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Sample records for multi-trait genetic analysis

  1. Genetic analysis of calving traits by the multi-trait individual animal model.

    PubMed

    Weller, J I; Ezra, E

    2016-01-01

    Five alternative models were applied for analysis of dystocia and stillbirth in first and second parities. Models 1 and 2 were included only to estimate the parameters required for model 4, and models 3 and 5 are included only as comparisons to the model 4 estimates. Variance components were estimated by multi-trait REML, including cows with valid calving records for both parities. For the effects of sire of calf on first and second parities, variance components were estimated including only calvings with the same sire of calf for both parities. All heritabilities for the cow effect were quite low, but higher for dystocia than for stillbirth and higher in first parity. The sire-of-calf heritabilities were higher than the cow effect heritabilities, except for stillbirth in parity 2. Unlike the effect of cow correlations, all sire of calf correlations were >0.6, and the correlations for the same trait in parities 1 and 2 were >0.9. Thus, a multi-trait analysis should yield a significant gain in accuracy with respect to the sire of calf effects for bulls not mated to virgin heifers. A multi-trait individual animal model algorithm was developed for joint analysis of dystocia and stillbirth in first and second parities. Relationships matrices were included both for the effects of cow and sire of calf. In addition, random herd-year-season and fixed sex of calf effects were included in the model. Records were preadjusted for calving month and age. A total of 899,223 Israeli Holstein cows with first calvings since 1985 were included in the complete analysis. Approximate reliabilities were computed for both sire of cow and sire of calf effects. Correlations between these reliabilities and reliabilities obtained by direct inversion of the coefficient matrix for a sire of cow-sire of calf model were all close to 0.99. Phenotypic trends for cows born from 1983 through 2007 were economically unfavorable for dystocia and favorable for stillbirth in both parities. Genetic trends

  2. Multi-trait BLUP model indicates sorghum hybrids with genetic potential for agronomic and nutritional traits.

    PubMed

    Almeida Filho, J E; Tardin, F D; Guimarães, J F R; Resende, M D V; Silva, F F; Simeone, M L; Menezes, C B; Queiroz, V A V

    2016-01-01

    The breeding of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, aimed at improving its nutritional quality, is of great interest, since it can be used as a highly nutritive alternative food source and can possibly be cultivated in regions with low rainfall. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential and genetic diversity of grain-sorghum hybrids for traits of agronomic and nutritional interest. To this end, the traits grain yield and flowering, and concentrations of protein, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, and zinc in the grain were evaluated in 25 grain-sorghum hybrids, comprising 18 experimental hybrids of Embrapa Milho e Sorgo and seven commercial hybrids. The genetic potential was analyzed by a multi-trait best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) model, and cluster analysis was accomplished by squared Mahalanobis distance using the predicted genotypic values. Hybrids 0306037 and 0306034 stood out in the agronomic evaluation. The hybrids with agronomic prominence, however, did not stand out for the traits related to the nutritional quality of the grain. Three clusters were formed from the dendrogram obtained with the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean method. From the results of the genotypic BLUP and the analysis of the dendrogram, hybrids 0577337, 0441347, 0307651, and 0306037 were identified as having the potential to establish a population that can aggregate alleles for all the evaluated traits of interest. PMID:26985915

  3. Short communication: Multi-trait estimation of genetic parameters for milk protein composition in the Danish Holstein.

    PubMed

    Gebreyesus, G; Lund, M S; Janss, L; Poulsen, N A; Larsen, L B; Bovenhuis, H; Buitenhuis, A J

    2016-04-01

    Genetic parameters were estimated for the major milk proteins using bivariate and multi-trait models based on genomic relationships between animals. The analyses included, apart from total protein percentage, αS1-casein (CN), αS2-CN, β-CN, κ-CN, α-lactalbumin, and β-lactoglobulin, as well as the posttranslational sub-forms of glycosylated κ-CN and αS1-CN-8P (phosphorylated). Standard errors of the estimates were used to compare the models. In total, 650 Danish Holstein cows across 4 parities and days in milk ranging from 9 to 481d were selected from 21 herds. The multi-trait model generally resulted in lower standard errors of heritability estimates, suggesting that genetic parameters can be estimated with high accuracy using multi-trait analyses with genomic relationships for scarcely recorded traits. The heritability estimates from the multi-trait model ranged from low (0.05 for β-CN) to high (0.78 for κ-CN). Genetic correlations between the milk proteins and the total milk protein percentage were generally low, suggesting the possibility to alter protein composition through selective breeding with little effect on total milk protein percentage. PMID:26805988

  4. A stochastic dynamic simulation model including multi-trait genetics to estimate genetic, technical and financial consequences of dairy farm reproduction and selection strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop a daily stochastic dynamic dairy simulation model which included multi-trait genetics, and to evaluate the effects of various reproduction and selection strategies on the genetic, technical and financial performance of a dairy herd. The 12 correlated geneti...

  5. Multi-trait QTL analysis for agronomic and quality characters of Agaricus bisporus (button mushrooms).

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Baars, Johan J P; Maliepaard, Chris; Visser, Richard G F; Zhang, Jinxia; Sonnenberg, Anton S M

    2016-12-01

    The demand for button mushrooms of high quality is increasing. Superior button mushroom varieties require the combination of multiple traits to maximize productivity and quality. Very often these traits are correlated and should, therefore, be evaluated together rather than as single traits. In order to unravel the genetic architecture of multiple traits of Agaricus bisporus and the genetic correlations among traits, we have investigated a total of six agronomic and quality traits through multi-trait QTL analyses in a mixed-model. Traits were evaluated in three heterokaryon sets. Significant phenotypic correlations were observed among traits. For instance, earliness (ER) correlated to firmness (FM), cap color, and compost colonization, and FM correlated to scales (SC). QTLs of different traits located on the same chromosomes genetically explains the phenotypic correlations. QTL detected on chromosome 10 mainly affects three traits, i.e., ER, FM and SC. It explained 31.4 % phenotypic variation of SC on mushroom cap (heterokaryon Set 1), 14.9 % that of the FM (heterokaryon Set 3), and 14.2 % that of ER (heterokaryon Set 3). High value alleles from the wild parental line showed beneficial effects for several traits, suggesting that the wild germplasm is a valuable donor in terms of those traits. Due to the limitations of recombination pattern, we only made a start at understanding the genetic base for several agronomic and quality traits in button mushrooms. PMID:27620731

  6. A Multi-Trait, Meta-analysis for Detecting Pleiotropic Polymorphisms for Stature, Fatness and Reproduction in Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Pryce, Jennie E.; Reverter, Antonio; Zhang, Yuandan; Barendse, William; Kemper, Kathryn; Tier, Bruce; Savin, Keith; Hayes, Ben J.; Goddard, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms that affect complex traits or quantitative trait loci (QTL) often affect multiple traits. We describe two novel methods (1) for finding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with one or more traits using a multi-trait, meta-analysis, and (2) for distinguishing between a single pleiotropic QTL and multiple linked QTL. The meta-analysis uses the effect of each SNP on each of n traits, estimated in single trait genome wide association studies (GWAS). These effects are expressed as a vector of signed t-values (t) and the error covariance matrix of these t values is approximated by the correlation matrix of t-values among the traits calculated across the SNP (V). Consequently, t'V−1t is approximately distributed as a chi-squared with n degrees of freedom. An attractive feature of the meta-analysis is that it uses estimated effects of SNPs from single trait GWAS, so it can be applied to published data where individual records are not available. We demonstrate that the multi-trait method can be used to increase the power (numbers of SNPs validated in an independent population) of GWAS in a beef cattle data set including 10,191 animals genotyped for 729,068 SNPs with 32 traits recorded, including growth and reproduction traits. We can distinguish between a single pleiotropic QTL and multiple linked QTL because multiple SNPs tagging the same QTL show the same pattern of effects across traits. We confirm this finding by demonstrating that when one SNP is included in the statistical model the other SNPs have a non-significant effect. In the beef cattle data set, cluster analysis yielded four groups of QTL with similar patterns of effects across traits within a group. A linear index was used to validate SNPs having effects on multiple traits and to identify additional SNPs belonging to these four groups. PMID:24675618

  7. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Underlying Function-Valued Traits Using Functional Principal Component Analysis and Multi-Trait Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Il-Youp; Moore, Candace R.; Spalding, Edgar P.; Broman, Karl W.

    2015-01-01

    We previously proposed a simple regression-based method to map quantitative trait loci underlying function-valued phenotypes. In order to better handle the case of noisy phenotype measurements and accommodate the correlation structure among time points, we propose an alternative approach that maintains much of the simplicity and speed of the regression-based method. We overcome noisy measurements by replacing the observed data with a smooth approximation. We then apply functional principal component analysis, replacing the smoothed phenotype data with a small number of principal components. Quantitative trait locus mapping is applied to these dimension-reduced data, either with a multi-trait method or by considering the traits individually and then taking the average or maximum LOD score across traits. We apply these approaches to root gravitropism data on Arabidopsis recombinant inbred lines and further investigate their performance in computer simulations. Our methods have been implemented in the R package, funqtl. PMID:26530421

  8. Bayesian Multi-Trait Analysis Reveals a Useful Tool to Increase Oil Concentration and to Decrease Toxicity in Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed Central

    Silva Junqueira, Vinícius; de Azevedo Peixoto, Leonardo; Galvêas Laviola, Bruno; Lopes Bhering, Leonardo; Mendonça, Simone; Agostini Costa, Tania da Silveira; Antoniassi, Rosemar

    2016-01-01

    The biggest challenge for jatropha breeding is to identify superior genotypes that present high seed yield and seed oil content with reduced toxicity levels. Therefore, the objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters for three important traits (weight of 100 seed, oil seed content, and phorbol ester concentration), and to select superior genotypes to be used as progenitors in jatropha breeding. Additionally, the genotypic values and the genetic parameters estimated under the Bayesian multi-trait approach were used to evaluate different selection indices scenarios of 179 half-sib families. Three different scenarios and economic weights were considered. It was possible to simultaneously reduce toxicity and increase seed oil content and weight of 100 seed by using index selection based on genotypic value estimated by the Bayesian multi-trait approach. Indeed, we identified two families that present these characteristics by evaluating genetic diversity using the Ward clustering method, which suggested nine homogenous clusters. Future researches must integrate the Bayesian multi-trait methods with realized relationship matrix, aiming to build accurate selection indices models. PMID:27281340

  9. The influence of animals from embryo transfer on the genetic evaluation of growth in Simmental beef cattle by using multi-trait models

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Rodrigo Reis; Lopes, Paulo Sávio; Marques, Luiz Fernando Aarão; da Silva, Luciano Pinheiro; de Resende, Marcos Deon Vilela; de Almeida Torres, Robledo

    2013-01-01

    The weight records from Simmental beef cattle were used in a genetic evaluation of growth with or without the inclusion of animals obtained by embryo transfer. A multi-trait model in which embryo transfer individuals were excluded (MTM1) contained 29,510 records from 10,659 animals, while another model without exclusion of these animals (MTM2) contained 62,895 weight records from 23,160 animals. The weight records were adjusted for ages of 100, 205, 365, 450, 550 and 730 days. The (co)variance components and genetic parameters were estimated by the restricted maximum likelihood method. The (co)variance components were similar in both models, except for maternal permanent environment variance. Direct heritabilities (h2d) in MTM1 were 0.04, 0.11, 0.20, 0.27, 0.31 and 0.42, while in MTM2 they were 0.11, 0.11, 0.17, 0.21, 0.22 and 0.26 for 100, 205, 365, 450, 550 and 730 days of age, respectively. Estimates of h2d in MTM1 were higher than in MTM2 for the weight at 365 days of age. Genetic correlations between weights in both models ranged from moderate to high, suggesting that these traits may be determined mainly by the same genes. Animals from embryo transfer may be included in the genetic evaluation of Simmental beef cattle in Brazil; this inclusion may provide potential gains in accuracy and genetic gains by reducing the interval between generations. PMID:23569407

  10. Efficient set tests for the genetic analysis of correlated traits.

    PubMed

    Casale, Francesco Paolo; Rakitsch, Barbara; Lippert, Christoph; Stegle, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Set tests are a powerful approach for genome-wide association testing between groups of genetic variants and quantitative traits. We describe mtSet (http://github.com/PMBio/limix), a mixed-model approach that enables joint analysis across multiple correlated traits while accounting for population structure and relatedness. mtSet effectively combines the benefits of set tests with multi-trait modeling and is computationally efficient, enabling genetic analysis of large cohorts (up to 500,000 individuals) and multiple traits. PMID:26076425

  11. Global genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Kumm, Jochen; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2004-01-31

    The introduction of molecular markers in genetic analysis has revolutionized medicine. These molecular markers are genetic variations associated with a predisposition to common diseases and individual variations in drug responses. Identification and genotyping a vast number of genetic polymorphisms in large populations are increasingly important for disease gene identification, pharmacogenetics and population-based studies. Among variations being analyzed, single nucleotide polymorphisms seem to be most useful in large-scale genetic analysis. This review discusses approaches for genetic analysis, use of different markers, and emerging technologies for large-scale genetic analysis where millions of genotyping need to be performed. PMID:14761299

  12. Multi-Trait GWAS and New Candidate Genes Annotation for Growth Curve Parameters in Brahman Cattle.

    PubMed

    Crispim, Aline Camporez; Kelly, Matthew John; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni; Fonseca e Silva, Fabyano; Fortes, Marina Rufino Salinas; Wenceslau, Raphael Rocha; Moore, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of beef cattle growth cannot be limited simply to the genome-wide association study (GWAS) for body weight at any specific ages, but should be extended to a more general purpose by considering the whole growth trajectory over time using a growth curve approach. For such an approach, the parameters that are used to describe growth curves were treated as phenotypes under a GWAS model. Data from 1,255 Brahman cattle that were weighed at birth, 6, 12, 15, 18, and 24 months of age were analyzed. Parameter estimates, such as mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) from nonlinear models are utilized as substitutes for the original body weights for the GWAS analysis. We chose the best nonlinear model to describe the weight-age data, and the estimated parameters were used as phenotypes in a multi-trait GWAS. Our aims were to identify and characterize associated SNP markers to indicate SNP-derived candidate genes and annotate their function as related to growth processes in beef cattle. The Brody model presented the best goodness of fit, and the heritability values for the parameter estimates for mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) were 0.23 and 0.32, respectively, proving that these traits can be a feasible alternative when the objective is to change the shape of growth curves within genetic improvement programs. The genetic correlation between A and K was -0.84, indicating that animals with lower mature body weights reached that weight at younger ages. One hundred and sixty seven (167) and two hundred and sixty two (262) significant SNPs were associated with A and K, respectively. The annotated genes closest to the most significant SNPs for A had direct biological functions related to muscle development (RAB28), myogenic induction (BTG1), fetal growth (IL2), and body weights (APEX2); K genes were functionally associated with body weight, body height, average daily gain (TMEM18), and skeletal muscle development (SMN1). Candidate

  13. Multi-Trait GWAS and New Candidate Genes Annotation for Growth Curve Parameters in Brahman Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Crispim, Aline Camporez; Kelly, Matthew John; Guimarães, Simone Eliza Facioni; e Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Fortes, Marina Rufino Salinas; Wenceslau, Raphael Rocha; Moore, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of beef cattle growth cannot be limited simply to the genome-wide association study (GWAS) for body weight at any specific ages, but should be extended to a more general purpose by considering the whole growth trajectory over time using a growth curve approach. For such an approach, the parameters that are used to describe growth curves were treated as phenotypes under a GWAS model. Data from 1,255 Brahman cattle that were weighed at birth, 6, 12, 15, 18, and 24 months of age were analyzed. Parameter estimates, such as mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) from nonlinear models are utilized as substitutes for the original body weights for the GWAS analysis. We chose the best nonlinear model to describe the weight-age data, and the estimated parameters were used as phenotypes in a multi-trait GWAS. Our aims were to identify and characterize associated SNP markers to indicate SNP-derived candidate genes and annotate their function as related to growth processes in beef cattle. The Brody model presented the best goodness of fit, and the heritability values for the parameter estimates for mature weight (A) and maturity rate (K) were 0.23 and 0.32, respectively, proving that these traits can be a feasible alternative when the objective is to change the shape of growth curves within genetic improvement programs. The genetic correlation between A and K was -0.84, indicating that animals with lower mature body weights reached that weight at younger ages. One hundred and sixty seven (167) and two hundred and sixty two (262) significant SNPs were associated with A and K, respectively. The annotated genes closest to the most significant SNPs for A had direct biological functions related to muscle development (RAB28), myogenic induction (BTG1), fetal growth (IL2), and body weights (APEX2); K genes were functionally associated with body weight, body height, average daily gain (TMEM18), and skeletal muscle development (SMN1). Candidate

  14. Multi-trait mimicry of ants by a parasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Malcicka, Miriama; Bezemer, T Martijn; Visser, Bertanne; Bloemberg, Mark; Snart, Charles J P; Hardy, Ian C W; Harvey, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Many animals avoid attack from predators through toxicity or the emission of repellent chemicals. Defensive mimicry has evolved in many species to deceive shared predators, for instance through colouration and other morphological adaptations, but mimicry hardly ever seems to involve multi-trait similarities. Here we report on a wingless parasitoid wasp that exhibits a full spectrum of traits mimicing ants and affording protection against ground-dwelling predators (wolf spiders). In body size, morphology and movement Gelis agilis (Ichneumonidae) is highly similar to the black garden ant (Lasius niger) that shares the same habitat. When threatened, G. agilis also emits a volatile chemical that is similar to an ant-produced chemical that repels spiders. In bioassays with L. niger, G. agilis, G. areator, Cotesia glomerata and Drosophila melanogaster, ants and G. agilis were virtually immune to spider attack, in contrast the other species were not. Volatile characterisation with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified G. agilis emissions as 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, a known insect defence semiochemical that acts as an alarm pheromone in ants. We argue that multi-trait mimicry, as observed in G. agilis, might be much more common among animals than currently realized. PMID:25622726

  15. Multi-trait mimicry of ants by a parasitoid wasp

    PubMed Central

    Malcicka, Miriama; Bezemer, T. Martijn; Visser, Bertanne; Bloemberg, Mark; Snart, Charles J. P.; Hardy, Ian C. W.; Harvey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Many animals avoid attack from predators through toxicity or the emission of repellent chemicals. Defensive mimicry has evolved in many species to deceive shared predators, for instance through colouration and other morphological adaptations, but mimicry hardly ever seems to involve multi-trait similarities. Here we report on a wingless parasitoid wasp that exhibits a full spectrum of traits mimicing ants and affording protection against ground-dwelling predators (wolf spiders). In body size, morphology and movement Gelis agilis (Ichneumonidae) is highly similar to the black garden ant (Lasius niger) that shares the same habitat. When threatened, G. agilis also emits a volatile chemical that is similar to an ant-produced chemical that repels spiders. In bioassays with L. niger, G. agilis, G. areator, Cotesia glomerata and Drosophila melanogaster, ants and G. agilis were virtually immune to spider attack, in contrast the other species were not. Volatile characterisation with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified G. agilis emissions as 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, a known insect defence semiochemical that acts as an alarm pheromone in ants. We argue that multi-trait mimicry, as observed in G. agilis, might be much more common among animals than currently realized. PMID:25622726

  16. Genetic parameter estimation for pre- and post-weaning traits in Brahman cattle in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Giovana; Buzanskas, Marcos Eli; Guidolin, Diego Gomes Freire; Grossi, Daniela do Amaral; Bonifácio, Alexandre da Silva; Lôbo, Raysildo Barbosa; da Fonseca, Ricardo; Oliveira, João Ademir de; Munari, Danísio Prado

    2014-10-01

    Beef cattle producers in Brazil use body weight traits as breeding program selection criteria due to their great economic importance. The objectives of this study were to evaluate different animal models, estimate genetic parameters, and define the most fitting model for Brahman cattle body weight standardized at 120 (BW120), 210 (BW210), 365 (BW365), 450 (BW450), and 550 (BW550) days of age. To estimate genetic parameters, single-, two-, and multi-trait analyses were performed using the animal model. The likelihood ratio test was verified between all models. For BW120 and BW210, additive direct genetic, maternal genetic, maternal permanent environment, and residual effects were considered, while for BW365 and BW450, additive direct genetic, maternal genetic, and residual effects were considered. Finally, for BW550, additive direct genetic and residual effects were considered. Estimates of direct heritability for BW120 were similar in all analyses; however, for the other traits, multi-trait analysis resulted in higher estimates. The maternal heritability and proportion of maternal permanent environmental variance to total variance were minimal in multi-trait analyses. Genetic, environmental, and phenotypic correlations were of high magnitude between all traits. Multi-trait analyses would aid in the parameter estimation for body weight at older ages because they are usually affected by a lower number of animals with phenotypic information due to culling and mortality. PMID:25037588

  17. QTL clustering as a mechanism for rapid multi-trait evolution.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Masato; O'Quin, Kelly E; Jeffery, William R

    2013-07-01

    Cave-dwelling animals exhibit remarkable convergence in multiple cave-related traits, yet the genetic mechanisms responsible for the evolution and integration of many such traits remain unclear. Astyanax mexicanus is a model cave-dwelling fish with sighted surface-dwelling (surface fish) and blind cave-dwelling (cavefish) forms. Using a genetic cross between these morphs, we discovered significant correlations among several cave-related traits, including reduced eyes, increased superficial neuromast receptors located within the eye orbit (EO SN) and a vibration-attraction behavior (VAB) that facilitates foraging in darkness. Furthermore, we discovered that the quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying these traits are clustered within the Astyanax genome. Following an ablation experiment that demonstrated that the EO SN contribute to VAB, we concluded that the adaptive evolution of VAB and EO SN has likely contributed to eye loss in cavefish. In this addendum, we further discuss the possible role of multi-trait QTL clustering in facilitating rapid adaptation. PMID:23956812

  18. Regression-based multi-trait QTL mapping using a structural equation model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative trait locus mapping often results in data on a number of traits that have well established causal relationships. Many multi-trait quantitative trait locus mapping methods that account for the correlation among the multiple traits have been developed to improve the statistical power and ...

  19. Contrasting genetic architectures of schizophrenia and other complex diseases using fast variance-components analysis.

    PubMed

    Loh, Po-Ru; Bhatia, Gaurav; Gusev, Alexander; Finucane, Hilary K; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan K; Pollack, Samuela J; de Candia, Teresa R; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R; Kendler, Kenneth S; O'Donovan, Michael C; Neale, Benjamin M; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L

    2015-12-01

    Heritability analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) cohorts have yielded important insights into complex disease architecture, and increasing sample sizes hold the promise of further discoveries. Here we analyze the genetic architectures of schizophrenia in 49,806 samples from the PGC and nine complex diseases in 54,734 samples from the GERA cohort. For schizophrenia, we infer an overwhelmingly polygenic disease architecture in which ≥71% of 1-Mb genomic regions harbor ≥1 variant influencing schizophrenia risk. We also observe significant enrichment of heritability in GC-rich regions and in higher-frequency SNPs for both schizophrenia and GERA diseases. In bivariate analyses, we observe significant genetic correlations (ranging from 0.18 to 0.85) for several pairs of GERA diseases; genetic correlations were on average 1.3 tunes stronger than the correlations of overall disease liabilities. To accomplish these analyses, we developed a fast algorithm for multicomponent, multi-trait variance-components analysis that overcomes prior computational barriers that made such analyses intractable at this scale. PMID:26523775

  20. Contrasting genetic architectures of schizophrenia and other complex diseases using fast variance components analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Gusev, Alexander; Finucane, Hilary K; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan K; Pollack, Samuela J; de Candia, Teresa R; Lee, Sang Hong; Wray, Naomi R; Kendler, Kenneth S; O’Donovan, Michael C; Neale, Benjamin M; Patterson, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Heritability analyses of GWAS cohorts have yielded important insights into complex disease architecture, and increasing sample sizes hold the promise of further discoveries. Here, we analyze the genetic architecture of schizophrenia in 49,806 samples from the PGC, and nine complex diseases in 54,734 samples from the GERA cohort. For schizophrenia, we infer an overwhelmingly polygenic disease architecture in which ≥71% of 1Mb genomic regions harbor ≥1 variant influencing schizophrenia risk. We also observe significant enrichment of heritability in GC-rich regions and in higher-frequency SNPs for both schizophrenia and GERA diseases. In bivariate analyses, we observe significant genetic correlations (ranging from 0.18 to 0.85) among several pairs of GERA diseases; genetic correlations were on average 1.3x stronger than correlations of overall disease liabilities. To accomplish these analyses, we developed a fast algorithm for multi-component, multi-trait variance components analysis that overcomes prior computational barriers that made such analyses intractable at this scale. PMID:26523775

  1. Genetic analysis in translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Patrinos, George P.; Innocenti, Federico; Cox, Nancy; Fortina, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The 2010 GOLDEN HELIX Symposium ‘Genetic Analysis in Translational Medicine' was held in Athens, Greece, Athens, Greece, 1-4 December 2010. The scientific program covered all aspects of this discipline, including genome-wide association studies, genomics of cancer and human disorders, molecular cytogenetics, advances in genomic technology, next-generation sequencing applications, pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics. In addition, various topics on genetics and society and genetic analysis in clinical practice were discussed. Here, we provide an overview of the plenary lectures and the topics discussed in the symposium. PMID:21438074

  2. Genetic Analysis in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Alan; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, neurogenetics research had made some remarkable advances owing to the advent of genotyping arrays and next-generation sequencing. These improvements to the technology have allowed us to determine the whole-genome structure and its variation and to examine its effect on phenotype in an unprecedented manner. The identification of rare disease-causing mutations has led to the identification of new biochemical pathways and has facilitated a greater understanding of the etiology of many neurological diseases. Furthermore, genome-wide association studies have provided information on how common genetic variability impacts on the risk for the development of various complex neurological diseases. Herein, we review how these technological advances have changed the approaches being used to study the genetic basis of neurological disease and how the research findings will be translated into clinical utility. PMID:23571731

  3. Genetic Analysis of Xenopus tropicalis

    PubMed Central

    Geach, Timothy J.; Stemple, Derek L.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.

