Science.gov

Sample records for multi-pollutant control project

  1. Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Daniel

    2008-10-18

    The Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative to demonstrate an innovative combination of air pollution control technologies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Hg, acid gases (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF), and particulate matter from smaller coal-fired electric generating units (EGUs). There are about 400 units in the United States with capacities of 50-300 MW that currently are not equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), flue gas desulfurization (FGD), or mercury control systems. Many of these units, which collectively represent more than 55 GW of installed capacity, are difficult to retrofit for deep emission reductions because of space constraints and unfavorable economies of scale, making them increasingly vulnerable to retirement or fuel switching in the face of progressively more stringent environmental regulations. The Greenidge Project sought to confirm the commercial readiness of an emissions control system that is specifically designed to meet the environmental compliance requirements of these smaller coal-fired EGUs by offering a combination of deep emission reductions, low capital costs, small space requirements, applicability to high-sulfur coals, mechanical simplicity, and operational flexibility. The multi-pollutant control system includes a NO{sub x}OUT CASCADE{reg_sign} hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct SCR system for NO{sub x} control and a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubbing system (with a new baghouse) for SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter control. Mercury removal is provided as a co-benefit of the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse, and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, if required. The multi-pollutant control system was installed and tested on the 107-MW{sub e}, 1953-vintage AES Greenidge Unit 4 by a team including

  2. Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Control Project Preliminary Public Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Daniel P

    2009-01-12

    The Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative to demonstrate an innovative combination of air pollution control technologies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Hg, acid gases (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF), and particulate matter from smaller coal-fired electrical generating units (EGUs). The multi-pollutant control system includes a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NOx emissions by {ge}60%, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by {ge}95%. Mercury removal of {ge}90% is also targeted via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The technology is particularly well suited, because of its relatively low capital and maintenance costs and small space requirements, to meet the needs of coal-fired units with capacities of 50-300 MWe. There are about 440 such units in the United States that currently are not equipped with SCR, flue gas desulfurization (FGD), or mercury control systems. These smaller units are a valuable part of the nation's energy infrastructure, constituting about 60 GW of installed capacity. However, with the onset of the Clean Air Interstate Rule, Clean Air Mercury Rule, and various state environmental actions requiring deep reductions in emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury, the continued operation of these units increasingly depends upon the ability to identify viable air pollution control retrofit options for them. The large capital costs and sizable space requirements associated with conventional technologies such as SCR and wet FGD make these technologies unattractive for many smaller units. The Greenidge Project aims to confirm the

  3. DOE/EA-1493: Environmental Assessment for Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project (August 2004)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-08-10

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1493, titled ''Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project'', to analyze the potential environmental consequences of providing cost-shared funding support for the design, construction, and demonstration of an integrated multipollutant control system at AES's Greenidge Station in Dresden, New York. The system, expected to control emissions of NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HF, HCl, and Hg, would be installed on the existing, coal-fired, 107-MW Unit 4 at Greenidge. The results of the analyses provided in the EA are summarized in this Finding of No Significant Impact. The proposed action is for DOE to provide about $14.5 million for this project, while CONSOL Energy Inc. and its project partners would be responsible for the remaining $21 million. The proposed project will result in technical, environmental, and financial data from the design, operation and construction of the multi-pollutant control system. This 4.5-year, commercial-scale demonstration project would allow utilities, particularly those with units less than 300-MW in capacity, to make decisions regarding the integrated multi-pollutant control system as a viable commercial option. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has concluded that the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project would result in minimal and insignificant consequences to the human environment. Thus, DOE considers that the proposed action, providing cost-shared funding for the project, is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 United States Code 4321, et seq. Therefore, in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1021.322, DOE has concluded that preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this FONSI.

  4. Mercury Specie and Multi-Pollutant Control

    SciTech Connect

    Rob James; Virgil Joffrion; John McDermott; Steve Piche

    2010-05-31

    This project was awarded to demonstrate the ability to affect and optimize mercury speciation and multi-pollutant control using non-intrusive advanced sensor and optimization technologies. The intent was to demonstrate plant-wide optimization systems on a large coal fired steam electric power plant in order to minimize emissions, including mercury (Hg), while maximizing efficiency and maintaining saleable byproducts. Advanced solutions utilizing state-of-the-art sensors and neural network-based optimization and control technologies were proposed to maximize the removal of mercury vapor from the boiler flue gas thereby resulting in lower uncontrolled releases of mercury into the atmosphere. Budget Period 1 (Phase I) - Included the installation of sensors, software system design and establishment of the as-found baseline operating metrics for pre-project and post-project data comparison. Budget Period 2 (Phase II) - Software was installed, data communications links from the sensors were verified, and modifications required to integrate the software system to the DCS were performed. Budget Period 3 (Phase III) - Included the validation and demonstration of all control systems and software, and the comparison of the optimized test results with the targets established for the project site. This report represents the final technical report for the project, covering the entire award period and representing the final results compared to project goals. NeuCo shouldered 61% of the total project cost; while DOE shouldered the remaining 39%. The DOE requires repayment of its investment. This repayment will result from commercial sales of the products developed under the project. NRG's Limestone power plant (formerly owned by Texas Genco) contributed the host site, human resources, and engineering support to ensure the project's success.

  5. Greenidge multi-pollutant project achieves emissions reduction goals

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    Performance testing at the Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Project has met or exceeded project goals, indicating that deep emission reduciton sin small, difficult-to-retrofit power plants can be achieved. The technology fitted at the 107 MWe AES Greenridge Unit 4 includes a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction/selective catalytic reduction system for NOx control (NOxOUT CASCADE) and a Turbosorp circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system for SO{sub 2}, mercury, SO{sub 3} HC and Hf control. 2 figs.

  6. Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Daniel P; Locke, James E

    2008-03-01

    On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the

  7. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE-BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    James Reynolds

    2003-01-01

    This is the first quarterly report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane--Based Upflow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members will conduct detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. Test results performed on the existing metallic WESP during November of 2002 showed consistent results with previous test results. Average collection efficiency of 89% on SO{sub 3} mist was achieved. Additionally, removal efficiencies of 62% were achieved at very high velocity, greater than 15 ft./sec.

  8. MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL USING MEMBRANE--BASED UP-FLOW WET ELECTROSTATIC PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    James Reynolds

    2004-10-29

    This is the Final Report of the ''Multi-Pollutant Control Using Membrane-Based Up-flow Wet Electrostatic Precipitation'' project funded by the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory under DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41592 to Croll-Reynolds Clean Air Technologies (CRCAT). In this 18 month project, CRCAT and its team members conducted detailed emission tests of metallic and new membrane collection material within a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) at First Energy's Penn Power's Bruce Mansfield (BMP) plant in Shippingport, Pa. The Membrane WESP was designed to be as similar as the metallic WESP in terms of collection area, air-flow, and electrical characteristics. Both units are two-field units. The membrane unit was installed during the 2nd and 3rd quarters of 2003. Testing of the metallic unit was performed to create a baseline since the Mansfield plant had installed selective catalytic reduction equipment for NOx control and a sodium bisulfate injection system for SO3 control during the spring of 2003. Tests results on the metallic WESP were consistent with previous testing for PM2.5, SO3 mist and mercury. Testing on the membrane WESP demonstrated no adverse impact and equivalent removal efficiencies as that of the metallic WESP. Testing on both units was performed at 8,000 acfm and 15,000 acfm. Summary results are shown.

  9. TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Richard E. Johnson

    2004-07-30

    baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury and other air pollutants, while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

  10. TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL-ON THREE 90 MW COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Richard E. Johnson

    2004-10-26

    baghouse. Mercury will be controlled by injection of activated carbon or other novel sorbents, while NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} will be controlled by injection of sodium based or other novel sorbents. Addition of the TOXECON baghouse will provide enhanced particulate control. Sorbents will be injected downstream of the existing particle collection device to allow for continued sale and reuse of captured fly ash from the existing particulate control device, uncontaminated by activated carbon or sodium sorbents. Methods for sorbent regeneration, i.e. mercury recovery from the sorbent, will be explored and evaluated. For mercury concentration monitoring in the flue gas streams, components available for use will be evaluated and the best available will be integrated into a mercury CEM suitable for use in the power plant environment. This project will provide for the use of a novel multi-pollutant control system to reduce emissions of mercury while minimizing waste, from a coal-fired power generation system.

  11. Role of sectoral and multi-pollutant emission control strategies in improving atmospheric visibility in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S; Gao, Yang; Dong, Xinyi; Zhuang, Guoshun; Lin, Yanfen

    2014-01-01

    The Community Multi-scale Air Quality modeling system is used to investigate the response of atmospheric visibility to the emission reduction from different sectors (i.e. industries, traffic and power plants) in the Yangtze River Delta, China. Visibility improvement from exclusive reduction of NOx or VOC emission was most inefficient. Sulfate and organic aerosol would rebound if NOx emission was exclusively reduced from any emission sector. The most efficient way to improve the atmospheric visibility was proven to be the multi-pollutant control strategies. Simultaneous emission reductions (20-50%) on NOx, VOC and PM from the industrial and mobile sectors could result in 0.3-1.0 km visibility improvement. And the emission controls on both NOx (85%) and SO2 (90%) from power plants gained the largest visibility improvement of up to 4.0 km among all the scenarios. The seasonal visibility improvement subject to emission controls was higher in summer while lower in the other seasons. PMID:24121267

  12. MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher R. McLaron

    2004-12-01

    Powerspan has conducted pilot scale testing of a multi-pollutant control technology at FirstEnergy's Burger Power Plant under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. The technology, Electro-Catalytic Oxidation (ECO), simultaneously removes sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and mercury (Hg) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Powerspan's ECO{reg_sign} pilot test program focused on optimization of Hg removal in a 1-MWe slipstream pilot while maintaining greater than 90% removal of NO{sub x} and 98% removal of SO{sub 2}. This Final Technical Report discusses pilot operations, installation and maintenance of the Hg SCEMS instrumentation, and performance results including component and overall removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, PM and Hg from the flue gas and removal of captured Hg from the co-product fertilizer stream.

  13. Characterization of Coal Combustion Residues from Electric Utilities Using Wet Scrubbers for Multi-Pollutant Control

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report evaluates changes that may occur to coal combustion residues (CCRs) in response to changes in air pollution control technology at coal-fired power plants, which will reduce emissions from the flue gas stack by transferring pollutants to fly ash and other air pollution...

  14. INTERDEPENDENCIES OF MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL SIMULATIONS IN AN AIR QUALITY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work, we use the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to examine the effect of several control strategies on simultaneous concentrations of ozone, PM2.5, and three important HAPs: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and benzene.

  15. TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Richard E. Johnson

    2006-01-25

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single

  16. TOXECON RETROFIT FOR MERCURY AND MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL ON THREE 90-MW COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Steven T. Derenne

    2006-04-28

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is supporting projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by a particulate control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. We Energies has over 3,200 MW of coal-fired generating capacity and supports an integrated multi-emission control strategy for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury emissions while maintaining a varied fuel mix for electric supply. The primary goal of this project is to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant. Additional goals are to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter (PM) emissions, allow for reuse and sale of fly ash, demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use in the power plant environment, and demonstrate a process to recover mercury captured in the sorbent. To achieve these goals, We Energies (the Participant) will design, install, and operate a TOXECON{trademark} system designed to clean the combined flue gases of Units 7, 8, and 9 at the Presque Isle Power Plant. TOXECON{trademark} is a patented process in which a fabric filter system (baghouse) installed downstream of an existing particle control device is used in conjunction with sorbent injection for removal of pollutants from combustion flue gas. For this project, the flue gas emissions will be controlled from the three units using a single

  17. Multi-Pollutant Emissions Control: Pilot Plant Study of Technologies for Reducing Hg, SO3, NOx and CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Fenger; Richard A. Winschel

    2005-08-31

    A slipstream pilot plant was built and operated to investigate technology to adsorb mercury (Hg) onto the existing particulate (i.e., fly ash) by cooling flue gas to 200-240 F with a Ljungstrom-type air heater or with water spray. The mercury on the fly ash was then captured in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). An alkaline material, magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}), is injected into flue gas upstream of the air heater to control sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), which prevents acid condensation and corrosion of the air heater and ductwork. The slipstream was taken from a bituminous coal-fired power plant. During this contract, Plant Design and Construction (Task 1), Start Up and Maintenance (Task 2), Baseline Testing (Task 3), Sorbent Testing (Task 4), Parametric Testing (Task 5), Humidification Tests (Task 6), Long-Term Testing (Task 7), and a Corrosion Study (Task 8) were completed. The Mercury Stability Study (Task 9), ESP Report (Task 11), Air Heater Report (Task 12) and Final Report (Task 14) were completed. These aspects of the project, as well as progress on Public Outreach (Task 15), are discussed in detail in this final report. Over 90% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 200-210 F at the ESP inlet; baseline conditions with 290 F flue gas gave about 26% removal. Mercury removal is sensitive to flue gas temperature and carbon content of fly ash. At 200-210 F, both elemental and oxidized mercury were effectively captured at the ESP. Mg(OH){sub 2} injection proved effective for removal of SO{sub 3} and eliminated rapid fouling of the air heater. The pilot ESP performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions. Mercury volatility and leaching tests did not show any stability problems. No significant corrosion was detected at the air heater or on corrosion coupons at the ESP. The results justify larger-scale testing/demonstration of the technology. These conclusions are presented and discussed in two presentations given in July and

  18. Current projects in Fuzzy Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugeno, Michio

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on current projects in fuzzy control are presented. Three projects on helicopter flight control are discussed. The projects are (1) radio control by oral instructions; (2) automatic autorotation entry in engine failure; and (3) unmanned helicopter for sea rescue.

  19. Device Oriented Project Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  20. Fly ash-TiO2 nanocomposite material for multi-pollutants wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Visa, Maria; Andronic, Luminita; Duta, Anca

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis, characterization and adsorption properties of a novel nano-composite obtained using the hydrothermal method applied to a fly ash-TiO2 slurry and hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide, as surface controlling agent. The new adsorbent was investigated in terms of crystallinity (XRD), surface properties (AFM, SEM, and porosity and BET surface) and surface chemistry (EDX, FTIR). The nanocomposite's properties were sequentially tested in adsorption and photocatalysis processes applied to multi-pollutant synthetic wastewaters loaded with copper cations and two industrial dyes: the acid dye Bemacid Blau and the reactive dye Bemacid Rot; the nano-composite substrate allowed reaching high removal efficiencies, above 90%, both in adsorption and in photodegradation experiments, in optimised conditions. PMID:25531918

  1. Septic tank discharges as multi-pollutant hotspots in catchments.

    PubMed

    Richards, Samia; Paterson, Eric; Withers, Paul J A; Stutter, Marc

    2016-01-15

    Small point sources of pollutants such as septic tanks are recognised as significant contributors to streams' pathogen and nutrient loadings, however there is little data in the UK on which to judge the potential risks that septic tank effluents (STEs) pose to water quality and human health. We present the first comprehensive analysis of STE to help assess multi-pollutant characteristics, management-related risk factors and potential tracers that might be used to identify STE sources. Thirty-two septic tank effluents from residential households located in North East of Scotland were sampled along with adjacent stream waters. Biological, physical, chemical and fluorescence characterisation was coupled with information on system age, design, type of tank, tank management and number of users. Biological characterisation revealed that total coliforms and Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration ranges were: 10(3)-10(8) and 10(3)-10(7)MPN/100 mL, respectively. Physical parameters such as electrical conductivity, turbidity and alkalinity ranged 160-1730 μS/cm, 8-916 NTU and 15-698 mg/L, respectively. Effluent total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive P (SRP), total nitrogen (TN) and ammonium-N (NH4-N) concentrations ranged 1-32, <1-26, 11-146 and 2-144 mg/L, respectively. Positive correlations were obtained between phosphorus, sodium, potassium, barium, copper and aluminium. Domestic STE may pose pollution risks particularly for NH4-N, dissolved P, SRP, copper, dissolved N, and potassium since enrichment factors were >1651, 213, 176, 63, 14 and 8 times that of stream waters, respectively. Fluorescence characterisation revealed the presence of tryptophan peak in the effluent and downstream waters but not detected upstream from the source. Tank condition, management and number of users had influenced effluent quality that can pose a direct risk to stream waters as multiple points of pollutants. PMID:26556750

  2. Multi-pollutant exposures in an asthmatic cohort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ron; Rappold, Ana G.; Case, Martin; Schmitt, Mike; Stone, Susan; Jones, Paul; Thornburg, Jonathan; Devlin, Robert B.

    2012-12-01

    An investigation of personal fine and coarse particulate matter (PM2.5, PM10-2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) exposures was conducted with an adult asthmatic cohort as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Moderate and Severe Asthmatics and their Environment Study (MASAES). The overall goal of the MASAES was to determine the association of particulate matter on the degree of resulting lung inflammation, with those having severe asthma hypothesized to be more highly susceptible to such outcomes. The primary exposure objective was to determine the spatial (personal versus ambient) and temporal relationships associated with the aforementioned air pollutants and establish the precision of a new dual PM2.5, PM10-2.5 monitor (CPEM) for personal exposure monitoring. A total of 16 non-smoking adults of various asthma severities were monitored over the course of a 14 month period during 2008-2009. Participants were monitored for 24 continuous hours each monitoring day with a maximum of five events per participant. Median personal PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 exposures were 16.5 and 10.1 μg m-3, respectively. Daily ambient mass concentrations accounted for less than 1% of the observed variability in personal PM2.5 or PM10-2.5 exposures. Duplicate personal measures yielded R2 values of 0.92 PM2.5 and 0.77 PM10-2.5, respectively. Maximum daily personal exposures of 17.0 ppb NO2 and 21.7 ppb O3 occurred with respective mean exposures of 5.8 and 3.4 ppb. Ambient NO2 and O3 measures were observed to be poorly associated with personal exposures (R2 < 0.08) when viewed independent of the participant. The poor correlation between personal and ambient concentrations of PM as well as the various gaseous copollutants indicates the complexity of the multi-pollutant environment and the impact of non-ambient sources on these pollutants relative to total personal exposures.

  3. Project resources planning and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibbers, C. W.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains instructional guidelines for the resources planning and control of research and development (R&D) projects managed by NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC). Although written to serve primarily as a practical guide and reference for those LaRC personnel who perform resources planning, analysis, control, and reporting functions, it should also be meaningful to other NASA personnel who are directly or indirectly involved in or affected by these functions, especially project technical managers whose responsibilities include resources management. Certain sections should help Contractor personnel to better understand what resources information must usually be submitted on LaRC projects and what use is made of such information. The Project Manager of a large R&D project typicaly receives support from an Analyst in the area of resources management. The Analyst provides assistance in four functional areas: Planning, Analysis/Control, Administration, and Reporting. Each of these functions are discussed in detail. Examples of techniques used effectively on LaRC projects have been included where applicable. A considerable amount of information has been included on the use of Performance Measurement (Earned Value) Systems for contract cost control and reporting as little information is currently available on this subject in NASA publications.

  4. Microphonics control for Project X

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, W.; Barbanotti, S.; Branlard, J.; Cancelo, G.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Champion, M.; Gonin, I.; Klebaner, A.; Orris, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The proposed multi-MW Project X facility at Fermilab will employ cavities with bandwidths as narrow as 20 Hz. This combination of high RF power with narrow bandwidths combined requires careful attention to detuning control if these cavities are to be operated successfully. Detuning control for Projects X will require a coordinated effort between the groups responsible for various machine subsystems. Considerable progress in this area has been made over the past year. Detuning levels in the Project X cavities, specifically the Low and High {beta} 650 MHz elliptical types, can have a significant impact on the overall cost of the project. The narrow bandwidths, and the high RF Power requirements, and the large number of these cavities mean that careful attention to detuning control will be required if these cavities are to operate successfully. Limiting cavity detuning in Project X will require a coordinated effort between the groups responsible for various subsystems of the planned machine. Considerable progress towards this goal has been made by each of these groups over the past year.

  5. Modelling multi-pollutant compliance options for power companies

    SciTech Connect

    Teeth, B.; Hopkins, B.

    2007-09-15

    Emission control regulations in the United States require that utilities consider retrofit of reduction technologies for multiple pollutants at all plants in their fleet. Washington Group International has developed a Compliance Strategy Model that evaluates the cost of combinations of flue gas desulfurization, NOx and mercury control processes for multiple units to determine an economical mix of the control processes of the fleet of generating units in each state or designated region. The Model is based on an Excel spreadsheet which uses mixed integer routines and Premium Solver to assess up to 10{sup 40} possible combinations of emissions control processes to determine the combination with an economic present worth of revenue requirement (PWRR). Examples of use of the Model have been for consideration of NOx reduction technologies at 19 coal-fired units in one fleet and of 76 units in one fleet in five regions. 1 tab.

  6. UMTRA Project document control system manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This manual defines the Project Document Control System (PDCS) operated by the US DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project Office. The purpose of the PDCS is to provide an active and continuing program for acquiring, controlling, retaining, retrieving, retiring and disposing of all UMTRA Project documents. The PDCS also provides guidance and coordination in transferring documents by various UMTRA Projection document control centers to a central location.

  7. Field project control. Back to basics

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, E.E. III )

    1993-10-01

    Computers and critical path method (CPM) software are the tools employed by project planning and scheduling teams to rapidly develop project schedules. It is the analysis of the CPM schedule and the follow-up actions that result in the successful completion of a project. A short duration field construction project is presented in this article which presented an opportunity for a project control engineer to apply a variety of project controls tools and techniques to the total project management effort. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Framing air pollution epidemiology in terms of population interventions, with applications to multi-pollutant modeling

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Jonathan M.; Reid, Colleen E.; Tager, Ira B.

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution epidemiology continues moving toward the study of mixtures and multi-pollutant modeling. Simultaneously, there is a movement in epidemiology to estimate policy-relevant health effects that can be understood in reference to specific interventions. Scaling regression coefficients from a regression model by an interquartile range (IQR) is one common approach to presenting multi-pollutant health effect estimates. We are unaware of guidance on how to interpret these effect estimates as an intervention. To illustrate the issues of interpretability of IQR-scaled air pollution health effects, we analyzed how daily concentration changes in two air pollutants (NO2 and PM2.5; nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5μm) related to one another within two seasons (summer and winter), within three cities with distinct air pollution profiles (Burbank, California; Houston, Texas; and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania). In each city-season, we examined how realistically IQR-scaling in multipollutant lag-1 time-series studies reflects a hypothetical intervention that is possible given the observed data. We proposed 2 causal conditions to explicitly link IQR-scaled effects to a clearly defined hypothetical intervention. Condition 1 specified that the index pollutant had to experience a daily concentration change of greater than one IQR, reflecting the notion that the IQR is an appropriate measure of variability between consecutive days. Condition 2 specified that the co-pollutant had to remain relatively constant. We found that in some city-seasons, there were very few instances in which these conditions were satisfied (e.g., 1 day in Pittsburgh during summer). We discuss the practical implications of IQR scaling and suggest alternative approaches to presenting multi-pollutant effects that are supported by empirical data. PMID:25643106

  9. Characterizing multi-pollutant air pollution in China: Comparison of three air quality indices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianlin; Ying, Qi; Wang, Yungang; Zhang, Hongliang

    2015-11-01

    Multi-pollutant air pollution (i.e., several pollutants reaching very high concentrations simultaneously) frequently occurs in many regions across China. Air quality index (AQI) is used worldwide to inform the public about levels of air pollution and associated health risks. The current AQI approach used in China is based on the maximum value of individual pollutants, and does not consider the combined health effects of exposure to multiple pollutants. In this study, two novel alternative indices--aggregate air quality index (AAQI) and health-risk based air quality index (HAQI)--were calculated based on data collected in six megacities of China (Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shjiazhuang, Xi'an, and Wuhan) during 2013 to 2014. Both AAQI and HAQI take into account the combined health effects of various pollutants, and the HAQI considers the exposure (or concentration)-response relationships of pollutants. AAQI and HAQI were compared to AQI to examine the effectiveness of the current AQI in characterizing multi-pollutant air pollution in China. The AAQI and HAQI values are higher than the AQI on days when two or more pollutants simultaneously exceed the Chinese Ambient Air Quality Standards (CAAQS) 24-hour Grade II standards. The results of the comparison of the classification of risk categories based on the three indices indicate that the current AQI approach underestimates the severity of health risk associated with exposure to multi-pollutant air pollution. For the AQI-based risk category of 'unhealthy', 96% and 80% of the days would be 'very unhealthy' or 'hazardous' if based on AAQI and HAQI, respectively; and for the AQI-based risk category of 'very unhealthy', 67% and 75% of the days would be 'hazardous' if based on AAQI and HAQI, respectively. The results suggest that the general public, especially sensitive population groups such as children and the elderly, should take more stringent actions than those currently suggested based on the AQI approach during

  10. Environmental Control Unit Harness Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Testing four new Environmental Control Unit Harnesses for improved user comfort during SCAPE operations. Phase I, testing in a lab environment, Phase II will continue testing the best candidates in a field environment.

  11. Version Control in Project-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milentijevic, Ivan; Ciric, Vladimir; Vojinovic, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of a generalized model for version control systems application as a support in a range of project-based learning methods. The model is given as UML sequence diagram and described in detail. The proposed model encompasses a wide range of different project-based learning approaches by assigning a supervisory…

  12. Multi-pollutant mobile platform measurements of air pollutants adjacent to a major roadway

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Erin A.; Banks, Lyndsey; Fintzi, Jonathan; Gould, Timothy R.; Hartin, Kris; Schaal, LaNae; Davey, Mark; Sheppard, Lianne; Larson, Timothy; Yost, Michael G.; Simpson, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    A mobile monitoring platform developed at the University of Washington Center for Clean Air Research (CCAR) measured 10 pollutant metrics (10 s measurements at an average speed of 22 km/hr) in two neighborhoods bordering a major interstate in Albuquerque, NM, USA from April 18-24 2012. 5 days of data sharing a common downwind orientation with respect to the roadway were analyzed. The aggregate results show a three-fold increase in black carbon (BC) concentrations within 10 meters of the edge of roadway, in addition to elevated nanoparticle concentration and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 1 μm (PN1) concentrations. A 30% reduction in ozone concentration near the roadway was observed, anti-correlated with an increase in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx). In this study, the pollutants measured have been expanded to include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), particle size distribution (0.25-32 μm), and ultra-violet absorbing particulate matter (UVPM). The raster sampling scheme combined with spatial and temporal measurement alignment provide a measure of variability in the near roadway concentrations, and allow us to use a principal component analysis to identify multi-pollutant features and analyze their roadway influences. PMID:25364294

  13. Simultaneous removal of multi-pollutants in an intimate integrated flocculation-adsorption fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dandan; Xu, Zhengxue; Wang, Yao; Wang, Jun; Hou, Dianxun; Dong, Shuangshi

    2015-03-01

    A novel intimate integrated flocculation-adsorption fluidized bed (IFAFB) was designed based on the hydraulic classification theory, and the operation, performance, characterization, and mechanisms of the novel process were developed. In this system, 150 mg · L(-1) kaolin clay and 100 mg · L(-1) phenol were used to simulate multi-pollutants in synthetic influent; resin beads and silica beads were the solid phases for the fluidized flocculator, and polymer aluminum chloride (PAC) and granular activated carbon were the flocculant and the adsorbent, respectively. The results showed that the Euler numeral was the most suitable dynamic parameter for flocculation in the fluidized bed when compared with the velocity gradient (G), Reynolds number (Re), and GRe (-1/2) . Additionally, the adsorption capacities of the fluidized regime were 8.77 and 24.70 mg · g(-1) greater than those of the fixed regime at superficial velocities of 6 and 8 mm · s(-1), respectively. In the IFAFB, the removal efficiencies of kaolin clay and phenol in the IFAFB reached 95 and 80 % simultaneously at total initial bed height of 35 mm. Flocs size, fractal dimension, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that the relationship of flocculation and adsorption in the IFAFB was mutually beneficial. Adsorption favored continuous growth of flocs and protected flocs from breakage, while flocculation removed fine particles as the first stage to prevent the adsorption of kaolin clay. PMID:25266059

  14. Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Mult-Pollutant Control Project

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Daniel P; Locke, James E

    2008-02-01

    CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-megawatt (MW) Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/induct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. Testing was conducted through ports located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor to evaluate the performance of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system, as well as through ports located at the air heater outlet and baghouse outlet or stack to determine pollutant removal efficiencies across the Turbosorp{reg_sign} scrubber and baghouse. Data from the unit's stack continuous emission monitor (CEM) were also used for determining attainment of the performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions and SO{sub 2} removal efficiency.

  15. Method oil shale pollutant sorption/NO.sub.x reburning multi-pollutant control

    DOEpatents

    Boardman, Richard D.; Carrington, Robert A.

    2008-06-10

    A method of decreasing pollutants produced in a combustion process. The method comprises combusting coal in a combustion chamber to produce at least one pollutant selected from the group consisting of a nitrogen-containing pollutant, sulfuric acid, sulfur trioxide, carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, chlorine, hydroiodic acid, iodine, hydrofluoric acid, fluorine, hydrobromic acid, bromine, phosphoric acid, phosphorous pentaoxide, elemental mercury, and mercuric chloride. Oil shale particles are introduced into the combustion chamber and are combusted to produce sorbent particulates and a reductant. The at least one pollutant is contacted with at least one of the sorbent particulates and the reductant to decrease an amount of the at least one pollutant in the combustion chamber. The reductant may chemically reduce the at least one pollutant to a benign species. The sorbent particulates may adsorb or absorb the at least one pollutant. A combustion chamber that produces decreased pollutants in a combustion process is also disclosed.

  16. Multi-pollutant treatment of crystalline cellulosic effluent: Function of dissolved oxygen on process control.

    PubMed

    Shanthi Sravan, J; Naresh Kumar, A; Venkata Mohan, S

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of crystalline cellulose based wastewater was carried out in periodic discontinuous batch reactor (PDBR). Specific influence of dissolved oxygen on treatment of crystalline cellulosic (CC) wastewater was evaluated in three different microenvironments such as aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic. PDBR-aerobic biosystem documented relatively higher substrate degradation [2.63kgCOD/m(3)-day (92%)] in comparison to PDBR-anoxic [2.12kgCOD/m(3)-day (71%)] and PDBR-anaerobic [1.81kgCOD/m(3)-day (63%)], which is in accordance with the observed DO levels. Similarly, multipollutants viz., phosphates and nitrates removal was observed to be higher in aerobic followed by anoxic and anaerobic operations. Higher nitrate removal in aerobic operation might be attributed to the efficient denitrification carried out by the biocatalyst, which utilizes both nitrates and oxygen as oxidizing agents. Multiscan spectral profiles depicted reduction in color intensity in all three microenvironments that correlated with the substrate degradation observed. Despite the high organic load, PDBR functioned well without exhibiting process inhibition. PMID:27005787

  17. ELKINS MINE DRAINAGE POLLUTION CONTROL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1964 several federal agencies in cooperation with the State of West Virginia initiated a project to demonstrate methods to control the pollution from abandoned underground and surface mines in the Roaring Creek-Grassy Run Watersheds near Elkins, West Virginia. The Roaring Cree...

  18. The AFIT gross motion control project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, M. B., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Gross Motion Control project is to study alternative control approaches that will provide payload invariant high speed trajectory tracking for nonrepetitive motions in free space. The research has concentrated on modifications to the model-based control structure. Development and evaluation is being actively pursued of both adaptive primary (inner loop) and robust secondary (output loop) controllers. In-house developments are compared and contrasted to the techniques proposed by other researchers. The case study for the evaluation is the first three links of a PUMA-560. Incorporating the principals of multiple model adaptive estimation, artificial neural networks, and Lyapunov theory into the model based paradigm has shown the potential for enhanced tracking. Secondary controllers based on Quantitative Feedback Theory, or augmented with auxiliary inputs, significantly improve the robustness to payload variations and unmodeled drive system dynamics. An overview is presented of the different concepts under investigation and a sample is provided of the latest experimental results.

  19. Controls and Electronics in the LEBIT Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janus, Elizabeth

    2002-10-01

    The LEBIT project at the NSCL is an experiment under construction that will accept a high-energy beam from the coupled cyclotron and convert it to a low-energy, low-emittance beam. This low-energy beam will be used in a variety of experiments, including precision mass measurements of exotic nuclei. The experiment contains a gas-stopping cell followed by an ion transport and trapping system. One particular section consists of an ion trap that accumulates incoming ions, cools them, and releases them as ion bunches. Following the buncher is an electrostatic deflector that serves to steer the ions as they leave this trap. Although the control for the deflector is at ground, the deflector needs be raised to an average 2kV potential. Relative to this potential, offsets are applied to the horizontal and vertical steering plates, in order to achieve beam steering. This summer, an electronic board was worked on to accomplish this. The main components of the board include DC/DC converter and high-voltage isolation amplifiers. Because of the complexity of the LEBIT project, all instruments will be controlled through computers. One programming interface currently being used is LabView. Programs have been designed to control the Keithley 2000-20 Multimeter and the Keithley 6514 Electrometer. These instruments will serve to measure voltage and small beam currents.

  20. Project W-058 monitor and control system logic

    SciTech Connect

    ROBERTS, J.B.

    1999-05-12

    This supporting document contains the printout of the control logic for the Project W-058 Monitor and Control System, as developed by Programmable Control Services, Inc. The logic is arranged in five appendices, one for each programmable logic controller console.

  1. Bioremediation of multi-polluted soil by spent mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) substrate: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons degradation and Pb availability.

    PubMed

    García-Delgado, Carlos; Yunta, Felipe; Eymar, Enrique

    2015-12-30

    This study investigates the effect of three spent Agaricus bisporus substrate (SAS) application methods on bioremediation of soil multi-polluted with Pb and PAH from close to a shooting range with respect natural attenuation (SM). The remediation treatments involve (i) use of sterilized SAS to biostimulate the inherent soil microbiota (SSAS) and two bioaugmentation possibilities (ii) its use without previous treatment to inoculate A. bisporus and inherent microbiota (SAS) or (iii) SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp). The efficiency of each bioremediation microcosm was evaluated by: fungal activity, heterotrophic and PAH-degrading bacterial population, PAH removal, Pb mobility and soil eco-toxicity. Biostimulation of the native soil microbiology (SSAS) achieved similar levels of PAH biodegradation as SM and poor soil detoxification. Bioaugmented microcosms produced higher PAH removal and eco-toxicity reduction via different routes. SAS increased the PAH-degrading bacterial population, but lowered fungal activity. Abisp was a good inoculum carrier for A. bisporus exhibiting high levels of ligninolytic activity, the total and PAH-degrading bacteria population increased with incubation time. The three SAS applications produced slight Pb mobilization (<0.3%). SAS sterilization and further A. bisporus re-inoculation (Abisp) proved the best application method to remove PAH, mainly BaP, and detoxify the multi-polluted soil. PMID:26188871

  2. A Statistical Project Control Tool for Engineering Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauch, Garland T.

    2001-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of a Statistical Project Control Tool (SPCT) for managing engineering projects. A literature review pointed to a definition of project success, (i.e., A project is successful when the cost, schedule, technical performance, and quality satisfy the customer.) The literature review also pointed to project success factors, and traditional project control tools, and performance measures that are detailed in the report. The essential problem is that with resources becoming more limited, and an increasing number or projects, project failure is increasing, there is a limitation of existing methods and systematic methods are required. The objective of the work is to provide a new statistical project control tool for project managers. Graphs using the SPCT method plotting results of 3 successful projects and 3 failed projects are reviewed, with success and failure being defined by the owner.

  3. Project Design Concept for Monitoring and Control System

    SciTech Connect

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2000-10-02

    This Project Design Concept represents operational requirements established for use in design the tank farm Monitoring and Control System. These upgrades are included within the scope of Project W-314, Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations.

  4. Controlled Ecological Life Support System Breadboard Project - 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Breadboard Project, NASA's effort to develop the technology required to produce a functioning bioregenerative system, is discussed. The different phases of the project and its current status are described. The relationship between the project components are shown, and major project activities for fiscal years 1989-1993 are listed. The biomass production chamber to be used by the project is described.

  5. Administrative Leadership as Projection, Social Control, and Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Donald B.

    Over the past 50 years, theoretical and methodological problems have plagued the study of leadership. This paper, proposing an alternative theory, argues that leadership has three fundamental components: projection and social control, which are linked by action. Projection is the visualization of a project to be completed. Educational…

  6. Self-Correcting HVAC Controls Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Cho, Heejin; Goddard, James K.; Dinh, Liem H.

    2010-01-04

    This document represents the final project report for the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls Project jointly funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP). The project, initiated in October 2008, focused on exploratory initial development of self-correcting controls for selected HVAC components in air handlers. This report, along with the companion report documenting the algorithms developed, Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units (Fernandez et al. 2009), document the work performed and results of this project.

  7. [Effect of comprehensive control project on schistosomiasis in Nanjian county].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ji-Mao; Wu, Jun-Sheng; Yang, Meng-Xian; Li, Dian; Jiao, Dian; Lian, Fu; Yang, Qing-Quan

    2011-04-01

    The comprehensive control project for schistosomiasis was implemented in Nanjian County from 2004 to 2008. After the implementation of the control project, the infection rates of population and livestock decreased by 94.39% and 83.29% in 2008, respectively, with both infection rates less than 1%, no acute schistosomiasis cases had been found since 2005. Snail areas decreased by 70.01%, no infected snails had been found since 2007. Through the implementation of the comprehensive control project, schistosomiasis had been effectively controlled in Nanjian County. PMID:22164604

  8. Environmental Risk Score as a New Tool to Examine Multi-Pollutants in Epidemiologic Research: An Example from the NHANES Study Using Serum Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Kyun; Tao, Yebin; Meeker, John D.; Harlow, Siobán D.; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2014-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that environmental pollutants, such as heavy metals, persistent organic pollutants and plasticizers play an important role in the development of chronic diseases. Most epidemiologic studies have examined environmental pollutants individually, but in real life, we are exposed to multi-pollutants and pollution mixtures, not single pollutants. Although multi-pollutant approaches have been recognized recently, challenges exist such as how to estimate the risk of adverse health responses from multi-pollutants. We propose an “Environmental Risk Score (ERS)” as a new simple tool to examine the risk of exposure to multi-pollutants in epidemiologic research. Methods and Results We examined 134 environmental pollutants in relation to serum lipids (total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) and triglycerides) using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1999 and 2006. Using a two-stage approach, stage-1 for discovery (n = 10818) and stage-2 for validation (n = 4615), we identified 13 associated pollutants for total cholesterol, 9 for HDL, 5 for LDL and 27 for triglycerides with adjustment for sociodemographic factors, body mass index and serum nutrient levels. Using the regression coefficients (weights) from joint analyses of the combined data and exposure concentrations, ERS were computed as a weighted sum of the pollutant levels. We computed ERS for multiple lipid outcomes examined individually (single-phenotype approach) or together (multi-phenotype approach). Although the contributions of ERS to overall risk predictions for lipid outcomes were modest, we found relatively stronger associations between ERS and lipid outcomes than with individual pollutants. The magnitudes of the observed associations for ERS were comparable to or stronger than those for socio-demographic factors or BMI. Conclusions This study suggests ERS is

  9. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 1: Planning Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the planning documents from the GCS project. Volume 1 contains five appendices: A. Plan for Software Aspects of Certification for the Guidance and Control Software Project; B. Software Development Standards for the Guidance and Control Software Project; C. Software Verification Plan for the Guidance and Control Software Project; D. Software Configuration Management Plan for the Guidance and Control Software Project; and E. Software Quality Assurance Activities.

  10. R&D Project Control System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Gene L.

    The recurrence of problems in connection with research and development (R and D) activities supported by the Audio-Visual Center of Indiana University led to the development of a proposed control system. This paper lists those problems and examines the assumptions which must be met by the control system--that the Center will support all types of R…

  11. Design of decentralized multivariable excitation controllers in multimachine power systems by projective controls

    SciTech Connect

    Arnautovic, D.; Medanic, J.

    1987-12-01

    A methodology for the design of decentralized multivariable excitation and controllers in multimachine power systems is developed using projective controls. The existing methodology, is extended to permit the coordinated design of AVR and PSS controllers in power systems.

  12. MILA Antenna Control Unit Replacement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresette, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The Air to Ground Subsystem (AGS) Antenna Control Units at the MILA Ground Network Tracking Station are at end-of-life and are being replaced. AGS consists of two antennas at MILA (Quad-Helix and Teltrac). Software was taken from the existing Subsystem Controller and modified for the Antenna Control Unit (ACU). The software is capable of receiving and sending commands to and from the ACU. Moving the azimuth clockwise, counterclockwise, moving the elevation up or down, turning servo power on and off, and inputting azimuth and elevation angles are commands that the antenna can receive.

  13. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 2: Development Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the development documents from the GCS project. Volume 2 contains three appendices: A. Guidance and Control Software Development Specification; B. Design Description for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software; and C. Source Code for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software

  14. Intelligence support to arms control. Study project

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, A.E.

    1990-04-09

    This paper argues that intelligence support is critical to the success of arms control. It identifies and describes the roles of intelligence in the arms control process, describes the existing intelligence organizational structure for arms control support, and identifies and analyzes issues. The roles include support to policy formulation, support to treaty negotiation, support to ratification, and finally, during verification, support for the implementation of the treaty through monitoring. The Director of Central Intelligence is responsible for monitoring, while the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency has responsibility for verification. Adjudication of conflicting interpretations occurs within the NSC committee structure. For several reasons, intelligence cannot be expected to do the actual verification of an arms control treaty. Most importantly, determination of an acceptable degree of confidence is always a political issue, although based on military judgement. Assigning intelligence responsibility for monitoring, rather than verification, helps to limit the politicization of intelligence. Issues identified during the research for this paper were analyzed within three subgroups: those inherent in the intelligence discipline; these must be managed successfully to limit adverse impact on intelligence products. Second, issues and challenges inherent in arms control bureaucratic relationships; these are best managed by keeping separate the actual monitoring analysis and verification this gives the West justification for caution, and reinforces the need for continued emphasis on verification.

  15. An Open Specification for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, A.; Heuser, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An 'open specification' for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures is under development in the Spacecraft Control Working Group of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astro- nautics. This architecture identifies 5 basic elements incorporated in the design of similar operations systems: Data, System Management, Control Interface, Decision Support Engine, & Space Messaging Service.

  16. Projection Operator: A Step Towards Certification of Adaptive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larchev, Gregory V.; Campbell, Stefan F.; Kaneshige, John T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major barriers to wider use of adaptive controllers in commercial aviation is the lack of appropriate certification procedures. In order to be certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), an aircraft controller is expected to meet a set of guidelines on functionality and reliability while not negatively impacting other systems or safety of aircraft operations. Due to their inherent time-variant and non-linear behavior, adaptive controllers cannot be certified via the metrics used for linear conventional controllers, such as gain and phase margin. Projection Operator is a robustness augmentation technique that bounds the output of a non-linear adaptive controller while conforming to the Lyapunov stability rules. It can also be used to limit the control authority of the adaptive component so that the said control authority can be arbitrarily close to that of a linear controller. In this paper we will present the results of applying the Projection Operator to a Model-Reference Adaptive Controller (MRAC), varying the amount of control authority, and comparing controller s performance and stability characteristics with those of a linear controller. We will also show how adjusting Projection Operator parameters can make it easier for the controller to satisfy the certification guidelines by enabling a tradeoff between controller s performance and robustness.

  17. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM - UNDERGROUND MINE SOURCE CONTROL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents results of the Mine Waste Technology Program Activity III, Project 8, Underground Mine Source Control Demonstration Project implemented and funded by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U. S. Department of E...

  18. Statistical Process Control. A Summary. FEU/PICKUP Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, M.; Clark, I.

    A project was conducted to develop a curriculum and training materials to be used in training industrial operatives in statistical process control (SPC) techniques. During the first phase of the project, questionnaires were sent to 685 companies (215 of which responded) to determine where SPC was being used, what type of SPC firms needed, and how…

  19. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Scott Staley

    2010-03-31

    This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while

  20. Supporting the Future Air Traffic Control Projection Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davison, Hayley J.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    In air traffic control, projecting what the air traffic situation will be over the next 30 seconds to 30 minutes is a key process in identifying conflicts that may arise so that evasive action can be taken upon discovery of these conflicts. A series of field visits in the Boston and New York terminal radar approach control (TRACON) facilities and in the oceanic air traffic control facilities in New York and Reykjavik, Iceland were conducted to investigate the projection process in two different ATC domains. The results from the site visits suggest that two types of projection are currently used in ATC tasks, depending on the type of separation minima and/or traffic restriction and information display used by the controller. As technologies improve and procedures change, care should be taken by designers to support projection through displays, automation, and procedures. It is critical to prevent time/space mismatches between interfaces and restrictions. Existing structure in traffic dynamics could be utilized to provide controllers with useful behavioral models on which to build projections. Subtle structure that the controllers are unable to internalize could be incorporated into an ATC projection aid.

  1. Multi-pollutant exposure profiles associated with term low birth weight in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Coker, Eric; Liverani, Silvia; Ghosh, Jo Kay; Jerrett, Michael; Beckerman, Bernardo; Li, Arthur; Ritz, Beate; Molitor, John

    2016-05-01

    neighborhood cluster, both contribute to TLBW while controlling for the other. PMID:26891269

  2. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 3: Verification Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the verification documents from the GCS project. Volume 3 contains four appendices: A. Software Verification Cases and Procedures for the Guidance and Control Software Project; B. Software Verification Results for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software; C. Review Records for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software; and D. Test Results Logs for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software.

  3. Using fuzzy numbers for construction projects monitoring and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorupka, Dariusz; Kuchta, Dorota

    2016-06-01

    Fuzzy numbers will be used to estimate project activities duration times possible increases, both in the planning phase and - for non-completed activities - in consecutive control points during project realisation. The fuzzy estimates will allow to estimate and continuously update the predicted project completion time and the risk of not keeping to the deadline. The fuzzy estimates of non-completed activities will be updated in each control point, on the basis of the information on the actual adequacy of the fuzzy estimates of already completed activities with similar risk factors. A new method for this updating process will be proposed. The method will focus on construction projects and will be applied to a real world construction project.

  4. Applying Water-Level Difference Control to Central Arizona Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Central Arizona Project (CAP) has been supplying Colorado River water to Central Arizona for roughly 25 years. The CAP canal is operated remotely with a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) System. Gate position changes are made either manually or through the use of automatic control...

  5. Co-Firing Oil Shale with Coal and Other Fuels for Improved Efficiency and Multi-Pollutant Control

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Carrington; William C. Hecker; Reed Clayson

    2008-06-01

    Oil shale is an abundant, undeveloped natural resource which has natural sorbent properties, and its ash has natural cementitious properties. Oil shale may be blended with coal, biomass, municipal wastes, waste tires, or other waste feedstock materials to provide the joint benefit of adding energy content while adsorbing and removing sulfur, halides, and volatile metal pollutants, and while also reducing nitrogen oxide pollutants. Oil shale depolymerization-pyrolysis-devolatilization and sorption scoping studies indicate oil shale particle sorption rates and sorption capacity can be comparable to limestone sorbents for capture of SO2 and SO3. Additionally, kerogen released from the shale was shown to have the potential to reduce NOx emissions through the well established “reburning” chemistry similar to natural gas, fuel oil, and micronized coal. Productive mercury adsorption is also possible by the oil shale particles as a result of residual fixed-carbon and other observed mercury capture sorbent properties. Sorption properties were found to be a function particle heating rate, peak particle temperature, residence time, and gas-phase stoichmetry. High surface area sorbents with high calcium reactivity and with some adsorbent fixed/activated carbon can be produced in the corresponding reaction zones that exist in a standard pulverized-coal or in a fluidized-bed combustor.

  6. MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew B. Loomis

    2004-05-01

    This technical report describes the results from Task 1 of the Cooperative Agreement. Powerspan has installed, tested, and validated Hg SCEMS systems for measuring oxidized and elemental mercury at the pilot facility at R.E. Burger Generating Station in Shadyside, Ohio. When operating properly, these systems are capable of providing near real-time monitoring of inlet and outlet gas flow streams and are capable of extracting samples from different locations to characterize mercury removal at these different ECO process stages. This report discusses the final configuration of the Hg CEM systems and the operating protocols that increase the reliability of the HG SCEM measurements. Documentation on the testing done to verify the operating protocols is also provided. In addition the report provides details on the protocols developed and used for measurement of mercury in process liquid streams and in captured ash.

  7. Overview of NASA's Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program includes the Orion, Altair, and Lunar Surface Systems project offices. The first two elements, Orion and Altair, are manned space vehicles while the third element is broader and includes several sub-elements including Rovers and a Lunar Habitat. The upcoming planned missions involving these systems and vehicles include several risks and design challenges. Due to the unique thermal environment, many of these risks and challenges are associated with the vehicles' thermal control system. NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) includes the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP). ETDP consists of several technology development projects. The project chartered with mitigating the aforementioned risks and design challenges is the Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project. The risks and design challenges are addressed through a rigorous technology development process that culminates with an integrated thermal control system test. The resulting hardware typically has a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of six. This paper summarizes the development efforts being performed by the technology development project. The development efforts involve heat acquisition and heat rejection hardware including radiators, heat exchangers, and evaporators. The project has also been developing advanced phase change material heat sinks and performing assessments for thermal control system fluids.

  8. ANG coal gasification project management control system report. [Great Plains project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Much time, money and effort has been spent in the forefront of this project for project controls. The work breakdown structure for the systems has been custom designed. The systems, both manual and computerized, have been well scrutinized and chosen by ANG to represent the most cost effective and efficient way of controlling a project the magnitude of $1.5 billion. These systems have been developed in a manner so that information can be gathered as detailed or as summarized as necessary, and in the most timely and expeditious ways.

  9. F-15 837 IFCS Intelligent Flight Control System Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) for the F-15. The goals of the project are: (1) Demonstrate Revolutionary Control Approaches that can Efficiently Optimize Aircraft Performance in both Normal and Failure Conditions (2) Advance Neural Network-Based Flight Control Technology for New Aerospace Systems Designs. The motivation for the development are to reduce the chance and skill required for survival.

  10. Controlled cooling of an electronic system based on projected conditions

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-05-17

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided based, in part, on projected conditions. The control includes automatically determining an adjusted control setting(s) for an adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on projected power consumed by the electronic system at a future time and projected temperature at the future time of a heat sink to which heat extracted is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on an experimentally obtained model(s) relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system.

  11. Controlled cooling of an electronic system based on projected conditions

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2015-08-18

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided based, in part, on projected conditions. The control includes automatically determining an adjusted control setting(s) for an adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on projected power consumed by the electronic system at a future time and projected temperature at the future time of a heat sink to which heat extracted is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on an experimentally obtained model(s) relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system.

  12. Exposure to Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals during Pregnancy and Weight at 7 Years of Age: A Multi-pollutant Approach

    PubMed Central

    Agay-Shay, Keren; Martinez, David; Valvi, Damaskini; Garcia-Esteban, Raquel; Basagaña, Xavier; Robinson, Oliver; Casas, Maribel; Sunyer, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    -disrupting chemicals during pregnancy and weight at 7 years of age: a multi-pollutant approach. Environ Health Perspect 123:1030–1037; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409049 PMID:25956007

  13. Corticothalamic Projections Control Synchronization in Locally Coupled Bistable Thalamic Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Jörg; Schuster, Heinz Georg; Claussen, Jens Christian; Mölle, Matthias

    2007-08-01

    Thalamic circuits are able to generate state-dependent oscillations of different frequencies and degrees of synchronization. However, little is known about how synchronous oscillations, such as spindle oscillations in the thalamus, are organized in the intact brain. Experimental findings suggest that the simultaneous occurrence of spindle oscillations over widespread territories of the thalamus is due to the corticothalamic projections, as the synchrony is lost in the decorticated thalamus. In this Letter we study the influence of corticothalamic projections on the synchrony in a thalamic network, and uncover the underlying control mechanism, leading to a control method which is applicable for several types of oscillations in the central nervous system.

  14. Project Management Using Modern Guidance, Navigation and Control Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry R.

