C.

    1990-10-01

    The computer program FREQFIT is designed to perform regression and statistical chi-squared goodness of fit analysis on one-dimensional or two-dimensional data. The program features an interactive user dialogue, numerous help messages, an option for screen or line printer output, and the flexibility to use practically any commercially available graphics package to create plots of the program`s results. FREQFIT is written in Microsoft QuickBASIC, for IBM-PC compatible computers. A listing of the QuickBASIC source code for the FREQFIT program, a user manual, and sample input data, output, and plots are included. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Problem-Oriented Simulation Packages and Computational Infrastructure for Numerical Studies of Powerful Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, M.; Sabchevski, S.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Vasileva, E.; Balabanova, E.; Dankov, P.; Malinov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Powerful gyrotrons are necessary as sources of strong microwaves for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) of magnetically confined plasmas in various reactors (most notably ITER) for controlled thermonuclear fusion. Adequate physical models and efficient problem-oriented software packages are essential tools for numerical studies, analysis, optimization and computer-aided design (CAD) of such high-performance gyrotrons operating in a CW mode and delivering output power of the order of 1-2 MW. In this report we present the current status of our simulation tools (physical models, numerical codes, pre- and post-processing programs, etc.) as well as the computational infrastructure on which they are being developed, maintained and executed.

  18. Some recent progress in transonic flow computation. [flow distribution, numerical optimization, and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Although the development of a finite difference relaxation procedure to solve the steady form of equations of motion gave birth to the study of computational transonic aerodynamics and considerable progress has been made using the small disturbance theory, no general analytical solution method yet exists for transonic flows that include three dimensional unsteady, and viscous effects. Two techniques are described which are useful in computational transonic aerodynamics applications. The finite volume method simplifies the application of boundary conditions without introducing the constriction associated with small disturbance theory. Governing equations are solved in a Cartesian coordinate system using a body-oriented and shock-oriented mesh network. Only the volume and surface normal directions of the volume elements must be known. The other method, configuration design by numerical optimization, can be used by aircraft designers to develop configurations that satisfy specific geometric performance constraints. Two examples of airfoil design by numerical optimization are presented.

  19. Multiresolution Wavelet Based Adaptive Numerical Dissipation Control for Shock-Turbulence Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjoegreen, B.; Yee, H. C.

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed essentially fourth-order or higher low dissipative shock-capturing scheme of Yee, Sandham and Djomehri (1999) aimed at minimizing nu- merical dissipations for high speed compressible viscous flows containing shocks, shears and turbulence. To detect non smooth behavior and control the amount of numerical dissipation to be added, Yee et al. employed an artificial compression method (ACM) of Harten (1978) but utilize it in an entirely different context than Harten originally intended. The ACM sensor consists of two tuning parameters and is highly physical problem dependent. To minimize the tuning of parameters and physical problem dependence, new sensors with improved detection properties are proposed. The new sensors are derived from utilizing appropriate non-orthogonal wavelet basis functions and they can be used to completely switch to the extra numerical dissipation outside shock layers. The non-dissipative spatial base scheme of arbitrarily high order of accuracy can be maintained without compromising its stability at all parts of the domain where the solution is smooth. Two types of redundant non-orthogonal wavelet basis functions are considered. One is the B-spline wavelet (Mallat & Zhong 1992) used by Gerritsen and Olsson (1996) in an adaptive mesh refinement method, to determine regions where re nement should be done. The other is the modification of the multiresolution method of Harten (1995) by converting it to a new, redundant, non-orthogonal wavelet. The wavelet sensor is then obtained by computing the estimated Lipschitz exponent of a chosen physical quantity (or vector) to be sensed on a chosen wavelet basis function. Both wavelet sensors can be viewed as dual purpose adaptive methods leading to dynamic numerical dissipation control and improved grid adaptation indicators. Consequently, they are useful not only for shock-turbulence computations but also for computational aeroacoustics and numerical combustion. In addition, these

  20. Improvements of the KIVA-II computer program for numerical combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, P. J.; Amsden, A. A.; Butler, T. D.; McKinley, T. L.

    This paper describes and illustrates the principal differences between the newly-released KIVA-II and the KIVA computer programs. Both programs are for the numerical calculation of two- and three-dimensional fluid flows with chemical reactions and sprays. Because of improvements to KIVA-II, it is faster, more accurate, and applicable to a wider variety of problems involving combustion and two-phase flow.

  1. Coupling artificial intelligence and numerical computation for engineering design (Invited paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of combining artificial intelligence (AI) systems and numerical computation methods for engineering designs is considered. Attention is given to three possible areas of application involving fan design, controlled vortex design of turbine stage blade angles, and preliminary design of turbine cascade profiles. Among the AI techniques discussed are: knowledge-based systems; intelligent search; and pattern recognition systems. The potential cost and performance advantages of an AI-based design-generation system are discussed in detail.

  2. Computationally Efficient Numerical Model for the Evolution of Directional Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malej, M.; Choi, W.; Goullet, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of this work has been the asymptotic and numerical modeling of weakly nonlinear ocean surface wave fields. In particular, a development of an efficient numerical model for the evolution of nonlinear ocean waves, including extreme waves known as Rogue/Freak waves, is of direct interest. Due to their elusive and destructive nature, the media often portrays Rogue waves as unimaginatively huge and unpredictable monsters of the sea. To address some of these concerns, derivations of reduced phase-resolving numerical models, based on the small wave steepness assumption, are presented and their corresponding numerical simulations via Fourier pseudo-spectral methods are discussed. The simulations are initialized with a well-known JONSWAP wave spectrum and different angular distributions are employed. Both deterministic and Monte-Carlo ensemble average simulations were carried out. Furthermore, this work concerns the development of a new computationally efficient numerical model for the short term prediction of evolving weakly nonlinear ocean surface waves. The derivations are originally based on the work of West et al. (1987) and since the waves in the ocean tend to travel primarily in one direction, the aforementioned new numerical model is derived with an additional assumption of a weak transverse dependence. In turn, comparisons of the ensemble averaged randomly initialized spectra, as well as deterministic surface-to-surface correlations are presented. The new model is shown to behave well in various directional wave fields and can potentially be a candidate for computationally efficient prediction and propagation of extreme ocean surface waves - Rogue/Freak waves.

  3. Multiple burn fuel-optimal orbit transfers: Numerical trajectory computation and neighboring optimal feedback guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C.-H.; Goodson, Troy D.; Ledsinger, Laura A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes current work in the numerical computation of multiple burn, fuel-optimal orbit transfers and presents an analysis of the second variation for extremal multiple burn orbital transfers as well as a discussion of a guidance scheme which may be implemented for such transfers. The discussion of numerical computation focuses on the use of multivariate interpolation to aid the computation in the numerical optimization. The second variation analysis includes the development of the conditions for the examination of both fixed and free final time transfers. Evaluations for fixed final time are presented for extremal one, two, and three burn solutions of the first variation. The free final time problem is considered for an extremal two burn solution. In addition, corresponding changes of the second variation formulation over thrust arcs and coast arcs are included. The guidance scheme discussed is an implicit scheme which implements a neighboring optimal feedback guidance strategy to calculate both thrust direction and thrust on-off times.

  4. Numerical Computation of a Continuous-thrust State Transition Matrix Incorporating Accurate Hardware and Ephemeris Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald; Conway, Bruce; Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A significant body of work exists showing that providing a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver with expressions for the problem constraint gradient substantially increases the speed of program execution and can also improve the robustness of convergence, especially for local optimizers. Calculation of these derivatives is often accomplished through the computation of spacecraft's state transition matrix (STM). If the two-body gravitational model is employed as is often done in the context of preliminary design, closed form expressions for these derivatives may be provided. If a high fidelity dynamics model, that might include perturbing forces such as the gravitational effect from multiple third bodies and solar radiation pressure is used then these STM's must be computed numerically. We present a method for the power hardward model and a full ephemeris model. An adaptive-step embedded eight order Dormand-Prince numerical integrator is discussed and a method for the computation of the time of flight derivatives in this framework is presented. The use of these numerically calculated derivatieves offer a substantial improvement over finite differencing in the context of a global optimizer. Specifically the inclusion of these STM's into the low thrust missiondesign tool chain in use at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center allows for an increased preliminary mission design cadence.

  5. Virtual photons in imaginary time: Computing exact Casimir forces via standard numerical electromagnetism techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Alejandro; Ibanescu, Mihai; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2007-09-15

    We describe a numerical method to compute Casimir forces in arbitrary geometries, for arbitrary dielectric and metallic materials, with arbitrary accuracy (given sufficient computational resources). Our approach, based on well-established integration of the mean stress tensor evaluated via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, is designed to directly exploit fast methods developed for classical computational electromagnetism, since it only involves repeated evaluation of the Green's function for imaginary frequencies (equivalently, real frequencies in imaginary time). We develop the approach by systematically examining various formulations of Casimir forces from the previous decades and evaluating them according to their suitability for numerical computation. We illustrate our approach with a simple finite-difference frequency-domain implementation, test it for known geometries such as a cylinder and a plate, and apply it to new geometries. In particular, we show that a pistonlike geometry of two squares sliding between metal walls, in both two and three dimensions with both perfect and realistic metallic materials, exhibits a surprising nonmonotonic ''lateral'' force from the walls.

  6. Modern numerical techniques and software for photo- and thermoemission electron optical systems computer-aided design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrski, Mikhail A.; Andreev, Sergei V.; Gaidukova, Inna S.; Tarasov, Victor A.; Filachev, Anatoly M.

    1997-09-01

    The paper is devoted to software development for simulation, optimization, and computer-aided design of photo/thermo- emission electron optical systems and units. The first part of the paper presents the applied program package (APP) 'ELIMDYNAMICS\\ intended for computer-aided design of dynamic photo-emission image tubes with electro/magnetostatic focusing and deflection (streak tubes). The developed software allows highly precise computation of basic image quality characteristics both in static and streak modes. One of the main advantages of the new program version presented is that 'through' electron beam computation from the photocathode to image receiver is available with regard to dynamic aberrations caused by scattering fields located nearby the edges of deflecting plates. In the second part, the possibility is shown to generalize some numerical techniques being effectively applied in photo-emission imaging electron optics (namely, the (tau) -variation - and the first kind integral equations techniques) to simulation of the thermo-emission electron beam technology units. Functions of the new APP 'CHARGE' are presented, and some numerical aspects of the self-coordinated problem are discussed.

  7. International Symposium on Computational Electronics—Physical Modeling, Mathematical Theory, and Numerical Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiming

    2007-12-01

    This symposium is an open forum for discussion on the current trends and future directions of physical modeling, mathematical theory, and numerical algorithm in electrical and electronic engineering. The goal is for computational scientists and engineers, computer scientists, applied mathematicians, physicists, and researchers to present their recent advances and exchange experience. We welcome contributions from researchers of academia and industry. All papers to be presented in this symposium have carefully been reviewed and selected. They include semiconductor devices, circuit theory, statistical signal processing, design optimization, network design, intelligent transportation system, and wireless communication. Welcome to this interdisciplinary symposium in International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering (ICCMSE 2007). Look forward to seeing you in Corfu, Greece!

  8. Poisson Green's function method for increased computational efficiency in numerical calculations of Coulomb coupling elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Anke; Kuhn, Sandra; Richter, Marten

    2016-01-01

    Often, the calculation of Coulomb coupling elements for quantum dynamical treatments, e.g., in cluster or correlation expansion schemes, requires the evaluation of a six dimensional spatial integral. Therefore, it represents a significant limiting factor in quantum mechanical calculations. If the size or the complexity of the investigated system increases, many coupling elements need to be determined. The resulting computational constraints require an efficient method for a fast numerical calculation of the Coulomb coupling. We present a computational method to reduce the numerical complexity by decreasing the number of spatial integrals for arbitrary geometries. We use a Green's function formulation of the Coulomb coupling and introduce a generalized scalar potential as solution of a generalized Poisson equation with a generalized charge density as the inhomogeneity. That enables a fast calculation of Coulomb coupling elements and, additionally, a straightforward inclusion of boundary conditions and arbitrarily spatially dependent dielectrics through the Coulomb Green's function. Particularly, if many coupling elements are included, the presented method, which is not restricted to specific symmetries of the model, presents a promising approach for increasing the efficiency of numerical calculations of the Coulomb interaction. To demonstrate the wide range of applications, we calculate internanostructure couplings, such as the Förster coupling, and illustrate the inclusion of symmetry considerations in the method for the Coulomb coupling between bound quantum dot states and unbound continuum states.

  9. Spatial correlations in intense ionospheric scintillations - comparison between numerical computation and observation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, H.