    2014-01-01

    The pipid frog Xenopus tropicalis has emerged as a powerful new model system for combining genetic and genomic analysis of tetrapod development with robust embryological, molecular and biochemical assays. Its early development closely resembles that of its well-understood relative X. laevis, from which techniques and reagents can be readily transferred. In contrast to the tetraploid X. laevis, X. tropicalis has a compact diploid genome with strong synteny to those of amniotes. Recently, advances in high-throughput sequencing together with solution-hybridization whole-exome enrichment technology offer powerful strategies for cloning novel mutations as well as reverse genetic identification of sequence lesions in specific genes of interest. Further advantages include the wide range of functional and molecular assays available, the large number of embryos/meioses produced, and the ease of haploid genetics and gynogenesis. The addition of these genetic tools to X. tropicalis provides a uniquely flexible platform for analysis of gene function in vertebrate development. PMID:22956083

  4. Toward Automated Multi-Trait Scoring of Essays: Investigating Links among Holistic, Analytic, and Text Feature Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yong-Won; Gentile, Claudia; Kantor, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the distinctness and reliability of analytic (or multi-trait) rating dimensions and their relationships to holistic scores and "e-rater"[R] essay feature variables in the context of the TOEFL[R] computer-based test (TOEFL CBT) writing assessment. Data analyzed in the study were holistic and…

  5. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation. PMID:27405681

  6. Integrated analysis of genetic data with R

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Genetic data are now widely available. There is, however, an apparent lack of concerted effort to produce software systems for statistical analysis of genetic data compared with other fields of statistics. It is often a tremendous task for end-users to tailor them for particular data, especially when genetic data are analysed in conjunction with a large number of covariates. Here, R http://www.r-project.org, a free, flexible and platform-independent environment for statistical modelling and graphics is explored as an integrated system for genetic data analysis. An overview of some packages currently available for analysis of genetic data is given. This is followed by examples of package development and practical applications. With clear advantages in data management, graphics, statistical analysis, programming, internet capability and use of available codes, it is a feasible, although challenging, task to develop it into an integrated platform for genetic analysis; this will require the joint efforts of many researchers. PMID:16460651

  7. Genetic analysis of safflower domestication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is an oilseed crop in the Compositae (a.k.a. Asteraceae) that is valued for its oils rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Here, we present an analysis of the genetic architecture of safflower domestication and compare our findings to those from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), an independently domesticated oilseed crop within the same family. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying 24 domestication-related traits in progeny from a cross between safflower and its wild progenitor, Carthamus palaestinus Eig. Also, we compared QTL positions in safflower against those that have been previously identified in cultivated x wild sunflower crosses to identify instances of colocalization. Results We mapped 61 QTL, the vast majority of which (59) exhibited minor or moderate phenotypic effects. The two large-effect QTL corresponded to one each for flower color and leaf spininess. A total of 14 safflower QTL colocalized with previously reported sunflower QTL for the same traits. Of these, QTL for three traits (days to flower, achene length, and number of selfed seed) had cultivar alleles that conferred effects in the same direction in both species. Conclusions As has been observed in sunflower, and unlike many other crops, our results suggest that the genetics of safflower domestication is quite complex. Moreover, our comparative mapping results indicate that safflower and sunflower exhibit numerous instances of QTL colocalization, suggesting that parallel trait transitions during domestication may have been driven, at least in part, by parallel genotypic evolution at some of the same underlying genes. PMID:24502326

  8. Genetic analysis in Bartter syndrome from India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pradeep Kumar; Saikia, Bhaskar; Sharma, Rachna; Ankur, Kumar; Khilnani, Praveen; Aggarwal, Vinay Kumar; Cheong, Hae

    2014-10-01

    Bartter syndrome is a group of inherited, salt-losing tubulopathies presenting as hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis with normotensive hyperreninemia and hyperaldosteronism. Around 150 cases have been reported in literature till now. Mutations leading to salt losing tubulopathies are not routinely tested in Indian population. The authors have done the genetic analysis for the first time in the Bartter syndrome on two cases from India. First case was antenatal Bartter syndrome presenting with massive polyuria and hyperkalemia. Mutational analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutations in KCNJ1(ROMK) gene [p(Leu220Phe), p(Thr191Pro)]. Second case had a phenotypic presentation of classical Bartter syndrome however, genetic analysis revealed only heterozygous novel mutation in SLC12A gene p(Ala232Thr). Bartter syndrome is a clinical diagnosis and genetic analysis is recommended for prognostication and genetic counseling. PMID:24696311

  9. Analysis: OB/GYN-Genetics.

    PubMed

    Fries, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian salvage from a patient with brain death is not available and will not preserve viable ova for future reproduction. Previous interest in assisted reproductive technology is only the first step in this process, which requires careful assessment of maternal risks and potential for recurrent genetic disease. PMID:27045306

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Integrated genetic analysis microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagally, Eric T.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2004-12-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the ongoing DNA sequencing of the genomes of other animals, bacteria, plants and others, a wealth of new information about the genetic composition of organisms has become available. However, as the demand for sequence information grows, so does the workload required both to generate this sequence and to use it for targeted genetic analysis. Microfabricated genetic analysis systems are well poised to assist in the collection and use of these data through increased analysis speed, lower analysis cost and higher parallelism leading to increased assay throughput. In addition, such integrated microsystems may point the way to targeted genetic experiments on single cells and in other areas that are otherwise very difficult. Concomitant with these advantages, such systems, when fully integrated, should be capable of forming portable systems for high-speed in situ analyses, enabling a new standard in disciplines such as clinical chemistry, forensics, biowarfare detection and epidemiology. This review will discuss the various technologies available for genetic analysis on the microscale, and efforts to integrate them to form fully functional robust analysis devices.

  11. Path analysis in genetic epidemiology: a critique.

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, S; Cameron, E C; Chakraborty, R

    1983-01-01

    Path analysis, a form of general linear structural equation models, is used in studies of human genetics data to discern genetic, environmental, and cultural factors contributing to familial resemblance. It postulates a set of linear and additive parametric relationships between phenotypes and genetic and cultural variables and then essentially uses the assumption of multivariate normality to estimate and perform tests of hypothesis on parameters. Such an approach has been advocated for the analysis of genetic epidemiological data by D. C. Rao, N. Morton, C. R. Cloninger, L. J. Eaves, and W. E. Nance, among others. This paper reviews and evaluates the formulations, assumptions, methodological procedures, interpretations, and applications of path analysis. To give perspective, we begin with a discussion of path analysis as it occurs in the form of general linear causal models in several disciplines of the social sciences. Several specific path analysis models applied to lipoprotein concentrations, IQ, and twin data are then reviewed to keep the presentation self-contained. The bulk of the critical discussion that follows is directed toward the following four facets of path analysis: (1) coherence of model specification and applicability to data; (2) plausibility of modeling assumptions; (3) interpretability and utility of the model; and (4) validity of statistical and computational procedures. In the concluding section, a brief discussion of the problem of appropriate model selection is presented, followed by a number of suggestions of essentially model-free alternative methods of use in the treatment of complex structured data such as occurs in genetic epidemiology. PMID:6349335

  12. Analysis of Genetically Complex Epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Ottman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    During the last decade, great progress has been made in the discovery of genes that influence risk for epilepsy. However, these gene discoveries have been in epilepsies with Mendelian modes of inheritance, which comprise only a tiny fraction of all epilepsy. Most people with epilepsy have no affected relatives, suggesting that the great majority of all epilepsies are genetically complex: multiple genes contribute to their etiology, none of which has a major effect on disease risk. Gene discovery in the genetically complex epilepsies is a formidable task. It is unclear which epilepsy phenotypes are most advantageous to study, and chromosomal localization and mutation detection are much more difficult than in Mendelian epilepsies. Association studies are very promising for the identification of complex epilepsy genes, but we are still in the earliest stages of their application in the epilepsies. Future studies should employ very large sample sizes to ensure adequate statistical power, clinical phenotyping methods of the highest quality, designs and analytic techniques that control for population stratification, and state-of-the-art molecular methods. Collaborative studies are essential to achieve these goals. PMID:16359464

  13. Monte Carlo methods in genetic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shili

    1996-12-31

    Many genetic analyses require computation of probabilities and likelihoods of pedigree data. With more and more genetic marker data deriving from new DNA technologies becoming available to researchers, exact computations are often formidable with standard statistical methods and computational algorithms. The desire to utilize as much available data as possible, coupled with complexities of realistic genetic models, push traditional approaches to their limits. These methods encounter severe methodological and computational challenges, even with the aid of advanced computing technology. Monte Carlo methods are therefore increasingly being explored as practical techniques for estimating these probabilities and likelihoods. This paper reviews the basic elements of the Markov chain Monte Carlo method and the method of sequential imputation, with an emphasis upon their applicability to genetic analysis. Three areas of applications are presented to demonstrate the versatility of Markov chain Monte Carlo for different types of genetic problems. A multilocus linkage analysis example is also presented to illustrate the sequential imputation method. Finally, important statistical issues of Markov chain Monte Carlo and sequential imputation, some of which are unique to genetic data, are discussed, and current solutions are outlined. 72 refs.

  14. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Chlamydia Species.

    PubMed

    Sixt, Barbara S; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2016-09-01

    Species of Chlamydia are the etiologic agent of endemic blinding trachoma, the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases, significant respiratory pathogens, and a zoonotic threat. Their dependence on an intracellular growth niche and their peculiar developmental cycle are major challenges to elucidating their biology and virulence traits. The last decade has seen tremendous advances in our ability to perform a molecular genetic analysis of Chlamydia species. Major achievements include the generation of large collections of mutant strains, now available for forward- and reverse-genetic applications, and the introduction of a system for plasmid-based transformation enabling complementation of mutations; expression of foreign, modified, or reporter genes; and even targeted gene disruptions. This review summarizes the current status of the molecular genetic toolbox for Chlamydia species and highlights new insights into their biology and new challenges in the nascent field of Chlamydia genetics. PMID:27607551

  15. Testing the convergent and discriminant validity of the Decisional Balance Scale of the Transtheoretical Model using the Multi-Trait Multi-Method approach.

    PubMed

    Guo, Boliang; Aveyard, Paul; Fielding, Antony; Sutton, Stephen

    2008-06-01

    The authors extended research on the construct validity of the Decisional Balance Scale for smoking in adolescence by testing its convergent and discriminant validity. Hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis multi-trait multi-method approach (HCFA MTMM) was used with data from 2,334 UK adolescents, both smokers and non-smokers. They completed computerized and paper versions of the questionnaire on 3 occasions over 2 years. The results indicated a 3-factor solution; Social Pros, Coping Pros, and Cons fit the data best. The HCFA MTMM model fit the data well, with correlated methods and correlated trait factors. Subsequent testing confirmed discriminant validity between the factors and convergent validity of both methods of administering the questionnaire. There was, however, clear evidence of a method effect, which may have arisen due to different response formats or may be a function of the method of presentation. Taken with other data, there is strong evidence for construct validity of Decisional Balance for smoking in adolescence, but evidence of predictive validity is required. PMID:18540726

  16. Data transformation for rank reduction in multi-trait MACE model for international bull comparison

    PubMed Central

    Tarres, Joaquim; Liu, Zengting; Ducrocq, Vincent; Reinhardt, Friedrich; Reents, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Since many countries use multiple lactation random regression test day models in national evaluations for milk production traits, a random regression multiple across-country evaluation (MACE) model permitting a variable number of correlated traits per country should be used in international dairy evaluations. In order to reduce the number of within country traits for international comparison, three different MACE models were implemented based on German daughter yield deviation data and compared to the random regression MACE. The multiple lactation MACE model analysed daughter yield deviations on a lactation basis reducing the rank from nine random regression coefficients to three lactations. The lactation breeding values were very accurate for old bulls, but not for the youngest bulls with daughters with short lactations. The other two models applied principal component analysis as the dimension reduction technique: one based on eigenvalues of a genetic correlation matrix and the other on eigenvalues of a combined lactation matrix. The first one showed that German data can be transformed from nine traits to five eigenfunctions without losing much accuracy in any of the estimated random regression coefficients. The second one allowed performing rank reductions to three eigenfunctions without having the problem of young bulls with daughters with short lactations. PMID:18400151

  17. Data transformation for rank reduction in multi-trait MACE model for international bull comparison.

    PubMed

    Tarres, Joaquim; Liu, Zengting; Ducrocq, Vincent; Reinhardt, Friedrich; Reents, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    Since many countries use multiple lactation random regression test day models in national evaluations for milk production traits, a random regression multiple across-country evaluation (MACE) model permitting a variable number of correlated traits per country should be used in international dairy evaluations. In order to reduce the number of within country traits for international comparison, three different MACE models were implemented based on German daughter yield deviation data and compared to the random regression MACE. The multiple lactation MACE model analysed daughter yield deviations on a lactation basis reducing the rank from nine random regression coefficients to three lactations. The lactation breeding values were very accurate for old bulls, but not for the youngest bulls with daughters with short lactations. The other two models applied principal component analysis as the dimension reduction technique: one based on eigenvalues of a genetic correlation matrix and the other on eigenvalues of a combined lactation matrix. The first one showed that German data can be transformed from nine traits to five eigenfunctions without losing much accuracy in any of the estimated random regression coefficients. The second one allowed performing rank reductions to three eigenfunctions without having the problem of young bulls with daughters with short lactations. PMID:18400151

  18. An integrated system for genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fiddy, Simon; Cattermole, David; Xie, Dong; Duan, Xiao Yuan; Mott, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background Large-scale genetic mapping projects require data management systems that can handle complex phenotypes and detect and correct high-throughput genotyping errors, yet are easy to use. Description We have developed an Integrated Genotyping System (IGS) to meet this need. IGS securely stores, edits and analyses genotype and phenotype data. It stores information about DNA samples, plates, primers, markers and genotypes generated by a genotyping laboratory. Data are structured so that statistical genetic analysis of both case-control and pedigree data is straightforward. Conclusion IGS can model complex phenotypes and contain genotypes from whole genome association studies. The database makes it possible to integrate genetic analysis with data curation. The IGS web site contains further information. PMID:16623936

  19. Genome Wide Single Locus Single Trait, Multi-Locus and Multi-Trait Association Mapping for Some Important Agronomic Traits in Common Wheat (T. aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Vandana; Gahlaut, Vijay; Meher, Prabina Kumar; Mir, Reyazul Rouf; Jaiswal, Jai Prakash; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Pushpendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted for 14 agronomic traits in wheat following widely used single locus single trait (SLST) approach, and two recent approaches viz. multi locus mixed model (MLMM), and multi-trait mixed model (MTMM). Association panel consisted of 230 diverse Indian bread wheat cultivars (released during 1910–2006 for commercial cultivation in different agro-climatic regions in India). Three years phenotypic data for 14 traits and genotyping data for 250 SSR markers (distributed across all the 21 wheat chromosomes) was utilized for GWAS. Using SLST, as many as 213 MTAs (p ≤ 0.05, 129 SSRs) were identified for 14 traits, however, only 10 MTAs (~9%; 10 out of 123 MTAs) qualified FDR criteria; these MTAs did not show any linkage drag. Interestingly, these genomic regions were coincident with the genomic regions that were already known to harbor QTLs for same or related agronomic traits. Using MLMM and MTMM, many more QTLs and markers were identified; 22 MTAs (19 QTLs, 21 markers) using MLMM, and 58 MTAs (29 QTLs, 40 markers) using MTMM were identified. In addition, 63 epistatic QTLs were also identified for 13 of the 14 traits, flag leaf length (FLL) being the only exception. Clearly, the power of association mapping improved due to MLMM and MTMM analyses. The epistatic interactions detected during the present study also provided better insight into genetic architecture of the 14 traits that were examined during the present study. Following eight wheat genotypes carried desirable alleles of QTLs for one or more traits, WH542, NI345, NI170, Sharbati Sonora, A90, HW1085, HYB11, and DWR39 (Pragati). These genotypes and the markers associated with important QTLs for major traits can be used in wheat improvement programs either using marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or pseudo-backcrossing method. PMID:27441835

  20. Genome Wide Single Locus Single Trait, Multi-Locus and Multi-Trait Association Mapping for Some Important Agronomic Traits in Common Wheat (T. aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Vandana; Gahlaut, Vijay; Meher, Prabina Kumar; Mir, Reyazul Rouf; Jaiswal, Jai Prakash; Rao, Atmakuri Ramakrishna; Balyan, Harindra Singh; Gupta, Pushpendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted for 14 agronomic traits in wheat following widely used single locus single trait (SLST) approach, and two recent approaches viz. multi locus mixed model (MLMM), and multi-trait mixed model (MTMM). Association panel consisted of 230 diverse Indian bread wheat cultivars (released during 1910-2006 for commercial cultivation in different agro-climatic regions in India). Three years phenotypic data for 14 traits and genotyping data for 250 SSR markers (distributed across all the 21 wheat chromosomes) was utilized for GWAS. Using SLST, as many as 213 MTAs (p ≤ 0.05, 129 SSRs) were identified for 14 traits, however, only 10 MTAs (~9%; 10 out of 123 MTAs) qualified FDR criteria; these MTAs did not show any linkage drag. Interestingly, these genomic regions were coincident with the genomic regions that were already known to harbor QTLs for same or related agronomic traits. Using MLMM and MTMM, many more QTLs and markers were identified; 22 MTAs (19 QTLs, 21 markers) using MLMM, and 58 MTAs (29 QTLs, 40 markers) using MTMM were identified. In addition, 63 epistatic QTLs were also identified for 13 of the 14 traits, flag leaf length (FLL) being the only exception. Clearly, the power of association mapping improved due to MLMM and MTMM analyses. The epistatic interactions detected during the present study also provided better insight into genetic architecture of the 14 traits that were examined during the present study. Following eight wheat genotypes carried desirable alleles of QTLs for one or more traits, WH542, NI345, NI170, Sharbati Sonora, A90, HW1085, HYB11, and DWR39 (Pragati). These genotypes and the markers associated with important QTLs for major traits can be used in wheat improvement programs either using marker-assisted recurrent selection (MARS) or pseudo-backcrossing method. PMID:27441835

  1. Meta-analysis in cancer genetics.

    PubMed

    Pabalan, Noel A

    2010-01-01

    Genetic association studies report potentially conflicting findings which meta-analysis seeks to quantify and objectively summarize. Attributing cancer to a single gene variant requires large sample sizes, which may strain resources in a primary study. Properly used, meta-analysis is a powerful tool for resolving discrepancies in genetic association studies given the exponential increase in sample sizes when data are combined. The several steps involved in this methodology require careful attention to critical issues in meta-analysis, heterogeneity and publication bias, evaluation of which can be graphical or statistical. Overall summary effects of a meta-analysis may or may not reflect similar associations when the component studies are sub grouped. Overall associations and that of the subgroups are evaluated for tenability using sensitivity analysis. The low association between a polymorphism and cancer is offset by detectable changes in cancer incidence in the general population making them an important issue from a public health point of view. Asian meta-analytic publications in cancer genetics come from six countries with an output that number from one to two. The exception is China, whose publication output has increased exponentially since 2008. PMID:20593927

  2. Genetic analysis for early diagnosis of otorhinolaryngeal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Propping, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Familiarity with the concepts and methods of human genetics is important in order to be able to perform genetic analysis. The grade of predictability of a genetic disease is partly given by formal genetics but also depends on the importance of the mutated gene for the phenotype. Possibilities for genetic analysis range from differential diagnosis to predictive diagnosis to prenatal diagnosis. After initial consultation in which the physician fully explains the procedure to the patient, it is mandatory that the patient give his full consent. This article summarises and evaluates current knowledge about genetic analysis of important otorhinolaryngeal diseases, including hereditary hearing disabilities, olfactory malfunction, hereditary tumorous diseases, hereditary syndromes and dysplasias. In addition, this article discusses genetic diseases that affect voice and speech, highlights the relevance of human genetic consultation and discusses the importance of embedding genetic analysis in medicine in general. PMID:22073089

  3. Using a Multi-Trait Approach to Manipulate Plant Functional Diversity in a Biodiversity-Ecosystem Function Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Schittko, Conrad; Hawa, Mahmoud; Wurst, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    A frequent pattern emerging from biodiversity-ecosystem function studies is that functional group richness enhances ecosystem functions such as primary productivity. However, the manipulation of functional group richness goes along with major disadvantages like the transformation of functional trait data into categories or the exclusion of functional differences between organisms in the same group. In a mesocosm study we manipulated plant functional diversity based on the multi-trait Functional Diversity (FD)-approach of Petchey and Gaston by using database data of seven functional traits and information on the origin of the species in terms of being native or exotic. Along a gradient ranging from low to high FD we planted 40 randomly selected eight-species mixtures under controlled conditions. We found a significant positive linear correlation of FD with aboveground productivity and a negative correlation with invasibility of the plant communities. Based on community-weighted mean calculations for each functional trait, we figured out that the traits N-fixation and species origin, i.e. being native or exotic, played the most important role for community productivity. Our results suggest that the identification of the impact of functional trait diversity and the relative contributions of relevant traits is essential for a mechanistic understanding of the role of biodiversity for ecosystem functions such as aboveground biomass production and resistance against invasion. PMID:24897501

  4. Meta-analysis in psychiatric genetics.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Douglas F

    2005-04-01

    The article reviews literature on methods for meta-analysis of genetic linkage and association studies, and summarizes and comments on specific meta-analysis findings for psychiatric disorders. The Genome Scan Meta-Analysis and Multiple Scan Probability methods assess the evidence for linkage across studies. Multiple Scan Probability analysis suggested linkage of two chromosomal regions (13q and 22q) to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, whereas Genome Scan Meta-Analysis on a larger sample identified at least 10 schizophrenia linkage regions, but none for bipolar disorder. Meta-analyses of pooled ORs support association of schizophrenia to the Ser311Cys polymorphism in DRD2 and the T102C polymorphism in HTR2A, and of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder to the 48-bp repeat in DRD4. The 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) may contribute to the risk of bipolar disorder, suicidal behavior, and neuroticism, but association to the lifetime risk of major depression has not been shown. Meta-analyses support linkage of schizophrenia to regions where replicable associations to candidate genes have been identified through positional cloning methods. There are additional supported regions where susceptibility genes are likely to be identified. Linkage meta-analysis has had less clear success for bipolar disorder based on a smaller dataset. Meta-analysis can guide the prioritization of regions for study, but proof of association requires biological confirmation of hypotheses about gene actions. Elucidation of causal mechanisms will require more comprehensive study of sequence variation in candidate genes, better statistical and meta-analytic methods to take all variation into account, and biological strategies for testing etiologic hypotheses. PMID:15802092

  5. Genetic analysis of haemophilia A in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    Petkova, Rumena; Chakarov, Stoian; Kremensky, Ivo

    2004-01-01

    Background Haemophilias are the most common hereditary severe disorders of blood clotting. In families afflicted with heamophilia, genetic analysis provides opportunities to prevent recurrence of the disease. This study establishes a diagnostical strategy for carriership determination and prenatal diagnostics of haemophilia A in Bulgarian haemophilic population. Methods A diagnostical strategy consisting of screening for most common mutations in the factor VIII gene and analysis of a panel of eight linked to the factor VIII gene locus polymorphisms was established. Results Polymorphic analysis for carrier status determination of haemophilia A was successful in 30 families out of 32 (94%). Carrier status was determined in 25 of a total of 28 women at risk (89%). Fourteen prenatal diagnoses in women at high risk of having a haemophilia A – affected child were performed, resulting in 6 healthy boys and 5 girls. Conclusion The compound approach proves to be a highly informative and cost-effective strategy for prevention of recurrence of haemophilia A in Bulgaria. DNA analysis facilitates carriership determination and subsequent prenatal diagnosis in the majority of Bulgarian families affected by haemophilia A. PMID:15035673

  6. Genetic analysis of glutamatergic function in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, B.A.; Kankel, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential for communication between neurons and hence are vital in the overall integrative functioning of the nervous system. Previous work on acetylcholine metabolism in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has also raised the possibility that transmitter metabolism may play a prominent role in either the achievement or maintenance of the normal structure of the central nervous system in this species. Unfortunately, acetylcholine is rather poorly characterized as a neurotransmitter in Drosophila; consequently, we have begun an analysis of the role of glutamate (probably the best characterized transmitter in this organism) in the formation and/or maintenance of nervous system structure. We present here the results of a series of preliminary analyses. To suggest where glutamatergic function may be localized, an examination of the spatial distribution of high affinity (/sup 3/H)-glutamate binding sites are presented. We present the results of an analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of enzymatic activities thought to be important in the regulation of transmitter-glutamate pools (i.e., glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenase). To begin to examine whether mutations in any of these functions are capable of affecting glutamatergic activity, we present the results of an initial genetic analysis of one enzymatic function, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), chosen because of its differential distribution within the adult central nervous system and musculature.