    2011-01-01

    Implementing guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) theory principles and applying them to the human element of project management and control is not a new concept. As both the literature on the subject and the real-world applications are neither readily available nor comprehensive with regard to how such principles might be applied, this paper has been written to educate the project manager on the "laws of physics" of his or her project (not to teach a GN&C engineer how to become a project manager) and to provide an intuitive, mathematical explanation as to the control and behavior of projects. This paper will also address how the fundamental principles of modern GN&C were applied to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Constellation Program (CxP) space suit project, ensuring the project was managed within cost, schedule, and budget. A project that is akin to a physical system can be modeled and managed using the same over arching principles of GN&C that would be used if that project were a complex vehicle, a complex system(s), or complex software with time-varying processes (at times nonlinear) containing multiple data inputs of varying accuracy and a range of operating points. The classic GN&C theory approach could thus be applied to small, well-defined projects; yet when working with larger, multiyear projects necessitating multiple organizational structures, numerous external influences, and a multitude of diverse resources, modern GN&C principles are required to model and manage the project. The fundamental principles of a GN&C system incorporate these basic concepts: State, Behavior, Feedback Control, Navigation, Guidance and Planning Logic systems. The State of a system defines the aspects of the system that can change over time; e.g., position, velocity, acceleration, coordinate-based attitude, and temperature, etc. The Behavior of the system focuses more on what changes are possible within the system; this is denoted in the state

  15. Overview of NASA's Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The now-cancelled Constellation Program included the Orion, Altair, and Lunar Surface Systems project offices. The first two elements, Orion and Altair, were planned to be manned space vehicles while the third element was much more diverse and included several sub-elements. Among other things, these sub-elements were Rovers and a Lunar Habitat. The planned missions involving these systems and vehicles included several risks and design challenges. Due to the unique thermal operating environment, many of these risks and challenges were associated with the vehicles thermal control system. NASA s Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) consisted of various technology development projects. The project chartered with mitigating the aforementioned thermal risks and design challenges was the Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project. These risks and design challenges were being addressed through a rigorous technology development process that was planned to culminate with an integrated thermal control system test. Although the technologies being developed were originally aimed towards mitigating specific Constellation risks, the technology development process is being continued within a new program. This continued effort is justified by the fact that many of the technologies are generically applicable to future spacecraft thermal control systems. The current paper summarizes the development efforts being performed by the technology development project. The development efforts involve heat acquisition and heat rejection hardware including radiators, heat exchangers, and evaporators. The project has also been developing advanced phase change material heat sinks and performing a material compatibility assessment for a promising thermal control system working fluid. The to-date progress and lessons-learned from these development efforts will be discussed throughout the paper.

  16. Advanced Guidance and Control Project for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, John M.

    2000-01-01

    The goals of this project are to significantly reduce the time and cost associated with guidance and control design for reusable launch vehicles, and to increase their safety and reliability. Success will lead to reduced cycle times during vehicle design and to reduced costs associated with flying to new orbits, with new payloads, and with modified vehicles. Success will also lead to more robustness to unforeseen circumstances in flight thereby enhancing safety and reducing risk. There are many guidance and control methods available that hold some promise for improvement in the desired areas. Investigators are developing a representative set of independent guidance and control methods for this project. These methods are being incorporated into a high-fidelity off is being conducted across a broad range of flight requirements. The guidance and control methods that perform the best will have demonstrated the desired qualities.

  17. Integrated Quality Control Measurement Project. Findings and Corrective Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price Waterhouse and Co., New York, NY.

    The Integrated Quality Control Measurement Project (IQCMP) of the U.S. Department of Education measured the quality of awards distributed during the 1988-89 award year under the three major Title IV programs: the Pell Grant program, the Campus-Based programs, and the Stafford Loan program, in order to evaluate and improve the quality of the…

  18. DESCHUTES PROJECT – WICKIUP DAM, CONTROL TOWER COMPLETE TO ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DESCHUTES PROJECT – WICKIUP DAM, CONTROL TOWER COMPLETE TO ELEVATION 4348.5 WITH TEMPORARY ROOF. BURNING OPERATIONS ON RESERVOIR CLEARING IN THE DISTANCE. Photocopy of historic photographs (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR Photographer, August 31, 1943 - Wickiup Dam, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  19. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 1. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-30

    A summary of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project is presented. The design of the greenhouses include transparent double pane glass roof with channels for fluid between the panes, inner pane tinted and double pane extruded acrylic aluminized mylar shade and diffuser. Solar energy technologies provide power for water desalination, for pumping irrigation water, and for cooling and heating the controlled environment space so that crops can grow in arid lands. The project is a joint effort between the United States and Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  20. CE IGCC repowering project: Controls & instrumentation. Topical report, June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The IGCC Control System is used to provide operator interface and controls for manual and auto operation of the IGCC Repowering Project Located at Springfield, Illinois. A Distributed Control System (DCS) is provided for analog (process control) loop functions and to provide the operator interface. A Data Acquisition System (DAS) is provided for gathering performance data and optimization. Programmable Logic Controllers will be provided for the following digital control systems: (a) GSSS (Gasifier Supervisory Safety System) including pulverized coal handling and char handling; (b) Coal Pulverization System; (c) HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generation); (d) Hot Gas Cleanup System; (e) Steam Turbine; and (f) Combined Cycle Operation. In general all systems are provided for auto/manual cascade operation; upstream equipment is interlocked to be proven in service operation and/or valve position before downstream equipment may operate.

  1. Intelligent control in mobile robotics: the PANORAMA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenway, Phil

    1994-03-01

    The European Community's strategic research initiative in information technology has been in place for seven years. A good example of the pan-European collaborative projects conducted under this initiative is PANORAMA: Perception and Navigation for Autonomous Mobile Robot Applications. This four-and-a-half-year project, completed in October 1993, aimed to prove the feasibility of an autonomous mobile robotic system replacing a human-operated vehicle working outdoors in a partially structured environment. The autonomous control of a mobile rock drilling machine was chosen as a challenging and representative test scenario. This paper presents an overview of intelligent mobile robot control architectures. Goals and objectives of the project are described, together with the makeup of the consortium and the roles of the members within it. The main technical achievements from PANORAMA are then presented, with emphasis given to the problems of realizing intelligent control. In particular, the planning and replanning of a mission, and the corresponding architectural choices and infrastructure required to support the chosen task oriented approach, are discussed. Specific attention is paid to the functional decomposition of the system, and how the requirements for `intelligent control' impact on the organization of the identified system components. Future work and outstanding problems are considered in some concluding remarks.

  2. Project Management Using Modern Guidance, Navigation and Control Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The idea of control theory and its application to project management is not new, however literature on the topic and real-world applications is not as readily available and comprehensive in how all the principals of Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) apply. This paper will address how the fundamental principals of modern GN&C Theory have been applied to NASA's Constellation Space Suit project and the results in the ability to manage the project within cost, schedule and budget. A s with physical systems, projects can be modeled and managed with the same guiding principles of GN&C as if it were a complex vehicle, system or software with time-varying processes, at times non-linear responses, multiple data inputs of varying accuracy and a range of operating points. With such systems the classic approach could be applied to small and well-defined projects; however with larger, multi-year projects involving multiple organizational structures, external influences and a multitude of diverse resources, then modern control theory is required to model and control the project. The fundamental principals of G N&C stated that a system is comprised of these basic core concepts: State, Behavior, Control system, Navigation system, Guidance and Planning Logic, Feedback systems. The state of a system is a definition of the aspects of the dynamics of the system that can change, such as position, velocity, acceleration, coordinate-based attitude, temperature, etc. The behavior of the system is more of what changes are possible rather than what can change, which is captured in the state of the system. The behavior of a system is captured in the system modeling and if properly done, will aid in accurate system performance prediction in the future. The Control system understands the state and behavior of the system and feedback systems to adjust the control inputs into the system. The Navigation system takes the multiple data inputs and based upon a priori knowledge of the input

  3. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Stottler, Gary

    2012-02-08

    General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

  4. NIF Projects Controls and Information Systems Software Quality Assurance Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fishler, B

    2011-03-18

    Quality achievement for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) is the responsibility of the NIF Projects line organization as described in the NIF and Photon Science Directorate Quality Assurance Plan (NIF QA Plan). This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) is subordinate to the NIF QA Plan and establishes quality assurance (QA) activities for the software subsystems within Controls and Information Systems (CIS). This SQAP implements an activity level software quality assurance plan for NIF Projects as required by the LLNL Institutional Software Quality Assurance Program (ISQAP). Planned QA activities help achieve, assess, and maintain appropriate quality of software developed and/or acquired for control systems, shot data systems, laser performance modeling systems, business applications, industrial control and safety systems, and information technology systems. The objective of this SQAP is to ensure that appropriate controls are developed and implemented for management planning, work execution, and quality assessment of the CIS organization's software activities. The CIS line organization places special QA emphasis on rigorous configuration control, change management, testing, and issue tracking to help achieve its quality goals.

  5. [Discussion on water conservancy projects and schistosomiasis control in Poyang Lake area].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dao-Nan

    2013-02-01

    According to the schistosomiasis endemic situation in the Poyang Lake area, this paper analyzes the relationship between the water conservancy projects and schistosomiasis control, and reviews and discusses the effects of the Water Level Control Project of Poyang Lake, the Lake Dike Slope Hardening Project, and the Lifting Delta and Descending Beach Project on Oncomelania snail control. PMID:23687826

  6. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP CONCEPTUAL DESIGN CONTROL DECISION REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    CARRO CA

    2010-03-09

    This control decision addresses the Knock-Out Pot (KOP) Disposition KOP Processing System (KPS) conceptual design. The KPS functions to (1) retrieve KOP material from canisters, (2) remove particles less than 600 {micro}m in size and low density materials from the KOP material, (3) load the KOP material into Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) baskets, and (4) stage the MCO baskets for subsequent loading into MCOs. Hazard and accident analyses of the KPS conceptual design have been performed to incorporate safety into the design process. The hazard analysis is documented in PRC-STP-00098, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Project Conceptual Design Hazard Analysis. The accident analysis is documented in PRC-STP-CN-N-00167, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Sub-Project Canister Over Lift Accident Analysis. Based on the results of these analyses, and analyses performed in support of MCO transportation and MCO processing and storage activities at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and Canister Storage Building (CSB), control decision meetings were held to determine the controls required to protect onsite and offsite receptors and facility workers. At the conceptual design stage, these controls are primarily defined by their safety functions. Safety significant structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that could provide the identified safety functions have been selected for the conceptual design. It is anticipated that some safety SSCs identified herein will be reclassified based on hazard and accident analyses performed in support of preliminary and detailed design.

  7. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Silvan, G.R.

    1994-09-20

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; proper operation of all display data on the operator`s console; proper operation of all required alarms; and proper operation of all required interlocks. The MICON A/S control system is configured to replace all the control, indication, and alarm panels now located in the Power Control Room. Nine systems are covered by this control configuration, 2736-ZB HVAC, 234-5Z HVAC, Process Vacuum, Dry Air, 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling, Building Accelerometer, Evacuation Siren, Stack CAMs, and Fire. The 2736-ZB HVAC system consists of the ventilation controls for 2736-ZB and 2736-Z as well as alarms for the emergency generators and 232-Z. The 234-5Z HVAC system is the ventilation controls for 235-5Z and 236-Z buildings. Process Vacuum covers the controls for the 26 inch vacuum system. Dry Air covers the controls for the steam and electric air dryers. The 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling system consists of the status indications and alarms for the 291-Z compressor and vacuum pump closed loop cooling system. The rest of closed loop cooling was tested earlier. The Building Accelerometer system consists of the status indications for the two seismic system accelerometers. The Evacuation Siren system includes the controls for the evacuation and take cover sirens. Stack CAMs cover the alarms for the various building ventilation stack continuous air monitors. Finally, the Fire system covers the various fire alarms now located in Room 321-A.

  8. Optimum Production Control and Workforce Scheduling of Machining Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian-Syung; Lo, Chih-Yao; Hou, Cheng-I.

    Through the proposed model in this study, the production control with the consideration of workforce scheduling for advanced manufacturing systems becomes realistically and concretely solvable. This study not only meditates the concept of balancing machine productivity and human ability into the objective, but also implements Calculus of Variations to optimize the profit for a deterministic production quantity. In addition, the optimum solutions of dynamic productivity control and workforce scheduling are comprehensively provided. Moreover, the decision criteria for selecting the optimum solution and the sensitivity analysis of the critical variables are fully discussed. This study definitely contributes the applicable strategy to control the productivity and workforce in manufacturing and provides the valuable tool to conclusively optimize the profit of a machining project for operations research in today`s manufacturing industry with profound insight.

  9. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope project management control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, Jeffrey P.

    2012-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) program is jointly funded by the NSF, the DOE, and private institutions and donors. From an NSF funding standpoint, the LSST is a Major Research Equipment and Facilities (MREFC) project. The NSF funding process requires proposals and D&D reviews to include activity-based budgets and schedules; documented basis of estimates; risk-based contingency analysis; cost escalation and categorization. "Out-of-the box," the commercial tool Primavera P6 contains approximately 90% of the planning and estimating capability needed to satisfy R&D phase requirements, and it is customizable/configurable for remainder with relatively little effort. We describe the customization/configuration and use of Primavera for the LSST Project Management Control System (PMCS), assess our experience to date, and describe future directions. Examples in this paper are drawn from the LSST Data Management System (DMS), which is one of three main subsystems of the LSST and is funded by the NSF. By astronomy standards the LSST DMS is a large data management project, processing and archiving over 70 petabyes of image data, producing over 20 petabytes of catalogs annually, and generating 2 million transient alerts per night. Over the 6-year construction and commissioning phase, the DM project is estimated to require 600,000 hours of engineering effort. In total, the DMS cost is approximately 60% hardware/system software and 40% labor.

  10. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Silvan, G.R.

    1995-06-27

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: (1) proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; (2) proper operation of all display data on the operators` console; (3) proper operation of all required alarms; and (4) proper operation of all required interlocks. This test only verifies the proper operation of the Westinghouse control configuration (or program). It will not be responsible for verifying proper operation of the MICON hardware or operating software. Neither does it test any of the B610 instrument. The MICON hardware and software has been tested as part of the equipment procurement. Instrumentation and wiring installed under project B620 will be tested under a separate functional test. In some cases, precise transmitter ranges, alarm setpoints, and controller tuning parameters are not available at this time. Therefore, approximate values are used during the test. This should not affect the proper operation of the configuration or the validity of this test. Final values will be assigned during operability testing.

  11. Development of a mediated whole cell-based electrochemical biosensor for joint toxicity assessment of multi-pollutants using a mixed microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guanyue; Qian, Jun; Fang, Deyu; Yu, Yuan; Zhi, Jinfang

    2016-06-14

    Since most risk assessment for toxicants is based on individual single-species test, the deduction of such results to ecosystem evaluation is afflicted with uncertainties. Herein, we successfully developed a p-benzoquinone mediated whole-cell electrochemical biosensor for multi-pollutants toxicological analysis by co-immobilizing mixed strains of microorganism, including Escherichia coli (gram-negative bacteria), Bacillus subtilis (gram-positive bacteria) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (fungus). The individual and combined toxicities of heavy metal ions (Cu(2+), Cd(2+)), phenol (3,5-dichlorophenol) and pesticides (Ametryn, Acephate) were examined. The experimental results showed that the order of toxicity for individual toxicant was ranked as Cu(2+) > 3,5-dichlorophenol (DCP) > Ametryn > Cd(2+) > Acephate. Then the toxic unit (TU) model was applied to determine the nature of toxicological interaction of the toxicants which can be classified as concentration additive (IC50mix = 1TU), synergistic (IC50mix < 1TU) and antagonistic (IC50mix > 1TU) responses. The binary combination of Cu(2+) + Cd(2+), Cu(2+) + DCP, Cu(2+) + Acephate, DCP + Acephate, Acephate + Ametryn were analyzed and the three kind of joint toxicity effects (i.e. additive, synergistic and antagonistic) mentioned above were observed according to the dose-response relationship. The results indicate that the whole-cell electrochemical biosensor based on mixed microbial consortium is more reasonable to reflect the joint biotoxicity of multi-pollutants existing in real wastewater, and combined effects of toxicants is extremely necessary to be taken into account in ecological risk assessment. Thus, present study has provided a promising approach to the quality assessment of wastewater and a reliable way for early risk warning of acute biotoxicity. PMID:27181640

  12. Simulation of slag control for the Plasma Hearth Project

    SciTech Connect

    Power, M.A.; Carney, K.P.; Peters. G.G.

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the Plasma Hearth Project is to stabilize alpha-emitting radionuclides in a vitreous slag and to reduce the effective storage volume of actinide-containing waste for long-term burial. The actinides have been shown to partition into the vitreous slag phase of the melt. The slag composition may be changed by adding glass-former elements to ensure that this removable slag has the most desired physical and chemical properties for long-term burial. A data acquisition and control system has been designed to regulate the composition of five elements in the slag.

  13. Technical Assistance Project for the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, L.

    2006-12-01

    This report was prepared in response to a request for technical assistance from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA). The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy supported the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in its response to this request through the Technical Assistance Project. Discussion with the MPCA identified the following as the highest-priority questions: What is the effect of (1) size of Renewable Energy Reserve (RER) and (2) duration of allocation award on (a) NOx emissions in Minnesota and (b) retail electricity prices? What data is available on the response of wind energy development to financial incentives? This report addresses those questions.

  14. Application of the PnET-BGC - An integrated biogeochemical model - To assess the surface water ANC recovery in the Adirondack region of New York under three multi-pollutant proposals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2009-11-01

    SummaryWe applied an integrated biogeochemical model PnET-BGC to predict the response of acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in lakes - a measure of the ability of water to neutralize inputs of strong acid - from 2001 to 2050 in the Adirondack region of New York, USA under three multi-pollutant proposal scenarios. Through model predictions, we assessed the impacts of these proposals on ecosystem recovery for research and policy initiatives. Our analysis indicated that the predicted recovery rates of surface water ANC obtained from the PnET-BGC model show low spatial autocorrelation. Predicted recovery rates are also closely related with the percentage of watershed areas of coniferous vegetation and deciduous vegetation, elevation and lake area, which turn out not to be significantly different from each other over the entire period of future scenarios (2001-2050). We applied a Geographic Weighted Regression model (GWR) to study the spatial patterns of predicted lake ANC in the Adirondacks through 2050 due to its high spatial autocorrelation. These results showed that lake depth and square of elevation can explain 40% of variation in the predicted ANC, which is 26% more variation than explained by the non-spatial Ordinary Least-Squares Regression (OLS). Our calculations also suggest that even under the Carper Bill, the most aggressive air pollutant control scenario considered, not all Adirondack lakes will recover (i.e., ANC > 50 μeq/L) from elevated acidic deposition by 2050. The research provides a basis for more informed emission controls and land use/land cover (LULC) policy-making in the north-eastern USA and elsewhere.

  15. 77 FR 3754 - Boise Project Board of Control; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Boise Project Board of Control; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...: Non-Capacity Amendment of a Conduit Exemption. b. Project No.: 5042-001. c. Date Filed: December 15, 2011. d. Applicant: Boise Project Board of Control. e. Name of Project: Fargo Drop No. 1...

  16. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels--Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 1 Summary, July 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-07-01

    The Advanced Petroleum Based Fuels-Diesel Emission Control project is a government/industry collaborative project to identify the optimal combinations of low-sulfur diesel fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet projected emission standards for the 2004-2010 time period. This summary describes the results of the first phase of the lubricants study investigating the impact on lubricant formulation on engine-out emissions.

  17. Management of a large distributed control system development project

    SciTech Connect

    Gurd, D. P.

    2002-01-01

    Building an accelerator at six geographically dispersed sites is quite mad, but politically expedient. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), currently under construction in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, combines a pulsed 1 Gev H{sup -} superconducting linac with a compressor ring to deliver 2 MW of beam power to a liquid mercury target for neutron production [1]. Accelerator components, target and experimental (neutron-scattering) instruments are being developed collaboratively by Lawrence Berkeley (Ion Source and Front End), Los Alamos (Linac), Thomas Jefferson (Cryosystems), Brookhaven (Compressor Ring), Oak Ridge (Target and Conventional Facilities) and Argonne (Neutron Scattering Instruments) National Laboratories. Similarly, a team distributed among all of the participating laboratories is developing the EPICS-based control system. this paper discusses the management model and strategies being used to address the unusual issues of organization, communication, standardization, integration and hand-off inherent in this widely-distributed project.

  18. Integrated Project Scheduling and Staff Assignment with Controllable Processing Times

    PubMed Central

    Framinan, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses a decision problem related to simultaneously scheduling the tasks in a project and assigning the staff to these tasks, taking into account that a task can be performed only by employees with certain skills, and that the length of each task depends on the number of employees assigned. This type of problems usually appears in service companies, where both tasks scheduling and staff assignment are closely related. An integer programming model for the problem is proposed, together with some extensions to cope with different situations. Additionally, the advantages of the controllable processing times approach are compared with the fixed processing times. Due to the complexity of the integrated model, a simple GRASP algorithm is implemented in order to obtain good, approximate solutions in short computation times. PMID:24895672

  19. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-03-01

    Annual progress report of the Advanced Petroleum-based fuels-Diesel Emissions Control Project. Contains information on 5 test projects to determine the best combinations of low-sulfur diesel fuels, lubricants, diesel engines, and emission control systems to meet projected emissions standards.

  20. Industrial Sectors Integrated Solutions (ISIS) - An Engineering–Economic and Multi-Pollutant Modeling Framework for Comprehensive Regulatory Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on the National Academy of Science’s 2004 report, “Air Quality Management in the United States”, the National Research Council (NRC) recommended to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that standard setting, planning, and control strategy development should be based...

  1. Controlled ecological life support system breadboard project, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    The Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Breadboard Project, NASA's effort to develop the technology required to produce a functioning bioregenerative system, is discussed. The different phases of the project and its current status are described. The relationship between the project components are shown, and major project activities for fiscal years 1989 to 1993 are listed. The Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) became operational and tests of wheat as a single crop are nearing completion.

  2. The economics of tobacco control: evidence from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Project.

    PubMed

    Tauras, John A; Chaloupka, Frank J; Quah, Anne Chiew Kin; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2014-03-01

    Over the past few decades, the importance of economic research in advancing tobacco control policies has become increasingly clear. Extensive research has demonstrated that increasing tobacco taxes and prices is the single most cost-effective tobacco control measure. The research contained in this supplement adds to this evidence and provides new insights into how smokers respond to tax and price changes using the rich data on purchase behaviours, brand choices, tax avoidance and evasion, and tobacco use collected systematically and consistently across countries and over time by the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Project. The findings from this research will help inform policymakers, public health professionals, advocates, and others seeking to maximise the public health and economic benefits from higher taxes. PMID:24500268

  3. Role of projection in the control of bird flocks.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Daniel J G; Miller, Adam M; Rowlands, George; Turner, Matthew S

    2014-07-22

    Swarming is a conspicuous behavioral trait observed in bird flocks, fish shoals, insect swarms, and mammal herds. It is thought to improve collective awareness and offer protection from predators. Many current models involve the hypothesis that information coordinating motion is exchanged among neighbors. We argue that such local interactions alone are insufficient to explain the organization of large flocks of birds and that the mechanism for the exchange of long-range information necessary to control their density remains unknown. We show that large flocks self-organize to the maximum density at which a typical individual still can see out of the flock in many directions. Such flocks are marginally opaque--an external observer also still can see a substantial fraction of sky through the flock. Although this seems intuitive, we show it need not be the case; flocks might easily be highly diffuse or entirely opaque. The emergence of marginal opacity strongly constrains how individuals interact with one another within large swarms. It also provides a mechanism for global interactions: an individual can respond to the projection of the flock that it sees. This provides for faster information transfer and hence rapid flock dynamics, another advantage over local models. From a behavioral perspective, it optimizes the information available to each bird while maintaining the protection of a dense, coherent flock. PMID:25002501

  4. Role of projection in the control of bird flocks

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Daniel J. G.; Miller, Adam M.; Rowlands, George; Turner, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    Swarming is a conspicuous behavioral trait observed in bird flocks, fish shoals, insect swarms, and mammal herds. It is thought to improve collective awareness and offer protection from predators. Many current models involve the hypothesis that information coordinating motion is exchanged among neighbors. We argue that such local interactions alone are insufficient to explain the organization of large flocks of birds and that the mechanism for the exchange of long-range information necessary to control their density remains unknown. We show that large flocks self-organize to the maximum density at which a typical individual still can see out of the flock in many directions. Such flocks are marginally opaque—an external observer also still can see a substantial fraction of sky through the flock. Although this seems intuitive, we show it need not be the case; flocks might easily be highly diffuse or entirely opaque. The emergence of marginal opacity strongly constrains how individuals interact with one another within large swarms. It also provides a mechanism for global interactions: an individual can respond to the projection of the flock that it sees. This provides for faster information transfer and hence rapid flock dynamics, another advantage over local models. From a behavioral perspective, it optimizes the information available to each bird while maintaining the protection of a dense, coherent flock. PMID:25002501

  5. 33 CFR 263.23 - Small flood control project authority (Section 205).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small flood control project..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Flood Control Policy § 263.23 Small flood control project authority (Section 205). (a) Legislative authority. Section 205 of the...

  6. 33 CFR 263.23 - Small flood control project authority (Section 205).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Small flood control project..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Flood Control Policy § 263.23 Small flood control project authority (Section 205). (a) Legislative authority. Section 205 of the...

  7. 33 CFR 263.23 - Small flood control project authority (Section 205).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Small flood control project..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Flood Control Policy § 263.23 Small flood control project authority (Section 205). (a) Legislative authority. Section 205 of the...

  8. 33 CFR 263.23 - Small flood control project authority (Section 205).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small flood control project..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTINUING AUTHORITIES PROGRAMS Flood Control Policy § 263.23 Small flood control project authority (Section 205). (a) Legislative authority. Section 205 of the...

  9. Trends in multi-pollutant emissions from a technology-linked inventory for India: I. Industry and transport sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavarte, Pankaj; Venkataraman, Chandra

    2014-12-01

    Emissions estimation, for research and regulatory applications including reporting to international conventions, needs treatment of detailed technology divisions and high-emitting technologies. Here we estimate Indian emissions, for 1996-2015, of aerosol constituents (PM2.5, BC and OC) and precursor gas SO2, ozone precursors (CO, NOx, NMVOC and CH4) and greenhouse gases (CO2 and N2O), using a common fuel consumption database and consistent assumptions. Six source categories and 45 technologies/activities in the industry and transport sectors were used for estimating emissions for 2010. Mean emission factors, developed at the source-category level, were used with corresponding fuel consumption data, available for 1996-2011, projected to 2015. New activities were included to account for fugitive emissions of NMVOC from chemical and petrochemical industries. Dynamic emission factors, reflecting changes in technology-mix and emission regulations, were developed for thermal power plants and on-road transport vehicles. Modeled emission factors were used for gaseous pollutants for on-road vehicles. Emissions of 2.4 (0.6-7.5) Tg y-1 PM2.5, 0.23 (0.1-0.7) Tg y-1 BC, 0.15 (0.04-0.5) Tg y-1 OC, 7.3 (6-10) Tg y-1 SO2, 19 (7.5-33) Tg y-1 CO, 1.5 (0.1-9) Tg y-1 CH4, 4.3 (2-9) Tg y-1 NMVOC, 5.6 (1.7-15.9) Tg y-1 NOx, 1750 (1397-2231) Tg y-1 CO2 and 0.13 (0.05-0.3) Tg y-1 N2O were estimated for 2015. Significant emissions of aerosols and their precursors were from coal use in thermal power and industry (PM2.5 and SO2), and on-road diesel vehicles (BC), especially superemitters. Emissions of ozone precursors were largely from thermal power plants (NOx), on-road gasoline vehicles (CO and NMVOC) and fugitive emissions from mining (CH4). Highly uncertain default emission factors were the principal contributors to uncertainties in emission estimates, indicating the need for region specific measurements.

  10. The Economics of Tobacco Control: Evidence from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Project

    PubMed Central

    Tauras, John A.; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Quah, Anne Chiew Kin; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the importance of economic research in advancing tobacco control policies has become increasingly clear. Extensive research has demonstrated that increasing tobacco taxes and prices is the single most cost-effective tobacco control measure. The research contained in this supplement adds to this evidence and provides new insights into how smokers respond to tax and price changes using the rich data on purchase behaviors, brand choices, tax avoidance and evasion, and tobacco use collected systematically and consistently across countries and over time by the ITC Project. The findings from this research will help inform policymakers, public health professionals, advocates, and others seeking to maximize the public health and economic benefits from higher taxes. PMID:24500268

  11. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 4: Configuration Management and Quality Assurance Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes configuration management and quality assurance documents from the GCS project. Volume 4 contains six appendices: A. Software Accomplishment Summary for the Guidance and Control Software Project; B. Software Configuration Index for the Guidance and Control Software Project; C. Configuration Management Records for the Guidance and Control Software Project; D. Software Quality Assurance Records for the Guidance and Control Software Project; E. Problem Report for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software Project; and F. Support Documentation Change Reports for the Guidance and Control Software Project.

  12. Mechanical Engineering Design Project report: Enabler control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, Christian; Delvecchio, Dave; Scarborough, Alan; Havics, Andrew A.

    1992-01-01

    The Controls Group was assigned the responsibility for designing the Enabler's control system. The requirement for the design was that the control system must provide a simple user interface to control the boom articulation joints, chassis articulation joints, and the wheel drive. The system required controlling hydraulic motors on the Enabler by implementing 8-bit microprocessor boards. In addition, feedback to evaluate positions and velocities must be interfaced to provide the operator with confirmation as well as control.

  13. Requirements management: keeping your technology acquisition project under control.

    PubMed

    Carr, J J

    2000-03-01

    Whether you are acquiring clinical or business information systems, patient monitoring systems, or therapeutic and diagnostic systems, the odds are good that the project will be delivered late, will cost far more than predicted, and will not provide all the features promised. The principal reason for project failure is improper management of the requirements of the system. Requirements engineering and management is a skill from the systems engineering profession that can be learned by nearly any professional who is managing a technology acquisition project. The author discusses what requirements engineering and management is and how it is done. PMID:10725942

  14. Computerized adaptive control weld skate with CCTV weld guidance project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes progress of the automatic computerized weld skate development portion of the Computerized Weld Skate with Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Arc Guidance Project. The main goal of the project is to develop an automatic welding skate demonstration model equipped with CCTV weld guidance. The three main goals of the overall project are to: (1) develop a demonstration model computerized weld skate system, (2) develop a demonstration model automatic CCTV guidance system, and (3) integrate the two systems into a demonstration model of computerized weld skate with CCTV weld guidance for welding contoured parts.

  15. The ISM Analysis on Influence Factors of Cost Control in the Wind Power Construction Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunna, Wu; Qing, Bian; Ping, Lin

    Cost control in the wind power construction project is essential under the trend of developing wind power in China. In order to carry out cost control effectively, structural interpretation model(ISM) is used to identify and analyze the major factors that affect the implementation of cost control and the hierarchy relationships between each other. In this way, the surface causes, the middle causes and the underlying causes that affect the cost control in the wind power construction project have been found, which provides decision theory for the smooth implementation of cost control in China's current wind power construction projects.

  16. OPERATION OF THE OLD RIVER CONTROL PROJECT, ATCHAFALAYA BASIN: AN EVALUATION FROM MULTIUSE MANAGEMENT STANDPOINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report evaluated from a multiuse management standpoint the operation of the Old River Control Project. It was found that limiting diversions to the extent presently being considered by the Old River Control Project would effectively remove those wetlands that are presently f...

  17. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section 263.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS....26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a) Legislative authority....

  18. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section 263.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS....26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a) Legislative authority....

  19. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section 263.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS....26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a) Legislative authority....

  20. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section 263.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS....26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a) Legislative authority....

  1. 33 CFR 263.26 - Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). 263.26 Section 263.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS....26 Small beach erosion control project authority (Section 103). (a) Legislative authority....

  2. 33 CFR 203.85 - Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rehabilitation of Federal flood... PROCEDURES Local Interests/Cooperation Agreements § 203.85 Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects. Some sponsors of Federal flood control projects are not required to furnish written assurances of...

  3. 33 CFR 203.85 - Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rehabilitation of Federal flood... PROCEDURES Local Interests/Cooperation Agreements § 203.85 Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects. Some sponsors of Federal flood control projects are not required to furnish written assurances of...

  4. 33 CFR 203.85 - Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rehabilitation of Federal flood... PROCEDURES Local Interests/Cooperation Agreements § 203.85 Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects. Some sponsors of Federal flood control projects are not required to furnish written assurances of...

  5. 33 CFR 203.85 - Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rehabilitation of Federal flood... PROCEDURES Local Interests/Cooperation Agreements § 203.85 Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects. Some sponsors of Federal flood control projects are not required to furnish written assurances of...

  6. 33 CFR 203.85 - Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rehabilitation of Federal flood... PROCEDURES Local Interests/Cooperation Agreements § 203.85 Rehabilitation of Federal flood control projects. Some sponsors of Federal flood control projects are not required to furnish written assurances of...

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project document control and Records Management Program Description

    SciTech Connect

    MARTIN, B.M.

    2000-05-18

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project document control and records management program, as defined within this document, is based on a broad spectrum of regulatory requirements, Department of Energy (DOE) and Project Hanford and SNF Project-specific direction and guidance. The SNF Project Execution Plan, HNF-3552, requires the control of documents and management of records under the auspices of configuration control, conduct of operations, training, quality assurance, work control, records management, data management, engineering and design control, operational readiness review, and project management and turnover. Implementation of the controls, systems, and processes necessary to ensure compliance with applicable requirements is facilitated through plans, directives, and procedures within the Project Hanford Management System (PHMS) and the SNF Project internal technical and administrative procedures systems. The documents cited within this document are those which directly establish or define the SNF Project document control and records management program. There are many peripheral documents that establish requirements and provide direction pertinent to managing specific types of documents that, for the sake of brevity and clarity, are not cited within this document.

  8. Two Undergraduate Projects for Data Acquisition and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiersche, Kelly; Pena, Tara; Grogan, Tanner; Wright, Matthew

    We are designing two separate instruments for use in our undergraduate laboratory. In the first project, a Raspberry Pi is used to simultaneously monitor a large number of current and voltage readings and store them in a database. In our second project, we are constructing our own microcontrollers to work as a general-purpose interface based off work carried out in Review of Scientific Instruments 84, 103101 (2013). It was designed for low cost and simple construction, making it ideal for undergraduate level work. This circuit has room for two interchangeable daughter boards, giving it the capability to work as a general lab interface, lock-in detector, or waveform generator.

  9. Noise prediction and control of Pudong International Airport expansion project.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bin; Yang, Xin; Yang, Jianguo

    2009-04-01

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process of the third runway building project of Pudong International Airport is briefly introduced in the paper. The basic principle, the features, and the operation steps of newly imported FAA's Integrated Noise Model (INM) are discussed for evaluating the aircraft noise impacts. The prediction of the aircraft noise and the countermeasures for the noise mitigation are developed, which includes the reasonable runway location, the optimized land use, the selection of low noise aircrafts, the Fly Quit Program, the relocation of sensitive receptors and the noise insulation of sensitive buildings. Finally, the expansion project is justified and its feasibility is confirmed. PMID:18373206

  10. The environmental control and life support system advanced automation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewberry, Brandon S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the ECLSS Advanced Automation project includes reduction of the risk associated with the integration of new, beneficial software techniques. Demonstrations of this software to baseline engineering and test personnel will show the benefits of these techniques. The advanced software will be integrated into ground testing and ground support facilities, familiarizing its usage by key personnel.

  11. Skills Conversion Project, Chapter 8, Pollution Control. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC.

    The Skills Conversion Project conducted by the National Society of Professional Engineers sought to study the transition mechanisms required to transfer available technical manpower from aerospace and defense industries into other areas of employment in private industry and public service. Fourteen study teams assessed the likelihood of future…

  12. Towards Greater Learner Control: Web Supported Project-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    Project-based learning has been suggested as an appropriate pedagogy to prepare students in information systems for the realities of the business world. Web-based resources have been used to support such pedagogy with mixed results. The paper argues that the design of web-based learning support to cater to different learning styles may give…

  13. Critical issues in process control system security : DHS spares project.

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Jacquelynne; McIntyre, Annie; Henrie, Morgan

    2010-10-01

    The goals of this event are: (1) Discuss the next-generation issues and emerging risks in cyber security for control systems; (2) Review and discuss common control system architectures; (3) Discuss the role of policy, standards, and supply chain issues; (4) Interact to determine the most pertinent risks and most critical areas of the architecture; and (5) Merge feedback from Control System Managers, Engineers, IT, and Auditors.

  14. Prenatal Phthalate, Perfluoroalkyl Acid, and Organochlorine Exposures and Term Birth Weight in Three Birth Cohorts: Multi-Pollutant Models Based on Elastic Net Regression

    PubMed Central

    Lenters, Virissa; Portengen, Lützen; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna; Jönsson, Bo A.G.; Lindh, Christian H.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Toft, Gunnar; Bonde, Jens Peter; Heederik, Dick; Rylander, Lars; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    , Heederik D, Rylander L, Vermeulen R. 2016. Prenatal phthalate, perfluoroalkyl acid, and organochlorine exposures and term birth weight in three birth cohorts: multi-pollutant models based on elastic net regression. Environ Health Perspect 124:365–372; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408933 PMID:26115335

  15. Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project Full Scale Flight Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Provide validation of adaptive control law concepts through full scale flight evaluation. Technical Approach: a) Engage failure mode - destabilizing or frozen surface. b) Perform formation flight and air-to-air tracking tasks. Evaluate adaptive algorithm: a) Stability metrics. b) Model following metrics. Full scale flight testing provides an ability to validate different adaptive flight control approaches. Full scale flight testing adds credence to NASA's research efforts. A sustained research effort is required to remove the road blocks and provide adaptive control as a viable design solution for increased aircraft resilience.

  16. [The Southern Cone Sub-Regional Project on Cystic Echinococcosis Control and Surveillance].

    PubMed

    Irabedra, Pilar; Salvatella, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Southern Cone Sub-Regional Project on Cystic Echinococcosis Control and Surveillance: Argentina, Brasil, Chile and Uruguay, is a joint and collaborative tool with the aim of promoting the implementation or the strengthening of programs for disease control. The paper describes the background, the institutional aspects that regulates the structure and functions, as well as the guidelines defined in the technical and operational project. The article emphasize the achievements through Projects of Technical Cooperation among Countries, and the development of integrated and innovative approaches for prevention and control of the disease and training of human resources of the control programs. Some of the challenges are: to achieve the sustainability of the project, implementation of technical groups for analysis and assessment at request of the countries, improvement of the regional information systems, to continue training human resources of the control programs and to expand and strengthen the technical cooperation among countries. PMID:21308202

  17. Microprocessor control of offshore enhanced oil recovery project

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.; Lechler, R.; Long, W.

    1983-01-01

    The proportioning of natural gas liquids among 6 injection wells is described and controlling the corresponding gas necessary to maintain a specified liquid to gas ratio for each individual well is discussed. To accomplish this proportioning, the system selects a master well, controls both liquid and gas header pressure, and calculates corrected flow rates. In addition to these functions the microprocessor also prints on demand both instantaneous flow rates and cumulative volume injected for each well.

  18. Advanced Ground Systems Maintenance Cryogenics Test Lab Control System Upgrade Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janice Leshay

    2014-01-01

    This project will outfit the Simulated Propellant Loading System (SPLS) at KSC's Cryogenics Test Laboratory with a new programmable logic control system. The control system upgrade enables the Advanced Ground Systems Maintenace Element Integration Team and other users of the SPLS to conduct testing in a controls environment similar to that used at the launch pad.

  19. Toward integrated opisthorchiasis control in northeast Thailand: the Lawa project.

    PubMed

    Sripa, Banchob; Tangkawattana, Sirikachorn; Laha, Thewarach; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Mallory, Frank F; Smith, John F; Wilcox, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, a food-borne trematode is a significant public health problem in Southeast Asia, particularly in Thailand. Despite a long history of control programmes in Thailand and a nationwide reduction, O. viverrini infection prevalence remains high in the northeastern provinces. Therefore, a new strategy for controlling the liver fluke infection using the EcoHealth/One Health approach was introduced into the Lawa Lake area in Khon Kaen province where the liver fluke is endemic. A programme has been carried using anthelminthic treatment, novel intensive health education methods both in the communities and in schools, ecosystem monitoring and active community participation. As a result, the infection rate in the more than 10 villages surrounding the lake has declined to approximate one third of the average of 50% as estimated by a baseline survey. Strikingly, the Cyprinoid fish species in the lake, which are the intermediate host, now showed less than 1% prevalence compared to a maximum of 70% at baseline. This liver fluke control programme, named "Lawa model," is now recognised nationally and internationally, and being expanding to other parts of Thailand and neighbouring Mekong countries. Challenges to O. viverrini disease control, and lessons learned in developing an integrative control programme using a community-based, ecosystem approach, and scaling-up regionally based on Lawa as a model are described. PMID:25102053

  20. Organization features of the work control quality improvement project

    SciTech Connect

    Dulin, R.

    1994-12-31

    One consequence of {open_quotes}reengineering{close_quotes} - the systematic review, design, and implementation of process, technology, and organization - is improvement in process efficiency. This improvement also causes change in organization size and function. This paper describes some of the key changes to organizational function brought about by Duke Power Company`s reengineering of the work control process. The fundamental principle observed during the Duke nuclear stations` recent organizational realignment is focus on the process. The process of work control must satisfy the customer needs of the station equipment owners. The changes to the organization serve to fulfill the numerous process requirements.

  1. Design Project on Controlled-Release Drug Delivery Devices: Implementation, Management, and Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qingxing; Liang, Youyun; Tong, Yen Wah; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2010-01-01

    A design project that focuses on the subject of controlled-release drug delivery devices is presented for use in an undergraduate course on mass transfer. The purpose of the project is to introduce students to the various technologies used in the fabrication of drug delivery systems and provide a practical design exercise for understanding the…

  2. Limited-angle holographic tomography with optically controlled projection generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuś, A.; Krauze, W.; Kujawińska, M.

    2015-03-01

    In the paper we demonstrate a holographic tomography system with limited angle of projections, realized by optical- only, diffraction-based beam steering. The system created for this purpose is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer modified to serve as a digital holographic microscope with high Numerical Aperture illumination module and a Spatial Light Modulator. Such solution is fast and robust. Apart from providing an elegant solution to the viewing angle shifting, it also adds new capabilities of the holographic microscope system. SLM, being an active optical element, allows wavefront correction in order to improve measurement accuracy. Integrated phase data captured with different scenarios within a highly limited angular range are processed by a new tomographic reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed sensing technique: total variation minimization, which is applied to non-piecewise constant samples. Finally, the accuracy of full measurement and processing path proposed is tested for a calibrated 3D microobject.

  3. Project Orion, Environmental Control and Life Support System Integrated Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, James F.; Lewis, John F.

    2008-01-01

    Orion is the next vehicle for human space travel. Humans will be sustained in space by the Orion subystem, environmental control and life support (ECLS). The ECLS concept at the subsystem level is outlined by function and technology. In the past two years, the interface definition with other subsystems has increased through different integrated studies. The paper presents the key requirements and discusses three recent studies (e.g., unpressurized cargo) along with the respective impacts on the ECLS design moving forward.

  4. Designing a controlled medical vocabulary server: the VOSER project.

    PubMed

    Rocha, R A; Huff, S M; Haug, P J; Warner, H R

    1994-12-01

    The authors describe their experience designing a controlled medical vocabulary server created to support the exchange of patient data and medical decision logic. The first section introduces practical and theoretical premises that guided the design of the vocabulary server. The second section describes a series of structures needed to implement the proposed server, emphasizing their conformance to the design premises. The third section introduces potential applications that provide services to end users and also a group of tools necessary for maintaining the server corpus. In the fourth section, the authors propose an implementation strategy based on a common framework and on the participation of groups from different health-related domains. PMID:7895474

  5. SOLERAS solar-energy controlled-environment agriculture project

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Froechtenigt, J.; Falatah, A.

    1982-05-01

    Three commercial-size (5-ha), solar-powered, controlled-environment agriculture systems for hot, dry climates are described. The systems use brackish well water for cooling. The well water is desalinated for irrigation using reverse osmosis. Produce output ranges from 44 to 78 kg/m/sup 2/.yr with an overall water consumption of 8 to 139 L/kg produce and electric energy consumption of 111 to 790 Wh/kg produce. The levelized cost ranges from $1.14 to $8.07 per kg of produce.

  6. National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

    2009-10-02

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

  7. DENSE PHASE REBURN COMBUSTION SYSTEM (DPRCS) DEMONSTRATION ON A 154 MWE TANGENTIAL FURNACE: ADDITIONAL AREA OF INTEREST-TO DEVELOP AND DEMONSTRATE AN IN-FURNACE MULTI-POLLUTANT REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE NOx, SO2 & Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Allen C. Wiley; Steven Castagnero; Geoff Green; Kevin Davis; David White

    2004-03-01

    Semi-dense phase pneumatic delivery and injection of calcium and sodium sorbents, and microfine powdered coal, at various sidewall elevations of an online operating coal-fired power plant, was investigated for the express purpose of developing an in-furnace, economic multi-pollutant reduction methodology for NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} & Hg. The 154 MWe tangentially-fired furnace that was selected for a full-scale demonstration, was recently retrofitted for NO{sub x} reduction with a high velocity rotating-opposed over-fire air system. The ROFA system, a Mobotec USA technology, has a proven track record of breaking up laminar flow along furnace walls, thereby enhancing the mix of all constituents of combustion. The knowledge gained from injecting sorbents and micronized coal into well mixed combustion gases with significant improvement in particulate retention time, should serve well the goals of an in-furnace multi-pollutant reduction technology; that of reducing back-end cleanup costs on a wide variety of pollutants, on a cost per ton basis, by first accomplishing significant in-furnace reductions of all pollutants.

  8. Combating dephasing decoherence by periodically performing tracking control and projective measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ming; Dai Hongyi; Xi Zairong; Xie Hongwei; Hu Dewen

    2007-10-15

    We propose a scheme to overcome phase damping decoherence by periodically performing open loop tracking control and projective measurement. Although it is impossible to stabilize a qubit subject to Markovian dynamics only by open loop coherent control, one can attain a 'softened' control goal with the help of periodical projective measurement. The 'softened' control objective in our scheme is to keep the state of the controlled qubit to stay near a reference pure state with a high probability for a sufficiently long time. Two suboptimal control problems are given in the sense of trace distance and fidelity, respectively, and they are eventually reduced to the design of a period T. In our scheme, one can choose the period T as long as possible if the 'softened' control goal is attained. This is in contrast to the observation that quantum Zeno effect takes place only if measurements are performed in a very frequent manner, i.e., the period T must be extremely small.

  9. 77 FR 29351 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control; Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control; Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Examination of Environmental Characteristics...

  10. Ongoing Control System Modernization Project at a Steel Plant Improves Operations (Weirton Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    Weirton Steel Corporation is the eighth largest steel producer in the U.S. and its main manufacturing facility is located in Weirton, West Virginia. In 1998 Weirton Steel successfully implemented a project at its Weirton plant in which it modernized the control systems on its utilities and built a control center in a central location from which those utilities could be monitored.

  11. Multi-Canister overpack pressurization monitoring and control methodology for the spent nuclear fuel project

    SciTech Connect

    Pajunen, A.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-19

    A control methodology is developed and monitoring alternatives evaluated for controlling pressurization in a Multi- Canister Overpack for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Monitoring alternative evaluations include concept description, identification of uncertainties, and identification of experimental work required for implementation. A monitoring alternative is recommended and implementation requirements, risks and start up testing associated with the recommendation are discussed.

  12. The United States Department of Agriculture northeast area-wide tick control project - history and protocol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript summarizes the history of development of the ARS-patented ‘4-Poster’ Deer Treatment Bait Station technology for the control of ticks feeding on white-tailed deer and other wild ungulates, provides the rationale for its use in the USDA Northeast Area-wide Tick Control Project, and des...

  13. 9 CFR 54.9 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 54.9 Section 54.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY...

  14. Evaluation of the USDA Northeast Area-wide Tick Control Project by Meta-analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of the Northeast Area-wide Tick Control Project (NEATCP), meta-analyses were performed using pooled data on the extent of tick-vector control achieved through seven concurrent studies, conducted within five states, using USDA ‘4-Poster’ devices to deliver targeted-acaricide to white-tailed d...

  15. 75 FR 28626 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): SIP 10...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): SIP 10-029, Pilot Study--Cancer Survivorship Care Planning & SIP 10-030, Evaluating Special Events as...

  16. 77 FR 31358 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Initial Review The meeting announced below concerns Research...

  17. 75 FR 30410 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Outcomes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Projects (SIPs): Outcomes of Screening American Indian/Alaska Native Women of Reproductive Age for Chronic Conditions...

  18. Remote Imaging Applied to Schistosomiasis Control: The Anning River Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seto, Edmund Y. W.; Maszle, Don R.; Spear, Robert C.; Gong, Peng

    1997-01-01

    The use of satellite imaging to remotely detect areas of high risk for transmission of infectious disease is an appealing prospect for large-scale monitoring of these diseases. The detection of large-scale environmental determinants of disease risk, often called landscape epidemiology, has been motivated by several authors (Pavlovsky 1966; Meade et al. 1988). The basic notion is that large-scale factors such as population density, air temperature, hydrological conditions, soil type, and vegetation can determine in a coarse fashion the local conditions contributing to disease vector abundance and human contact with disease agents. These large-scale factors can often be remotely detected by sensors or cameras mounted on satellite or aircraft platforms and can thus be used in a predictive model to mark high risk areas of transmission and to target control or monitoring efforts. A review of satellite technologies for this purpose was recently presented by Washino and Wood (1994) and Hay (1997) and Hay et al. (1997).

  19. DOE/NETL's advanced NOx emissions control technology R & D program

    SciTech Connect

    Lani, B.W.; Feeley, T.J. III; Miller, C.E.; Carney, B.A.; Murphy, J.T.

    2006-11-15

    Efforts are underway to provide more cost-effective options for coal-fired power plants to meet stringent emissions limits. Several recently completed DOE/NETL R & D projects were successful in achieving the short-term goal of controlling NOx emissions at 0.15 lb/MMBtu using in-furnace technologies. In anticipation of CAIR and possible congressional multi-pollutant legislation, DOE/NETL issued a solicitation in 2004 to continue R & D efforts to meet the 2007 goal and to initiate R & D targeting the 2010 goal of achieving 0.10 lb/MMBtu using in-furnace technologies in lieu of SCR. As a result, four new NOx R & D projects are currently underway and will be completed over the next three years. The article outlines: ALSTOM's Project on developing an enhanced combustion, low NOx burner for tangentially-fired boilers; Babcock and Wilcox's demonstration of an advanced NOx control technology to achieve an emission rate of 0.10 lb/MMBtu while burning bituminous coal for both wall- and cyclone-fired boilers; Reaction Engineering International's (REI) full-scale field testing of advanced layered technology application (ALTA) NOx control for cyclone fired boilers; and pilot-scale testing of ALTA NOx control of coal-fired boilers also by REI. DOE/NETL has begun an R & D effort to optimize performance of SCR controls to achieve the long term goal of 0.01 lb/MMBtu NOx emission rate by 2020. 1 fig.

  20. Inverting the Pendulum Using Fuzzy Control (Center Director's Discretionary Fund (Project 93-02)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissel, R. R.; Sutherland, W. T.

    1997-01-01

    A single pendulum was simulated in software and then built on a rotary base. A fuzzy controller was used to show its advantages as a nonlinear controller since bringing the pendulum inverted is extremely nonlinear. The controller was implemented in a Motorola 6811 microcontroller. A double pendulum was simulated and fuzzy control was used to hold it in a vertical position. The double pendulum was not built into hardware for lack of time. This project was for training and to show advantages of fuzzy control.

  1. A Manual of Mosquito Control Projects and Committee Assignments for 4-H and Scouts Biology Class Projects, Organized Community Service Programs, and Individuals Interested in Environmental Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Richard A.