    1987-06-01

    The spatial correlations in intense ionospheric scintillations were analyzed by comparing numerical results with observational ones. The observational results were obtained by spaced-receiver scintillation measurements of VHF satellite radiowave. The numerical computation was made by using the fourth-order moment equation with fairly realistic ionospheric irregularity models, in which power-law irregularities with spectral index 4, both thin and thick slabs, and both isotropic and anisotropic irregularities, were considered. Evolution of the S(4) index and the transverse correlation function was computed. The numerical result that the transverse correlation distance decreases with the increase in S(4) was consistent with that obtained in the observation, suggesting that multiple scattering plays an important role in the intense scintillations observed. The anisotropy of irregularities proved to act as if the density fluctuation increased. This effect, as well as the effect of slab thickness, was evaluated by the total phase fluctuations that the radiowave experienced in the slab. On the basis of the comparison, the irregularity height and electron-density fluctuation which is necessary to produce a particular strength of scintillation were estimated. 30 references.

  10. Numerically Exact Computer Simulations of Light Scattering by Densely Packed, Random Particulate Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Janna M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    Direct computer simulations of electromagnetic scattering by discrete random media have become an active area of research. In this progress review, we summarize and analyze our main results obtained by means of numerically exact computer solutions of the macroscopic Maxwell equations. We consider finite scattering volumes with size parameters in the range, composed of varying numbers of randomly distributed particles with different refractive indices. The main objective of our analysis is to examine whether all backscattering effects predicted by the low-density theory of coherent backscattering (CB) also take place in the case of densely packed media. Based on our extensive numerical data we arrive at the following conclusions: (i) all backscattering effects predicted by the asymptotic theory of CB can also take place in the case of densely packed media; (ii) in the case of very large particle packing density, scattering characteristics of discrete random media can exhibit behavior not predicted by the low-density theories of CB and radiative transfer; (iii) increasing the absorptivity of the constituent particles can either enhance or suppress typical manifestations of CB depending on the particle packing density and the real part of the refractive index. Our numerical data strongly suggest that spectacular backscattering effects identified in laboratory experiments and observed for a class of high-albedo Solar System objects are caused by CB.

  11. What numerical models can and cannot tell us: Limitations on inferences in computational geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Wiel, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Computer simulations and numerical experiments have become an increasingly important part of geomorphological investigation in the last decades. Process-based numerical models attempt to simulate real-world processes in a virtual environment which can be easily manipulated and studied. Conceptually, the experimental design of these simulation studies broadly falls in one of three categories: predictive modelling, explanatory modelling, and exploratory modelling. However, the epistemologies of these three modes of modelling are as of yet incomplete and not fully understood. Not only do the three modes of modelling have different underlying assumptions, they also have different criteria to establish validity and different limitations on the interpretations and inferences that can be made. These differences are usually only implicitly recognized, if at all, in computational geomorphology studies. This presentation provides an explicit, though not necessarily exhaustive, overview of the epistemological differences between the three modes of computational modelling, and of the limitations this imposes on what can and cannot be learned from simulation experiments.

  12. Numerical computation of the effective-one-body potential q using self-force results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; van de Meent, Maarten

    2016-03-01

    The effective-one-body theory (EOB) describes the conservative dynamics of compact binary systems in terms of an effective Hamiltonian approach. The Hamiltonian for moderately eccentric motion of two nonspinning compact objects in the extreme mass-ratio limit is given in terms of three potentials: a (v ) , d ¯ (v ) , q (v ) . By generalizing the first law of mechanics for (nonspinning) black hole binaries to eccentric orbits, [A. Le Tiec, Phys. Rev. D 92, 084021 (2015).] recently obtained new expressions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in terms of quantities that can be readily computed using the gravitational self-force approach. Using these expressions we present a new computation of the EOB potential q (v ) by combining results from two independent numerical self-force codes. We determine q (v ) for inverse binary separations in the range 1 /1200 ≤v ≲1 /6 . Our computation thus provides the first-ever strong-field results for q (v ) . We also obtain d ¯ (v ) in our entire domain to a fractional accuracy of ≳10-8 . We find that our results are compatible with the known post-Newtonian expansions for d ¯(v ) and q (v ) in the weak field, and agree with previous (less accurate) numerical results for d ¯(v ) in the strong field.

  13. Large-scale numerical simulation of laser propulsion by parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yaoyuan; Zhao, Wentao; Wang, Zhenghua

    2013-05-01

    As one of the most significant methods to study laser propelled rocket, the numerical simulation of laser propulsion has drawn an ever increasing attention at present. Nevertheless, the traditional serial simulation model cannot satisfy the practical needs because of insatiable memory overhead and considerable computation time. In order to solve this problem, we study on a general algorithm for laser propulsion design, and bring about parallelization by using a twolevel hybrid parallel programming model. The total computing domain is decomposed into distributed data spaces, and each partition is assigned to a MPI process. A single step of computation operates in the inter loop level, where a compiler directive is used to split MPI process into several OpenMP threads. Finally, parallel efficiency of hybrid program about two typical configurations on a China-made supercomputer with 4 to 256 cores is compared with pure MPI program. And, the hybrid program exhibits better performance than the pure MPI program on the whole, roughly as expected. The result indicates that our hybrid parallel approach is effective and practical in large-scale numerical simulation of laser propulsion.

  14. Numerical computation of three-dimensional blunt body flow fields with an impinging shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    A time-marching finite-difference method was used to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for the three-dimensional wing-leading-edge shock impingement problem. The bow shock was treated as a discontinuity across which the exact shock jump conditions were applied. All interior shock layer detail such as shear layers, shock waves, jets, and the wall boundary layer were automatically captured in the solution. The impinging shock was introduced by discontinuously changing the freestream conditions across the intersection line at the bow shock. A special storage-saving procedure for sweeping through the finite-difference mesh was developed which reduces the required amount of computer storage by at least a factor of two without sacrificing the execution time. Numerical results are presented for infinite cylinder blunt body cases as well as the three-dimensional shock impingement case. The numerical results are compared with existing experimental and theoretical results.

  15. SIVEH: numerical computing simulation of wireless energy-harvesting sensor nodes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Antonio; Blanc, Sara; Climent, Salvador; Yuste, Pedro; Ors, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents a numerical energy harvesting model for sensor nodes, SIVEH (Simulator I-V for EH), based on I-V hardware tracking. I-V tracking is demonstrated to be more accurate than traditional energy modeling techniques when some of the components present different power dissipation at either different operating voltages or drawn currents. SIVEH numerical computing allows fast simulation of long periods of time-days, weeks, months or years-using real solar radiation curves. Moreover, SIVEH modeling has been enhanced with sleep time rate dynamic adjustment, while seeking energy-neutral operation. This paper presents the model description, a functional verification and a critical comparison with the classic energy approach. PMID:24008287

  16. A numerical method for computing three dimensional viscous supersonic flow fields about slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walitt, L.; Trulio, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for the calculation of steady, three-dimensional, viscous, compressible flow fields about slender bodies at angle of attack and at supersonic speeds. Approximations are introduced in modeling the flow in the longitudinal direction. Accordingly, the flow fields calculated with the program were computed with a model that permits viscous crossflow together with inviscid axial flow. An analysis of the errors introduced by such a treatment is presented. Numerical calculations were made and compared with experimental results for an ogive-cylinder and an airplane fuselage configuration. Generally, good agreement with experiment was obtained. However, boundary layer separation and body vortex positions differed from experimental locations on the ogive-cylinder, and the shock induced by the fuselage canopy was predicted at a slightly different location.

  17. Computational simulations of the total cavo-pulmonary connection: insights in optimizing numerical solutions.

    PubMed

    DeGroff, Curt; Birnbaum, Brian; Shandas, Robin; Orlando, Wendy; Hertzberg, Jean

    2005-03-01

    The Fontan procedure is a palliative surgical technique that is used to treat patients with congenital heart defects that include complex lesions such as those with a hypoplastic ventricle. In vitro, in vivo, and computational models of a set of modifications to the Fontan procedure, called the total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC), have been developed. Using these modeling methods, attempts have been made at finding the most energy efficient TCPC circuit. Computational modeling has distinct advantages to other modeling methods. However, discrepancies have been found in validation studies of TCPC computational models. There is little in the literature available to help explain and correct for such discrepancies. Differences in computational results can occur when choosing between steady flow versus transient flow numerical solvers. In this study transient flow solver results were shown to be more consistent with results from previous TCPC in vitro experiments. Using a transient flow solver we found complex fluctuating flow patterns can exist with steady inflow boundary conditions in computational models of the TCPC. To date such findings have not been reported in the literature. Furthermore, our computational modeling results suggest fluctuating flow patterns as well as the magnitudes of these secondary flow structures diminish if the TCPC offset between vena cavae is increased or if flanged connections are added. An association was found between these modifications and improvements in TCPC circuit flow efficiencies. In summary, development of accurate computational simulations in the validation process is critical to efforts in finding the most efficient TCPC circuits, efforts aimed at potentially improving the long term outcome for Fontan patients. PMID:15642509

  18. Non-numeric computation for high eccentricity orbits. [Earth satellite orbit perturbation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, R.; Renard, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    Geocentric orbits of large eccentricity (e = 0.9 to 0.95) are significantly perturbed in cislunar space by the sun and moon. The time-history of the height of perigee, subsequent to launch, is particularly critical. The determination of 'launch windows' is mostly concerned with preventing the height of perigee from falling below its low initial value before the mission lifetime has elapsed. Between the extremes of high accuracy digital integration of the equations of motion and of using an approximate, but very fast, stability criteria method, this paper is concerned with the developement of a method of intermediate complexity using non-numeric computation. The computer is used as the theory generator to generalize Lidov's theory using six osculating elements. Symbolic integration is completely automatized and the output is a set of condensed formulae well suited for repeated applications in launch window analysis. Examples of applications are given.

  19. Efficient numerical method for computation of thermohydrodynamics of laminar lubricating films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, Harold G.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an accurate, yet economical, method for computing temperature effects in laminar lubricating films in two dimensions. The procedure presented here is a sequel to one presented in Leeds in 1986 that was carried out for the one-dimensional case. Because of the marked dependence of lubricant viscosity on temperature, the effect of viscosity variation both across and along a lubricating film can dwarf other deviations from ideal constant-property lubrication. In practice, a thermohydrodynamics program will involve simultaneous solution of the film lubrication problem, together with heat conduction in a solid, complex structure. The extent of computation required makes economy in numerical processing of utmost importance. In pursuit of such economy, we here use techniques similar to those for Gaussian quadrature. We show that, for many purposes, the use of just two properly positioned temperatures (Lobatto points) characterizes well the transverse temperature distribution.

  20. Achieving high performance in numerical computations on RISC workstations and parallel systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goedecker, S.; Hoisie, A.

    1997-08-20

    The nominal peak speeds of both serial and parallel computers is raising rapidly. At the same time however it is becoming increasingly difficult to get out a significant fraction of this high peak speed from modern computer architectures. In this tutorial the authors give the scientists and engineers involved in numerically demanding calculations and simulations the necessary basic knowledge to write reasonably efficient programs. The basic principles are rather simple and the possible rewards large. Writing a program by taking into account optimization techniques related to the computer architecture can significantly speedup your program, often by factors of 10--100. As such, optimizing a program can for instance be a much better solution than buying a faster computer. If a few basic optimization principles are applied during program development, the additional time needed for obtaining an efficient program is practically negligible. In-depth optimization is usually only needed for a few subroutines or kernels and the effort involved is therefore also acceptable.

  1. Computational time analysis of the numerical solution of 3D electrostatic Poisson's equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamboh, Shakeel Ahmed; Labadin, Jane; Rigit, Andrew Ragai Henri; Ling, Tech Chaw; Amur, Khuda Bux; Chaudhary, Muhammad Tayyab

    2015-05-01

    3D Poisson's equation is solved numerically to simulate the electric potential in a prototype design of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropump. Finite difference method (FDM) is employed to discretize the governing equation. The system of linear equations resulting from FDM is solved iteratively by using the sequential Jacobi (SJ) and sequential Gauss-Seidel (SGS) methods, simulation results are also compared to examine the difference between the results. The main objective was to analyze the computational time required by both the methods with respect to different grid sizes and parallelize the Jacobi method to reduce the computational time. In common, the SGS method is faster than the SJ method but the data parallelism of Jacobi method may produce good speedup over SGS method. In this study, the feasibility of using parallel Jacobi (PJ) method is attempted in relation to SGS method. MATLAB Parallel/Distributed computing environment is used and a parallel code for SJ method is implemented. It was found that for small grid size the SGS method remains dominant over SJ method and PJ method while for large grid size both the sequential methods may take nearly too much processing time to converge. Yet, the PJ method reduces computational time to some extent for large grid sizes.