  7. Estimates of genetic correlations among growth traits including competition effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to estimate genetic parameters of direct and competition effects for traits measured at the end of a growth test utilizing multi-trait analyses. A total of 9,720 boars were tested with 15 boars per pen from about 71 to 161 d of age and weight from 31 to 120 kg. Traits analyzed wi...

  8. Methods for genetic linkage analysis using trisomies

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, E.; Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.

    1995-02-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population, but more common in individuals with specific trisomies. Examples of this include leukemia and duodenal atresia in trisomy 21. This paper presents a linkage analysis method for using trisomic individuals to map genes for such traits. It is based on a very general gene-specific dosage model that posits that the trait is caused by specific effects of different alleles at one or a few loci and that duplicate copies of {open_quotes}susceptibility{close_quotes} alleles inherited from the nondisjoining parent give increased likelihood of having the trait. Our mapping method is similar to identity-by-descent-based mapping methods using affected relative pairs and also to methods for mapping recessive traits using inbred individuals by looking for markers with greater than expected homozygosity by descent. In the trisomy case, one would take trisomic individuals and look for markers with greater than expected homozygosity in the chromosomes inherited from the nondisjoining parent. We present statistical methods for performing such a linkage analysis, including a test for linkage to a marker, a method for estimating the distance from the marker to the trait gene, a confidence interval for that distance, and methods for computing power and sample sizes. We also resolve some practical issues involved in implementing the methods, including how to use partially informative markers and how to test candidate genes. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF ABSCISIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    MCCARTY D R

    2012-01-10

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD) catalyze synthesis of a variety of apo-carotenoid secondary metabolites in plants, animals and bacteria. In plants, the reaction catalyzed by the 11, 12, 9-cis-epoxy carotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the first committed and key regulated step in synthesis of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is a key regulator of plant stress responses and has critical functions in normal root and seed development. The molecular mechanisms responsible for developmental control of ABA synthesis in plant tissues are poorly understood. Five of the nine CCD genes present in the Arabidopsis genome encode NCED's involved in control of ABA synthesis in the plant. This project is focused on functional analysis of these five AtNCED genes as a key to understanding developmental regulation of ABA synthesis and dissecting the role of ABA in plant development. For this purpose, the project developed a comprehensive set of gene knockouts in the AtNCED genes that facilitate genetic dissection of ABA synthesis. These mutants were used in combination with key molecular tools to address the following specific objectives: (1) the role of ABA synthesis in root development; (2) developmental control of ABA synthesis in seeds; (3) analysis of ATNCED over-expressers; (4) preliminary crystallography of the maize VP14 protein.

  10. Genetic analysis of plant height in wheat.

    PubMed

    Halloran, G M

    1974-01-01

    Genetic studies of plant height were made of 8 wheats and the 28 crosses between them using the diallel method of analysis. The inheritance of plant height in a glasshouse-grown F1 diallel set in which vernalization and photoperiodic responses had been removed, indicated close to complete dominance in its expression. A similar F1 set of crosses in the field environment indicated non-allelic interaction in its expression, attributable mainly to the cultivar Chile 1B generally in its crosses with the other 7 wheats. Its removal gave close to complete average dominance in the inheritance of plant height.In the F2 generation in the field its inheritance was again subject to non-allelic interaction, attributed mainly to Chile 1B which, on removal, gave a situation of average partial dominance in height expression.Standardized deviations of Yr and (Wr + Vr) for plant height for the diallels indicated a resonably close association of tallness with dominance and shortness with recessiveness.Frequency distributions of plant height in the F1 and F2 of two crosses from the diallel confirmed certain findings of the diallel analysis.At least two groups of dominant genes were found to influence plant height expression in the crosses of the diallel ; this number must be regarded as a minimal estimate of the number of genes influencing plant height in wheat. PMID:24419549

  11. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  12. Methods for genetic linkage analysis using trisomies

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, E.; Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.

    1994-09-01

    Certain genetic disorders (e.g. congenital cataracts, duodenal atresia) are rare in the general population, but more common in people with Down`s syndrome. We present a method for using individuals with trisomy 21 to map genes for such traits. Our methods are analogous to methods for mapping autosomal dominant traits using affected relative pairs by looking for markers with greater than expected identity-by-descent. In the trisomy case, one would take trisomic individuals and look for markers with greater than expected reduction to homozygosity in the chromosomes inherited form the non-disjoining parent. We present statistical methods for performing such a linkage analysis, including a test for linkage to a marker, a method for estimating the distance from the marker to the gene, a confidence interval for that distance, and methods for computing power and sample sizes. The methods are described in the context of gene-dosage model for the etiology of the disorder, but can be extended to other models. We also resolve some practical issues involved in implementing the methods, including how to use partially informative markers, how to test candidate genes, and how to handle the effect of reduced recombination associated with maternal meiosis I non-disjunction.

  13. Genetic analysis of embryo dormancy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Galau, G.

    1998-09-01

    Primary dormancy is the inability of mature seed to immediately germinate until specific environmental stimuli are perceived that predict that future conditions will support plant growth and seed set. The analysis of abscisic acid deficient and insensitive mutants, in particular in Arabidopsis, suggests that embryo abscisic acid may be directly involved in the development of primary dormancy. Other studies implicate the continued accumulation of LEA proteins as inhibiting germination in dormant embryos. The results of these physiological, molecular and genetic approaches are complex and equivocal. There is a real need for approaches that test the separate nature of vivipary inhibition and primary dormancy and deliberately seed to decouple and dissect them. These approaches should be of help in understanding both late embryo development and primary dormancy. The approach taken here is to directly isolate mutants of Arabidopsis that appear to be deficient only in primary dormancy, that is fresh seed that germinate rapidly without the normally-required cold-stratification. The authors have isolated at least 8 independent, rapidly germinating RGM mutants of Arabidopsis. All others aspects of plant growth and development appear normal in these lines, suggesting that the rgm mutants are defective only in the establishment or maintenance of primary dormancy. At least one of these may be tagged with T-DNA. In addition, about 50 RGM isolates have been recovered from EMS-treated seed.

  14. Genetic analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Troy P; Chao, Michael C; Abel, Sören; Blondel, Carlos J; Abel Zur Wiesch, Pia; Zhou, Xiaohui; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-05-31

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide and a blight on global aquaculture. This organism requires a horizontally acquired type III secretion system (T3SS2) to infect the small intestine, but knowledge of additional factors that underlie V. parahaemolyticus pathogenicity is limited. We used transposon-insertion sequencing to screen for genes that contribute to viability of V. parahaemolyticus in vitro and in the mammalian intestine. Our analysis enumerated and controlled for the host infection bottleneck, enabling robust assessment of genetic contributions to in vivo fitness. We identified genes that contribute to V. parahaemolyticus colonization of the intestine independent of known virulence mechanisms in addition to uncharacterized components of T3SS2. Our study revealed that toxR, an ancestral locus in Vibrio species, is required for V. parahaemolyticus fitness in vivo and for induction of T3SS2 gene expression. The regulatory mechanism by which V. parahaemolyticus ToxR activates expression of T3SS2 resembles Vibrio cholerae ToxR regulation of distinct virulence elements acquired via lateral gene transfer. Thus, disparate horizontally acquired virulence systems have been placed under the control of this ancestral transcription factor across independently evolved human pathogens. PMID:27185914

  15. Genetic algorithms and supernovae type Ia analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanos, Charalampos; Nesseris, Savvas E-mail: nesseris@nbi.dk

    2009-05-15

    We introduce genetic algorithms as a means to analyze supernovae type Ia data and extract model-independent constraints on the evolution of the Dark Energy equation of state w(z) {identical_to} P{sub DE}/{rho}{sub DE}. Specifically, we will give a brief introduction to the genetic algorithms along with some simple examples to illustrate their advantages and finally we will apply them to the supernovae type Ia data. We find that genetic algorithms can lead to results in line with already established parametric and non-parametric reconstruction methods and could be used as a complementary way of treating SNIa data. As a non-parametric method, genetic algorithms provide a model-independent way to analyze data and can minimize bias due to premature choice of a dark energy model.

  16. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David

    2009-07-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by trisomy of all or part of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) and is the most common genetic cause of significant intellectual disability. In addition to intellectual disability, many other health problems, such as congenital heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, leukemia, hypotonia, motor disorders, and various physical anomalies occur at an elevated frequency in people with DS. On the other hand, people with DS seem to be at a decreased risk of certain cancers and perhaps of atherosclerosis. There is wide variability in the phenotypes associated with DS. Although ultimately the phenotypes of DS must be due to trisomy of HSA21, the genetic mechanisms by which the phenotypes arise are not understood. The recent recognition that there are many genetically active elements that do not encode proteins makes the situation more complex. Additional complexity may exist due to possible epigenetic changes that may act differently in DS. Numerous mouse models with features reminiscent of those seen in individuals with DS have been produced and studied in some depth, and these have added considerable insight into possible genetic mechanisms behind some of the phenotypes. These mouse models allow experimental approaches, including attempts at therapy, that are not possible in humans. Progress in understanding the genetic mechanisms by which trisomy of HSA21 leads to DS is the subject of this review. PMID:19526251

  17. High volume molecular genetic identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms using Genetic Bit Analysis Application to human genetic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce-Jacino, M.T.; Reynolds, J.; Nikiforov, T.

    1994-09-01

    The most common type of genetic disease-associated mutation is the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Because most genetic diseases can be caused by multiple SNPs in the same gene, effective routine diagnosis of complex genetic diseases is dependent on a simple and reliable method of interrogating SNP sites. Molecular Tool`s solid phase assay capable of direct genotyping (single base sequencing) of SNP sites, Genetic Bit Analysis (GBA), involves hybridization-capture of a single-stranded PCR product to a sequence-specific, microtiter plate-bound oligonucleotide primer. The captured PCR product then acts as template for single-base extension of the capture primer across the polymorphic site, enabling direct determination of the base composition of the polymorphism through a simple colormetric assay. Genotyping in a high volume, semi-automated, processing system with a current capacity of 100 SNP interrogations per technician per day enables the screening of candidate mutations rapidly and cost-effectively, critically important to comprehensive genetic diagnosis. Using this gel-free technology, we have developed prototype diagnostic tests for CFTR and ApoE polymorphisms which enable direct sequencing of the polymorphic base at each site of interest. Routine clinical diagnosis of genetically complex diseases such as cystic fibrosis is dependent on this combination of robust biochemistry and simple format. Additionally, the ability to transfer the format and biochemistry to any disease gene of interest enables the broad application of this technology to clinical diagnostics, especially for genetically complex diseases.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Human Preimplantation Embryos.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Herrero, S; Cervero, A; Mateu, E; Mir, P; Póo, M E; Rodrigo, L; Vera, M; Rubio, C

    2016-01-01

    Preimplantation development comprises the initial stages of mammalian development, before the embryo implants into the mother's uterus. In normal conditions, after fertilization the embryo grows until reaching blastocyst stage. The blastocyst grows as the cells divide and the cavity expands, until it arrives at the uterus, where it "hatches" from the zona pellucida to implant into the uterine wall. Nevertheless, embryo quality and viability can be affected by chromosomal abnormalities, most of which occur during gametogenesis and early embryo development; human embryos produced in vitro are especially vulnerable. Therefore, the selection of chromosomally normal embryos for transfer in assisted reproduction can improve outcomes in poor-prognosis patients. Additionally, in couples with an inherited disorder, early diagnosis could prevent pregnancy with an affected child and would, thereby, avoid the therapeutic interruption of pregnancy. These concerns have prompted advancements in the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Genetic testing is applied in two different scenarios: in couples with an inherited genetic disorder or carriers of a structural chromosomal abnormality, it is termed PGD; in infertile couples with increased risk of generating embryos with de novo chromosome abnormalities, it is termed preimplantation genetic screening, or PGS. PMID:27475859

  19. Genetic analysis of clinical findings at health examinations of young Swedish warmblood riding horses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Soundness is important for welfare and utility of the riding horse. Musculoskeletal disorders are the most common causes of interruption in training and of culling. Despite great importance, heritability of a majority of health traits in horses has previously not been estimated. The objective was to perform genetic analyses of medical and orthopaedic health traits in young riding horses, including estimates of heritability and genetic correlations between health traits, and to reveal possibilities for genetic evaluation of stallions for progeny health. Results The heritability of health traits was estimated using records from 8,238 Swedish warmblood riding horses examined as 4–5 year olds at the Riding Horse Quality Test in 1983–2005. The analyses were performed using multi-trait linear mixed animal models. The heritabilities of palpatory orthopaedic health (PALP), including effusion, swelling, heat, soreness and stiffness/atrophy, and hoof examination results (HOOF), of hoof shape and hoof wall quality, were 0.12 and 0.10, respectively. The genetic variation in these traits resulted in distinct health differences between progeny groups of stallions. The highest heritability among clinical signs of PALP was found for synovial effusions at 0.14. For systemic locations, joint related findings had the highest heritability; 0.13. The heritabilities of medical health and locomotion examination results were low, 0.02 and 0.04, respectively. A genetic improvement of health status has occurred over time but accounts only partly for the decrease in clinical findings of health during the studied period. Conclusions The genetic variation found in PALP and HOOF implies distinct differences between progeny groups. Thus, there are possibilities for improvement of these traits in the population through selection. The weak and non-significant correlation between PALP and HOOF suggests that both traits need to be selected for in practical breeding to improve both

  20. The genetic architecture of petal number in Cardamine hirsuta.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Bjorn; Monniaux, Marie; Hay, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Invariant petal number is a characteristic of most flowers and is generally robust to genetic and environmental variation. We took advantage of the natural variation found in Cardamine hirsuta petal number to investigate the genetic basis of this trait in a case where robustness was lost during evolution. We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis to characterize the genetic architecture of petal number. Αverage petal number showed transgressive variation from zero to four petals in five C. hirsuta mapping populations, and this variation was highly heritable. We detected 15 QTL at which allelic variation affected petal number. The effects of these QTL were relatively small in comparison with alleles induced by mutagenesis, suggesting that natural selection may act to maintain petal number within its variable range below four. Petal number showed a temporal trend during plant ageing, as did sepal trichome number, and multi-trait QTL analysis revealed that these age-dependent traits share a common genetic basis. Our results demonstrate that petal number is determined by many genes of small effect, some of which are age-dependent, and suggests a mechanism of trait evolution via the release of cryptic variation. PMID:26268614

  1. Multi-trait analysis of post-harvest storage in rocket salad (Diplotaxis tenuifolia) links sensorial, volatile and nutritional data.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, Natasha D; Amaro, Ana L; Pereira, Maria J; Müller, Carsten T; Pintado, Manuela; Rogers, Hilary J

    2016-11-15

    Rocket salad (Diplotaxis tenuifolia; wild rocket) is an important component of ready to eat salads providing a distinct peppery flavour and containing nutritionally relevant compounds. Quality deteriorates during post-harvest, in relation to time and storage temperature amongst other factors. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are easily measurable from rocket leaves and may provide useful quality indicators for e.g. changes in isothiocyanates derived from nutritionally important glucosinolates. VOC profiles discriminated storage temperatures (0, 5 and 10°C) and times (over 14days). More specifically, concentrations of aldehydes and isothiocyanates decreased with time paralleling a fall in vitamin C and a reduction in sensorial quality at the two higher temperatures. Sulphur containing compounds rise at later time-points and at higher temperatures coincident with an increase in microbial titre, mirroring a further drop in sensorial quality thus indicating their contribution to off-odours. PMID:27283614

  2. Composing and Performing in the Key Stage 3 Classroom: A Study using Multi-Trait, Multi-Method Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    "Music is both a creative and a performing art" (Hallam, 2006, p. 70). Many musicians and music educators maintain that composing and performing, although related, are essentially different aspects of musical activity. In the professional musical sphere, composition and performance are almost invariably separated; academic studies have…

  3. A Multi-Trait, Multi-Method Analysis of the Bayesian Screening Instrument and Test Battery for LD Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Gordon R.; And Others

    The reliability and validity of the Modified Component Disability Checklist were examined with five secondary learning disabled (LD) teachers, 21 low achieving students, and 21 LD students in grades 7, 8, and 9. During Phase I, teachers matched the component disability to the target behavior; and in Phase II teachers were told to judge each target…

  4. Statistical Analysis in Genetic Studies of Mental Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heping

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the risk factors for mental illnesses is of significant public health importance. Diagnosis, stigma associated with mental illnesses, comorbidity, and complex etiologies, among others, make it very challenging to study mental disorders. Genetic studies of mental illnesses date back at least a century ago, beginning with descriptive studies based on Mendelian laws of inheritance. A variety of study designs including twin studies, family studies, linkage analysis, and more recently, genomewide association studies have been employed to study the genetics of mental illnesses, or complex diseases in general. In this paper, I will present the challenges and methods from a statistical perspective and focus on genetic association studies. PMID:21909187

  5. Polyglot Programming in Applications Used for Genetic Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development. PMID:25197633

  6. Polyglot programming in applications used for genetic data analysis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development. PMID:25197633

  7. Rare genetic variant analysis on blood pressure in related samples

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The genetic variants associated with blood pressure identified so far explain only a small proportion of the total heritability of this trait. With recent advances in sequencing technology and statistical methodology, it becomes feasible to study the association between blood pressure and rare genetic variants. Using real baseline phenotype data and imputed dosage data from Genetic Analysis Workshop 18, we performed a candidate gene association analysis. We focused on 8 genes shown to be associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure to identify the association with both common and rare genetic variants, and then did a genome-wide rare-variant analysis on blood pressure. We performed association analysis for rare coding and splicing variants within each gene region and all rare variants in each sliding window, using either burden tests or sequence kernel association tests accounting for familial correlation. With a sample size of only 747, we failed to find any novel associated genetic loci. Consequently, we performed analyses on simulated data, with knowledge of the underlying simulating model, to evaluate the type I error rate and power for the methods used in real data analysis. PMID:25519320

  8. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Phototropism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Tatsuya; Haga, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant life is strongly dependent on the environment, and plants regulate their growth and development in response to many different environmental stimuli. One of the regulatory mechanisms involved in these responses is phototropism, which allows plants to change their growth direction in response to the location of the light source. Since the study of phototropism by Darwin, many physiological studies of this phenomenon have been published. Recently, molecular genetic analyses of Arabidopsis have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this response system, including phototropin blue light photoreceptors, phototropin signaling components, auxin transporters, auxin action mechanisms and others. This review highlights some of the recent progress that has been made in further elucidating the phototropic response, with particular emphasis on mutant phenotypes. PMID:22864452

  9. Promoting Utilization of Saccharum spp. Genetic Resources through Genetic Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C.; Kuhn, David N.; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A.; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  10. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Spurthi N; Song, Jian; Villa, Andrea; Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C; Kuhn, David N; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  11. SYNAPTONEMAL COMPLEX ANALYSIS IN GENETIC TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synaptonemal complex analysis provides a unique means of visualizing the behavior of meiotic chromosomes. he technique has been applied to the study of normal karyotypes and mutant stocks of mice. ecent work demonstrating the usefulness of SC analysis for the detection of chromos...

  12. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions. PMID:27468297

  13. Quantitative genetic analysis of injury liability in infants and toddlers

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K.; Matheny, A.P. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    A threshold model of latent liability was applied to infant and toddler twin data on total count of injuries sustained during the interval from birth to 36 months of age. A quantitative genetic analysis of estimated twin correlations in injury liability indicated strong genetic dominance effects, but no additive genetic variance was detected. Because interpretations involving overdominance have little research support, the results may be due to low order epistasis or other interaction effects. Boys had more injuries than girls, but this effect was found only for groups whose parents were prompted and questioned in detail about their children`s injuries. Activity and impulsivity are two behavioral predictors of childhood injury, and the results are discussed in relation to animal research on infant and adult activity levels, and impulsivity in adult humans. Genetic epidemiological approaches to childhood injury should aid in targeting higher risk children for preventive intervention. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. A roadmap for the genetic analysis of renal aging

    PubMed Central

    Noordmans, Gerda A; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; van Goor, Harry; Korstanje, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Several studies show evidence for the genetic basis of renal disease, which renders some individuals more prone than others to accelerated renal aging. Studying the genetics of renal aging can help us to identify genes involved in this process and to unravel the underlying pathways. First, this opinion article will give an overview of the phenotypes that can be observed in age-related kidney disease. Accurate phenotyping is essential in performing genetic analysis. For kidney aging, this could include both functional and structural changes. Subsequently, this article reviews the studies that report on candidate genes associated with renal aging in humans and mice. Several loci or candidate genes have been found associated with kidney disease, but identification of the specific genetic variants involved has proven to be difficult. CUBN, UMOD, and SHROOM3 were identified by human GWAS as being associated with albuminuria, kidney function, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These are promising examples of genes that could be involved in renal aging, and were further mechanistically evaluated in animal models. Eventually, we will provide approaches for performing genetic analysis. We should leverage the power of mouse models, as testing in humans is limited. Mouse and other animal models can be used to explain the underlying biological mechanisms of genes and loci identified by human GWAS. Furthermore, mouse models can be used to identify genetic variants associated with age-associated histological changes, of which Far2, Wisp2, and Esrrg are examples. A new outbred mouse population with high genetic diversity will facilitate the identification of genes associated with renal aging by enabling high-resolution genetic mapping while also allowing the control of environmental factors, and by enabling access to renal tissues at specific time points for histology, proteomics, and gene expression. PMID:26219736

  15. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  16. Comparing G: multivariate analysis of genetic variation in multiple populations.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J D; Hine, E; McGuigan, K; Blows, M W

    2014-01-01

    The additive genetic variance-covariance matrix (G) summarizes the multivariate genetic relationships among a set of traits. The geometry of G describes the distribution of multivariate genetic variance, and generates genetic constraints that bias the direction of evolution. Determining if and how the multivariate genetic variance evolves has been limited by a number of analytical challenges in comparing G-matrices. Current methods for the comparison of G typically share several drawbacks: metrics that lack a direct relationship to evolutionary theory, the inability to be applied in conjunction with complex experimental designs, difficulties with determining statistical confidence in inferred differences and an inherently pair-wise focus. Here, we present a cohesive and general analytical framework for the comparative analysis of G that addresses these issues, and that incorporates and extends current methods with a strong geometrical basis. We describe the application of random skewers, common subspace analysis, the 4th-order genetic covariance tensor and the decomposition of the multivariate breeders equation, all within a Bayesian framework. We illustrate these methods using data from an artificial selection experiment on eight traits in Drosophila serrata, where a multi-generational pedigree was available to estimate G in each of six populations. One method, the tensor, elegantly captures all of the variation in genetic variance among populations, and allows the identification of the trait combinations that differ most in genetic variance. The tensor approach is likely to be the most generally applicable method to the comparison of G-matrices from any sampling or experimental design. PMID:23486079

  17. A roadmap for the genetic analysis of renal aging.

    PubMed

    Noordmans, Gerda A; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; van Goor, Harry; Korstanje, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Several studies show evidence for the genetic basis of renal disease, which renders some individuals more prone than others to accelerated renal aging. Studying the genetics of renal aging can help us to identify genes involved in this process and to unravel the underlying pathways. First, this opinion article will give an overview of the phenotypes that can be observed in age-related kidney disease. Accurate phenotyping is essential in performing genetic analysis. For kidney aging, this could include both functional and structural changes. Subsequently, this article reviews the studies that report on candidate genes associated with renal aging in humans and mice. Several loci or candidate genes have been found associated with kidney disease, but identification of the specific genetic variants involved has proven to be difficult. CUBN, UMOD, and SHROOM3 were identified by human GWAS as being associated with albuminuria, kidney function, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These are promising examples of genes that could be involved in renal aging, and were further mechanistically evaluated in animal models. Eventually, we will provide approaches for performing genetic analysis. We should leverage the power of mouse models, as testing in humans is limited. Mouse and other animal models can be used to explain the underlying biological mechanisms of genes and loci identified by human GWAS. Furthermore, mouse models can be used to identify genetic variants associated with age-associated histological changes, of which Far2, Wisp2, and Esrrg are examples. A new outbred mouse population with high genetic diversity will facilitate the identification of genes associated with renal aging by enabling high-resolution genetic mapping while also allowing the control of environmental factors, and by enabling access to renal tissues at specific time points for histology, proteomics, and gene expression. PMID:26219736