    The mosquito control projects presented in this manual were prepared from an educational viewpoint and are intended for use by students in 4-H and Scouts and as a supplement to high school and college biology course work. The major emphasis of the projects is on integrated pest management, an approach utilizing cost-effective control methods which…

  2. Maintenance of Certification Part IV Quality-Improvement Project for Hypertension Control: A Preliminary Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kolasinski, Vallerie A; Price, David W

    2015-01-01

    Context: A Maintenance of Certification Part IV project was created on the basis of an existing, multifaceted hypertension improvement program. Objective: To evaluate the impact of the Maintenance of Certification project, the effects of the improvement options on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients, and the participants’ perception of the workload related to participation in the project. Design: Nonexperimental retrospective analysis. Setting: Kaiser Permanente hospitals and medical office buildings in Northern California. Intervention: Participants used one or more options from a defined menu of strategies to attempt to increase the percentage of hypertensive patients on their patient panels who had controlled blood pressure. Main Outcome Measure: Proportion of hypertensive patients with blood pressure ≤ 139/89 mm Hg. Results: Fifty-two American Board of Family Medicine and 19 American Board of Internal Medicine certified physicians completed projects. Mean panel blood pressure control improved from 79.49% (standard deviation [SD] = 11.32) to 84.64% (SD = 7.80). The choice of improvement option was not associated with the level of improvement or with the participants’ perception of the workload related to completing the project. Conclusion: Project participants improved the care of their patients without an increased perceived burden to their practice. We found no association between the choice of improvement option and either the level of improvement or the perception of workload. PMID:25785642

  3. Joint Power and Multiple Access Control for Wireless Mesh Network with Rose Projection Method

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Meiqin; Shang, Lili; Xin, Yalin; Liu, Xiaohua; Wei, Xinjiang

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the utility maximization problem for the downlink of the multi-interface multichannel wireless mesh network with orthogonal frequency division multiple access. A cross-layer joint power and multiple access control algorithm are proposed. Rosen projection matrix is combined with Solodov projection techniques to build a three-memory gradient Rosen projection method, which is applied to solve this optimization problem. The convergence analysis is given and simulations show that the proposed solution achieves significant throughput compared with existing approaches. PMID:24883384

  4. Projective synchronization of nonidentical fractional-order neural networks based on sliding mode controller.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhixia; Shen, Yi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates global projective synchronization of nonidentical fractional-order neural networks (FNNs) based on sliding mode control technique. We firstly construct a fractional-order integral sliding surface. Then, according to the sliding mode control theory, we design a sliding mode controller to guarantee the occurrence of the sliding motion. Based on fractional Lyapunov direct methods, system trajectories are driven to the proposed sliding surface and remain on it evermore, and some novel criteria are obtained to realize global projective synchronization of nonidentical FNNs. As the special cases, some sufficient conditions are given to ensure projective synchronization of identical FNNs, complete synchronization of nonidentical FNNs and anti-synchronization of nonidentical FNNs. Finally, one numerical example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. PMID:26874968

  5. Lessons Learned and Flight Results from the F15 Intelligent Flight Control System Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the lessons learned and flight results from the F15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) project is shown. The topics include: 1) F-15 IFCS Project Goals; 2) Motivation; 3) IFCS Approach; 4) NASA F-15 #837 Aircraft Description; 5) Flight Envelope; 6) Limited Authority System; 7) NN Floating Limiter; 8) Flight Experiment; 9) Adaptation Goals; 10) Handling Qualities Performance Metric; 11) Project Phases; 12) Indirect Adaptive Control Architecture; 13) Indirect Adaptive Experience and Lessons Learned; 14) Gen II Direct Adaptive Control Architecture; 15) Current Status; 16) Effect of Canard Multiplier; 17) Simulated Canard Failure Stab Open Loop; 18) Canard Multiplier Effect Closed Loop Freq. Resp.; 19) Simulated Canard Failure Stab Open Loop with Adaptation; 20) Canard Multiplier Effect Closed Loop with Adaptation; 21) Gen 2 NN Wts from Simulation; 22) Direct Adaptive Experience and Lessons Learned; and 23) Conclusions

  6. Overview of implementing a project control system in the nuclear utility industry

    SciTech Connect

    Cooprider, D.H. )

    1994-03-01

    During the late 1980s, a metamorphosis began at Florida Power and Light Company (FPL). A strategic step in nuclear engineering's efforts to become more cost effective began in January 1990. A project control department was formed. The initial mission was to provide support for nuclear engineering design activities associated with FPL's two twin-unit nuclear power generation facilities - Turkey Point and St. Lucie. Later, the goal expanded to include the division's materials management, nuclear licensing, and information management departments. The project control group was organized along the lines of the organizations served. Separate dedicated groups were established for each plant. Since most engineering activity was based at the Juno Beach headquarters, the project control staff also was based there.

  7. 7 CFR Appendix D to Subpart E of... - Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Development and Project Control D Appendix D to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the... of Part 1980—Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control (I) Design Policy. The borrower shall ensure or cause to be ensured that: (A) All project facilities...

  8. Robust Control Design for Vibration Isolation of an Electron Beam Projection Lithography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-Cheng; Hong, Min-Feng; Yen, Jia-Yush

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes vibration control for an electron beam projection lithography (EPL) system. Two kinds of disturbances should be considered for an EPL: load disturbances from the machine and ground disturbances from the environment. However, the suspension settings for insulating these two disturbances conflict with each other. Therefore, we propose a double-layer optical table and apply disturbance response decomposing (DRD) techniques to independently control the disturbances. We use a passive control structure to isolate the ground disturbances, and an active control structure to suppress load disturbances. In addition, symmetric transformation is applied to decouple a full optical table into bounce/pitch and roll/warp half-table models, which can be further decoupled into quarter-table models to simplify controller design. Finally, we apply robust control techniques to design active controllers. From both simulation and experimental results, the designed H∞ robust controllers are proven effective in reducing EPL system vibrations.

  9. The conceptual framework of the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Project

    PubMed Central

    Fong, G T; Cummings, K M; Borland, R; Hastings, G; Hyland, A; Giovino, G A; Hammond, D; Thompson, M E

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the conceptual model that underlies the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC Project), whose mission is to measure the psychosocial and behavioural impact of key policies of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) among adult smokers, and in some countries, among adult non‐smokers and among youth. The evaluation framework utilises multiple country controls, a longitudinal design, and a pre‐specified, theory‐driven conceptual model to test hypotheses about the anticipated effects of specific policies. The ITC Project consists of parallel prospective cohort surveys of representative samples of adult smokers currently in nine countries (inhabited by over 45% of the world's smokers), with other countries being added in the future. Collectively, the ITC Surveys constitute the first‐ever international cohort study of tobacco use. The conceptual model of the ITC Project draws on the psychosocial and health communication literature and assumes that tobacco control policies influence tobacco related behaviours through a causal chain of psychological events, with some variables more closely related to the policy itself (policy‐specific variables) and other variables that are more downstream from the policy, which have been identified by health behaviour and social psychological theories as being important causal precursors of behaviour (psychosocial mediators). We discuss the objectives of the ITC Project and its potential for building the evidence base for the FCTC. PMID:16754944

  10. Spinal sensory projection neuron responses to spinal cord stimulation are mediated by circuits beyond gate control

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhe C.; Janik, John J.; Peters, Ryan V.; Chen, Gang; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a therapy used to treat intractable pain with a putative mechanism of action based on the Gate Control Theory. We hypothesized that sensory projection neuron responses to SCS would follow a single stereotyped response curve as a function of SCS frequency, as predicted by the Gate Control circuit. We recorded the responses of antidromically identified sensory projection neurons in the lumbar spinal cord during 1- to 150-Hz SCS in both healthy rats and neuropathic rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). The relationship between SCS frequency and projection neuron activity predicted by the Gate Control circuit accounted for a subset of neuronal responses to SCS but could not account for the full range of observed responses. Heterogeneous responses were classifiable into three additional groups and were reproduced using computational models of spinal microcircuits representing other interactions between nociceptive and nonnociceptive sensory inputs. Intrathecal administration of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, increased spontaneous and evoked activity in projection neurons, enhanced excitatory responses to SCS, and reduced inhibitory responses to SCS, suggesting that GABAA neurotransmission plays a broad role in regulating projection neuron activity. These in vivo and computational results challenge the Gate Control Theory as the only mechanism underlying SCS and refine our understanding of the effects of SCS on spinal sensory neurons within the framework of contemporary understanding of dorsal horn circuitry. PMID:25972582

  11. The microbiome quality control project: baseline study design and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rashmi; Abnet, Christian C; White, Owen; Knight, Rob; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Microbiome research has grown exponentially over the past several years, but studies have been difficult to reproduce across investigations. Relevant variation in measurements between laboratories, from a variety of sources, has not been systematically assessed. This is coupled with a growing concern in the scientific community about the lack of reproducibility in biomedical research. The Microbiome Quality Control project (MBQC) was initiated to identify sources of variation in microbiome studies, to quantify their magnitudes, and to assess the design and utility of different positive and negative control strategies. Here we report on the first MBQC baseline study project and workshop. PMID:26653756

  12. Control room modernization at Finnish nuclear power plants - Two projects compared

    SciTech Connect

    Laarni, J.; Norros, L.

    2006-07-01

    The modernization of automation systems and human-machine interfaces is a current issue at both of the two nuclear power plants (i.e., Fortum's Loviisa plant and TVO's Olkiluoto plant) in Finland. Since the plants have been launched in the 1970's or 1980's, technology is in part old-fashioned and needs to be renewed. At Olkiluoto upgrades of the turbine operator systems have already been conducted; at Loviisa the first phase of the modernization project has just started. Basically, there is a question of the complete digitalization of the information streams at the two plants, and transition from a conventional hard-wired or hybrid control room to a screen-based one. The new human-machine interfaces will comprise new technology, such as PC workstations, soft control, touch screens and large-screen overall displays. The modernization of human-system interfaces is carried out in a stepwise manner at both plants. At both plants the main driver has not been the need to renew the user interfaces of the control room, but the need to upgrade the automation systems. In part because of this, there is a lack of a systematic top-down approach in which different aspects of human factors (HF) engineering are considered in relationship to higher level goals. Our aim here is to give an overview description of the control room modernization projects at the two plants and provide a preliminary evaluation of their progress to date. The projects are also compared, for example, in terms of duration, scope and phasing, and who is responsible for the realization of the project. In addition, we also compare experiences from the Finnish projects to experiences from similar projects abroad. The main part of the data used in this study is based on designers' and project members' interviews. (authors)

  13. Robust projective lag synchronization in drive-response dynamical networks via adaptive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-mahbashi, G.; Noorani, M. S. Md; Bakar, S. A.; Al-sawalha, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the problem of projective lag synchronization behavior in drive-response dynamical networks (DRDNs) with identical and non-identical nodes. An adaptive control method is designed to achieve projective lag synchronization with fully unknown parameters and unknown bounded disturbances. These parameters were estimated by adaptive laws obtained by Lyapunov stability theory. Furthermore, sufficient conditions for synchronization are derived analytically using the Lyapunov stability theory and adaptive control. In addition, the unknown bounded disturbances are also overcome by the proposed control. Finally, analytical results show that the states of the dynamical network with non-delayed coupling can be asymptotically synchronized onto a desired scaling factor under the designed controller. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. A homotopy algorithm for digital optimal projection control GASD-HADOC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; Richter, Stephen; Davis, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    The linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) compensator was developed to facilitate the design of control laws for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems. The compensator is computed by solving two algebraic equations for which standard closed-loop solutions exist. Unfortunately, the minimal dimension of an LQG compensator is almost always equal to the dimension of the plant and can thus often violate practical implementation constraints on controller order. This deficiency is especially highlighted when considering control-design for high-order systems such as flexible space structures. This deficiency motivated the development of techniques that enable the design of optimal controllers whose dimension is less than that of the design plant. A homotopy approach based on the optimal projection equations that characterize the necessary conditions for optimal reduced-order control. Homotopy algorithms have global convergence properties and hence do not require that the initializing reduced-order controller be close to the optimal reduced-order controller to guarantee convergence. However, the homotopy algorithm previously developed for solving the optimal projection equations has sublinear convergence properties and the convergence slows at higher authority levels and may fail. A new homotopy algorithm for synthesizing optimal reduced-order controllers for discrete-time systems is described. Unlike the previous homotopy approach, the new algorithm is a gradient-based, parameter optimization formulation and was implemented in MATLAB. The results reported may offer the foundation for a reliable approach to optimal, reduced-order controller design.

  15. Feedback control of a solid-state qubit using high-fidelity projective measurement.

    PubMed

    Ristè, D; Bultink, C C; Lehnert, K W; DiCarlo, L

    2012-12-14

    We demonstrate feedback control of a superconducting transmon qubit using discrete, projective measurement and conditional coherent driving. Feedback realizes a fast and deterministic qubit reset to a target state with 2.4% error averaged over input superposition states, and allows concatenating experiments more than 10 times faster than by passive initialization. This closed-loop qubit control is necessary for measurement-based protocols such as quantum error correction and teleportation. PMID:23368293

  16. An interdisciplinary school project using a Nintendo Wii controller for measuring car speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Nils Kristian; Mitchell, James Robert

    2013-03-01

    This work examines the feasibility of employing a Nintendo Wii game controller for measuring car speed in an interdisciplinary school project. It discusses the physical characteristics of the controller and of vehicle headlights. It suggests how an experiment may be linked to topics in mathematics, statistics, physics and computer science. An algorithm for calculating speed from repeated recordings of car headlights is provided. Finally the results of repeated experiments with an approaching car are provided.

  17. Resilient Propulsion Control Research for the NASA Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are designed to provide sufficient safety margins to guarantee robust operation with an exceptionally long life. However, engine performance requirements may be drastically altered during abnormal flight conditions or emergency maneuvers. In some situations, the conservative design of the engine control system may not be in the best interest of overall aircraft safety; it may be advantageous to "sacrifice" the engine to "save" the aircraft. Motivated by this opportunity, the NASA Aviation Safety Program is conducting resilient propulsion research aimed at developing adaptive engine control methodologies to operate the engine beyond the normal domain for emergency operations to maximize the possibility of safely landing the damaged aircraft. Previous research studies and field incident reports show that the propulsion system can be an effective tool to help control and eventually land a damaged aircraft. Building upon the flight-proven Propulsion Controlled Aircraft (PCA) experience, this area of research will focus on how engine control systems can improve aircraft safe-landing probabilities under adverse conditions. This paper describes the proposed research topics in Engine System Requirements, Engine Modeling and Simulation, Engine Enhancement Research, Operational Risk Analysis and Modeling, and Integrated Flight and Propulsion Controller Designs that support the overall goal.

  18. Tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Lithuania: lessons learnt from a capacity support project

    PubMed Central

    Ljungqvist, I.; Davidavičiene, E.; Mikaityte, J.; van der Werf, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control (IC) is key in controlling TB transmission in health facilities in Lithuania. This article presents a project that aimed at supporting health care facilities in Lithuania in implementing TB-IC. The project consisted of 1) facility TB-IC assessments, 2) development of facility TB-IC plans, 3) TB-IC training and 4) site visits. We assessed the impact of these activities through a self-assessment questionnaire. The project resulted in limited improvements. Most progress was seen in administrative and managerial activities. Possible reasons for the limited improvements are challenges with funding and the lack of supportive legislation and a national TB-IC plan. PMID:27051607

  19. Tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Lithuania: lessons learnt from a capacity support project.

    PubMed

    Turusbekova, N; Ljungqvist, I; Davidavičiene, E; Mikaityte, J; van der Werf, M J

    2016-03-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control (IC) is key in controlling TB transmission in health facilities in Lithuania. This article presents a project that aimed at supporting health care facilities in Lithuania in implementing TB-IC. The project consisted of 1) facility TB-IC assessments, 2) development of facility TB-IC plans, 3) TB-IC training and 4) site visits. We assessed the impact of these activities through a self-assessment questionnaire. The project resulted in limited improvements. Most progress was seen in administrative and managerial activities. Possible reasons for the limited improvements are challenges with funding and the lack of supportive legislation and a national TB-IC plan. PMID:27051607

  20. ACFA 2020 - An FP7 project on active control of flexible fuel efficient aircraft configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, R.

    2013-12-01

    This paper gives an overview about the project ACFA 2020 which is funded by the European Commission within the 7th framework program. The acronym ACFA 2020 stands for Active Control for Flexible Aircraft 2020. The project is dealing with the design of highly fuel efficient aircraft configurations and, in particular, on innovative active control concepts with the goal to reduce loads and structural weight. Major focus lays on blended wing body (BWB) aircraft. Blended wing body type aircraft configurations are seen as the most promising future concept to fulfill the so-called ACARE (Advisory Council for Aeronautics Research in Europe) vision 2020 goals in regards to reduce fuel consumption and external noise. The paper discusses in some detail the overall goals and how they are addressed in the workplan. Furthermore, the major achievements of the project are outlined and a short outlook on the remaining work is given.

  1. Auditory cortex controls sound-driven innate defense behaviour through corticofugal projections to inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Liang, Feixue; Zingg, Brian; Ji, Xu-ying; Ibrahim, Leena A.; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2015-01-01

    Defense against environmental threats is essential for animal survival. However, the neural circuits responsible for transforming unconditioned sensory stimuli and generating defensive behaviours remain largely unclear. Here, we show that corticofugal neurons in the auditory cortex (ACx) targeting the inferior colliculus (IC) mediate an innate, sound-induced flight behaviour. Optogenetic activation of these neurons, or their projection terminals in the IC, is sufficient for initiating flight responses, while the inhibition of these projections reduces sound-induced flight responses. Corticocollicular axons monosynaptically innervate neurons in the cortex of the IC (ICx), and optogenetic activation of the projections from the ICx to the dorsal periaqueductal gray is sufficient for provoking flight behaviours. Our results suggest that ACx can both amplify innate acoustic-motor responses and directly drive flight behaviours in the absence of sound input through corticocollicular projections to ICx. Such corticofugal control may be a general feature of innate defense circuits across sensory modalities. PMID:26068082

  2. Movement suppression during anesthesia: neural projections from the mesopontine tegmentum to areas involved in motor control.

    PubMed

    Sukhotinsky, Inna; Hopkins, David A; Lu, Jun; Saper, Clifford B; Devor, Marshall

    2005-09-01

    Microinjection of pentobarbital and GABA(A)-receptor agonists into a brainstem region we have called the mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA; Devor and Zalkind [2001] Pain 94:101-112) induces a general anesthesia-like state. As in systemic general anesthesia, rats show loss of the righting reflex, atonia, nonresponsiveness to noxious stimuli, and apparent loss of consciousness. GABA(A) agonist anesthetics acting on the MPTA might suppress movement by engaging endogenous motor regulatory systems previously identified in research on decerebrate rigidity and REM sleep atonia. Anterograde and retrograde tracing revealed that the MPTA has multiple descending projections to pontine and medullary areas known to be associated with motor control and atonia. Prominent among these are the dorsal pontine reticular formation and components of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). The MPTA also has direct projections to the intermediate gray matter and ventral horn of the spinal cord via the lateral and anterior funiculi. These projections show a rostrocaudal topography: neurons in the rostral MPTA project to the RVM, but only minimally to the spinal cord, while those in the caudal MPTA project to both targets. Finally, the MPTA has ascending projections to motor control areas including the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and the caudate-putamen. Projections are bilateral with an ipsilateral predominance. We propose that GABA(A) agonist anesthetics induce immobility at least in part by acting on these endogenous motor control pathways via the MPTA. Analysis of MPTA connectivity has the potential for furthering our understanding of the neural circuitry responsible for the various functional components of general anesthesia. PMID:16025457

  3. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  4. 9 CFR 54.9 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 54.9 Section 54.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  5. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS SCRAPIE IN SHEEP AND GOATS §...

  6. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  7. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  8. 9 CFR 79.7 - Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... contains testing or other procedures that indicate that an animal, despite meeting the definition of high... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Waiver of requirements for scrapie control pilot projects. 79.7 Section 79.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  9. 75 FR 30410 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Project (SIP): Provider...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Control Special Interest Project (SIP): Provider and Public Health Input for Vaccine Policy Decisions SIP..., discussion, and evaluation of applications received in response to ``Provider and Public Health Input for... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  10. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, Paul H.

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 6-hour introductory module on statistical process control (SPC), designed to develop competencies in the following skill areas: (1) identification of the three classes of SPC use; (2) understanding a process and how it works; (3)…

  11. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Advanced Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Dale

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 20-hour advanced statistical process control (SPC) and quality improvement course designed to develop the following competencies: (1) understanding quality systems; (2) knowing the process; (3) solving quality problems; and (4)…

  12. BCAUS Project description and consideration of separation of data and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Joy L.; Weaver, Steven J.

    1989-01-01

    The commonly stated truths that data may be segregated from program control in generic expert system shells and that such tools support straightforward knowledge representation were examined. The ideal of separation of data from program control in expert systems is difficult to realize for a variety of reasons. One approach to achieving this goal is to integrate hybrid collections of specialized shells and tools instead of producing custom systems built with a single all purpose expert system tool. Aspects of these issues are examined in the context of a specific diagnostic expert system application, the Backup Control Mode Analysis and Utility System (BCAUS), being developed for the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) spacecraft. The project and the knowledge gained in working on the project are described.

  13. Targeting Erosion Control: Adoption of Erosion Control Practices. A Report from a National Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Peter; And Others

    Research analyzed adoption of erosion control practices by farm operators in two counties in each of four states: Alabama, Missouri, Tennessee, and Washington. Analysis was based on farm survey data and technical and financial assistance information from county Soil Conservation Service (SCS) and Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service…

  14. Polarization aberration control for hyper-NA lithographic projection optics at design stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Ke

    2015-08-01

    For hyper numerical aperture (NA) lithographic projection optics, not only scalar aberration but also polarization aberration (PA) should be controlled. Optical interfaces, coatings and intrinsic birefringence of lens materials can induce polarization aberration, so they cannot be ignored at design phase. There are few comprehensive and systematic studies on PA control at design phase for lithographic optics. In this paper, a lithographic projection lens with 1.2 of NA is designed, the root-mean-square of scalar aberration reach 1nm. For PA control of this system, firstly the influence of different subsets of polarization aberration on imaging performance is analyzed. The results indicate that the scalar transmission and diattenuation mainly cause critical dimension error (CDE), and the scalar phase and retardance mainly cause pattern placement error (PE). The results also show the diattenuation is the main controlled object in the process of PA control. Furthermore, a cooperative design strategy for PA control is proposed, which is to cooperate between custom coating design and the optimization of crystal orientation based on optical structure design. Through the cooperative design, the PA can be greatly reduced, especially diattenuation. The simulation results of the final system reveal that the dynamic range of CDE is suppressed from -12.7nm ~ +4.3nm to -0.1nm ~ +0.9nm after PA control, while keeping PE at an acceptable level.

  15. Blood Pressure, Sodium Intake, and Hypertension Control: Lessons From the North Karelia Project.

    PubMed

    Laatikainen, Tiina; Nissinen, Aulikki; Kastarinen, Mika; Jula, Antti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2016-06-01

    From the very beginning of the North Karelia Project, prevention, detection, and control of hypertension were included as key aims in the project. An intensive hypertension prevention and control program was established in North Karelia in 1972 that included community-based activities to reduce blood pressure levels in the entire population, detect people with hypertension, improve their treatment, establish standard diagnostic and therapeutic methods, and to monitor blood pressure levels, control of hypertension, and the performance of the health care. After the first 5 years of the project, most of these activities were also implemented on the national level. In late 1970s, work to reduce the salt intake was started, and substantial reductions have taken place in salt intake in the Finnish population. Remarkable improvements have been seen both in blood pressure levels and in treatment and control of hypertension in North Karelia and in the whole of Finland. Between 1972 and 2012 in North Karelia, the mean systolic blood pressure among 30- to 59-year-old men has decreased from 149 mm Hg to 135 mm Hg and among women from 153 mm Hg to 129 mm Hg. The decreases in mean diastolic blood pressure have been from 92 mm Hg to 84 mm Hg among men and from 92 mm Hg to 79 mm Hg among women. PMID:27242086

  16. Project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems, retrieval control system software configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    RIECK, C.A.

    1999-02-23

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides the instructions for change control of the W-211 Project, Retrieval Control System (RCS) software after initial approval/release but prior to the transfer of custody to the waste tank operations contractor. This plan applies to the W-211 system software developed by the project, consisting of the computer human-machine interface (HMI) and programmable logic controller (PLC) software source and executable code, for production use by the waste tank operations contractor. The plan encompasses that portion of the W-211 RCS software represented on project-specific AUTOCAD drawings that are released as part of the C1 definitive design package (these drawings are identified on the drawing list associated with each C-1 package), and the associated software code. Implementation of the plan is required for formal acceptance testing and production release. The software configuration management plan does not apply to reports and data generated by the software except where specifically identified. Control of information produced by the software once it has been transferred for operation is the responsibility of the receiving organization.

  17. NERI PROJECT 99-119. TASK 1. ADVANCED CONTROL TOOLS AND METHODS. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, J.A.

    2002-09-09

    Nuclear plants of the 21st century will employ higher levels of automation and fault tolerance to increase availability, reduce accident risk, and lower operating costs. Key developments in control algorithms, fault diagnostics, fault tolerance, and communication in a distributed system are needed to implement the fully automated plant. Equally challenging will be integrating developments in separate information and control fields into a cohesive system, which collectively achieves the overall goals of improved performance, safety, reliability, maintainability, and cost-effectiveness. Under the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), the U. S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a project to address some of the technical issues involved in meeting the long-range goal of 21st century reactor control systems. This project, ''A New Paradigm for Automated Development Of Highly Reliable Control Architectures For Future Nuclear Plants,'' involves researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Tennessee, and North Carolina State University. This paper documents a research effort to develop methods for automated generation of control systems that can be traced directly to the design requirements. Our final goal is to allow the designer to specify only high-level requirements and stress factors that the control system must survive (e.g. a list of transients, or a requirement to withstand a single failure.) To this end, the ''control engine'' automatically selects and validates control algorithms and parameters that are optimized to the current state of the plant, and that have been tested under the prescribed stress factors. The control engine then automatically generates the control software from validated algorithms. Examples of stress factors that the control system must ''survive'' are: transient events (e.g., set-point changes, or expected occurrences such a load rejection,) and postulated component failures. These stress factors are specified by the

  18. Radiometric compensation for cooperative distributed multi-projection system through 2-DOF distributed control.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Jun; Iwai, Daisuke; Kashima, Kenji

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiometric compensation technique for cooperative projection system based-on distributed optimization. To achieve high scalability and robustness, we assume cooperative projection environments such that 1. each projector does not have information about other projectors as well as target images, 2. the camera does not have information about the projectors either, while having the target images, and 3. only a broadcast communication from the camera to the projectors is allowed to suppress the data transfer bandwidth. To this end, we first investigate a distributed optimization based feedback mechanism that is suitable for the required decentralized information processing environment. Next, we show that this mechanism works well for still image projection, however not necessary for moving images due to the lack of dynamic responsiveness. To overcome this issue, we propose to implement an additional feedforward mechanism. Such a 2 Degree Of Freedom (2-DOF) control structure is well-known in control engineering community as a typical method to enhance not only disturbance rejection but also reference tracking capability, simultaneously. We theoretically guarantee and experimentally demonstrate that this 2-DOF structure yields the moving image projection accuracy that is overwhelming the best achievable performance only by the distributed optimization mechanisms. PMID:26439824

  19. [Progress report on a World Bank loan to China for a tuberculosis control project].

    PubMed

    Zhao, F; Chi, Y; Wang, K

    1995-02-01

    The progress of the World Bank loaned TB control project implemented from the second quarter of 1991 to the fourth quarter of 1993 was described in this paper. In the past three years, 737 counties of the 12 provinces with the population of 360 million has been covered by the project. Among 95176 new smear positive cases discovered, 93909 patients received free treatment of TB. The treatment coverage is 98.7%, of which 95% were treated under full course supervision. The smear conversion rate at two, three months of new smear positive TB patients are 83.4% and 90.6% respectively. The cohort analysis showed that the cure rate is 89.8%, which has reached the advanced level of the modern national tuberculosis control programme in the world. PMID:7600599

  20. Knowledge based and interactive control for the Superfluid Helium On-orbit Transfer Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castellano, Timothy P.; Raymond, Eric A.; Shapiro, Jeff C.; Robinson, Frank A.; Rosenthal, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) project is a Shuttle-based experiment designed to acquire data on the properties of superfluid helium in micro-gravity. Aft Flight Deck Computer Software for the SHOOT experiment is comprised of several monitoring programs which give the astronaut crew visibility into SHOOT systems and a rule based system which will provide process control, diagnosis and error recovery for a helium transfer without ground intervention. Given present Shuttle manifests, this software will become the first expert system to be used in space. The SHOOT Command and Monitoring System (CMS) software will provide a near real time highly interactive interface for the SHOOT principal investigator to control the experiment and to analyze and display its telemetry. The CMS software is targeted for all phases of the SHOOT project: hardware development, pre-flight pad servicing, in-flight operations, and post-flight data analysis.

  1. Philip Morris's Project Sunrise: weakening tobacco control by working with it

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, P A; Smith, E A; Malone, R E

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyse the implications of Philip Morris USA's (PM's) overtures toward tobacco control and other public health organisations, 1995–2006. Data sources Internal PM documents made available through multi‐state US attorneys general lawsuits and other cases, and newspaper sources. Methods Documents were retrieved from several industry documents websites and analysed using a case study approach. Results PM's Project Sunrise, initiated in 1995 and proposed to continue through 2006, was a long‐term plan to address tobacco industry delegitimisation and ensure the social acceptability of smoking and of the company itself. Project Sunrise laid out an explicit divide‐and‐conquer strategy against the tobacco control movement, proposing the establishment of relationships with PM‐identified “moderate” tobacco control individuals and organisations and the marginalisation of others. PM planned to use “carefully orchestrated efforts” to exploit existing differences of opinion within tobacco control, weakening its opponents by working with them. PM also planned to thwart tobacco industry delegitimisation by repositioning itself as “responsible”. We present evidence that these plans were implemented. Conclusion Sunrise exposes differences within the tobacco control movement that should be further discussed. The goal should not be consensus, but a better understanding of tensions within the movement. As the successes of the last 25 years embolden advocates to think beyond passage of the next clean indoor air policy or funding of the next cessation programme, movement philosophical differences may become more important. If tobacco control advocates are not ready to address them, Project Sunrise suggests that Philip Morris is ready to exploit them. PMID:16728753

  2. Maximum Entropy/Optimal Projection (MEOP) control design synthesis: Optimal quantification of the major design tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, D. C.; Bernstein, D. S.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying philosophy and motivation of the optimal projection/maximum entropy (OP/ME) stochastic modeling and reduced control design methodology for high order systems with parameter uncertainties are discussed. The OP/ME design equations for reduced-order dynamic compensation including the effect of parameter uncertainties are reviewed. The application of the methodology to several Large Space Structures (LSS) problems of representative complexity is illustrated.

  3. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2006 Progress Update

    SciTech Connect

    Wipke, K.; Welch, C.; Thomas, H.; Sprik, S.; Gronich, S.; Garbak, J.

    2006-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project through a competitive solicitation process in 2003. The purpose of this project is to conduct an integrated field validation that simultaneously examines the performance of fuel cell vehicles and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure. Four industry teams have signed cooperative agreements with DOE and are supporting plans for more than 130 fuel cell vehicles and 20 hydrogen refueling stations over the 5-year project duration. This paper provides a status update covering the progress accomplished by the demonstration and validation project over the last six months; the first composite data products from the project were published in March 2006. The composite data products aggregate individual performance into a range that protects the intellectual property of the companies involved, while publicizing the progress the hydrogen and fuel cell industry is making as a whole relative to the program objectives and timeline. Updates to previously published composite data products, such as on-road fuel economy and vehicle/infrastructure safety, will be presented along with new composite data products, such as fuel cell stack efficiency and refueling behavior.

  4. The prevention and control of avian influenza: The avian influenza coordinated agriculture project1

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, C.; Slemons, R.; Perez, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Avian Influenza Coordinated Agriculture Project (AICAP) entitled “Prevention and Control of Avian Influenza in the US” strives to be a significant point of reference for the poultry industry and the general public in matters related to the biology, risks associated with, and the methods used to prevent and control avian influenza. To this end, AICAP has been remarkably successful in generating research data, publications through an extensive network of university- and agency-based researchers, and extending findings to stakeholders. An overview of the highlights of AICAP research is presented. PMID:19276431

  5. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Program review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport Project, established as one element of the NASA/Boeing Energy Efficient Transport Technology Program. The performance assessment showed that incorporating ACT into an airplane designed to fly approximately 200 passengers approximately 2,000 nmi could yield block fuel savings from 6 to 10 percent at the design range. The principal risks associated with incorporating these active control functions into a commercial airplane are those involved with the ACT system implementation. The Test and Evaluation phase of the IAAC Project focused on the design, fabrication, and test of a system that implemented pitch axis fly-by-wire, pitch axis augmentation, and wing load alleviation. The system was built to be flight worthy, and was planned to be experimentally flown on the 757. The system was installed in the Boeing Digital Avionics Flight Controls Laboratory (DAFCL), where open loop hardware and software tests, and a brief examination of a direct drive valve (DDV) actuation concept were accomplished. The IAAC Project has shown that ACT can be beneficially incorporated into a commercial transport airplane. Based on the results achieved during the testing phase, there appears to be no fundamental reason(s) that would preclude the commercial application of ACT, assuming an appropriate development effort is included.

  6. Forebrain dopamine neurons project down to a brainstem region controlling locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Ryczko, Dimitri; Grätsch, Swantje; Auclair, François; Dubé, Catherine; Bergeron, Saskia; Alpert, Michael H.; Cone, Jackson J.; Roitman, Mitchell F.; Alford, Simon; Dubuc, Réjean

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of dopamine (DA) to locomotor control is traditionally attributed to ascending dopaminergic projections from the substantia nigra pars compacta and the ventral tegmental area to the basal ganglia, which in turn project down to the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR), a brainstem region controlling locomotion in vertebrates. However, a dopaminergic innervation of the pedunculopontine nucleus, considered part of the MLR, was recently identified in the monkey. The origin and role of this dopaminergic input are unknown. We addressed these questions in a basal vertebrate, the lamprey. Here we report a functional descending dopaminergic pathway from the posterior tuberculum (PT; homologous to the substantia nigra pars compacta and/or ventral tegmental area of mammals) to the MLR. By using triple labeling, we found that dopaminergic cells from the PT not only project an ascending pathway to the striatum, but send a descending projection to the MLR. In an isolated brain preparation, PT stimulation elicited excitatory synaptic inputs into patch-clamped MLR cells, accompanied by activity in reticulospinal cells. By using voltammetry coupled with electrophysiological recordings, we demonstrate that PT stimulation evoked DA release in the MLR, together with the activation of reticulospinal cells. In a semi-intact preparation, stimulation of the PT elicited reticulospinal activity together with locomotor movements. Microinjections of a D1 antagonist in the MLR decreased the locomotor output elicited by PT stimulation, whereas injection of DA had an opposite effect. It appears that this descending dopaminergic pathway has a modulatory role on MLR cells that are known to receive glutamatergic projections and promotes locomotor output. PMID:23918379

  7. Advanced emissions control development project. Final report, November 1, 1993--February 29, 1996. Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Farthing, G.A.

    1996-02-29

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase I activities were primarily directed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emission control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. The AECDP facility consists of an ESP, pulse-jet baghouse, and wet scrubber. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal. In order to successfully apply the results of the program to utility systems, the relationship between the performance of the CEDF/AECDP test equipment and commercial units had to be established. The first step in the verification process was to validate that the flue gas treatment devices - boiler/convection pass simulator, ESP, baghouse, and wet SO{sub 2} scrubber - operate in a manner representative of commercial units.

  8. Advanced emissions control development project. Phase I, Final report, November 1, 1993--February 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-29

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase 1 activities were primarily aimed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emissions control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal.

  9. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  10. Controlled Sonar Exposure Experiments on Cetaceans in Norwegian Waters: Overview of the 3S-Project.

    PubMed

    Lam, Frans-Peter A; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A; Curé, Charlotte; Kleivane, Lars; Sivle, Lise Doksæter; van Ijsselmuide, Sander P; Visser, Fleur; von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Dekeling, René P A

    2016-01-01

    In mitigating the risk of sonar operations, the behavioral response of cetaceans is one of the major knowledge gaps that needs to be addressed. The 3S-Project has conducted a number of controlled exposure experiments with a realistic sonar source in Norwegian waters from 2006 to 2013. In total, the following six target species have been studied: killer, long-finned pilot, sperm, humpback, minke, and northern bottlenose whales. A total of 38 controlled sonar exposures have been conducted on these species. Responses from controlled and repeated exposure runs have been recorded using acoustic and visual observations as well as with electronic tags on the target animal. So far, the first dose-response curves as well as an overview of the scored severity of responses have been revealed. In this paper, an overview is presented of the approach for the study, including the results so far as well as the current status of the ongoing analysis. PMID:26611008

  11. Coordinating robot motion, sensing, and control in plans. LDRD project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.; Brown, R.G.; Watterberg, P.A.

    1997-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a framework for robotic planning and execution that provides a continuum of adaptability with respect to model incompleteness, model error, and sensing error. For example, dividing robot motion into gross-motion planning, fine-motion planning, and sensor-augmented control had yielded productive research and solutions to individual problems. Unfortunately, these techniques could only be combined by hand with ad hoc methods and were restricted to systems where all kinematics are completely modeled in planning. The original intent was to develop methods for understanding and autonomously synthesizing plans that coordinate motion, sensing, and control. The project considered this problem from several perspectives. Results included (1) theoretical methods to combine and extend gross-motion and fine-motion planning; (2) preliminary work in flexible-object manipulation and an implementable algorithm for planning shortest paths through obstacles for the free-end of an anchored cable; (3) development and implementation of a fast swept-body distance algorithm; and (4) integration of Sandia`s C-Space Toolkit geometry engine and SANDROS motion planer and improvements, which yielded a system practical for everyday motion planning, with path-segment planning at interactive speeds. Results (3) and (4) have either led to follow-on work or are being used in current projects, and they believe that (2) will eventually be also.

  12. An estimation method of the direct benefit of a waterlogging control project applicable to the changing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengmei, L.; Guanghua, Q.; Zishen, C.

    2015-05-01

    The direct benefit of a waterlogging control project is reflected by the reduction or avoidance of waterlogging loss. Before and after the construction of a waterlogging control project, the disaster-inducing environment in the waterlogging-prone zone is generally different. In addition, the category, quantity and spatial distribution of the disaster-bearing bodies are also changed more or less. Therefore, under the changing environment, the direct benefit of a waterlogging control project should be the reduction of waterlogging losses compared to conditions with no control project. Moreover, the waterlogging losses with or without the project should be the mathematical expectations of the waterlogging losses when rainstorms of all frequencies meet various water levels in the drainage-accepting zone. So an estimation model of the direct benefit of waterlogging control is proposed. Firstly, on the basis of a Copula function, the joint distribution of the rainstorms and the water levels are established, so as to obtain their joint probability density function. Secondly, according to the two-dimensional joint probability density distribution, the dimensional domain of integration is determined, which is then divided into small domains so as to calculate the probability for each of the small domains and the difference between the average waterlogging loss with and without a waterlogging control project, called the regional benefit of waterlogging control project, under the condition that rainstorms in the waterlogging-prone zone meet the water level in the drainage-accepting zone. Finally, it calculates the weighted mean of the project benefit of all small domains, with probability as the weight, and gets the benefit of the waterlogging control project. Taking the estimation of benefit of a waterlogging control project in Yangshan County, Guangdong Province, as an example, the paper briefly explains the procedures in waterlogging control project benefit estimation. The

  13. Improvement in the control aspect of laser frequency stabilization for SUNLITE project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zia, Omar

    1992-01-01

    Flight Electronics Division of Langley Research Center is developing a spaceflight experiment called the Stanford University and NASA Laser In-Space Technology (SUNLITE). The objective of the project is to explore the fundamental limits on frequency stability using an FM laser locking technique on a Nd:YAG non-planar ring (free-running linewidth of 5 KHz) oscillator in the vibration free, microgravity environment of space. Compact and automated actively stabilized terahertz laser oscillators will operate in space with an expected linewidth of less than 3 Hz. To implement and verify this experiment, NASA engineers have designed and built a state of the art, space qualified high speed data acquisition system for measuring the linewidth and stability limits of a laser oscillator. In order to achieve greater stability and better performance, an active frequency control scheme requiring the use of a feedback control loop has been applied. In the summer of 1991, the application of control theory in active frequency control as a frequency stabilization technique was investigated. The results and findings were presented in 1992 at the American Control Conference in Chicago, and have been published in Conference Proceedings. The main focus was to seek further improvement in the overall performance of the system by replacing the analogue controller by a digital algorithm.

  14. Corticothalamic Projection Neuron Development beyond Subtype Specification: Fog2 and Intersectional Controls Regulate Intraclass Neuronal Diversity.

    PubMed

    Galazo, Maria J; Emsley, Jason G; Macklis, Jeffrey D

    2016-07-01

    Corticothalamic projection neurons (CThPN) are a diverse set of neurons, critical for function of the neocortex. CThPN development and diversity need to be precisely regulated, but little is known about molecular controls over their differentiation and functional specialization, critically limiting understanding of cortical development and complexity. We report the identification of a set of genes that both define CThPN and likely control their differentiation, diversity, and function. We selected the CThPN-specific transcriptional coregulator Fog2 for functional analysis. We identify that Fog2 controls CThPN molecular differentiation, axonal targeting, and diversity, in part by regulating the expression level of Ctip2 by CThPN, via combinatorial interactions with other molecular controls. Loss of Fog2 specifically disrupts differentiation of subsets of CThPN specialized in motor function, indicating that Fog2 coordinates subtype and functional-area differentiation. These results confirm that we identified key controls over CThPN development and identify Fog2 as a critical control over CThPN diversity. PMID:27321927

  15. Lessons learned in digital upgrade projects digital control system implementation at US nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, S.; Bolian, T. W.

    2006-07-01

    AREVA NP has gained significant experience during the past five years in digital upgrades at operating nuclear power stations in the US. Plants are seeking modernization with digital technology to address obsolescence, spare parts availability, vendor support, increasing age-related failures and diminished reliability. New systems offer improved reliability and functionality, and decreased maintenance requirements. Significant lessons learned have been identified relating to the areas of licensing, equipment qualification, software quality assurance and other topics specific to digital controls. Digital control systems have been installed in non safety-related control applications at many utilities within the last 15 years. There have also been a few replacements of small safety-related systems with digital technology. Digital control systems are proving to be reliable, accurate, and easy to maintain. Digital technology is gaining acceptance and momentum with both utilities and regulatory agencies based upon the successes of these installations. Also, new plants are being designed with integrated digital control systems. To support plant life extension and address obsolescence of critical components, utilities are beginning to install digital technology for primary safety-system replacement. AREVA NP analyzed operating experience and lessons learned from its own digital upgrade projects as well as industry-wide experience to identify key issues that should be considered when implementing digital controls in nuclear power stations.

  16. Distribution automation and control support; Analysis and interpretation of DAC working group results for use in project planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klock, P.; Evans, D.

    1979-01-01

    The Executive Summary and Proceedings of the Working Group Meeting was analyzed to identify specific projects appropriate for Distribution Automation and Control DAC RD&D. Specific projects that should be undertaken in the DAC RD&D program were recommended. The projects are presented under broad categories of work selected based on ESC's interpretation of the results of the Working Group Meeting. Some of the projects are noted as utility industry projects. The ESC recommendations regarding program management are presented. Utility versus Government management responsibilities are noted.

  17. Measuring software development characteristics in the local environment. [considering project requirements for spacecraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Zelkowitz, M. V.

    1978-01-01

    In a brief evaluation of software-related considerations, it is found that suitable approaches for software development depend to a large degree on the characteristics of the particular project involved. An analysis is conducted of development problems in an environment in which ground support software is produced for spacecraft control. The amount of work involved is in the range from 6 to 10 man-years. Attention is given to a general project summary, a programmer/analyst survey, a component summary, a component status report, a resource summary, a change report, a computer program run analysis, aspects of data collection on a smaller scale, progress forecasting, problems of overhead, and error analysis.

  18. Inhibitory control of ascending glutamatergic projections to the lamprey respiratory rhythm generator.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, Elenia; Mutolo, Donatella; Contini, Massimo; Pantaleo, Tito; Bongianni, Fulvia

    2016-06-21

    Neurons within the vagal motoneuron region of the lamprey have been shown to modulate respiratory activity via ascending excitatory projections to the paratrigeminal respiratory group (pTRG), the proposed respiratory rhythm generator. The present study was performed on in vitro brainstem preparations of the lamprey to provide a characterization of ascending projections within the whole respiratory motoneuron column with regard to the distribution of neurons projecting to the pTRG and related neurochemical markers. Injections of Neurobiotin were performed into the pTRG and the presence of glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivity was investigated by double-labeling experiments. Interestingly, retrogradely labeled neurons were found not only in the vagal region, but also in the facial and glossopharyngeal motoneuron regions. They were also present within the sensory octavolateral area (OLA). The results show for the first time that neurons projecting to the pTRG are immunoreactive for glutamate, surrounded by GABA-immunoreactive structures and associated with the presence of glycinergic cells. Consistently, GABAA or glycine receptor blockade within the investigated regions increased the respiratory frequency. Furthermore, microinjections of agonists and antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors and of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol showed that OLA neurons do not contribute to respiratory rhythm generation. The results provide evidence that glutamatergic ascending pathways to the pTRG are subject to a potent inhibitory control and suggest that disinhibition is one important mechanism subserving their function. The general characteristics of inhibitory control involved in rhythmic activities, such as respiration, appear to be highly conserved throughout vertebrate evolution. PMID:27058146

  19. Communications and control for electric power systems: The AbNET Project 1993 report

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkham, H.

    1993-12-01

    This report is a progress report on the development of the AbNET communication system, the principles of which have been described in a number of earlier technical reports from the Communication and Control Project. The status of the JPL PC-based version of the network is described, along with early results of tests on that system. The work done in preparation for the system demonstration and test to be performed in Columbus, Ohio, in collaboration with American Electric Power is discussed. The Ohio experiment, and the kind of results expected, are described.

  20. Trends in multi-pollutant emissions from a technology-linked inventory for India: II. Residential, agricultural and informal industry sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Apoorva; Sadavarte, Pankaj; Rao, Anand B.; Venkataraman, Chandra

    2014-12-01

    Dispersed traditional combustion technologies, characterized by inefficient combustion and significant emissions, are widely used in residential cooking and "informal industries" including brick production, food and agricultural product processing operations like drying and cooking operations related to sugarcane juice, milk, food-grain, jute, silk, tea and coffee. In addition, seasonal agricultural residue burning in field is a discontinuous source of significant emissions. Here we estimate fuel consumption in these sectors and agricultural residue burned using detailed technology divisions and survey-based primary data for 2010 and projected between 1996 and 2015. In the residential sector, a decline in the fraction of solid biomass users for cooking from 79% in 1996 to 65% in 2010 was offset by a growing population, leading to a nearly constant population of solid biomass users, with a corresponding increase in the population of LPG users. Emissions from agriculture followed the growth in agricultural production and diesel use by tractors and pumps. Trends in emissions from the informal industries sector followed those in coal combustion in brick kilns. Residential biomass cooking stoves were the largest contributors to emissions of PM2.5, OC, CO, NMVOC and CH4. Highest emitting technologies of BC were residential kerosene wick lamps. Emissions of SO2 were largely from coal combustion in Bull's trench kilns and other brick manufacturing technologies. Diesel use in tractors was the major source of NOx emissions. Uncertainties in emission estimates were principally from highly uncertain emission factors, particularly for technologies in the informal industries.

  1. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The current status of the Active Controls Technology (ACT) for the advanced subsonic transport project is investigated through analysis of the systems technical data. Control systems technologies under examination include computerized reliability analysis, pitch axis fly by wire actuator, flaperon actuation system design trade study, control law synthesis and analysis, flutter mode control and gust load alleviation analysis, and implementation of alternative ACT systems. Extensive analysis of the computer techniques involved in each system is included.

  2. Human Connectome Project Informatics: quality control, database services, and data visualization

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Daniel S.; Harms, Michael P.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Jenkinson, Mark; Wilson, J Anthony; Glasser, Matthew F.; Barch, Deanna M.; Archie, Kevin A.; Burgess, Gregory C.; Ramaratnam, Mohana; Hodge, Michael; Horton, William; Herrick, Rick; Olsen, Timothy; McKay, Michael; House, Matthew; Hileman, Michael; Reid, Erin; Harwell, John; Coalson, Timothy; Schindler, Jon; Elam, Jennifer S.; Curtiss, Sandra W.; Van Essen, David C.

    2013-01-01

    The Human Connectome Project (HCP) has developed protocols, standard operating and quality control procedures, and a suite of informatics tools to enable high throughput data collection, data sharing, automated data processing and analysis, and data mining and visualization. Quality control procedures include methods to maintain data collection consistency over time, to measure head motion, and to establish quantitative modality-specific overall quality assessments. Database services developed as customizations of the XNAT imaging informatics platform support both internal daily operations and open access data sharing. The Connectome Workbench visualization environment enables user interaction with HCP data and is increasingly integrated with the HCP's database services. Here we describe the current state of these procedures and tools and their application in the ongoing HCP study. PMID:23707591

  3. Human Connectome Project informatics: quality control, database services, and data visualization.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Daniel S; Harms, Michael P; Snyder, Abraham Z; Jenkinson, Mark; Wilson, J Anthony; Glasser, Matthew F; Barch, Deanna M; Archie, Kevin A; Burgess, Gregory C; Ramaratnam, Mohana; Hodge, Michael; Horton, William; Herrick, Rick; Olsen, Timothy; McKay, Michael; House, Matthew; Hileman, Michael; Reid, Erin; Harwell, John; Coalson, Timothy; Schindler, Jon; Elam, Jennifer S; Curtiss, Sandra W; Van Essen, David C

    2013-10-15

    The Human Connectome Project (HCP) has developed protocols, standard operating and quality control procedures, and a suite of informatics tools to enable high throughput data collection, data sharing, automated data processing and analysis, and data mining and visualization. Quality control procedures include methods to maintain data collection consistency over time, to measure head motion, and to establish quantitative modality-specific overall quality assessments. Database services developed as customizations of the XNAT imaging informatics platform support both internal daily operations and open access data sharing. The Connectome Workbench visualization environment enables user interaction with HCP data and is increasingly integrated with the HCP's database services. Here we describe the current state of these procedures and tools and their application in the ongoing HCP study. PMID:23707591

  4. Overview of a classical biological control project directed against the red palm mite in Florida.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Marjorie A

    2012-08-01

    Information is provided on the steps involved in classical biological control programs, with an outline of the steps achieved in the classical biological control of the red palm mite, Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae), in Florida. An overview is provided of the results and an accompanying paper by Bowman and Hoy (2012) describes the molecular analyses conducted to characterize phytoseiid predators of the red palm mite collected from Mauritius. The Mauritius phytoseiids were identified as Amblyseius largoensis, using morphological criteria, and compared to four populations of A. largoensis from Florida. The difficulties encountered in the systematics, rearing, and evaluation of the Mauritius phytoseiids are described. A method was tested for obtaining DNA from single mites without destroying the body so that voucher specimens can be maintained. Ultimately, the project was terminated due to constraints expected in obtaining permission to make releases. PMID:22456811

  5. A Web-Based System for Monitoring and Controlling Multidisciplinary Design Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Andrea O.; Rogers, James L.