  2. Numerical computation of 2D sommerfeld integrals— A novel asymptotic extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Steven L.; Kuester, Edward F.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate and efficient computation of the elements in the impedance matrix is a crucial step in the application of Galerkin's method to the analysis of planar structures. As was demonstrated in a previous paper, it is possible to decompose the angular integral, in the polar representation for the 2D Sommerfeld integrals, in terms of incomplete Lipschitz-Hankel integrals (ILHIs) when piecewise sinusoidal basis functions are employed. Since Bessel series expansions can be used to compute these ILHIs, a numerical integration of the inner angular integral is not required. This technique provides an efficient method for the computation of the inner angular integral; however, the outer semi-infinite integral still converges very slowly when a real axis integration is applied. Therefore, it is very difficult to compute the impedance elements accurately and efficiently. In this paper, it is shown that this problem can be overcome by using the ILHI representation for the angular integral to develop a novel asymptotic extraction technique for the outer semi-infinite integral. The usefulness of this asymptotic extraction technique is demonstrated by applying it to the analysis of a printed strip dipole antenna in a layered medium.

  3. Ray trajectories in a torus: An application of MACSYMA to a complex numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulp, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The study of ray trajectories of plasma waves in a torodial geometry using MACSYMA is an example of how symbolic, numerical, and graphical facilities can be used in concert to accomplish a complex computational goal. Computational features of this study which are of particular significance include: the derivation of code (i.e. writing functions to generate program fragments), the use of array functions to simplify the specification of a numerical iteration scheme, and the graphical presentation of the results. Mathematically, this study originates in the solution of a linear inhomogeneous partial differential equation in 3 dimensions by the method of characteristics. While it is possible to describe this equation compactly by using vector notation, and by specifying the spatial variation of the coefficients in terms of intermediate parameters, the transformation of the equation into a form amenable to solution is very tedious. A MACSYMA program is presented for obtaining description of the rf field structure excited by a waveguide located at the edge of a toroidal plasma confinement device.

  4. WATERLOPP V2/64: A highly parallel machine for numerical computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostlund, Neil S.

    1985-07-01

    Current technological trends suggest that the high performance scientific machines of the future are very likely to consist of a large number (greater than 1024) of processors connected and communicating with each other in some as yet undetermined manner. Such an assembly of processors should behave as a single machine in obtaining numerical solutions to scientific problems. However, the appropriate way of organizing both the hardware and software of such an assembly of processors is an unsolved and active area of research. It is particularly important to minimize the organizational overhead of interprocessor comunication, global synchronization, and contention for shared resources if the performance of a large number ( n) of processors is to be anything like the desirable n times the performance of a single processor. In many situations, adding a processor actually decreases the performance of the overall system since the extra organizational overhead is larger than the extra processing power added. The systolic loop architecture is a new multiple processor architecture which attemps at a solution to the problem of how to organize a large number of asynchronous processors into an effective computational system while minimizing the organizational overhead. This paper gives a brief overview of the basic systolic loop architecture, systolic loop algorithms for numerical computation, and a 64-processor implementation of the architecture, WATERLOOP V2/64, that is being used as a testbed for exploring the hardware, software, and algorithmic aspects of the architecture.

  5. Efficient numerical methods for computing ground states of spin-1 Bose–Einstein condensates based on their characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Weizhu; Chern, I-Liang; Zhang, Yanzhi

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, we propose efficient numerical methods for computing ground states of spin-1 Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) with/without the Ioffe–Pritchard magnetic field B(x). When B(x)≠0, a numerical method is introduced to compute the ground states and it is also applied to study properties of ground states. Numerical results suggest that the densities of m{sub F}=±1 components in ground states are identical for any nonzero B(x). In particular, if B(x)≡B≠0 is a constant, the ground states satisfy the single-mode approximation. When B(x)≡0, efficient and simpler numerical methods are presented to solve the ground states of spin-1 BECs based on their ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic characterizations. Numerical simulations show that our methods are more efficient than those in the literature. In addition, some conjectures are made from our numerical observations.

  6. Numerical Study of Boundary Layer Interaction with Shocks: Method Improvement and Test Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is the development of a high-order and high-resolution method for the direct numerical simulation of shock turbulent-boundary-layer interaction. Details concerning the spatial discretization of the convective terms can be found in Adams and Shariff (1995). The computer code based on this method as introduced in Adams (1994) was formulated in Cartesian coordinates and thus has been limited to simple rectangular domains. For more general two-dimensional geometries, as a compression corner, an extension to generalized coordinates is necessary. To keep the requirements or limitations for grid generation low, the extended formulation should allow for non-orthogonal grids. Still, for simplicity and cost efficiency, periodicity can be assumed in one cross-flow direction. For easy vectorization, the compact-ENO coupling algorithm as used in Adams (1994) treated whole planes normal to the derivative direction with the ENO scheme whenever at least one point of this plane satisfied the detection criterion. This is apparently too restrictive for more general geometries and more complex shock patterns. Here we introduce a localized compact-ENO coupling algorithm, which is efficient as long as the overall number of grid points treated by the ENO scheme is small compared to the total number of grid points. Validation and test computations with the final code are performed to assess the efficiency and suitability of the computer code for the problems of interest. We define a set of parameters where a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent boundary layer along a compression corner with reasonably fine resolution is affordable.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Topics in Computational Partial Differential Equations: Numerical Methods and Diffpack Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaounis, T. D.

    2005-02-01

    equations in Diffpack can be used to derive fully implicit solvers for systems. The proposed techniques are illustrated in terms of two applications, namely a system of PDEs modelling pipeflow and a two-phase porous media flow. Stochastic PDEs is the topic of chapter 7. The first part of the chapter is a simple introduction to stochastic PDEs; basic analytical properties are presented for simple models like transport phenomena and viscous drag forces. The second part considers the numerical solution of stochastic PDEs. Two basic techniques are presented, namely Monte Carlo and perturbation methods. The last part explains how to implement and incorporate these solvers into Diffpack. Chapter 8 describes how to operate Diffpack from Python scripts. The main goal here is to provide all the programming and technical details in order to glue the programming environment of Diffpack with visualization packages through Python and in general take advantage of the Python interfaces. Chapter 9 attempts to show how to use numerical experiments to measure the performance of various PDE solvers. The authors gathered a rather impressive list, a total of 14 PDE solvers. Solvers for problems like Poisson, Navier--Stokes, elasticity, two-phase flows and methods such as finite difference, finite element, multigrid, and gradient type methods are presented. The authors provide a series of numerical results combining various solvers with various methods in order to gain insight into their computational performance and efficiency. In Chapter 10 the authors consider a computationally challenging problem, namely the computation of the electrical activity of the human heart. After a brief introduction on the biology of the problem the authors present the mathematical models involved and a numerical method for solving them within the framework of Diffpack. Chapter 11 and 12 are closely related; actually they could have been combined in a single chapter. Chapter 11 introduces several mathematical

  8. Using Linear Algebra to Introduce Computer Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Data Structures and Algorithms (and To Teach Linear Algebra, Too).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Vega, Laureano

    1999-01-01

    Using a Computer Algebra System (CAS) to help with the teaching of an elementary course in linear algebra can be one way to introduce computer algebra, numerical analysis, data structures, and algorithms. Highlights the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to the teaching of linear algebra. (Author/MM)

  9. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  10. A numerical method for computing unsteady 2-D boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainer, Andreas

    1988-01-01

    A numerical method for computing unsteady two-dimensional boundary layers in incompressible laminar and turbulent flows is described and applied to a single airfoil changing its incidence angle in time. The solution procedure adopts a first order panel method with a simple wake model to solve for the inviscid part of the flow, and an implicit finite difference method for the viscous part of the flow. Both procedures integrate in time in a step-by-step fashion, in the course of which each step involves the solution of the elliptic Laplace equation and the solution of the parabolic boundary layer equations. The Reynolds shear stress term of the boundary layer equations is modeled by an algebraic eddy viscosity closure. The location of transition is predicted by an empirical data correlation originating from Michel. Since transition and turbulence modeling are key factors in the prediction of viscous flows, their accuracy will be of dominant influence to the overall results.

  11. Numerical method to compute acoustic scattering effect of a moving source.

    PubMed

    Song, Hao; Yi, Mingxu; Huang, Jun; Pan, Yalin; Liu, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the aerodynamic characteristic of a ducted tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using CFD method. An analytical time domain formulation based on Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) equation is derived for the prediction of the acoustic velocity field and used as Neumann boundary condition on a rigid scattering surface. In order to predict the aerodynamic noise, a hybrid method combing computational aeroacoustics with an acoustic thin-body boundary element method has been proposed. The aerodynamic results and the calculated sound pressure levels (SPLs) are compared with the known method for validation. Simulation results show that the duct can change the value of SPLs and the sound directivity. Compared with the isolate tail rotor, the SPLs of the ducted tail rotor are smaller at certain azimuth. PMID:27610323

  12. Numerical method for computing Maass cusp forms on triply punctured two-sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K. T.; Kamari, H. M.; Zainuddin, H.

    2014-03-05

    A quantum mechanical system on a punctured surface modeled on hyperbolic space has always been an important subject of research in mathematics and physics. This corresponding quantum system is governed by the Schrödinger equation whose solutions are the Maass waveforms. Spectral studies on these Maass waveforms are known to contain both continuous and discrete eigenvalues. The discrete eigenfunctions are usually called the Maass Cusp Forms (MCF) where their discrete eigenvalues are not known analytically. We introduce a numerical method based on Hejhal and Then algorithm using GridMathematica for computing MCF on a punctured surface with three cusps namely the triply punctured two-sphere. We also report on a pullback algorithm for the punctured surface and a point locater algorithm to facilitate the complete pullback which are essential parts of the main algorithm.

  13. A novel formulation for the numerical computation of magnetization modes in complex micromagnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Aquino, Massimiliano; Serpico, Claudio; Miano, Giovanni; Forestiere, Carlo

    2009-09-01

    The small oscillation modes in complex micromagnetic systems around an equilibrium are numerically evaluated in the frequency domain by using a novel formulation, which naturally preserves the main physical properties of the problem. The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, which describes magnetization dynamics, is linearized around a stable equilibrium configuration and the stability of micromagnetic equilibria is discussed. Special attention is paid to take into account the property of conservation of magnetization magnitude in the continuum as well as discrete model. The linear equation is recast in the frequency domain as a generalized eigenvalue problem for suitable self-adjoint operators connected to the micromagnetic effective field. This allows one to determine the normal oscillation modes and natural frequencies circumventing the difficulties arising in time-domain analysis. The generalized eigenvalue problem may be conveniently discretized by finite difference or finite element methods depending on the geometry of the magnetic system. The spectral properties of the eigenvalue problem are derived in the lossless limit. Perturbation analysis is developed in order to compute the changes in the natural frequencies and oscillation modes arising from the dissipative effects. It is shown that the discrete approximation of the eigenvalue problem obtained either by finite difference or finite element methods has a structure which preserves relevant properties of the continuum formulation. Finally, the generalized eigenvalue problem is solved for a rectangular magnetic thin-film by using the finite differences and for a linear chain of magnetic nanospheres by using the finite elements. The natural frequencies and the spatial distribution of the natural modes are numerically computed.

  14. Numerical algorithms for computations of feedback laws arising in control of flexible systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, Irena

    1989-01-01

    Several continuous models will be examined, which describe flexible structures with boundary or point control/observation. Issues related to the computation of feedback laws are examined (particularly stabilizing feedbacks) with sensors and actuators located either on the boundary or at specific point locations of the structure. One of the main difficulties is due to the great sensitivity of the system (hyperbolic systems with unbounded control actions), with respect to perturbations caused either by uncertainty of the model or by the errors introduced in implementing numerical algorithms. Thus, special care must be taken in the choice of the appropriate numerical schemes which eventually lead to implementable finite dimensional solutions. Finite dimensional algorithms are constructed on a basis of a priority analysis of the properties of the original, continuous (infinite diversional) systems with the following criteria in mind: (1) convergence and stability of the algorithms and (2) robustness (reasonable insensitivity with respect to the unknown parameters of the systems). Examples with mixed finite element methods and spectral methods are provided.

  15. A methodology to compute GPS slant total delays in a numerical weather model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zus, Florian; Bender, Michael; Deng, Zhiguo; Dick, Galina; Heise, Stefan; Shang-Guan, Ming; Wickert, Jens

    2012-04-01

    A numerical algorithm based on Fermat's Principle was developed to simulate the propagation of Global Positioning System (GPS) radio signals in the refractivity field of a numerical weather model. The unique in the proposed algorithm is that the ray-trajectory automatically involves the location of the ground-based receiver and the satellite, i.e. the posed two-point boundary value problem is solved by an implicit finite difference scheme. This feature of the algorithm allows the fast and accurate computation of the signal travel-time delay, referred to as Slant Total Delay (STD), between a satellite and a ground-based receiver. We provide a technical description of the algorithm and estimate the uncertainty of STDs due to simplifying assumptions in the algorithm and due to the uncertainty of the refractivity field. In a first application, we compare STDs retrieved from GPS phase-observations at the German Research Centre for Geosciences Potsdam (GFZ STDs) with STDs derived from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses (ECMWF STDs). The statistical comparison for one month (August 2007) for a large and continuously operating network of ground-based receivers in Germany indicates good agreement between GFZ STDs and ECMWF STDs; the standard deviation is 0.5% and the mean deviation is 0.1%.