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    PubMed Central

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  19. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  20. Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  1. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  2. Genetic diversity of popcorn genotypes using molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Resh, F S; Scapim, C A; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S; do Amaral, A T; Ramos, H C C; Vivas, M

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed dominant molecular markers to estimate the genetic divergence of 26 popcorn genotypes and evaluate whether using various dissimilarity coefficients with these dominant markers influences the results of cluster analysis. Fifteen random amplification of polymorphic DNA primers produced 157 amplified fragments, of which 65 were monomorphic and 92 were polymorphic. To calculate the genetic distances among the 26 genotypes, the complements of the Jaccard, Dice, and Rogers and Tanimoto similarity coefficients were used. A matrix of Dij values (dissimilarity matrix) was constructed, from which the genetic distances among genotypes were represented in a more simplified manner as a dendrogram generated using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average. Clusters determined by molecular analysis generally did not group material from the same parental origin together. The largest genetic distance was between varieties 17 (UNB-2) and 18 (PA-091). In the identification of genotypes with the smallest genetic distance, the 3 coefficients showed no agreement. The 3 dissimilarity coefficients showed no major differences among their grouping patterns because agreement in determining the genotypes with large, medium, and small genetic distances was high. The largest genetic distances were observed for the Rogers and Tanimoto dissimilarity coefficient (0.74), followed by the Jaccard coefficient (0.65) and the Dice coefficient (0.48). The 3 coefficients showed similar estimations for the cophenetic correlation coefficient. Correlations among the matrices generated using the 3 coefficients were positive and had high magnitudes, reflecting strong agreement among the results obtained using the 3 evaluated dissimilarity coefficients. PMID:26345916

  3. Analysis of genetic diversity of Lactarius hatsudake in south China.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Liang, Guo; Guoying, Zhou; Jun-ang, Liu

    2011-08-01

    Lactarius hatsudake is a type of ectomycorrhizal fungus that significantly influences the growth of pine trees. It is widely prevalent in Asian countries and has a high economic value. Artificial cultivation of this fungus has not been achieved as yet; therefore, excessive manual harvesting may cause serious damages to the site of its production. In this study, we analyzed 41 samples of L. hatsudake from south China using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. By comparing the differences among ITS sequences to identify the haplotype diversity within each population, the relationships among local populations, the relationship between the level of genetic differentiation and geographical separation, and the contributions of local and regional geographical separations to the overall ITS haplotype variation were analyzed. Genetic analysis indicates that ITS sequences obtained from these 41 L. hatsudake samples could be identified as 18 haplotypes, of which 13 haplotypes were contained in only a single sample, whereas the remaining sequence types all were contained in two or more samples. The most common sequence type, haplotype 6, was found in 16 samples and was distributed across nearly every region. The Mantel test demonstrated that there is no significant linear relationship between geographical distance and the F(ST) value of genetic difference. Results of this research illustrates that there exists a certain degree of genetic intermixing among natural populations of L. hatsudake. From the group genetic analysis, it appears that there exists genetic differentiation of lower frequencies in natural populations of L. hatsudake; however, the linear relationship between the degree of genetic differentiation and geographical distance is not distinctly apparent. PMID:21815833

  4. Multivariate Genetic Analysis of Learning and Early Reading Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Brian; Wadsworth, Sally; Boehme, Kristi; Talk, Andrew C.; Coventry, William L.; Olson, Richard K.; Samuelsson, Stefan; Corley, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The genetic factor structure of a range of learning measures was explored in twin children, recruited in preschool and followed to Grade 2 ("N"?=?2,084). Measures of orthographic learning and word reading were included in the analyses to determine how these patterned with the learning processes. An exploratory factor analysis of the…

  5. Molecular analysis of genetic diseases: an overview for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Javed, A A; Huang, Y; Bombard, A T

    1995-01-01

    The identification of fetal genetic disease has, for the most part, relied on examination of an end product, such as analysis of factor VIII levels obtained from cord blood in fetuses at risk for hemophilia. Advances in molecular genetics have shifted our focus in prenatal diagnosis away from protein product analysis toward etiology, making new discoveries gleaned from the Human Genome Project relevant to clinicians. This review discusses the basic principles involved in gene-based diagnosis, highlighting the complexities of current approaches to molecular diagnosis of fetal genetic disease. Given an understanding of both the theory and practice of genetic analysis, the review covers the fundamental principles of molecular biology (structure, function, packaging, and regulation) and discusses recombinant DNA techniques presently used for the analysis of mutations. Clinical examples are presented to introduce the techniques most commonly employed in service laboratories: direct detection assays, where the specific mutation is recognized, and indirect detection assays, useful for the deduction of an inheritance pattern where the actual mutation or its gene is not known but may be closely linked to known DNA polymorphisms. PMID:7858372

  6. Understanding genetics: Analysis of secondary students' conceptual status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Chi-Yan; Treagust, David F.

    2007-02-01

    This article explores the conceptual change of students in Grades 10 and 12 in three Australian senior high schools when the teachers included computer multimedia to a greater or lesser extent in their teaching of a genetics course. The study, underpinned by a multidimensional conceptual-change framework, used an interpretive approach and a case-based design with multiple data collection methods. Over 4-8 weeks, the students learned genetics in classroom lessons that included BioLogica activities, which feature multiple representations. Results of the online tests and interview tasks revealed that most students improved their understanding of genetics as evidenced in the development of genetics reasoning. However, using Thorley's (1990) status analysis categories, a cross-case analysis of the gene conceptions of 9 of the 26 students interviewed indicated that only 4 students' postinstructional conceptions were intelligible-plausible-fruitful. Students' conceptual change was consistent with classroom teaching and learning. Findings suggested that multiple representations supported conceptual understanding of genetics but not in all students. It was also shown that status can be a viable hallmark enabling researchers to identify students' conceptual change that would otherwise be less accessible. Thorley's method for analyzing conceptual status is discussed.

  7. Castor Bean Organelle Genome Sequencing and Worldwide Genetic Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Agnes P.; Williams, Amber L.; Rice, Danny W.; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M. J.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Allan, Gerard J.; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade. PMID:21750729

  8. A genetic analysis of Adhl regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    Several separate but related studies are reported on the mechanism of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh-1) are reported. A study of a deletion mutation in the TATA box region which resulted in an increase from 6--60% of wildtype Adh-1 expression in the revertant has led to a focus on trans-acting protein factors that bind the TATA box. Analysis of another revertant has led to study of cis-acting sequences in Adh-1 expression. Screening efforts aimed at defining different mutants affecting Adh-1 expression are reported.

  9. The future of genetic analysis of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J; Singleton, A

    2000-04-01

    Molecular genetic analysis has allowed the elucidation of the etiology of many single-gene, neurodegenerative syndromes. However, as yet, it has had little direct impact on our understanding of the etiology in cases with more complex modes of inheritance. With the completion of the sequence of the human genome, it should be possible to start to attack these more complex problems. In this article, we review the genetic methods that may be used to dissect the etiologies of these diseases and outline what types of clinical samples will be needed for this quest. PMID:10783291

  10. Methods for the survey and genetic analysis of populations

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Matthew

    2003-09-02

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  11. MTG2: an efficient algorithm for multivariate linear mixed model analysis based on genomic information

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S. H.; van der Werf, J. H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We have developed an algorithm for genetic analysis of complex traits using genome-wide SNPs in a linear mixed model framework. Compared to current standard REML software based on the mixed model equation, our method is substantially faster. The advantage is largest when there is only a single genetic covariance structure. The method is particularly useful for multivariate analysis, including multi-trait models and random regression models for studying reaction norms. We applied our proposed method to publicly available mice and human data and discuss the advantages and limitations. Availability and implementation: MTG2 is available in https://sites.google.com/site/honglee0707/mtg2. Contact: hong.lee@une.edu.au Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26755623

  12. The role of genome and gene regulatory network canalization in the evolution of multi-trait polymorphisms and sympatric speciation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sexual reproduction has classically been considered as a barrier to the buildup of discrete phenotypic differentiation. This notion has been confirmed by models of sympatric speciation in which a fixed genetic architecture and a linear genotype phenotype mapping were assumed. In this paper we study the influence of a flexible genetic architecture and non-linear genotype phenotype map on differentiation under sexual reproduction. We use an individual based model in which organisms have a genome containing genes and transcription factor binding sites. Mutations involve single genes or binding sites or stretches of genome. The genome codes for a regulatory network that determines the gene expression pattern and hence the phenotype of the organism, resulting in a non-linear genotype phenotype map. The organisms compete in a multi-niche environment, imposing selection for phenotypic differentiation. Results We find as a generic outcome the evolution of discrete clusters of organisms adapted to different niches, despite random mating. Organisms from different clusters are distinct on the genotypic, the network and the phenotypic level. However, the genome and network differences are constrained to a subset of the genome locations, a process we call genotypic canalization. We demonstrate how this canalization leads to an increased robustness to recombination and increasing hybrid fitness. Finally, in case of assortative mating, we explain how this canalization increases the effectiveness of assortativeness. Conclusion We conclude that in case of a flexible genetic architecture and a non-linear genotype phenotype mapping, sexual reproduction does not constrain phenotypic differentiation, but instead constrains the genotypic differences underlying it. We hypothesize that, as genotypic canalization enables differentiation despite random mating and increases the effectiveness of assortative mating, sympatric speciation is more likely than is commonly suggested

  13. Genetic diversity analysis in Piper species (Piperaceae) using RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sandeep; Skaria, Reby; Abdul Muneer, P M

    2010-09-01

    The genetic diversity of eight species of Piper (Piperaceae) viz., P. nigrum, P. longum, P. betle, P. chaba, P. argyrophyllum, P. trichostachyon, P. galeatum, and P. hymenophyllum from Kerala state, India were analyzed by Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Out of 22 10-mer RAPD primers screened, 11 were selected for comparative analysis of different species of Piper. High genetic variations were found among different Piper species studied. Among the total of 149 RAPD fragments amplified, 12 bands (8.05%) were found monomorphic in eight species. The remaining 137 fragments were found polymorphic (91.95%). Species-specific bands were found in all eight species studied. The average gene diversity or heterozygosity (H) was 0.33 across all the species, genetic distances ranged from 0.21 to 0.69. The results of this study will facilitate germplasm identification, management, and conservation. PMID:20383613

  14. Molecular population genetic analysis of emerged bacterial pathogens: selected insights.

    PubMed Central

    Musser, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Research in bacterial population genetics has increased in the last 10 years. Population genetic theory and tools and related strategies have been used to investigate bacterial pathogens that have contributed to recent episodes of temporal variation in disease frequency and severity. A common theme demonstrated by these analyses is that distinct bacterial clones are responsible for disease outbreaks and increases in infection frequency. Many of these clones are characterized by unique combinations of virulence genes or alleles of virulence genes. Because substantial interclonal variance exists in relative virulence, molecular population genetic studies have led to the concept that the unit of bacterial pathogenicity is the clone or cell line. Continued new insights into host parasite interactions at the molecular level will be achieved by combining clonal analysis of bacterial pathogens with large-scale comparative sequencing of virulence genes. PMID:8903193

  15. [Screening of peafowl microsatellite primers and analysis of genetic diversity].

    PubMed

    Bao, Wen-Bin; Chen, Guo-Hong; Shu, Jing-Ting; Xu, Qi; Li, Hui-Fang

    2006-10-01

    The applicability of chicken microsatellite primers to peafowl population was analyzed in the present paper, and the results showed 14 of 29 pairs of microsatellite primers from chicken could amplify peafowl DNA and produce specific allele patterns. A mean of 1.71 alleles was found for each locus. Seven pairs were highly polymorphic, and MCW0080 and MCW0098 were ideal markers for peafowl. Genetic diversity analysis within and between the green peafowl and the blue peafowl populations demonstrated that the expected heterozygosity of two peafowl populations were 0.2482 and 0.2744, respectively. The inbreeding index (FST), Reynolds' genetic distance and gene flow between the two populations were 0.078, 0.0603 and 3.896 respectively. These results indicate that the heterozygosity and the genetic diversity of these two peafowl populations were very low, and suggest a tendency towards intermixing. PMID:17035182

  16. Frequency Analysis Techniques for Identification of Viral Genetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Trifonov, Vladimir; Rabadan, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Environmental metagenomic samples and samples obtained as an attempt to identify a pathogen associated with the emergence of a novel infectious disease are important sources of novel microorganisms. The low costs and high throughput of sequencing technologies are expected to allow for the genetic material in those samples to be sequenced and the genomes of the novel microorganisms to be identified by alignment to those in a database of known genomes. Yet, for various biological and technical reasons, such alignment might not always be possible. We investigate a frequency analysis technique which on one hand allows for the identification of genetic material without relying on alignment and on the other hand makes possible the discovery of nonoverlapping contigs from the same organism. The technique is based on obtaining signatures of the genetic data and defining a distance/similarity measure between signatures. More precisely, the signatures of the genetic data are the frequencies of k-mers occurring in them, with k being a natural number. We considered an entropy-based distance between signatures, similar to the Kullback-Leibler distance in information theory, and investigated its ability to categorize negative-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viral genetic data. Our conclusion is that in this viral context, the technique provides a viable way of discovering genetic relationships without relying on alignment. We envision that our approach will be applicable to other microbial genetic contexts, e.g., other types of viruses, and will be an important tool in the discovery of novel microorganisms. PMID:20824103

  17. Genetic analysis of two Taiwanese bluetongue viruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fan; Ting, Lu-Jen; Lee, Ming-Shiuh; Chang, Wei-Ming; Wang, Fun-In

    2011-03-24

    BTV2/KM/2003 and BTV12/PT/2003 are the first identified bluetongue viruses in Taiwan. The prototype virus BTV2/KM/2003 was previously characterized in various respects as low virulent. In the present study, nucleotide sequences of the ten genome segments and their coding regions of the Taiwan strains were determined and analyzed. The two strains had >96.8% nucleotide and >97.9% deduced amino acid identities to each other, except for the VP2 genes. Their genome sequences, except for NS1 and VP2 genes, clustered overall in the Asian lineage, and were closely related to strains from China, India, Indonesia, and Japan. The phylogenetic trees and nucleotide identities of six BTV genes were suggestive of the geographical origin of the bluetongue virus strains analyzed, with a few exceptions. To examine which genes better distinguished strains from different origins (topography), the distribution of and the levels of differences in nucleotide identities were analyzed, revealing that VP3, NS2, and NS3 genes were more suitable for topotyping of BTVs. Analysis of ratios of non-synonymous/synonymous substitutions (dN/dS values) between putative ancestry and their descendant strains suggested that most BTV genes evolved under a negative selection, whereas the VP7 gene evolved under positive selection, and its non-synonymous substitutions accumulated more rapidly in strains from the Mediterranean region. PMID:20855174

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of plant gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of mutants is a powerful approach for elucidating the components of complex biological processes. A growing number of mutants have been isolated which affect plant gravitropism and the classes of mutants found thus far provide important information about the gravity response mechanism. The wide variety of mutants isolated, especially in Arabidopsis, indicates that gravitropism is a complex, multi-step process. The existence of mutants altered in either root gravitropism alone, shoot gravitropism alone, or both indicates that the root and shoot gravitropic mechanisms have both separate and common steps. Reduced starch mutants have confirmed the role of amyloplasts in sensing the gravity signal. The hormone auxin is thought to act as the transducing signal between the sites of gravity perception (the starch parenchyma cells surrounding the vascular tissue in shoots and the columella cells of root caps) and asymmetric growth (the epidermal cells of the elongation zone(s) of each organ). To date, all mutants that are resistant to high concentrations of auxin have also been found to exhibit a reduced gravitropic response, thus supporting the role of auxin. Not all gravitropic mutants are auxin-resistant, however, indicating that there are additional steps which do not involve auxin. Studies with mutants of tomato which exhibit either reduced or reversed gravitropic responses further support the role of auxin redistribution in gravitropism and suggest that both red light and cytokinin interact with gravitropism through controlling lateral auxin transport. Plant responses to gravity thus likely involve changes in both auxin transport and sensitivity.

  19. Genetic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

    SciTech Connect

    St. Jean, P.L.; Hart, B.K.; Zhang, X.C.

    1994-09-01

    The association between AAA and gender, smoking (SM), hypertension (HTN) and inguinal herniation (IH) was examined in 141 AAA probands and 139 of their 1st degree relatives with aortic exam (36 affected, 103 unaffected). There was no significant difference between age at diagnosis of affecteds and age at exam of unaffecteds. Of 181 males, 142 had AAA; of 99 females, 35 had AAA. Using log-linear modeling AAA was significantly associated at the 5% level with gender, SM and HTN but not IH. The association of AAA with SM and HTN held when males and females were analyzed separately. HTN was -1.5 times more common in both affected males and females, while SM was 1.5 and 2 times more common in affected males and females, respectively. Tests of association and linkage analyses were performed with relevant candidate genes: 3 COL3A1 polymorphisms (C/T, ALA/THR, AvaII), 2 ELN polymorphisms (SER/GLY, (CA)n), FBN1(TAAA)n, 2 APOB polymorphisms (Xbal,Ins/Del), CLB4B (CA)n, PI and markers D1S243 (CA)n, HPR (CA)n and MFD23(CA)n. The loci were genotyped in > 100 AAA probands and > 95 normal controls. No statistically significant evidence of association at the 5% level was obtained for any of the loci using chi-square test of association. 28 families with 2 or more affecteds were analyzed using the affected pedigree member method (APM) and lod-score analyses. There was no evidence for linkage with any loci using APM. Lod-score analysis under an autosomal recessive model resulted in excluding linkage (lod score < -2) of all loci to AAA at {theta}=0.0. Under an autosomal dominant model, linkage was excluded at {theta}=0.0 to ELN, APOB, CLG4B, D1S243, HPR and MFD23. The various genes previously proposed in AAA pathogenesis are neither associated nor casually related in our study population.

  20. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Yoke-Kqueen, Cheah; Radu, Son

    2006-12-15

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used to analyzed 78 samples comprises of certified reference materials (soya and maize powder), raw seeds (soybean and maize), processed food and animal feed. Combination assay of two arbitrary primers in the RAPD analysis enable to distinguish genetically modified organism (GMO) reference materials from the samples tested. Dendrogram analysis revealed 13 clusters at 45% similarity from the RAPD. RAPD analysis showed that the maize and soybean samples were clustered differently besides the GMO and non-GMO products. PMID:16860900

  1. Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, Vivek; Sokoloff, Greta; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl; Striz, Martin; Branstetter, Lisa R; Beckmann, Melissa; Spence, Jason S; Jackson, Barbara L; Galloway, Leslie D; Barker, Gene; Wymore, Ann M; Hunsicker, Patricia R; Durtschi, David W; Shaw, Ginger S; Shinpock, Sarah G; Manly, Kenneth F; Miller, Darla R; Donahue, Kevin; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Churchill, Gary A; Lariviere, William R; Palmer, Abraham; O'Hara, Bruce; Voy, Brynn H; Chesler, Elissa J

    2011-01-01

    Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations. Supplementary material consists of Supplementary Table 1 Phenotypic means, variances, ranges and heritabilities for all traits and generations, Supplementary Table

  2. Genetic Analysis of Rough Sheath1 Developmental Mutants of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Becraft, P. W.; Freeling, M.

    1994-01-01

    Maize Rough sheath1 (Rs1) mutants are dominant and cause a proliferation of sheath-like tissue at the base of the blade and throughout the ligular region. They also cause ligule displacement, a chaotic pattern of vasculature and abnormal cellular structure of vascular bundles. The affected region of Rs1-O leaves displays genetic and morphological attributes of both sheath and auricle, suggesting an overlap of these genetic programs. The rs1 locus maps approximately 26 map units distal to opaque2 (o2) on chromosome 7S, defining a new distal-most locus on the genetic map. Three mutant alleles, Rs1-O, Rs1-1025 and Rs1-Z, all display similar phenotypes. The mutations are completely dominant and the Rs1-O phenotype is not affected by dosage of the chromosome arm carrying the rs1(+) allele, indicating that these alleles are neomorphic. Analysis of genetic mosaics showed that the Rs1-O phenotype is non-cell-autonomous, suggesting that intercellular signals convey the phenotype. Rs1 mutant phenotypes are affected by modifiers present in particular genetic backgrounds. An enhancer of Rs1-O was identified; segregation data imply a single recessive gene, ers1. Rs1 mutants were also found to enhance the expression of unlinked rs2 and Rs4 mutants, suggesting that these mutations affect similar developmental processes. We discuss the phenotypic and genetic similarities between Rs1 and Knotted1 (Kn1) mutants that led to the identification of rs1 as a kn1-like homeobox gene (unpublished data). PMID:8138166

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of six Dutch families with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Entius, M.M.; Groenewegen, A.; Pronk, A.; van der Smagt, J.J; Loh, P.; Hauer, R.N.; Derksen, R.; van Gelder, I.C.; Lok, D.J.A.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is characterised by rapid and irregular contraction of the atrium. The risk of AF increases with age and AF increases the risk of various heart disorders, stroke and mortality. AF can occur in a sporadic or familial form. The underlying mechanism leading to AF is not well known but genetic analysis can increase our insight into the molecular pathways in AF. Detailed information on the molecular mechanisms of a disorder increase options for diagnosis and treatment. Recently, a gain-of-function mutation in exon of the KCNQ1 gene located on chromosome 11 was identified in a large Chinese AF family. KCNQ1 associates with KCNE1 or KCNE2 (both located on chromosome 21) to form cardiac potassium channels. Subsequent analysis of Chinese families showed a KCNE2 mutation in two families. Other genetic studies show linkage to chromosome 6 and 10, indicating genetic heterogeneity. A number of studies have shown that altered expression of the atrial connexin40 protein is a risk factor for AF. Connexin genes encode gap-junction proteins that are important in cardiac conduction and for normal wave propagation. Objectives/methods In this study we analysed the role of KCNQ1, KCNE1 coding region and Cx40 promoter region in six Dutch AF families by sequence analysis. Conclusion No mutations were found in these genes. The absence of mutations indicates genetic heterogeneity in familial AF; however, further research is needed. Candidate genes are being sequenced, linkage analysis in a large family will be performed and additional AF families will be collected. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696507

  4. Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis.

    PubMed

    Speed, Doug; O'Brien, Terence J; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G; Balding, David J; Johnson, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy. PMID:25063994

  5. [Genetic analysis of Streptomyces erythreus heteroclones. II. Determination of the distances between genetic loci on the map].