    1997-01-01

    In today's competitive environment, both industry and government agencies are under enormous pressure to reduce the time and cost of multidisciplinary design projects. A number of frameworks have been introduced to assist in this process by facilitating the integration of and communication among diverse disciplinary codes. An examination of current frameworks reveals weaknesses in various areas such as sequencing, displaying, monitoring, and controlling the design process. The objective of this research is to explore how Web technology, in conjunction with an existing framework, can improve these areas of weakness. This paper describes a system that executes a sequence of programs, monitors and controls the design process through a Web-based interface, and visualizes intermediate and final results through the use of Java(Tm) applets. A small sample problem, which includes nine processes with two analysis programs that are coupled to an optimizer, is used to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  6. BARC 2007 EXPERIMENT STATION REPORT FOR NC-229 NATIONAL PROJECT ON PORCINE REPRODUCTIVE AND RESPIRATORY SYNDROME (PRRS) CONTROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NC-229 national project “Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS): Methods for the integrated control, prevention, and elimination of PRRS in United States swine herds.” This station report summarizes the BARC lab’s recent research progress. Four major projects have been addressed. 1...

  7. Project SUCCESS' Effects on Substance Use-Related Attitudes and Behaviors: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Alternative High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Ringwalt, Chris L.; Shamblen, Stephen R.; Hanley, Sean M.

    2011-01-01

    Using a randomized controlled effectiveness trial, we examined the effects of Project SUCCESS on a range of secondary outcomes, including the program's mediating variables. Project SUCCESS, which is based both on the Theory of Reasoned Action and on Cognitive Behavior Theory, is a school-based substance use prevention program that targets…

  8. 40 CFR 93.125 - Enforceability of design concept and scope and project-level mitigation and control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enforceability of design concept and... Transit Laws § 93.125 Enforceability of design concept and scope and project-level mitigation and control... determinations for a transportation plan or TIP and are included in the project design concept and scope which...

  9. 7 CFR Appendix D to Subpart E of... - Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Development and Project Control D Appendix D to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the... (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, App. D Appendix D to Subpart E... facilities and their relative operation and maintenance costs. (d) The project engineer or...

  10. 7 CFR Appendix D to Subpart E of... - Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Development and Project Control D Appendix D to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the... (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, App. D Appendix D to Subpart E... facilities and their relative operation and maintenance costs. (d) The project engineer or...

  11. Sfm_georef: Automating image measurement of ground control points for SfM-based projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.

    2016-04-01

    Deriving accurate DEM and orthomosaic image products from UAV surveys generally involves the use of multiple ground control points (GCPs). Here, we demonstrate the automated collection of GCP image measurements for SfM-MVS processed projects, using sfm_georef software (James & Robson, 2012; http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm). Sfm_georef was originally written to provide geo-referencing procedures for SfM-MVS projects. It has now been upgraded with a 3-D patch-based matching routine suitable for automating GCP image measurement in both aerial and ground-based (oblique) projects, with the aim of reducing the time required for accurate geo-referencing. Sfm_georef is compatible with a range of SfM-MVS software and imports the relevant files that describe the image network, including camera models and tie points. 3-D survey measurements of ground control are then provided, either for natural features or artificial targets distributed over the project area. Automated GCP image measurement is manually initiated through identifying a GCP position in an image by mouse click; the GCP is then represented by a square planar patch in 3-D, textured from the image and oriented parallel to the local topographic surface (as defined by the 3-D positions of nearby tie points). Other images are then automatically examined by projecting the patch into the images (to account for differences in viewing geometry) and carrying out a sub-pixel normalised cross-correlation search in the local area. With two or more observations of a GCP, its 3-D co-ordinates are then derived by ray intersection. With the 3-D positions of three or more GCPs identified, an initial geo-referencing transform can be derived to relate the SfM-MVS co-ordinate system to that of the GCPs. Then, if GCPs are symmetric and identical, image texture from one representative GCP can be used to search automatically for all others throughout the image set. Finally, the GCP observations can be

  12. Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of the second phase of a lubricants project, which investigated the impact of engine oil formulation on diesel vehicle emissions and the performance of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst (NAC).

  13. Quality of surface water before implementation of a flood-control project in Chaska, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tornes, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    Samples were collected for 1 year from East Creek, Chaska Creek, and Courthouse Lake in Chaska, Minnesota, to determine the water quality before implementation of a flood-control project proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The creeks had similar water-quality characteristics. Data indicate that ground water may be the primary source of dissolved solids, sulfate, chloride, and chromium in the creeks. The pesticides alachlor, atrazine, simazine, and 2,4-D were found in water samples from both creeks but were well below the lethal concentrations for fish. Courthouse Lake, a 57-foot-deep stream-trout lake, had a mean summer trophic-state index of 35. Phytoplankton populations varied seasonally, and blue-green algae were predominant only in late summer. The algal-pollution index was highest in late summer, but did not provide evidence of high organic pollution. The apparently successful recovery of Courthouse Lake from past inundations by Minnesota River floodwaters having total phosphorus concentrations as high as 0.66 milligram per liter suggests that the lake, in time, will also recover from the added runoff expected as a result of implementing the flood-control project. The runoff could temporarily raise the total phosphorus concentration in the lake from 0.03 to 0.12 milligram per liter and raise the spring trophic-state index from 49 to 69.

  14. Precise control and animation creation over the DMD for projection-based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudsi, Badia

    2014-03-01

    Digital micromirror devices (DMDs) are used in a variety of display and projection applications to produce high resolution images, both static and animated. A common obstacle to working with DMDs in research and development applications is the steep learning curve required to obtain proficiency in programming the boards that control the behavior of the DMDs. This can discourage developers who wish to use DMDs in new or novel research and development applications which might benefit from their light-control properties. A new software package called Light Animator has been developed that provides a user friendly and more intuitive interface for controlling the DMD. The software allows users to address the micromirror array by the drawing and animation of objects in a style similar to that of commercial drawing programs. Sequences and animation are controlled by dividing the sequence into frames which the user can draw individually or the software can fill in for the user. Examples and descriptions of the software operation are described and operational performance measures are provided. Potential applications include 3D volumetric displays, a 3D scanner when combining the DMD with a CCD camera, and most any 2D application for which DMDs are currently used. The software's capabilities allow scientists to develop applications more easily and effectively.

  15. The environmental control and life support system advanced automation project. Phase 1: Application evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewberry, Brandon S.

    1990-01-01

    The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) is a Freedom Station distributed system with inherent applicability to advanced automation primarily due to the comparatively large reaction times of its subsystem processes. This allows longer contemplation times in which to form a more intelligent control strategy and to detect or prevent faults. The objective of the ECLSS Advanced Automation Project is to reduce the flight and ground manpower needed to support the initial and evolutionary ECLS system. The approach is to search out and make apparent those processes in the baseline system which are in need of more automatic control and fault detection strategies, to influence the ECLSS design by suggesting software hooks and hardware scars which will allow easy adaptation to advanced algorithms, and to develop complex software prototypes which fit into the ECLSS software architecture and will be shown in an ECLSS hardware testbed to increase the autonomy of the system. Covered here are the preliminary investigation and evaluation process, aimed at searching the ECLSS for candidate functions for automation and providing a software hooks and hardware scars analysis. This analysis shows changes needed in the baselined system for easy accommodation of knowledge-based or other complex implementations which, when integrated in flight or ground sustaining engineering architectures, will produce a more autonomous and fault tolerant Environmental Control and Life Support System.

  16. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: current and advanced act control system definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability (2) angle of attack limiting (3) lateral/directional augmented stability (4) gust load alleviation (5) maneuver load control and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  17. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Current and Advanced Technology ACT control system definition tasks of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program are summarized. The systems mechanize six active control functions: (1) pitch augmented stability; (2) angle of attack limiting; (3) lateral/directional augmented stability; (4) gust load alleviation; (5) maneuver load control; and (6) flutter mode control. The redundant digital control systems meet all function requirements with required reliability and declining weight and cost as advanced technology is introduced.

  18. PMP Estimations at Sparsely Controlled Andinian Basins and Climate Change Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos Zúñiga, M. A.; Vargas, X.

    2012-12-01

    Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) estimation implies an extensive review of hydrometeorological data and understandig of precipitation formation processes. There exists different methodology processes that apply for their estimations and all of them require a good spatial and temporal representation of storms. The estimation of hydrometeorological PMP on sparsely controlled basins is a difficult task, specially if the studied area has an important orographic effect due to mountains and the mixed precipitation occurrence in the most several storms time period, the main task of this study is to propose and estimate PMP in a sparsely controlled basin, affected by abrupt topography and mixed hidrology basin; also analyzing statystic uncertainties estimations and possible climate changes effects in its estimation. In this study the PMP estimation under statistical and hydrometeorological aproaches (watershed-based and traditional depth area duration analysis) was done in a semi arid zone at Puclaro dam in north Chile. Due to the lack of good spatial meteorological representation at the study zone, we propose a methodology to consider the orographic effects of Los Andes due to orographic effects patterns based in a RCM PRECIS-DGF and annual isoyetal maps. Estimations were validated with precipitation patterns for given winters, considering snow route and rainfall gauges at the preferencial wind direction, finding good results. The estimations are also compared with the highest areal storms in USA, Australia, India and China and with frequency analysis in local rain gauge stations in order to decide about the most adequate approach for the study zone. Climate change projections were evaluated with ECHAM5 GCM model, due to its good quality representation in the seasonality and the magnitude of meteorological variables. Temperature projections, for 2040-2065 period, show that there would be a rise in the catchment contributing area that would lead to an increase of the

  19. Controlled Vocabularies and Ontologies for Oceanographic Data: The R2R Eventlogger Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, E.; Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.; Raymond, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    Research vessels coordinated by the United States University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (US-UNOLS) collect data which is considered an important oceanographic resource. The NSF-funded Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) project aims to improve access to this data and diminish the barriers to use. One aspect of the R2R project has been to develop a shipboard scientific event logging system, Eventlogger, that incorporates best practice guidelines, controlled vocabularies, a cruise metadata schema, and a scientific event log. This will facilitate the eventual ingestion of datasets into oceanographic data repositories for subsequent integration and synthesis by investigators. One important aspect of this system is the careful use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies. Existing ontologies, where available, will be used and others will be developed. The use of internationally-informed, consensus-driven controlled vocabularies will make datasets more interoperable, and discoverable. The R2R Eventlogger project is led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), and the management of the controlled vocabularies and mapping of these vocabularies to authoritative community vocabularies are led by the Data Librarian in the Marine Biological Laboratory/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (MBLWHOI) Library. The first target vocabulary is oceanographic instruments. Management of this vocabulary has thus far consisted of reconciling local community terms with the more widely used SeaDataNet Device Vocabulary terms. Rather than adopt existing terms, often the local terms are mapped by data managers in the NSF-funded Biological and Chemical Oceanographic Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) to the existing terms as they are given by investigators and often provide important information and meaning. New terms (often custom, or modified instruments) are submitted for review to the SeaDataNet community listserv for discussion and eventual incorporation into the Device

  20. Ebola infection control in Sierra Leonean health clinics: A large cross-agency cooperative project.

    PubMed

    Levy, Benjamin; Rao, Carol Y; Miller, Laura; Kennedy, Ngozi; Adams, Monica; Davis, Rosemary; Hastings, Laura; Kabano, Augustin; Bennett, Sarah D; Sesay, Momodu

    2015-07-01

    The Ebola virus disease outbreak occurring in West Africa has resulted in at least 199 cases of Ebola in Sierra Leonean health care workers, many as a result of transmission occurring in health facilities. The Ministry of Health and Sanitation of Sierra Leone recognized that improvements in infection prevention and control (IPC) were necessary at all levels of health care delivery. To this end, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United Nations Children's Fund, and multiple nongovernmental organizations implemented a national IPC training program in 1,200 peripheral health units (PHUs) in Sierra Leone. A tiered training of trainers program was used. Trainers conducted multiday trainings at PHUs and coordinated the delivery of personal protective equipment (gloves, gowns, masks, boots) and infection control supplies (chlorine, buckets, disposable rags, etc) to all PHU staff. Under the ongoing project, 4,264 health workers have already been trained, and 98% of PHUs have received their first shipment of supplies. PMID:25891979

  1. The United States Department of Agriculture's Northeast Area-wide Tick Control Project: summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Pound, Joe Mathews; Miller, John Allen; George, John E; Fish, Durland; Carroll, John F; Schulze, Terry L; Daniels, Thomas J; Falco, Richard C; Stafford, Kirby C; Mather, Thomas N

    2009-08-01

    From 1997 to 2002, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Northeast Area-wide Tick Control Project used acaricide-treated 4-Poster Deer Treatment Bait Stations in five eastern states to control ticks feeding on white-tailed deer. The objectives of this host-targeted technology were to reduce free-living blacklegged (Ixodes scapularis Say) and lone star (Amblyomma americanum [L.]) tick populations and thereby to reduce the risk of tick-borne disease. During 2002 to 2004, treatments were suspended, and tick population recovery rates were assayed. Subsequently, the major factors that influenced variations in efficacy were extrapolated to better understand and improve this technology. Treatments resulted in significant reductions in free-living populations of nymphal blacklegged ticks at six of the seven sites, and lone star ticks were significantly reduced at all three sites where they were present. During the study, maximal significant (p < or = 0.05) efficacies against nymphal blacklegged and lone star ticks at individual sites ranged from 60.0 to 81.7 and 90.9 to 99.5%, respectively. The major environmental factor that reduced efficacy was the occurrence of heavy acorn masts, which provided an alternative food resource for deer. Although the 4-Poster technology requires 1 or more years to show efficacy, this host-targeted intervention was demonstrated to be an efficacious, economical, safe, and environment-friendly alternative to area-wide spraying of acaricide to control free-living populations of these tick species. PMID:19650739

  2. Aeroelastic Sizing for High-Speed Research (HSR) Longitudinal Control Alternatives Project (LCAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Dunn, H. J.; Stroud, W. Jefferson; Barthelemy, J.-F.; Weston, Robert P.; Martin, Carl J.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The Longitudinal Control Alternatives Project (LCAP) compared three high-speed civil transport configurations to determine potential advantages of the three associated longitudinal control concepts. The three aircraft configurations included a conventional configuration with a layout having a horizontal aft tail, a configuration with a forward canard in addition to a horizontal aft tail, and a configuration with only a forward canard. The three configurations were aeroelastically sized and were compared on the basis of operational empty weight (OEW) and longitudinal control characteristics. The sized structure consisted of composite honeycomb sandwich panels on both the wing and the fuselage. Design variables were the core depth of the sandwich and the thicknesses of the composite material which made up the face sheets of the sandwich. Each configuration was sized for minimum structural weight under linear and nonlinear aeroelastic loads subject to strain, buckling, ply-mixture, and subsonic and supersonic flutter constraints. This report describes the methods that were used and the results that were generated for the aeroelastic sizing of the three configurations.

  3. Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control (II&C) Research and Development Facility Buildout and Project Execution of LWRS II&C Pilot Projects 1 and 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Farris; Johanna Oxstrand; Gregory Weatherby

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research, development, and deployment on light water reactor sustainability (LWRS), in which the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe operational life extension of current reactors. As technologies are introduced that change the operation of the plant, the LWRS pilot projects can help identify their best-advanced uses and help demonstrate the safety of these technologies. In early testing of operator performance given these emerging technologies will ensure the safety and usability of systems prior to large-scale deployment and costly verification and validation at the plant. The aim of these collaborations, demonstrations, and approaches are intended to lessen the inertia that sustains the current status quo of today's II&C systems technology, and to motivate transformational change and a shift in strategy to a long-term approach to II&C modernization that is more sustainable. Research being conducted under Pilot Project 1 regards understanding the conditions and behaviors that can be modified, either through process improvements and/or technology deployment, to improve the overall safety and efficiency of outage control at nuclear facilities. The key component of the research in this pilot project is accessing the delivery of information that will allow researchers to simulate the control room, outage control center (OCC) information, and plant status data. The simulation also allows researchers to identify areas of opportunity where plant operating status and outage activities can be analyzed to increase overall plant efficiency. For Pilot Project 3 the desire is to demonstrate the ability of technology deployment and the subsequent impact on maximizing the 'Collective Situational Awareness' of the various stakeholders in a commercial nuclear power plant. Specifically, the desire is to show positive results in plant

  4. Bibliographic control of audiovisuals: analysis of a cataloging project using OCLC.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J A; Davison, F M

    1985-04-01

    The staff of the Quillen-Dishner College of Medicine Library cataloged 702 audiovisual titles between July 1, 1982, and June 30, 1983, using the OCLC database. This paper discusses the library's audiovisual collection and describes the method and scope of a study conducted during this project, the cataloging standards and conventions adopted, the assignment and use of NLM classification, the provision of summaries for programs, and the amount of staff time expended in cataloging typical items. An analysis of the use of OCLC for this project resulted in the following findings: the rate of successful searches for audiovisual copy was 82.4%; the error rate for records used was 41.9%; modifications were required in every record used; the Library of Congress and seven member institutions provided 62.8% of the records used. It was concluded that the effort to establish bibliographic control of audiovisuals is not widespread and that expanded and improved audiovisual cataloging by the Library of Congress and the National Library of Medicine would substantially contribute to that goal. PMID:2581645

  5. Project Cerberus: Tobacco Industry Strategy to Create an Alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Mamudu, Hadii M.; Hammond, Ross; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, British American Tobacco, Philip Morris, and Japan Tobacco International executed Project Cerberus to develop a global voluntary regulatory regime as an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). They aimed to develop a global voluntary regulatory code to be overseen by an independent audit body and to focus attention on youth smoking prevention. The International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards announced in September 2001, however, did not have the independent audit body. Although the companies did not stop the FCTC, they continue to promote the International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards youth smoking prevention as an alternative to the FCTC. Public health civil society groups should help policymakers and governments understand the importance of not working with the tobacco industry. PMID:18633079

  6. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 5. Science Applications, Incorporated system requirements definition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report sets forth the system requirements for a Solar Controlled-Environment Agriculture System (SCEAS) Project. In the report a conceptual baseline system description for an engineering test facility is given. This baseline system employs a fluid roof/roof filter in combination with a large storage tank and a ground water heat exchanger in order to provide cooling and heating as needed. Desalination is accomplished by pretreatment followed by reverse osmosis. Energy is provided by means of photovoltaics and wind machines in conjunction with storage batteries. Site and climatic data needed in the design process are given. System performance specifications and integrated system design criteria are set forth. Detailed subsystem design criteria are presented and appropriate references documented.

  7. Project Cerberus: tobacco industry strategy to create an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    PubMed

    Mamudu, Hadii M; Hammond, Ross; Glantz, Stanton A

    2008-09-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, British American Tobacco, Philip Morris, and Japan Tobacco International executed Project Cerberus to develop a global voluntary regulatory regime as an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). They aimed to develop a global voluntary regulatory code to be overseen by an independent audit body and to focus attention on youth smoking prevention. The International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards announced in September 2001, however, did not have the independent audit body. Although the companies did not stop the FCTC, they continue to promote the International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards youth smoking prevention as an alternative to the FCTC. Public health civil society groups should help policymakers and governments understand the importance of not working with the tobacco industry. PMID:18633079

  8. Tobacco control among disadvantaged youth living in low-income communities in India: Introducing Project ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Stigler, Melissa; Gupta, Vinay; Bassi, Shalini; Dhavan, Poonam; Mathur, Neha; Tripathy, Vikal; Perry, Cheryl; Reddy, K. Srinath

    2010-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of Project ACTIVITY, a group randomized intervention trial designed to test the efficacy of a community-based, comprehensive approach to tobacco control for youth (10-19 years) living in low-income communities in India. In doing so, details regarding baseline characteristics of the study sample are provided. Methods Fourteen slum communities in Delhi, India were matched and randomized to intervention (n=7) and control (n=7) conditions. The intervention included multiple strategies to promote prevention and cessation of tobacco use among youth. A census was conducted in selected blocks in all study communities (n=78,133), as well as a baseline survey of eligible youth (n=6,023). Main outcomes measures on the survey included ever use, past six months use and current use of multiple forms of tobacco. Mixed effects regression models were used to examine differences between study conditions in (a) demographic characteristics and (b) the prevalence of tobacco consumption. Results Census data revealed that 31.9% of sampled population was in the age group of 10-19 years. No differences between study conditions in demographic characteristics (e.g. age, gender, religion, education, and occupation) among either adults or youth were noted (p>0.05). The baseline survey data revealed the prevalence of ever tobacco use among youth was 7.99%, past six months use was 5.70%, and current use was 4.88%. No differences between study conditions in these prevalence rates were observed, either (p>0.05). Conclusion The two study conditions in Project ACTIVITY are comparable. The evaluation should provide a robust test of this intervention's efficacy. PMID:20593929

  9. Preliminary projections of the effects of chloride-control structures on the Quaternary aquifer at Great Salt Plains, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    About 1,200 tons of chloride per day are added to the salt load of the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River at Great Salt Plains Lake from natural sources. The source of this chloride is brine discharge from the rocks of Permian age in the vicinity of the lake. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has planned a chloride-control project. The Corps requested that the U.S. Geological Survey use a digital model to project the effects of the chloride-control plan on ground water. Ground-water flow and ground-water transport models were calibrated to represent the Quaternary aquifer that is the near-surface part of the flow system. The models were used to project the effects of planned chloride-control structures. Based on model results, ground-water levels are projected to rise as much as 19 feet. However, these water-level rises will occur only in areas near three reservoirs. Changes in ground-water level caused by the project will be small throughout most of the area. Chloride concentration of ground water is projected to increase by more than 90,000 milligrams per liter at one location. However, significant increases in chloride concentration during the 50-year period simulated are projected to be limited to areas where the ground water already contains excessive chloride concentrations.

  10. Examining the Dynamics of Managing Information Systems Development Projects: A Control Loss Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narayanaswamy, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    The failure rate of information systems development (ISD) projects continues to pose a big challenge for organizations. The success rate of ISD projects is less then forty percent. Factors such as disagreements and miscommunications among project manager and team members, poor monitoring and intermediary problems contribute to project failure.…

  11. MULTI-POLLUTANT WET SCRUBBER TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Implementation of fine PM standards, EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule, and Clean Air Mercury Rule are leading to a focus on future reductions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and mercury emissions from power plants. Wet scrubber-based technologies are capable of pro...

  12. NASA systems autonomy demonstration project: Advanced automation demonstration of Space Station Freedom thermal control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Jeffrey; Bull, John; Healey, Kathleen J.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project (SADP) was initiated in response to Congressional interest in Space station automation technology demonstration. The SADP is a joint cooperative effort between Ames Research Center (ARC) and Johnson Space Center (JSC) to demonstrate advanced automation technology feasibility using the Space Station Freedom Thermal Control System (TCS) test bed. A model-based expert system and its operator interface were developed by knowledge engineers, AI researchers, and human factors researchers at ARC working with the domain experts and system integration engineers at JSC. Its target application is a prototype heat acquisition and transport subsystem of a space station TCS. The demonstration is scheduled to be conducted at JSC in August, 1989. The demonstration will consist of a detailed test of the ability of the Thermal Expert System to conduct real time normal operations (start-up, set point changes, shut-down) and to conduct fault detection, isolation, and recovery (FDIR) on the test article. The FDIR will be conducted by injecting ten component level failures that will manifest themselves as seven different system level faults. Here, the SADP goals, are described as well as the Thermal Control Expert System that has been developed for demonstration.

  13. Application of quality assurance controls to TBM tunneling on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.D.

    1996-06-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), a 7.62-meter diameter tunnel is being constructed using a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). This tunnel, which may form a portion of a permanent high-level nuclear waste repository, is being constructed under the auspices of a nuclear quality assurance (QA) program. The YMP nuclear QA program applies to items and activities determined to be important to radiological safety, waste isolation, and potential interactions with the environment. The items and activities determined to be important have been assigned a quality assurance classification. This paper focuses on the items (rockbolts, steel sets, and shotcrete) and quality affecting activities involved in providing ground support and excavating the tunnel. Typical activities that have been assigned QA classifications include TBM maintenance, control of water used in the tunnel during construction, and control of diesel emissions in the tunnel. The paper concludes that the key to the successful implementation of nuclear QA requirements for tunneling at Yucca Mountain was the assignment of personnel with the appropriate mix of tunneling and nuclear experience.

  14. Project MEDSAT: The design of a remote sensing platform for malaria research and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Project MEDSAT was proposed with the specific goal of designing a satellite to remotely sense pertinent information useful in establishing strategies to control malaria. The 340 kg MEDSAT satellite is to be inserted into circular earth orbit aboard the Pegasus Air-Launched Space Booster at an inclination of 21 degrees and an altitude of 473 km. It is equipped with a synthetic aperture radar and a visible thermal/infrared sensor to remotely sense conditions at the target area of Chiapas, Mexico. The orbit is designed so that MEDSAT will pass over the target site twice each day. The data from each scan will be downlinked to Hawaii for processing, resulting in maps indicating areas of high malaria risk. These will be distributed to health officials at the target site. A relatively inexpensive launch by Pegasus and a design using mainly proven, off-the-shelf technology permit a low mission cost, while innovations in the satellite controls and the scientific instruments allow a fairly complex mission.

  15. Project MEDSAT: The design of a remote sensing platform for malaria research and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-04-01

    Project MEDSAT was proposed with the specific goal of designing a satellite to remotely sense pertinent information useful in establishing strategies to control malaria. The 340 kg MEDSAT satellite is to be inserted into circular earth orbit aboard the Pegasus Air-Launched Space Booster at an inclination of 21 degrees and an altitude of 473 km. It is equipped with a synthetic aperture radar and a visible thermal/infrared sensor to remotely sense conditions at the target area of Chiapas, Mexico. The orbit is designed so that MEDSAT will pass over the target site twice each day. The data from each scan will be downlinked to Hawaii for processing, resulting in maps indicating areas of high malaria risk. These will be distributed to health officials at the target site. A relatively inexpensive launch by Pegasus and a design using mainly proven, off-the-shelf technology permit a low mission cost, while innovations in the satellite controls and the scientific instruments allow a fairly complex mission.

  16. The Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) advanced automation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewberry, Brandon S.; Carnes, Ray

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) Advanced Automation Project is to influence the design of the initial and evolutionary Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) ECLSS toward a man-made closed environment in which minimal flight and ground manpower is needed. Another objective includes capturing ECLSS design and development knowledge future missions. Our approach has been to (1) analyze the SSFP ECLSS, (2) envision as our goal a fully automated evolutionary environmental control system - an augmentation of the baseline, and (3) document the advanced software systems, hooks, and scars which will be necessary to achieve this goal. From this analysis, prototype software is being developed, and will be tested using air and water recovery simulations and hardware subsystems. In addition, the advanced software is being designed, developed, and tested using automation software management plan and lifecycle tools. Automated knowledge acquisition, engineering, verification and testing tools are being used to develop the software. In this way, we can capture ECLSS development knowledge for future use develop more robust and complex software, provide feedback to the knowledge based system tool community, and ensure proper visibility of our efforts.

  17. An invisible benefit: integrated project on family planning and parasite control has expanded operations multi-dimensionally.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, H

    1985-11-01

    Resolutions adopted by the 12th Annual Asian Parasite Control/Family Planning (APCO/FP) Conference held in Colombo, Sri Lanka urge the incorporation of quality of life issues of all dimensions in projects of all participating countries. 1 study discussed during the conference concerned health volunteers of the integrated project in Sri Lanka, which analyzes motivating factors which make community young people work on a voluntary basis. Another topic covered was the role of women in the achievement of primary health care. Video reports were presented by Bangladesh on family planning and parasite control activities, Brazil on utilization of existing organizations to improve successful integrated projects, China on making twin concerns of family planning and primary health care, Indonesia on strengthening urban FP/MCH clinics, Korea on health promotion through the integrated project, Malaysia on the NADI program, the Philippines on the Cebu model of integrated health care, and Thailand on fee charging urban programs. PMID:12280293

  18. The Electronic Documentation Project in the NASA mission control center environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lui; Leigh, Albert

    1994-01-01

    NASA's space programs like many other technical programs of its magnitude is supported by a large volume of technical documents. These documents are not only diverse but also abundant. Management, maintenance, and retrieval of these documents is a challenging problem by itself; but, relating and cross-referencing this wealth of information when it is all on a medium of paper is an even greater challenge. The Electronic Documentation Project (EDP) is to provide an electronic system capable of developing, distributing and controlling changes for crew/ground controller procedures and related documents. There are two primary motives for the solution. The first motive is to reduce the cost of maintaining the current paper based method of operations by replacing paper documents with electronic information storage and retrieval. And, the other is to improve the efficiency and provide enhanced flexibility in document usage. Initially, the current paper based system will be faithfully reproduced in an electronic format to be used in the document viewing system. In addition, this metaphor will have hypertext extensions. Hypertext features support basic functions such as full text searches, key word searches, data retrieval, and traversal between nodes of information as well as speeding up the data access rate. They enable related but separate documents to have relationships, and allow the user to explore information naturally through non-linear link traversals. The basic operational requirements of the document viewing system are to: provide an electronic corollary to the current method of paper based document usage; supplement and ultimately replace paper-based documents; maintain focused toward control center operations such as Flight Data File, Flight Rules and Console Handbook viewing; and be available NASA wide.

  19. HOP'N after-school project: an obesity prevention randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This paper reports the primary outcomes of the Healthy Opportunities for Physical Activity and Nutrition (HOP'N) after-school project, which was an effectiveness trial designed to evaluate the prevention of childhood obesity through building the capacity of after-school staff to increase physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable (FV) opportunities. Methods We conducted a three-year, nested cross-sectional group randomized controlled effectiveness trial. After a baseline assessment year (2005-2006), schools and their after-school programs were randomized to the HOP'N after-school program (n = 4) or control (n = 3), and assessed for two subsequent years (intervention year 1, 2006-2007; intervention year 2, 2007-2008). Across the three years, 715 fourth grade students, and 246 third and fourth grade after-school program participants were included in the study. HOP'N included community government human service agency (Cooperative Extension) led community development efforts, a three-time yearly training of after-school staff, daily PA for 30 minutes following CATCH guidelines, a daily healthful snack, and a weekly nutrition and PA curriculum (HOP'N Club). Child outcomes included change in age- and gender-specific body mass index z-scores (BMIz) across the school year and PA during after-school time measured by accelerometers. The success of HOP'N in changing after-school program opportunities was evaluated by observations over the school year of after-school program physical activity sessions and snack FV offerings. Data were analyzed in 2009. Results The intervention had no impact on changes in BMIz. Overweight/obese children attending HOP'N after-school programs performed 5.92 minutes more moderate-to-vigorous PA per day after intervention, which eliminated a baseline year deficit of 9.65 minutes per day (p < 0.05) compared to control site overweight/obese children. Active recreation program time at HOP'N sites was 23.40 minutes (intervention year 1

  20. Developing a corss-project support system during mission operations: Deep Space 1 extended mission flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarffe, V. A.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is focusing on small, low-cost spacecraft for both planetary and earth science missions. Deep Space 1 (DS1) was the first mission to be launched by the NMP. The New Millennium Project (NMP) is designed to develop and test new technology that can be used on future science missions with lower cost and risk. The NMP is finding ways to reduce cost not only in development, but also in operations. DS 1 was approved for an extended mission, but the budget was not large, so the project began looking into part time team members shared with other projects. DS1 launched on October 24, 1998, in it's primary mission it successfully tested twelve new technologies. The extended mission started September 18, 1999 and ran through the encounter with Comet Borrelly on September 22,2001. The Flight Control Team (FCT) was one team that needed to use part time or multi mission people. Circumstances led to a situation where for the few months before the Borrelly encounter in September of 2001 DSl had no certified full time Flight Control Engineers also known as Aces. This paper examines how DS 1 utilized cross-project support including the communication between different projects, and the how the tools used by the Flight Control Engineer fit into cross-project support.

  1. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The active control technology (ACT) control/guidance system task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the NASA energy efficient transport program was documented. The air traffic environment of navigation and air traffic control systems and procedures were extrapolated. An approach to listing flight functions which will be performed by systems and crew of an ACT configured airplane of the 1990s, and a determination of function criticalities to safety of flight, are the basis of candidate integrated ACT/Control/Guidance System architecture. The system mechanizes five active control functions: pitch augmented stability, angle of attack limiting, lateral/directional augmented stability, gust load alleviation, and maneuver load control. The scope and requirements of a program for simulating the integrated ACT avionics and flight deck system, with pilot in the loop, are defined, system and crew interface elements are simulated, and mechanization is recommended. Relationships between system design and crew roles and procedures are evaluated.

  2. MCHergic projections to the nucleus pontis oralis participate in the control of active (REM) sleep.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H

    2009-05-01

    Neurons that utilize melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) as a neuromodulator are located in the lateral hypothalamus and incerto-hypothalamic area and project diffusely throughout the central nervous system, including areas that participate in the generation and maintenance of sleep and wakefulness. Recent studies have shown that hypothalamic MCHergic neurons are active during active sleep (AS), and that intraventricular microinjections of MCH induce AS sleep; however, there are no data available regarding the manner in which MCHergic neurons participate in the control of this behavioral state. Utilizing immunohistochemical and retrograde tracing techniques, we examined, in the cat, projections from MCHergic neurons to the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO), which is considered to be the executive area that is responsible for the generation and maintenance of AS. In addition, we explored the effects on sleep and waking states produced by the microinjection of MCH into the NPO. We first determined that MCHergic fibers and terminals are present in the NPO. We also found that when a retrograde tracer (cholera toxin subunit B) was placed in the NPO MCHergic neurons of the hypothalamus were labeled. When MCH was microinjected into the NPO, there was a significant increase in the amount of AS (19.8+/-1.4% versus 11.9+/-0.2%, P<0.05) and a significant decrease in the latency to AS (10.4+/-4.2 versus 26.6+/-2.3 min, P<0.05). The preceding anatomical and functional data support our hypothesis that the MCHergic system participates in the regulation of AS by modulating neuronal activity in the NPO. PMID:19269278

  3. Reduction of Urogenital Schistosomiasis with an Integrated Control Project in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Ha; Jeong, Hoo Gn; Kong, Woo Hyun; Lee, Soon-Hyung; Cho, Han-Ik; Nam, Hae-Sung; Ismail, Hassan Ahmed Hassan Ahmed; Alla, Gibril Nouman Abd; Oh, Chung Hyeon; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Schistosomiasis remains a major public health concern in Sudan, particularly Schistosoma haematobium infection. This study presents the disease-reduction outcomes of an integrated control program for schistosomiasis in Al Jabalain locality of White Nile State, Sudan from 2009 through 2011. Methods The total population of the project sites was 482,902, and the major target group for intervention among them was 78,615 primary school students. For the cross-sectional study of the prevalence, urine and stool specimens were examined using the urine sedimentation method and the Kato cellophane thick smear method, respectively. To assess the impacts of health education for students and a drinking water supply facility at Al Hidaib village, questionnaire survey was done. Results The overall prevalence for S. haematobium and S. mansoni at baseline was 28.5% and 0.4%, respectively. At follow-up survey after 6–9 months post-treatment, the prevalence of S. haematobium infection was reduced to 13.5% (95% CI = 0.331–0.462). A higher reduction in prevalence was observed among girls, those with moderately infected status (around 20%), and residents in rural areas, than among boys, those with high prevalence (>40%), and residents in urban areas. After health education, increased awareness about schistosomiasis was checked by questionnaire survey. Also, a drinking water facility was constructed at Al Hidaib village, where infection rate was reduced more compared to that in a neighboring village within the same unit. However, we found no significant change in the prevalence of S. mansoni infection between baseline and follow-up survey (95% CI = 0.933–6.891). Conclusions At the end of the project, the prevalence of S. haematobium infection was reduced by more than 50% in comparison with the baseline rate. Approximately 200,000 subjects had received either praziquantel therapy, health education, or supply of clean water. To consolidate the achievements of this

  4. Yolo County's Accelerated Anaerobic and Aerobic Composting (Full-Scale Controlled Landfill Bioreactor) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Kieffer, J.; Akau, H.; Augenstein, D.

    2002-12-01

    Sanitary landfilling is the dominant method of solid waste disposal in the United States, accounting for about 217 million tons of waste annually (U.S. EPA, 1997) and has more than doubled since 1960. In spite of increasing rates of reuse and recycling, population and economic growth will continue to render landfilling as an important and necessary component of solid waste management. Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works, Division of Integrated Waste Management is demonstrating a new landfill technology called Bioreactor Landfill to better manage solid waste. In a Bioreactor Landfill, controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray-water, etc.) are added and recirculated to increase the moisture content of the waste and improve waste decomposition. As demonstrated in a small-scale demonstration project at the Yolo County Central Landfill in 1995, this process significantly increases the biodegradation rate of waste and thus decreases the waste stabilization and composting time (5 to 10 years) relative to what would occur within a conventional landfill (30 to 50 years or more). When waste decomposes anaerobically (in absence of oxygen), it produces landfill gas (biogas). Biogas is primarily a mixture of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC's) which can be recovered for electricity or other uses. Other benefits of a bioreactor landfill composting operation include increased landfill waste settlement which increases in landfill capacity and life, improved leachate chemistry, possible reduction of landfill post-closure management time, opportunity to explore decomposed waste for landfill mining, and abatement of greenhouse gases through highly efficient methane capture over a much shorter period of time than is typical of waste management through conventional landfilling. This project also investigates the aerobic decomposition of waste of 13,000 tons of waste (2.5 acre) for

  5. Pleasant Prairie Power Plant air quality control upgrade project, Pleasant Praire, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhart, S.; Pennline, D.; Brodsky, I.; Bichler, D.

    2007-10-15

    We Energies recently completed a multiyear project at its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant to add a selective catalytic reduction system to one of its two units and a scrubber to both. These projects are described. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Projection of controlled repeatable real-time moving targets to test and evaluate motion imagery quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, Stephen D.; Mendez, Michael; Trent, Randall

    2015-05-01

    The projection of controlled moving targets is key to the quantitative testing of video capture and post processing for Motion Imagery. This presentation will discuss several implementations of target projectors with moving targets or apparent moving targets creating motion to be captured by the camera under test. The targets presented are broadband (UV-VIS-IR) and move in a predictable, repeatable and programmable way; several short videos will be included in the presentation. Among the technical approaches will be targets that move independently in the camera's field of view, as well targets that change size and shape. The development of a rotating IR and VIS 4 bar target projector with programmable rotational velocity and acceleration control for testing hyperspectral cameras is discussed. A related issue for motion imagery is evaluated by simulating a blinding flash which is an impulse of broadband photons in fewer than 2 milliseconds to assess the camera's reaction to a large, fast change in signal. A traditional approach of gimbal mounting the camera in combination with the moving target projector is discussed as an alternative to high priced flight simulators. Based on the use of the moving target projector several standard tests are proposed to provide a corresponding test to MTF (resolution), SNR and minimum detectable signal at velocity. Several unique metrics are suggested for Motion Imagery including Maximum Velocity Resolved (the measure of the greatest velocity that is accurately tracked by the camera system) and Missing Object Tolerance (measurement of tracking ability when target is obscured in the images). These metrics are applicable to UV-VIS-IR wavelengths and can be used to assist in camera and algorithm development as well as comparing various systems by presenting the exact scenes to the cameras in a repeatable way.

  7. Mobile phone diabetes project led to improved glycemic control and net savings for Chicago plan participants.

    PubMed

    Nundy, Shantanu; Dick, Jonathan J; Chou, Chia-Hung; Nocon, Robert S; Chin, Marshall H; Peek, Monica E

    2014-02-01

    Even with the best health care available, patients with chronic illnesses typically spend no more than a few hours a year in a health care setting, while their outcomes are largely determined by their activities during the remaining 5,000 waking hours of the year. As a widely available, low-cost technology, mobile phones are a promising tool to use in engaging patients in behavior change and facilitating self-care between visits. We examined the impact of a six-month mobile health (mHealth) demonstration project among adults with diabetes who belonged to an academic medical center's employee health plan. In addition to pre-post improvements in glycemic control (p=0.01) and patients' satisfaction with overall care (p=0.04), we observed a net cost savings of 8.8 percent. Those early results suggest that mHealth programs can support health care organizations' pursuit of the triple aim of improving patients' experiences with care, improving population health, and reducing the per capita cost of health care PMID:24493770

  8. Demonstration of coal reburning for cyclone boiler NO{sub x} control. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program, under Round 2, a project for Full Scale Demonstration of Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x},) Control was selected. DOE sponsored The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company, with Wisconsin Power & Light (WP&L) as the host utility, to demonstrate coal reburning technology at WP&L`s 110 MW{sub c}, cyclone-fired Unit No.2 at the Nelson Dewey Generating Station in Cassville, Wisconsin. The coal reburning demonstration was justified based on two prior studies. An Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and B&W sponsored engineering feasibility study indicated that the majority of cyclone-equipped boilers could successfully apply reburning technology to reduce NO{sub x}, emissions by 50 to 70%. An EPRI/Gas Research Institute (GRI)/B&W pilot-scale evaluation substantiated this conclusion through pilot-scale testing in B&W`s 6 million Btu/hr Small Boiler Simulator. Three different reburning fuels, natural gas, No. 6 oil, and pulverized coal were tested. This work showed that coal as a reburning fuel performs nearly as well as gas/oil without deleterious effects of combustion efficiency. Coal was selected for a full scale demonstration since it is available to all cyclone units and represents the highest level of technical difficulty-in demonstrating the technology.

  9. Marine Data Management within the EMODNet Chemistry project: data aggregation, quality control and products preparation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iona, Athanasia Sissy; Karagevrekis, Pelopidas; Balopoulou, Stavroula; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Schaap, Dick

    2015-04-01

    graphics of station time series. Quality control and quality assurance guidelines have been created and followed by all regional groups in order to ensure that the data and their derived products are of uniform quality and reliability. The Hellenic National Oceanographic Data Centre (HNODC) is the Regional Coordinator for the Mediterranean Sea products preparation. During the first one and a half year of the project, almost 90000 chemical datasets covering the four Mediterranean MSFD regions were harvested, processed, quality controlled, validated and analyzed. In this presentation, the work carried out by HNODC and the first data products will be described.

  10. Hydrologic evaluation of salinity control and reclamation projects in the Indus Plain, Pakistan--A summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, Maurice John; Carrigan, P.H., Jr.; Steele, T.D.; Randall, A.D.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes the observations and findings of a team of four specialists from the U.S. Geological Survey assigned to Pakistan under the auspices of the U.S. Agency for International Development during May to August 1972 for a hydrologic evaluation of Salinity Control and Reclamation Projects in the Indus Plain Individual members of the team undertook comprehensive studies related to climatology, surface-water hydrology, and the canal system; streamflow and sediment yields of the rivers; computer applications to hydrologic data; aquifer characteristics; hydrologic evaluation of Salinity Control and Reclamation Projects (SCARPs); tubewell performance; hydrology of shallow versus deep tubewells; well and well-screen design in the Indus Plain; evaluation of observed and anticipated trends in both private and public tubewell development; evaluation of water-quality programs, data analysis, and records, and computer coding of special water-quality data; and evaluation of water-level data, well discharge and specific-capacity tests and aquifer tests. The reclamation program, by pumping from tubewells, has been notably successful in lowering the water table, in providing supplemental water for irrigation and for leaching of salinized soils, and in improving crop production. Some changes in water quality have been observed in SCARP-I and the Mona Scheme of SCARP-II, but these have not as yet (1972) significantly affected the utility of the water for irrigation. Problems associated with reclamation include control of deterioration in performance of tubewells and their rehabilitation, local brackish or saline-water encroachment, and maintenance of a favorable salt balance in the ground-water system. Rapid and as yet (1972) unregulated growth of shallow private tubewell development in the past decade has introduced complicating factors to the reclamation planning of the early 1960's which had emphasized public tubewell development through the SCARP program. In

  11. Schistosomiasis control in China: the impact of a 10-year World Bank Loan Project (1992-2001).

    PubMed Central

    Xianyi, Chen; Liying, Wang; Jiming, Cai; Xiaonong, Zhou; Jiang, Zheng; Jiagang, Guo; Xiaohua, Wu; Engels, D.; Minggang, Chen

    2005-01-01

    China has been carrying out large-scale schistosomiasis control since the mid-1950s, but in the early 1990s, schistosomiasis was still endemic in eight provinces. A World Bank Loan Project enabled further significant progress to be made during the period 1992-2001. The control strategy was focused on the large-scale use of chemotherapy -- primarily to reinforce morbidity control -- while at the same time acting on transmission with the ultimate goal of interrupting it. Chemotherapy was complemented by health education, chemical control of snails and environmental modification where appropriate. A final evaluation in 2002 showed that infection rates in humans and livestock had decreased by 55% and 50%, respectively. The number of acute infections and of individuals with advanced disease had also significantly decreased. Although snail infection rates continued to fluctuate at a low level, the densities of infected snails had decreased by more than 75% in all endemic areas. The original objectives of the China World Bank Loan Project for schistosomiasis control had all been met. One province, Zhejiang, had already fulfilled the criteria for elimination of schistosomiasis by 1995. The project was therefore a success and has provided China with a sound basis for further control. PMID:15682248

  12. Evaluation by villagers of the malaria control project on Lombok and Sumbawa Islands, west Nusa Tenggara Province, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Takeshi; Minematsu, Kazuo; Abe, Tomoko; Basuki, Sukmawati; Artasutra, Ketut; Dachlan, Yoes Prijatna; Moji, Kazuhiko; Kanbara, Hiroji; Rakue, Yasuyuki; Mizota, Tsutomu

    2007-03-01

    The cooperative malaria control project between Indonesian and Japanese institutions was conducted from 2001 to 2004 at small malaria endemic foci on Lombok and Sumbawa Islands. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of the project according to the opinions of the villagers. We conducted a KAP survey of a simple random sample of 300 householders on each island. The conclusion of the study was that the project reduced malaria incidence significantly on Lombok. However, the effects were not as clear on Sumbawa. Poor socio-economic status and lack of school education were important related factors. Therefore, health education, or behavioral change communication, was an essential component of malaria control. PMID:17539269

  13. Decentralized coordination through digital technology, dynamic pricing, and Customer-Driven control: the GridWise testbed demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Kiesling, Lynne

    2008-10-15

    The project highlights the idea that technology-enabled decentralized coordination can achieve the same, or better, economic and reliability benefits when compared to utility-focused centralized physical and economic control. Among the design's unique features was a retail double auction with five-minute market-clearing intervals that included residential customers as direct, active market participants. (author)

  14. The Constructive Control of Aggressive Behavior. Developing Curricula for the Education of Youth in Meeting Modern Problems. Project Termination Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakewood Public Schools, OH.

    The project's purpose was to develop a Grade 1-12 curriculum to assist students in dealing with knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors involved in the constructive control of aggression. Approximately 1,870 public and parochial students participated in piloting thecurriculum. Staff from the Lakewood City Schools and The Educational Research Council…

  15. 7 CFR Appendix D to Subpart E of... - Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control D Appendix D to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE...

  16. Interface control document for tank waste remediation system privatization phase 1 infrastructure support Project W-519

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-04-23

    This document describes the functional and physical interfaces between the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Phase 1 Infrastructure Project W-519 and the various other projects (i.e., Projects W-314, W-464, W-465, and W-520) supporting Phase 1 that will require the allocation of land in and about the Privatization Phase 1 Site and/or interface with the utilities extended by Project W-519. Project W-519 will identify land use allocations and upgrade/extend several utilities in the 200-East Area into the Privatization Phase 1 Site (formerly the Grout Disposal Compound) in preparation for the Privatization Contractors (PC) to construct treatment facilities. The project will upgrade/extend: Roads, Electrical Power, Raw Water (for process and fire suppression), Potable Water, and Liquid Effluent collection. The replacement of an existing Sanitary Sewage treatment system that may be displaced by Phase 1 site preparation activities may also be included.

  17. Estimation and control of droplet size and frequency in projected spray mode of a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process.

    PubMed

    Anzehaee, Mohammad Mousavi; Haeri, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    New estimators are designed based on the modified force balance model to estimate the detaching droplet size, detached droplet size, and mean value of droplet detachment frequency in a gas metal arc welding process. The proper droplet size for the process to be in the projected spray transfer mode is determined based on the modified force balance model and the designed estimators. Finally, the droplet size and the melting rate are controlled using two proportional-integral (PI) controllers to achieve high weld quality by retaining the transfer mode and generating appropriate signals as inputs of the weld geometry control loop. PMID:21444083

  18. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2007-09-16

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), the Test Cell A (TCA) Facility was used in the early to mid-1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program, to further space travel. Nuclear rocket testing resulted in the activation of materials around the reactors and the release of fission products and fuel particles in the immediate area. Identified as Corrective Action Unit 115, the TCA facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) from December 2004 to July 2005 using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. The SAFER process allows environmental remediation and facility closure activities (i.e., decommissioning) to occur simultaneously provided technical decisions are made by an experienced decision maker within the site conceptual site model, identified in the Data Quality Objective process. Facility closure involved a seven-step decommissioning strategy. Key lessons learned from the project included: (1) Targeted preliminary investigation activities provided a more solid technical approach, reduced surprises and scope creep, and made the working environment safer for the D&D worker. (2) Early identification of risks and uncertainties provided opportunities for risk management and mitigation planning to address challenges and unanticipated conditions. (3) Team reviews provided an excellent mechanism to consider all aspects of the task, integrated safety into activity performance, increase team unity and ''buy-in'' and promoted innovative and time saving ideas. (4) Development of CED protocols ensured safety and control. (5) The same proven D&D strategy is now being employed on the larger ''sister'' facility, Test Cell C.

  19. Cigarette tax avoidance and evasion: findings from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project

    PubMed Central

    Guindon, G. Emmanuel; Driezen, Pete; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Decades of research have produced overwhelming evidence that tobacco taxes reduce tobacco use and increase government tax revenue. The magnitude and effectiveness of taxes at reducing tobacco use provide an incentive for tobacco users, manufacturers and others, most notably criminal networks, to devise ways to avoid or evade tobacco taxes. Consequently, tobacco tax avoidance and tax evasion can reduce the public health and fiscal benefit of tobacco taxes. Objectives First, this study aims to document, using data from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC), levels and trends in cigarette users’ tax avoidance and tax evasion behaviour in a sample of sixteen low-, middle- and high-income countries. Second, this study explores factors associated with cigarette tax avoidance and evasion. Methods We use data from ITC surveys conducted in 16 countries to estimate the extent and the type of cigarette tax avoidance/evasion between countries and across time. We use self-reported information about the source of a smoker’s last purchase of cigarettes or self-reported packaging information, or similar information gathered by the interviewers during face-to-face interviews to measure tax avoidance/evasion behaviours. We use generalized estimating equations (GEE) to explore individual-level factors that may affect the likelihood of cigarette tax avoidance or evasion in Canada, United States, United Kingdom and France. Findings We find prevalence estimates of cigarette tax avoidance/evasion vary substantially between countries and across time. In Canada, France and the United Kingdom, more than 10% of smokers report last purchasing cigarettes from low or untaxed sources while in Malaysia, some prevalence estimates suggest substantial cigarette tax avoidance/evasion. We also find important associations between household income and education and the likelihood to engage in tax avoidance/evasion. These associations, however, vary both in

  20. Ethics control of vertebrate animals experiments in biosatellite BION-M1 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, Eugene

    During April 19-May 19, 2013 it was realized 30-days flight of Russian biosatellite Bion-M1. The main goal of this flight was to study effects of microgravity upon behavior and structural-functional state of different physiological systems of vertebrates. The folloving species were accommodated aboard of biosatellite: 45 mice C57bl/6, 8 Mongolian gerbils Meriones unguiculatus, 15 lizards, i.e. geckos Chondrodctylus turneri Gray, and fish Oreochromis mossambicus. The selection and traing of mice for the flight and ground-based control experiments was carried out at the Research Institute of Mitoengineering by Moscow State University. The protocols for animals care and reserch were revised and adopted by Bioethics Commission of above mentioned institute (decision on November 01, 2013, N35). The final version of Bion-M1 Scientific Reseach Program and protocols for separate experiments were discussed and adopted by Biomedical Ethics Commission of Institute of Biomedical Problems (decision on April 4, 2014, N317). The IMBP Commission has a status of Physiological Section of Russian Bioethics Committee by Russian Commision for UNESCO affairs and follows the Russian Bioethical Guidelines for Experiments in Aerospace and Naval Medicine and other national and international rules including COSPAR International Policy and Guidelines for Animal Care and Use in Space-born Research. Because US-scientists were the main partners in mice investigations the decision of IMBP Biomedical Commission related to Bion-M1 project was sended for information to Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of NASA Ames Research Center. Postflight estimation of mice was done by Russian veterinary with the participation of NASA Chief veterinary.