  16. Numerical computations of interior transmission eigenvalues for scattering objects with cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Stefan; Kleefeld, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In this article we extend the inside-outside duality for acoustic transmission eigenvalue problems by allowing scattering objects that may contain cavities. In this context we provide the functional analytical framework necessary to transfer the techniques that have been used in Kirsch and Lechleiter (2013 Inverse Problems, 29 104011) to derive the inside-outside duality. Additionally, extensive numerical results are presented to show that we are able to successfully detect interior transmission eigenvalues with the inside-outside duality approach for a variety of obstacles with and without cavities in three dimensions. In this context, we also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the inside-outside duality approach from a numerical point of view. Furthermore we derive the integral equations necessary to extend the algorithm in Kleefeld (2013 Inverse Problems, 29 104012) to compute highly accurate interior transmission eigenvalues for scattering objects with cavities, which we will then use as reference values to examine the accuracy of the inside-outside duality algorithm.

  17. Numerical study of premixed HCCI engine combustion and its sensitivity to computational mesh and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Song-Charng; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2003-06-01

    This study used a numerical model to investigate the combustion process in a premixed iso-octane homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The engine was a supercharged Cummins C engine operated under HCCI conditions. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V code so that the combustion could be modelled using detailed chemistry in the context of engine CFD simulations. The model was able to accurately simulate the ignition timing and combustion phasing for various engine conditions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were also well predicted while the carbon monoxide emissions were under predicted. Model results showed that the majority of unburned hydrocarbon is located in the piston-ring crevice region and the carbon monoxide resides in the vicinity of the cylinder walls. A sensitivity study of the computational grid resolution indicated that the combustion predictions were relatively insensitive to the grid density. However, the piston-ring crevice region needed to be simulated with high resolution to obtain accurate emissions predictions. The model results also indicated that HCCI combustion and emissions are very sensitive to the initial mixture temperature. The computations also show that the carbon monoxide emissions prediction can be significantly improved by modifying a key oxidation reaction rate constant.

  18. Computationally robust and noise resistant numerical detector for the detection of atmospheric infrasound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Chang; Olson, John V; Szuberla, Curt A L

    2013-07-01

    This work reports on a performance study of two numerical detectors that are particularly useful for infrasound arrays operating under windy conditions. The sum of squares of variance ratios (SSVR1)-proposed for detecting signals with frequency ranging from 1 to 10 Hz-is computed by taking the ratio of the squared sum of eigenvalues to the square of largest eigenvalue of the covariance matrix of the power spectrum. For signals with lower frequency between 0.015 and 0.1 Hz, SSVR2 is developed to reduce the detector's sensitivity to noise. The detectors' performances are graphically compared against the current method, the mean of cross correlation maxima (MCCM), using the receiver operating characteristics curves and three types of atmospheric infrasound, corrupted by Gaussian and Pink noise. The MCCM and SSVR2 detectors were also used to detect microbaroms from the 24 h-long infrasound data. It was found that the two detectors outperform the MCCM detector in both sensitivity and computational efficiency. For mine blasts corrupted by Pink noise (signal-to-noise ratio = -7 dB), the MCCM and SSVR1 detectors yield 62 and 88 % true positives when accepting 20% false positives. For an eight-sensor array, the speed gain is approximately eleven-fold for a 50 s long signal. PMID:23862892

  19. Energy conserving numerical methods for the computation of complex vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaneau, Yves

    One of the original goals of this thesis was to develop numerical tools to help with the design of micro air vehicles. Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) are small flying devices of only a few inches in wing span. Some people consider that as their size becomes smaller and smaller, it would be increasingly more difficult to keep all the classical control surfaces such as the rudders, the ailerons and the usual propellers. Over the years, scientists took inspiration from nature. Birds, by flapping and deforming their wings, are capable of accurate attitude control and are able to generate propulsion. However, the biomimicry design has its own limitations and it is difficult to place a hummingbird in a wind tunnel to study precisely the motion of its wings. Our approach was to use numerical methods to tackle this challenging problem. In order to precisely evaluate the lift and drag generated by the wings, one needs to be able to capture with high fidelity the extremely complex vortical flow produced in the wake. This requires a numerical method that is stable yet not too dissipative, so that the vortices do not get diffused in an unphysical way. We solved this problem by developing a new Discontinuous Galerkin scheme that, in addition to conserving mass, momentum and total energy locally, also preserves kinetic energy globally. This property greatly improves the stability of the simulations, especially in the special case p=0 when the approximation polynomials are taken to be piecewise constant (we recover a finite volume scheme). In addition to needing an adequate numerical scheme, a high fidelity solution requires many degrees of freedom in the computations to represent the flow field. The size of the smallest eddies in the flow is given by the Kolmogoroff scale. Capturing these eddies requires a mesh counting in the order of Re³ cells, where Re is the Reynolds number of the flow. We show that under-resolving the system, to a certain extent, is acceptable. However our

  20. High Performance Parallel Processing Project: Industrial computing initiative. Progress reports for fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.

    1996-02-09

    This project is a package of 11 individual CRADA`s plus hardware. This innovative project established a three-year multi-party collaboration that is significantly accelerating the availability of commercial massively parallel processing computing software technology to U.S. government, academic, and industrial end-users. This report contains individual presentations from nine principal investigators along with overall program information.

  1. Numerical Aspects of Eigenvalue and Eigenfunction Computations for Chaotic Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäcker, A.

    Summary: We give an introduction to some of the numerical aspects in quantum chaos. The classical dynamics of two-dimensional area-preserving maps on the torus is illustrated using the standard map and a perturbed cat map. The quantization of area-preserving maps given by their generating function is discussed and for the computation of the eigenvalues a computer program in Python is presented. We illustrate the eigenvalue distribution for two types of perturbed cat maps, one leading to COE and the other to CUE statistics. For the eigenfunctions of quantum maps we study the distribution of the eigenvectors and compare them with the corresponding random matrix distributions. The Husimi representation allows for a direct comparison of the localization of the eigenstates in phase space with the corresponding classical structures. Examples for a perturbed cat map and the standard map with different parameters are shown. Billiard systems and the corresponding quantum billiards are another important class of systems (which are also relevant to applications, for example in mesoscopic physics). We provide a detailed exposition of the boundary integral method, which is one important method to determine the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the Helmholtz equation. We discuss several methods to determine the eigenvalues from the Fredholm equation and illustrate them for the stadium billiard. The occurrence of spurious solutions is discussed in detail and illustrated for the circular billiard, the stadium billiard, and the annular sector billiard. We emphasize the role of the normal derivative function to compute the normalization of eigenfunctions, momentum representations or autocorrelation functions in a very efficient and direct way. Some examples for these quantities are given and discussed.

  2. The Design of a Templated C++ Small Vector Class for Numerical Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a templated C++ class for vectors. The vector class is templated both for vector length and vector component type; the vector length is fixed at template instantiation time. The vector implementation is such that for a vector of N components of type T, the total number of bytes required by the vector is equal to N * size of (T), where size of is the built-in C operator. The property of having a size no bigger than that required by the components themselves is key in many numerical computing applications, where one may allocate very large arrays of small, fixed-length vectors. In addition to the design trade-offs motivating our fixed-length vector design choice, we review some of the C++ template features essential to an efficient, succinct implementation. In particular, we highlight some of the standard C++ features, such as partial template specialization, that are not supported by all compilers currently. This report provides an inventory listing the relevant support currently provided by some key compilers, as well as test code one can use to verify compiler capabilities.

  3. Investigation of the adjoint-state method for ultrasound computed tomography: a numerical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anis, Fatima; Lou, Yang; Conjusteau, André; Su, Richard; Oruganti, Tanmayi; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate a novel reconstruction method for laser-induced ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) breast imaging that circumvents limitations of existing methods that rely on ray-tracing. There is currently great interest in developing hybrid imaging systems that combine optoacoustic tomography (OAT) and USCT. There are two primary motivations for this: (1) the speed-of-sound (SOS) distribution reconstructed by USCT can provide complementary diagnostic information; and (2) the reconstructed SOS distribution can be incorporated in the OAT reconstruction algorithm to improve OAT image quality. However, image reconstruction in USCT remains challenging. The majority of existing approaches for USCT breast imaging involve ray-tracing to establish the imaging operator. This process is cumbersome and can lead to inaccuracies in the reconstructed SOS images in the presence of multiple ray-paths and/or shadow zones. To circumvent these problems, we implemented a partial differential equation-based Eulerian approach to USCT that was proposed in the mathematics literature but never investigated for medical imaging applications. This method operates by directly inverting the Eikonal equation without ray-tracing. A numerical implementation of this method was developed and compared to existing reconstruction methods for USCT breast imaging. We demonstrated the ability of the new method to reconstruct SOS maps from TOF data obtained by a hybrid OAT/USCT imager built by our team.

  4. [Numerical finite element modeling of custom car seat using computer aided design].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuqi; Singare, Sekou

    2014-02-01

    A good cushion can not only provide the sitter with a high comfort, but also control the distribution of the hip pressure to reduce the incidence of diseases. The purpose of this study is to introduce a computer-aided design (CAD) modeling method of the buttocks-cushion using numerical finite element (FE) simulation to predict the pressure distribution on the buttocks-cushion interface. The buttock and the cushion model geometrics were acquired from a laser scanner, and the CAD software was used to create the solid model. The FE model of a true seated individual was developed using ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc, Canonsburg, PA). The model is divided into two parts, i.e. the cushion model made of foam and the buttock model represented by the pelvis covered with a soft tissue layer. Loading simulations consisted of imposing a vertical force of 520N on the pelvis, corresponding to the weight of the user upper extremity, and then solving iteratively the system. PMID:24804486

  5. HONEI: A collection of libraries for numerical computations targeting multiple processor architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dyk, Danny; Geveler, Markus; Mallach, Sven; Ribbrock, Dirk; Göddeke, Dominik; Gutwenger, Carsten

    2009-12-01

    We present HONEI, an open-source collection of libraries offering a hardware oriented approach to numerical calculations. HONEI abstracts the hardware, and applications written on top of HONEI can be executed on a wide range of computer architectures such as CPUs, GPUs and the Cell processor. We demonstrate the flexibility and performance of our approach with two test applications, a Finite Element multigrid solver for the Poisson problem and a robust and fast simulation of shallow water waves. By linking against HONEI's libraries, we achieve a two-fold speedup over straight forward C++ code using HONEI's SSE backend, and additional 3-4 and 4-16 times faster execution on the Cell and a GPU. A second important aspect of our approach is that the full performance capabilities of the hardware under consideration can be exploited by adding optimised application-specific operations to the HONEI libraries. HONEI provides all necessary infrastructure for development and evaluation of such kernels, significantly simplifying their development. Program summaryProgram title: HONEI Catalogue identifier: AEDW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPLv2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 216 180 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 270 140 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: x86, x86_64, NVIDIA CUDA GPUs, Cell blades and PlayStation 3 Operating system: Linux RAM: at least 500 MB free Classification: 4.8, 4.3, 6.1 External routines: SSE: none; [1] for GPU, [2] for Cell backend Nature of problem: Computational science in general and numerical simulation in particular have reached a turning point. The revolution developers are facing is not primarily driven by a change in (problem-specific) methodology, but rather by the fundamental paradigm shift of the

  6. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Madnia, Cyrus K.; Steinberger, C. J.; Frankel, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The principal objective is to extend the boundaries within which large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) can be applied in computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. A summary of work accomplished during the last six months is presented.

  7. Curriculums in Industrial Technology. Plastics Technology. Industrial Maintenance. Computer Numerical Control. Teacher's Manuals and Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Paso Community Coll., TX.

    Curriculum guides are provided for plastics technology, industrial maintenance, and computer numerical control. Each curriculum is divided into a number of courses. For each course these instructor materials are presented in the official course outline: course description, course objectives, unit titles, texts and materials, instructor resources,…

  8. GIM code user's manual for the STAR-100 computer. [for generating numerical analogs of the conversion laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, L.; Pearson, M.

    1979-01-01

    The General Interpolants Method (GIM), a three dimensional, time dependent, hybrid procedure for generating numerical analogs of the conversion laws, is described. The Navier-Stokes equations written for an Eulerian system are considered. The conversion of the GIM code to the STAR-100 computer, and the implementation of 'GIM-ON-STAR' is discussed.