    PubMed

    Pencheva, R; Todorov, T

    1989-01-01

    As a result of recombination experiments between auxotrophic mutants of S. erythreus BTCC2 haploid recombinants and heteroclones were isolated. A genetic map of S. erythreus, including 15 auxotrophic loci was constructed by genetic analysis of the segregants of the heteroclones obtained. The genetic distances between 7 key loci on the map were determined and the entire length of the map of about 105 standard recombination units was calculated. PMID:2624163

  6. Genetic analysis of first lactation production traits in Kankrej cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ankuya, K. J.; Pareek, N. K.; Patel, M. P.; Rathod, B. S.; Prajapati, K. B.; Patel, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to estimate genetic factors affecting the first lactation milk production traits in Kankrej cattle of North Gujarat. Materials and Methods: The 475 first lactation records of Kankrej cows that were maintained at the Livestock Research Station, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar, Gujarat, over a period of 35 years from 1980 to 2014 were studied. The least squares maximum likelihood program was used to estimate genetic parameters of first lactation traits. Heritability was estimated through paternal half-sib analysis in adjusted data. Results: The heritability estimate for production traits was 0.40±0.17, 0.45±0.17, 0.35±0.18, and 0.20±0.14 for standard 300 days milk yield (F300Y), total lactation milk yield (FLY), wet average (FWA), and lactation length (FLL), respectively, in the first parity. All the genetic and phenotypic correlations among different production efficiency traits were high and positive. Genetic correlations between F300Y and FLY, FLL, and FWA were 0.80±0.20, 0.59±0.16, and 0.81±0.32, where as the phenotypic correlations were 0.969, 0.688, and 0.868, respectively. Genetic correlations of FLY with FLL and FWA were 0.60±0.13 and 0.79±0.20, whereas the phenotypic correlations were 0.777 and 0.817, respectively. Genetic and phenotypic correlation between FLL and FWA was 0.63±0.28 and 0.31, respectively. Conclusion: The heritability estimate of all first parity lactation traits waslow to medium (0.20-0.45) indicated the scope for further improvement in this trait through selection as well as managemental practice. Higher genetic and phenotypic correlation between thefirst lactation milk production traits gives theidea that genetic gain due to selection for one trait also givesmorecorrelated response of selection for other traits which is economically advantageous. PMID:27397993

  7. Forward and reverse genetic analysis of microtubule motors in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Pazour, G J; Witman, G B

    2000-12-01

    The ability to integrate biochemical, cell biological, and genetic approaches makes Chlamydomonas reinhardtii the premier model organism for studies of the eukaryotic flagellum and its associated molecular motors. Hundreds of motility mutations have been identified in Chlamydomonas, including many that affect dyneins and kinesins. These mutations have yielded much information on the structure and function of the motors as well as the roles of individual subunits within the motors. The development of insertional mutagenesis has opened the door to powerful new approaches for genetic analysis in Chlamydomonas. Insertional mutants are created by transforming cells with DNA-containing selectable markers. The DNA is randomly integrated throughout the genome and usually deletes part of the chromosome at the site of insertion, thereby creating mutations that are marked by the integrated DNA. These mutations can be used for forward genetic approaches where one characterizes a mutant phenotype and then clones the relevant gene using the integrated DNA as a tag. The insertional mutants also may be used in a reverse genetic approach in which mutants lacking a gene of interest are identified by DNA hybridization. We describe methods to generate and characterize insertional mutants, using mutations that affect the outer dynein arm as examples. PMID:11133235

  8. Markov Logic Networks in the Analysis of Genetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Sakhanenko, Nikita A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Complex, non-additive genetic interactions are common and can be critical in determining phenotypes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and similar statistical studies of linkage data, however, assume additive models of gene interactions in looking for genotype-phenotype associations. These statistical methods view the compound effects of multiple genes on a phenotype as a sum of influences of each gene and often miss a substantial part of the heritable effect. Such methods do not use any biological knowledge about underlying mechanisms. Modeling approaches from the artificial intelligence (AI) field that incorporate deterministic knowledge into models to perform statistical analysis can be applied to include prior knowledge in genetic analysis. We chose to use the most general such approach, Markov Logic Networks (MLNs), for combining deterministic knowledge with statistical analysis. Using simple, logistic regression-type MLNs we can replicate the results of traditional statistical methods, but we also show that we are able to go beyond finding independent markers linked to a phenotype by using joint inference without an independence assumption. The method is applied to genetic data on yeast sporulation, a complex phenotype with gene interactions. In addition to detecting all of the previously identified loci associated with sporulation, our method identifies four loci with smaller effects. Since their effect on sporulation is small, these four loci were not detected with methods that do not account for dependence between markers due to gene interactions. We show how gene interactions can be detected using more complex models, which can be used as a general framework for incorporating systems biology with genetics. PMID:20958249

  9. Genetic analysis of hispanic individuals with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Grebe, T.A.; Doane, W.W.; Norman, R.A.; Rhodes, S.N. ); Seltzer, W.K. ); DeMarchi, J.; Silva, D.K.; Gozal, D.; Bowman, C.M.; Accurso, F.J.; Jain, K.D. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have performed molecular genetic analysis of Hispanic individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the southwestern United States. Of 129 CF chromosomes analyzed, oly 46% (59/129) carry [Delta]F508. The G542X mutation was found on 5% (7/129) of CF chromosomes. The 3849+10kbC[yields]T mutation, detected primarily in Ashkenazi Jews, was present on 2% (3/129). R1162X and R334W, mutations identified in Spain and Italy, each occurred on 1.6% (2/129) of CF chromosomes. W1282X and R553X were each detected once. G551D and N1303K were not found. Overall, screening for 22 or more mutations resulted in detection of only 58% of CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutations among Hispanic individuals. Analysis of KM19/XV2c haplotypes revealed an unusual distribution. Although the majority of [Delta]508 mutations are on chromosomes of B haplotypes, the other CF mutations are on A and C haplotypes at higher-than-expected frequencies. These genetic analysis demonstrate significant differences between Hispanic individuals with CF and those of the general North American population. Assessment of carrier/affected risk in Hispanic CF individuals cannot, therefore, be based on the mutation frequencies found through studies of the general population but must be adjusted to better reflect the genetic makeup of this ethnic group. Further studies are necessary to identify the causative mutation(s) in this population and to better delineate genotype/phenotype correlations. These will enable counselors to provide more accurate genetic counseling. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Transdominant genetic analysis of a growth control pathway

    PubMed Central

    Caponigro, Giordano; Abedi, Majid R.; Hurlburt, Anthony P.; Maxfield, Andrew; Judd, Weston; Kamb, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    Genetic selections that use proteinaceous transdominant inhibitors encoded by DNA libraries to cause mutant phenocopies may facilitate genetic analysis in traditionally nongenetic organisms. We performed a selection for random short peptides and larger protein fragments (collectively termed “perturbagens”) that inhibit the yeast pheromone response pathway. Peptide and protein fragment perturbagens that permit cell division in the presence of pheromone were recovered. Two perturbagens were derived from proteins required for pheromone response, and an additional two were derived from proteins that may negatively influence the pheromone response pathway. Furthermore, three known components of the pathway were identified as probable perturbagen targets based on physical interaction assays. Thus, by selection for transdominant inhibitors of pheromone response, multiple pathway components were identified either directly as gene fragments or indirectly as the likely targets of specific perturbagens. These results, combined with the results of previous work [Holzmayer, T. A., Pestov, D. G. & Roninson, I. B. (1992) Nucl. Acids. Res. 20, 711–717; Whiteway, M., Dignard, D. & Thomas, D. Y. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 9410–9414; and Gudkov, A. V., Kazarov, A. R., Thimmapaya, R., Axenovich, S. A., Mazo, I. A. & Roninson, I. B. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 3744–3748], suggest that transdominant genetic analysis of the type described here will be broadly applicable. PMID:9636180

  11. Quantitative genetic analysis of the metabolic syndrome in Hispanic children.

    PubMed

    Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Cole, Shelley A; Mehta, Nitesh R; Cai, Guowen; Tejero, Maria; Bastarrachea, Raul; Smith, E O'Brian

    2005-12-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with a constellation of metabolic derangements including glucose intolerance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, referred to as metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate genetic and environmental factors contributing to the metabolic syndrome in Hispanic children. Metabolic syndrome, defined as having three or more metabolic risk components, was determined in 1030 Hispanic children, ages 4-19 y, from 319 families enrolled in the VIVA LA FAMILIA study. Anthropometry, body composition by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, clinical signs, and serum biochemistries were measured using standard techniques. Risk factor analysis and quantitative genetic analysis were performed. Of the overweight children, 20%, or 28% if abnormal liver function is included in the definition, presented with the metabolic syndrome. Odds ratios for the metabolic syndrome were significantly increased by body mass index z-score and fasting serum insulin; independent effects of sex, age, puberty, and body composition were not seen. Heritabilities +/- SE for waist circumference, triglycerides (TG), HDL, systolic blood pressure (SBP), glucose, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were highly significant. Pleiotropy (a common set of genes affecting two traits) detected between SBP and waist circumference, SBP and glucose, HDL and waist circumference, ALT and waist circumference, and TG and ALT may underlie the clustering of the components of the metabolic syndrome. Significant heritabilities and pleiotropy seen for the components of the metabolic syndrome indicate a strong genetic contribution to the metabolic syndrome in overweight Hispanic children. PMID:16306201

  12. Genetic diversity and recombination analysis of sweepoviruses from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Monopartite begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) that infect sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) around the world are known as sweepoviruses. Because sweet potato plants are vegetatively propagated, the accumulation of viruses can become a major constraint for root production. Mixed infections of sweepovirus species and strains can lead to recombination, which may contribute to the generation of new recombinant sweepoviruses. Results This study reports the full genome sequence of 34 sweepoviruses sampled from a sweet potato germplasm bank and commercial fields in Brazil. These sequences were compared with others from public nucleotide sequence databases to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic diversity and patterns of genetic exchange in sweepoviruses isolated from Brazil, as well as to review the classification and nomenclature of sweepoviruses in accordance with the current guidelines proposed by the Geminiviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Co-infections and extensive recombination events were identified in Brazilian sweepoviruses. Analysis of the recombination breakpoints detected within the sweepovirus dataset revealed that most recombination events occurred in the intergenic region (IR) and in the middle of the C1 open reading frame (ORF). Conclusions The genetic diversity of sweepoviruses was considerably greater than previously described in Brazil. Moreover, recombination analysis revealed that a genomic exchange is responsible for the emergence of sweepovirus species and strains and provided valuable new information for understanding the diversity and evolution of sweepoviruses. PMID:23082767

  13. Analysis of genetic traits for drought tolerance in maize.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, R W; Qayyum, A; Hamza, A; Ahmad, M Q; Naseer, N S; Liaqat, S; Ahmad, B; Malik, W; Noor, E

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-four genotypes of maize were crossed and evaluated in the field during the crop season in February 2012 under both normal and water stress conditions. To identify the major parameters responsible for variation among genotypes, single linkage cluster analysis and principle component analysis (PCA) were carried out. Thirteen characters were studied. The PCA showed that the first six components, with eigen values >1, contributed 82.30% of the variability among the genotypes under normal field irrigation conditions while other PCs (7-13) had eigen values less than 1. Under drought conditions, the first four PCs, with eigen values >1, contributed 64.79% of the variability among genotypes while the other PCs (5-13) had eigen values less than 1. In the absence of water stress, heritability ranged from 68% (sucrose content) to 99% (plant height) and genetic advance ranged between 158.43% for stomatal frequency and 0.87 for biological yield. Under drought conditions, the coefficient of variability (CV) was 1.43-7.79, whereas estimates of heritability ranged between 68% and 99% for sucrose content and leaf area, respectively. The values of genetic advance ranged between 153.41 for stomatal frequency and 0.47 for nitrogen content. CV was 1.52-7.38 under drought conditions. The results indicated that the plant characters studied were under the control of additive genetic effects and suggested that selection should lead to fast genetic improvements. Clusters with superior agronomic types were identified and could be exploited for the transfer of desirable genes to improve the yield potential of the maize crop. PMID:26535668

  14. The geography of genetics: an analysis of referral patterns to a cancer genetics service

    PubMed Central

    Iredale, Rachel; Higgs, Gary

    2008-01-01

    This study uses a geographical information system (GIS) and statistical analysis to look for patterns in referrals to a British cancer genetics service. In this case, familial cancers are taken to be those that can develop when an individual inherits DNA mutations that cause an increased risk of cancer. Between 1998 and 2006 the Cancer Genetics Service for Wales received nearly 11,000 referrals for patients resident in Wales and it is the service database recording those referrals which is the subject of this secondary analysis. Using postcodes to match referred patients to areas, deprivation scores were assigned. Referral rates per 10,000 head of population across the 8-year study period by unitary authority are presented, as is information on referrals from primary and secondary care sources by year. Each patient referred has their family history of cancer recorded and is assigned to a risk category; high, medium or average. There are correlations between number of GPs (General Practitioners) in a practice, number of patients referred from a practice, and deprivation as measured by the overall Welsh Index of Multiple Deprivation 2005, such that the two former factors increase as deprivation decreases. Over time there were changes in referral sources, with referrals from primary care overtaking those from secondary care in percentage and absolute terms. There were also changes in the types of cancer referred, risk categories seen and to which centre referrals were made. Referral patterns reveal an inverse relationship between deprivation and health service availability and use. PMID:18923938

  15. Genetic Geostatistical Framework for Spatial Analysis of Fine-Scale Genetic Heterogeneity in Modern Populations: Results from the KORA Study.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lacava, A N; Walier, M; Holler, D; Steffens, M; Gieger, C; Furlanello, C; Lamina, C; Wichmann, H E; Becker, T

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to investigate fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity in modern humans from a geographic perspective, a genetic geostatistical approach framed within a geographic information system is presented. A sample collected for prospective studies in a small area of southern Germany was analyzed. None indication of genetic heterogeneity was detected in previous analysis. Socio-demographic and genotypic data of German citizens were analyzed (212 SNPs; n = 728). Genetic heterogeneity was evaluated with observed heterozygosity (H O ). Best-fitting spatial autoregressive models were identified, using socio-demographic variables as covariates. Spatial analysis included surface interpolation and geostatistics of observed and predicted patterns. Prediction accuracy was quantified. Spatial autocorrelation was detected for both socio-demographic and genetic variables. Augsburg City and eastern suburban areas showed higher H O values. The selected model gave best predictions in suburban areas. Fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity were observed. In accordance to literature, more urbanized areas showed higher levels of admixture. This approach showed efficacy for detecting and analyzing subtle patterns of genetic heterogeneity within small areas. It is scalable in number of loci, even up to whole-genome analysis. It may be suggested that this approach may be applicable to investigate the underlying genetic history that is, at least partially, embedded in geographic data. PMID:26258132

  16. Genetic Geostatistical Framework for Spatial Analysis of Fine-Scale Genetic Heterogeneity in Modern Populations: Results from the KORA Study

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Lacava, A. N.; Walier, M.; Holler, D.; Steffens, M.; Gieger, C.; Furlanello, C.; Lamina, C.; Wichmann, H. E.; Becker, T.

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to investigate fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity in modern humans from a geographic perspective, a genetic geostatistical approach framed within a geographic information system is presented. A sample collected for prospective studies in a small area of southern Germany was analyzed. None indication of genetic heterogeneity was detected in previous analysis. Socio-demographic and genotypic data of German citizens were analyzed (212 SNPs; n = 728). Genetic heterogeneity was evaluated with observed heterozygosity (HO). Best-fitting spatial autoregressive models were identified, using socio-demographic variables as covariates. Spatial analysis included surface interpolation and geostatistics of observed and predicted patterns. Prediction accuracy was quantified. Spatial autocorrelation was detected for both socio-demographic and genetic variables. Augsburg City and eastern suburban areas showed higher HO values. The selected model gave best predictions in suburban areas. Fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity were observed. In accordance to literature, more urbanized areas showed higher levels of admixture. This approach showed efficacy for detecting and analyzing subtle patterns of genetic heterogeneity within small areas. It is scalable in number of loci, even up to whole-genome analysis. It may be suggested that this approach may be applicable to investigate the underlying genetic history that is, at least partially, embedded in geographic data. PMID:26258132

  17. Genetic Analysis of Oncorhynchus Nerka : Life History and Genetic Analysis of Redfish Lake Oncorhynchus Nerka, 1993-1994 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, E.L.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Cummings, S.A.

    1994-10-01

    The study has shown through life history examination and DNA analysis that three forms of O. nerka are present in Redfish Lake. The three forms are closely related, but may be sufficiently different to be considered three separate stocks. Fishhook Creek kokanee are temporally isolated from the beach spawners, and may represent the gene pool most similar to the historic sockeye population that once spawned there. Fishhook Creek offers the best spawning area available in the lake system, and should be considered for use in reestablishing an anadromous Fishhook Creek sockeye swain. The resident beach spawning strain of O. nerka is likewise the most similar genetic form of the companion anadromous beach spawning O. nerka, and needs to be considered the most appropriate genetic source to help minimize reduced fitness of the sockeye from inbreeding.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Craniofacial Traits in the Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsuaki; Shimada, Atsuko; Sakai, Noriyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Tamiya, Gen; Shinya, Minori

    2007-01-01

    Family and twin studies suggest that a substantial genetic component underlies individual differences in craniofacial morphology. In the current study, we quantified 444 craniofacial traits in 100 individuals from two inbred medaka (Oryzias latipes) strains, HNI and Hd-rR. Relative distances between defined landmarks were measured in digital images of the medaka head region. A total of 379 traits differed significantly between the two strains, indicating that many craniofacial traits are controlled by genetic factors. Of these, 89 traits were analyzed via interval mapping of 184 F2 progeny from an intercross between HNI and Hd-rR. We identified quantitative trait loci for 66 craniofacial traits. The highest logarithm of the odds score was 6.2 for linkage group (LG) 9 and 11. Trait L33, which corresponds to the ratio of head length to head height at eye level, mapped to LG9; trait V15, which corresponds to the ratio of snout length to head width measured behind the eyes, mapped to LG11. Our initial results confirm the potential of the medaka as a model system for the genetic analysis of complex traits such as craniofacial morphology. PMID:18073435

  19. A generalized genetic random field method for the genetic association analysis of sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; He, Zihuai; Zhang, Min; Zhan, Xiaowei; Wei, Changshuai; Elston, Robert C; Lu, Qing

    2014-04-01

    With the advance of high-throughput sequencing technologies, it has become feasible to investigate the influence of the entire spectrum of sequencing variations on complex human diseases. Although association studies utilizing the new sequencing technologies hold great promise to unravel novel genetic variants, especially rare genetic variants that contribute to human diseases, the statistical analysis of high-dimensional sequencing data remains a challenge. Advanced analytical methods are in great need to facilitate high-dimensional sequencing data analyses. In this article, we propose a generalized genetic random field (GGRF) method for association analyses of sequencing data. Like other similarity-based methods (e.g., SIMreg and SKAT), the new method has the advantages of avoiding the need to specify thresholds for rare variants and allowing for testing multiple variants acting in different directions and magnitude of effects. The method is built on the generalized estimating equation framework and thus accommodates a variety of disease phenotypes (e.g., quantitative and binary phenotypes). Moreover, it has a nice asymptotic property, and can be applied to small-scale sequencing data without need for small-sample adjustment. Through simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed GGRF attains an improved or comparable power over a commonly used method, SKAT, under various disease scenarios, especially when rare variants play a significant role in disease etiology. We further illustrate GGRF with an application to a real dataset from the Dallas Heart Study. By using GGRF, we were able to detect the association of two candidate genes, ANGPTL3 and ANGPTL4, with serum triglyceride. PMID:24482034

  20. Genetic aspect of Alzheimer disease: Results of complex segregation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sadonvick, A.D.; Lee, I.M.L.; Bailey-Wilson, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the possibility that a single major locus will explain the segregation of Alzheimer disease (AD). The data were from the population-based AD Genetic Database and consisted of 402 consecutive, unrelated probands, diagnosed to have either `probable` or `autopsy confirmed` AD and their 2,245 first-degree relatives. In this analysis, a relative was considered affected with AD only when there were sufficient medical/autopsy data to support diagnosis of AD being the most likely cause of the dementia. Transmission probability models allowing for a genotype-dependent and logistically distributed age-of-onset were used. The program REGTL in the S.A.G.E. computer program package was used for a complex segregation analysis. The models included correction for single ascertainment. Regressive familial effects were not estimated. The data were analyzed to test for single major locus (SML), random transmission and no transmission (environmental) hypotheses. The results of the complex segregation analysis showed that (1) the SML was the best fit, and (2) the non-genetic models could be rejected.

  1. Population genetic analysis of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cama, Vitaliano; Feng, Yaoyu; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn; Zhang, Xichen; Xiao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Genotyping based on sequence analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer has revealed significant genetic diversity in Enterocytozoonbieneusi. Thus far, the population genetics of E. bieneusi and its significance in the epidemiology of microsporidiosis have not been examined. In this study, a multilocus sequence typing of E. bieneusi in AIDS patients in Lima, Peru was conducted, using 72 specimens previously genotyped as A, D, IV, EbpC, WL11, Peru7, Peru8, Peru10 and Peru11 at the internal transcribed spacer locus. Altogether, 39 multilocus genotypes were identified among the 72 specimens. The observation of strong intragenic linkage disequilibria and limited genetic recombination among markers were indicative of an overall clonal population structure of E. bieneusi. Measures of pair-wise intergenic linkage disequilibria and a standardised index of association (IAS) based on allelic profile data further supported this conclusion. Both sequence-based and allelic profile-based phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of two genetically isolated groups in the study population, one (group 1) containing isolates of the anthroponotic internal transcribed spacer genotype A, and the other (group 2) containing isolates of multiple internal transcribed spacer genotypes (mainly genotypes D and IV) with zoonotic potential. The measurement of linkage disequilibria and recombination indicated group 2 had a clonal population structure, whereas group 1 had an epidemic population structure. The formation of the two sub-populations was confirmed by STRUCTURE and Wright's fixation index (FST) analyses. The data highlight the power of MLST in understanding the epidemiology of E. bieneusi. PMID:22534008

  2. Dielectrophoretic Capture and Genetic Analysis of Single Neuroblastoma Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L.; Rader, JulieAnn; Ruden, Jacob; Rappaport, Eric F.; Hunter, Kristen N.; Hallberg, Paul L.; Krytska, Kate; O’Dwyer, Peter J.; Mosse, Yael P.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here, we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells (WBCs). Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control WBCs. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples of patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here, we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients. PMID:25133137

  3. Genetic analysis and attribution of microbial forensics evidence.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Johnson, Martin D; Fraser, Claire M; Leighton, Terrance J; Murch, Randall S; Chakraborty, Ranajit

    2005-01-01

    Because of the availability of pathogenic microorganisms and the relatively low cost of preparing and disseminating bioweapons, there is a continuing threat of biocrime and bioterrorism. Thus, enhanced capabilities are needed that enable the full and robust forensic exploitation and interpretation of microbial evidence from acts of bioterrorism or biocrimes. To respond to the need, greater resources and efforts are being applied to the burgeoning field of microbial forensics. Microbial forensics focuses on the characterization, analysis and interpretation of evidence for attributional purposes from a bioterrorism act, biocrime, hoax or inadvertent agent release. To enhance attribution capabilities, a major component of microbial forensics is the analysis of nucleic acids to associate or eliminate putative samples. The degree that attribution can be addressed depends on the context of the case, the available knowledge of the genetics, phylogeny, and ecology of the target microorganism, and technologies applied. The types of genetic markers and features that can impact statistical inferences of microbial forensic evidence include: single nucleotide polymorphisms, repetitive sequences, insertions and deletions, mobile elements, pathogenicity islands, virulence and resistance genes, house keeping genes, structural genes, whole genome sequences, asexual and sexual reproduction, horizontal gene transfer, conjugation, transduction, lysogeny, gene conversion, recombination, gene duplication, rearrangements, and mutational hotspots. Nucleic acid based typing technologies include: PCR, real-time PCR, MLST, MLVA, whole genome sequencing, and microarrays. PMID:16417203

  4. Analysis of genetic diversity in earthworms using DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshul; Sonah, Humira; Deshmukh, Rupesh K; Gupta, Navneet K; Singh, Nagendra K; Sharma, Tilak R

    2011-01-01

    Earthworms are one of the most important and beneficial macrofauna, and are used extensively in organic farming. Earthworms mediate soil biological regulation systems, and produce biogenic structures. They help to maintain soil structure, water infiltration, and regulate the availability of nutrients assimilated by plants. The objectives of this study were to perform morphological and molecular characterizations of 24 earthworm individuals collected from geographically diverse locations to assess the level of genetic variation. For molecular analysis, the effectiveness of RAPD, ISSR, and Universal rice primers (URPs) markers was investigated to identify polymorphism among 24 isolates of earthworms. A total of 62 molecular markers were used for amplification of genomic DNA of earthworms. Of these, 10 RAPD, 10 ISSR, and 10 URPs markers were used for characterization, which showed 95.7%, 96.7% and 98.3% polymorphism, respectively. The dendrogram, generated from the DNA markers by the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic averages, grouped all the isolates into two main clusters. All Eisenia fetida isolates were clustered in group A, whereas group B included three isolates belonging to Eudrilus eugeniae. Molecular markers allowed a rapid assessment of genetic variation among these closely related isolates of earthworms. These results suggest that molecular markers are a good choice for diversity analysis of earthworm individuals. PMID:21186943

  5. Simultaneous Bayesian analysis of contingency tables in genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Dickhaus, Thorsten

    2015-08-01

    Genetic association studies lead to simultaneous categorical data analysis. The sample for every genetic locus consists of a contingency table containing the numbers of observed genotype-phenotype combinations. Under case-control design, the row counts of every table are identical and fixed, while column counts are random. The aim of the statistical analysis is to test independence of the phenotype and the genotype at every locus. We present an objective Bayesian methodology for these association tests, which relies on the conjugacy of Dirichlet and multinomial distributions. Being based on the likelihood principle, the Bayesian tests avoid looping over all tables with given marginals. Making use of data generated by The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC), we illustrate that the ordering of the Bayes factors shows a good agreement with that of frequentist p-values. Furthermore, we deal with specifying prior probabilities for the validity of the null hypotheses, by taking linkage disequilibrium structure into account and exploiting the concept of effective numbers of tests. Application of a Bayesian decision theoretic multiple test procedure to the WTCCC data illustrates the proposed methodology. Finally, we discuss two methods for reconciling frequentist and Bayesian approaches to the multiple association test problem. PMID:26215535

  6. MEGA6: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 6.0.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Koichiro; Stecher, Glen; Peterson, Daniel; Filipski, Alan; Kumar, Sudhir