  1. Effect of sediment settling on controlling golden mussel invasion in water transfer project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengzhen; Wang, Zhaoyin; Bogen, Jim; Pan, Baozhu

    2013-04-01

    Inter-basin water transfer projects have been widely used to solve uneven distribution of water resources and water shortage in China. Along with the transferring of water resources, golden mussel (Limnoperna fortunei), the filter-collector macro-invertebrate species originating from southern China has also been inadvertently transferred to new aquatic environment, resulting in quick and uncontrolled spread of the species. The golden mussels are invasive by nature and endowed with a strong byssus for attaching onto their habitat, allowing them to easily invade natural and artificial aquatic systems, which was resulted in high-density golden mussel attachment that causes serious bio-fouling. Invasion and bio-fouling by golden mussels in water transfer systems has drawn attention widely because it has resulted in high resistance to water flow, corrosion of pipe walls and even clogging of tunnels, as well as causing water pollution and ecological imbalance in the regions that receive water infested with golden mussels. Field investigation was conducted along the East River, which is the main drinking water resource for Cantong province and Hongkong, China, to study the natural habitats of golden mussels. Surveys of water transfer tunnels which carry water from the East River to several big cities in Cantong province were done to study golden mussel invasion and attachment in tunnels. It is found that in the natural habitat, golden mussels mainly attach to bedrock and bank stones and solid surfaces facing upstream, while no golden mussels are attached on the surfaces facing downstream and suffering sediment deposition. In the water transfer tunnels, golden mussel attachment densities of 40,000 individuals/m2 mainly occurred on the portion of tunnel walls which face downwards and thus avoid sedimentation. An experiment was designed to study the effect of sediment settling on golden mussel attachment. The results showed that settling of fine sediment particles affects

  2. PROJECT INTERACT: A Study of Patterns of Interaction in Abusive, Neglectful and Control Families. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Robert L.

    The project report (Project Interact) describes the outcome of 3 years of research on the nature, causes, and consequences of child abuse and neglect. The family as a locus of violence and the frequency of family violence (including homicide, police calls, physical punishment, and child abuse) are considered. Three models are presented to help…

  3. Framework for Organization and Control of Capstone Design/Build Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massie, Darrell D.; Massie, Cheryl A.

    2006-01-01

    Senior design capstone projects frequently require team members to self-organize for a project and then execute the design/build portion with limited resources. This is challenging for inexperienced students who struggle with technical as well as program management and team building issues. This paper outlines a general framework that can be used…

  4. Integrated Family Planning, Nutrition, and Parasite-Control Project in Ghana: a baseline survey report.

    PubMed

    Odai, I

    1990-10-01

    In 1987, the Integrated Family Planning, Nutrition, and Parasite Control Project interviewed 564 people from 9 communities in Awutu, Ghana to learn their perceptions of health problems and the level of family planning (FP) knowledge and practice in those communities. 95.2% or their spouses breast fed their infants and 72.5% supplemented breast milk at 8 months. Even though 57.3% had 5 children, most were young and still could have had more children. 51.6% wanted 4-6 children. 86.7% were aware of FP and the majority (46%) heard about it from the maternal and child health/FP clinic. It was also the leading source of information about contraception. Mass media ranked a distant 2nd (15.3%). 66.3% knew of at least 1 contraceptive and the leading known contraceptive was oral contraceptives (OCs). 50.5% said the ideal duration for spacing births was 3 years. 82.6% were not currently using contraceptives and 68.6% never did use them. Of those who had never used them, 58.8% did not wish to use contraceptives. The majority of couples (49%) using contraceptives used OCs. The clinic served 56.1% of contraceptive acceptors. Drug stores represented the next leading contraceptive source (33.7%). 72.4% believed the prices of contraceptives to be inexpensive. 89.4% did not know about side effects of contraceptives. 80.9% had not heard any rumors about contraceptives. Of those that did, 34.3% said that contraceptives cause sterility. 66.1% did not know the effectiveness of contraceptives. 61.2% did not prefer any contraceptive method over the other, but 32.4% preferred artificial methods. 25% preferred them because they were familiar with them. The typical respondent was of the Akan ethnic group, married, 20-49 years old, a farmer, and a Christian. The typical respondent also had little to no formal education and an income 20,000 cedis. PMID:12316755

  5. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Test act system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The engineering and fabrication of the test ACT system, produced in the third program element of the IAAC Project is documented. The system incorporates pitch-augmented stability and wing-load alleviation, plus full authority fly-by-wire control of the elevators. The pitch-augmented stability is designed to have reliability sufficient to allow flight with neutral or negative inherent longitudinal stability.

  6. Evaluation of pilot-scale air pollution control devices on a municipal waterfall incinerator. Project report, June 1978-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.D.; Bruck, J.M.; Albrinck, D.N.

    1985-10-01

    The project report describes the results of a program for the testing of two pilot-scale pollution control devices, a fabric filter, and a venturi scrubber at the Braintree, Massachusetts Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator. It includes operation, sampling, and analytical efforts and outlines the plant operating conditions at the time of testing of the two pilot control devices. The Braintree Municipal Incinerator is a mass-burn, water-wall type consisting of two furnaces, each designed to burn 4.7 Mg (5 tons) per hour of unprocessed refuse.

  7. Computer system requirements specification for 101-SY hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    McNeece, S.G.; Truitt, R.W.

    1994-10-12

    The system requirements specification for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project (HMTP) data acquisition and control system (DACS-1) documents the system requirements for the DACS-1 project. The purpose of the DACS is to provide data acquisition and control capabilities for the hydrogen mitigation testing of Tank SY-101. Mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste, directed at varying angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. Tank and supporting instrumentation is brought into the DACS to monitor the status of the tank and to provide information on the effectiveness of the mitigation test. Instrumentation is also provided for closed loop control of the pump operation. DACS is also capable for being expanded to control and monitor other mitigation testing. The intended audience for the computer system requirements specification includes the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test data acquisition and control system designers: analysts, programmers, instrument engineers, operators, maintainers. It is intended for the data users: tank farm operations, mitigation test engineers, the Test Review Group (TRG), data management support staff, data analysis, Hanford data stewards, and external reviewers.

  8. Projections from neocortex mediate top-down control of memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Marshel, James H; Kim, Christina K; Ferenczi, Emily; Lee, Soo Yeun; Berndt, Andre; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Jaffe, Anna; Lo, Maisie; Liston, Conor; Deisseroth, Karl

    2015-10-29

    Top-down prefrontal cortex inputs to the hippocampus have been hypothesized to be important in memory consolidation, retrieval, and the pathophysiology of major psychiatric diseases; however, no such direct projections have been identified and functionally described. Here we report the discovery of a monosynaptic prefrontal cortex (predominantly anterior cingulate) to hippocampus (CA3 to CA1 region) projection in mice, and find that optogenetic manipulation of this projection (here termed AC-CA) is capable of eliciting contextual memory retrieval. To explore the network mechanisms of this process, we developed and applied tools to observe cellular-resolution neural activity in the hippocampus while stimulating AC-CA projections during memory retrieval in mice behaving in virtual-reality environments. Using this approach, we found that learning drives the emergence of a sparse class of neurons in CA2/CA3 that are highly correlated with the local network and that lead synchronous population activity events; these neurons are then preferentially recruited by the AC-CA projection during memory retrieval. These findings reveal a sparsely implemented memory retrieval mechanism in the hippocampus that operates via direct top-down prefrontal input, with implications for the patterning and storage of salient memory representations. PMID:26436451

  9. Projections from neocortex mediate top-down control of memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Sankaran, Sethuraman; Marshel, James H.; Kim, Christina K.; Ferenczi, Emily; Lee, Soo Yeun; Berndt, Andre; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Jaffe, Anna; Lo, Maisie; Liston, Conor; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Top-down prefrontal cortex inputs to the hippocampus have been hypothesized to be important in memory consolidation, retrieval, and the pathophysiology of major psychiatric diseases; however, no such direct projections have been identified and functionally described. Here we report the discovery of a monosynaptic prefrontal cortex (predominantly anterior cingulate) to hippocampus (CA3 to CA1 region) projection in mice, and find that optogenetic manipulation of this projection (here termed AC–CA) is capable of eliciting contextual memory retrieval. To explore the network mechanisms of this process, we developed and applied tools to observe cellular-resolution neural activity in the hippocampus while stimulating AC–CA projections during memory retrieval in mice behaving in virtual-reality environments. Using this approach, we found that learning drives the emergence of a sparse class of neurons in CA2/CA3 that are highly correlated with the local network and that lead synchronous population activity events; these neurons are then preferentially recruited by the AC–CA projection during memory retrieval. These findings reveal a sparsely implemented memory retrieval mechanism in the hippocampus that operates via direct top-down prefrontal input, with implications for the patterning and storage of salient memory representations. PMID:26436451

  10. Flood control project selection using an interval type-2 entropy weight with interval type-2 fuzzy TOPSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamri, Nurnadiah; Abdullah, Lazim

    2014-06-01

    Flood control project is a complex issue which takes economic, social, environment and technical attributes into account. Selection of the best flood control project requires the consideration of conflicting quantitative and qualitative evaluation criteria. When decision-makers' judgment are under uncertainty, it is relatively difficult for them to provide exact numerical values. The interval type-2 fuzzy set (IT2FS) is a strong tool which can deal with the uncertainty case of subjective, incomplete, and vague information. Besides, it helps to solve for some situations where the information about criteria weights for alternatives is completely unknown. Therefore, this paper is adopted the information interval type-2 entropy concept into the weighting process of interval type-2 fuzzy TOPSIS. This entropy weight is believed can effectively balance the influence of uncertainty factors in evaluating attribute. Then, a modified ranking value is proposed in line with the interval type-2 entropy weight. Quantitative and qualitative factors that normally linked with flood control project are considered for ranking. Data in form of interval type-2 linguistic variables were collected from three authorised personnel of three Malaysian Government agencies. Study is considered for the whole of Malaysia. From the analysis, it shows that diversion scheme yielded the highest closeness coefficient at 0.4807. A ranking can be drawn using the magnitude of closeness coefficient. It was indicated that the diversion scheme recorded the first rank among five causes.

  11. Selective activation of dorsal raphe nucleus-projecting neurons in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex by controllable stress.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Michael V; Zarza, Christina M; Gomez, Devan M; Campeau, Serge; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2009-09-01

    Exposure to uncontrollable stressors produces a variety of behavioral consequences (e.g. exaggerated fear, reduced social exploration) that do not occur if the stressor is controllable. In addition, an initial experience with a controllable stressor can block the behavioral and neural responses to a later uncontrollable stressor. The serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) has come to be viewed as a critical structure in mediating the behavioral effects of uncontrollable stress. Recent work suggests that the buffering effects of behavioral control on the DRN-dependent behavioral outcomes of uncontrollable stress require ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFCv) activation at the time of behavioral control. The present studies were conducted to directly determine whether or not controllable stress selectively activates DRN-projecting neurons within the mPFCv. To examine this possibility in the rat, we combined retrograde tracing (fluorogold iontophoresed into the DRN) with Fos immunohistochemistry, a marker for neural activation. Exposure to controllable, relative to uncontrollable, stress increased Fos expression in fluorogold-labeled neurons in the prelimbic region (PL) of the mPFCv. Furthermore, in a separate experiment, a prior experience with controllable stress led to potentiation of Fos expression in retrogradely labeled PL neurons in response to an uncontrollable stressor 1 week later. These results suggest that the PL selectively responds to behavioral control and utilizes such information to regulate the brainstem response to ongoing and subsequent stressors. PMID:19686468

  12. Selective activation of dorsal raphe nucleus-projecting neurons in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex by controllable stress

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Michael V.; Zarza, Christina M.; Gomez, Devan M.; Campeau, Serge; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to uncontrollable stressors produces a variety of behavioral consequences (e.g. exaggerated fear, reduced social exploration) that do not occur if the stressor is controllable. In addition, an initial experience with a controllable stressor can block the behavioral and neural responses to a later uncontrollable stressor. The serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) has come to be viewed as a critical structure in mediating the behavioral effects of uncontrollable stress. Recent work suggests that the buffering effects of behavioral control on the DRN-dependent behavioral outcomes of uncontrollable stress require ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFCv) activation at the time of behavioral control. The present studies were conducted to directly determine whether or not controllable stress selectively activates DRN-projecting neurons within the mPFCv. To examine this possibility in the rat, we combined retrograde tracing (fluorogold iontophoresed into the DRN) with Fos immunohistochemistry, a marker for neural activation. Exposure to controllable, relative to uncontrollable, stress increased Fos expression in fluorogold-labeled neurons in the prelimbic region (PL) of the mPFCv. Furthermore, in a separate experiment, a prior experience with controllable stress led to potentiation of Fos expression in retrogradely labeled PL neurons in response to an uncontrollable stressor one week later. These results suggest that the PL selectively responds to behavioral control and utilizes such information to regulate the brainstem response to ongoing and subsequent stressors. PMID:19686468

  13. Project SUTOR Superconducting Speed-Controlled Torque Motor for 25.000Nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, B.; de Waele, A. T. A. M.; Söll, M.; Reis, T.; Maier, T.; Oswald, J.; Teigelkötter, J.; Kowalski, T.

    SUTOR is a project that is supported by the german ministry of economy and technology (FKZ 0327866A). The partners working on this project are Oswald Elektromotoren and Hochschule Aschaffenburg. Oswald is responsible for the layout of the Motor and its cryostat. Together with the Hochschule Aschaffenburg, Oswald has build a number of coils to determine the loss rates of superconductors when used with AC current and in external, oscillating magnetic fields. These results are taken to proof the at Oswald developed calculations for superconducting motors. The Hochschule Aschaffenburg is measuring the loss rates in superconducting coils and builds an inverter to fit the special requests a motor has when running with superconducting wires. The aim of this project is to realize a high torque motor that has compared to conventional torque motors a lower volume and weight, a higher efficiency and an increased dynamic acceleration.

  14. Achievements and challenges of the World Bank Loan/Department for International Development grant-assisted Tuberculosis Control Project in China.

    PubMed

    Kong, Peng; Jiang, Xu; Zhang, Ben; Jiang, Shi-wen; Liu, Bo

    2011-07-01

    In March 2002, the government of China launched the World Bank Loan/ Department for International Development-supported Tuberculosis (TB) Control Project to reduce the prevalence and mortality of TB. The project generated promising results in policy development, strengthening of TB control systems, patient treatment success, funds management, and the introduction of legislation. In light of the global TB epidemic and control environment, it is useful to review the TB control priorities of the project, summarize the achievements and experiences around its implementation. PMID:21933629

  15. Subsea processing and control system in the GASP project; Testing of the prototype system

    SciTech Connect

    Nordvik, H.S. )

    1992-03-01

    The subsea production and processing system developed under the Goodfellow Assocs. Subsea Production (GASP) project involved two stages of separation that led to the production of exportable-quality crude oil by pipeline. The produced gas is transported along a separate line. This paper described key elements of the subsea process system. A prototype system was developed during the second phase of the project. The system was tested under dry and submerged conditions in a dry dock. Key features of the prototype system and the tests carried out are described. Prototype testing proved the viability of the GASP system and helped identify areas requiring particular attention and improvement for future applications.

  16. A quality improvement plan for hypertension control: the INCOTECA Project (INterventions for COntrol of hyperTEnsion in CAtalonia)

    PubMed Central

    Vallès-Fernandez, Roser; Rosell-Murphy, Magdalena; Correcher-Aventin, Olga; Mengual-Martínez, Lucas; Aznar-Martínez, Núria; Prieto-De Lamo, Gemma; Franzi-Sisó, Alícia; Puig-Manresa, Jordi; Ma Bonet-Simó, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Background Different studies have shown insufficient blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive patients. Multiple factors influence hypertension management, and the quality of primary care is one of them. We decided therefore to evaluate the effectiveness of a quality improvement plan directed at professionals of Primary Health Care Teams (PHCT) with the aim to achieve a better control of hypertension. The hypothesis of the study is that the implementation of a quality improvement plan will improve the control of hypertension. The primary aim of this study will be to evaluate the effectiveness of this plan. Methods and design Design: multicentric study quasi-experimental before – after with control group. The non-randomised allocation of the intervention will be done at PHCT level. Setting: 18 PHCT in the Barcelona province (Spain). Sample: all patients with a diagnosis of hypertension (population based study). Exclusion criteria: patients with a diagnosis of hypertension made later than 01/01/2006 and patients younger than 18 years. Intervention: a quality improvement plan, which targets primary health care professionals and includes educational sessions, feedback to health professionals, audit and implementation of recommended clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypertensive patients. Measurements: age, sex, associated co-morbidity (diabetes mellitus type I and II, heart failure and renal failure). The following variables will be recorded: BP measurement, cardiovascular risk and antihypertensive drugs used. Results will be measured before the start of the intervention and twelve months after the start of the study. Dependent variable: prevalence of hypertensive patients with poor BP control. Analysis: Chi-square test and Student's t-test will be used to measure the association between independent qualitative and quantitative variables, respectively. Non-parametric tests will be used for the analysis of non-normally distributed variables

  17. The Results of a Randomized Control Trial of the Milwaukee Community Literacy Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    The tutoring component of the Investing in Innovations (i3) funded Milwaukee Community Literacy Project (MCLP) is based on the Reading Recovery program. Reading Recovery focuses on in-school tutoring with lesson plans written, and assessments analyzed, by the tutors themselves. The objective of this study is to measure the impact of the MCLP on…

  18. Sensory Cortical Control of a Visually Induced Arrest Behavior via Corticotectal Projections

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Feixue; Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Zingg, Brian; Ji, Xu-ying; Zhang, Li I.; Tao, Huizhong W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Innate defense behaviors (IDBs) evoked by threatening sensory stimuli are essential for animal survival. Although subcortical circuits are implicated in IDBs, it remains largely unclear whether sensory cortex modulates IDBs and what are the underlying neural pathways. Here, we show that optogenetic silencing of corticotectal projections from layer 5 (L5) of the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) to the superior colliculus (SC) significantly reduces a SC-dependent innate behavior, i.e. temporary suspension of locomotion upon a sudden flash of light as short as milliseconds. Surprisingly, optogenetic activation of SC-projecting neurons in V1 or their axon terminals in SC sufficiently elicits the behavior, in contrast to other major L5 corticofugal projections. Thus, via the same corticofugal projection, visual cortex not only modulates the light-induced arrest behavior, but also can directly drive the behavior. Our results suggest that sensory cortex may play a previously unrecognized role in the top-down initiation of sensory-motor behaviors. PMID:25913860

  19. Use of a Modern Polymerization Pilot-Plant for Undergraduate Control Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza-Bustos, S. A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Described is a project where students gain experience in handling large volumes of hazardous materials, process start up and shut down, equipment failures, operational variations, scaling up, equipment cleaning, and run-time scheduling while working in a modern pilot plant. Included are the system design, experimental procedures, and results. (KR)

  20. Launch vehicle flight control augmentation using smart materials and advanced composites (CDDF Project 93-05)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, C.

    1995-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a rich heritage of launch vehicles that have used aerodynamic surfaces for flight stability such as the Saturn vehicles and flight control such as on the Redstone. Recently, due to aft center-of-gravity locations on launch vehicles currently being studied, the need has arisen for the vehicle control augmentation that is provided by these flight controls. Aerodynamic flight control can also reduce engine gimbaling requirements, provide actuator failure protection, enhance crew safety, and increase vehicle reliability, and payload capability. In the Saturn era, NASA went to the Moon with 300 sq ft of aerodynamic surfaces on the Saturn V. Since those days, the wealth of smart materials and advanced composites that have been developed allow for the design of very lightweight, strong, and innovative launch vehicle flight control surfaces. This paper presents an overview of the advanced composites and smart materials that are directly applicable to launch vehicle control surfaces.

  1. Mixed Tracking and Projective Synchronization of 5D Hyperchaotic System Using Active Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, Kayode; Ogunjo, Samuel T.; Williams, Oluwafemi

    2013-08-01

    This paper examines mixed tracking control and hy- brid synchronization of two identical 5-D hyperchaotic Lorenz systems via active control technique. The de- signed control functions for the mixed tracking enable each of the system state variables to stabilize at differ- ent chosen positions as well as control each state vari- ables of the system to track different desired smooth function of time. Also, the active control technique is used to design control functions which achieve projec- tive synchronization between the slave state variables and the master state variables. We also show that the coupling strength is inversely proportional to the syn- chronization time. Numerical simulations are carried out to validate the effectiveness of the analytical tech- nique.

  2. Effect of nutrition improvement project on morbidity from infectious diseases in preschool children in Vietnam: comparison with control commune.

    PubMed

    English, R M; Badcock, J C; Giay, T; Ngu, T; Waters, A M; Bennett, S A

    1997-11-01

    A nutrition program based on home garden food production and nutrition education for mothers of young children was associated with significant reductions in morbidity from acute respiratory infection and diarrheal disease in preschool children in Viet Nam's Vinh Phu province. The nutrition program was implemented in Khai Xuan commune during 1991-93; Ching Cong commune, which did not receive the intervention, served as the control community. In Khai Xuan, the incidence of respiratory infections among children under 6 years of age decreased from 49.5% to 11.2% during the study period, while that of diarrheal disease dropped from 18.3% to 5.1%. The nutrition project was also associated with significant declines in severe pneumonia. No changes in morbidity occurred in the control commune. The intervention resulted in significantly higher intakes of vegetables, fruit, energy, protein, vitamin A, and iron by project children compared with controls. It is recommended that nutrition improvement be adopted as an infectious disease control strategy in international and national development programs, especially those in countries where respiratory and diarrheal infections are the major cause of child morbidity and mortality. PMID:9374884

  3. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the Wing Planform Study Task and Final Configuration Selection of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology (except for ACT), takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail sizes), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3590 km) (1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block fuel reduction. Good takeoff performance at high-altitude airports on a hot day was also achieved. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation and begin the required control system development and testing.

  4. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Wing planform study and final configuration selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Wing Planform Study and Final Configuration Selection Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is documented. Application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span resulted in significant improvements over the Conventional Baseline Configuration (Baseline) and the Initial ACT Configuration previously established. The configurations use the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, and payload as the Baseline. The Final ACT Configuration (Model 768-107) incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 44% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle-of-attack limiter, and wing-load alleviation. Flutter-mode control was not beneficial for this configuration. This resulted in an 890 kg (1960 lb) reduction in airplane takeoff gross weight and a 9.8% improvement in cruise lift/drag. At the Baseline mission range (3589 km 1938 nmi), this amounts to 10% block-fuel reduction. Results of this task strongly indicate that the IAAC Project should proceed with the Final ACT evaluation, and begin the required control system development and test.

  5. Project: "Project!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    In November 2006, the editors of "Campus Technology" launched their first-ever High-Resolution Projection Study, to find out if the latest in projector technology could really make a significant difference in teaching, learning, and educational innovation on US campuses. The author and her colleagues asked campus educators, technologists, and…

  6. Computer Numerical Control: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinn, John W.

    This instructional manual contains five learning activity packets for use in a workshop on computer numerical control for computer-aided manufacturing. The lessons cover the following topics: introduction to computer-aided manufacturing, understanding the lathe, using the computer, computer numerically controlled part programming, and executing a…

  7. Integrative application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial act configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The performance and economic benefits of a constrained application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) are identified, and the approach to airplane design is established for subsequent steps leading to the development of a less constrained final ACT configuration. The active controls configurations are measured against a conventional baseline configuration, a state-of-the-art transport, to determine whether the performance and economic changes resulting from ACT merit proceeding with the project. The technology established by the conventional baseline configuration was held constant except for the addition of ACT. The wing, with the same planform, was moved forward on the initial ACT configuration to move the loading range aft relative to the wing mean aerodynamic chord. Wing trailing-edge surfaces and surface controls also were reconfigured for load alleviation and structural stabilization.

  8. Framework for Small-Scale Experiments in Software Engineering: Guidance and Control Software Project: Software Engineering Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1998-01-01

    Software is becoming increasingly significant in today's critical avionics systems. To achieve safe, reliable software, government regulatory agencies such as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Department of Defense mandate the use of certain software development methods. However, little scientific evidence exists to show a correlation between software development methods and product quality. Given this lack of evidence, a series of experiments has been conducted to understand why and how software fails. The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project is the latest in this series. The GCS project is a case study of the Requirements and Technical Concepts for Aviation RTCA/DO-178B guidelines, Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification. All civil transport airframe and equipment vendors are expected to comply with these guidelines in building systems to be certified by the FAA for use in commercial aircraft. For the case study, two implementations of a guidance and control application were developed to comply with the DO-178B guidelines for Level A (critical) software. The development included the requirements, design, coding, verification, configuration management, and quality assurance processes. This paper discusses the details of the GCS project and presents the results of the case study.

  9. ‘Like sugar and honey’: The embedded ethics of a larval control project in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ann H.; Ameh, David; Majambere, Silas; Lindsay, Steve; Pinder, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a malaria research project in The Gambia to provoke thinking on the social value of transnational research. The Larval Control Project (LCP) investigated the efficacy of a microbial insecticide to reduce vector density and, ultimately, clinical malaria in Gambian children. The LCP’s protocol delineated a clinical surveillance scheme that involved Village Health Workers (VHWs) supported by project nurses. Combining insights from ethnographic fieldwork conducted at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratories in Farafenni from 2005 to 2009, open-ended interviews with project nurses, and eight focus group discussions held with participant mothers in October 2007, we consider the social impact of the LCP’s investigative method against the backdrop of several years of research activity. We found that while participants associated the LCP with the clinical care it provided, they also regarded the collaboration between the nurses and VHWs added additional benefits. Organised around the operational functions of the trial, small-scale collaborations provided the platform from which to build local capacity. While ethical guidelines emphasise the considerations that must be added to experimental endeavour in southern countries (e.g. elaborating processes of informed consent, developing strategies of community engagement or providing therapeutic access to participants after the trial concludes), these findings suggest that shifting attention from supplementing ethical protocols to the everyday work of research – embedding ethics through scientific activity – may provide a sounder basis to reinforce the relationship between scientific rigour and social value. PMID:20362381

  10. Control Room Training for the Hyper-X Project Utilizing Aircraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux-Baumann, Jesica; Dees, Ray; Fratello, David

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center flew two Hyper-X research vehicles and achieved hypersonic speeds over the Pacific Ocean in March and November 2004. To train the flight and mission control room crew, the NASA Dryden simulation capability was utilized to generate telemetry and radar data, which was used in nominal and emergency mission scenarios. During these control room training sessions personnel were able to evaluate and refine data displays, flight cards, mission parameter allowable limits, and emergency procedure checklists. Practice in the mission control room ensured that all primary and backup Hyper-X staff were familiar with the nominal mission and knew how to respond to anomalous conditions quickly and successfully. This report describes the technology in the simulation environment and the Mission Control Center, the need for and benefit of control room training, and the rationale and results of specific scenarios unique to the Hyper-X research missions.

  11. The Pistoia Alliance Controlled Substance Compliance Service Project: from start to finish.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel; Bowden, Stuart G; Knorr, Reinhard; Wilson, Derek R; Proudfoot, John; Dunlop, Anne E

    2015-02-01

    Pharmaceutical companies and other life science R&D organizations routinely work with controlled substances, and must have adequate controls in place to meet the legislative requirements of the countries in which they operate. Controlled substances include a range of narcotics and psychotropic drugs, which are covered by increasingly complex legislation as legislators attempt to keep up with a rapidly changing environment. This legislation must be interpreted and transformed from legal wording into chemical structures to be used effectively. Over the past year a working party of pharmaceutical and technology companies has come together under the umbrella of the Pistoia Alliance to define a Controlled Substance Compliance Service. We describe the benefits of bringing together this group of experts to solve the pre-competitive issue of controlled substance management. PMID:25281592

  12. D0 Silicon Strip Detector Upgrade Project SVX Sequencer Controller Board

    SciTech Connect

    Utes, M.; /Fermilab

    2001-05-29

    The Sequencer Controller boards are 9U by 340mm circuit boards that will reside in slot 1 of each of eight Sequencer crates in the D0 detector platform. The primary purpose is to control the Sequencers during data acquisition based on trigger information from the D0 Trigger Framework. Functions and features are as follows: (1) Receives the Serial Command Link (SCL) from the D0 Trigger System and controls the operation of the Sequencers by forming a custom serial control link (NRZ/Clock) which is distributed individually to each Sequencer via the 11 Backplane; (2) Controllable delays adjust NRZ control link phasing to compensate for the various cable-length delays between the Sequencers and SVX chips, delay control is common for slots 2-11, and for slots 12-21 of the crate; (3) Each NRZ control link is phase controlled so that commands reach each Sequencer in a given half-crate simultaneously, i.e., the link is compensated for backplane propagation delays; (4) External communication via MIL-STD-1553; (5) Stand-alone operation via 1553 trigger commands in absence of an SCL link; (6) 1553-writeable register for triggering a laser, etc. followed by an acquisition cycle; (7) TTL front panel input to trigger an acquisition cycle, e.g. from a scintillator; (8) Synch Trig, Veto, Busy and Preamp Reset TTL outputs on front panel LEMOs; (9) On-board 53.104 MHz oscillator for stand-alone operation; (10) 1553 or SCL-triggerable Cal-inject cycle; (11) Front-panel inputs to accept NRZ/Clock link from the VRB Controller; (12) Front panel displays and LEDs show the board status at a glance; and (13) In-system programmable EPLDs are programmed via Altera's 'Byteblaster'.

  13. Controls of the Geomorphic Effectiveness of Passive Restoration Projects in the Interior Columbia River Basin, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, P.; Mowry, A.

    2002-12-01

    Low-order montane tributaries in watersheds of the interior Columbia River Basin historically were highly productive habitat for anadromous and resident salmonids, now greatly reduced in numbers and listed under the Endangered Species Act. Historical impacts, including cattle grazing, other land use activities and direct channel modification, have resulted in loss of streamside vegetation, and channel widening and simplification. Over the past fifteen years, many stream restoration projects have been completed, using both active (instream structures) and passive (cattle grazing exclosure) approaches. The implicit goal of most projects has been to restore multiple structural and functional characteristics, with the ultimate goal of increasing salmonid populations. Very little evaluation of effectiveness of these projects has been done. Previous work has suggested several hypotheses concerning restoration effectiveness: 1) channel narrowing may be driven by increased vegetation cover in response to treatment; 2) adjustment of bed morphology may be controlled by stream power and competence, or channel constraint; 3) response to restoration may require several years. We selected eleven passive restoration sites and measured vegetation and channel morphology at adjacent paired reaches (grazing exclosure vs. grazed reach). All sites were gravel-bedded, <100 km2 drainage area, moderately to highly sinuous; all except one had channel gradients <0.0015. Exclosure age was 2 to 36 years. We used statistical analysis and data visualization to test the hypotheses discussed above. Overall, exclosure reaches were narrower, deeper and had more pool area than comparable grazed reaches. Most exclosure reaches had more sedge cover and riparian shrub cover, and less bare ground. Degree of narrowing was not strongly related vegetation cover, but young sites that did not show vegetation response also failed to show channel narrowing. Adjustment of bed morphology was limited, at

  14. Field activity cost estimates for the first 3 years of the World Bank Loan Project for schistosomiasis control in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, J; Booth, M; Jenkins, J; Wang, H; Tanner, M

    1998-12-01

    The World Bank Loan Project for schistosomiasis in China commenced field activities in 1992. In this paper, we describe disease control strategies for levels of different endemicity, and estimate unit costs and total expenditure of screening, treatment (cattle and humans) and snail control for 8 provinces where Schistosoma japonicum infection is endemic. Overall, we estimate that more than 21 million US dollars were spent on field activities during the first three years of the project. Mollusciciding (43% of the total expenditure) and screening (28% of the total) are estimated to have the most expensive field activities. However, despite the expense of screening, a simple model predicts that selective chemotherapy could have been cheaper than mass chemotherapy in areas where infection prevalence was higher than 15%, which was the threshold for mass chemotherapy intervention. It is concluded that considerable cost savings could be made in the future by narrowing the scope of snail control activities, redefining the threshold infection prevalence for mass chemotherapy, defining smaller administrative units, and developing rapid assessment tools. PMID:10772550

  15. Setting the PACE in IRSP: a reconfigurable PC-based array-control electronics system for infrared scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, George C., II; Herald, W. Larry; Erickson, Ricky A.; Irvine, Walter S., Jr.; Mackin, Paul R.; Bryant, Paul T.; Lindberg, Brian

    2003-09-01

    The development of a new generation PC-based array control electronics (PACE) system was completed during the first quarter of 2003 in the Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-loop (KHILS) facility. This system replaces the bulky VME-based system that was the previous standard with more compact digital control electronics using field-programmable gate array (FPGA) technology hosted on a personal computer. The analog interface electronics (AIE) were redesigned to eliminate obsolete components and miniaturize the package for better compatibility with harsh environments. The resulting PACE system supports both Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) and Honeywell Technology Center"s (HTC's) 512 x 512 legacy emitter array infrared projection devices as well as SBIR"s upcoming 1024 x 1024 and next-generation 512 x 512 arrays. Two FPGA-based PCI boards enable this system to reconfigure the inputs, processing and outputs of the projection electronics through firmware loaded from the control PC. The increased flexibility provides potential for additional real-time functions such as distortion correction, convolution and calibration to be implemented along with nonuniformity correction (NUC) techniques by simply reconfiguring firmware. This paper describes the capabilities of the new PACE system in terms of current and future hardware-in-the-loop (HITL) requirements.

  16. Muscarinic receptor subtypes differentially control synaptic input and excitability of cerebellum-projecting medial vestibular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei have a vital function in balance maintenance, gaze stabilization, and posture. Although muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed and involved in regulating vestibular function, it remains unclear how individual mAChR subtypes regulate vestibular neuronal activity. In this study, we determined which specific subtypes of mAChRs control synaptic input and excitability of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons that project to the cerebellum. Cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons were labeled by a fluorescent retrograde tracer and then identified in rat brainstem slices. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that M2 and M3 were the possible major mAChR subtypes expressed in the MVN. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory post-synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of vestibular primary afferents, and this effect was abolished by the M2-preferring antagonist AF-DX 116. However, oxotremorine-M had no effect on GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents of labeled MVN neurons. Furthermore, oxotremorine-M significantly increased the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons, and this effect was blocked by the M3-preferring antagonist J104129 in most neurons tested. In addition, AF-DX 116 reduced the onset latency and prolonged the excitatory effect of oxotremorine-M on the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons. Our findings suggest that M3 is the predominant post-synaptic mAChR involved in muscarinic excitation of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. Pre-synaptic M2 mAChR regulates excitatory glutamatergic input from vestibular primary afferents, which in turn influences the excitability of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. This new information has important therapeutic implications for treating vestibular disorders with mAChR subtype-selective agents. Medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to the cerebellum are involved in balance control. We

  17. ALARA Controls and the Radiological Lessons Learned During the Uranium Fuel Removal Projects at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliam, B. J.; Chapman, J. A.; Jugan, M. R.

    2002-02-26

    The removal of uranium-233 (233 U) from the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB) of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), performed from January through May 2001, created both unique radiological challenges and widely-applicable lessons learned. In addition to the criticality concerns and alpha contamination, 233U has an associated intense gamma photon from the cocontaminant uranium-232 (232U) decaying to thallium-208 (208Tl). Therefore, rigorous contamination controls and significant shielding were implemented. Extensive, timed mock-up training was also imperative to minimize individual and collective personnel exposures. Back-up shielding and containment techniques (that had been previously developed for defense in depth) were used successfully to control significant, changed conditions. Additional controls were placed on tests and on recovery designs to assure a higher level of safety throughout the removal operations. This paper delineates the manner in which each difficulty was solved, while relating the relevance of the results and the methodology to other projects with high dose-rate, highly-contaminated ionizing radiation hazards. Because of the distinctive features of and current interest in molten salt technology, a brief overview is provided. Also presented is the detailed, practical application of radiological controls integrated into, rather than added after, each evolution of the project--thus demonstrating the broad-based benefits of radiological engineering and ALARA reviews. The resolution of the serious contamination-control problems caused by unexpected uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gaseous diffusion is also explicated. Several tables and figures document the preparations, equipment and operations. A comparison of the pre-job dose calculations for the various functions of the uranium deposit removal (UDR) and the post-job dose-rate data are included in the conclusion.

  18. Projecting the impact of climate change on the effectiveness of Controlled Drainage in the U.S. Corn Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Bowling, L. C.; Cherkauer, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface tile drainage systems are used to create arable conditions for agriculture in low-gradient regions with poorly drained soils, such as the U.S. Corn Belt. Traditionally these systems allow excess water to continually drain from the landscape until the water table underlying the field drops below the depth of the tile drain. These 'free draining' systems increase the volume of subsurface water, and thus increase the amount of nutrients, leaving fields. Controlled Drainage (CD) is a water conservation practice that allows farmers to decrease the volume of water leaving their field by using a control structure to manually raise the resting water table above the tile drains. In order to better understand the potential impacts of climate change on agricultural drainage in the Corn Belt, this study focuses on evaluating differences in the simulated effectiveness of CD under different climate change scenarios. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrology model, with a subsurface drainage algorithm, was calibrated to nine sites across the Midwest with drainflow records from 1987 to 2012. It is used to simulate drainflow from 1980-2010 and 2035-2064 using projections for the A1B, A2 and B1 emissions scenarios from the GFDL, PCM and HadCM3 models to represent variation in the severity of projected climate change. Simulated drainflow volume, timing, and variability for both freely-drained and controlled scenarios is used to quantify projected changes in drainflow and calculate metrics of CD effectiveness in mitigating negative water quality impacts, spatially under different climate scenarios. Assessing potential changes in effectiveness of CD due to climate change is necessary to investigate potential long-term benefits and drawbacks of this best management practice.

  19. Design, analysis, and interpretation of field quality-control data for water-sampling projects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David K.; Schertz, Terry L.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Sandstrom, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    The report provides extensive information about statistical methods used to analyze quality-control data in order to estimate potential bias and variability in environmental data. These methods include construction of confidence intervals on various statistical measures, such as the mean, percentiles and percentages, and standard deviation. The methods are used to compare quality-control results with the larger set of environmental data in order to determine whether the effects of bias and variability might interfere with interpretation of these data. Examples from published reports are presented to illustrate how the methods are applied, how bias and variability are reported, and how the interpretation of environmental data can be qualified based on the quality-control analysis.

  20. Yucca Mountain Project: ESF Title I design control process review report

    SciTech Connect

    1989-01-19

    The Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) Title 1 Design Control Process Review was initiated in response to direction from the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) (letter: Kale to Gertz, NRC Concerns on Title 1 Design Control Process, November 17, 1988). The direction was to identify the existing documentation that described ``{hor_ellipsis} the design control process and the quality assurance that governed {hor_ellipsis}`` (a) the development of the requirements documents for the ESF design, (b) the various interfaces between activities, (c) analyses and definitions leading to additional requirements in the System Design Requirements Documents and, (d) completion of Title 1 Design. This report provides historical information for general use in determining the extent of the quality assurance program in existence during the ESF Title 1 Design.

  1. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 6. Science Applications, Incorporated system analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the systems analysis task for the conceptual design of a commercial size, solar powered, controlled environment agriculture system. The baseline greenhouse system consists of a 5-hectare growing facility utilizing an innovative fluid roof filter concept to provide temperature and humidity control. Fresh water for the system is produced by means of a reverse osmosis desalination unit and energy is provided by means of a solar photovoltaic array in conjunction with storage batteries and a power conditioning unit. The greenhouse environment is controlled via circulation of brackish groundwater in a closed system, which permits water recovery during dehumidification as well as CO/sub 2/ enrichment for increased crop productivity.

  2. Controlled motion in an elastic world. Research project: Manipulation strategies for massive space payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Wayne J.

    1992-01-01

    The flexibility of the drives and structures of controlled motion systems are presented as an obstacle to be overcome in the design of high performance motion systems, particularly manipulator arms. The task and the measure of performance to be applied determine the technology appropriate to overcome this obstacle. Included in the technologies proposed are control algorithms (feedback and feed forward), passive damping enhancement, operational strategies, and structural design. Modeling of the distributed, nonlinear system is difficult, and alternative approaches are discussed. The author presents personal perspectives on the history, status, and future directions in this area.

  3. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology to an Advanced Subsonic Transport: Project Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art of active controls technology (ACT) and a recommended ACT development program plan are reviewed. The performance benefits and cost of ownership of an integrated application of ACT to civil transport aircraft is to be assessed along with the risk and laboratory and/or flight experiments designed to reduce the technical risks to a commercially acceptable level.

  4. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Pressure Ratings for Some Chimney and Control Dewar Componenets

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-05-25

    Pressure rating calculations were done for some of the chimney and control dewar components. This engineering note documents these calculations. The table below summarizes the components looked at, and what pressure rating are. The raw engineering calculations for each of the components is given.

  5. Status of biological control projects on terrestrial invasive alien weeds in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In cooperation with foreign scientists, we are currently developing new classical biological control agents for five species of invasive alien terrestrial weeds. Cape-Ivy. A gall-forming fly, Parafreutreta regalis, and a stem-boring moth, Digitivalva delaireae, have been favorably reviewed by TAG...

  6. Controlled blasting and its implications for the NNWSI project exploratory shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eeckhout, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    This report reviews controlled blasting techniques for shaft sinking. Presplitting and smooth blasting are the techniques of principal interest. Smooth blasting is preferred for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations exploratory shaft. Shaft damage can be monitored visually or by peak velocity measurements and refractive techniques. Damage into the rock should be limited to 3 ft. 40 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. 76 FR 28437 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Interest Project (SIP): Initial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Colley Gilbert, PhD, M.P.H., Director, Extramural Research Program Office, National Center for Chronic... Prevention (CDC) announces the aforementioned meeting: Time and Date: 11 a.m.-5 p.m., June 14, 2011 (Closed... for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  8. Upgrade of Compressed Air Control System Reduces Energy Costs at Michelin Tire Plant. Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Project Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-01-01

    This case study highlights the upgraded compressed air system at a Michelin tire manufacturing plant in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The controls upgrade project enabled multiple compressor operation without blow-off, and significantly reduced energy costs.

  9. Controlling our destinies: Historical, philosophical, social and ethical perspectives on the Human Genome Project: Final report, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, P.R.

    1996-09-25

    This report briefly describes the efforts by the organizing committee in preparation for the conference entitled Controlling Our Destinies: Historical, Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Perspectives on the Human Genome Project. The conference was held October 5-8, 1995.

  10. High and equitable tuberculosis awareness coverage in the community-driven Axshya TB control project in India

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, S. S.; Das, A.; Mohanty, S.; Tonsing, J.

    2015-01-01

    Data from surveys on knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) on tuberculosis (TB) conducted under the Axshya project at two time points (baseline 2010–2011 and mid-line 2012–2013) were analysed for changes in coverage and equity of TB awareness after project interventions. Overall coverage increased from 84% at baseline to 88% at midline (5% increase, P < 0.05). In comparison to baseline results, coverage at the midline survey had significantly increased, from 81% to 87% among the rural population, from 81% to 86% among women, from 73% to 85% in the ⩾55 years age group, from 71% to 80% among illiterates and from 73% to 81% in the south zone (P < 0.05). The equity gap among the different study groups (settlement, sex, age, education and zones) decreased from 6–23% at baseline to 3–11% during the midline survey. The maximum decline was observed for type of settlement (rural vs. urban), from 10% to 3% (P < 0.05). This community-driven TB control project has achieved high and equitable coverage of TB awareness, offering valuable lessons for the global community. PMID:26400604

  11. The controlled ecological life support system Antarctic analog project: Analysis of wastewater from the South Pole Station, Antarctica, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Bubenheim, David L.; Straight, Christian L.; Belisle, Warren

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support system (CELSS) Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP) is a joint National Science Foundation (NSF) and NASA project for the development, deployment and operation of CELSS technologies at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. NASA goals are operational testing of CELSS technologies and the conduct of scientific studies to facilitate technology selection and system design. The NSF goals are that the food production, water purification, and waste treatment capabilities which will be provided by CAAP will improve the quality of life for the South Pole inhabitants, reduce logistics dependence, and minimize environmental impacts associated with human presence on the polar plateau. This report presents an analysis of wastewater samples taken from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica. The purpose of the work is to develop a quantitative understanding of the characteristics of domestic sewage streams at the South Pole Station. This information will contribute to the design of a proposed plant growth/waste treatment system which is part of the CELSS Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP).

  12. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 9. Science Applications, Incorporated Phase 2 - definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the effort required to implement the design of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Engineering Test Facility, SCEA-ETF. This report is a basic blueprint for the Phase 2 activities which have as a goal the construction of the ETF. These activities have been broken down into five major tasks, namely Project Management; Engineering and Design; Procurement/Fabrication; Construction, Installation and Checkout; and Operation and Maintenance. The type of activities required under each of these tasks are described followed by a detailed work breakdown structure. The Phase 2 project organization is discussed. A 13 month schedule for the total project is also given. Lastly, two appendices discuss cost adjustment factors for an ETF located in the KSA, and an update of the commercial system cost estimate based on preliminary cost quotations for the ETF. The results show a 63% cost increase for the KSA ETF primarily due to higher construction costs and greater well depth. The commercial system cost required an adjustment upwards of 7.7%.

  13. [Infection control and compliance with national recommendations among dentists in Frankfurt/M, Germany: results of a pilot project, 2005].

    PubMed

    Heudorf, U; Dehler, A; Klenner, W; Exner, M

    2006-07-01

    Recommendations for prevention of infection in dentistry have been published in many countries and in Germany as well. In a pilot project in collaboration with the Public Health Service of the City of Frankfurt and the chamber of dentists in Hesse, compliance with these recommendations was studied in dental practices in Frankfurt/M in 2005. After being informed about the recommendations, more than 50% of the 560 Frankfurt dentists agreed to participate in this project, and 127 of these practitioners were visited by experts of the dentist chamber. Hygienic standards in the practices were examined using a checklist. A proper hygiene schedule was observed in 84% of the practices. Facilities for hand hygiene such as dispensers for soap, disinfectant and towels were available in 98, 93 and 92% of the practices, and personal protective equipment such as gloves, masks, eye wear and gowns was found in 98, 100, 98 and 88% of the practices, respectively. Reprocessing of dental instruments was done either manually (52%), manually in combination with ultrasonic cleaning (48%) or by using special reprocessing machines (32%). Steam sterilization was used in all practices; in some practices gravity displacement sterilizers were used (14%), whereas in most of the practices (61%) a high-speed prevacuum sterilizer was available -- especially in dental surgeon practices (77%). Monitoring and documentation of the sterilization process was done automatically (33%) or by hand (55%). In 80% of the practices, pressure, temperature, time and person responsible were documented. Documents of routine maintenance and regular biological testing of the sterilizers could be shown in 93 and 84% of the practices. The Frankfurt pilot project based on information and advice in combination with control has proven to be successful in the majority of practices enrolled. Encouraged by this experience, the chamber of dentists wants to implement this project all over the state of Hesse. The intention is to

  14. New process modeling [sic], design, and control strategies for energy efficiency, high product quality, and improved productivity in the process industries. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, W. Harmon

    2002-06-05

    This project was concerned with the development of process design and control strategies for improving energy efficiency, product quality, and productivity in the process industries. In particular, (i) the resilient design and control of chemical reactors, and (ii) the operation of complex processing systems, was investigated. Specific topics studied included new process modeling procedures, nonlinear controller designs, and control strategies for multiunit integrated processes. Both fundamental and immediately applicable results were obtained. The new design and operation results from this project were incorporated into computer-aided design software and disseminated to industry. The principles and design procedures have found their way into industrial practice.

  15. The Swift Project Contamination Control Program: A Case Study of Balancing Cost, Schedule and Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Day, Diane T.; Secunda, Mark S.; Rosecrans, Glenn P.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Observatory will be launched in early 2004 to examine the dynamic process of gamma ray burst (GRB) events. The multi-wavelength Observatory will study the GRB afterglow characteristics, which will help to answer fundamental questions about both the structure and the evolution of the universe. The Swift Observatory Contamination Control Program has been developed to aid in ensuring the success of the on-orbit performance of two of the primary instruments: the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT). During the design phase of the Observatory, the contamination control program evolved and trade studies were performed to assess the risk of contaminating the sensitive UVOT and XRT optics during both pre-launch testing and on-orbit operations, within the constraints of the overall program cost and schedule.

  16. The Swift Project Contamination Control Program: A Case study of Balancing Cost, Schedule and Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Day, Diane; Secunda, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The Swift Observatory will be launched in early 2004 to examine the dynamic process of gamma ray burst (GRB) events. The multi-wavelength Observatory will study the GRB afterglow characteristics, which will help to answer fundamental questions about both the structure and the evolution of the universe. The Swift Observatory Contamination Control Program has been developed to aid in ensuring the success of the on-orbit performance of two of the primary instruments: the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT). During the design phase of the Observatory, the contamination control program evolved and trade studies were performed to assess the risk of contaminating the sensitive UVOT and XRT optics during both pre-launch testing and on-orbit operations, within the constraints of the overall program cost and schedule.

  17. Ensuring Success of Adaptive Control Research Through Project Lifecycle Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    Lessons Learne: 1. Design-out unnecessary risk to prevent excessive mitigation management during flight. 2. Consider iterative checkouts to confirm or improve human factor characteristics. 3. Consider the total flight test profile to uncover unanticipated human-algorithm interactions. 4. Consider test card cadence as a metric to assess test readiness. 5. Full-scale flight test is critical to development, maturation, and acceptance of adaptive control laws for operational use.

  18. Command and Control Architectures for Autonomous Micro-Robotic Forces - FY-2000 Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dudenhoeffer, Donald Dean

    2001-04-01

    Advances in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and micro-technologies will soon give rise to production of large-scale forces of autonomous micro-robots with systems of innate behaviors and with capabilities of self-organization and real world tasking. Such organizations have been compared to schools of fish, flocks of birds, herds of animals, swarms of insects, and military squadrons. While these systems are envisioned as maintaining a high degree of autonomy, it is important to understand the relationship of man with such machines. In moving from research studies to the practical deployment of large-scale numbers of robots, one of critical pieces that must be explored is the command and control architecture for humans to re-task and also inject global knowledge, experience, and intuition into the force. Tele-operation should not be the goal, but rather a level of adjustable autonomy and high-level control. If a herd of sheep is comparable to the collective of robots, then the human element is comparable to the shepherd pulling in strays and guiding the herd in the direction of greener pastures. This report addresses the issues and development of command and control for largescale numbers of autonomous robots deployed as a collective force.

  19. A study of a solar central power plant with a gas turbine - Project Sirocco modelling and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacim, M.

    A thermodynamics and receiver design analysis is presented for a solar tower power plant, together with a control model for operations in varying working conditions. The analysis covers the central receiver and the gas-air turbine, adapted for functioning at 820 C, such as was experienced with the 100 kW Project Sirocco test station. A heliostat field concentrates solar energy onto a central receiver traversed by compressed air, which is allowed to expand while driving a turbine generator. A combustion chamber is included in the loop to augment the thermal performance when insufficient solar energy is available. The plant can be either grid-connected or stand alone. Static and dynamic characteristics of the thermal loop are modelled, and are included in the development of control laws based on quadratic criteria. An optimized control scheme is devised which features weighting criteria matrices, and the results of simulations covering different insolation levels are reported. Finally, an adjoint state control system is produced to account for peculiarities of the power plant.

  20. Measuring Progress on the Control of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) at a Regional Level: The Minnesota N212 Regional Control Project (Rcp) as a Working Example.