  9. Mechanical Behavior of Salt Caverns: Closed-Form Solutions vs Numerical Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linlin; Bérest, Pierre; Brouard, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    Creep closure and structural stability of a cylindrical elongated cavern leached out from a salt formation are discussed. The Norton-Hoff creep law, or "power law", is used to capture the main features of salt rheological behavior. Two failure criteria are considered: (1) shear stresses must not be larger than a certain fraction of the mean stress (dilation criterion); and (2) the effective stress at the cavern wall (actual stress plus cavern fluid pressure) must not be tensile. The case of a brine-filled cavern whose pressure is kept constant is discussed first. It is proved that creep closure reaches a steady state such that stresses in the rock mass remain constant. However, decades are needed to reach such a state. During the transient phase that results from the slow redistribution of stresses in the rock mass, deviatoric stresses decrease at the vicinity of the cavern wall, and onset of dilation is less and less likely. At this point, the case of a rapid brine pressure increase, typical of a tightness test, is considered. It is proved that during such a swift pressure increase, cavern behavior is almost perfectly elastic; there is no risk of dilation onset. However, even when cavern pressure remains significantly smaller than geostatic, the effective stress at cavern wall can become tensile. These results, obtained through numerical computations, are confirmed by closed-form solutions obtained in the case of an idealized perfectly cylindrical cavern; these solutions provide a better insight into the main structural features of the behavior of the cavern.

  10. Development of a numerical computer code and circuit element models for simulation of firing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, K.H. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1990-07-02

    Numerical simulation of firing systems requires both the appropriate circuit analysis framework and the special element models required by the application. We have modified the SPICE circuit analysis code (version 2G.6), developed originally at the Electronic Research Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley, to allow it to be used on MSDOS-based, personal computers and to give it two additional circuit elements needed by firing systems--fuses and saturating inductances. An interactive editor and a batch driver have been written to ease the use of the SPICE program by system designers, and the interactive graphical post processor, NUTMEG, supplied by U. C. Berkeley with SPICE version 3B1, has been interfaced to the output from the modified SPICE. Documentation and installation aids have been provided to make the total software system accessible to PC users. Sample problems show that the resulting code is in agreement with the FIRESET code on which the fuse model was based (with some modifications to the dynamics of scaling fuse parameters). In order to allow for more complex simulations of firing systems, studies have been made of additional special circuit elements--switches and ferrite cored inductances. A simple switch model has been investigated which promises to give at least a first approximation to the physical effects of a non ideal switch, and which can be added to the existing SPICE circuits without changing the SPICE code itself. The effect of fast rise time pulses on ferrites has been studied experimentally in order to provide a base for future modeling and incorporation of the dynamic effects of changes in core magnetization into the SPICE code. This report contains detailed accounts of the work on these topics performed during the period it covers, and has appendices listing all source code written documentation produced.

  11. Modelling LARES temperature distribution and thermal drag II: Numerical computation of current-epoch thermal forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Jason W.; Matzner, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The LARES satellite is a laser-ranged space experiment to contribute to geophysics observation, and to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect. LARES consists of a solid tungsten alloy sphere, into which 92 fused-silica Cube Corner Reflectors (CCRs) are set in colatitude circles ("rows"). During its first four months in orbit it was observed to undergo an anomalous along-track orbital acceleration of approximately -0.4 pm/s2 (pm: = picometer). The first paper in this series (Eur. Phys. J. Plus 130, 206 (2015) - Paper I) computed the thermally induced along-track "thermal drag" on the LARES satellite during the first 126 days after launch. The results there suggest that the IR absorbance α and emissivity ɛ of the CCRs equal 0.60, a possible value for silica with slight surface contamination subjected to the space environment. Paper I computed an average thermal drag acceleration of -0.36 pm/s2 for a 120-day period starting with the 7th day after launch. The heating and the resultant along-track acceleration depend on the plane of the orbit, the sun position, and in particular on the occurrence of eclipses, all of which are functions of time. Thus we compute the thermal drag for specific days. The satellite is heated from two sources: sunlight and Earth's infrared (IR) radiation. Paper I worked in the fast-spin regime, where CCRs with the same colatitude can be taken to have the same temperature. Further, since all temperature variations (temporal or spatial) were small in this regime, Paper I linearized the Stefan-Boltzmann law and performed a Fourier series analysis. However, the spin rate of the satellite is expected currently ( ≈ day 1500) to be slow, of order ≈ 5 /orbit, so the "fast-spin equal-temperatures in a row" assumption is suspect. In this paper, which considers epochs up to 1580 days after launch, we do not linearize and we use direct numerical integration instead of Fourier methods. In addition to the along-track drag, this code

  12. Numerical computation of viscous flow around bodies and wings moving at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Research in aerodynamics is discussed. The development of equilibrium air curve fits; computation of hypersonic rarefield leading edge flows; computation of 2-D and 3-D blunt body laminar flows with an impinging shock; development of a two-dimensional or axisymmetric real gas blunt body code; a study of an over-relaxation procedure forthe MacCormack finite-difference scheme; computation of 2-D blunt body turbulent flows with an impinging shock; computation of supersonic viscous flow over delta wings at high angles of attack; and computation of the Space Shuttle Orbiter flowfield are discussed.

  13. Neural computing for numeric-to-symbolic conversion in control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passino, Kevin M.; Sartori, Michael A.; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    1989-01-01

    A type of neural network, the multilayer perceptron, is used to classify numeric data and assign appropriate symbols to various classes. This numeric-to-symbolic conversion results in a type of information extraction, which is similar to what is called data reduction in pattern recognition. The use of the neural network as a numeric-to-symbolic converter is introduced, its application in autonomous control is discussed, and several applications are studied. The perceptron is used as a numeric-to-symbolic converter for a discrete-event system controller supervising a continuous variable dynamic system. It is also shown how the perceptron can implement fault trees, which provide useful information (alarms) in a biological system and information for failure diagnosis and control purposes in an aircraft example.

  14. Development of mathematical models and numerical methods for aerodynamic design on multiprocessor computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, F. A.; Churakov, D. A.; Shevelev, Yu. D.

    2011-02-01

    Complex-geometry design and grid generation are addressed. The gasdynamic equations are solved, and the numerical results are compared with experimental data. For aerodynamic problems, a suite of mathematical and information technology tools is proposed for the support and management of geometric models of actual objects. Based on the mathematical modeling methods developed, numerical experiments can be performed for a wide class of geometric forms and the aerodynamic properties of aircraft can be predicted with allowance for the viscosity effects.

  15. TEMPEST: A three-dimensional time-dependent computer program for hydrothermal analysis: Volume 1, Numerical methods and input instructions

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, D.S.; Eyler, L.L.; Budden, M.J.

    1983-09-01

    This document describes the numerical methods, current capabilities, and the use of the TEMPEST (Version L, MOD 2) computer program. TEMPEST is a transient, three-dimensional, hydrothermal computer program that is designed to analyze a broad range of coupled fluid dynamic and heat transfer systems of particular interest to the Fast Breeder Reactor thermal-hydraulic design community. The full three-dimensional, time-dependent equations of motion, continuity, and heat transport are solved for either laminar or turbulent fluid flow, including heat diffusion and generation in both solid and liquid materials. 10 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Computation of the Diffracted Field by an Elliptic Rigid or Elastic Scatterer: An Overview of the Numerical Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassereau, Didier; Mézière, Fabien; Muller, Marie; Bossy, Emmanuel; Derode, Arnaud

    In this paper, we are interested in the 2D computation of the pressure scattered by an elliptic scatterer using a semi-analytical method based on a decomposition of the solutions on a basis of cylindrical waves. This approach is perfectly adapted to circular scatterers, and has been extended to scatterers of arbitrary shape [F. Chati et al. (2004)]. We will see that this extended formulation yields some very difficult numerical issues, particularly in our context of a flat and small elliptic scatterer. The use of arbitrary precision mathematics appears as a possible workaround, even if the cost in terms of the computation time may be prohibitive.

  17. Simplified analytical solutions and numerical computation of one and two-dimensional circular fins with contact conductance and end cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yovanovich, M. M.; Culham, J. R.; Lemczyk, T. F.

    1986-01-01

    One and two-dimensional solutions are obtained for annular fins of constant cross-section having uniform base, end and side conductances. The solutions are dependent upon one geometric parameter and three fin parameters which relate the internal conductive resistance to the three boundary resistances. The two and one-dimensional solutions are compared by means of the heat flow rate or fin efficiency ratios. Simple polynomials are developed for fast, accurate numerical computation of the modified Bessel functions which appear in the solutions. For annular fins used in typical microelectronic applications the analytical expressions are also reduced to alternate expressions which are shown to be expressible by means of simple polynomials which converge to unity for large values of the arguments. Numerical computations were performed on an IBM-PC and some typical results are reported in graphical form. These plots give the heat loss ratio as a function of the dimensionless geometric and fin parameters.

  18. Numerical Scheme for Viability Computation Using Randomized Technique with Linear Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Djeridane, Badis

    2008-06-12

    We deal with the problem of computing viability sets for nonlinear continuous or hybrid systems. Our main objective is to beat the curse of dimensionality, that is, we want to avoid the exponential growth of required computational resource with respect to the dimension of the system. We propose a randomized approach for viability computation: we avoid griding the state-space, use random extraction of points instead, and the computation of viable set test is formulated as a classical feasibility problem. This algorithm was implemented successfully to linear and nonlinear examples. We provide comparison of our results with results of other method.

  19. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental United-State (US) has reached its eastern part, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave (Vs) model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. We here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of Vs for NA based entirely on SEM-based numerical waveforms from an augmented dataset of 155 regional events and 70 teleseismic events. The forward wavefield computations are performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic Vs model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). To model teleseismic wavefields within our regional computational domain, we developed a new modeling technique which allows us to replace a distant source by virtual sources at the boundary of the computational domain (Masson et al., 2014). Computing virtual sources requires one global simulation per teleseismic events.We then compare two models obtained: one using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and another using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels

  20. Numerical computation of transonic flow governed by the full-potential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical solution techniques for solving transonic flow fields governed by the full potential equation are discussed. In a general sense relaxation schemes suitable for the numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations are presented and discussed with emphasis on transonic flow applications. The presentation can be divided into two general categories: An introductory treatment of the basic concepts associated with the numerical solution of elliptic partial differential equations and a more advanced treatment of current procedures used to solve the full potential equation for transonic flow fields. The introductory material is presented for completeness and includes a brief introduction (Chapter 1), governing equations (Chapter 2), classical relaxation schemes (Chapter 3), and early concepts regarding transonic full potential equation algorithms (Chapter 4).

  1. Numerical modeling of inelastic structures at loading of steady state rolling. Thermo-mechanical asphalt pavement computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, Ines; Hartung, Felix; Kaliske, Michael

    2016-05-01

    In order to gain a deeper knowledge of the interactions in the coupled tire-pavement-system, e.g. for the future design of durable pavement structures, the paper presents recent results of research in the field of theoretical-numerical asphalt pavement modeling at material and structural level, whereby the focus is on a realistic and numerically efficient computation of pavements under rolling tire load by using the finite element method based on an Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) formulation. Inelastic material descriptions are included into the ALE frame efficiently by a recently developed unsplit history update procedure. New is also the implementation of a viscoelastic cohesive zone model into the ALE pavement formulation to describe the interaction of the single pavement layers. The viscoelastic cohesive zone model is further extended to account for the normal pressure dependent shear behavior of the bonding layer. Another novelty is that thermo-mechanical effects are taken into account by a coupling of the mechanical ALE pavement computation to a transient thermal computation of the pavement cross-section to obtain the varying temperature distributions of the pavement due to climatic impact. Then, each ALE pavement simulation considers the temperature dependent asphalt material model that includes elastic, viscous and plastic behavior at finite strains and the temperature dependent viscoelastic cohesive zone formulation. The temperature dependent material parameters of the asphalt layers and the interfacial layers are fitted to experimental data. Results of coupled tire-pavement computations are presented to demonstrate potential fields of application.

  2. Numerical model for computation of effective and ambient dose equivalent at flight altitudes. Application for dose assessment during GLEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishev, Alexander; Usoskin, Ilya

    2015-05-01

    A numerical model for assessment of the effective dose and ambient dose equivalent produced by secondary cosmic ray particles of galactic and solar origin at commercial aircraft altitudes is presented. The model represents a full chain analysis based on ground-based measurements of cosmic rays, from particle spectral and angular characteristics to dose estimation. The model is based on newly numerically computed yield functions and realistic propagation of cosmic ray in the Earth magnetosphere. The yield functions are computed using a straightforward full Monte Carlo simulation of the atmospheric cascade induced by primary protons and α-particles and subsequent conversion of secondary particle fluence (neutrons, protons, gammas, electrons, positrons, muons and charged pions) to effective dose or the ambient dose equivalent. The ambient dose equivalent is compared with reference data at various conditions such as rigidity cut-off and level of solar activity. The method is applied for computation of the effective dose rate at flight altitude during the ground level enhancement of 13 December 2006. The solar proton spectra are derived using neutron monitor data. The computation of the effective dose rate during the event explicitly considers the derived anisotropy i.e. the pitch angle distribution as well as the propagation of the solar protons in the magnetosphere of the Earth.

  3. Equilibrium gas flow computations. II - An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel; Liu, Yen

    1988-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, equilibrium gas laws. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for three-dimensional, time-varying grids. The approximations inherent in previous generalizations are discussed.

  4. Interactive Computing With a Programmable Calculator; Student Experimentations in Numerical Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Curtis F.