    2013-12-01

    We announce the release of an advanced version of the Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (MEGA) software, which currently contains facilities for building sequence alignments, inferring phylogenetic histories, and conducting molecular evolutionary analysis. In version 6.0, MEGA now enables the inference of timetrees, as it implements the RelTime method for estimating divergence times for all branching points in a phylogeny. A new Timetree Wizard in MEGA6 facilitates this timetree inference by providing a graphical user interface (GUI) to specify the phylogeny and calibration constraints step-by-step. This version also contains enhanced algorithms to search for the optimal trees under evolutionary criteria and implements a more advanced memory management that can double the size of sequence data sets to which MEGA can be applied. Both GUI and command-line versions of MEGA6 can be downloaded from www.megasoftware.net free of charge. PMID:24132122

  7. Genetic analysis of superovulatory response of Holstein cows in Canada.

    PubMed

    Jaton, C; Koeck, A; Sargolzaei, M; Malchiodi, F; Price, C A; Schenkel, F S; Miglior, F

    2016-05-01

    Superovulation of dairy cattle is frequently used in Canada. The cost of this protocol is high, and so is the variability of the outcome. Knowing the superovulatory potential of a donor cow could influence the breeder's decision to superovulate it or not. The main objective of this study was to perform a genetic analysis for superovulatory response of Holstein cows in Canada using data recorded by Holstein Canada, and to investigate if these data could be used for genetic evaluation. Data contained the total number of embryos and the number of viable embryos from every successful flushing performed across Canada. After editing, 137,446 records of superovulation performed between 1992 and 2014 were analyzed. A univariate repeatability animal model analysis was performed for both total number of embryos and number of viable embryos. Because both data and residuals did not follow a normal distribution, records were subject to either logarithmic or Anscombe transformation. Using logarithmic transformation, heritability estimates (SE) of 0.15 (0.01) and 0.14 (0.01) were found for total number of embryos and number of viable embryos, respectively. Using Anscombe transformation, heritability estimates (SE) of 0.17 (0.01) and 0.14 (0.01) were found for total number of embryos and number of viable embryos, respectively. The genetic correlation between the 2 traits was estimated at 0.97 using logarithmic transformation and 0.95 using Anscombe transformation. Breeding values were estimated for 54,463 cows, and 3,513 sires. Only estimated breeding values of sires having a reliability higher than 40% were considered for estimated breeding values correlations with other routinely evaluated traits. The results showed that selection for a higher response to superovulation would lead to a slight decrease in milk production, but an improvement for functional traits, including all reproduction traits. In all cases, the estimated correlations are either low or modest. We conclude that

  8. Genetic analysis of fructan-hyperproducing strains of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Kiska, D L; Macrina, F L

    1994-01-01

    Fructan polymer, synthesized from sucrose by the extracellular fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus mutans, is thought to contribute to the progression of dental caries. It may serve as an extracellular storage polysaccharide facilitating survival and acid production. It may also have a role in adherence or accumulation of bacterial cells on the tooth surface. A number of clinical isolates of S. mutans which produce large, mucoid colonies on sucrose-containing agar as a result of increased production of fructan have been discovered. By using eight independent isolates, we sought to determine if such fructan-hyperproducing strains represented a genetically homogeneous group of organisms. Restriction fragment patterns of total cellular DNA were examined by using pulsed-field and conventional gel electrophoresis. Four genetic types which appeared to correlate with the serotype of the organism and the geographic site of isolation were evident. Southern blot analysis of several genetic loci for extracellular enzymes revealed some minor differences between the strains, but the basic genomic organizations of these loci were similar. To evaluate whether the excess fructan produced by these strains enhanced the virulence of these organisms in the oral cavity, it was of interest to create mutants deficient in fructosidase (FruA), the extracellular enzyme which degrades this polymer. The fruA gene was inactivated by allelic exchange in two fructan-hyperproducing strains as well as in S. mutans GS5, a strain which does not hyperproduce fructan. All of the fruA mutant strains were devoid of fructan hydrolase activity when levan was used as a substrate. However, the fructan-hyperproducing strains retained the ability to hydrolyze inulin, suggesting the presence of a second fructosidase with specificity for inulin in these strains. Images PMID:7911782

  9. Multivariate analysis of noise in genetic regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Ryota; Kimura, Hidenori; J Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-08-21

    Stochasticity is an intrinsic property of genetic regulatory networks due to the low copy numbers of the major molecular species, such as, DNA, mRNA, and regulatory proteins. Therefore, investigation of the mechanisms that reduce the stochastic noise is essential in understanding the reproducible behaviors of real organisms and is also a key to design synthetic genetic regulatory networks that can reliably work. We use an analytical and systematic method, the linear noise approximation of the chemical master equation along with the decoupling of a stoichiometric matrix. In the analysis of fluctuations of multiple molecular species, the covariance is an important measure of noise. However, usually the representation of a covariance matrix in the natural coordinate system, i.e. the copy numbers of the molecular species, is intractably complicated because reactions change copy numbers of more than one molecular species simultaneously. Decoupling of a stoichiometric matrix, which is a transformation of variables, significantly simplifies the representation of a covariance matrix and elucidates the mechanisms behind the observed fluctuations in the copy numbers. We apply our method to three types of fundamental genetic regulatory networks, that is, a single-gene autoregulatory network, a two-gene autoregulatory network, and a mutually repressive network. We have found that there are multiple noise components differently originating. Each noise component produces fluctuation in the characteristic direction. The resulting fluctuations in the copy numbers of the molecular species are the sum of these fluctuations. In the examples, the limitation of the negative feedback in noise reduction and the trade-off of fluctuations in multiple molecular species are clearly explained. The analytical representations show the full parameter dependence. Additionally, the validity of our method is tested by stochastic simulations. PMID:15246787

  10. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  11. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  12. Genetic analysis by DNA fingerprinting in tsetse fly genomes.

    PubMed

    Blanchetot, A; Gooding, R H

    1993-12-01

    Genomic DNA from tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidae: Glossina Wiedemann) was analyzed by hybridization using the whole M13 phage as a probe to reveal DNA fingerprinting (DNAfp) profiles. Intrapopulation variability, measured by comparison of DNAfp profiles of tsetse flies from a large colony of G. brevipalpis, showed a high degree of polymorphism similar to that found in other animal species. Different lines of G. m. morsitans, G. m. centralis, G. m. submorsitans, G. p. palpalis and G. p. gambiensis established from small colonies displayed less genetic variability than the G. brevipalpis population. The analysis of pedigree relationships within an inbred line of G. m. centralis conformed to a Mendelian inheritance pattern. In the pedigree presented no mutations were observed, one fragment was linked to the X chromosome, and three fragment sets were linked, but most fragments showed independent segregation. M13 revealed no characteristic DNAfp profile differences between the subgenus Glossina and the subgenus Nemorhina, but a conserved distribution pattern was found in the laboratory colonies within each subspecies. M13 also revealed line specific DNA fragments that may be useful as genetic markers to expand the present linkage map of G. m. morsitans. PMID:8220390

  13. Genetic analysis of arsenic accumulation in maize using QTL mapping

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Xing, Xiaolong; Xu, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Haochuan; Xue, Yadong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in crops and poses a threat to human health. The genetic mechanism of As accumulation is unclear. Herein, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to unravel the genetic basis of As accumulation in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from the Chinese crossbred variety Yuyu22. The kernels had the lowest As content among the different maize tissues, followed by the axes, stems, bracts and leaves. Fourteen QTLs were identified at each location. Some of these QTLs were identified in different environments and were also detected by joint analysis. Compared with the B73 RefGen v2 reference genome, the distributions and effects of some QTLs were closely linked to those of QTLs detected in a previous study; the QTLs were likely in strong linkage disequilibrium. Our findings could be used to help maintain maize production to satisfy the demand for edible corn and to decrease the As content in As-contaminated soil through the selection and breeding of As pollution-safe cultivars. PMID:26880701

  14. Genetic analysis of biosurfactant production in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Hewald, Sandra; Josephs, Katharina; Bölker, Michael

    2005-06-01

    The dimorphic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis produces large amounts of surface-active compounds under conditions of nitrogen starvation. These biosurfactants consist of derivatives of two classes of amphipathic glycolipids. Ustilagic acids are cellobiose lipids in which the disaccharide is O-glycosidically linked to 15,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid. Ustilipids are mannosylerythritol lipids derived from acylated beta-d-mannopyranosyl-d-erythritol. Whereas the chemical structure of these biosurfactants has been determined, the genetic basis for their biosynthesis and regulation is largely unknown. Here we report the first identification of two genes, emt1 and cyp1, that are essential for the production of fungal extracellular glycolipids. emt1 is required for mannosylerythritol lipid production and codes for a protein with similarity to prokaryotic glycosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of macrolide antibiotics. We suggest that Emt1 catalyzes the synthesis of mannosyl-d-erythritol by transfer of GDP-mannose. Deletion of the gene cyp1 resulted in complete loss of ustilagic acid production. Cyp1 encodes a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase which is highly related to a family of plant fatty acid hydroxylases. Therefore we assume that Cyp1 is directly involved in the biosynthesis of the unusual 15,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid. We could show that mannosylerythritol lipid production is responsible for hemolytic activity on blood agar, whereas ustilagic acid secretion is required for long-range pheromone recognition. The mutants described here allow for the first time a genetic analysis of glycolipid production in fungi. PMID:15932999

  15. Genetic Analysis of Biosurfactant Production in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Hewald, Sandra; Josephs, Katharina; Bölker, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The dimorphic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis produces large amounts of surface-active compounds under conditions of nitrogen starvation. These biosurfactants consist of derivatives of two classes of amphipathic glycolipids. Ustilagic acids are cellobiose lipids in which the disaccharide is O-glycosidically linked to 15,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid. Ustilipids are mannosylerythritol lipids derived from acylated β-d-mannopyranosyl-d-erythritol. Whereas the chemical structure of these biosurfactants has been determined, the genetic basis for their biosynthesis and regulation is largely unknown. Here we report the first identification of two genes, emt1 and cyp1, that are essential for the production of fungal extracellular glycolipids. emt1 is required for mannosylerythritol lipid production and codes for a protein with similarity to prokaryotic glycosyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of macrolide antibiotics. We suggest that Emt1 catalyzes the synthesis of mannosyl-d-erythritol by transfer of GDP-mannose. Deletion of the gene cyp1 resulted in complete loss of ustilagic acid production. Cyp1 encodes a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase which is highly related to a family of plant fatty acid hydroxylases. Therefore we assume that Cyp1 is directly involved in the biosynthesis of the unusual 15,16-dihydroxyhexadecanoic acid. We could show that mannosylerythritol lipid production is responsible for hemolytic activity on blood agar, whereas ustilagic acid secretion is required for long-range pheromone recognition. The mutants described here allow for the first time a genetic analysis of glycolipid production in fungi. PMID:15932999

  16. Genetic analysis of arsenic accumulation in maize using QTL mapping.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhongjun; Li, Weihua; Xing, Xiaolong; Xu, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Haochuan; Xue, Yadong; Liu, Zonghua; Tang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic heavy metal that can accumulate in crops and poses a threat to human health. The genetic mechanism of As accumulation is unclear. Herein, we used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to unravel the genetic basis of As accumulation in a maize recombinant inbred line population derived from the Chinese crossbred variety Yuyu22. The kernels had the lowest As content among the different maize tissues, followed by the axes, stems, bracts and leaves. Fourteen QTLs were identified at each location. Some of these QTLs were identified in different environments and were also detected by joint analysis. Compared with the B73 RefGen v2 reference genome, the distributions and effects of some QTLs were closely linked to those of QTLs detected in a previous study; the QTLs were likely in strong linkage disequilibrium. Our findings could be used to help maintain maize production to satisfy the demand for edible corn and to decrease the As content in As-contaminated soil through the selection and breeding of As pollution-safe cultivars. PMID:26880701

  17. Genetic analysis of genome-wide transcriptional regulation through eQTL mapping in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) mapping is a powerful tool for identifying the genetic basis of gene expression variation. Coincident genetic locations of eQTL and phenotypic QTL provide the basis for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved. Genetic analysis of expr...

  18. Genetic analysis of biological pathway data through genomic randomization

    PubMed Central

    Yaspan, Brian L.; Bush, William S.; Torstenson, Eric S.; Ma, Deqiong; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) are a standard approach for large-scale common variation characterization and for identification of single loci predisposing to disease. However, due to issues of moderate sample sizes and particularly multiple testing correction, many variants of smaller effect size are not detected within a single allele analysis framework. Thus, small main effects and potential epistatic effects are not consistently observed in GWAS using standard analytical approaches that consider only single SNP alleles. Here we propose unique methodology that aggregates variants of interest (for example, genes in a biological pathway) using GWAS results. Multiple testing and type I error concerns are minimized using empirical genomic randomization to estimate significance. Randomization corrects for common pathway-based analysis biases such as SNP coverage and density, linkage disequilibrium, gene size and pathway size. PARIS (Pathway Analysis by Randomization Incorporating Structure) applies this randomization and in doing so directly accounts for linkage disequilibrium effects. PARIS is independent of association analysis method and is thus applicable to GWAS datasets of all study designs. Using the KEGG database as an example, we apply PARIS to the publicly available Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) GWA dataset, revealing pathways with a significant enrichment of positive association results. PMID:21279722

  19. Genetic analysis of interspecific incompatibility in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, H; Ishimaru, Y; Li, F; Sato, Y; Kitashiba, H; Nishio, T

    2010-08-01

    In interspecific pollination of Brassica rapa stigmas with Brassica oleracea pollen grains, pollen tubes cannot penetrate stigma tissues. This trait, called interspecific incompatibility, is similar to self-incompatibility in pollen tube behaviors of rejected pollen grains. Since some B. rapa lines have no interspecific incompatibility, genetic analysis of interspecific incompatibility was performed using two F(2) populations. Analysis with an F(2) population between an interspecific-incompatible line and a self-compatible cultivar 'Yellow sarson' having non-functional alleles of S-locus genes and MLPK, the stigmas of which are compatible with B. oleracea pollen grains, revealed no involvement of the S locus and MLPK in the difference of their interspecific incompatibility phenotypes. In QTL analysis of the strength of interspecific incompatibility, three peaks of LOD scores were found, but their LOD scores were as high as the threshold value, and the variance explained by each QTL was small. QTL analysis using another F(2) population derived from selected parents having the highest and lowest levels of interspecific incompatibility revealed five QTLs with high LOD scores, which did not correspond to those found in the former population. The QTL having the highest LOD score was found in linkage group A02. The effect of this QTL on interspecific incompatibility was confirmed by analyzing backcrossed progeny. Based on synteny of this QTL region with Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5, a possible candidate gene, which might be involved in interspecific incompatibility, is discussed. PMID:20414635

  20. A Comprehensive Analysis of High School Genetics Standards: Are States Keeping Pace with Modern Genetics?

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, M.J.; Pleasants, C.; Solow, L.; Wong, A.; Zhang, H.

    2011-01-01

    Science education in the United States will increasingly be driven by testing and accountability requirements, such as those mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act, which rely heavily on learning outcomes, or “standards,” that are currently developed on a state-by-state basis. Those standards, in turn, drive curriculum and instruction. Given the importance of standards to teaching and learning, we investigated the quality of life sciences/biology standards with respect to genetics for all 50 states and the District of Columbia, using core concepts developed by the American Society of Human Genetics as normative benchmarks. Our results indicate that the states’ genetics standards, in general, are poor, with more than 85% of the states receiving overall scores of Inadequate. In particular, the standards in virtually every state have failed to keep pace with changes in the discipline as it has become genomic in scope, omitting concepts related to genetic complexity, the importance of environment to phenotypic variation, differential gene expression, and the differences between inherited and somatic genetic disease. Clearer, more comprehensive genetics standards are likely to benefit genetics instruction and learning, help prepare future genetics researchers, and contribute to the genetic literacy of the U.S. citizenry. PMID:21885828

  1. Genetic Analysis of Mice Skin Exposed by Hyper-Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Rika; Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2013-02-01

    In the space environment, physiological alterations, such as low bone density, muscle weakness and decreased immunity, are caused by microgravity and cosmic radiation. On the other hand, it is known that the leg muscles are hypertrophy by 2G-gravity. An understanding of the effects on human body from microgravity to hyper-gravity is very important. Recently, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has started a project to detect the changes on gene expression and mineral metabolism caused by microgravity by analyzing the hair of astronauts who stay in the international Space Station (ISS) for a long time. From these results of human hair’s research, the genetic effects of human hair roots by microgravity will become clear. However, it is unclear how the gene expression of hair roots was effected by hypergravity. Therefore, in this experiment, we analyzed the effect on mice skin contained hair roots by comparing microgravity or hypergravity exposed mice. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the genetic effects on mice skin by microgravity or 2G-gravity. The samples were taken from mice exposed to space flight (FL) or hypergravity environment (2G) for 3-months, respectively. The extracted and amplified RNA from these mice skin was used to DNA microarray analysis. in this experiment, we analyzed the effect of gravity by using mice skin contained hair roots, which exposed space (FL) and hyper-gravity (2G) for 3 months and each control. By DNA microarray analysis, we found the common 98 genes changed in both FL and 2G. Among these 98 genes, the functions and pathways were identified by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software. Next, we focused the one of the identified pathways and compared the effects on each molecules in this pathways by the different environments, such as FL and 2G. As the results, we could detect some interesting molecules, which might be depended on the gravity levels. In addition, to investigate

  2. Traffic Lines: New Tools for Genetic Analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Rossidivito, Gabrielle; Hu, Tieqiang; Berlyand, Yosef; Poethig, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Genetic analysis requires the ability to identify the genotypes of individuals in a segregating population. This task is straightforward if each genotype has a distinctive phenotype, but is difficult if these genotypes are phenotypically similar or identical. We show that Arabidopsis seeds homozygous or heterozygous for a mutation of interest can be identified in a segregating family by placing the mutation in trans to a chromosome carrying a pair of seed-expressed green and red fluorescent transgenes (a “traffic line”) that flank the mutation. Nonfluorescent seeds in the self-pollinated progeny of such a heterozygous plant are usually homozygous for the mutation, whereas seeds with intermediate green and red fluorescence are typically heterozygous for the mutation. This makes it possible to identify seedlings homozygous for mutations that lack an obvious seedling phenotype, and also facilitates the analysis of lethal or sterile mutations, which must be propagated in heterozygous condition. Traffic lines can also be used to identify progeny that have undergone recombination within a defined region of the genome, facilitating genetic mapping and the production of near-isogenic lines. We produced 488 transgenic lines containing single genome-mapped insertions of NAP:dsRED and NAP:eGFP in Columbia (330 lines) and Landsberg erecta (158 lines) and generated sets of traffic lines that span most regions of the Arabidopsis genome. We demonstrated the utility of these lines for identifying seeds of a specific genotype and for generating near-isogenic lines using mutations of WUSCHEL and SHOOTMERISTEMLESS. This new resource significantly decreases the effort and cost of genotyping segregating families and increases the efficiency of experiments that rely on the ability to detect recombination in a defined chromosomal segment. PMID:25711279

  3. The Genetic Analysis of an Acinetobacter johnsonii Clinical Strain Evidenced the Presence of Horizontal Genetic Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Montaña, Sabrina; Schramm, Sareda T. J.; Traglia, German Matías; Chiem, Kevin; Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Quiroga, Cecilia; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Iriarte, Andrés; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii rarely causes human infections. While most A. johnsonii isolates are susceptible to virtually all antibiotics, strains harboring a variety of β-lactamases have recently been described. An A. johnsonii Aj2199 clinical strain recovered from a hospital in Buenos Aires produces PER-2 and OXA-58. We decided to delve into its genome by obtaining the whole genome sequence of the Aj2199 strain. Genome comparison studies on Aj2199 revealed 240 unique genes and a close relation to strain WJ10621, isolated from the urine of a patient in China. Genomic analysis showed evidence of horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) events. Forty-five insertion sequences and two intact prophages were found in addition to several resistance determinants such as blaPER-2, blaOXA-58, blaTEM-1, strA, strB, ereA, sul1, aacC2 and a new variant of blaOXA-211, called blaOXA-498. In particular, blaPER-2 and blaTEM-1 are present within the typical contexts previously described in the Enterobacteriaceae family. These results suggest that A. johnsonii actively acquires exogenous DNA from other bacterial species and concomitantly becomes a reservoir of resistance genes. PMID:27548264

  4. The Genetic Analysis of an Acinetobacter johnsonii Clinical Strain Evidenced the Presence of Horizontal Genetic Transfer.

    PubMed

    Montaña, Sabrina; Schramm, Sareda T J; Traglia, German Matías; Chiem, Kevin; Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Quiroga, Cecilia; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Iriarte, Andrés; Ramírez, María Soledad

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter johnsonii rarely causes human infections. While most A. johnsonii isolates are susceptible to virtually all antibiotics, strains harboring a variety of β-lactamases have recently been described. An A. johnsonii Aj2199 clinical strain recovered from a hospital in Buenos Aires produces PER-2 and OXA-58. We decided to delve into its genome by obtaining the whole genome sequence of the Aj2199 strain. Genome comparison studies on Aj2199 revealed 240 unique genes and a close relation to strain WJ10621, isolated from the urine of a patient in China. Genomic analysis showed evidence of horizontal genetic transfer (HGT) events. Forty-five insertion sequences and two intact prophages were found in addition to several resistance determinants such as blaPER-2, blaOXA-58, blaTEM-1, strA, strB, ereA, sul1, aacC2 and a new variant of blaOXA-211, called blaOXA-498. In particular, blaPER-2 and blaTEM-1 are present within the typical contexts previously described in the Enterobacteriaceae family. These results suggest that A. johnsonii actively acquires exogenous DNA from other bacterial species and concomitantly becomes a reservoir of resistance genes. PMID:27548264

  5. Genetic analysis of Indian tasar silkmoth (Antheraea mylitta) populations.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Muthulakshmi, M; Vardhini, Deena; Jayaprakash, P; Nagaraju, J; Arunkumar, K P

    2015-01-01

    Indian tasar silkmoth, Antheraea mylitta is an economically important wild silkmoth species distributed across India. A number of morphologically and ethologically well-defined ecotypes are known for this species that differ in their primary food plant specificity. Most of these ecotypes do not interbreed in nature, but are able to produce offspring under captive conditions. Microsatellite markers were developed for A. mylitta, and out of these, ten well-behaved microsatellite loci were used to analyze the population structure of different ecoraces. A total of 154 individual moths belonging to eight different ecoraces, were screened at each locus. Hierarchical analysis of population structure using Analysis of MOlecular VAriance (AMOVA) revealed significant structuring (FST = 0.154) and considerable inbreeding (FIS = 0.505). A significant isolation by distance was also observed. The number of possible population clusters was investigated using distance method, Bayesian algorithm and self organization maps (SOM). The first two methods revealed two distinct clusters, whereas the SOM showed the different ecoraces not to be clearly differentiated. These results suggest that although there is a large degree of phenotypic variation among the different ecoraces of A. mylitta, genetically they are not very different, and the phenotypic differences may largely be a result of their respective ecology. PMID:26510465

  6. Genetic analysis of Indian tasar silkmoth (Antheraea mylitta) populations

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Muthulakshmi, M; Vardhini, Deena; Jayaprakash, P; Nagaraju, J; Arunkumar, K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Indian tasar silkmoth, Antheraea mylitta is an economically important wild silkmoth species distributed across India. A number of morphologically and ethologically well-defined ecotypes are known for this species that differ in their primary food plant specificity. Most of these ecotypes do not interbreed in nature, but are able to produce offspring under captive conditions. Microsatellite markers were developed for A. mylitta, and out of these, ten well-behaved microsatellite loci were used to analyze the population structure of different ecoraces. A total of 154 individual moths belonging to eight different ecoraces, were screened at each locus. Hierarchical analysis of population structure using Analysis of MOlecular VAriance (AMOVA) revealed significant structuring (FST = 0.154) and considerable inbreeding (FIS = 0.505). A significant isolation by distance was also observed. The number of possible population clusters was investigated using distance method, Bayesian algorithm and self organization maps (SOM). The first two methods revealed two distinct clusters, whereas the SOM showed the different ecoraces not to be clearly differentiated. These results suggest that although there is a large degree of phenotypic variation among the different ecoraces of A. mylitta, genetically they are not very different, and the phenotypic differences may largely be a result of their respective ecology. PMID:26510465

  7. Analysis of the Genetic Basis of Disease in the Context of Worldwide Human Relationships and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Erik; Chen, Rong; Sikora, Martin; Morgan, Alexander A.; Patel, Chirag J.; Ramesh, Aditya; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Butte, Atul J.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity across different human populations can enhance understanding of the genetic basis of disease. We calculated the genetic risk of 102 diseases in 1,043 unrelated individuals across 51 populations of the Human Genome Diversity Panel. We found that genetic risk for type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer decreased as humans migrated toward East Asia. In addition, biliary liver cirrhosis, alopecia areata, bladder cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, membranous nephropathy, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, ulcerative colitis, and vitiligo have undergone genetic risk differentiation. This analysis represents a large-scale attempt to characterize genetic risk differentiation in the context of migration. We anticipate that our findings will enable detailed analysis pertaining to the driving forces behind genetic risk differentiation. PMID:23717210

  8. Multivariate genetic analysis of academic skills of the Queensland core skills test and IQ highlight the importance of genetic g.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Mark A; Wright, Margaret J; Luciano, Michelle; Geffen, Gina M; Martin, Nicholas G

    2005-12-01

    This study examined the genetic and environmental relationships among 5 academic achievement skills of a standardized test of academic achievement, the Queensland Core Skills Test (QCST; Queensland Studies Authority, 2003a). QCST participants included 182 monozygotic pairs and 208 dizygotic pairs (mean 17 years +/- 0.4 standard deviation). IQ data were included in the analysis to correct for ascertainment bias. A genetic general factor explained virtually all genetic variance in the component academic skills scores, and accounted for 32% to 73% of their phenotypic variances. It also explained 56% and 42% of variation in Verbal IQ and Performance IQ respectively, suggesting that this factor is genetic g. Modest specific genetic effects were evident for achievement in mathematical problem solving and written expression. A single common factor adequately explained common environmental effects, which were also modest, and possibly due to assortative mating. The results suggest that general academic ability, derived from genetic influences and to a lesser extent common environmental influences, is the primary source of variation in component skills of the QCST. PMID:16354502

  9. Stability analysis of genetic regulatory networks with multiple time delays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    A genetic regulatory network is a dynamic system to describe interactions among genes (mRNA) and its products (proteins). From the statistic thermodynamics and biochemical reaction principle, a genetic regulatory network can be described by a group of nonlinear differential equations with time delays. Stability is one of interesting properties for genetic regulatory network. Previous studies have investigated stability of genetic regulatory networks with a single time delay. In this paper, we investigate properties of genetic regulatory networks with multiple time delays in the notion of delay-independent stability. We present necessary and sufficient condition for the local delay-independent stability of genetic regulatory network with multiple time delays which are independent or commensurate. PMID:18002223

  10. Analysis of the optimality of the standard genetic code.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Balaji; Saini, Supreet

    2016-07-19

    Many theories have been proposed attempting to explain the origin of the genetic code. While strong reasons remain to believe that the genetic code evolved as a frozen accident, at least for the first few amino acids, other theories remain viable. In this work, we test the optimality of the standard genetic code against approximately 17 million genetic codes, and locate 29 which outperform the standard genetic code at the following three criteria: (a) robustness to point mutation; (b) robustness to frameshift mutation; and (c) ability to encode additional information in the coding region. We use a genetic algorithm to generate and score codes from different parts of the associated landscape, which are, as a result, presumably more representative of the entire landscape. Our results show that while the genetic code is sub-optimal for robustness to frameshift mutation and the ability to encode additional information in the coding region, it is very strongly selected for robustness to point mutation. This coupled with the observation that the different performance indicator scores for a particular genetic code are negatively correlated makes the standard genetic code nearly optimal for the three criteria tested in this work. PMID:27327359

  11. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian J.; Davis, Richard C.; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R. Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Gargalovic, Peter S.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  12. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brian J; Davis, Richard C; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C; Hazen, Stanley L; Gargalovic, Peter S; Lusis, Aldons J

    2015-12-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  13. Joint analysis of multiple phenotypes: summary of results and discussions from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19.