    PubMed

    Valdes-Donoso, Pablo; Jarvis, Lovell S; Wright, Dave; Alvarez, Julio; Perez, Andres M

    2016-01-01

    Due to the highly transmissible nature of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), implementation of regional programs to control the disease may be critical. Because PRRS is not reported in the US, numerous voluntary regional control projects (RCPs) have been established. However, the effect of RCPs on PRRS control has not been assessed yet. This study aims to quantify the extent to which RCPs contribute to PRRS control by proposing a methodological framework to evaluate the progress of RCPs. Information collected between July 2012 and June 2015 from the Minnesota Voluntary Regional PRRS Elimination Project (RCP-N212) was used. Demography of premises (e.g. composition of farms with sows = SS and without sows = NSS) was assessed by a repeated analysis of variance. By using general linear mixed-effects models, active participation of farms enrolled in the RCP-N212, defined as the decision to share (or not to share) PRRS status, was evaluated and used as a predictor, along with other variables, to assess the PRRS trend over time. Additionally, spatial and temporal patterns of farmers' participation and the disease dynamics were investigated. The number of farms enrolled in RCP-N212 and its geographical coverage increased, but the proportion of SS and NSS did not vary significantly over time. A significant increasing (p<0.001) trend in farmers' decision to share PRRS status was observed, but with NSS producers less willing to report and a large variability between counties. The incidence of PRRS significantly (p<0.001) decreased, showing a negative correlation between degree of participation and occurrence of PRRS (p<0.001) and a positive correlation with farm density at the county level (p = 0.02). Despite a noted decrease in PRRS, significant spatio-temporal patterns of incidence of the disease over 3-weeks and 3-kms during the entire study period were identified. This study established a systematic approach to quantify the effect of RCPs on PRRS

  1. Measuring Progress on the Control of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) at a Regional Level: The Minnesota N212 Regional Control Project (Rcp) as a Working Example

    PubMed Central

    Valdes-Donoso, Pablo; Jarvis, Lovell S.; Wright, Dave; Alvarez, Julio; Perez, Andres M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the highly transmissible nature of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), implementation of regional programs to control the disease may be critical. Because PRRS is not reported in the US, numerous voluntary regional control projects (RCPs) have been established. However, the effect of RCPs on PRRS control has not been assessed yet. This study aims to quantify the extent to which RCPs contribute to PRRS control by proposing a methodological framework to evaluate the progress of RCPs. Information collected between July 2012 and June 2015 from the Minnesota Voluntary Regional PRRS Elimination Project (RCP-N212) was used. Demography of premises (e.g. composition of farms with sows = SS and without sows = NSS) was assessed by a repeated analysis of variance. By using general linear mixed-effects models, active participation of farms enrolled in the RCP-N212, defined as the decision to share (or not to share) PRRS status, was evaluated and used as a predictor, along with other variables, to assess the PRRS trend over time. Additionally, spatial and temporal patterns of farmers’ participation and the disease dynamics were investigated. The number of farms enrolled in RCP-N212 and its geographical coverage increased, but the proportion of SS and NSS did not vary significantly over time. A significant increasing (p<0.001) trend in farmers’ decision to share PRRS status was observed, but with NSS producers less willing to report and a large variability between counties. The incidence of PRRS significantly (p<0.001) decreased, showing a negative correlation between degree of participation and occurrence of PRRS (p<0.001) and a positive correlation with farm density at the county level (p = 0.02). Despite a noted decrease in PRRS, significant spatio-temporal patterns of incidence of the disease over 3-weeks and 3-kms during the entire study period were identified. This study established a systematic approach to quantify the effect of RCPs on PRRS

  2. Glycine receptors control the generation of projection neurons in the developing cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Avila, A; Vidal, P M; Tielens, S; Morelli, G; Laguesse, S; Harvey, R J; Rigo, J-M; Nguyen, L

    2014-01-01

    The development of the cerebral cortex requires coordinated regulation of proliferation, specification, migration and differentiation of cortical progenitors into functionally integrated neurons. The completion of the neurogenic program requires a dynamic interplay between cell intrinsic regulators and extrinsic cues, such as growth factor and neurotransmitters. We previously demonstrated a role for extrasynaptic glycine receptors (GlyRs) containing the α2 subunit in cerebral cortical neurogenesis, revealing that endogenous GlyR activation promotes interneuron migration in the developing cortical wall. The proliferative compartment of the cortex comprises apical progenitors that give birth to neurons directly or indirectly through the generation of basal progenitors, which serve as amplification step to generate the bulk of cortical neurons. The present work shows that genetic inactivation of Glra2, the gene coding the α2 subunit of GlyRs, disrupts dorsal cortical progenitor homeostasis with an impaired capability of apical progenitors to generate basal progenitors. This defect results in an overall reduction of projection neurons that settle in upper or deep layers of the cerebral cortex. Overall, the depletion of cortical neurons observed in Glra2-knockout embryos leads to moderate microcephaly in newborn Glra2-knockout mice. Taken together, our findings support a contribution of GlyR α2 to early processes in cerebral cortical neurogenesis that are required later for the proper development of cortical circuits. PMID:24926615

  3. Roles of additives and surface control in slurry atomization. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    This project studies the rheology and airblast atomization of micronized coal slurries. Its major objectives are (1) to promote further understanding of the mechanisms and the roles of additives in airblast atomization of coal water slurry (CWS), and (2) to investigate the impacts of coal particle surface properties and interparticle forces on CWS rheology. We have found that the flow behavior index (n) of a suspension (or slurry) is determined by the relative importance of the interparticle van der Waals attraction and the interparticle electrostatic repulsion. The interparticle attraction, measured by the Hamaker constant scaled to the thermal energy at 25{degrees}C (A/kT), causes particle aggregation, which breaks down at high shear rates, and thus leads to slurry pseudoplastic behavior (n< 1). At a constant particle volume fraction and surface charge density (qualitatively measured by the zeta potential in deionized water), n decreases linearly as A/kT increases. The relative viscosity of the pseudoplastic suspension with respect to that of the suspending liquid is found to be independent of particle density and correlate well with the particle Peclet number which equals the particle diffusional relaxation time multiplied by shear rate. Specifically, the relative viscosities of the pseudoplastic glycerol/water coal slurry and the ethylene glycol/glycerol sand slurry, at same volume fractions as well as similar particle size distributions and liquid viscosities, as functions of the particle Peclet number fall along the same line.

  4. The Mind Your Health Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of an Innovative Behavioral Treatment for Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Forman, E.M.; Butryn, M.L.; Juarascio, A.S.; Bradley, L.E.; Lowe, M.R.; Herbert, J.D.; Shaw, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether acceptance-based behavioral treatment (ABT) would result in greater weight loss than standard behavioral treatment (SBT), and whether treatment effects were moderated by interventionist expertise or participants’ susceptibility to eating cues. Recent research suggests that poor long-term weight control outcomes are due to lapses in adherence to weight control behaviors, and that adherence might be improved by enhancing SBT with acceptance-based behavioral strategies. Design and Methods Overweight participants (n = 128) were randomly assigned to 40 weeks of SBT or ABT. Results Both groups produced significant weight loss and, when administered by experts, weight loss was significantly higher in ABT than SBT at post-treatment (13.17% v. 7.54%) and 6-month follow-up (10.98% v. 4.83%). Moreover, 64% of those receiving ABT from experts (v. 46% for SBT) maintained at least a 10% weight loss by follow-up. Moderation analyses revealed a powerful advantage, at follow-up, of ABT over SBT in those potentially more susceptible to eating cues. For participants with greater baseline depression symptomology, weight loss at follow-up was 11.18% in ABT vs. 4.63% in SBT; other comparisons were 10.51% vs. 6.00% (emotional eating), 8.29% v. 6.35% (disinhibition) and 9.70% v. 4.46% (responsivity to food cues). Mediation analyses produced partial support for theorized food-related psychological acceptance as a mechanism of action. Conclusions Results offer strong support for the incorporation of acceptance-based skills into behavioral weight loss treatments, particularly among those with greater levels of depression, responsivity to the food environment, disinhibition and emotional eating, and especially when interventions are provided by weight control experts. Trial Registration clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT00746265 PMID:23666772

  5. Cost Control Best Practices for Net Zero Energy Building Projects: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2014-02-01

    For net zero energy (NZE) buildings to become the norm in commercial construction, it will be necessary to design and construct these buildings cost effectively. While industry leaders have developed workflows (for procurement, design, and construction) to achieve cost-effective NZE buildings for certain cases, the expertise embodied in those workflows has limited penetration within the commercial building sector. Documenting cost control best practices of industry leaders in NZE and packaging those strategies for adoption by the commercial building sector will help make the business case for NZE. Furthermore, it will promote market uptake of the innovative technologies and design approaches needed to achieve NZE. This paper summarizes successful cost control strategies for NZE procurement, design, and construction that key industry users (such as building owners, architects, and designers) can incorporate into their everyday workflows. It will also evaluate the current state of NZE economics and propose a path forward for greater market penetration of NZE buildings. By demonstrating how to combine NZE technologies and design approaches into an overall efficiency package that can be implemented at minimal (zero, in certain cases) incremental capital cost, the domain of NZE design and construction can be expanded from a niche market to the commercial construction mainstream.

  6. The heart healthy lenoir project-an intervention to reduce disparities in hypertension control: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Racial disparities in blood pressure control are well established; however the impact of low health literacy (LHL) on blood pressure has garnered less attention. Office based interventions that are created with iterative patient, practice and community stakeholder input and are rolled out incrementally, may help address these disparities in hypertension control. This paper describes our study protocol. Methods/design Using a community based participatory research (CBPR) approach, we designed and implemented a cohort study that includes both a practice level and patient level intervention to enhance the care and support of patients with hypertension in primary care practices in a rural region of eastern North Carolina. The study is divided into a formative phase and an ongoing 2.5 year implementation phase. Our main care enhancement activities include the integration of a community health coach, using home blood pressure monitoring in clinical decision making, standardizing care delivery processes, and working to improve medication adherence. Main outcomes include overall blood pressure change, the differential change in blood pressure by race (African American vs. White) and health literacy level (low vs. higher health literacy). Discussion Using a community based participatory approach in primary care practice settings has helped to engage patients and practice staff and providers in the research effort and in making practice changes to support hypertension care. Practices have engaged at varying levels, but progress has been made in implementing and iteratively improving upon the interventions to date. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01425515. PMID:24156629

  7. Conventional Middle East arms control: Impact of the end of the cold war. Study project report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Johnsen, W.T.

    1993-03-31

    The end of the Gulf War brought to the forefront concern for dangers posed by unrestrained militarization of the Middle East. In response, on 29 May 1991 President Bush unveiled a comprehensive Middle East arms control policy in a speech at the U.S. Air Force Academy. A key element of the policy banned the sale of the most dangerous conventional weapons to the region. Although the major arms suppliers (which also happen to be the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council) have held a series of high level meetings to discuss options for restricting sales to the region, all continue conventional arms transfers to the Middle East and are likely to continue to do so. This paper contends that the end of the Cold War put additional economic pressure on the major suppliers to export arms to the Middle East; and, their interests are so compelling that the suppliers are unlikely to support President Bush's proposal. This position is supported by analyzing the interests that influence major arms suppliers to sell arms abroad. The format for this analysis includes an assessment of: each country's interest in selling arms during the Cold War; the impact of the Cold War's end on those interests; and whether the post Cold War interests conflict with President Bush's conventional arms control proposal. The paper concludes with recommendations for US policy in the region.

  8. The Healthy Worker Project: a work-site intervention for weight control and smoking cessation.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, R W; Forster, J L; French, S A; Kelder, S H; Lando, H A; McGovern, P G; Jacobs, D R; Baxter, J E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. A randomized trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a work-site health promotion program in reducing obesity and the prevalence of cigarette smoking. METHODS. Thirty-two work sites were randomized to treatment or no treatment for 2 years. Treatment consisted of health education classes combined with a payroll-based incentive system. Evaluation was based on cohort and cross-sectional surveys. RESULTS. Of 10,000 total employees in treatment work sites, 2041 and 270 participated in weight control and smoking cessation programs, respectively. Weight losses averaged 4.8 lbs, and 43% of smoking participants quit. Net 2-year reductions in smoking prevalence in treatment vs control work sites were 4.0% and 2.1% in cross-sectional and cohort surveys, respectively. No treatment effect was found for weight. Treatment effects for smoking prevalence and weight were both positively correlated with participation rates in the intervention programs (r = .45 for smoking and r = .55 for weight). CONCLUSIONS. This work-site health promotion program was effective in reducing smoking prevalence at a cost that is believed to make the investment worthwhile. PMID:8438979

  9. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Puneet; Casey, Dan

    2011-03-29

    This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14286 by Chevron Technology Ventures (CTV, a division of Chevron U.S.A., Inc.), Hyundai Motor Company (HMC), and UTC Power (UTCP, a United Technologies company) to validate hydrogen (H2) infrastructure technology and fuel cell hybrid vehicles. Chevron established hydrogen filling stations at fleet operator sites using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage, and dispensing. CTV constructed five demonstration stations to support a vehicle fleet of 33 fuel cell passenger vehicles, eight internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, three fuel cell transit busses, and eight internal combustion engine shuttle busses. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2010. HMC introduced 33 fuel cell hybrid electric vehicles (FCHEV) in the course of the project. Generation I included 17 vehicles that used UTCP fuel cell power plants and operated at 350 bar. Generation II included 16 vehicles that had upgraded UTC fuel cell power plants and demonstrated options such as the use of super-capacitors and operation at 700 bar. All 33 vehicles used the Hyundai Tucson sports utility vehicle (SUV) platform. Fleet operators demonstrated commercial operation of the vehicles in three climate zones (hot, moderate, and cold) and for various driving patterns. Fleet operators were Southern California Edison (SCE), AC Transit (of Oakland, California), Hyundai America Technical Center Inc. (HATCI), and the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC, in a site agreement with Selfridge Army National Guard Base in Selfridge, Michigan).

  10. Status Report on the Development of Micro-Scheduling Software for the Advanced Outage Control Center Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shawn St. Germain; Kenneth Thomas; Ronald Farris; Jeffrey Joe

    2014-09-01

    The long-term viability of existing nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States (U.S.) is dependent upon a number of factors, including maintaining high capacity factors, maintaining nuclear safety, and reducing operating costs, particularly those associated with refueling outages. Refueling outages typically take 20-30 days, and for existing light water NPPs in the U.S., the reactor cannot be in operation during the outage. Furthermore, given that many NPPs generate between $1-1.5 million/day in revenue when in operation, there is considerable interest in shortening the length of refueling outages. Yet, refueling outages are highly complex operations, involving multiple concurrent and dependent activities that are difficult to coordinate. Finding ways to improve refueling outage performance while maintaining nuclear safety has proven to be difficult. The Advanced Outage Control Center project is a research and development (R&D) demonstration activity under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. LWRS is a R&D program which works with industry R&D programs to establish technical foundations for the licensing and managing of long-term, safe, and economical operation of current NPPs. The Advanced Outage Control Center project has the goal of improving the management of commercial NPP refueling outages. To accomplish this goal, this INL R&D project is developing an advanced outage control center (OCC) that is specifically designed to maximize the usefulness of communication and collaboration technologies for outage coordination and problem resolution activities. This report describes specific recent efforts to develop a capability called outage Micro-Scheduling. Micro-Scheduling is the ability to allocate and schedule outage support task resources on a sub-hour basis. Micro-Scheduling is the real-time fine-tuning of the outage schedule to react to the actual progress of the primary outage activities to ensure that support task resources are

  11. Final report for the Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) control plane security LDRD project.

    SciTech Connect

    Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Michalski, John T.; Tarman, Thomas David; Black, Stephen P.; Pierson, Lyndon George

    2003-09-01

    As rapid Internet growth continues, global communications becomes more dependent on Internet availability for information transfer. Recently, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) introduced a new protocol, Multiple Protocol Label Switching (MPLS), to provide high-performance data flows within the Internet. MPLS emulates two major aspects of the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) technology. First, each initial IP packet is 'routed' to its destination based on previously known delay and congestion avoidance mechanisms. This allows for effective distribution of network resources and reduces the probability of congestion. Second, after route selection each subsequent packet is assigned a label at each hop, which determines the output port for the packet to reach its final destination. These labels guide the forwarding of each packet at routing nodes more efficiently and with more control than traditional IP forwarding (based on complete address information in each packet) for high-performance data flows. Label assignment is critical in the prompt and accurate delivery of user data. However, the protocols for label distribution were not adequately secured. Thus, if an adversary compromises a node by intercepting and modifying, or more simply injecting false labels into the packet-forwarding engine, the propagation of improperly labeled data flows could create instability in the entire network. In addition, some Virtual Private Network (VPN) solutions take advantage of this 'virtual channel' configuration to eliminate the need for user data encryption to provide privacy. VPN's relying on MPLS require accurate label assignment to maintain user data protection. This research developed a working distributive trust model that demonstrated how to deploy confidentiality, authentication, and non-repudiation in the global network label switching control plane. Simulation models and laboratory testbed implementations that demonstrated this concept were developed, and results

  12. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Initial ACT configuration design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The initial ACT configuration design task of the integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology project within the Energy Efficient Transport Program is summarized. A constrained application of active controls technology (ACT) resulted in significant improvements over a conventional baseline configuration previously established. The configuration uses the same levels of technology, takeoff gross weight, payload, and design requirements/objectives as the baseline, except for flying qualities, flutter, and ACT. The baseline wing is moved forward 1.68 m. The configuration incorporates pitch-augmented stability (which enabled an approximately 10% aft shift in cruise center of gravity and a 45% reduction in horizontal tail size), lateral/directional-augmented stability, an angle of attack limiter, wing load alleviation, and flutter mode control. This resulted in a 930 kg reduction in airplane operating empty weight and a 3.6% improvement in cruise efficiency, yielding a 13% range increase. Adjusted to the 3590 km baseline mission range, this amounts to 6% block fuel reduction and a 15.7% higher incremental return on investment, using 1978 dollars and fuel cost.

  13. Final Technical Report: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Grasman

    2011-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-FC36-04GO14285 by Mercedes-Benz & Research Development, North America (MBRDNA), Chrysler, Daimler, Mercedes Benz USA (MBUSA), BP, DTE Energy and NextEnergy to validate fuel cell technologies for infrastructure, transportation as well as assess technology and commercial readiness for the market. The Mercedes Team, together with its partners, tested the technology by operating and fueling hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under real world conditions in varying climate, terrain and driving conditions. Vehicle and infrastructure data was collected to monitor the progress toward the hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure performance targets of $2.00 to 3.00/gge hydrogen production cost and 2,000-hour fuel cell durability. Finally, to prepare the public for a hydrogen economy, outreach activities were designed to promote awareness and acceptance of hydrogen technology. DTE, BP and NextEnergy established hydrogen filling stations using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage and dispensing. DTE established a hydrogen station in Southfield, Michigan while NextEnergy and BP worked together to construct one hydrogen station in Detroit. BP constructed another fueling station in Burbank, California and provided a full-time hydrogen trailer at San Francisco, California and a hydrogen station located at Los Angeles International Airport in Southern, California. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2011. The Team deployed 30 Gen I Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) in the beginning of the project. While 28 Gen I F-CELLs used the A-Class platform, the remaining 2 were Sprinter delivery vans. Fuel cell vehicles were operated by external customers for real-world operations in various regions (ecosystems) to capture various driving patterns and climate conditions (hot, moderate and cold). External operators consisted of F-CELL partner organizations in California and Michigan

  14. 33 CFR 208.11 - Regulations for use of storage allocated for flood control or navigation and/or project operation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulations for use of storage allocated for flood control or navigation and/or project operation at reservoirs subject to prescription of rules and regulations by the Secretary of the Army in the interest of flood control and navigation. 208.11 Section 208.11 Navigation...

  15. Preliminary design study of advanced composite blade and hub and nonmechanical control system for the tilt-rotor aircraft. Volume 2: Project planning data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Project planning data for a rotor and control system procurement and testing program for modifications to the XV-15 tilt-rotor research demonstrator aircraft is presented. The design, fabrication, and installation of advanced composite blades compatible with the existing hub, an advanced composite hub, and a nonmechanical control system are required.

  16. Pallet insertion glovebox/hood control ladder diagram. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Issaian, V.

    1995-12-01

    The pallet insertion glovebox/hood (G/H) is a special confinement space that will be designed to allow for insertion of pallets into the Stacker/Retriever (S/R) area. The S/R a large vault that is kept at negative 1 inches w.c. relative to the atmosphere and is used for the safe storage of special nuclear material. The S/R system uses a vehicle to move the special nuclear material that are placed on the pallets from the storage bins to input/output (I/O) stations and vice versa. As the name suggest the I/O stations are used to place the material into the S/R vault or to remove material from the S/R vault. The pallets are specially designed structures that will hold certain numbers of the material containers in a safe configuration. To store additional material containers, there is a need to insert additional pallets in the SIR vault. Due to the presence of radioactive contamination and the fact that the vault must be kept at a negative pressure at all times, one of the several I/O stations will be modified so that pallets could be inserted into the S/R vault. The ventilation system for the S/R area is a dedicated system that recirculates nitrogen with less than 5% oxygen by volume throughout the area while exhausting small option of the nitrogen to keep the S/R at negative 1 inches w.c. relative to the atmosphere. The rooms surrounding the G/H and the S/R area are maintained at negative of 0.3 inches w.c. relative to the outside atmosphere. Both the G/H and the control system for the G/H will be designed such that the confinement requirements of the S/R and the G/H system will not be jeopardized. A ladder diagram will be developed to illustrate the control system.

  17. Use of INSAR in surveillance and control of a large field project

    SciTech Connect

    Patzek, T.W.; Silin, D.B.

    2000-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new element of our [1] multilevel, integrated surveillance and control system: satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry (InSAR) images of oil field surface. In particular, we analyze five differential InSAR images of the Belridge Diatomite field, CA, between 11/98 and 12/99. The images have been reprocessed and normalized to obtain the ground surface displacement rate. In return, we have been able to calculate pixel-by-pixel the net subsidence of ground surface over the entire field area. The calculated annual subsidence volume of 19 million barrels is thought to be close to the subsidence at the top of the diatomite. We have also compared the 1999 rate of surface displacement from the satellite images with the surface monument triangulations between 1942 and 1997. We have found that the maximum rate of surface subsidence has been steadily increasing from -0.8 ft/year in 1988-97 to -1 ft/year in 1998-99. The respective rates of uplift of the field fringes also increased from 0.1 ft/year to 0.24 ft/year. In 1999, the observed subsidence rate exceeded by 4.5 million barrels the volumetric deficit of fluid injection.

  18. The Controlled Ecological Life Support System Antarctic Analog Project: Prototype Crop Production and Water Treatment System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David L.; Flynn, Michael T.; Bates, Maynard; Schlick, Greg; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP), is a joint endeavor between the National Science Foundation, Office of Polar Programs (NSF-OPP) and the NASA. The fundamental objective is to develop, deploy, and operate a testbed of advanced life support technologies at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station that enable the objectives of both the NSF and NASA. The functions of food production, water purification, and waste treatment, recycle and reduction provided by CAAP will improve the quality of life for the South Pole inhabitants, reduce logistics dependence, enhance safety and minimize environmental impacts associated with human presence on the polar plateau. Because of the analogous technical, scientific, and mission features with Planetary missions such as a mission to Mars, CAAP provides NASA with a method for validating technologies and overall approaches to supporting humans. Prototype systems for sewage treatment, water recycle and crop production are being evaluated at Ames Research Center. The product water from sewage treatment using a Wiped-Film Rotating Disk is suitable for input to the crop production system. The crop production system has provided an enhanced level of performance compared with projected performance for plant-based life support: an approximate 50% increase in productivity per unit area, more than a 65% decrease in power for plant lighting, and more than a 75% decrease in the total power requirement to produce an equivalent mass of edible biomass.

  19. Integrated flue gas treatment for simulataneous emission control and heat rate improvement - demonstration project at Ravenswood

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, J.; Carbonara, J.; Cressner, A.

    1995-06-01

    Results are presented for electric-utility, residual-oil fired, field demonstration testing of advanced-design, heat-recovery type, flue gas sub-coolers that incorporate sulfite-alkali-based wet scrubbing for efficient removal of volatile and semi-volatile trace elements, sub-micron solid particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. By innovative adaptation of wet collector system operation with methanol injection into the rear boiler cavity to convert flue-gas NO to No{sub 2}, simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} is also achieved. The focus of this integrated flue gas treatment (IFGT) technology development and demonstration-scale, continuous performance testing is an upward-gas-flow, indirectly water-cooled, condensing heat exchanger fitted with acid-proof, teflon-covered tubes and tubesheets and that provides a unique condensing (non-evaporative) wet-scrubbing mode to address air toxics control objectives of new Clean Air Act, Title III. Advantageous trace-metal condensation/nucleation/agglomeration along with substantially enhanced boiler efficiency is accomplished in the IFGT system by use of boiler makeup water as a heat sink in indirectly cooling boiler flue gas to a near-ambient-temperature, low-absolute-humidity, water-saturated state. Moreover, unique, innocuous, stack systems design encountered with conventional high-humidity, wet-scrubber operations. The mechanical design of this advanced flue-gas cooling/scrubbing equipment is based on more than ten years of commercial application of such units is downward-gas-flow design/operation for energy recovery, e.g. in preheating of makeup water, in residual-oil and natural-gas fired boiler operations.

  20. The immersed boundary projection method and its application to simulation and control of flows around low-aspect-ratio wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Kunihiko

    First, we present a new formulation of the immersed boundary method that is algebraically identical to the traditional fractional step algorithm. This method, called the immersed boundary projection method, allows for the simulations of incompressible flows over arbitrarily shaped bodies under motion and/or deformation in both two and three dimensions. The no-slip condition along the immersed boundary is enforced simultaneously with the incompressibility constraint through a single projection. The boundary force is determined implicitly without any constitutive relations for the rigid body formulation, which in turn allows the use of high CFL numbers in our simulations compared to past methods. Next, the above immersed boundary projection method is used to analyze three-dimensional separated flows around low-aspect-ratio flat-plate wings. A number of simulations highlighting the unsteady nature of the separated flows are performed for Re=300 and 500 with various aspect ratios, angles of attack, and planform geometries. The aspect ratio and angle of attack are found to have a large influence on the stability of the wake profile and the force experienced by the low-aspect-ratio wing. At early times, following an impulsive start, topologies of the wake vortices are found to be the same across different aspect ratios and angles of attack. Behind low-aspect-ratio rectangular plates, leading-edge vortices form and eventually separate as hairpin vortices following the start-up. This phenomenon is found to be similar to dynamic stall observed behind pitching plates. The detached structure would then interact with the tip vortices, reducing the downward velocity induced by the tip vortices acting upon the leading-edge vortex. At large time, depending on the aspect ratio and angles of attack, the wakes reach one of the three states: (i) a steady state, (ii) a periodic unsteady state, or (iii) an aperiodic unsteady state. We have observed that the tip effects in three

  1. Nuclear Rocket Facility Decommissioning Project: Controlled Explosive Demolition of Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic

    2008-06-01

    centimeters squared (cm2) beta/gamma. Removable beta/gamma contamination levels seldom exceeded 1,000 dpm/100 cm2, but, in railroad trenches on the reactor pad containing soil on the concrete pad in front of the shield wall, the beta dose rates ranged up to 120 milli-roentgens per hour from radioactivity entrained in the soil. General area dose rates were less than 100 micro-roentgens per hour. Prior to demolition of the reactor shield wall, removable and fixed contaminated surfaces were decontaminated to the best extent possible, using traditional decontamination methods. Fifth, large sections of the remaining structures were demolished by mechanical and open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). Mechanical demolition methods included the use of conventional demolition equipment for removal of three main buildings, an exhaust stack, and a mobile shed. The 5-foot (ft), 5-inch (in.) thick, neutron-activated reinforced concrete shield was demolished by CED, which had never been performed at the NTS.

  2. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Final ACT configuration evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Final ACT Configuration Evaluation Task of the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology project within the energy efficient transport program is summarized. The Final ACT Configuration, through application of Active Controls Technology (ACT) in combination with increased wing span, exhibits significant performance improvements over the conventional baseline configuration. At the design range for these configurations, 3590 km, the block fuel used is 10% less for the Final ACT Configuration, with significant reductions in fuel usage at all operational ranges. Results of this improved fuel usage and additional system and airframe costs and the complexity required to achieve it were analyzed to determine its economic effects. For a 926 km mission, the incremental return on investment is nearly 25% at 1980 fuel prices. For longer range missions or increased fuel prices, the return is greater. The technical risks encountered in the Final ACT Configuration design and the research and development effort required to reduce these risks to levels acceptable for commercial airplane design are identified.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Exploratory Evaluation of Standardized Ayurvedic Formulations in Symptomatic Osteoarthritis Knees: A Government of India NMITLI Project

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Tillu, Girish; Venugopalan, Anuradha; Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev; Raut, Ashwini Kumar; Bichile, Lata; Narsimulu, Gumdal; Handa, Rohini; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    The multidisciplinary “New Millennium Indian Technology Leadership Initiative” Arthritis Project was undertaken to validate Ayurvedic medicines. Herbal formulations in popular use were selected by expert consensus and standardized using modern tools. Our clinical strategy evolved from simple exploratory evaluations to better powered statistically designed drug trials. The results of the first drug trial are presented here. Five oral formulations (coded A, B, C, D and E), with a common base of Zingiber officinale and Tinospora cordifolia with a maximum of four plant extracts, were evaluated; with placebo and glucosamine as controls. 245 patients suffering from symptomatic OA knees were randomized into seven arms (35 patients per arm) of a double blind, parallel efficacy, multicentric trial of sixteen weeks duration. The groups matched well at baseline. There were no differences for patient withdrawals (17.5%) or adverse events (AE) of mild nature. Intention-to-treat efficacy analysis, demonstrated no significant differences (P < .05) for pain (weight bearing) and WOMAC questionnaire (knee function); placebo response was high. Based on better pain relief, significant (P < .05) least analgesic consumption and improved knee status, “C” formulation was selected for further development. Controlled exploratory drug trials with multiple treatment arms may be used to economically evaluate several candidate standardized formulations. PMID:20981160

  4. System design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Truitt, R.W.; Pounds, T.S.; Smith, S.O.

    1994-08-24

    This document describes the hardware subsystems of the data acquisition and control system (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste tank, directed at certain angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. The SY-101 tank has experienced recurrent periodic gas releases of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and (recently discovered) methane. The hydrogen gas represents a danger, as some of the releases are in amounts above the lower flammability limit (LFL). These large gas releases must be mitigated. Several instruments have been added to the tank to monitor the gas compositions, the tank level, the tank temperature, and other parameters. A mixer pump has been developed to stir the tank waste to cause the gases to be released at a slow rate. It is the function of the DACS to monitor those instruments and to control the mixer pump in a safe manner. During FY93 and FY94 the mixer pump was installed with associated testing operations support equipment and a mitigation test project plan was implemented. These activities successfully demonstrated the mixer pump`s ability to mitigate the SY-101 tank hydrogen gas hazard.

  5. Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged

  6. NERI Project 99-119. A New Paradigm for Automatic Development of Highly Reliable Control Architectures for Nuclear Power Plants. Phase-2 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, JA

    2002-01-15

    This report describes the tasks performed and the progress made during Phase 2 of the DOE-NERI project number 99-119 entitled Automatic Development of Highly Reliable Control Architecture for Future Nuclear Power Plants. This project is a collaboration effort between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) and the North Carolina State University (NCSU). ORNL is the lead organization and is responsible for the coordination and integration of all work.

  7. Infection control and antibiotic stewardship practices reported by south-eastern Mediterranean hospitals collaborating in the ARMed project.

    PubMed

    Borg, M A; Cookson, B D; Gür, D; Ben, Redjeb S; Rasslan, O; Elnassar, Z; Benbachir, M; Bagatzouni, D P; Rahal, K; Daoud, Z

    2008-11-01

    The prevalence of multiply resistant organisms (MROs) reported from south-eastern Mediterranean hospitals highlights the need to identify possible contributory factors to help design control interventions. This was investigated through a structured questionnaire, which examined infection control and antibiotic stewardship practices in hospitals participating or collaborating with the Antibiotic Resistance SurveilLance & Control in the Mediterranean Region (ARMed) project. A total of 45 hospitals (78.9% of invited institutions) responded to the questionnaire; 60% indicated that they faced periods of overcrowding when available bed complement was insufficient to cope with hospital admissions and 62% reported difficulties in isolating patients with MROs due to lack of available beds. Most hospitals relied mainly on washing to achieve hand hygiene, whether by non-medicated or disinfectant soaps. Dependence on solid bars of soap (28.9%) and cloth towels (37.8%) were among the problems identified as well as inconvenient distances of sinks from patient beds (66.6%). Alcohol hand rub was the predominant hand hygiene product in only 7% of hospitals. Programmes for better antibiotic use were mostly limited in scope; 33.3% reported having antibiotic prescribing guidelines and 53.3% of hospitals fed back resistance rates to prescribers. Auditing of antibiotic consumption, whether institution- or unit-based, was carried out in 37.8% of responding hospitals. Multi-faceted approaches aimed at improving isolation of patients with MROs, increasing the emphasis on hand hygiene by encouraging greater use of alcohol hand rubs and introducing effective antibiotic stewardship programmes should be encouraged in south-eastern Mediterranean hospitals. PMID:18783850

  8. Recovery Act: Federspiel Controls (now Vigilent) and State of California Department of General Services Data Center Energy Efficient Cooling Control Demonstration. Final technical project report

    SciTech Connect

    Federspiel, Clifford; Evers, Myah

    2011-09-30

    Eight State of California data centers were equipped with an intelligent energy management system to evaluate the effectiveness, energy savings, dollar savings and benefits that arise when powerful artificial intelligence-based technology measures, monitors and actively controls cooling operations. Control software, wireless sensors and mesh networks were used at all sites. Most sites used variable frequency drives as well. The system dynamically adjusts temperature and airflow on the fly by analyzing real-time demands, thermal behavior and historical data collected on site. Taking into account the chaotic interrelationships of hundreds to thousands of variables in a data center, the system optimizes the temperature distribution across a facility while also intelligently balancing loads, outputs, and airflow. The overall project will provide a reduction in energy consumption of more than 2.3 million kWh each year, which translates to $240,000 saved and a reduction of 1.58 million pounds of carbon emissions. Across all sites, the cooling energy consumption was reduced by 41%. The average reduction in energy savings across all the sites that use VFDs is higher at 58%. Before this case study, all eight data centers ran the cooling fans at 100% capacity all of the time. Because of the new technology, cooling fans run at the optimum fan speed maintaining stable air equilibrium while also expending the least amount of electricity. With lower fan speeds, the life of the capital investment made on cooling equipment improves, and the cooling capacity of the data center increases. This case study depicts a rare technological feat: The same process and technology worked cost effectively in eight very different environments. The results show that savings were achieved in centers with diverse specifications for the sizes, ages and types of cooling equipment. The percentage of cooling energy reduction ranged from 19% to 78% while keeping temperatures substantially within the

  9. Non-native fish control below Glen Canyon Dam - Report from a structured decision-making project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, Michael C.; Bean, Ellen; Smith, David; Kokos, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the results of a structured decision-making project by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide substantive input to the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) for use in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment concerning control of non-native fish below Glen Canyon Dam. A forum was created to allow the diverse cooperating agencies and Tribes to discuss, expand, and articulate their respective values; to develop and evaluate a broad set of potential control alternatives using the best available science; and to define individual preferences of each group on how to manage the inherent trade-offs in this non-native fish control problem. This project consisted of two face-to-face workshops, held in Mesa, Arizona, October 18-20 and November 8-10, 2010. At the first workshop, a diverse set of objectives was discussed, which represented the range of concerns of those agencies and Tribes present. A set of non-native fish control alternatives ('hybrid portfolios') was also developed. Over the 2-week period between the two workshops, four assessment teams worked to evaluate the control alternatives against the array of objectives. At the second workshop, the results of the assessment teams were presented. Multi-criteria decision analysis methods were used to examine the trade-offs inherent in the problem, and allowed the participating agencies and Tribes to express their individual judgments about how those trade-offs should best be managed in Reclamation`s selection of a preferred alternative. A broad array of objectives was identified and defined, and an effort was made to understand how these objectives are likely to be achieved by a variety of strategies. In general, the objectives reflected desired future conditions over 30 years. A rich set of alternative approaches was developed, and the complex structure of those alternatives was documented. Multi-criteria decision analysis methods allowed the evaluation of those alternatives against the array

  10. The National Aeolian Detritus Project, A Student-controlled, Standards-based Research Opportunity for Middle and Hight School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammons, J. I.; Murray, D. D.; Reid, J. B.

    2001-12-01

    Schools across the United States are adopting Standards-based philosophies and practices at a quickening pace. Two of the biggest challenges in this transition are the integration of concepts and the development of meaningful evaluation of student progress. The National Aeolian Detritus Project is a collaboration among Jamestown School, the University of Rhode Island, Hampshire College, the Rhode Island Space Grant Consortium at Brown University and the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center. This Project provides students with an opportunity to integrate and enhance previous elements of instruction and allows them decision-making control over the direction of an extended research investigation. This project also provides opportunities for undergraduate community service development through University - Local School collaboration and mentoring. Students first collect Aeolian Detritus, that is, randomly deposited airborne particulate matter (APM) by deploying flat sheet collectors. Retained APM is removed from the collectors with repulpable tape and concentrated by vacuum filtration. APM is initially identified by simple light microscopy, solubility, density, and magnetic response. More advanced identification includes ICP and Neutron Activation. With assistance from collaborating universities, students craft research questions based on these initial samples and develop investigation designs. Sample research questions include: 1) Can insect infestations or possible defoliation events be predicted by identification of insect bodies, parts, and excrement? 2) What information can we collect about micrometeorites when typed, analyzed, and compared to NASA comet track data? 3) Can the distribution of flora be confirmed or modified based on pollen grain collection and mapping? 4) Can the distribution of mineral particulate matter be mapped by collection and comparison with wind patterns over known geologic features? Schools correlate collection data with National Weather

  11. Reforming tuberculosis control in Ukraine: results of pilot projects and implications for the national scale-up of DOTS.

    PubMed

    Vassall, A; Chechulin, Y; Raykhert, I; Osalenko, N; Svetlichnaya, S; Kovalyova, A; van der Werf, M J; Turchenko, L V; Hasker, E; Miskinis, K; Veen, J; Zaleskis, R

    2009-01-01

    The period of economic transition has had severe consequences for health and health systems in Ukraine. The tuberculosis (TB) situation illustrates this. The strategy recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for TB, directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS), has the potential to provide real improvements in TB services, forming the basis of the response to the growing epidemic. In 2002, Ukraine, financially supported by USAID and the European Community (EC), began to introduce DOTS through pilot projects in Mariupol and Kyiv City. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility, effectiveness, health service cost, patient cost, and the cost-effectiveness of these pilots, in order to inform the national scale-up of DOTS. The study finds that DOTS is feasible and has the potential to be both effective and cost-effective in Ukraine. Following this study, Ukraine adopted DOTS as a national TB control strategy in 2005. However, the pilots also found that there are several evidence-related concerns and perverse economic incentives to both providers and patients that will need to be addressed if national scale-up is to be successful. These include concerns related to the treatment of MDR-TB, economic benefits to some patients to remain hospitalized, and payments to providers and health facilities that support current practices. These will need to be addressed if Ukraine is to develop an effective response to its emerging TB epidemic. PMID:19056804

  12. The MEXICO project (Model Experiments in Controlled Conditions): The database and first results of data processing and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snel, H.; Schepers, J. G.; Montgomerie, B.

    2007-07-01

    The Mexico (Model experiments in Controlled Conditions) was a FP5 project, partly financed by European Commission. The main objective was to create a database of detailed aerodynamic and load measurements on a wind turbine model, in a large and high quality wind tunnel, to be used for model validation and improvement. Here model stands for both the extended BEM modelling used in state-of-the-art design and certification software, and CFD modelling of the rotor and near wake flow. For this purpose a three bladed 4.5 m diameter wind tunnel model was built and instrumented. The wind tunnel experiments were carried out in the open section (9.5*9.5 m2) of the Large Scale Facility of the DNW (German-Netherlands) during a six day campaign in December 2006. The conditions for measurements cover three operational tip speed ratios, many blade pitch angles, three yaw misalignment angles and a small number of unsteady cases in the form of pitch ramps and rotor speed ramps. One of the most important feats of the measurement program was the flow field mapping, with stereo PIV techniques. Overall the measurement campaign was very successful. The paper describes the now existing database and discusses a number of highlights from early data processing and interpretation. It should be stressed that all results are first results, no tunnel correction has been performed so far, nor has the necessary checking of data quality.

  13. Achievement of the World Bank loan project on schistosomiasis control (1992-2000) in Hubei province and the challenge in the future.

    PubMed

    Changsong, Sun; Binggui, Yu; Hongyi, Liao; Yuhai, Dai; Xu, Xingjian; Huiguo, Zhu; Yong, Jiang

    2002-05-01

    Since the World Bank provided a loan for control of schistosomiasis in China, started from 1992, with the objective of a reduction of prevalence and intensity of the infection both in humans and animals by 40%, through mass chemotherapy in areas of high prevalence, and selective chemotherapy in areas with medium and low endemicity together with focal mollusciciding, the objective of morbidity control of the project has been reached in Hubei Province. PMID:12020889

  14. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project, UAS Control and Non-Payload Communication System Phase-1 Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS project, has partnered with Rockwell Collins to develop a concept Control and Non-Payload Communication (CNPC) system prototype radio, operating on recently allocated UAS frequency spectrum bands. This prototype radio is being used to validate initial proposed performance requirements for UAS control communications. This presentation will give an overview of the current status of the prototype radio development, and results from phase 1 flight tests conducted during 2013.

  15. The Development of a Technical Conceptual Structure for the Concepts Possessed by Selected Quality Control Specialists. Report of a Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, John G.

    This project had as its specific objective the development and field testing of a procedure for identifying the structure of technical concepts possessed by a group of selected quality control specialists. The associative theory of verbal behavior served as the rationale by which conceptual structures depicted by graphical maps of technical…

  16. Mechanism of Developmental Change in the PLAY Project Home Consultation Program: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Gerald; Solomon, Richard

    2016-05-01

    This investigation is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized control trial of the PLAY Home Consultation Intervention Program which was conducted with 112 preschool children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and their parents (Solomon et al. in J Dev Behav Pediatr 35:475-485, 2014). Subjects were randomly assigned to either a community standard (CS) treatment group or to the PLAY Project plus CS Treatment (PLAY). PLAY subjects received monthly parent-child intervention sessions for 1 year during which parents learned how to use the rationale and interactive strategies of the Developmental, Individual-differences, Relationship-based (DIR) intervention model (Greenspan and Weider in The child with special needs: encouraging intellectual and emotional growth. DeCapo Press, Cambridge, MA, 1998) to engage in more responsive, affective and less directive interactions with their children. This investigation examined whether PLAY intervention effects on parents' style of interacting with their children as well as on children's social engagement mediated the effects of PLAY on children's autism severity as measured by ADOS calibrated severity scores. Regression procedures were used to test for mediation. There were two main findings. First the effects of PLAY on children's social engagement were mediated by the increases in parental responsiveness and affect that were promoted by PLAY. Second, the effects of PLAY on the severity children's Social Affect disorders were mediated by changes in parental responsiveness and affect; however, the effects of Responsive/Affect were mediated by the impact these variables had on children's social engagement. Results are discussed in terms of contemporary models of developmental change including the developmental change model that is the foundation for DIR. PMID:26830414

  17. The Association between Tax Structure and Cigarette Price Variability: Findings from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Project

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ce; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Fong, Geoffrey T; Thompson, Mary; O’Connor, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that more opportunities exist for tax avoidance when cigarette excise tax structure departs from a uniform specific structure. However, the association between tax structure and cigarette price variability has not been thoroughly studied in the existing literature. Objective To examine how cigarette tax structure is associated with price variability. The variability of self-reported prices is measured using the ratios of differences between higher and lower prices to the median price such as the IQR-to-median ratio. Methods We used survey data taken from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Project in 17 countries to conduct the analysis. Cigarette prices were derived using individual purchase information and aggregated to price variability measures for each surveyed country and wave. The effect of tax structures on price variability was estimated using Generalised Estimating Equations after adjusting for year and country attributes. Findings Our study provides empirical evidence of a relationship between tax structure and cigarette price variability. We find that, compared to the specific uniform tax structure, mixed uniform and tiered (specific, ad valorem or mixed) structures are associated with greater price variability (p≤0.01). Moreover, while a greater share of the specific component in total excise taxes is associated with lower price variability (p≤0.05), a tiered tax structure is associated with greater price variability (p≤0.01). The results suggest that a uniform and specific tax structure is the most effective tax structure for reducing tobacco consumption and prevalence by limiting price variability and decreasing opportunities for tax avoidance. PMID:25855641

  18. The distribution of cigarette prices under different tax structures: findings from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Project

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ce; Chaloupka, Frank J; Zahra, Nahleen; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2013-01-01

    Background The distribution of cigarette prices has rarely been studied and compared under different tax structures. Descriptive evidence on price distributions by countries can shed light on opportunities for tax avoidance and brand switching under different tobacco tax structures, which could impact the effectiveness of increased taxation in reducing smoking. Objective This paper aims to describe the distribution of cigarette prices by countries and to compare these distributions based on the tobacco tax structure in these countries. Methods We employed data for 16 countries taken from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project to construct survey-derived cigarette prices for each country. Self-reported prices were weighted by cigarette consumption and described using a comprehensive set of statistics. We then compared these statistics for cigarette prices under different tax structures. In particular, countries of similar income levels and countries that impose similar total excise taxes using different tax structures were paired and compared in mean and variance using a two-sample comparison test. Findings Our investigation illustrates that, compared with specific uniform taxation, other tax structures, such as ad valorem uniform taxation, mixed (a tax system using ad valorem and specific taxes) uniform taxation, and tiered tax structures of specific, ad valorem and mixed taxation tend to have price distributions with greater variability. Countries that rely heavily on ad valorem and tiered taxes also tend to have greater price variability around the median. Among mixed taxation systems, countries that rely more heavily on the ad valorem component tend to have greater price variability than countries that rely more heavily on the specific component. In countries with tiered tax systems, cigarette prices are skewed more towards lower prices than are prices under uniform tax systems. The analyses presented here demonstrate that more opportunities

  19. APSTNG: Associated particle sealed-tube neutron generator studies for arms control. Final report on NN-20 Project ST220

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; Brunner, T.; Hess, A.; Tylinski, S.

    1994-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has performed research and development on the use of Associated Particle Sealed-Tube Neutron Generator (APSTNG) technology for treaty verification and non-proliferation applications, under funding from the DOE Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. Results indicate that this technology has significant potential for nondestructively detecting elemental compositions inside inspected objects or volumes. The final phase of this project was placement of an order for commercial procurement of an advanced sealed tube, with its high-voltage supply and control systems. Procurement specifications reflected lessons learned during the study. The APSTNG interrogates a volume with a continuous 14-MeV neutron flux. Each neutron is emitted coincident with an {open_quotes}associated{close_quotes} alpha-particle emitted in the opposite direction. Thus detection of an alpha-particle marks the emission of a neutron in a cone opposite to that defined by the alpha detector. Detection of a gamma ray coincident with the alpha indicates that the gamma was emitted from a neutron-induced reaction inside the neutron cone: the gamma spectra can be used to identify fissionable materials and many isotopes having an atomic number larger than that of boron. The differences in gamma-ray and alpha-particle detection times yield a coarse measurement of the distance along the cone axis from the APSTNG emitter to each region containing the identified nuclide. A position-sensitive alpha detector would permit construction of coarse three-dimensional images. The source and emission-detection systems can be located on the same side of the interrogated volume. The neutrons and gamma rays are highly penetrating. A relatively high signal-to-background ratio allows the use of a relatively small neutron source and conventional electronics.

  20. Stochastic modeling and control system designs of the NASA/MSFC Ground Facility for large space structures: The maximum entropy/optimal projection approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsia, Wei-Shen

    1986-01-01

    In the Control Systems Division of the Systems Dynamics Laboratory of the NASA/MSFC, a Ground Facility (GF), in which the dynamics and control system concepts being considered for Large Space Structures (LSS) applications can be verified, was designed and built. One of the important aspects of the GF is to design an analytical model which will be as close to experimental data as possible so that a feasible control law can be generated. Using Hyland's Maximum Entropy/Optimal Projection Approach, a procedure was developed in which the maximum entropy principle is used for stochastic modeling and the optimal projection technique is used for a reduced-order dynamic compensator design for a high-order plant.

  1. Crustal Rock Fracture Mechanics for Design and Control of Artificial Subsurface Cracks in Geothermal Energy Extraction Engineering ({Gamma}-Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hideaki

    1983-12-15

    Recently a significant role of artificial and/or natural cracks in the geothermal reservoir has been demonstrated in the literatures (Abe, H., et al., 1983, Nielson, D.L. and Hullen, J.B., 1983), where the cracks behave as fluid paths and/or heat exchanging surfaces. Until now, however, there are several problems such as a design procedure of hydraulic fracturing, and a quantitative estimate of fluid and heat transfer for reservoir design. In order to develop a design methodology of geothermal reservoir cracks, a special distinguished research project, named as ''{Lambda}-Project'', started at Tohoku University (5 years project, 1983-1988). In this project a basic fracture mechanics model of geothermal reservoir cracks is being demonstrated and its validation is being discussed both theoretically and experimentally. This paper descibes an outline of ''{Lambda}-Project''.

  2. Under Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Rich

    2001-01-01

    Offers advice on how school administrators can properly plan and monitor school construction projects to contain costs. Cost control tips discussed include project scope definition, contract bidding and awarding practice, and project management techniques. (GR)

  3. NERI PROJECT 99-119."A NEW PARADIGM FOR AUTOMATIC DEVELOPMENT OF HIGHLY RELIABLE CONTROL ARCHITECTURES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS."PHASE-1 PROGRESS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, J.A.

    2000-08-29

    This report describes the tasks performed and the progress made during Phase 1 of the DOE-NERI project number 99-119 entitled ''Automatic Development of Highly Reliable Control Architecture for Future Nuclear Power Plants''. This project is a collaboration effort between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL,) The University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) and the North Carolina State University (NCSU). ORNL is the lead organization and is responsible for the coordination and integration of all work. This research focuses on the development of methods for automated generation of control systems that can be traced directly to the design requirements for the life of the plant. Our final goal is to ''capture'' the design requirements inside a ''control engine'' during the design phase. This control engine is, then, not only capable of designing automatically the initial implementation of the control system, but it also can confirm that the original design requirements are still met during the life of the plant as conditions change. This control engine captures the high-level requirements and stress factors that the control system must survive (e.g. a list of transients, or a requirement to withstand a single failure). The control engine, then, is able to generate automatically the control-system algorithms and parameters that optimize a design goal and satisfy all requirements. As conditions change during the life of the plant (e.g. component degradation, or subsystem failures) the control engine automatically ''flags'' that a requirement is not satisfied, and it can even suggest a modified configuration that would satisfy it. This control engine concept is shown schematically in Fig. 1. The implementation of this ''control-engine'' design methodology requires the following steps, which are described in detail in the attachments to this report: (1) Selection of Design Requirements Related to Control System Performance; (2) Implementation of Requirements in

  4. The National Environmental Respiratory Center (NERC) experiment in multi-pollutant air quality health research: IV. Vascular effects of repeated inhalation exposure to a mixture of five inorganic gases.