    Programable desk calculators can provide students with personal experience in the use of numerical methods. Courses at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo use the Compucorp Model 025 Educator Experiences with it as a teaching device for solving non-linear equations and differential equations show that students can by-pass…

  5. Source Stacking for Numerical Wavefield Computations - Application to Global Scale Seismic Mantle Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, L. S.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wavefield computations using the Spectral Element Method are now regularly used to recover tomographic images of the upper mantle and crust at the local, regional, and global scales (e.g. Fichtner et al., GJI, 2009; Tape et al., Science 2010; Lekic and Romanowicz, GJI, 2011; French and Romanowicz, GJI, 2014). However, the heaviness of the computations remains a challenge, and contributes to limiting the resolution of the produced images. Using source stacking, as suggested by Capdeville et al. (GJI,2005), can considerably speed up the process by reducing the wavefield computations to only one per each set of N sources. This method was demonstrated through synthetic tests on low frequency datasets, and therefore should work for global mantle tomography. However, the large amplitudes of surface waves dominates the stacked seismograms and these cases can no longer be separated by windowing in the time domain. We have developed a processing approach that helps address this issue and demonstrate its usefulness through a series of synthetic tests performed at long periods (T >60 s) on toy upper mantle models. The summed synthetics are computed using the CSEM code (Capdeville et al., 2002). As for the inverse part of the procedure, we use a quasi-Newton method, computing Frechet derivatives and Hessian using normal mode perturbation theory.

  6. 3-D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problems with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronov, I.D.; Voronin, B.L.; Butnev, O.I.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of the work performed is to develop a 3D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problem with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS), satisfying the condition of numerical result independence from the number of processors involved. Two basically different approaches to the structure of massive parallel computations have been developed. The first approach uses the 3D data matrix decomposition reconstructed at temporal cycle and is a development of parallelization algorithms for multiprocessor CS with shareable memory. The second approach is based on using a 3D data matrix decomposition not reconstructed during a temporal cycle. The program was developed on 8-processor CS MP-3 made in VNIIEF and was adapted to a massive parallel CS Meiko-2 in LLNL by joint efforts of VNIIEF and LLNL staffs. A large number of numerical experiments has been carried out with different number of processors up to 256 and the efficiency of parallelization has been evaluated in dependence on processor number and their parameters.

  7. A two-parameter continuation method for computing numerical solutions of spin-1 Bose–Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-S.; Chien, C.-S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel two-parameter continuation method combined with a spectral-collocation method (SCM) for computing the ground state and excited-state solutions of spin-1 Bose–Einstein condensates (BEC), where the second kind Chebyshev polynomials are used as the basis functions for the trial function space. To compute the ground state solution of spin-1 BEC, we implement the single parameter continuation algorithm with the chemical potential μ as the continuation parameter, and trace the first solution branch of the Gross–Pitaevskii equations (GPEs). When the curve-tracing is close enough to the target point, where the normalization condition of the wave function is going to be satisfied, we add the magnetic potential λ as the second continuation parameter with the magnetization M as the additional constraint condition. Then we implement the two-parameter continuation algorithm until the target point is reached, and the ground state solution of the GPEs is obtained. The excited state solutions of the GPEs can be treated in a similar way. Some numerical experiments on {sup 23}Na and {sup 87}Rb are reported. The numerical results on the spin-1 BEC are the same as those reported in [10]. Further numerical experiments on excited-state solutions of spin-1 BEC suffice to show the robustness and efficiency of the proposed two-parameter continuation algorithm.

  8. Numerical method to compute optical conductivity based on pump-probe simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Can; Tohyama, Takami; Luo, Hong-Gang; Lu, Hantao

    2016-05-01

    A numerical method to calculate optical conductivity based on a pump-probe setup is presented. Its validity and limits are tested and demonstrated via concrete numerical simulations on the half-filled one-dimensional extended Hubbard model both in and out of equilibrium. By employing either a steplike or a Gaussian-like probing vector potential, it is found that in nonequilibrium, the method in the narrow-probe-pulse limit can be identified with variant types of linear-response theory, which, in equilibrium, produce identical results. The observation reveals the underlying probe-pulse dependence of the optical conductivity calculations in nonequilibrium, which may have applications in the theoretical analysis of ultrafast spectroscopy measurements.

  9. Nonequilibrium flow computations. I - An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    1989-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, nonequilibrium flows. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer Flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for 3-D, time-varying grids. The analysis is based on a thermodynamic model that includes the most general thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flow of an arbitrary gas. Various special cases are also discussed.

  10. Nonequilibrium flow computations. 1: An analysis of numerical formulations of conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Vinokur, Marcel

    1988-01-01

    Modern numerical techniques employing properties of flux Jacobian matrices are extended to general, nonequilibrium flows. Generalizations of the Beam-Warming scheme, Steger-Warming and van Leer Flux-vector splittings, and Roe's approximate Riemann solver are presented for 3-D, time-varying grids. The analysis is based on a thermodynamic model that includes the most general thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flow of an arbitrary gas. Various special cases are also discussed.

  11. The numerical computation of the preionization phase of a toroidal pinch discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, I. R.; Pettibone, J. S.; Stevens, J. C.; Kraybill, D. M.; Suter, J. L.; Harding, R. C.

    1980-03-01

    Using the two-dimensional MHD computer code ANIMAL the plasma dynamics of the preionization phase of a toroidal pinch is computed. The physical model includes electron and ion thermal conduction, electron-ion resistivity, electron-neutral resistivity, ionization, dissociation, and line radiation, all based on local thermodynamic equilibrium. The code uses ADI finite difference equations with improved boundary conditions which enable the code to follow the oscillatory motion of the plasma. A coupled electrical circuit calculation is performed. The physical model requires the specification of a minimum ionization fraction to set an upper bound on the resistivity. By suitably choosing this fraction, many of the features of the preionization discharge are reproduced. These calculations have suggested a new electrical diagnostic, the measurement of intervals between zero-crossings of current and flux, which is used to help normalize the computations.

  12. Numerical computation of two dimensional viscous blunt body flows with an impinging shock, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, T. L.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    Two-dimensional viscous blunt body flows with an impinging shock have been computed using a time-dependent finite-difference method which solves the complete set of Navier-Stokes equations for a compressible flow. For low Reynolds number flows, the entire flow field, including the bow shock and impinging shock, has been captured in the computation. For higher Reynolds number flows, the bow shock is treated as a discontinuity across which the Rankine-Hugoniot equations are applied, while the boundary layer and interaction regions are captured as before. Using this latter shock-fitting approach, a Type III shock interaction flow field has been computed with flow conditions corresponding to the space shuttle orbiter freestream conditions at 61 km (200,000 ft).

  13. The implementation of the graphics of program EAGLE: A numerical grid generation code on NASA Langley SNS computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, Johnny L.

    1989-01-01

    Program EAGLE (Eglin Arbitrary Geometry Implicit Euler) Numerical Grid Generation System is a composite (multi-block) algebraic or elliptic grid generation system designed to discretize the domain in and/or around any arbitrarily shaped three dimensional regions. This system combines a boundary conforming surface generation scheme and includes plotting routines designed to take full advantage of the DISSPLA Graphics Package (Version 9.0). Program EAGLE is written to compile and execute efficiently on any Cray machine with or without solid state disk (SSD) devices. Also, the code uses namelist inputs which are supported by all Cray machines using the FORTRAN compiler CFT77. The namelist inputs makes it easier for the user to understand the inputs and operation of Program EAGLE. EAGLE's numerical grid generator is constructed in the following form: main program, EGG (executive routine); subroutine SURFAC (surface generation routine); subroutine GRID (grid generation routine); and subroutine GRDPLOT (grid plotting routines). The EAGLE code was modified to use on the NASA-LaRC SNS computer (Cray 2S) system. During the modification a conversion program was developed for the output data of EAGLE's subroutine GRID to permit the data to be graphically displayed by IRIS workstations, using Plot3D. The code of program EAGLE was modified to make operational subroutine GRDPLOT (using DI-3000 Graphics Software Packages) on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. How to implement graphically, the output data of subroutine GRID was determined on any NASA-LaRC graphics terminal that has access to the SNS Computer System DI-300 Graphics Software Packages. A Quick Reference User Guide was developed for the use of program EAGLE on the NASA-LaRC SNS Computer System. One or more application program(s) was illustrated using program EAGLE on the NASA LaRC SNS Computer System, with emphasis on graphics illustrations.

  14. Current and planned numerical development for improving computing performance for long duration and/or low pressure transients

    SciTech Connect

    Faydide, B.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the current and planned numerical development for improving computing performance in case of Cathare applications needing real time, like simulator applications. Cathare is a thermalhydraulic code developed by CEA (DRN), IPSN, EDF and FRAMATOME for PWR safety analysis. First, the general characteristics of the code are presented, dealing with physical models, numerical topics, and validation strategy. Then, the current and planned applications of Cathare in the field of simulators are discussed. Some of these applications were made in the past, using a simplified and fast-running version of Cathare (Cathare-Simu); the status of the numerical improvements obtained with Cathare-Simu is presented. The planned developments concern mainly the Simulator Cathare Release (SCAR) project which deals with the use of the most recent version of Cathare inside simulators. In this frame, the numerical developments are related with the speed up of the calculation process, using parallel processing and improvement of code reliability on a large set of NPP transients.

  15. Programmer's guide for the GNAT computer program (numerical analysis of stratification in supercritical oxygen)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinmiller, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    This document is the programmer's guide for the GNAT computer program developed under MSC/TRW Task 705-2, Apollo cryogenic storage system analysis, subtask 2, is reported. Detailed logic flow charts and compiled program listings are provided for all program elements.

  16. Chrysler improved numerical differencing analyzer for third generation computers CINDA-3G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaski, J. D.; Lewis, D. R.; Thompson, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    New and versatile method has been developed to supplement or replace use of original CINDA thermal analyzer program in order to take advantage of improved systems software and machine speeds of third generation computers. CINDA-3G program options offer variety of methods for solution of thermal analog models presented in network format.

  17. Aneesur Rahman Prize for Computational Physics Talk: Numerical Modeling of Accretion Disk Dynamos driven by the MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, James

    2011-04-01

    Numerical methods have proved crucial for the study of the nonlinear regime of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and resulting dynamo action. After a brief introduction to the methods, a variety of results from new simulations of the MRI in both local (shearing box approximation) and global domains will be presented. Previous work on the saturation level and numerical convergence in both stratified and unstratified domains with no net flux (both with and without explicit dissipation) will be described, and the connection to dynamo theory will be mentioned. Results from several groups in which the size of the computational domain, and the vertical boundary conditions, are varied will be discussed. Finally, new work on the direct comparison between high-resolution global and shearing box simulations will be presented, and new studies of stratified disks with radiative transfer will be introduced.

  18. OpenGeoSys: Performance-Oriented Computational Methods for Numerical Modeling of Flow in Large Hydrogeological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, D.; Fischer, T.; Böttcher, N.; Watanabe, N.; Walther, M.; Rink, K.; Bilke, L.; Shao, H.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    OpenGeoSys (OGS) is a scientific open source code for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical processes in porous and fractured media. Its basic concept is to provide a flexible numerical framework for solving multi-field problems for applications in geoscience and hydrology as e.g. for CO2 storage applications, geothermal power plant forecast simulation, salt water intrusion, water resources management, etc. Advances in computational mathematics have revolutionized the variety and nature of the problems that can be addressed by environmental scientists and engineers nowadays and an intensive code development in the last years enables in the meantime the solutions of much larger numerical problems and applications. However, solving environmental processes along the water cycle at large scales, like for complete catchment or reservoirs, stays computationally still a challenging task. Therefore, we started a new OGS code development with focus on execution speed and parallelization. In the new version, a local data structure concept improves the instruction and data cache performance by a tight bundling of data with an element-wise numerical integration loop. Dedicated analysis methods enable the investigation of memory-access patterns in the local and global assembler routines, which leads to further data structure optimization for an additional performance gain. The concept is presented together with a technical code analysis of the recent development and a large case study including transient flow simulation in the unsaturated / saturated zone of the Thuringian Syncline, Germany. The analysis is performed on a high-resolution mesh (up to 50M elements) with embedded fault structures.

  19. Numerical computations and optical diagnostics of unsteady partially premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Nogenmyr, K.J.; Bai, X.S.; Kiefer, J.; Li, Z.S.; Alden, M.