    PubMed

    Schillert, Arne; Konigorski, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    For Genetic Analysis Workshop 19, 2 extensive data sets were provided, including whole genome and whole exome sequence data, gene expression data, and longitudinal blood pressure outcomes, together with nongenetic covariates. These data sets gave researchers the chance to investigate different aspects of more complex relationships within the data, and the contributions in our working group focused on statistical methods for the joint analysis of multiple phenotypes, which is part of the research field of data integration. The analysis of data from different sources poses challenges to researchers but provides the opportunity to model the real-life situation more realistically.Our 4 contributions all used the provided real data to identify genetic predictors for blood pressure. In the contributions, novel multivariate rare variant tests, copula models, structural equation models and a sparse matrix representation variable selection approach were applied. Each of these statistical models can be used to investigate specific hypothesized relationships, which are described together with their biological assumptions.The results showed that all methods are ready for application on a genome-wide scale and can be used or extended to include multiple omics data sets. The results provide potentially interesting genetic targets for future investigation and replication. Furthermore, all contributions demonstrated that the analysis of complex data sets could benefit from modeling correlated phenotypes jointly as well as by adding further bioinformatics information. PMID:26866608

  14. Integrative genetic analysis of transcription modules: towards filling the gap between genetic lociand inherited traits

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Hao; Bao, Lei; Manly, Kenneth; Chesler, Elissa J; Lu, Lu; Wang, Jintao; Zhou, Mi; Williams, Robert; Cui, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Genetic loci that regulate inherited traits are routinely identified using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping methods. However, the genotype-phenotype associations do not provide information on the gene expression program through which the genetic loci regulate the traits. Transcription modules are 'selfconsistent regulatory units' and are closely related to the modular components of gene regulatory network [Ihmels, J., Friedlander, G., Bergmann, S., Sarig, O., Ziv, Y. and Barkai, N. (2002) Revealing modular organization in the yeast transcriptional network. Nat. Genet., 31, 370-377; Segal, E., Shapira, M., Regev, A., Pe'er, D., Botstein, D., Koller, D. and Friedman, N. (2003) Module networks: identifying regulatory modules and their condition-specific regulators from gene expression data. Nat. Genet., 34, 166-176]. We used genome-wide genotype and gene expression data of a genetic reference population that consists of mice of 32 recombinant inbred strains to identify the transcription modules and the genetic loci regulating them. Twenty-nine transcription modules defined by genetic variations were identified. Statistically significant associations between the transcription modules and 18 classical physiological and behavioral traits were found. Genome-wide interval mapping showed that major QTLs regulating the transcription modules are often co-localized with the QTLs regulating the associated classical traits. The association and the possible co-regulation of the classical trait and transcription module indicate that the transcription module may be involved in the gene pathways connecting the QTL and the classical trait. Our results show that a transcription module may associate with multiple seemingly unrelated classical traits and a classical trait may associate with different modules. Literature mining results provided strong independent evidences for the relations among genes of the transcription modules, genes in the regions of the QTLs regulating the

  15. Analysis of Molecular Genetics Content in Spanish Secondary School Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Gracia, M. V.; Gil-Quilez, M. J.; Osada, J.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of molecular biology in thirty-four Spanish high school biology textbooks has been analysed using a check-list made up of twenty-three items. The study showed a tendency to confuse the genetic code with genetic information. The treatment of DNA transcription, regulation of gene expression and translation were presented as masses of…

  16. Analysis of Errors Made by Students Solving Genetics Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Sandra Judith

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the errors made by students solving genetics problems. A sample of 10 non-science undergraduate students was obtained from a private college in Northern New Jersey. The results support prior research in the area of genetics education and show that a weak understanding of the relationship of meiosis to…

  17. Genetic analysis of tolerance to infections using random regressions: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kause, Antti

    2011-08-01

    Tolerance to infections is the ability of a host to limit the impact of a given pathogen burden on host performance. This simulation study demonstrated the merit of using random regressions to estimate unbiased genetic variances for tolerance slope and its genetic correlations with other traits, which could not be obtained using the previously implemented statistical methods. Genetic variance in tolerance was estimated as genetic variance in regression slopes of host performance along an increasing pathogen burden level. Random regressions combined with covariance functions allowed genetic variance for host performance to be estimated at any point along the pathogen burden trajectory, providing a novel means to analyse infection-induced changes in genetic variation of host performance. Yet, the results implied that decreasing family size as well as a non-zero environmental or genetic correlation between initial host performance before infection and pathogen burden led to biased estimates for tolerance genetic variance. In both cases, genetic correlation between tolerance slope and host performance in a pathogen-free environment became artificially negative, implying a genetic trade-off when it did not exist. Moreover, recording a normally distributed pathogen burden as a threshold trait is not a realistic way of obtaining unbiased estimates for tolerance genetic variance. The results show that random regressions are suitable for the genetic analysis of tolerance, given suitable data structure collected either under field or experimental conditions. PMID:21767462

  18. Genetic analysis of evolutionary relationships among deer (subfamily Cervinae).

    PubMed

    Emerson, B C; Tate, M L

    1993-01-01

    The evolutionary relationships among 10 taxa of deer from the four genera of the subfamily Cervinae (Cervus, Elaphurus, Axis, and Dama) were examined by a comparison of their electrophoretic types for 22 proteins. We analyzed the data using both phenetic and cladistic methods and found that the genera of the Cervinae were not monophyletic. The genus Cervus was split into two distinct groups with red deer, wapiti (C. elaphus ssp.), and sika (C. nippon) in one clade and sambar (C. unicolor) and rusa (C. timorensis) in another. There was a close genetic relationship between the genus Elaphurus and the red deer, wapiti, sika group, whereas sambar and rusa were more similar to members of the genera Dama and Axis than to the other members of their own genus. These findings contrast with the taxonomy of the species that is based largely on studies of comparative morphology. Our samples (n = 5) showed fixed allelic differences between wapiti and red, wapiti and sika, and red and sika samples at 3, 6, and 7 loci, respectively. Analysis of these protein loci in a wider range of C. elaphus and C. nippon subspecies could resolve debate over the evolutionary relationships of these taxa. PMID:8340615

  19. Bayesian robust analysis for genetic architecture of quantitative traits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runqing; Wang, Xin; Li, Jian; Deng, Hongwen

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: In most quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping studies, phenotypes are assumed to follow normal distributions. Deviations from this assumption may affect the accuracy of QTL detection and lead to detection of spurious QTLs. To improve the robustness of QTL mapping methods, we replaced the normal distribution for residuals in multiple interacting QTL models with the normal/independent distributions that are a class of symmetric and long-tailed distributions and are able to accommodate residual outliers. Subsequently, we developed a Bayesian robust analysis strategy for dissecting genetic architecture of quantitative traits and for mapping genome-wide interacting QTLs in line crosses. Results: Through computer simulations, we showed that our strategy had a similar power for QTL detection compared with traditional methods assuming normal-distributed traits, but had a substantially increased power for non-normal phenotypes. When this strategy was applied to a group of traits associated with physical/chemical characteristics and quality in rice, more main and epistatic QTLs were detected than traditional Bayesian model analyses under the normal assumption. Contact: runqingyang@sjtu.edu.cn; dengh@umkc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18974168

  20. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Sadovnick, A Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Bernales, Cecily Q; Ross, Jay P; Forwell, Amanda L; Yee, Irene M; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93-1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  1. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Forwell, Amanda L.; Yee, Irene M.; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T.; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K.; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M.; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M.; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  2. Genetic and evolutionary analysis of the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Megan

    Although evolution of brains and behaviors is of fundamental biological importance, we lack comprehensive understanding of the general principles governing these processes or the specific mechanisms and molecules through which the evolutionary changes are effected. Because synapses are the basic structural and functional units of nervous systems, one way to address these problems is to dissect the genetic and molecular pathways responsible for morphological evolution of a defined synapse. I have undertaken such an analysis by examining morphology of the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in wild caught D. melanogaster as well as in over 20 other species of Drosophila. Whereas variation in NMJ morphology within a species is limited, I discovered a surprisingly extensive variation among different species. Compared with evolution of other morphological traits, NMJ morphology appears to be evolving very rapidly. Moreover, my data indicate that natural selection rather than genetic drift is primarily responsible for evolution of NMJ morphology. To dissect underlying molecular mechanisms that may govern NMJ growth and evolutionary divergence, I focused on a naturally occurring variant in D. melanogaster that causes NMJ overgrowth. I discovered that the variant mapped to Mob2, a gene encoding a kinase adapter protein originally described in yeast as a member of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN). I have subsequently examined mutations in the Drosophila orthologs of all the core components of the yeast MEN and found that all of them function as part of a common pathway that acts presynaptically to negatively regulate NMJ growth. As in the regulation of yeast cytokinesis, these components of the MEN appear to act ultimately by regulating actin dynamics during the process of bouton growth and division. These studies have thus led to the discovery of an entirely new role for the MEN---regulation of synaptic growth---that is separate from its function in cell division. This work

  3. Automating data manipulation for genetic analysis using a data base management system.

    PubMed

    Farrer, L A; Haines, J L; Yount, E A

    1985-01-01

    Inefficient coding and manipulation of pedigree data have often hindered the progress of genetic studies. In this paper we present the methodology for interfacing a data base management system (DBMS) called MEGADATS with a linkage analysis program called LIPED. Two families that segregate a dominant trait and one test marker were used in a simulated exercise to demonstrate how a DBMS can be used to automate tedious clerical steps and improve the efficiency of a genetic analysis. The merits of this approach to data management are discussed. We conclude that a standardized format for genetic analysis programs would greatly facilitate data analysis. PMID:3840122

  4. Blinders, phenotype, and fashionable genetic analysis: a critical examination of the current state of epilepsy genetic studies.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, David A; Subaran, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Although it is accepted that idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) is strongly, if not exclusively, influenced by genetic factors, there is little consensus on what those genetic influences may be, except for one point of agreement: epilepsy is a "channelopathy." This point of agreement has continued despite the failure of studies investigating channel genes to demonstrate the primacy of their influence on IGE expression. The belief is sufficiently entrenched that the more important issues involving phenotype definition, data collection, methods of analysis, and the interpretation of results have become subordinate to it. The goal of this article is to spark discussion of where the study of epilepsy genetics has been and where it is going, suggesting we may never get there if we continue on the current road. We use the long history of psychiatric genetic studies as a mirror and starting point to illustrate that only when we expand our outlook on how to study the genetics of the epilepsies, consider other mechanisms that could lead to epilepsy susceptibility, and, especially, focus on the critical problem of phenotype definition, will the major influences on common epilepsy begin to be understood. PMID:21219301

  5. Genetic analysis of Iranian autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: new insight to haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Entezam, M; Khatami, M R; Saddadi, F; Ayati, M; Roozbeh, J; Saghafi, H; Keramatipour, M

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) caused by mutations in two PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Due to the complexity of the PKD1 gene, its direct mutation screening is an expensive and time-consuming procedure. Pedigree-based haplotype analysis is a useful indirect approach to identify the responsible gene in families with multiple affected individuals, before direct mutation analysis. Here, we applied this approach to investigate 15 appropriate unrelated ADPKD families, selected from 25 families, who referred for genetic counseling. Four polymorphic microsatellite markers were selected around each PKD1 and PKD2 loci. In addition, by investigating the genomic regions, two novel flanking tetranucleotide STR markers were identified. Haplotype analysis and calculating Lod score confirmed linkage to PKD1 in 9 families (60%) and to PKD2 in 2 families (13%). Linkage to both loci was excluded in one family (6.6%). In 2 families (13%) the Lod scores were inconclusive. Causative mutation was identified successfully by direct analysis in two families with confirmed linkage, one to PKD1 and another to PKD2 locus. The study showed that determining the causative locus prior to direct mutation analysis is an efficient strategy to reduce the resources required for genetic analysis of ADPKD families. This is more prominent in PKD2-linked families. Selection of suitable markers, and appropriate PCR multiplexing strategy, using fluorescent labeled primers and 3 primer system, will also add value to this approach. PMID:26950445

  6. Genetic analysis of erythromycin production in Streptomyces erythreus.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J M; Wierman, C K; Hutchinson, C R

    1985-01-01

    Streptomyces erythreus produces the 14-membered macrolide antibiotic erythromycin A. The properties of erythromycin A nonproducing mutants and their genetic linkage to chromosomal markers were used to establish the rudiments of genetic organization of antibiotic production. Thirty-three Ery- mutants, produced by mutagenesis of S. erythreus NRRL 2338 and affecting the formation of the macrolactone and deoxysugar intermediates of erythromycin A biosynthesis, were classified into four phenotypically different groups based on their cosynthesis behavior, the type of biosynthetic intermediate accumulated, and their ability to biotransform known biochemical intermediates of erythromycin A. Demonstration of the occurrence of natural genetic recombination during conjugal mating in S. erythreus enabled comparison of the genetic linkage relationships of three different ery mutations with seven other markers on a simple chromosome map. This established a chromosomal location for the ery mutations, which appear to be located in at least two positions within one interval of the map. PMID:4044528

  7. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saar, Kathrin; Beck, Alfred; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Birney, Ewan; Brocklebank, Denise; Chen, Yuan; Cuppen, Edwin; Demonchy, Stephanie; Dopazo, Joaquin; Flicek, Paul; Foglio, Mario; Fujiyama, Asao; Gut, Ivo G; Gauguier, Dominique; Guigo, Roderic; Guryev, Victor; Heinig, Matthias; Hummel, Oliver; Jahn, Niels; Klages, Sven; Kren, Vladimir; Kube, Michael; Kuhl, Heiner; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuroki, Yoko; Lechner, Doris; Lee, Young-Ae; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Lathrop, G Mark; Mashimo, Tomoji; Medina, Ignacio; Mott, Richard; Patone, Giannino; Perrier-Cornet, Jeanne-Antide; Platzer, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Reinhardt, Richard; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schilhabel, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Serikawa, Tadao; Shikhagaie, Medya; Tatsumoto, Shouji; Taudien, Stefan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Voigt, Birger; Zelenika, Diana; Zimdahl, Heike; Hubner, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a survey of genetic variation based on almost 3 million newly identified SNPs. We obtained accurate and complete genotypes for a subset of 20,238 SNPs across 167 distinct inbred rat strains, two rat recombinant inbred panels and an F2 intercross. Using 81% of these SNPs, we constructed high-density genetic maps, creating a large dataset of fully characterized SNPs for disease gene mapping. Our data characterize the population structure and illustrate the degree of linkage disequilibrium. We provide a detailed SNP map and demonstrate its utility for mapping of quantitative trait loci. This community resource is openly available and augments the genetic tools for this workhorse of physiological studies. PMID:18443594

  8. Internal quantum efficiency analysis of solar cell by genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Kanglin; Yang, Hui; Lu, Shulong; Zhou, Taofei; Wang, Rongxin; Qiu, Kai; Dong, Jianrong; Jiang, Desheng

    2010-11-15

    To investigate factors limiting the performance of a GaAs solar cell, genetic algorithm is employed to fit the experimentally measured internal quantum efficiency (IQE) in the full spectra range. The device parameters such as diffusion lengths and surface recombination velocities are extracted. Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is performed in the base region of the cell with obtained diffusion length agreeing with the fit result. The advantage of genetic algorithm is illustrated. (author)

  9. Genetic heterogeneity in rhabdomyosarcoma revealed by SNP array analysis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Mayrhofer, Markus; Nilsson, Jenny; Hofvander, Jakob; Jonson, Tord; Mandahl, Nils; Øra, Ingrid; Gisselsson, David; Mertens, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children and adolescents. Alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS) histologies predominate, but rare cases are classified as spindle cell/sclerosing (SRMS). For treatment stratification, RMS is further subclassified as fusion-positive (FP-RMS) or fusion-negative (FN-RMS), depending on whether a gene fusion involving PAX3 or PAX7 is present or not. We investigated 19 cases of pediatric RMS using high resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. FP-ARMS displayed, on average, more structural rearrangements than ERMS; the single FN-ARMS had a genomic profile similar to ERMS. Apart from previously known amplification (e.g., MYCN, CDK4, and MIR17HG) and deletion (e.g., NF1, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B) targets, amplification of ERBB2 and homozygous loss of ASCC3 or ODZ3 were seen. Combining SNP array with cytogenetic data revealed that most cases were polyploid, with at least one case having started as a near-haploid tumor. Further bioinformatic analysis of the SNP array data disclosed genetic heterogeneity, in the form of subclonal chromosomal imbalances, in five tumors. The outcome was worse for patients with FP-ARMS than ERMS or FN-ARMS (6/8 vs. 1/9 dead of disease), and the only children with ERMS showing intratumor diversity or with MYOD1 mutation-positive SRMS also died of disease. High resolution SNP array can be useful in evaluating genomic imbalances in pediatric RMS. PMID:26482321

  10. Genetic Analysis of Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation through eQTL Mapping in Soy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variation in gene transcript accumulation levels can be measured to map underlying expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL). Coincident genetic locations of eQTL and phenotypic QTL provide the basis for further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved. Genetic analysis of expression trait...

  11. A Behaviour-Genetic Analysis of Orthographic Learning, Spelling and Decoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Brian; Coventry, William L.; Olson, Richard K.; Hulslander, Jacqueline; Wadsworth, Sally; DeFries, John C.; Corley, Robin; Willcutt, Erik G.; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal twin study of literacy and language, we conducted a behaviour-genetic analysis of orthographic learning, spelling and decoding in Grade 2 children (225 identical and 214 fraternal twin pairs) in the United States and Australia. Each variable showed significant genetic and unique environment influences. Multivariate…

  12. Genetic Analysis of Recombinant Inbred Lines For Sorghum Bicolor x Perennial S. Propinquum.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    From an annual S. bicolor x perennial S. propinquum F2 population used in early-generation genetic analysis, we have produced and describe here a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of 161 F5 genotypes that segregates for rhizomatousness and many other traits. The genetic map of the recombinant...

  13. Development of a Fluidigm SNP panel for genetic analysis in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although microsatellite markers have been widely used in aquaculture species for genetic analysis such as parentage assignment and genetic mapping, SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) are the marker of choice as they are highly abundant and are amenable for high throughput genotyping. Recently we ...

  14. [Genetic relationships among Far Eastern species of the family Araliacea inferred by RAPD analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, Iu N; Artiukova, E V; Kozyrenko, M M; Reunova, G D

    2003-01-01

    A molecular genetic study of Far Eastern species of the family Araliaceae by means of RAPD analysis was conducted. Using 21 primers we assessed variability at 595 loci. Based on matrices of genetic distances D, dendrograms of genetic relationships among eleven species of six genera of this family were constructed. Our results suggest that Acanthopanax sessiliflorus and Eleutherococcus senticosus belong to different genera, Aralia cordata and A. continentalis are different species, and A. elata and A. mandshurica probably cannot be regarded as distinct species. Genetic similarity of Far Eastern A. cordata and American A. hispida is shown. PMID:12624934

  15. Genetic and environmental influences on antisocial behavior: a meta-analysis of twin and adoption studies.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo Hyun; Waldman, Irwin D

    2002-05-01

    A meta-analysis of 51 twin and adoption studies was conducted to estimate the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on antisocial behavior. The best fitting model included moderate proportions of variance due to additive genetic influences (.32), nonadditive genetic influences (.09), shared environmental influences (.16), and nonshared environmental influences (.43). The magnitude of familial influences (i.e., both genetic and shared environmental influences) was lower in parent-offspring adoption studies than in both twin studies and sibling adoption studies. Operationalization, assessment method, zygosity determination method, and age were significant moderators of the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on antisocial behavior, but there were no significant differences in the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences for males and females. PMID:12002699

  16. Informed consent, participation in, and withdrawal from a population based cohort study involving genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, K; Kita, Y; Ueshima, H

    2005-01-01

    Design: Descriptive analyses. Setting and participants: The study evaluated two non-genetic subcohorts comprising 3166 people attending for a health checkup during 2002, and two genetic subcohorts comprising 2195 people who underwent a checkup during 2003. Main outcome measurements: Analysis endpoints were differences in participation rates between the non-genetic and genetic subcohorts, differences between providing non-extensive and extensive preliminary information, and changes in participation status between baseline and at 6 months. Results: Participation rates in the genetic subcohorts were 4·7–9·3% lower than those in the non-genetic subcohorts. The odds ratios (OR) of participation in genetic research were between 0·60 and 0·77, and the OR for withdrawal from the research was over 7·70; providing preliminary extensive information about genetic research reduced the withdrawal risks (OR 0·15 for all dependent variables) but worsened participation rates (OR 0·63–0·74). Conclusions: The general population responded sceptically towards genetic research. It is crucial that genetic researchers utilise an informative and educational consent process worthy of public trust. PMID:15994356

  17. Genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity: A meta-analysis of twin, family and adoption studies

    PubMed Central

    Bezdjian, Serena; Baker, Laura A.; Tuvblad, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analysis of twin, family and adoption studies was conducted to estimate the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. The best fitting model for 41 key studies (58 independent samples from 14 month old infants to adults; N = 27,147) included equal proportions of variance due to genetic (0.50) and non-shared environmental (0.50) influences, with genetic effects being both additive (0.38) and non-additive (0.12). Shared environmental effects were unimportant in explaining individual differences in impulsivity. Age, sex, and study design (twin vs. adoption) were all significant moderators of the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. The relative contribution of genetic effects (broad sense heritability) and unique environmental effects were also found to be important throughout development from childhood to adulthood. Total genetic effects were found to be important for all ages, but appeared to be strongest in children. Analyses also demonstrated that genetic effects appeared to be stronger in males than in females. Method of assessment (laboratory tasks vs. questionnaires), however, was not a significant moderator of the genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. These results provide a structured synthesis of existing behavior genetic studies on impulsivity by providing a clearer understanding of the relative genetic and environmental contributions in impulsive traits through various stages of development. PMID:21889436

  18. The genetic analysis of tolerance to infections: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kause, Antti; Ødegård, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Tolerance to infections is defined as the ability of a host to limit the impact of a given pathogen burden on host performance. Uncoupling resistance and tolerance is a challenge, and there is a need to be able to separate them using specific trait recording or statistical methods. We present three statistical methods that can be used to investigate genetics of tolerance-related traits. Firstly, using random regressions, tolerance can be analyzed as a reaction norm slope in which host performance (y-axis) is regressed against an increasing pathogen burden (x-axis). Genetic variance in tolerance slopes is the genetic variance for tolerance. Variation in tolerance can induce genotype re-ranking and changes in genetic and phenotypic variation in host performance along the pathogen burden trajectory, contributing to environment-dependent genetic responses to selection. Such genotype-by-environment interactions can be quantified by combining random regressions and covariance functions. To apply random regressions, pathogen burden of individuals needs to be recorded. Secondly, when pathogen burden is not recorded, the cure model for time-until-death data allows separating two traits, susceptibility and endurance. Susceptibility is whether or not an individual was susceptible to an infection, whereas endurance denotes how long time it took until the infection killed a susceptible animal (influenced by tolerance). Thirdly, the normal mixture model can be used to classify continuously distributed host performance, such as growth rate, into different sub-classes (e.g., non-infected and infected), which allows estimation of host performance reduction specific to infected individuals. Moreover, genetics of host performance can be analyzed separately in healthy and affected animals, even in the absence of pathogen burden and survival data. These methods provide novel tools to increase our understanding on the impact of parasites, pathogens, and production diseases on host

  19. [Genetic analysis of biochemical differences of Yersinia pestis strains].