    PubMed

    Mauderly, J L; Kracko, D; Brower, J; Doyle-Eisele, M; McDonald, J D; Lund, A K; Seilkop, S K

    2014-09-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that a mixture of five inorganic gases could reproduce certain central vascular effects of repeated inhalation exposure of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice to diesel or gasoline engine exhaust. The hypothesis resulted from preceding multiple additive regression tree (MART) analysis of a composition-concentration-response database of mice exposed by inhalation to the exhausts and other complex mixtures. The five gases were the predictors most important to MART models best fitting the vascular responses. Mice on high-fat diet were exposed 6 h/d, 7 d/week for 50 d to clean air or a mixture containing 30.6 ppm CO, 20.5 ppm NO, 1.4 ppm NO₂, 0.5 ppm SO₂, and 2.0 ppm NH₃ in air. The gas concentrations were below the maxima in the preceding studies but in the range of those in exhaust exposure levels that caused significant effects. Five indicators of stress and pro-atherosclerotic responses were measured in aortic tissue. The exposure increased all five response indicators, with the magnitude of effect and statistical significance varying among the indicators and depending on inclusion or exclusion of an apparent outlying control. With the outlier excluded, three responses approximated predicted values and two fell below predictions. The results generally supported evidence that the five gases drove the effects of exhaust, and thus supported the potential of the MART approach for identifying putative causal components of complex mixtures. PMID:25162721

  5. Final LDRD Report for Projects %23 52797 and %23 93362: Rational Understanding and Control of the Magnetic Behavior of Nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. John

    2006-11-01

    This is the final LDRD report for projects %23 52797 and %23 93362 that funded a five year research program directed by Prof. Z. John Zhang at the Georgia Institute of Technology Chemistry Department. Prof. Zhang was awarded this funding after winning a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) in 2001 with Sandia as the DOE sponsoring lab. The project PI was Blake Simmons and the PM was Alfredo Morales. The page intentionally left blank

  6. Final Report for the Energy Efficient and Affordable Small Commercial and Residential Buildings Research Program - Project 3.3 - Smart Load Control and Grid Friendly Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Guttromson, Ross T.; Oedingen, Daniel L.; Lang, Steffen

    2003-07-31

    This report summarizes the results of a research effort that evolved during the course of the project. The objective of this project was to develop, implement, and test new methods for detecting pre-cursors of impending problems in the California electric power system. The approach pursued in this project utilized information that is measurable at the wall outlet anywhere in California. The approach deliberately focused on methods that do not require communication from an outside source, but rather be fully autonomous by relying on a local frequency sensor that measures the frequency in the AC power supply at the wall outlet and some control intelligence that can ultimately be implemented at low-cost in commonly used appliances for homes and business.

  7. Improving parenting in families referred for child maltreatment: a randomized controlled trial examining effects of Project Support.

    PubMed

    Jouriles, Ernest N; McDonald, Renee; Rosenfield, David; Norwood, William D; Spiller, Laura; Stephens, Nanette; Corbitt-Shindler, Deborah; Ehrensaft, Miriam

    2010-06-01

    Project Support is an intervention designed to decrease coercive patterns of aggressive discipline and increase positive parenting. This research evaluates Project Support in a sample of families reported to Children's Protective Services (CPS) for allegations of physical abuse or neglect; 35 families with a child between 3- and 8-years-old participated. In all families, CPS allowed the children to remain in the family home while the family received services. Families were randomly assigned to receive either Project Support or services as usual, which were provided by CPS or CPS-contracted service providers. To evaluate intervention effects, a multimethod, multi-informant assessment strategy was used that included data from mothers' reports, direct observation of parents' behavior, and review of CPS records for re-referrals for child maltreatment. Families who received Project Support services showed greater decreases than families who received services as usual in the following areas: mothers' perceived inability to manage childrearing responsibilities, mothers' reports of harsh parenting, and observations of ineffective parenting practices. Only 5.9% of families in the Project Support condition had a subsequent referral to CPS for child maltreatment, compared with 27.7% of families in the comparison condition. The results suggest that Project Support may be a promising intervention for reducing child maltreatment among families in which it has occurred. PMID:20545406

  8. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transpot project-demonstration act system definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Crumb, C. B.; Flora, C. C.; Macdonald, K. A. B.; Smith, R. D.; Sassi, A. P.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The 1985 ACT airplane is the Final Active Controls Technology (ACT) Airplane with the addition of three-axis fly by wire. Thus it retains all the efficiency features of the full ACT system plus the weight and cost savings accruing from deletion of the mechanical control system. The control system implements the full IAAC spectrum of active controls except flutter-mode control, judged essentially nonbeneficial, and incorporates new control surfaces called flaperons to make the most of wing-load alleviation. This redundant electronic system is conservatively designed to preserve the extreme reliability required of crucial short-period pitch augmentation, which provides more than half of the fuel savings.

  9. Capacity building on systems engineering, management and projects control for the nanosatc-br cubesat development program - library & data-bank building up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, Tiago Travi; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Lourencena Caldas Franke, Lucas; Moro, Pietro Fernando; Ramos Manica, Thales; Cupertino Durao, Otavio S.; Jaenisch, Guilherme Paul; Escobar B, Eduardo; Zavareze da Costa, Leonardo; Balestrin, Maurício Ricardo; Camargo Silveira, Iago; Francisco Mozzaquatro Wen, João

    The Capacity Building (CB) on Systems Engineering, Management && Projects Control for the Brazilian NANOSATC-BR Cubesat Development Program - library && data-bank building up results are presented. The Program && its CB involves a partnership between the INPE's Southern Regional Space Research - CRS/INPE - MCTI and the Federal University of Santa Maria - UFSM, through the Santa Maria Space Science Laboratory LACESM/CT - UFSM. The NANOSATC-BR Program consists of two nanosatellites, the NANOSATC-BR1, a 1U standard CubeSat, that is predicted to be launched in the first semester of 2014 (the first Brazilian CubeSat which will be launched) and the NANOSATC-BR2 - 2U CubeSat, which is expected to be launched in the first semester of 2015. The main goal of this paper is to introduce the application of Systems Engineering, Management && Projects Control documentation methodologies in the library building up and data-bank procedures for the CB, Program and its Projects: NANOSATC-BR 1 && 2. These CB, Program and Projects have support from the Brazilian Space Agency (AEB).

  10. Presentation of a Swedish study program concerning recruitment, selection and training of student air traffic controllers: The MRU project phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haglund, Rune

    1994-01-01

    The Director of the ANS Department has set up an objective for the efficiency of screening and training procedures for air traffic controller students which implies that all students admitted 'shall be considered to have the qualification for - and be given the means of - completing the training'. As a consequence, a study project has been established. It is run by the ANS Department with members from the Swedish CAA, in close cooperation with Uppsala University.

  11. Building POCS: An open source observatory control system for amateur telescopes used by the PANOPTES project for the detection of extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Wilfred T.; Walawender, Josh; Butterfield, Mike; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Panoptes Team

    2015-01-01

    The Panoptic Astronomical Networked OPtical observatory for Transiting Exoplanets Survey (PANOPTES, www.projectpanoptes.org) project is a citizen science project consisting of a wide network of low-cost imaging units built using commerically available products and working toward the identification of transiting exoplanets. The PANOPTES Observatory Control System (POCS) is a an open source software system designed to act as the control mechanism for the operation of the unit. POCS defines an Observatory class that is responsible for automated control of a commercially available equatorial mount, including image analysis and corresponding mount adjustment to obtain a percent-level photometric precision. Also responsible for controlling the two digital cameras and the archiving of 5 GB of nightly data, the Observatory class works via a state machine and in conjuction with a configurable target object scheduler, local environmental monitoring, and an inter-task messaging system for total hardware and software control. POCS is written in modern python and attempts to adhere to best practices within the astropy and scipy communities. An overview of the system is presented, along with key technical challenges and design considerations due to the open source and citizen science oriented aspect of PANOPTES.

  12. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. ACT/Control/Guidance System study. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport is reported. Supplementary technical data on the following topics are included: (1) 1990's avionics technology assessment; (2) function criticality assessment; (3) flight deck system for total control and functional features list; (4) criticality and reliability assessment of units; (5) crew procedural function task analysis; and (6) recommendations for simulation mechanization.

  13. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Current and advanced act control system definition study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, G. W.; Shomber, H. A.; Dethman, H. A.; Gratzer, L. B.; Maeshiro, A.; Gangsaas, D.; Blight, J. D.; Buchan, S. M.; Crumb, C. B.; Dorwart, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    An active controls technology (ACT) system architecture was selected based on current technology system elements and optimal control theory was evaluated for use in analyzing and synthesizing ACT multiple control laws. The system selected employs three redundant computers to implement all of the ACT functions, four redundant smaller computers to implement the crucial pitch-augmented stability function, and a separate maintenance and display computer. The reliability objective of probability of crucial function failure of less than 1 x 10 to the -9th power per flight of 1 hr can be met with current technology system components, if the software is assumed fault free and coverage approaching 1.0 can be provided. The optimal control theory approach to ACT control law synthesis yielded comparable control law performance much more systematically and directly than the classical s-domain approach. The ACT control law performance, although somewhat degraded by the inclusion of representative nonlinearities, remained quite effective. Certain high-frequency gust-load alleviation functions may require increased surface rate capability.

  14. Basics of Control: The Mechanical, Hydraulic, and Pneumatic Transfer of Power and Motion. Project Description, Teacher's Manual, and Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collict, George

    In 1990, the New Jersey Department of Education awarded the Randolph Township Board of Education a grant to evaluate the effectiveness of an existing technology learning activity called the "Magic Box", as part of the Teacher Developed Technology Education for the Nineties grant project. This document is comprised of three publications: a project…

  15. 7 CFR Appendix D to Subpart E of... - Alcohol Production Facilities Planning, Performing, Development and Project Control

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... design incorporates cost-effective primary fuel systems, energy recovery systems and conservation... or used equipment. Consideration must be given to the relative energy requirements of used and new...) The project is producing products of the quantity and quality and at the conversion and...

  16. Creating Indices from the Control Structure Interview Through Data Collapsing and Multidimensional Scaling: Approaches to Data Analysis in Project MITT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jovick, Thomas D.

    This paper discribes the analysis of data in the Management Implications of Team Teaching Project (MITT). It touches on the interviews conducted with teachers and principals, presents the breadth of information obtained in the questionnaire, and explains how the data were aggregated and how issues were grouped. Information collected in the…

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROJECT - INDOOR AIR PRODUCTS PILOT (INDOOR ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to verify environmental claims of products used in the indoor environment. Testing protocols will be developed and approved by a stakeholder group. To ensure wide acceptability and comparability of data, the protocols will (1) include strong qua...

  18. Projections to the anterodorsal thalamus and lateral mammillary nuclei arise from different cell populations within the postsubiculum: Implications for the control of head direction cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Ryan M.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    The neural representation of directional heading is encoded by a population of cells located in a circuit that includes the postsubiculum (PoS), anterodorsal thalamus (ADN), and lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN). Throughout this circuit, many cells rely on both movement- and landmark-related information to discharge as a function of the animal's directional heading. The PoS projects to both the ADN and LMN and these connections may convey critical spatial information about landmarks, since lesions of the PoS disrupt landmark control in head direction (HD) cells and hippocampal place cells (Goodridge and Taube, 1997; Calton et al., 2003). The PoS→ADN projection originates in the deep layers of PoS, but no studies have determined whether the PoS→LMN projection originates from the same cells that project to ADN. To address this issue, two distinct cholera toxin-subunit B (CTB) fluorophore conjugates (Alexa Fluor 488 and Alexa Fluor 594) were injected into the LMN and ADN of the same rats, and PoS sections were examined for cell bodies containing either or both CTB conjugates. Results indicate the PoS→LMN projection originates exclusively from a thin layer of cells located superficial to the layer(s) of PoS→ADN projection cells, with no overlap. To verify the laminar distribution and morphological characteristics of PoS→LMN and PoS→ADN cells, biotinylated dextran amine was injected into LMN or ADN of different rats, and tissue sections were counterstained with thionin. Results indicate the PoS→LMN projection arises from large pyramidal cells in layer IV, whereas the PoS→ADN projection arises from a heterogeneous cell population in layers V/VI. The present study provides the first evidence that the PoS→ADN and PoS→LMN projections arise from distinct, non-overlapping cell layers in PoS. Functionally, the PoS may provide landmark information to HD cells in LMN. PMID:20575008

  19. Water contamination control: Guide for project planning and financing. Technical paper. Control de la contaminacion del agua: Guias para la planificacion y financiamiento de proyectos

    SciTech Connect

    Palange, R.C.; Zavala, A.

    1989-01-01

    This report provides guidelines for administrators, supervisors, and others involved in decision making to satisfy the need for facilities to control water contamination, but who possibly lack specialized training in engineering, economics, financial administration, or other pertinent specialties.

  20. Environmental Science: 49 Science Fair Projects. Science Fair Projects Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Robert L.; Keen, G. Daniel

    This book contains 49 science fair projects designed for 6th to 9th grade students. Projects are organized by the topics of soil, ecology (projects in habitat and life cycles), pests and controls (projects in weeds and insects), recycling (projects in resources and conservation), waste products (projects in decomposition), microscopic organisms,…

  1. Design of Launch Vehicle Flight Control Augmentors and Resulting Flight Stability and Control (Center Director's Discretionary Fund Project 93-05, Part III)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, C.

    1997-01-01

    This publication presents the control requirements, the details of the designed Flight Control Augmentor's (FCA's), the static stability and dynamic stability wind tunnel test programs, the static stability and control analyses, the dynamic stability characteristics of the experimental Launch Vehicle (LV) with the designed FCA's, and a consideration of the elastic vehicle. Dramatic improvements in flight stability have been realized with all the FCA designs; these ranged from 41 percent to 72 percent achieved by the blunt TE design. The control analysis showed that control increased 110 percent with only 3 degrees of FCA deflection. The dynamic stability results showed improvements with all FCA designs tested at all Mach numbers tested. The blunt TE FCA's had the best overall dynamic stability results. Since the lowest elastic vehicle frequency must be well separated from that of the control system, the significant frequencies and modes of vibration have been identified, and the response spectra compared for the experimental LV in both the conventional and the aft cg configuration. Although the dynamic response was 150 percent greater in the aft cg configuration, the lowest bending mode frequency decreased by only 2.8 percent.

  2. Capability Description for NASA's F/A-18 TN 853 as a Testbed for the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt

    2009-01-01

    The NASA F/A-18 tail number (TN) 853 full-scale Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) testbed has been designed with a full array of capabilities in support of the Aviation Safety Program. Highlights of the system's capabilities include: 1) a quad-redundant research flight control system for safely interfacing controls experiments to the aircraft's control surfaces; 2) a dual-redundant airborne research test system for hosting multi-disciplinary state-of-the-art adaptive control experiments; 3) a robust reversionary configuration for recovery from unusual attitudes and configurations; 4) significant research instrumentation, particularly in the area of static loads; 5) extensive facilities for experiment simulation, data logging, real-time monitoring and post-flight analysis capabilities; and 6) significant growth capability in terms of interfaces and processing power.

  3. Intervention for control of hypertension in Catalonia, Spain (INCOTECA Project): results of a multicentric, non-randomised, quasi-experimental controlled intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Teresa; Mengual-Martínez, Lucas; Rosell-Murphy, Magdalena; Prieto-De Lamo, Gemma; Martínez-Frutos, Fina; Mimoso-Moreno, Sonia; Bellerino-Serrano, Eva; Àlvarez-Lázaro, Alícia; Franzi-Sisó, Alícia; Martínez-Vindel, Juan Carlos; Alonso-Ortega, Mª Socorro; Olmedo-Muñoz, Imma; Bonet-Simó, Josep Mª

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quality improvement (QI) plan aimed at primary healthcare teams (PHCTs) to optimise hypertension control and to compare it with standard clinical care. Methods Design Multicentric, non-randomised, quasi-experimental controlled intervention study. Setting 5 PHCTs in the intervention and 13 in the standard care group in the province of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Participants This is a population-based study in which all patients over 18 years of age with a diagnosis of hypertension before 1 January 2006 were included (n=9877 in the intervention group and n=21 704 in the control group). Intervention A QI plan that targeted primary care professionals. The plan included training sessions, implementation of recommended clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypertensive patients and audit and feedback to health professionals. Main outcome measure Prevalence of hypertensive patients with an adequate blood pressure (BP) control. Results The adjusted difference between intervention and standard care groups in the odds of BP control was 1.3 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.6, p=0.003). Results of the mixed model on repeated measures showed that, on average, an individual in the intervention group had an increase of 92% in the odds of BP control (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.7 to 2.1). Conclusions The implementation of a QI plan can improve BP control. This strategy is potentially feasible for up-scaling within the existing PHCTs. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov MS: 1998275938244441. PMID:22514242

  4. Full-Scaled Advanced Systems Testbed: Ensuring Success of Adaptive Control Research Through Project Lifecycle Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center completed flight testing of adaptive controls research on the Full-Scale Advance Systems Testbed (FAST) in January of 2011. The research addressed technical challenges involved with reducing risk in an increasingly complex and dynamic national airspace. Specific challenges lie with the development of validated, multidisciplinary, integrated aircraft control design tools and techniques to enable safe flight in the presence of adverse conditions such as structural damage, control surface failures, or aerodynamic upsets. The testbed is an F-18 aircraft serving as a full-scale vehicle to test and validate adaptive flight control research and lends a significant confidence to the development, maturation, and acceptance process of incorporating adaptive control laws into follow-on research and the operational environment. The experimental systems integrated into FAST were designed to allow for flexible yet safe flight test evaluation and validation of modern adaptive control technologies and revolve around two major hardware upgrades: the modification of Production Support Flight Control Computers (PSFCC) and integration of two, fourth-generation Airborne Research Test Systems (ARTS). Post-hardware integration verification and validation provided the foundation for safe flight test of Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion and Model Reference Aircraft Control adaptive control law experiments. To ensure success of flight in terms of cost, schedule, and test results, emphasis on risk management was incorporated into early stages of design and flight test planning and continued through the execution of each flight test mission. Specific consideration was made to incorporate safety features within the hardware and software to alleviate user demands as well as into test processes and training to reduce human factor impacts to safe and successful flight test. This paper describes the research configuration

  5. Effects of properties of manganese oxide-impregnated catalysts and flue gas condition on multipollutant control of Hg0 and NO.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng; Lin, Hong-Ping; Chang, Tien-Chin

    2015-06-30

    This research investigated the effects of manganese oxide (MnOx) impregnation on the physical/chemical properties and multi pollutant control effectiveness of Hg(0) and NO using a V2O5-WO3/TiO2-SiO2 selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst. Raw and MnOx-treated SCR samples were bean-shaped nanoparticles with sizes within 10-30 nm. Impregnating MnOx of ≤ 5 wt% caused limited changes in physical properties of the catalyst. The decrease in surface area when the impregnated MnOx amount was 10 wt% may stem from the pore blockage and particle growth or aggregation of the catalyst. Mn(4+) was the main valence state of impregnated MnOx. Apparent crystallinity of MnOx was not observed based on X-ray diffraction. MnOx impregnation enhanced the Hg(0) oxidation and NO/SO2 removal of SCR catalyst. The 5 and 10% MnOx-impregnated samples had the greatest multi pollutant control potentials for Hg(0) oxidation and NO removal; however, the increasing SO2 removal that may be mainly due to SO2-SO3 conversion should be cautioned. HCl and O2 greatly promoted Hg(0) oxidation. SO2 enhanced Hg(0) oxidation at ≤ 200 ppm while NO and NH3 consistently inhibited Hg(0) oxidation. Elevating flue gas temperature enhanced Hg(0) oxidation. Overall, MnOx-impregnated catalysts show stable and consistent multi pollutant removal effectiveness under the test conditions. PMID:25748996

  6. Automated waste canister docking and emplacement using a sensor-based intelligent controller; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.D.

    1992-08-01

    A sensor-based intelligent control system is described that utilizes a multiple degree-of-freedom robotic system for the automated remote manipulation and precision docking of large payloads such as waste canisters. Computer vision and ultrasonic proximity sensing are used to control the automated precision docking of a large object with a passive target cavity. Real-time sensor processing and model-based analysis are used to control payload position to a precision of {plus_minus} 0.5 millimeter.

  7. No “Magic Bullet”: Exploring Community Mobilization Strategies Used in a Multi-site Community Based Randomized Controlled Trial: Project Accept (HPTN 043)

    PubMed Central

    Tedrow, Virginia A.; Zelaya, Carla E.; Kennedy, Caitlin E.; Morin, Stephen F.; Khumalo-Sakutukwa, Gertrude; Sweat, Michael D.; Celentano, David D.

    2012-01-01

    As community-level interventions become more common in HIV prevention, processes such as community mobilization (CM) are increasingly utilized in public health programs and research. Project Accept, a multi-site community randomized controlled trial, is testing the hypothesis that CM coupled with community-based mobile voluntary counseling and testing and post-test support services will alter community norms and reduce the incidence of HIV. By using a multiple-case study approach, this qualitative study identifies seven major community mobilization strategies used in Project Accept, including stakeholder buy-in, formation of community coalitions, community engagement, community participation, raising community awareness, involvement of leaders, and partnership building, and describes three key elements of mobilization success. PMID:21822627

  8. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  9. Integrated Project Management System description. [UMTRAP Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is a Department of Energy (DOE) designated Major System Acquisition (MSA). To execute and manage the Project mission successfully and to comply with the MSA requirements, the UMTRA Project Office ( Project Office'') has implemented and operates an Integrated Project Management System (IPMS). The Project Office is assisted by the Technical Assistance Contractor's (TAC) Project Integration and Control (PIC) Group in system operation. Each participant, in turn, provides critical input to system operation and reporting requirements. The IPMS provides a uniform structured approach for integrating the work of Project participants. It serves as a tool for planning and control, workload management, performance measurement, and specialized reporting within a standardized format. This system description presents the guidance for its operation. Appendices 1 and 2 contain definitions of commonly used terms and abbreviations and acronyms, respectively. 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-01-24

    This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

  11. Dynamic aspects and controllability of the MELiSSA project: a bioregenerative system to provide life support in space.

    PubMed

    Farges, Bérangère; Poughon, Laurent; Creuly, Catherine; Cornet, Jean-François; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Lasseur, Christophe

    2008-12-01

    Manmade ecosystems differ from their prototype biosphere by the principle of control. The Earth Biosphere is sustainable by stochastic control and very large time constants. By contrast, in a closed ecosystem such as the micro-ecological life support system alternative (MELiSSA system) developed by the European Space Agency for space exploration, a deterministic control is a prerequisite of sustainable existence. MELiSSA is an integrated sum of interconnected biological subsystems. On one hand, all unit operations in charge of the elementary functions constitutive of the entire life support system are studied until a thorough understanding and mathematical modelling. On the other hand, the systemic approach of complex, highly branched systems with feedback loops is performed. This leads to study in the same perspective, with the same degree of accuracy and with the same language, waste degradation, water recycling, atmosphere revitalisation and food production systems prior to the integration of knowledge-based control models. This paper presents the mathematical modelling of the MELiSSA system and the interface between the control strategy of the entire system and the control of the bioreactors. PMID:18592407

  12. Final Project Report for Grant DE-FG03-00ER54581 Selective Control of Chemical Reactions With Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony Muscat

    2004-01-28

    OAK-B135 This research work focused on control of the reactive species inside a plasma through measurement and manipulation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and on understanding the surface reaction mechanisms on the substrate exposed to a combination of ion and atom beam sources to simulate a real plasma. A GEC chamber (Gaseous Electronic Conference Reference Cell)8 with a mass spectrometer and a Langmuir probe (LP) system were used for this research. It was found that H2 and N2 additives to an Ar plasma could effectively change the EEDF and the average electron temperature (Te). This finding provides the possibility to selectively control reaction rates in the plasma to control etching selectivity on a surface. This concept was demonstrated in Ar/N2/H2 and Ar/CH4 /H2 systems.

  13. Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Truitt, R.W.

    1994-08-24

    This document provides descriptions of components and tasks that are involved in the computer system for the data acquisition and control of the mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los alamos National Laboratory and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company. The computers (both personal computers and specialized data-taking computers) and the software programs of the system will hereafter collectively be referred to as the DACS (Data Acquisition and Control System).

  14. Status of biological control projects on yellow starthistle, Russian thistle, Scotch thistle, Cape-ivy and French broom

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA-ARS quarantine laboratory in Albany, CA, in cooperation with foreign scientists, is currently developing classical biological control agents for five species of invasive alien terrestrial weeds. Host specificity testing of the yellow starthistle rosette weevil, Ceratapion basicorne, indica...

  15. Mechanism of Developmental Change in the PLAY Project Home Consultation Program: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Gerald; Solomon, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This investigation is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized control trial of the PLAY Home Consultation Intervention Program which was conducted with 112 preschool children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and their parents (Solomon et al. in "J Dev Behav Pediatr" 35:475-485, 2014). Subjects were randomly assigned to either a…

  16. The YouthMood Project: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of an Online Cognitive Behavioral Program with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calear, Alison L.; Christensen, Helen; Mackinnon, Andrew; Griffiths, Kathleen M.; O'Kearney, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The aim in the current study was to investigate the effectiveness of an online, self-directed cognitive-behavioral therapy program (MoodGYM) in preventing and reducing the symptoms of anxiety and depression in an adolescent school-based population. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted with 30 schools (N = 1,477) from across…

  17. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  18. Randomized Controlled Trial for Early Intervention for Autism: A Pilot Study of the Autism 1-2-3 Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Virginia C. N.; Kwan, Queenie K.

    2010-01-01

    We piloted a 2-week "Autism-1-2-3" early intervention for children with autism and their parents immediately after diagnosis that targeted at (1) eye contact, (2) gesture and (3) vocalization/words. Seventeen children were randomized into the Intervention (n = 9) and Control (n = 8) groups. Outcome measures included the Autism Diagnostic…

  19. An undergraduate student project to improve mechanical control of perenial nutsedges with a peanut digger in organic crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial nutsedges are difficult to control in organic crop production systems. Tubers are generally confined to the upper portions of the soil profile and vulnerable to desiccation when on the soil surface. A peanut digger is a common implement found in the coastal plain region of the southeaste...

  20. The Hazardous-Drums Project: A Multiweek Laboratory Exercise for General Chemistry Involving Environmental, Quality Control, and Cost Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, David; Widanski, Bozena

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that introduces students to "real-world" hazardous waste management issues chemists face. The students are required to define an analytical problem, choose a laboratory analysis method, investigate cost factors, consider quality-control issues, interpret the meaning of results, and provide management…

  1. [Impact of the Beijing and Tianjin Sand Source Control Project on the grassland soil organic carbon storage: a case study of Xilingol League, Inner Mongolia, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang-Xia; Fan, Jiang-Wen; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tang, Feng-Pei

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the impacts of eco-construction project on grassland soil carbon storage is crucial to assess the effectiveness of the project and its role in carbon cycling of the grassland ecosystems. Using IPCC carbon budget inventory method, this paper analyzed the influence of Beijing and Tianjin Sand Source Control Project (BTSSCP) on the grassland soil carbon storage between 2000 and 2006 in Xilingol League, Inner Mongolia, and evaluated the time needed to reach the maximal soil carbon density for three management practices (i. e. , sown pasture, aerial sowing pasture, and grazing exclosure). Results showed that the BTSSCP significantly increased soil carbon storage, with a carbon sequestration of 59.26 x 10(4) t C from 2000 to 2006. The rate and effectiveness of soil carbon sequestration varied significantly with management practices, with the highest rate in sown pasture (0.25 t C x hm(-2) x a(-1)) while a greater benefit of soil carbon sequestration in the grazing exclosure (63 million yuan). Compared with other grassland vegetations, lowland meadow and temperate meadow steppe both had higher carbon sequestration rates of 0.14 t C x hm(-2) x a(-1). Long time would be needed to reach the maximum soil carbon density in grassland under the three practices, yet shorter for sown pasture with average of 57.75 years. PMID:24830235

  2. Demonstration of advanced combustion NO{sub X} control techniques for a wall-fired boiler. Project performance summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    2001-01-01

    The project represents a landmark assessment of the potential of low-NO{sub x} burners, advanced overtire air, and neural-network control systems to reduce NO{sub x} emissions within the bounds of acceptable dry-bottom, wall-fired boiler performance. Such boilers were targeted under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). Testing provided valuable input to the Environmental Protection Agency ruling issued in March 1994, which set NO{sub x} emission limits for ''Group 1'' wall-fired boilers at 0.5 lb/10{sup 6} Btu to be met by January 1996. The resultant comprehensive database served to assist utilities in effectively implementing CAAA compliance. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. Five nationally competed solicitations sought cost-shared partnerships with industry to accelerate commercialization of the most advanced coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The Program, valued at over $5 billion, has leveraged federal funding twofold through the resultant partnerships encompassing utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. This project was one of 16 selected in May 1988 from 55 proposals submitted in response to the Program's second solicitation. Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation's (FWEC) advanced overfire air (AOFA), low-NO{sub x} burners (LNB), and LNB/AOFA on wall-fired boiler NO{sub x} emissions and other combustion parameters. SCS also evaluated the effectiveness of an advanced on-line optimization system, the Generic NO{sub x} Control Intelligent System (GNOCIS). Over a six-year period, SCS carried out testing at Georgia Power Company's 500-MWe Plant Hammond Unit 4 in Coosa, Georgia. Tests proceeded in a logical sequence using rigorous statistical analyses to

  3. Observational constraints on projections of the ozone response to NOx controls in the Southern San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusede, S. E.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Browne, E. C.; Russell, A. R.; Rollins, A.; Min, K.; Thomas, J.; Zhang, L.; Brune, W. H.; Henry, S. B.; DiGangi, J. P.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sanders, J. E.; Ren, X.; Weber, R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Cohen, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the impact of NOx reductions on ozone production in the Southern San Joaquin Valley using a large suite of radical and trace gas measurements collected during CalNex-2010 in Bakersfield, California (May 15-June 28) combined with the historical record of O3, nitrogen oxides and temperature from CARB monitoring sites in the region. We calculate the instantaneous ozone production rate (PO3) by radical balance and investigate relationships between PO3 and NOx abundance; finding temperature to be a useful proxy for VOC reactivity. We show Bakersfield photochemistry is at peak PO3 and therefore at a minimum with respect to the effectiveness of NOx controls indicating: (1) more than 30% reductions from present day are required before sizable decreases in ozone will occur and (2) reduction from the lower weekend baseline NOx concentrations will result in weekend PO3 decreases with continued NOx controls at high temperatures when VOC reactivity is largest.

  4. Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, A.M.

    1997-05-01

    Description of the Proposed Activity/REPORTABLE OCCURRENCE or PIAB: This ECN changes the computer systems design description support document describing the computers system used to control, monitor and archive the processes and outputs associated with the Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump installed in SY-101. There is no new activity or procedure associated with the updating of this reference document. The updating of this computer system design description maintains an agreed upon documentation program initiated within the test program and carried into operations at time of turnover to maintain configuration control as outlined by design authority practicing guidelines. There are no new credible failure modes associated with the updating of information in a support description document. The failure analysis of each change was reviewed at the time of implementation of the Systems Change Request for all the processes changed. This document simply provides a history of implementation and current system status.

  5. ARRA FEMP Technical Assistance -- Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 -- Control Tower and Support Building, Palm Springs, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-31

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 100% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Palm Springs, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  6. NNWSI PROJECT ELEMENT WBS-1.2.6.9.4.6.1.B INTERIM REPORT ON DUST CONTROL PROPOSALS

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Burton

    2005-09-06

    This report presents interim findings of studies conducted to evaluate dust control equipment during prototype drilling. Based on available data on silica content, type, particle size, and on proposed dry drilling operations, it is estimated that allowable exposures to free silica will range from 0.07 to 1.5 mg/cu meter. They have concluded that airborne concentrations of dust may approach or exceed these values during normal operations, based on studies conducted as part of this task.

  7. System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-08-25

    This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, The original system was designed and implemented by LANL, supplied to WHC, and turned over to LMHC for operation. In 1999, the hardware and software were upgraded to provide a state-of-the-art, Year-2000 compliant system.

  8. Childhood obesity prevention and control in city recreation centers and family homes: the MOVE/me Muevo Project

    PubMed Central

    Elder, John P.; Crespo, Noe C.; Corder, Kirsten; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Slymen, Donald J.; Lopez, Nanette V.; Moody, Jamie S.; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Interventions to prevent and control childhood obesity have shown mixed results in terms of short- and long-term changes. Objectives “MOVE/me Muevo” was a two-year family- and recreation center-based randomized controlled trial to promote healthy eating and physical activity among 5-8 year old children. It was hypothesized that children in the intervention group would demonstrate lower post-intervention BMI values and improve obesity-related behaviors compared to control group children. Methods Thirty recreation centers in San Diego County, California were randomized to an intervention or control condition. Five hundred and forty-one families were enrolled and children’s body mass index (BMI), diet, physical activity and other health indicators were tracked from baseline to two years post-baseline. Analyses followed an intent-to-treat approach using mixed effects models. Results No significant intervention effects were observed for the primary outcomes of child or parent BMI and child waist circumference. Moderator analyses however showed girls (but not boys) in the intervention condition reduced their BMI. At the two-year follow-up, intervention condition parents reported that their children were consuming fewer high-fat foods and sugary beverages. Conclusions Favorable implementation fidelity and high retention rates support the feasibility of this intervention in a large metropolitan area; however, interventions of greater intensity may be needed to achieve effects on child’s BMI. Also, further research is needed to develop gender-specific intervention strategies so that both genders may benefit from such efforts. PMID:23754782

  9. Dulce Wireless Tijuana: A Randomized Control Trial Evaluating the Impact of Project Dulce and Short-Term Mobile Technology on Glycemic Control in a Family Medicine Clinic in Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Sonia; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana; Menchaca-Díaz, Rufino; Fortmann, Addie; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The global epidemic of diabetes calls for innovative interventions. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Project Dulce model, with and without wireless technology, on glycemic control and other clinical and self-reported outcomes in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in Mexico. Subjects and Methods: Adults with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥8% were recruited from Family Medical Unit #27 of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) in Tijuana, México, and randomly assigned to one of three groups: Project Dulce–only (PD); Project Dulce technology-enhanced with mobile tools (PD-TE); or IMSS standard of care/control group (CG). Clinical and self-reported outcomes were assessed at baseline, Month 4, and Month 10. Time-by-group interactions and within-group changes were analyzed. Results: HbA1c reductions from baseline to Month 10 were significantly greater in PD-TE (−3.0% [−33 mmol/mol]) and PD (−2.6% [−28.7 mmol/mol]) compared with CG (−1.3% [−14.2 mmol/mol]) (P = 0.009 and 0.001, respectively). PD-TE and PD also exhibited significant improvement in diabetes knowledge when compared with CG (P < 0.05 for both). No statistically significant differences were detected between PD and PD-TE on these indicators (P = 0.54 and 0.86, respectively). Several within-group improvements were observed on other clinical and self-report indicators but did not vary significantly across groups. Conclusions: Project Dulce with and without wireless technology substantially improved glycemic control and diabetes knowledge in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes in a Mexican family medical unit, suggesting that integrating peer-led education, nurse coordination, and 3G wireless technology is an effective approach for improving diabetes outcomes in high-risk populations. PMID:26914371

  10. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project: Test act system validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective of the Test Active Control Technology (ACT) System laboratory tests was to verify and validate the system concept, hardware, and software. The initial lab tests were open loop hardware tests of the Test ACT System as designed and built. During the course of the testing, minor problems were uncovered and corrected. Major software tests were run. The initial software testing was also open loop. These tests examined pitch control laws, wing load alleviation, signal selection/fault detection (SSFD), and output management. The Test ACT System was modified to interface with the direct drive valve (DDV) modules. The initial testing identified problem areas with DDV nonlinearities, valve friction induced limit cycling, DDV control loop instability, and channel command mismatch. The other DDV issue investigated was the ability to detect and isolate failures. Some simple schemes for failure detection were tested but were not completely satisfactory. The Test ACT System architecture continues to appear promising for ACT/FBW applications in systems that must be immune to worst case generic digital faults, and be able to tolerate two sequential nongeneric faults with no reduction in performance. The challenge in such an implementation would be to keep the analog element sufficiently simple to achieve the necessary reliability.

  11. Rationale and study design for a randomised controlled trial to reduce sedentary time in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: project stand (Sedentary Time ANd diabetes)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The rising prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a major public health problem. There is an urgent need for effective lifestyle interventions to prevent the development of T2DM. Sedentary behaviour (sitting time) has recently been identified as a risk factor for diabetes, often independent of the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Project STAND (Sedentary Time ANd Diabetes) is a study which aims to reduce sedentary behaviour in younger adults at high risk of T2DM. Methods/Design A reduction in sedentary time is targeted using theory driven group structured education. The STAND programme is subject to piloting and process evaluation in line with the MRC framework for complex interventions. Participants are encouraged to self-monitor and self-regulate their behaviour. The intervention is being assessed in a randomised controlled trial with 12 month follow up. Inclusion criteria are a) aged 18-40 years with a BMI in the obese range; b) 18-40 years with a BMI in the overweight range plus an additional risk factor for T2DM. Participants are randomised to the intervention (n = 89) or control (n = 89) arm. The primary outcome is a reduction in sedentary behaviour at 12 months as measured by an accelerometer (count < 100/min). Secondary outcomes include physical activity, sitting/lying time using the ActivPAL posture monitor, fasting and 2 h oral glucose tolerance test, lipids, inflammatory biomarkers, body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, illness perceptions, and efficacy beliefs for behaviour change. Conclusions This is the first UK trial to address sedentary behaviour change in a population of younger adults at risk of T2DM. The results will provide a platform for the development of a range of future multidisciplinary interventions in this rapidly expanding high-risk population. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN08434554, MRC project 91409. PMID:22151909

  12. Long-Term Impact of the World Bank Loan Project for Schistosomiasis Control: A Comparison of the Spatial Distribution of Schistosomiasis Risk in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijie; Zhu, Rong; Ward, Michael P.; Xu, Wanghong; Zhang, Lijuan; Guo, Jiagang; Zhao, Fei; Jiang, Qingwu

    2012-01-01

    Background The World Bank Loan Project (WBLP) for controlling schistosomiasis in China was implemented during 1992–2001. Its short-term impact has been assessed from non-spatial perspective, but its long-term impact remains unclear and a spatial evaluation has not previously been conducted. Here we compared the spatial distribution of schistosomiasis risk using national datasets in the lake and marshland regions from 1999–2001 and 2007–2008 to evaluate the long-term impact of WBLP strategy on China's schistosomiasis burden. Methodology/Principal Findings A hierarchical Poisson regression model was developed in a Bayesian framework with spatially correlated and uncorrelated heterogeneities at the county-level, modeled using a conditional autoregressive prior structure and a spatially unstructured Gaussian distribution, respectively. There were two important findings from this study. The WBLP strategy was found to have a good short-term impact on schistosomiasis control, but its long-term impact was not ideal. It has successfully reduced the morbidity of schistosomiasis to a low level, but can not contribute further to China's schistosomiasis control because of the current low endemic level. A second finding is that the WBLP strategy could not effectively compress the spatial distribution of schistosomiasis risk. To achieve further reductions in schistosomiasis-affected areas, and for sustainable control, focusing on the intermediate host snail should become the next step to interrupt schistosomiasis transmission within the two most affected regions surrounding the Dongting and Poyang Lakes. Furthermore, in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River, the WBLP's morbidity control strategy may need to continue for some time until snails in the upriver provinces have been well controlled. Conclusion It is difficult to further reduce morbidity due to schistosomiasis using a chemotherapy-based control strategy in the lake and marshland regions of China because of the

  13. System design description for the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Ermi, A.M.

    1998-03-02

    There is no new activity or procedure associated with the updating of this reference document. The updating of this system design description maintains an agreed upon documentation program initiated within the test program and carried into operations at time of turnover to maintain configuration control as outlined by design authority practicing guidelines. Any changes made to controlled components in the field will be updated after the time of implementation to support the engineers and operators understand, maintain, train to and operate the system. There are no new credible failure modes associated with the updating of information in a support description document. The failure analysis of each change was reviewed at the time of implementation of the Systems Change Request for all the processes changed. This document simply provides a history of implementation and current system status. The incorporation of the two documents, Computer Systems Design Description (HNF-SD-WMCSDD-008) and the Input/Output Channel List (HNF-SD-WM-EL-001), as appendices allow for fewer errors in changes. Because the documents are all together, they will be approved as one document, not three separate entities which could be updated at different times, creating a situation which does not accurately depict field conditions.

  14. Final Project Report: Self-Correcting Controls for VAV System Faults Filter/Fan/Coil and VAV Box Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Cort, Katherine A.; Cho, Heejin; Ngo, Hung; Goddard, James K.

    2011-05-01

    This report addresses original research by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the California Institute for Energy and Environment on self-correcting controls for variable-air-volume (VAV) heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems and focuses specifically on air handling and VAV box components of the air side of the system. A complete set of faults for these components was compiled and a fault mode analysis performed to understand the detectable symptoms of the faults and the chain of causation. A set of 26 algorithms was developed to facilitate the automatic correction of these faults in typical commercial VAV systems. These algorithms include training tests that are used during commissioning to develop models of normal system operation, passive diagnostics used to detect the symptoms of faults, proactive diagnostics used to diagnose the cause of a fault, and finally fault correction algorithms. Ten of the twenty six algorithms were implemented in a prototype software package that interfaces with a test bed facility at PNNL's Richland, WA, laboratory. Measurement bias faults were instigated in the supply-air temperature sensor and the supply-air flow meter to test the algorithms developed. The algorithms as implemented in the laboratory software correctly detected, diagnosed and corrected these faults. Finally, an economic and impact assessment was performed for the State of California for deployment of self-correcting controls. Assuming 15% HVAC energy savings and a modeled deployment profile, 3.1-5.8 TBu of energy savings are possible by year 15.

  15. A case study of the Thunderstorm Research International Project. 2. Interrelations among the observable parameters controlling electrification

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, J.S.; Kasha, J.R.; Forbes, G.S. )

    1990-04-20

    In Part 1 of this paper, the data obtained at the time of the Thunderstorm Research International Project storm at the Kennedy Space Center on July 11, 1978, are discussed and analyzed in a model-independent manner. Here the parameters of the electrical system that would be consistent with these observations are discussed. Three-dimensional electrodynamic modeling of the thundercloud electrification allowed estimates to be made of the current moments and electrical power generated continuously throughout the evolution of the two cells of the storm that were studied. The evolution and configuration of the currents were consistent with the separation of an originally neutral ensemble of particles by gravity in the region of 7 km in the region close to the maximum of the updraft velocity. After about 370 s the effect of wind shears would have caused the particles to separate in the convective system of the cells. Rain did not appear to be the dominant charge carrier. The current moments generated were compared with the current moments transferred by intercloud and cloud-to-ground lightning. It is shown that for the southern cell, which produced a charge moment of about 8.4 (MC m), lightning utilized about 84% of the charge moment separated, while for the northern cell, which produced about 1.1 (MC m), this figure was approximately 60%. It was shown that the times of initiation and maximum electrical power generated correspond best with the normalized mass above 7.5 km. It was deduced that the median diameter heavier particles had a fall velocity of about 3 m/s. The generator currents, flash rates, cloud conductivities, and mean charge per flash were used to estimate the volume associated with the lower region of current divergence.

  16. PLAY Project Home Consultation Intervention Program for Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Egeren, Laurie A.; Mahoney, Gerald; Quon Huber, Melissa S.; Zimmerman, Perri

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Play and Language for Autistic Youngsters (PLAY) Project Home Consultation model, in combination with usual community services (CS), to improve parent-child interaction, child development, and autism symptomatology in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) compared with CS only. Methods: Children (N = 128) with autism or PDD-NOS (DSM-4 criteria) aged 2 years 8 months to 5 years 11 months and recruited from 5 disability agencies in 4 US states were randomized in two 1-year cohorts. Using videotape and written feedback within a developmental framework, PLAY consultants coached caregivers monthly for 12 months to improve caregiver-child interaction. CS included speech/language and occupational therapy and public education services. Primary outcomes included change in parent-child interactions, language and development, and autism-related diagnostic category/symptoms. Secondary outcomes included parent stress and depression and home consultant fidelity. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention. Results: Using intent-to-treat analysis (ITT), large treatment effects were evident for parent and child interactional behaviors on the Maternal and Child Behavior Rating Scales. Child language and developmental quotient did not differ over time by group, although functional development improved significantly. PLAY children improved in diagnostic categories on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS). PLAY caregivers' stress did not increase, and depressive symptomatology decreased. Home consultants administered the intervention with fidelity. Conclusions: PLAY intervention demonstrated substantial changes in parent-child interaction without increasing parents' stress/depression. ADOS findings must be interpreted cautiously because results do not align with clinical experience. PLAY offers communities a relatively inexpensive effective intervention for children with ASD and their parents. PMID

  17. RM12-2703 Advanced Rooftop Unit Control Retrofit Kit Field Demonstration: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Doebber, I.; Dean, J.; Dominick, J.; Holland, G.

    2014-03-01

    As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This was one of several demonstrations of new and underutilized commercial energy efficiency technologies. The consistent year-round demand for air conditioning and dehumidification in Hawaii provides an advantageous demonstration location for advanced rooftop control (ARC) retrofit kits to packaged rooftop units (RTUs). This report summarizes the field demonstration of ARCs installed on nine RTUs serving a 70,000-ft2 exchange store (large retail) and two RTUs, each serving small office buildings located on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH).

  18. Correction of contrast in projection systems by means of phase-controlled prism coatings and band-shifted twist compensators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbluth, Alan E.; Lu, Minhua; Yang, Kei H.; Ho, Kenneth; Singh, Rama N.; Nakasogi, Teruhiro

    2000-04-01

    Projectors that use LCOS lightvalves face special contrast requirements. Most configurations for reflective light valves employ tilted beam-dividing coatings that see both bright and dark polarization states. The optics must then be designed to eliminate polarization mixing at these coatings, which ordinarily arises when the S and P planes for different rays are non-parallel. We show how phase- controlled coatings can exploit the double-pass symmetry of the Plumbicon tri-prism geometry to correct this effect, reducing cross-polarized reflectivity to approximately 1E-3 when the light valve is mirror-like in black-state. Though contrast in different rays varies as a function of both ray skew component and coating angle of incidence, we show that for NA control in the optics. Scatter depolarization at the edges of pixel electrodes is enhanced in these light valves, because the inherent twist causes the backplane polarization to be rotated out of alignment with pixel edges. We show that all of these contrast degradation mechanisms can be addressed by incorporating into the light valve a compensating layer having opposite birefringence to the black-state TN active layer. Moreover, when the compensating layer and driven layer are blue-shifted to a shorter LC thickness than would ordinarily be appropriate for the wavelength band of interest, a highly achromatic response is obtained at all gray levels.

  19. Cost-effectiveness analysis of tuberculosis control policies in Ivanovo Oblast, Russian Federation. Ivanovo Tuberculosis Project Study Group.

    PubMed

    Migliori, G B; Khomenko, A G; Punga, V V; Ambrosetti, M; Danilova, I; Ribka, L N; Grzemska, M; Sawert, H; Raviglione, M C

    1998-01-01

    Many of the current tuberculosis control programmes in the Russian Federation are based on costly strategies which are underfunded and use long, individualized treatment regimens. This article compares, using a cost-effectiveness analysis, the new WHO strategy implemented in the Ivanovo Oblast (case-finding among symptomatic patients (SCF) and shorter regimens) and the old strategy (active screening of the asymptomatic population (ACF) and longer regimens). The cost per case cured was calculated at different levels of cure rate (45-95%) using three scenarios to describe the new WHO strategy (use of WHO-recommended regimens and three options at increasing rates of admission) and a fourth scenario to describe the old strategy (all patients admitted for the whole treatment and longer regimens). The cost per case detected was determined by calculating the following: yield of the new and old strategy (number of examinations necessary to diagnose one case); cost of the diagnostic process; multiplying yield per cost according to the three scenarios describing the new WHO strategy and a fourth scenario describing the old strategy. In the Ivanovo Oblast the cost per case cured, at 85% cure rate level, ranged from US$ 1197 (new strategy, scenario 1 without food) to US$ 6293 (old strategy, scenario 4) the cost per case detected ranged from US$ 1581 (new strategy, scenario 1) to US$ 4000 (old strategy, scenario 4). Significant savings can result from shifting towards the new WHO strategy. Decision-makers and health administrators should be responsible for re-investing the financial and human resources mobilized by the adoption of cost-effective strategies within the TB control programme. PMID:9868838

  20. Tropical Controls on the CO2 Atmospheric Growth Rate 2010-2011 from the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Flux (CMS-Flux) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, K. W.; Liu, J.; Parazoo, N.; Lee, M.; Menemenlis, D.; Gierach, M. M.; Brix, H.; Gurney, K. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Bousserez, N.; Henze, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Interannual variations in the atmospheric growth rate of CO2 have been attributed to the tropical regions and the controls are correlated with temperature anomalies. We investigate the spatial drivers of the atmospheric growth rate and the processes controlling them over the exceptional period of 2010-2011. This period was marked by a marked shift from an El Nino to La Nina period resulting in historically high sea surface temperature anomalies in the tropical Atlantic leading to serious droughts in the Amazon. However, in 2011, unusual precipitation in Australia was linked to gross primary productivity anomalies in semi-arid regions. We use satellite observations of CO2, CO, and solar induced fluorescence assimilated into the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Project (CMS-Flux) to attribute the atmospheric growth rate to global, spatially resolved fluxes. This system is based upon observationally-constrained "bottom-up" estimates from the Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System (FFDAS), the ECCO2­-Darwin physical and biogeochemical adjoint ocean state estimation system, and CASA-GFED3 land-surface biogeochemical model. The system is used to compute regional tropical and extra-tropical fluxes and quantify the role of biomass burning and gross primary productivity in controlling those fluxes.

  1. Improving actions to control high blood pressure in Hispanic communities — Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health Across the U.S. Project, 2009–2012☆

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Youlian; Siegel, Paul Z.; White, Shannon; Dulin, Rick; Taylor, April

    2015-01-01

    Background Compared with the general population in the United States (U.S.), Hispanics with hypertension are less likely to be aware of their condition, to take antihypertensive medication, and to adopt healthy lifestyles to control high blood pressure. We examined whether a multi-community intervention successfully increased the prevalence of actions to control hypertension among Hispanics. Methods Annual survey from 2009–2012 was conducted in six Hispanic communities in the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) Across the U.S. project. The survey used address based sampling design that matched the geographies of intervention program. Results Age- and sex-standardized prevalences of taking hypertensive medication, changing eating habits, cutting down on salt, and reducing alcohol use significantly increased among Hispanics with self-reported hyper-tension in REACH communities. The 3-year relative percent increases were 5.8, 6.8, 7.9, and 35.2% for the four indicators, respectively. These favorable (healthier) trends occurred in both foreign-born and U.S.-born Hispanics. Conclusion This large community-based participatory intervention resulted in more Hispanic residents in the communities taking actions to control high blood pressure. PMID:26656406

  2. Avoiding Project Creep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennerknecht, Norbert J.; Scarnati, James T.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how to keep school district capital-improvement projects within budget. Examines areas where runaway costs creep into a project and ways of cutting or lessening these costs, such as using standard agreements, controlling architect's expense reimbursements, developing a quality-control process, and reducing document duplication. (GR)

  3. Using Community Feedback to Improve Community Interventions: Results From the Deep South Network for Cancer Control Project.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Theresa A; Wyatt, Sharon B; Hardy, Claudia M; Walker, Shundra S; Thomas, Tammi Floyd; Williams, Angela G; Partridge, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    The Deep South Network for Cancer Control (DSNCC), initiated in 2000, is a dual-state, community-based participatory research infrastructure composed of academic and community partners committed to reducing cancer disparities among underserved African Americans in 12 designated counties of the Alabama Black Belt and the Mississippi Delta, 2 historically underserved areas of the country. Local residents trained as Community Health Advisors as Research Partners implemented a 3-tier community action plan (CAP) focused on promoting cancer screening, physical activity, and nutrition. Breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening, healthy eating habits, and physical activity levels increased among many, but not all, African American women in the 12-county DSNCC coverage area. Seeking to improve our reach to include participants who reported they had never heard of the DSNCC or participated in the CAP, we conducted in-depth conversations with community residents about reasons for selective nonparticipation and ways to improve participation in the DSNCC community health interventions. Three patterns and their associated themes described ways to improve the penetration of CAP strategies and tailor them to effectively reach underserved African Americans in the intervention counties. We conclude with lessons learned for future interventions. PMID:27536928

  4. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Conventional baseline configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics of the U.S. domestic fleet were evaluated to determine the mission characteristics that would have the most impact on U. S. transport fuel use in the future. This resulted in selection of a 197-passenger (plus cargo), about 3710-km (2000 nmi) mission. The existing data base was reviewed and additional analysis was conducted as necessary to complete the technical descriptions. The resulting baseline configuration utilizes a double-lobe, but nearly circular, body with seven-abreast seating. External characteristics feature an 8.71 aspect ratio, 31.5-degree sweep wing, a T-tail empennage, and a dual CF6-6D2, wing-mounted engine arrangement. It provides for 22 LD-2 or 11 LD-3 containers plus bulk cargo in the lower lobe. Passenger/cargo loading, servicing provisions, taxi/takeoff speeds, and field length characteristics are all compatible with accepted airline operations and regulatory provisions. The baseline configuration construction uses conventional aluminum structure except for advanced aluminum alloys and a limited amount of graphite epoxy secondary structure. Modern systems are used, including advanced guidance, navigation, and controls which emphasize application of digital electronics and advanced displays.