    2010-05-15

    The structures and dynamics of unsteady laminar partially premixed methane/air Bunsen flames are studied by means of numerical simulations, OH and CH PLIF imaging, and high speed chemiluminescence imaging employing a high framing speed intensified charge coupled device camera. The Bunsen burner has a diameter of 22 mm. Rich methane/air mixtures with an equivalence ratio of 1.5 are injected from the burner into atmosphere at different flow speeds ranging from 0.77 to 1.7 m/s, with Reynolds numbers based on the nozzle flow ranging from 1100 to 2500. The numerical simulations are based on a two-scalar flamelet manifold tabulation approach. Detailed chemistry is used to generate the flamelet manifold tabulation which relates the species concentrations, reaction rates, temperature and density to a distance function G and mixture fraction Z. Two distinct reaction zones are identified using CH and OH PLIF imaging and numerical simulations; one inner reaction zone corresponds to premixed flames on the rich side of the mixture and one outer reaction zone corresponds to mixing controlled diffusion flames on the lean side of the mixture. Under normal gravity conditions both the inner premixed flames and the outer diffusion flames are unsteady. The outer diffusion flames oscillate with a flickering frequency of about 15 Hz, which slightly increases with the burner exit velocity. The inner premixed flames are more random with much more small-scale wrinkling structures. Under zero gravity conditions the outer diffusion flames are stable whereas the inner premixed flames are unstable and highly wrinkled. It appears that the outer diffusion flames are governed by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability whereas the inner premixed flames are dictated by Landau-Darrieus instability. The two-scalar flamelet approach is shown to capture the basic structures and dynamics of the investigated unsteady partially premixed flames. (author)

  20. A non-numerical method for track finding in experimental high energy physics using vector computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiopoulos, C. H.; Goldman, J. H.; Levinthal, D.; Hodous, M. F.

    1986-09-01

    A non-numerical vector algorithm is used to reconstruct charged particle trajectories in the E-711 detector at Fermilab. The program is written for a CYBER 205. The vectorized version of the code is approximately 10 times faster than that of the previous scalar codes. The techniques used are applicable to other spectrometers relying on wire chambers for tracking information. The average event takes 7.7 ms to process in vector mode on a CYBER 205 compared to 1.6 s in scalar mode on a VAX-11/780.

  1. Kernel sweeping method for exact diagonalization of spin models - numerical computation of a CSL Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Darrell; Kapit, Eliot; Thomale, Ronny; Greiter, Martin

    2007-03-01

    We have recently constructed a Hamiltonian that singles out the chiral spin liquid on a square lattice with periodic boundary conditions as the exact and, apart from the two-fold topological degeneracy, unique ground state [1]. The talk will present a kernel-sweeping method that greatly reduces the numerical effort required to perform the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. Results from the calculation of the model on a 4x4 lattice, including the spectrum of the model, will be presented. [1] D. F. Schroeter, E. Kapit, R. Thomale, and M. Greiter, Phys. Rev. Lett. in review.

  2. Notes and comments on computational elastoplasticity - Some new models and their numerical implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this paper: (1) the basic interactive nature of classical elasto-plasticity and a redefinition of elastic and plastic processes that facilitates numerical calculations, (2) generalized mid-point or end-point algorithms to determine the stress increment in an elastic-plastic solid from a given strain increment, (3) an endochronic (internal time) rate theory of time-independent plasticity which encompasses various multiple-yield-surface theories and nonlinear kinematic hardening theories as its specializations, and (4) comments on finite element and boundary element methods for solving boundary value problems in elasto-plasticity.

  3. Computation of Nonlinear Backscattering Using a High-Order Numerical Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fibich, G.; Ilan, B.; Tsynkov, S.

    2001-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) is the standard model for propagation of intense laser beams in Kerr media. The NLS is derived from the nonlinear Helmholtz equation (NLH) by employing the paraxial approximation and neglecting the backscattered waves. In this study we use a fourth-order finite-difference method supplemented by special two-way artificial boundary conditions (ABCs) to solve the NLH as a boundary value problem. Our numerical methodology allows for a direct comparison of the NLH and NLS models and for an accurate quantitative assessment of the backscattered signal.

  4. Description of a computer program and numerical techniques for developing linear perturbation models from nonlinear systems simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dieudonne, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed which generates linear perturbation models from nonlinear aircraft vehicle simulations. The technique is very general and can be applied to simulations of any system that is described by nonlinear differential equations. The computer program used to generate these models is discussed, with emphasis placed on generation of the Jacobian matrices, calculation of the coefficients needed for solving the perturbation model, and generation of the solution of the linear differential equations. An example application of the technique to a nonlinear model of the NASA terminal configured vehicle is included.

  5. Efficient numerical method for computation of the thermohydrodynamics of laminar lubricating films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, H. G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe an accurate, yet economical, method for computing temperature effects in laminar lubricating films in two dimensions. Because of the marked dependence of lubricant viscosity on temperature, the effect of viscosity variation both across and along a lubricating film can dwarf other deviations from ideal constant-property lubrication. In practice, a thermohydrodynamics program will involve simultaneous solution of the film lubrication problem, together with heat conduction in a solid, complex structure. In pursuit of computational economy, techniques similar to those for Gaussian quadrature are used; it is shown that, for many purposes, the use of just two properly positioned temperatures (Lobatto points) characterizes the transverse temperature distribution.

  6. Design and evaluation of the computer-based training program Calcularis for enhancing numerical cognition.

    PubMed

    Käser, Tanja; Baschera, Gian-Marco; Kohn, Juliane; Kucian, Karin; Richtmann, Verena; Grond, Ursina; Gross, Markus; von Aster, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the design and a first pilot evaluation of the computer-based training program Calcularis for children with developmental dyscalculia (DD) or difficulties in learning mathematics. The program has been designed according to insights on the typical and atypical development of mathematical abilities. The learning process is supported through multimodal cues, which encode different properties of numbers. To offer optimal learning conditions, a user model completes the program and allows flexible adaptation to a child's individual learning and knowledge profile. Thirty-two children with difficulties in learning mathematics completed the 6-12-weeks computer training. The children played the game for 20 min per day for 5 days a week. The training effects were evaluated using neuropsychological tests. Generally, children benefited significantly from the training regarding number representation and arithmetic operations. Furthermore, children liked to play with the program and reported that the training improved their mathematical abilities. PMID:23935586

  7. A numerical method for parameterization of atmospheric chemistry - Computation of tropospheric OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spivakovsky, C. M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Prather, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    An efficient and stable computational scheme for parameterization of atmospheric chemistry is described. The 24-hour-average concentration of OH is represented as a set of high-order polynomials in variables such as temperature, densities of H2O, CO, O3, and NO(t) (defined as NO + NO2 + NO3 + 2N2O5 + HNO2 + HNO4) as well as variables determining solar irradiance: cloud cover, density of the overhead ozone column, surface albedo, latitude, and solar declination. This parameterization of OH chemistry was used in the three-dimensional study of global distribution of CH3CCl3. The proposed computational scheme can be used for parameterization of rates of chemical production and loss or of any other output of a full chemical model.

  8. Numerical computations of natural convection heat transfer in irregular geometries: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Glakpe, E.K.

    1987-01-23

    The goal of the research program at Howard University is to develop ad document a general purpose computer code that can be used to obtain flow and heat transfer data for the transport or storage of spent fuel configurations. We believe that this work is relevant to DOE/OCRWM storage and transportation programs for the protection of public health and quality of the environment. The computer code is expected to be used to support primarily the following activities: (a) to obtain heat transfer and flow data for the design of sealed storage casks for transport to, and storage at the proposed MRS facility; (b) to obtain heat transfer and flow data for storage of spent fuel assemblies in pools or transportable metal casks at reactor sites. It is therefore proposed that the research work be continued to modify and add to the BODYFIT-1FE code physical models and applicable equations that will simulate realistic configurations of shipping/storage casks.

  9. Numerical studies on the electromagnetic properties of the nonlinear Lorentz Computational model for the dielectric media

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Okuda, H.

    1994-06-01

    We study linear and nonlinear properties of a new computer simulation model developed to study the propagation of electromagnetic waves in a dielectric medium in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The model is constructed by combining a microscopic model used in the semi-classical approximation for the dielectric media and the particle model developed for the plasma simulations. It is shown that the model may be useful for studying linear and nonlinear wave propagation in the dielectric media.

  10. An efficient and general numerical method to compute steady uniform vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzzatto-Fegiz, Paolo; Williamson, Charles H. K.

    2011-07-01

    Steady uniform vortices are widely used to represent high Reynolds number flows, yet their efficient computation still presents some challenges. Existing Newton iteration methods become inefficient as the vortices develop fine-scale features; in addition, these methods cannot, in general, find solutions with specified Casimir invariants. On the other hand, available relaxation approaches are computationally inexpensive, but can fail to converge to a solution. In this paper, we overcome these limitations by introducing a new discretization, based on an inverse-velocity map, which radically increases the efficiency of Newton iteration methods. In addition, we introduce a procedure to prescribe Casimirs and remove the degeneracies in the steady vorticity equation, thus ensuring convergence for general vortex configurations. We illustrate our methodology by considering several unbounded flows involving one or two vortices. Our method enables the computation, for the first time, of steady vortices that do not exhibit any geometric symmetry. In addition, we discover that, as the limiting vortex state for each flow is approached, each family of solutions traces a clockwise spiral in a bifurcation plot consisting of a velocity-impulse diagram. By the recently introduced "IVI diagram" stability approach [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 (2010) 044504], each turn of this spiral is associated with a loss of stability for the steady flows. Such spiral structure is suggested to be a universal feature of steady, uniform-vorticity flows.

  11. Software Aspects of IEEE Floating-Point Computations for Numerical Applications in High Energy Physics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-05-11

    Floating-point computations are at the heart of much of the computing done in high energy physics. The correctness, speed and accuracy of these computations are of paramount importance. The lack of any of these characteristics can mean the difference between new, exciting physics and an embarrassing correction. This talk will examine practical aspects of IEEE 754-2008 floating-point arithmetic as encountered in HEP applications. After describing the basic features of IEEE floating-point arithmetic, the presentation will cover: common hardware implementations (SSE, x87) techniques for improving the accuracy of summation, multiplication and data interchange compiler options for gcc and icc affecting floating-point operations hazards to be avoided About the speaker Jeffrey M Arnold is a Senior Software Engineer in the Intel Compiler and Languages group at Intel Corporation. He has been part of the Digital->Compaq->Intel compiler organization for nearly 20 years; part of that time, he worked on both low- and high-level math libraries. Prior to that, he was in the VMS Engineering organization at Digital Equipment Corporation. In the late 1980s, Jeff spent 2½ years at CERN as part of the CERN/Digital Joint Project. In 2008, he returned to CERN to spent 10 weeks working with CERN/openlab. Since that time, he has returned to CERN multiple times to teach at openlab workshops and consult with various LHC experiments. Jeff received his Ph.D. in physics from Case Western Reserve University.

  12. Software Aspects of IEEE Floating-Point Computations for Numerical Applications in High Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Floating-point computations are at the heart of much of the computing done in high energy physics. The correctness, speed and accuracy of these computations are of paramount importance. The lack of any of these characteristics can mean the difference between new, exciting physics and an embarrassing correction. This talk will examine practical aspects of IEEE 754-2008 floating-point arithmetic as encountered in HEP applications. After describing the basic features of IEEE floating-point arithmetic, the presentation will cover: common hardware implementations (SSE, x87) techniques for improving the accuracy of summation, multiplication and data interchange compiler options for gcc and icc affecting floating-point operations hazards to be avoided About the speaker Jeffrey M Arnold is a Senior Software Engineer in the Intel Compiler and Languages group at Intel Corporation. He has been part of the Digital->Compaq->Intel compiler organization for nearly 20 years; part of that time, he worked on both low- and high-level math libraries. Prior to that, he was in the VMS Engineering organization at Digital Equipment Corporation. In the late 1980s, Jeff spent 2½ years at CERN as part of the CERN/Digital Joint Project. In 2008, he returned to CERN to spent 10 weeks working with CERN/openlab. Since that time, he has returned to CERN multiple times to teach at openlab workshops and consult with various LHC experiments. Jeff received his Ph.D. in physics from Case Western Reserve University.

  13. Numerical computation of shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction in transonic flow over an axisymmetric curved hill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1989-01-01

    A control-volume based finite difference computation of a turbulent transonic flow over an axisymmetric curved hill is presented. The numerical method is based on the SIMPLE algorithm, and hence the conservation of mass equation is replaced by a pressure correction equation for compressible flows. The turbulence is described by a k-epsilon turbulence model supplemented by a near-wall turbulence model. In the method, the dissipation rate in the region very close to the wall is obtained from an algebraic equation and that for the rest of the flow domain is obtained by solving a partial differential equation for the dissipation rate. The other flow equations are integrated up to the wall. It is shown that the present turbulence model yields the correct location of the compression shock. The other computational results are also in good agreement with experimental data.

  14. Analysis of numerical methods for computer simulation of kinetic processes: development of KINSIM--a flexible, portable system.

    PubMed

    Barshop, B A; Wrenn, R F; Frieden, C

    1983-04-01

    A flexible and convenient computational method for the simulation of kinetic progress curves has been developed. A mechanism is represented in conventional chemical format with either kinetic or rapid equilibrium steps separating chemical species. A table describing the differential equations of the mechanism is generated and a direct numerical integration is performed. The same program can be used to simulate any number of mechanisms. The user may interactively set kinetic parameters to seek the optimal fit for a set of experiments, as determined by graphical superimposition of simulated curves with experimental data. Standard error analysis and automatic optimization may also be included. The program is computationally efficient and its interactive nature makes it a good teaching tool. The source code is written in FORTRAN IV and adheres closely with the ANSI 1966 standard, so as to make it maximally portable and machine independent. PMID:6688159

  15. Numerical Investigation of Different Radial Inlet Forms for Centrifugal Compressor and Influence of the Deflectors Number by Means of Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods with Computational Model Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhukhov, Y. V.; Yun, V. K.; Reshetnikova, L. V.; Prokopovich, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this work is numerical experiments for five different types of the centrifugal compressor's inlet chambers with the help of CFD-methods and comparison of the computational results with the results of the real experiment which was held in the Nevskiy Lenin Plant in Saint-Petersburg. In the context of one of the chambers the influence of deflectors on its characteristics was investigated. The objects of investigation are 5 inlet chambers of different types which differ from each other by deflectors’ existence and by its number. The comparative analyze of the results of numerical and real experiments was held by means of comparison of relative velocity and static pressure coefficient distribution on hub and shroud region, and also by means of loss coefficient values change for all five chambers. As a result of the numerical calculation the quantitative and qualitative departure of CFD- calculations results and real experiment were found out. The investigation of the influence of the number of deflectors on flow parameters was carried out. The results of the study prove that the presence of the deflectors on flow path significantly increases the probability of the flow separations and reversed flows appearance on them. At the same time, the complete absence of the deflectors in the chamber significantly increases circumferential distortion of the flow; however the loss coefficient decreases anyway, the high values of which are caused by the shock flow existence. Thus, the profiling of the deflectors of the inlet chamber should be given a special attention.

  16. Numerical computation of unsteady laminar boundary layers with separation using two-parameter integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, T.; Matsushita, M.; Murata, S.

    1985-11-01

    A two-parameter integral method is presented which is applicable even to separated boundary layers. The governing equation system, which consists of three moment equations of the boundary layer equation, is shown to be classifiable as a quasi-linear hyperbolic system under the assumed velocity profile function. The governing system is numerically solved by a dissipative finite difference scheme in order to capture a discontinuous solution associated with the singularity of unsteady separation. The spontaneous generation of singularity associated with unsteady separation is confirmed as the focusing of characteristics. The starting flows of a circular and an elliptic cylinder are considered as definite examples. This method is found to give excellent results in comparison with exact methods, not only for practically important boundary layer quantities such as displacement thickness or skin friction coefficient, but also for generation of separation singularity.

  17. Six degree of freedom simulation of fluid payload projectiles using numerically computed fluid moments

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, H.R.; Wolfe, W.P.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1985-07-01

    A flight trajectory simulation method has been developed for calculating the six degree of freedom motion of fluid filled projectiles. Numerically calculated internal fluid moments and experimentally known aerodynamic forces and moments are coupled to the projectile motion. Comparisons of predicted results with flight test data of an M483 155mm artillery projectile with a highly viscous payload confirm the accuracy of the simulation. This simulation clearly shows that the flight instability is due to the growth of the nutation component of angular motion caused by the viscous effects of the fluid payload. This simulation procedure, when used in conjunction with the previously developed method for calculating internal fluid moments, allows the designer to examine the effects of various liquid payloads and container geometries on the dynamic behavior of flight vehicles.

  18. An efficient numerical method for computing dynamics of spin F = 2 Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hanquan

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we extend the efficient time-splitting Fourier pseudospectral method to solve the generalized Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equations, which model the dynamics of spin F = 2 Bose-Einstein condensates at extremely low temperature. Using the time-splitting technique, we split the generalized GP equations into one linear part and two nonlinear parts: the linear part is solved with the Fourier pseudospectral method; one of nonlinear parts is solved analytically while the other one is reformulated into a matrix formulation and solved by diagonalization. We show that the method keeps well the conservation laws related to generalized GP equations in 1D and 2D. We also show that the method is of second-order in time and spectrally accurate in space through a one-dimensional numerical test. We apply the method to investigate the dynamics of spin F = 2 Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a uniform/nonuniform magnetic field.

  19. Numerical computation of viscous flows on the lee side of blunt shapes flying at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakich, J. V.; Lubard, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the parabolic approximation to the steady-state compressible Navier-Stokes equations is examined. The approximation neglects only the streamwise gradients of shear stress. An implicit finite difference method is used which advances the solution downstream from an initial data surface and determines the complete viscous-inviscid flow between the body and bow shock wave. It is necessary that the inviscid portion of the flow field be supersonic. Crossflow separation is determined as part of the solution. The method is applied to a 15 deg sphere-cone at 15 deg angle of attack, and the results are compared with an inviscid method-of-characteristics calculation.

  20. Desirable floating-point arithmetic and elementary functions for numerical computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, T. E.

    1978-01-01

    The topics considered are: (1) the base of the number system, (2) precision control, (3) number representation, (4) arithmetic operations, (5) other basic operations, (6) elementary functions, and (7) exception handling. The possibility of doing without fixed-point arithmetic is also mentioned. The specifications are intended to be entirely at the level of a programming language such as FORTRAN. The emphasis is on convenience and simplicity from the user's point of view. Conforming to such specifications would have obvious beneficial implications for the portability of numerical software, and for proving programs correct, as well as attempting to provide facilities which are most suitable for the user. The specifications are not complete in every detail, but it is intended that they be complete in spirit - some further details, especially syntatic details, would have to be provided, but the proposals are otherwise relatively complete.

  1. Modeling and Numerical Challenges in Eulerian-Lagrangian Computations of Shock-driven Multiphase Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diggs, Angela; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    The present work addresses the numerical methods required for particle-gas and particle-particle interactions in Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations of multiphase flow. Local volume fraction as seen by each particle is the quantity of foremost importance in modeling and evaluating such interactions. We consider a general multiphase flow with a distribution of particles inside a fluid flow discretized on an Eulerian grid. Particle volume fraction is needed both as a Lagrangian quantity associated with each particle and also as an Eulerian quantity associated with the flow. In Eulerian Projection (EP) methods, the volume fraction is first obtained within each cell as an Eulerian quantity and then interpolated to each particle. In Lagrangian Projection (LP) methods, the particle volume fraction is obtained at each particle and then projected onto the Eulerian grid. Traditionally, EP methods are used in multiphase flow, but sub-grid resolution can be obtained through use of LP methods. By evaluating the total error and its components we compare the performance of EP and LP methods. The standard von Neumann error analysis technique has been adapted for rigorous evaluation of rate of convergence. The methods presented can be extended to obtain accurate field representations of other Lagrangian quantities. Most importantly, we will show that such careful attention to numerical methodologies is needed in order to capture complex shock interaction with a bed of particles. Supported by U.S. Department of Defense SMART Program and the U.S. Department of Energy PSAAP-II program under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  2. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  3. Numerical modeling of turbulent flows over an urban-type surface: Computations for neutral stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazunov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    Computations of turbulent flows over surfaces with explicitly specified roughness elements that imitate an urban built-up area have been performed using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. Results are presented for neutral stratification. Some statistics of the flow over an inhomogeneous surface are compared with those over a flat surface. Results of spectral analysis performed to identify characteristic length scales are discussed. A relation is established between the Prandtl mixing length and the turbulence scale defined through the cospectrum-weighted-mean wave number. Values of the roughness parameter and displacement height are determined for three different configurations of objects on the surface.

  4. Numerical computation of dynamically important excited states of many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łącki, Mateusz; Delande, Dominique; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2012-07-01

    We present an extension of the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group, also known as the time evolving block decimation algorithm, allowing for the computation of dynamically important excited states of one-dimensional many-body systems. We show its practical use for analyzing the dynamical properties and excitations of the Bose-Hubbard model describing ultracold atoms loaded in an optical lattice from a Bose-Einstein condensate. This allows for a deeper understanding of nonadiabaticity in experimental realizations of insulating phases.

  5. Comparison of Numerical Schemes for a Realistic Computational Aeroacoustics Benchmark Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Wu, J.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a nonlinear structured-multiblock CAA solver, the NASA GRC BASS code, will be tested on a realistic CAA benchmark problem. The purpose of this test is to ascertain what effect the high-accuracy solution methods used in CAA have on a realistic test problem, where both the mean flow and the unsteady waves are simultaneously computed on a fully curvilinear grid from a commercial grid generator. The proposed test will compare the solutions obtained using several finite-difference methods on identical grids to determine whether high-accuracy schemes have advantages for this benchmark problem.

  6. Interpolation Method Needed for Numerical Uncertainty Analysis of Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Curtis; Ilie, Marcel; Schallhorn, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict a flow field is an approximation to the exact problem and uncertainties exist. There is a method to approximate the errors in CFD via Richardson's Extrapolation. This method is based off of progressive grid refinement. To estimate the errors in an unstructured grid, the analyst must interpolate between at least three grids. This paper describes a study to find an appropriate interpolation scheme that can be used in Richardson's extrapolation or other uncertainty method to approximate errors. Nomenclature

  7. Anisotropic Shear Velocity Models of the North American Upper Mantle Based on Waveform Inversion and Numerical Wavefield Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, C.; Masson, Y.; Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S. W.; Yuan, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Earthscope TA deployment across the continental US now has reached the eastern part of the United States, providing the opportunity for high-resolution 3D seismic velocity imaging of both lithosphere and asthenosphere across the entire north-American continent (NA). Previously (Yuan et al., 2014), we presented a 3D radially anisotropic shear wave model of North America (NA) lithospheric mantle based on full waveform tomography, combining teleseismic and regional distance data sampling the NA. Regional wavefield computations were performed numerically, using a regional Spectral Element code (RegSEM, Cupillard et al., 2012), while teleseismic computations were performed approximately, using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). For both datasets, the inversion was performed iteratively, using a Gauss-Newton scheme, with kernels computed using either NACT or the surface wave, path average approximation (PAVA), depending on the source-station distance. Building upon our previous work, we here present a new radially anisotropic lithospheric/asthenospheric model of shear velocity for North America based entirely on regional waveforms from an augmented dataset of ~150 events contained and observed inside the study region, with forward wavefield computations performed using RegSEM down to 40s, starting from our most recent whole mantle 3D radially anisotropic shear velocity model (SEMUCB-wm1, French and Romanowicz, 2014). Several iterations of inversion are performed using a Gauss-Newton scheme. We present and compare two models obtained, on the one hand, using NACT/PAVA kernels as in our previous work, and on the other, using hybrid kernels, where the Hessian is computed using NACT/PAVA, but the gradient is computed numerically from the adjoint wavefield, providing more accurate kernels while preserving the fast convergence properties of the Gauss-Newton inversion scheme. We also present an update to our azimuthally anisotropic shear

  8. Numerical computation of multishocked, three-dimensional supersonic flow fields with real gas effects.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, P.; Reinhardt, W. A.; Warming, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented which is capable of determining the supersonic flow field surrounding three-dimensional wing-body configurations such as a delta-wing space shuttle. The governing equations in conservation-law form are solved by a finite difference method using a second-order noncentered algorithm between the body and the outermost shock wave, which is treated as a sharp discontinuity. Secondary shocks which form between these boundaries are captured automatically, and the intersection of these shocks with the bow shock posed no difficulty. Resulting flow fields about typical blunt nose shuttle-like configurations at angle of attack are presented. The differences between perfect and real gas effects for high Mach number flows are shown.

  9. Numerical computation of the linear stability of the diffusion model for crystal growth simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Sorensen, D.C.; Meiron, D.I.; Wedeman, B.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a computational scheme for determining the linear stability of a diffusion model arising from the simulation of crystal growth. The process of a needle crystal solidifying into some undercooled liquid can be described by the dual diffusion equations with appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Here U{sub t} and U{sub a} denote the temperature of the liquid and solid respectively, and {alpha} represents the thermal diffusivity. At the solid-liquid interface, the motion of the interface denoted by r and the temperature field are related by the conservation relation where n is the unit outward pointing normal to the interface. A basic stationary solution to this free boundary problem can be obtained by writing the equations of motion in a moving frame and transforming the problem to parabolic coordinates. This is known as the Ivantsov parabola solution. Linear stability theory applied to this stationary solution gives rise to an eigenvalue problem of the form.

  10. Analysis and mitigation of numerical dissipation in inviscid and viscid computation of vortex-dominated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1990-01-01

    The conservative unsteady Euler equations for the flow relative motion in the moving frame of reference are used to solve for the steady and unsteady flows around sharp-edged delta wings. The resulting equations are solved by using an implicit approximately-factored finite volume scheme. Implicit second-order and explicit second- and fourth-order dissipations are added to the scheme. The boundary conditions are explicitly satisfied. The grid is generated by locally using a modified Joukowski transformation in cross flow planes at the grid chord stations. The computational applications cover a steady flow around a delta wing whose results serve as the initial conditions for the unsteady flow around a pitching delta wing about a large angle of attack. The steady results are compared with the experimental data and the periodic solution is achieved within the third cycle of oscillation.