  5. DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

    2012-10-26

    The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

  6. Project Wild (Project Tame).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenthaler, David

    For 37 states in the United States, Project Wild has become an officially sanctioned, distributed and funded "environemtnal and conservation education program." For those who are striving to implement focused, sequential, learning programs, as well as those who wish to promote harmony through a non-anthropocentric world view, Project Wild may…

  7. DBMS as a Tool for Project Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, H.

    1984-01-01

    Scientific objectives of crustal dynamics are listed as well as the contents of the centralized data information system for the crustal dynamics project. The system provides for project observation schedules, gives project configuration control information and project site information.

  8. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-309-1739, Oregon Department of Human Resources, Health Division, Gypsy Moth Control Project, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.J.; Huemann, M.; Sokolow, R.; Elefant, S.

    1986-10-01

    Evaluation of occupational and general public exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) during application of this microbial agent for control of the gypsy moth was requested by the Oregon State Department of Human Resources, Health Division, located in Portland. Bt was applied by helicopter on about 250,000 acres of forest, rural, and urban areas in 1985 and 1986. Project operational plans, accident prevention, safety plans, personal protective-equipment usage, and work practices were reviewed and evaluated. Personal exposure and area air monitoring for Bt was carried out during application. Air sampling indicated there was a widespread exposure potential. The author recommends that care be taken by those employees handling Bt in solution and that splashing of Bt to the eye be avoided due to possible corneal ulcer development. The dispersing-agent Plyac is recommended for use in handling the waste-disposal problem. Access to the mixing and application areas should be restricted.

  9. Ethical and social dilemmas in community-based controlled trials in situations of poverty: a view from a South African project.

    PubMed

    Nama, Nosisana; Swartz, Leslie

    2002-01-01

    All psychological and social research presents ethical dilemmas, many of which centre around the difficulties which flow from the power imbalances between those conducting the research and the research respondents or participants. Issues of power are magnified in research undertaken in contexts of poverty, and there is a burgeoning literature on ethical issues in research in developing countries. In this article, we augment the existing literature by focusing on the experiences of an assessor working in a controlled trial of a mother-infant intervention in a poor South African community. We consider issues of community expectations, the presentation to our project of physical health problems, the issue of HIV/AIDS, cultural beliefs which impact on the research, child protection issues, and the tensions between research assessment and ubuntu--a cultural norm which requires helpful engagement with others. We suggest that our experiences may assist with the development of further research. PMID:16881161

  10. EDUCORE project: a clinical trial, randomised by clusters, to assess the effect of a visual learning method on blood pressure control in the primary healthcare setting

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background High blood pressure (HBP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). European hypertension and cardiology societies as well as expert committees on CVD prevention recommend stratifying cardiovascular risk using the SCORE method, the modification of lifestyles to prevent CVD, and achieving good control over risk factors. The EDUCORE (Education and Coronary Risk Evaluation) project aims to determine whether the use of a cardiovascular risk visual learning method - the EDUCORE method - is more effective than normal clinical practice in improving the control of blood pressure within one year in patients with poorly controlled hypertension but no background of CVD; Methods/Design This work describes a protocol for a clinical trial, randomised by clusters and involving 22 primary healthcare clinics, to test the effectiveness of the EDUCORE method. The number of patients required was 736, all between 40 and 65 years of age (n = 368 in the EDUCORE and control groups), all of whom had been diagnosed with HBP at least one year ago, and all of whom had poorly controlled hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic ≥ 90 mmHg). All personnel taking part were explained the trial and trained in its methodology. The EDUCORE method contemplates the visualisation of low risk SCORE scores using images embodying different stages of a high risk action, plus the receipt of a pamphlet explaining how to better maintain cardiac health. The main outcome variable was the control of blood pressure; secondary outcome variables included the SCORE score, therapeutic compliance, quality of life, and total cholesterol level. All outcome variables were measured at the beginning of the experimental period and again at 6 and 12 months. Information on sex, age, educational level, physical activity, body mass index, consumption of medications, change of treatment and blood analysis results was also recorded; Discussion The EDUCORE method could provide a

  11. Comparative Prospective Study of Load Distribution Projection Among Patients with Vertebral Fractures Treated with Percutaneous Vertebroplasty and a Control Group of Healthy Volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Kelekis, Alexios Filippiadis, Dimitrios K. Vergadis, Chrysovalantis Tsitskari, Maria Nasis, Nikolaos Malagari, Aikaterini Kelekis, Nikolaos

    2013-04-12

    PurposeThrough a prospective comparison of patients with vertebral fractures and normal population, we illustrate effect of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) upon projection of load distribution changes.MethodsVertebroplasty group (36 symptomatic patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures) was evaluated on an electronic baropodometer registering projection of weight bearing areas on feet. Load distribution between right and left foot (including rear-front of the same foot) during standing and walking was recorded and compared before (group V1) and the day after (group V2) PV. Control group (30 healthy asymptomatic volunteers-no surgery record) were evaluated on the same baropodometer.ResultsMean value of load distribution difference between rear-front of the same foot was 9.45 ± 6.79 % (54.72–45.28 %) upon standing and 14.76 ± 7.09 % (57.38–42.62 %) upon walking in the control group. Respective load distribution values before PV were 16.52 ± 11.23 and 30.91 ± 19.26 % and after PV were 10.08 ± 6.26 and 14.25 ± 7.68 % upon standing and walking respectively. Mean value of load distribution variation between the two feet was 6.36 and 14.6 % before and 4.62 and 10.4 % after PV upon standing and walking respectively. Comparison of load distribution variation (group V1–V2, group V1-control group) is statistically significant. Comparison of load distribution variation (group V2-control group) is not statistically significant. Comparison of load distribution variation among the two feet is statistically significant during walking but not statistically significant during standing.ConclusionsThere is a statistically significant difference when comparing load distribution variation prior vertebroplasty and that of normal population. After vertebroplasty, this difference normalizes in a statistically significant way. PV is efficient on equilibrium-load distribution improvement as well.

  12. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The <2-mm fraction of each sample was analyzed for Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Ti, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Ga, In, La, Li, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sn, Sr, Te, Th, Tl, U, V, W, Y, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry following a near-total digestion in a mixture of HCl, HNO3, HClO4, and HF. Separate methods were used for Hg, Se, total C, and carbonate-C on this same size fraction. Only Ag, In, and Te had a large percentage of concentrations below the detection limit. Quality control (QC) of the analyses was monitored at three levels: the laboratory performing the analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset

  13. Exercise for Everyone: A randomized controlled trial of Project Workout On Wheels in promoting exercise among wheelchair users

    PubMed Central

    Froehlich-Grobe, Katherine; Lee, Jaehoon; Aaronson, Lauren; Nary, Dorothy E.; Washburn, Richard A; Little, Todd D

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of two home-based behavioral interventions to promote wheelchair users exercise adoption and maintenance over 12 months. Design Randomized controlled trial, with participants stratified into groups based on disability type (stable, episodic, progressive) and support partner availability. Setting Exercise occurred in participant preferred locations (e.g., home, recreation center), with physiological data collected at the university-based exercise lab. Participants One hundred twenty-eight inactive wheelchair users (64 women) with sufficient upper arm mobility for arm-based exercise enrolled. Participants on average were 45 years old, lived with their impairment for 22 years, with spinal cord injury (46.1%) most commonly reported as causing mobility impairment. Interventions Both groups received home-based exercise interventions. The staff-supported group (n= 69) received intensive exercise support, while the self-guided group (n= 59) received minimal support. Both received exercise information, resistance bands, instructions to self-monitor exercise, regularly-scheduled phone calls, and handwritten cards. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome derived from weekly self-reported exercise. Secondary outcomes included physical fitness (aerobic/muscular) and predictors of exercise participation. Results The staff-supported group reported significantly greater exercise (~ 16 minutes/week) than the self-guided group over the year (t=10.6, p=0.00), with no significant between group difference in aerobic capacity (t=0.76, p=0.45) and strength (t=1.5, p=0.14). Conclusions Although the staff-supported group reported only moderately more exercise, the difference is potentially clinically significant as they also exercised more frequently. The staff-supported approach holds promise for encouraging exercise among wheelchair users, yet additional support may be necessary to achieve more exercise to meet national recommendations. PMID

  14. Design and Implementation of a Randomized Controlled Social and Mobile Weight Loss Trial for Young Adults (project SMART)

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, K; Marshall, SJ; Davila, EP; Kolodziejczyk, JK; Fowler, J; Calfas, KJ; Huang, J; Rock, CL; Griswold, W; Gupta, A; Merchant, G; Norman, GJ; Raab, F; Donohue, M; Fogg, BJ; Robinson, TN

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the theoretical rationale, intervention design, and clinical trial of a two-year weight control intervention for young adults deployed via social and mobile media. Methods A total of 404 overweight or obese college students from three Southern California universities (Mage = 22(±4) years; MBMI=29(±2.8); 70% female) were randomized to participate in the intervention or to receive an informational web-based weight loss program. The intervention is based on behavioral theory and integrates intervention elements across multiple touch points, including Facebook, SMS, smartphone applications, blogs, and e-mail. Participants are encouraged to seek social support among their friends, self-monitor their weight weekly, post their health behaviors on Facebook, and e-mail their weight loss questions/concerns to a health coach. The intervention is adaptive because new theory-driven and iteratively tailored intervention elements are developed and released over the course of the two-year intervention in response to patterns of use and user feedback. Measures of body mass index, waist circumference, physical activity (PA), sedentary behavior (SED), diet, weight management practices, smoking, alcohol, sleep, body image, self-esteem, and depression occur at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Currently, all participants have been recruited, and all are in the final year of the trial. Conclusion Theory-driven, evidence-based strategies for PA, SED, and dietary intake can be embedded in an intervention using social and mobile technologies to promote healthy weight-related behaviors in young adults. PMID:24215774

  15. Sex differences in myelin-associated protein levels within and density of projections between the orbital frontal cortex and dorsal striatum of adult rats: implications for inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Bayless, D W; Daniel, J M

    2015-08-01

    Impulsive actions and decisions often lead to undesirable outcomes. Lesion and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and dorsal striatum (dSTR) play key roles in inhibitory control. It has been proposed that greater OFC input into the dSTR reflects enhanced top-down cognitive control and less impulsive responding. We previously reported a sex difference in inhibitory control, such that female rats make fewer impulsive errors than do male rats. The goal of the present study was to investigate differences in the OFC and dSTR of young adult male and female rats. In Experiment 1, we measured levels of two myelin-associated proteins, myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin proteolipid protein (PLP), in the OFC and dSTR. Western blot data revealed that females had significantly higher levels of both MBP and PLP in the OFC but similar levels in the dSTR as compared to males. In Experiment 2, we infused the anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), into the OFC and measured the density of BDA in the dSTR. BDA was visualized using histochemistry followed by light microscopy imaging and densitometry analysis. Density of BDA in the dSTR was significantly greater in females as compared to males indicating that the projections from the OFC to dSTR may be greater in females as compared to males. Our results suggest a potential neuroanatomical sex difference that may contribute to the reported differences in inhibitory control levels of male and female rats. PMID:26002313

  16. Emergency control system based on the analytical hierarchy process and coordinated development degree model for sudden water pollution accidents in the Middle Route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project in China.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan; Xu, Guobin; Ma, Chao; Chen, Liang

    2016-06-01

    Water transfer projects are important for realizing reasonable allocation of water resources, but once a water pollution accident occurs during such a project, the water environment is exposed to enormous risks. Therefore, it is critical to determine an appropriate emergency control system (ECS) for sudden water pollution accidents that occur in water transfer projects. In this study, the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) integrated with the coordinated development degree model (CDDM) was used to develop the ECS. This ECS was developed into two parts, including the emergency risk assessment and the emergency control. Feasible emergency control targets and control technology were also proposed for different sudden water pollution accidents. A demonstrative project was conducted in the Fangshui to Puyang channel, which is part of the Beijing-Shijiazhuang Emergency Water Supply Project (BSP) in the Middle Route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project (MR-SNWTP) in China. However, we could not use an actual toxic soluble pollutant to validate our ECS, so we performed the experiment with sucrose to test the ECS based on its concentration variation. The relative error of peak sucrose concentration was less than 20 %. PMID:26979314

  17. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new

  18. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.

    1992-03-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach that will be used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems that will be used to plan and control the HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP).

  19. Environmental Impact of Controlled-Source Explosions in Ethiopia (Project EAGLE): Surface Shaking, Ground Velocities, and Effects on Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Les, A.; Klemperer, S. L.; Keranen, K.; Khan, A.; Maguire, P.

    2003-12-01

    In January 2003, as part of the Ethiopia-Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment (EAGLE) we conducted a refraction and wide-angle reflection survey of the Main Ethiopian Rift. 757 RefTek "Texan" seismographs with vertical geophones were deployed in 400 km-long axial and cross-rift lines, with another 231 in a central 3D array 100 km in diameter. An 80-instrument passive array of intermediate and broadband sensors was active during our experiment. We recorded 19 borehole shots loaded in nominal 50-meter boreholes, 2 quarry shots, and 2 lake shots. The shots ranged in size from 50-5750 kg, with the most common shot size being 1 tonne. Prior to loading each shot-hole, we measured distances between shots and the nearest structure, typically un-reinforced mud-and-wood houses, occasionally concrete irrigation ditches and aqueducts. We then used semi-empirical formulae derived by Oriard (Hendron and Oriard, 1972) to calculate expected maximum and minimum bounds on ground velocity at these structures, and selected an appropriate shot size to keep the predicted velocity below the "threshold for cosmetic damage", or 2 inches per second, at the most vulnerable structure. The Oriard formulae are derived from measurements associated with blasting for mining and civil engineering purposes and may not accurately predict the ground velocity from the source depths and explosive type used in the EAGLE and other controlled-source experiments. A detailed, trace-by-trace analysis of maximum ground velocities at our closest seismographs can provide data that will be useful in planning future large-scale seismic experiments. Preliminary results from traces within 20 km of our borehole shots suggest that maximum recorded ground velocities were within or below the maximum-minimum range predicted by Oriard, and hence that larger shot sizes could have been used with acceptable risks. A lake shot fired at the optimum depth (84 m for a 1 tonne shot) produced ground velocities that exceeded

  20. Environmental Impact of Controlled-Source Explosions in Ethiopia (Project EAGLE): Geochemical Effects on Lakes and Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, M.; Klemperer, S. L.; Mengistou, S.

    2003-12-01

    Controlled-source seismologists seek to detonate charges in lakes or rivers because source coupling is an order of magnitude larger in water than in drill holes. Previous studies have documented the biological impact of dynamite explosions on small fish populations; however, little attention has been paid to the potential chemical changes associated with the dispersal of a dynamite charge in a body of water. At the request of the Ethiopian Environmental Protection Authority, we sought to examine the effects on water chemistry resulting from the detonation of one tonne dynamite charges used during the Ethiopia-Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment (EAGLE), an active source seismic survey of the Main Ethiopian Rift. Water samples from two Ethiopian lakes and six Ethiopian streams were collected in January 2003. Samples were collected immediately preceding and following the detonation of the 2 lake shots and those 6 of our 19 borehole shots for which a stream was present in the surrounding area. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) analysis has provided concentrations of 16 elements, including: As, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Sr, V, Zn. Additional elements were also examined, however elements such as Cr, Fe, and Pb, had concentrations residing close to the detection limits of the ICP-OES, and the certainty of these numbers is not reliable. We plan to make measurements of Cl and S using the Ion Chromatograph (IC) method. The sites from which the water samples were collected include: (1) Lake Shala, a 12 by 15 km lake, 266 meters deep, (2) Lake Arenguade, an approximately 800m diameter crater lake, 32 m deep, and (3) six streams, each located within close proximity to one of the 19 borehole shots. All samples were filtered using a 2 micron nalgene filter to remove any biotic material. Prior to each shot, water samples were collect. To the extent possible, lake samples were taken 1 hour before the shot, 10 minutes

  1. An exercise-based randomized controlled trial on brain, cognition, physical health and mental health in overweight/obese children (ActiveBrains project): Rationale, design and methods.

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Sánchez, Cristina; Mora-González, José; Migueles, Jairo H; Martín-Matillas, Miguel; Gómez-Vida, José; Escolano-Margarit, María Victoria; Maldonado, José; Enriquez, Gala María; Pastor-Villaescusa, Belén; de Teresa, Carlos; Navarrete, Socorro; Lozano, Rosa María; de Dios Beas-Jiménez, Juan; Estévez-López, Fernando; Mena-Molina, Alejandra; Heras, María José; Chillón, Palma; Campoy, Cristina; Muñoz-Hernández, Victoria; Martínez-Ávila, Wendy Daniela; Merchan, María Elisa; Perales, José C; Gil, Ángel; Verdejo-García, Antonio; Aguilera, Concepción M; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Labayen, Idoia; Catena, Andrés; Ortega, Francisco B

    2016-03-01

    The new and recent advances in neuroelectric and neuroimaging technologies provide a new era for further exploring and understanding how brain and cognition function can be stimulated by environmental factors, such as exercise, and particularly to study whether physical exercise influences brain development in early ages. The present study, namely the ActiveBrains project, aims to examine the effects of a physical exercise programme on brain and cognition, as well as on selected physical and mental health outcomes in overweight/obese children. A total of 100 participants aged 8 to 11 years are randomized into an exercise group (N=50) or a control group (N=50). The intervention lasts 20-weeks, with 3-5 sessions per week of 90 min each, and is mainly focused on high-intensity aerobic exercise yet also includes muscle-strengthening exercises. The extent to what the intervention effect remains 8-months after the exercise programme finishes is also studied in a subsample. Brain structure and function and cognitive performance are assessed using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalographic recordings. Secondary outcomes include physical health outcomes (e.g. physical fitness, body fatness, bone mass and lipid-metabolic factors) and mental health outcomes (e.g. chronic stress indicators and overall behavioural and personality measurements such as anxiety or depression). This project will substantially contribute to the existing knowledge and will have an impact on societies, since early stimulation of brain development might have long lasting consequences on cognitive performance, academic achievement and in the prevention of behavioural problems and the promotion of psychological adjustment and mental health. Clinical trials. Gov identifier: NCT02295072. PMID:26924671

  2. Pilot-scale Limestone Emission Control (LEC) process: A development project. Volume 1, Main report and appendices A, B, C, and D: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Appell, K.W.; McKenna, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    ETS, Inc., a pollution consulting firm with headquarters in Roanoke, Virginia, has developed a dry, limestone-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This SO{sub 2} removal system, called Limestone Emission Control (LEC), can be designed for installation on either new or existing coal-fired boilers. In the LEC process, the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas reacts with wetted granular limestone that is contained in a moving bed. A surface layer of principally calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) is formed on the limestone. Periodic removal of this surface layer by mechanical agitation allows high utilization of the limestone granules. A nominal 5,000 acfm LEC pilot plant has been designed, fabricated and installed on the slipstream of a 70,000 pph stoker boiler providing steam to Ohio University`s Athens, Ohio campus. A total of over 90 experimental trials have been performed using the pilot-scale moving-bed LEC dry scrubber as a part of this research project with run times ranging up to a high of 125 hours. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies as high as 99.9% were achievable for all experimental conditions studied during which sufficient humidification was added to the LEC bed. The LEC process and conventional limestone scrubbing have been compared on an equatable basis using flue gas conditions that would be expected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of a 500 MW coal-fired power plant. The LEC was found to have a definite economic advantage in both direct capital costs and operating costs. Based on the success and findings of the present project, the next step in LEC process development will be a full-scale commercial demonstration unit.

  3. Chemical management and control strategies: experiences from the GTZ pilot project on chemical safety in Indonesian small and medium-sized enterprises.

    PubMed

    Tischer, M; Scholaen, S

    2003-10-01

    In 1998 the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) launched the Convention Project on Chemical Safety in developing countries. The project aims to support developing countries in the implementation of the Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, create human resources and institutional capacities and to demonstrate via pilot measures how chemical safety in the partner countries can be improved and sustainably implemented in line with international standards. With this objective the development of a Chemical Management Guide (CM Guide) for small and medium-sized enterprises in developing countries has been initiated. The guide describes a step-by-step approach which is based on identifying 'hot-spots' as a first step, and making a chemical inventory as a second step. The third step is the continuous improvement of chemical management. In total, there are six tools that aim to support the chemical management process: basic concepts for risk assessment; description of control approaches; using material safety data sheets (MSDSs); risk phrases for hazardous substances; safety phrases for hazardous substances; symbols used for labelling hazardous substances. In the course of the test-implementation of the CM Guide in Indonesia, it was found that MSDSs were not available in most of the smaller companies. In contrast, medium-sized and larger companies do have more MSDSs available. It was also found that the way to engage the minds of company owners and managers is with economic arguments related to the loss, waste and expiry of materials, and quality standards expected from importing countries. PMID:14530183

  4. Final Technical Report for project "Factors Controlling In Situ Uranium and Technetium Bio-Reduction and Reoxidation at the NABIR Field Research Center"

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jonathan D. Istok , Oregon State University; Dr. Lee Krumholz, University of Oklahoma; Dr. James McKinley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Dr. Baohua Gu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2006-10-31

    The overall goal of this project was to better understand factors and processes controlling microbially-mediated reduction and reoxidation of U and Tc in the unconsolidated residuum overlying the Nolichucky shale at the Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Project activities were designed to test the following hypotheses: 1. The small rates of denitrification and U bio-reduction observed in laboratory incubations of sediments from FRC Area 1 at low pH (< 5) are due to the presence of high concentrations of toxic metals (especially Al and Ni). Rates of Tc reduction will also be small at low pH in the presence of high concentrations of toxic metals. 2. In situ rates of U and perhaps Tc bio-reduction can be increased by increasing system pH and thus precipitating toxic metals from solution. 3. In situ rates of U and Tc bio-reduction can be increased by the addition of humic substances, which complex toxic metals such as Al and Ni, buffer pH, and serve as electron shuttles to facilitate U and Tc reduction. 4. Microbially-reduced U and Tc are rapidly oxidized in the presence of high concentrations of NO3- and the denitrification intermediates NO2-, N2O, and NO. 5. An electron-donor-addition strategy (type and form of donor, with or without pH adjustment and with or without the co-addition of humic substances) can be devised to reduce U and Tc concentrations for an extended period of time in low pH groundwater in the presence of high concentrations of NO3-, Al, and Ni. This strategy operates by removing or complexing these components of FRC groundwater to allow the subsequent reduction of U(VI) and Tc(VII).

  5. "Project Management Controls with Systems."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell' Isola, A. J.

    There have recently been a number of new concepts introduced into the building industry to reduce building costs. In this speech, the author illustrates how three of these new concepts -- construction management, building systems, and value engineering -- can be combined to effect significant reduction in both the initial and the ownership costs…

  6. Bath Breakfast Project (BBP) - Examining the role of extended daily fasting in human energy balance and associated health outcomes: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN31521726

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Current guidance regarding the role of daily breakfast in human health is largely grounded in cross-sectional observations. However, the causal nature of these relationships has not been fully explored and what limited information is emerging from controlled laboratory-based experiments appears inconsistent with much existing data. Further progress in our understanding therefore requires a direct examination of how daily breakfast impacts human health under free-living conditions. Methods/Design The Bath Breakfast Project (BBP) is a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of daily breakfast consumption relative to extended fasting on energy balance and human health. Approximately 70 men and women will undergo extensive laboratory-based assessments of their acute metabolic responses under fasted and post-prandial conditions, to include: resting metabolic rate, substrate oxidation, dietary-induced thermogenesis and systemic concentrations of key metabolites/hormones. Physiological and psychological indices of appetite will also be monitored both over the first few hours of the day (i.e. whether fed or fasted) and also following a standardised test lunch used to assess voluntary energy intake under controlled conditions. Baseline measurements of participants' anthropometric characteristics (e.g. DEXA) will be recorded prior to intervention, along with an oral glucose tolerance test and acquisition of adipose tissue samples to determine expression of key genes and estimates of tissue-specific insulin action. Participants will then be randomly assigned either to a group prescribed an energy intake of ≥3000 kJ before 1100 each day or a group to extend their overnight fast by abstaining from ingestion of energy-providing nutrients until 1200 each day, with all laboratory-based measurements followed-up 6 weeks later. Free-living assessments of energy intake (via direct weighed food diaries) and energy expenditure (via combined heart

  7. Pricing Policies And Control of Tobacco in Europe (PPACTE) project: cross-national comparison of smoking prevalence in 18 European countries.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Silvano; Lugo, Alessandra; La Vecchia, Carlo; Boffetta, Paolo; Chaloupka, Frank J; Colombo, Paolo; Currie, Laura; Fernandez, Esteve; Fischbacher, Colin; Gilmore, Anna; Godfrey, Fiona; Joossens, Luk; Leon, Maria E; Levy, David T; Nguyen, Lien; Rosenqvist, Gunnar; Ross, Hana; Townsend, Joy; Clancy, Luke

    2014-05-01

    Limited data on smoking prevalence allowing valid between-country comparison are available in Europe. The aim of this study is to provide data on smoking prevalence and its determinants in 18 European countries. In 2010, within the Pricing Policies And Control of Tobacco in Europe (PPACTE) project, we conducted a face-to-face survey on smoking in 18 European countries (Albania, Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Croatia, England, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain and Sweden) on a total of 18 056 participants, representative for each country of the population aged 15 years or older. Overall, 27.2% of the participants were current smokers (30.6% of men and 24.1% of women). Smoking prevalence was highest in Bulgaria (40.9%) and Greece (38.9%) and lowest in Italy (22.0%) and Sweden (16.3%). Smoking prevalence ranged between 15.7% (Sweden) and 44.3% (Bulgaria) for men and between 11.6% (Albania) and 38.1% (Ireland) for women. Multivariate analysis showed a significant inverse trend between smoking prevalence and the level of education in both sexes. Male-to-female smoking prevalence ratios ranged from 0.85 in Spain to 3.47 in Albania and current-to-ex prevalence ratios ranged from 0.68 in Sweden to 4.28 in Albania. There are considerable differences across Europe in smoking prevalence, and male-to-female and current-to-ex smoking prevalence ratios. Eastern European countries, lower income countries and those with less advanced tobacco control policies have less favourable smoking patterns and are at an earlier stage of the tobacco epidemic. PMID:24441832

  8. Project Energize: whole-region primary school nutrition and physical activity programme; evaluation of body size and fitness 5 years after the randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rush, Elaine; McLennan, Stephanie; Obolonkin, Victor; Vandal, Alain C; Hamlin, Michael; Simmons, David; Graham, David

    2014-01-28

    Project Energize, a region-wide whole-school nutrition and physical activity programme, commenced as a randomised controlled trial (RCT) in the period 2004-6 in 124 schools in Waikato, New Zealand. In 2007, sixty-two control schools were engaged in the programme, and by 2011, all but two of the 235 schools in the region were engaged. Energizers (trained nutrition and physical activity specialists) work with eight to twelve schools each to achieve the goals of the programme, which are based on healthier eating and enhanced physical activity. In 2011, indices of obesity and physical fitness of 2474 younger (7·58 (sd 0·57) years) and 2330 older (10·30 (sd 0·51) years) children attending 193 of the 235 primary schools were compared with historical measurements. After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, socio-economic status (SES) and school cluster effects, the combined prevalence of obesity and overweight among younger and older children in 2011 was lower by 31 and 15 %, respectively, than that among 'unEnergized' children in the 2004 to 2006 RCT. Similarly, BMI was lower by 3·0 % (95 % CI - 5·8, - 1·3) and 2·4 % (95 % CI - 4·3, - 0·5). Physical fitness (time taken to complete a 550 m run) was significantly higher in the Energized children (13·7 and 11·3 %, respectively) than in a group of similarly aged children from another region. These effects were observed for boys and girls, both indigenous Māori and non-Māori children, and across SES. The long-term regional commitment to the Energize programme in schools may potentially lead to a secular reduction in the prevalence of overweight and obesity and gains in physical fitness, which may reduce the risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23867069

  9. Knowledge about the relationship between smoking and blindness in Canada, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia: Results from the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Project

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Ryan David; Spafford, Marlee M.; Parkinson, Carla M.; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Smoking is causally associated with certain prevalent visually impairing eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration and cataract. Studies have found that people are afraid of “going blind” and may be motivated to quit smoking if they know that vision loss is associated with smoking behavior. Methods A random-digit dialed telephone survey was used to measure health knowledge of adult smokers in Canada (n 5 2,765), the United States (n 5 3,178), the United Kingdom (n 5 2,767), and Australia (n 5 2,623) as part of the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Project. Results A low proportion of smokers from Canada (13.0%), the United States (9.5%), and the United Kingdom (9.7%) believed that smoking can cause blindness. In contrast, 47.2% of Australian smokers believed that smoking causes blindness. Australia was the only country during the sampling period to have national awareness campaigns about smoking and its effects on eye health. Conclusion These findings point to the need across countries to educate the public on this important consequence of smoking. There is an opportunity for the public health and eye health communities to work to educate the public about the impacts smoking has on eye health to improve quit rates and help discourage people from starting to smoke. PMID:21524603

  10. H I scaling relations of galaxies in the environment of H I-rich and control galaxies observed by the Bluedisk project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enci; Wang, Jing; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Li, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Our work is based on the `Bluedisk' project, a programme to map the neutral gas in a sample of 25 H I-rich spirals and a similar number of control galaxies with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). In this paper, we focus on the H I properties of the galaxies in the environment of our targeted galaxies. In total, we extract 65 galaxies from the WSRT cubes with stellar masses between 108 and 1011 M⊙. Most of these galaxies are located on the same H I mass-size relation and `H I-plane' as normal spiral galaxies. We find that companions around H I-rich galaxies tend to be H I-rich as well and to have larger R_{90,H I}/R_{50,H I}. This suggests a scenario of `H I conformity', similar to the colour conformity found by Weinmann et al.: galaxies tend to adopt the H I properties of their neighbours. We visually inspect the outliers from the H I mass-size relation and galaxies which are offset from the H I plane and find that they show morphological and kinematical signatures of recent interactions with their environment. We speculate that these outliers have been disturbed by tidal or ram-pressure stripping processes, or in a few cases, by accretion events.

  11. Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project-longitudinal handling qualities study of a relaxed-stability airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The results of a piloted simulation of longitudinal handling qualities of an airplane with relaxed static stability are described. This task was performed under the Integrated Application of Active Controls (IAAC) Technology Project within the NASA Energy Efficient Transport Program. A representative medium range transport airplane, the Boeing Model 757, was simulated. Evaluations were made of the unaugmented airplane and of the airplane with an Essential Pitch Augmented Stability (PAS) System and with a Primary PAS System at various center of gravity (cg) conditions. Level 2 pilot ratings were attained with cg locations aft to about 57% mean aerodynamic chord (MAC) or 6% aft of the neutral point for unaugmented landing approach. For Mach = 0.80, unaugmented cruise Level 2 ratings were attained to 47% MAC or 5% forward of the maneuver point. The augmented airplane model provided handling qualities close to or within the Level 1 boundary at all cg locations for both Essential and Primary PAS. Analyses of the test conditions when compared with existing handling qualities criteria based on classical unaugmented airplane characteristics agreed well with the pilot ratings. The unaugmented results are comparable to those reported by both the Douglas Aircraft Company and Lockheed California Company from simulation investigations of transport configurations with roughly similar dimensional and mass characteristics.

  12. The Challenge of Time-Dependent Control of Both Processing and Performance of Materials at the Mesoscale, and the MaRIE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Cris W.

    DOE and NNSA are recognizing a mission need for flexible and reduced-cost product-based solutions to materials through accelerated qualification, certification, and assessment. The science challenge lies between the nanoscale of materials and the integral device scale, at the middle or ''mesoscale'' where interfaces, defects, and microstructure determine the performance of the materials over the lifecycle of the intended use. Time-dependent control of the processing, structure and properties of materials at this scale lies at the heart of qualifying and certifying additive manufactured parts; experimental data of high fidelity and high resolution are necessary to discover the right physical mechanisms to model and to validate and calibrate those reduced-order models in codes on Exascale computers. The scientific requirements to do this are aided by a revolution in coherent imaging of non-periodic features that can be combined with scattering off periodic structures. This drives the need to require a coherent x-ray source, brilliant and high repetition rate, of sufficiently high energy to see into and through the mesoscale. The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) Project is a proposal to build such a very-high-energy X-ray Free Electron Laser.

  13. Evaluation of diesel fleet emissions and control policies from plume chasing measurements of on-road vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Chui Fong; Rakowska, Agata; Townsend, Thomas; Brimblecombe, Peter; Chan, Tat Leung; Yam, Yat Shing; Močnik, Griša; Ning, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Vehicle emissions are an important source of urban air pollution. Diesel fuelled vehicles, although constituting a relatively small fraction of fleet population in many cities, are significant contributors to the emission inventory due to their often long mileage for goods and public transport. Recent classification of diesel exhaust as carcinogenic by the World Health Organization also raises attention to more stringent control of diesel emissions to protect public health. Although various mandatory and voluntary based emission control measures have been implemented in Hong Kong, there have been few investigations to evaluate if the fleet emission characteristics have met desired emission reduction objectives and if adoption of an Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) programme has been effective in achieving these objectives. The limitations are partially due to the lack of cost-effective approaches for the large scale characterisation of fleet based emissions to assess the effectiveness of control measures and policy. This study has used a plume chasing method to collect a large amount of on-road vehicle emission data of Hong Kong highways and a detailed analysis was carried out to provide a quantitative evaluation of the emission characteristics in terms of the role of high and super-emitters in total emission reduction, impact of after-treatment on the multi-pollutants reduction strategy and the trend of NO2 emissions with newer emission standards. The study revealed that not all the high-emitters are from those vehicles of older Euro emission standards. Meanwhile, there is clear evidence that high-emitters for one pollutant may not be a high-emitter for another pollutant. Multi-pollutant control strategy needs to be considered in the enactment of the emission control policy which requires more comprehensive retrofitting technological solutions and matching I/M programme to ensure the proper maintenance of fleets. The plume chasing approach used in this study also

  14. Projects Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Textor, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    The great educational value of projects is emphasized by contrasting negative aspects of the life of today's children with the goals of project work. This is illustrated by a project "Shopping." It is shown what children are learning in such projects and what the advantages of project work are. Relevant topic areas, criteria for selecting a…

  15. The UP-TECH project, an intervention to support caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease patients in Italy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents a significant challenge for the health care and social service systems of many developed countries. AD affects both patients and family caregivers, on whom the main burden of care falls, putting them at higher risk of stress, anxiety, mortality and lower quality of life. Evidence remains controversial concerning the effectiveness of providing support to caregivers of AD patients, through case management, counseling, training, technological devices and the integration of existing care services. The main objectives of the UP-TECH project are: 1) to reduce the care burden of family caregivers of AD patients; and 2) to maintain AD patients at home. Methods/design A total of 450 dyads comprising AD patients and their caregivers in five health districts of the Marche region, Italy, will be randomized into three study arms. Participants in the first study arm will receive comprehensive care and support from a case manager (an ad hoc trained social worker) (UP group). Subjects in the second study arm will be similarly supported by a case manager, but in addition will receive a technological toolkit (UP-TECH group). Participants in the control arm will only receive brochures regarding available services. All subjects will be visited at home by a trained nurse who will assess them using a standardized questionnaire at enrollment (M0), 6 months (M6) and 12 months (M12). Follow-up telephone interviews are scheduled at 24 months (M24). The primary outcomes are: 1) caregiver burden, measured using the Caregiver Burden Inventory (CBI); and 2) the actual number of days spent at home during the study period, defined as the number of days free from institutionalizations, hospitalizations and stays in an observation unit of an emergency room. Discussion The UP-TECH project protocol integrates previous evidence on the effectiveness of strategies in dementia care, that is, the use of case management, new technologies, nurse

  16. ALS Project Management Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Krupnick, Jim; Harkins, Joe

    2000-05-01

    This manual has been prepared to help establish a consistent baseline of management practices across all ALS projects. It describes the initial process of planning a project, with a specific focus on the production of a formal project plan. We feel that the primary weakness in ALS project management efforts to date stems from a failure to appreciate the importance of ''up-front'' project planning. In this document, we present a guide (with examples) to preparing the documents necessary to properly plan, monitor, and control a project's activities. While following the manual will certainly not guarantee good project management, failure to address the issues we raise will dramatically reduce the chance of success. Here we define success as meeting the technical goals on schedule and within the prescribed budget.

  17. Structural Image of Arc-Arc Collision in Central Hokkaido, Japan, Revealed from Integrated Analysis for Controlled Source Seismic Data of the 1998-2000 Hokkaido Transect Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Takaya; Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Tanio; Kurashimo, Eiji; Tsumura, Noriko; Abe, Susumu; Noda, Katsuya; Hirata, Naoshi

    2013-04-01

    The Hidaka region in the central part of Hokkaido Island, Japan is known as an arc-arc collision zone where the Kuril Arc (southern part of eastern Hokkaido) has been collided against the NE Japan Arc (western Hokkaido) since the middle Miocene. This collision is a controlling factor for the formation of the Hidaka Mountains, the westward obduction of the middle/upper part of lower crustal rocks of the Kuril Arc (the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt) and the development of the foreland fold-and-thrust belt. The Hokkaido Transect Project from 1998 to 2000 was a multidisciplinary effort intended to clarify the structural deformation process associated with the arc-arc collision. The element of the active source experiment in this project was composed of a 227-km seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile running southern part of Hokkaido and three seismic reflection lines from the hinterland to the foreland crossing the Hidaka Mountains. The previous study for these data sets, mainly based on the forward modelling by the ray-tracing technique, revealed the collision structure in the upper and middle crustal levels beneath the Hidaka Mountains, and a thick sedimentary package developed beneath the fold-and-thrust belt (Iwasaki et al., 2004). The data sets collected through this project are of high quality, which enables us to apply more advanced interpretation techniques. Because refraction/wide-angle reflection method and near-vertical reflection profiling are complimentary to each other, simultaneous evaluation for these two kinds of data set is expected to yield significant improvement for structural modelling and its geophysical/geological interpretation. In the present analysis, seismic tomography analysis was applied to a combined set of a large amount of near vertical reflection data and the refraction data. This analysis was mainly undertaken to confirm the validity of the upper 20-km crustal structure deduced from the previous result (Iwasaki et al. 2004) and

  18. Effectiveness of Antismoking Media Messages and Education Among Adolescents in Malaysia and Thailand: Findings From the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Project

    PubMed Central

    Zawahir, Shukry

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Finding ways to discourage adolescents from taking up smoking is important because those who begin smoking at an earlier age are more likely to become addicted and have greater difficulty in quitting. This article examined whether anti smoking messages and education could help to reduce smoking susceptibility among adolescents in two Southeast Asian countries and to explore the possible moderating effect of country and gender. Methods: Data came from Wave 1 of the International Tobacco Control Southeast Asia Project (ITC-SEA) survey conducted in Malaysia (n = 1,008) and Thailand (n = 1,000) where adolescents were asked about receiving antismoking advice from nurses or doctors, being taught at schools about the danger of smoking, noticing antismoking messages, knowledge of health effects of smoking, beliefs about the health risks of smoking, smoking susceptibility, and demographic information. Data were analyzed using chi-square tests and logistic regression models. Results: Overall, significantly more Thai adolescents reported receiving advice from their nurses or doctors about the danger of smoking (p < .001), but no country difference was observed for reported antismoking education in schools and exposure to antismoking messages. Multivariate analyses revealed that only provision of antismoking education at schools was significantly associated with reduced susceptibility to smoking among female Malaysian adolescents (OR = 0.26). Higher knowledge of smoking harm and higher perceived health risk of smoking were associated with reduced smoking susceptibility among Thai female (OR = 0.52) and Malaysian male adolescents (OR = 0.63), respectively. Conclusions: Educating adolescents about the dangers of smoking in schools appears to be the most effective means of reducing adolescents’ smoking susceptibility in both countries, although different prevention strategies may be necessary to ensure effectiveness for male and female adolescents. PMID:22949569

  19. A model to calculate consistent atmospheric emission projections and its application to Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumbreras, Julio; Borge, Rafael; de Andrés, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez, Encarnación

    Global warming and air quality are headline environmental issues of our time and policy must preempt negative international effects with forward-looking strategies. As part of the revision of the European National Emission Ceilings Directive, atmospheric emission projections for European Union countries are being calculated. These projections are useful to drive European air quality analyses and to support wide-scale decision-making. However, when evaluating specific policies and measures at sectoral level, a more detailed approach is needed. This paper presents an original methodology to evaluate emission projections. Emission projections are calculated for each emitting activity that has emissions under three scenarios: without measures (business as usual), with measures (baseline) and with additional measures (target). The methodology developed allows the estimation of highly disaggregated multi-pollutant, consistent emissions for a whole country or region. In order to assure consistency with past emissions included in atmospheric emission inventories and coherence among the individual activities, the consistent emission projection (CEP) model incorporates harmonization and integration criteria as well as quality assurance/quality check (QA/QC) procedures. This study includes a sensitivity analysis as a first approach to uncertainty evaluation. The aim of the model presented in this contribution is to support decision-making process through the assessment of future emission scenarios taking into account the effect of different detailed technical and non-technical measures and it may also constitute the basis for air quality modelling. The system is designed to produce the information and formats related to international reporting requirements and it allows performing a comparison of national results with lower resolution models such as RAINS/GAINS. The methodology has been successfully applied and tested to evaluate Spanish emission projections up to 2020 for 26

  20. Shop Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Bob

    Vocational agriculture teachers in Oklahoma prepared the shop project drawings which comprise the document. Seventy-one projects, with lists of required materials, diagrams, and measurements, are included. Construction projects fall into six categories (number of projects in parentheses): Trailers (5), racks (3), livestock production projects…

  1. Trend analysis of selected water-quality data associated with salinity-control projects in the Grand Valley, in the lower Gunnison River basin, and at Meeker Dome, western Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    To decrease salt loading to the Colorado River from irrigated agriculture, salinity-control projects have been under construction since 1979 by the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the Grand Valley and since 1988 in the lower Gunnison River Basin of western Colorado. In 1980, a salinity-control project was initiated at Meeker Dome, which involved plugging three abandoned oil wells that were discharging saline water to the White River. Trend analysis was used to determine if the salinity-control projects had affected salinity in the Colorado and White Rivers. The mean annual dissolved-solids load in the Colorado River near the Colorado-Utah State line for water years 1970-93 was about 3.32 million tons. About 46 percent of that load was from the Colorado River upstream from the Grand Valley and about 38 percent was from the Gunnison River. About 16 percent of the dissolved-solids load in the Colorado River near the State line was discharged from the Grand Valley, and most of the Grand Valley dissolved-solids load was from irrigation-induced sources. Monotonic trend analysis of dissolved-solids and major-ion data for the Colorado and Gunnison Rivers was used for determining if salinity-control projects had affected salinity (dissolved solids) in the Colorado River. Data collected in water years 1970-93 at gaging stations on the Colorado River-one near Cameo and the other near the Colorado-Utah State line, and at the station on the Gunnison River near Grand Junction-were analyzed for trends. A computerized procedure developed by the U.S. Geological Survey that uses the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test with adjustment for streamflow was used for trend analysis of periodic and monthly data, and linear regression was used for trend analysis of annual data. Three time periods were tested, including periods that were concurrent with work on salinity-control projects. Many of the trends in unadjusted concentration and load data were not

  2. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; McMakin, A.H.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach being used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems used to plan and control HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP). Battelle's contract with CDC only extends through May 1994 when the key technical work will be completed. There-fore, this plan is focused only on the period during which Battelle is a participant.

  3. Project Management Plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shipler, D.B.; McMakin, A.H.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This Project Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach being used to manage the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The plan describes the management structure and the technical and administrative control systems used to plan and control HEDR Project performance. The plan also describes the relationship among key project participants: Battelle, the Centers for Disease control (CDC), and the Technical Steering Panel (TSP). Battelle`s contract with CDC only extends through May 1994 when the key technical work will be completed. There-fore, this plan is focused only on the period during which Battelle is a participant.

  4. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; From Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  5. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White described the simulator as follows: 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  6. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Track, Model 2 and Model 1, the 20-foot sphere. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) From Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966. 'The model system is designed so that a television camera is mounted on a camera boom on each transport cart and each cart system is shared by two models. The cart's travel along the tracks represents longitudinal motion along the plane of a nominal orbit, vertical travel of the camera boom represents latitude on out-of-plane travel, and horizontal travel of the camera boom represents altitude changes.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379.

  7. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  8. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Construction of Model 1 used in the LOLA simulator. This was a twenty-foot sphere which simulated for the astronauts what the surface of the moon would look like from 200 miles up. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote: 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  9. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  10. 33 CFR 208.11 - Regulations for use of storage allocated for flood control or navigation and/or project operation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... use of reservoir storage space allocated for flood control or navigation and/or release functions of a... discharge and storage space required for flood control and/or navigation, based on the runoff potential... regarding the quantity and value of space to reserve in the reservoir for flood control and/or...

  11. 33 CFR 208.11 - Regulations for use of storage allocated for flood control or navigation and/or project operation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... use of reservoir storage space allocated for flood control or navigation and/or release functions of a... discharge and storage space required for flood control and/or navigation, based on the runoff potential... regarding the quantity and value of space to reserve in the reservoir for flood control and/or...

  12. 33 CFR 208.11 - Regulations for use of storage allocated for flood control or navigation and/or project operation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... use of reservoir storage space allocated for flood control or navigation and/or release functions of a... discharge and storage space required for flood control and/or navigation, based on the runoff potential... regarding the quantity and value of space to reserve in the reservoir for flood control and/or...

  13. 33 CFR 208.11 - Regulations for use of storage allocated for flood control or navigation and/or project operation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... use of reservoir storage space allocated for flood control or navigation and/or release functions of a... discharge and storage space required for flood control and/or navigation, based on the runoff potential... regarding the quantity and value of space to reserve in the reservoir for flood control and/or...

  14. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  15. Issues in NASA Program and Project Management: Focus on Project Planning and Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor); Lawbaugh, William M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Topics addressed include: Planning and scheduling training for working project teams at NASA, overview of project planning and scheduling workshops, project planning at NASA, new approaches to systems engineering, software reliability assessment, and software reuse in wind tunnel control systems.

  16. Oral clodronate for adjuvant treatment of operable breast cancer (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-34): a multicentre, placebo-controlled, randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Alexander H G; Anderson, Stewart J; Lembersky, Barry C; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Falkson, Carla I; King, Karen M; Weir, Lorna M; Brufsky, Adam M; Dakhil, Shaker; Lad, Thomas; Baez-Diaz, Luis; Gralow, Julie R; Robidoux, André; Perez, Edith A; Zheng, Ping; Geyer, Charles E; Swain, Sandra M; Costantino, Joseph P; Mamounas, Eleftherios P; Wolmark, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Bisphosphonates are thought to act through the osteoclast by changing bone microenvironment. Previous findings of adjuvant clodronate trials in different populations with operable breast cancer have been mixed. The National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) protocol B-34 aims to ascertain whether oral clodronate can improve outcomes in women with primary breast cancer. Methods NSABP B-34 is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 3323 women with stage 1–3 breast cancer. After surgery to remove the tumour, patients were stratified by age, axillary nodes, and oestrogen and progesterone receptor status and randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either oral clodronate 1600 mg daily for 3 years (n=1662) or placebo (1661). The primary endpoint was disease-free survival, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00009945. Findings Median follow-up was 90·7 months (IQR 82·7–100·0) and 3311 patients had data for this period. Disease-free survival did not differ between groups (286 events in the clodronate group vs 312 in the placebo group; hazard ratio 0·91, 95% CI 0·78–1·07; p=0·27). Moreover, no differences were recorded for overall survival (0·84, 0·67–1·05; p=0·13), recurrence-free interval (0·83, 0·67–1·04; p=0·10), or bone metastasis-free interval (0·77, 0·55–1·07; p=0·12). Non-bone metastasis-free interval was slightly increased with clodronate (0·74, 0·55–1·00; p=0·047). Analyses in women age 50 years or older on study entry showed benefits of clodronate for recurrence-free interval (0·75, 0·57–0·99; p=0·045), bone metastasis-free interval (0·62, 0·40–0·95; p=0·027), and non-bone metastasis-free interval (0·63, 0·43–0·91; p=0·014), but not for overall survival (0·80, 0·61–1·04, p=0·094). Adherence to treatment at 3 years was 56% for the clodronate group and 60% for the placebo group. Grade 3 or

  17. DAF Glovebox Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, M.W.; Higgs, R.L.

    2000-11-14

    This document defines how the glovebox project will be managed and executed. It provides a path forward for establishing a glovebox capability in Building 341 of the DAF in time to meet JASPER programmatic requirements as the first user. Note that some elements of the glovebox project have been under way for some time and are more mature than others; other elements are being worked concurrently. This plan serves the following purposes: Assign organizational and individual responsibilities for bringing the glovebox capability online; Coordinate activities between organizations; Facilitate communication between project members and management; and Identify the mechanisms used to manage and control the project. The scope of this plan includes all activities conducted to achieve project objectives, culminating in DOE/NV approval to operate. This plan does not address the issues associated with the steady-state operation of the glovebox.

  18. Parent-Offspring Resemblance for Cognitive Abilities in the Colorado Adoption Project: Biological, Adoptive, and Control Parents and One-Year-Old Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFries, J. C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Results from the Colorado Adoption Project, a longitudinal study initiated in 1975, are reported. The cognitive ability of parents and measures of one-year olds' mental development were significantly correlated for all three parent/child comparisons. Caldwell's HOME Responsibility measure was correlated with infant intelligence in adoptive and…

  19. Program and Project Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Cassandra D.

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a framework and system architecture for integrating program and project management tools that may be applied consistently throughout Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to optimize planning, cost estimating, risk management, and project control. Project management methodology used in building interactive systems to accommodate the needs of the project managers is applied as a key component in assessing the usefulness and applicability of the framework and tools developed. Research for the project included investigation and analysis of industrial practices, KSC standards, policies, and techniques, Systems Management Office (SMO) personnel, and other documented experiences of project management experts. In addition, this project documents best practices derived from the literature as well as new or developing project management models, practices, and techniques.

  20. The HOT (Healthy Outcome for Teens) project. Using a web-based medium to influence attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and intention for obesity and type 2 diabetes prevention.

    PubMed

    Muzaffar, Henna; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Castelli, Darla M; Scherer, Jane A

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) constructs (behavioral belief, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, knowledge and behavioral intention) regarding preventive behaviors for obesity and type 2 diabetes will change favorably after completing the web-based intervention, HOT (Healthy Outcome for Teens) project, grounded in the TPB; and that passive online learning (POL) group will improve more than the active online learning (AOL) group. The secondary hypothesis was to determine to what extent constructs of the TPB predict intentions. 216 adolescents were recruited, 127 randomly allocated to the treatment group (AOL) and 89 to the control group (POL). The subjects completed a TPB questionnaire pre and post intervention. Both POL and AOL groups showed significant improvements from pretest to posttest survey. However, the results indicated no significant difference between POL and AOL for all constructs except behavioral belief. Correlational analysis indicated that all TPB constructs were significantly correlated with intentions for pretest and posttest for both groups. Attitude and behavioral control showed strongest correlations. Regression analysis indicated that TPB constructs were predictive of intentions and the predictive power improved post intervention. Behavioral control consistently predicted intentions for all categories and was the strongest predictor for pretest scores. For posttest scores, knowledge and attitude were the strongest predictors for POL and AOL groups respectively. Thus, HOT project improved knowledge and the TPB constructs scores for targeted behaviors, healthy eating and physical activity, for prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24099704