    PubMed

    Eroshenko, G A; Odinokov, G N; Kukleva, L M; Kutyrev, V V

    2012-01-01

    Literature data and results of our experimental studies on genetic base of biochemical differentiation of Yersinia pestis strains of various subspecies and biovars are summarized in the review. Data on variability of genes coding biochemical features (sugar and alcohol fermentation, nitrate reduction), the differential development of which are the base of existing phenotypic schemes of Y. pestis strains classification, are presented. Variability of these genes was shown to have possible use for the development of genetic classification of Y. pestis strains of various subspecies and biovars. PMID:22830282

  20. Genetic Analysis of Intracapillary Glomerular Lipoprotein Deposits in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noordmans, Gerda A.; Huang, Yuan; Savage, Holly; van Dijk, Marcory C. R. F.; Schaart, Gert; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A.; Heeringa, Peter; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Korstanje, Ron; van Goor, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal aging is characterized by functional and structural changes like decreased glomerular filtration rate, and glomerular, tubular and interstitial damage. To gain insight in pathways involved in renal aging, we studied aged mouse strains and used genetic analysis to identify genes associated with aging phenotypes. Methods Upon morphological screening in kidneys from 20-month-old mice from 26 inbred strains we noted intracapillary PAS-positive deposits. The severity of these deposits was quantified by scoring of a total of 50 glomeruli per section (grade 0–4). Electron microscopy and immunohistochemical staining for apoE, apoB, apoA-IV and perilipin-2 was performed to further characterize the lesions. To identify loci associated with these PAS-positive intracapillary glomerular deposits, we performed haplotype association mapping. Results Six out of 26 mouse strains showed glomerular PAS-positive deposits. The severity of these deposits varied: NOD(0.97), NZW(0.41), NON(0.30), B10(0.21), C3 H(0.9) and C57BR(0.7). The intracapillary deposits were strongly positive for apoE and weakly positive for apoB and apoA-IV. Haplotype association mapping showed a strong association with a 30-Kb haplotype block on Chr 1 within the Esrrg gene. We investigated 1 Mb on each site of this region, which includes the genes Spata17, Gpatch2, Esrrg, Ush2a and Kctd3. Conclusions By analyzing 26 aged mouse strains we found that some strains developed an intracapillary PAS and apoE-positive lesion and identified a small haplotype block on Chr 1 within the Esrrg gene to be associated with these lipoprotein deposits. The region spanning this haplotype block contains the genes Spata17, Gpatch2, Esrrg, Ush2a and Kctd3, which are all highly expressed in the kidney. Esrrg might be involved in the evolvement of these glomerular deposits by influencing lipid metabolism and possibly immune reponses. PMID:25353171

  1. Actor-network theory: a tool to support ethical analysis of commercial genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Williams-Jones, Bryn; Graham, Janice E

    2003-12-01

    Social, ethical and policy analysis of the issues arising from gene patenting and commercial genetic testing is enhanced by the application of science and technology studies, and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) in particular. We suggest the potential for transferring ANT's flexible nature to an applied heuristic methodology for gathering empirical information and for analysing the complex networks involved in the development of genetic technologies. Three concepts are explored in this paper--actor-networks, translation, and drift--and applied to the case of Myriad Genetics and their commercial BRACAnalysis genetic susceptibility test for hereditary breast cancer. Treating this test as an active participant in socio-technical networks clarifies the extent to which it interacts with, shapes and is shaped by people, other technologies, and institutions. Such an understanding enables more sophisticated and nuanced technology assessment, academic analysis, as well as public debate about the social, ethical and policy implications of the commercialization of new genetic technologies. PMID:15115034

  2. Porcine bocaviruses: genetic analysis and prevalence in Chinese swine population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among members of the Bocavirus genus, that contain three open reading frames (ORFs), of the Parvovirinae subfamily, porcine bocaviruses (PoBoVs) exhibit the most genetic diversity. Based on the ORF2-encoded VP1 classification, the six reported porcine bocaviruses were grouped into four species: PoBo...

  3. Understanding Genetics: Analysis of Secondary Students' Conceptual Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsui, Chi-Yan; Treagust, David F.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the conceptual change of students in Grades 10 and 12 in three Australian senior high schools when the teachers included computer multimedia to a greater or lesser extent in their teaching of a genetics course. The study, underpinned by a multidimensional conceptual-change framework, used an interpretive approach and a…

  4. Genetic and biochemical analysis of solvent formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-05-01

    The anaerobic organism Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for commercial production of important organic solvents due to its ability to convert a wide variety of crude substrates to acids and alcohols. Current knowledge concerning the molecular genetics, cell regulation and metabolic engineering of this organism is still rather limited. The objectives are to improve the knowledge of the molecular genetics and enzymology of Clostridia in order to make genetic alterations which will more effectively channel cell metabolism toward production of desired products. Two factors that limit butanol production in continuous cultures are: (1) The degeneration of the culture, with an increase in the proportion of cells which are incapable of solvent production. Currently isolated degenerate strains are being evaluated to analyze the molecular mechanism of degeneration to determine if it is due to a genetic loss of solvent related genes, loss of a regulatory element, or an increase in general mutagenesis. Recent studies show two general types of degenerates, one which seems to have lost essential solvent pathway genes and another which has not completely lost all solvent production capability and retains the DNA bearing solvent pathway genes. (2) The production of hydrogen which uses up reducing equivalents in the cell. If the reducing power were more fully directed to the reduction reactions involved in butanol production, the process would be more efficient. The authors have studied oxidation reduction systems related to this process. These studies focus on ferredoxin and rubredoxin and their oxidoreductases.

  5. Genetic analysis of phytosterol content in sunflower seeds.

    PubMed

    Merah, Othmane; Langlade, Nicolas; Alignan, Marion; Roche, Jane; Pouilly, Nicolas; Lippi, Yannick; Vear, Felicity; Cerny, Muriel; Bouniols, Andrée; Mouloungui, Zephirin; Vincourt, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Interest in phytosterol contents due to their potential benefits for human health has been largely documented in several crop species. Studies were focused mainly on total sterol content and their concentration or distribution in seed. This study aimed at providing new insight into the genetic control of total and individual sterol contents in sunflower seed through QTL analyses in a RIL population characterized over 2 years showing contrasted rainfall during seed filling. Results indicated that 13 regions on 9 linkage groups were involved in different phytosterol traits. Most of the QTL mapped were stable across years in spite of contrasted growing conditions. Some of them explained up to 30 % of phenotypic variation. Two QTL, located on LG10, near b1, and on LG14, were found to co-localize with QTL for oil content, indicating that likely, a part of the genetic variation for sterol content is only the result of genetic variation for oil content. However, three other QTL, stable over the 2 years, were found on LG1, LG4 and LG7 each associated with a particular class of sterols, suggesting that some enzymes known to be involved in the sterol metabolic pathway may determine the specificity of sterol profiles in sunflower seeds. These results suggest that it may be possible to introduce these traits as criteria in breeding programmes for quality in sunflower. The molecular markers linked to genetic factors controlling phytosterol contents could help selection during breeding programs. PMID:22824968

  6. A genetic analysis of the Italian Salernitano horse.

    PubMed

    Criscione, A; Moltisanti, V; Chies, L; Marletta, D; Bordonaro, S

    2015-10-01

    Salernitano (SAL) is an ancient Italian horse breed developed over the course of the ages together with Napoletano and, during the 20th century, by crossing with Thoroughbred horse lines. Excellent in hurdle jumping, this breed is currently facing a concrete risk of extinction due to the lack of appropriate management strategies. This research is the first SAL genetic characterization that aims to set up the basic knowledge for a conservation plan. A representative sample of 61 SALs was analyzed by means of a set of 16 microsatellites markers (short tandem repeats (STRs)). The sequence of hypervariable D-loop mtDNA region was also performed on a subset of 24 mares in order to study the maternal diversity and obtain a complete picture of the internal genetic variation. All the molecular data were analyzed together with those obtained from three Sicilian horse breeds investigated in a previous research (Siciliano, Sanfratellano and Sicilian Oriental Purebred). STRs markers revealed a moderate level of genetic diversity in SAL (alleles/locus 5.1, He 0.67) and confirmed the hunch of genetic erosion. Autosomal variability highlighted a very light deficit of homozygotes (FIS=-0.067). Experimental D-loop sequences were compared by multiple alignments with those retrieved from biological databases and revealed two unreported haplotypes. The phylogenetic network, which was built on mtDNA sequences, included various cosmopolitan and European horses and showed SAL haplotypes distributed among different mtDNA lineages. PMID:26144256

  7. Genetic analysis of behavior traits in swine production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimates of genetic parameters related to pig behavior under stressful situations are required before selection programs can be designed to produce more docile pigs. Pig behavior was evaluated in a pedigreed Landrace-Duroc-Yorkshire composite population. Piglets were evaluated for their response to...

  8. SSR Marker Analysis of Genetic Relationships within Hydrangea paniculata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity studies using 26 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers were conducted with 36 taxa of Hydrangea paniculata Sieb. The SSR loci were highly variable among the taxa, producing a mean of 5.8 alleles per locus. Three cultivars (Boskoop, Compact Grandiflora and Webb) were either identic...

  9. SSR Marker Analysis of Genetic Relationships within Hydrangea Macrophylla

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity studies using 39 SSR markers were carried out with 114 taxa of H. macrophylla. The SSR loci were highly variable among the taxa, producing a mean of 8.26 alleles per locus. Overall allelic richness was relatively high at 5.12 alleles per locus. Subspecies serrata contained nearly t...

  10. Identification of genetic markers to distinguish the virulent and avirulent subspecies of Pantoea stewartii by comparative proteomics and genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Jiang, Zide; Liao, Jinliang; Chen, Zhinan; Li, Huaping; Mei, Mantong; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2007-02-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss), the causal agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt and leaf blight of maize and sweet corn, is one of the quarantine pathogens in many countries and regions. In contrast, P. stewartii subsp. indologenes (Pnsi), the closely related subspecies of Pnss, is avirulent on these plants. In this study, the protein expression profiles of these two subspecies were compared using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis. Twenty-one unique protein spots consistently detected in Pnss but not in Pnsi were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Some of these Pnss-specific proteins are known to be essential for virulence and survival in host, such as FoxR and HrcJ, which are the key components of iron uptake and Type III secretion systems, respectively. For further genetic analysis, six Pnss-specific proteins were characterized by peptide sequencing. Southern and Northern blot analyses revealed that the differences in protein expression profiles of the two subspecies were either due to the discrepancy at genome level or because of the variations in transcriptional expression. The results provide novel genetic markers to distinguish the two closely related subspecies and may also serve as useful clues for investigation of the genetic basis accounting for their sharp difference in virulence. PMID:17086414

  11. Genetic analysis of 12 unrelated CADASIL families: Demonstration of genetic homogeneity: Physical mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Nibbio, A.; Vahedi, K.

    1994-09-01

    CADASIL is the acronym (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Ischemic Strokes and Leukoencephalopathy) designating a recently identified mendelian cerebral arteriopathy characterized by the recurrence of ischemic sensory and motor deficits leading to a progressive subcortical dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain shows extensive areas of increased signal in the hemispheric white matter. We recently mapped the CADASIL locus in 2 large families on chromosome 19 in a 14 cM interval bracketed by D19S221 and D19S215{sup *}. Forty additional families have been collected. Twelve of them including more than 200 members have already been genotyped with a set of 10 highly polymorphic markers located between D19S221 and D19S215. All families are significantly linked to chromosome 19 demonstrating genetic homogeneity. Combined lod scores for several of these markers are above 30. The size of the mapping interval has been reduced to 2 cM. Genetic testing for presymptomatic individuals is now possible with respect to all ethical rules in this severe condition. Lastly, physical mapping of the affected gene has been started and data will be presented at the meeting.

  12. Genetic diversity based on SSR analysis of the cultured snakehead fish, Channa argus, (Channidae) in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S-R; Li, J-L; Xie, N; Zhu, L-M; Wang, Q; Yue, G-H

    2014-01-01

    The snakehead fish Channa argus is an important food fish in China. We identified six microsatellite loci for C. argus. These six microsatellite loci and four other microsatellite markers were used to analyze genetic diversity in four cultured populations of C. argus (SD, JX, HN, and ZJ) and determine their relationships. A total of 154 alleles were detected at the 10 microsatellite loci. The average expected and observed heterozygosities varied from 0.70-0.84 and 0.69-0.83, respectively, and polymorphism information content ranged between 0.66 and 0.82 in the four populations, indicating high genetic diversity. Population JX deviated from mutation-drift equilibrium and may have experienced a recent bottleneck. Analysis of pairwise genetic differentiation revealed FST values that ranged from 0.028 to 0.100, which indicates a moderate level of genetic differentiation. The largest distances were observed between populations HN and SD, whereas the smallest distances were obtained between populations HN and JX. Genetic clustering analysis demonstrated that the ZJ and HN populations probably share the same origin. This information about the genetic diversity within each of the four populations, and their genetic relationships will be useful for future genetic improvement of C. argus through selective breeding. PMID:24615092

  13. Genetic polymorphism of IgG in mink. II. A genetic analysis of allotypes.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, D K; Fomicheva, I I; Taranin, A V; Baranov, O K

    1986-01-01

    Population distribution and inheritance pattern were analyzed in mink IgG allotypes: L1 (L chains), H2, H3, H4, H6, H7, and H8 (the constant region of the H chains, i.e. C gamma-allotypes) and conformational allotype 5 with unknown chain localization. Contrary to expectation, neither allelism, nor close linkage were demonstrated for these allotypes. The major feature of the inheritance of H2, H3, and H4 C gamma-allotypes, as well as allotype 5, was significant excess of negative (without these allotypes) progeny in the F1 generation from monohybrid cross. The explanation offered for this departure of the C gamma-allotypes from normal Mendelian genetics suggests widespread latencies of their expression in mink. PMID:3274048

  14. Array-CGH Analysis Suggests Genetic Heterogeneity in Rhombencephalosynapsis

    PubMed Central

    Démurger, F.; Pasquier, L.; Dubourg, C.; Dupé, V.; Gicquel, I.; Evain, C.; Ratié, L.; Jaillard, S.; Beri, M.; Leheup, B.; Lespinasse, J.; Martin-Coignard, D.; Mercier, S.; Quelin, C.; Loget, P.; Marcorelles, P.; Laquerrière, A.; Bendavid, C.; Odent, S.; David, V.

    2013-01-01

    Rhombencephalosynapsis is an uncommon, but increasingly recognized, cerebellar malformation defined as vermian agenesis with fusion of the hemispheres. The embryologic and genetic mechanisms involved are still unknown, and to date, no animal models are available. In the present study, we used Agilent oligonucleotide arrays in a large series of 57 affected patients to detect candidate genes. Four different unbalanced rearrangements were detected: a 16p11.2 deletion, a 14q12q21.2 deletion, an unbalanced translocation t(2p;10q), and a 16p13.11 microdeletion containing 2 candidate genes. These genes were further investigated by sequencing and in situ hybridization. This first microarray screening of a rhombencephalosynapsis series suggests that there may be heterogeneous genetic causes. PMID:24167461

  15. Genetic analysis of familial spontaneous pneumothorax in an Indian family.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anindita; Paul, Suman; Chattopadhyay, Esita; Kundu, Susmita; Roy, Bidyut

    2015-06-01

    Familial spontaneous pneumothorax is one of the phenotypes of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), an autosomal dominant condition associated with folliculin (FLCN). We investigated clinical and genetic data of an Indian family having two patients suffering from spontaneous pneumothorax in the absence of skin lesions or renal tumors. HRCT scan of patient's lung revealed paracardiac cysts, and DNA sequencing of all 14 exons of FLCN from patients showed the presence of heterozygous "C allele" deletion in the poly-cytosine (poly-C) tract of exon 11 leading to truncated folliculin. This mutation was also observed in four asymptomatic members of the family. Our results confirmed the presence of deletion mutation in poly-C tract of FLCN in members of BHDS family. This is the first report of genetic insight in a BHDS family from India but in-depth studies with a larger sample set are necessary to understand mechanism of familial pneumothorax. PMID:25827758

  16. Genetic analysis of fruit shape traits at different maturation stages in sponge gourd*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Jin; Zhang, Cai-fang; Guan, Ya-jing; Zhang, Ying

    2007-01-01

    The fruit shape is important quantitative trait closely related to the fruit quality. However, the genetic model of fruit shapes has not been proposed. Therefore, in the present study, analysis of genetic effects for fruit shape traits (fruit length and fruit perimeter) in sponge gourd was conducted by employing a developmental genetic model including fruit direct effects and maternal effects. Analysis approaches of unconditional and conditional variances were applied to evaluate the genetic behavior of fruit shape traits at economical and physiological maturation times. The results of variance analysis indicated that fruit length and fruit perimeter were simultaneously affected by fruit direct genetic effects and maternal effects. Fruit direct genetic effects were relatively more important for fruit shape traits at whole developmental period. The gene expression was most active at the economical maturation stage (1~12 d after flowering) for two shape traits, and the activation of gene was mostly due to direct dominance effects at physiological maturation stage (13~60 d after flowering). The coefficients due to different genetic effects, as well as the phenotypic correlation coefficients, varied significantly between fruit shape traits themselves at various maturation stages. The results showed that it was relatively easy to improve fruit shape traits for industrial purpose by carefully selecting the parents at economical maturation stage instead of that at physiological maturation stage. PMID:17542062

  17. Software for analysis and manipulation of genetic linkage data.

    PubMed

    Weaver, R; Helms, C; Mishra, S K; Donis-Keller, H

    1992-06-01

    We present eight computer programs written in the C programming language that are designed to analyze genotypic data and to support existing software used to construct genetic linkage maps. Although each program has a unique purpose, they all share the common goals of affording a greater understanding of genetic linkage data and of automating tasks to make computers more effective tools for map building. The PIC/HET and FAMINFO programs automate calculation of relevant quantities such as heterozygosity, PIC, allele frequencies, and informativeness of markers and pedigrees. PREINPUT simplifies data submissions to the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) data base by creating a file with genotype assignments that CEPH's INPUT program would otherwise require to be input manually. INHERIT is a program written specifically for mapping the X chromosome: by assigning a dummy allele to males, in the nonpseudoautosomal region, it eliminates falsely perceived noninheritances in the data set. The remaining four programs complement the previously published genetic linkage mapping software CRI-MAP and LINKAGE. TWOTABLE produces a more readable format for the output of CRI-MAP two-point calculations; UNMERGE is the converse to CRI-MAP's merge option; and GENLINK and LINKGEN automatically convert between the genotypic data file formats required by these packages. All eight applications read input from the same types of data files that are used by CRI-MAP and LINKAGE. Their use has simplified the management of data, has increased knowledge of the content of information in pedigrees, and has reduced the amount of time needed to construct genetic linkage maps of chromosomes. PMID:1598906

  18. Genetic Analysis of the Maltose A Region in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Dolph; Hofnung, Maurice; Schwartz, Maxime

    1969-01-01

    The genetic map of the maltose A locus of Escherichia coli contains at least three closely linked genes, malT, malP, and malQ. The order of these genes is established by deletion mapping. MalP and malQ, the presumed structural genes for maltodextrin phosphorylase and amylomaltase, belong to the same operon. MalT may be a regulator gene involved in the positive control of this operon. PMID:4891257

  19. Functional and genetic analysis of choroid plexus development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Hannah E.; Parupalli, Chaithanyarani; Ju, Bensheng; Taylor, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The choroid plexus, an epithelial-based structure localized in the brain ventricle, is the major component of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The choroid plexus produces the cerebrospinal fluid and regulates the components of the cerebrospinal fluid. Abnormal choroid plexus function is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation in the choroid plexus epithelium, and hydrocephaly. In this study, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model system to understand the genetic components of choroid plexus development. We generated an enhancer trap line, Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the choroid plexus epithelium. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescent tracers, we demonstrated that the zebrafish choroid plexus possesses brain barrier properties such as tight junctions and transporter activity. Thus, we have established zebrafish as a functionally relevant model to study choroid plexus development. Using an unbiased approach, we performed a forward genetic dissection of the choroid plexus to identify genes essential for its formation and function. Using Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, we isolated 10 recessive mutant lines with choroid plexus abnormalities, which were grouped into five classes based on GFP intensity, epithelial localization, and overall choroid plexus morphology. We also mapped the mutation for two mutant lines to chromosomes 4 and 21, respectively. The mutants generated in this study can be used to elucidate specific genes and signaling pathways essential for choroid plexus development, function, and/or maintenance and will provide important insights into how these genetic mutations contribute to disease. PMID:25426018

  20. Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Susan T.; Sehgal, Amita

    2008-01-01

    Although intensively studied, the biological purpose of sleep is not known. To identify candidate genes affecting sleep, we assayed 136 isogenic P-element insertion lines of Drosophila melanogaster. Since sleep has been negatively correlated with energy reserves across taxa, we measured energy stores (whole-body protein, glycogen, and triglycerides) in these lines as well. Twenty-one insertions with known effects on physiology, development, and behavior affect 24-hr sleep time. Thirty-two candidate insertions significantly impact energy stores. Mutational genetic correlations among sleep parameters revealed that the genetic basis of the transition between sleep and waking states in males and females may be different. Furthermore, sleep bout number can be decoupled from waking activity in males, but not in females. Significant genetic correlations are present between sleep phenotypes and glycogen stores in males, while sleep phenotypes are correlated with triglycerides in females. Differences observed in male and female sleep behavior in flies may therefore be related to sex-specific differences in metabolic needs. Sleep thus emerges as a complex trait that exhibits extensive pleiotropy and sex specificity. The large mutational target that we observed implicates genes functioning in a variety of biological processes, suggesting that sleep may serve a number of different functions rather than a single purpose. PMID:18430954

  1. Genetic Analysis of the Henry Mountains Bison Herd.

    PubMed

    Ranglack, Dustin H; Dobson, Lauren K; du Toit, Johan T; Derr, James

    2015-01-01

    Wild American plains bison (Bison bison) populations virtually disappeared in the late 1800s, with some remnant animals retained in what would become Yellowstone National Park and on private ranches. Some of these private bison were intentionally crossbred with cattle for commercial purposes. This forced hybridization resulted in both mitochondrial and nuclear introgression of cattle genes into some of the extant bison genome. As the private populations grew, excess animals, along with their history of cattle genetics, provided founders for newly established public bison populations. Of the US public bison herds, only those in Yellowstone and Wind Cave National Parks (YNP and WCNP) appear to be free of detectable levels of cattle introgression. However, a small free-ranging population (~350 animals) exists on public land, along with domestic cattle, in the Henry Mountains (HM) of southern Utah. This isolated bison herd originated from a founder group translocated from YNP in the 1940s. Using genetic samples from 129 individuals, we examined the genetic status of the HM population and found no evidence of mitochondrial or nuclear introgression of cattle genes. This new information confirms it is highly unlikely for free-living bison to crossbreed with cattle, and this disease-free HM bison herd is valuable for the long-term conservation of the species. This bison herd is a subpopulation of the YNP/WCNP/HM metapopulation, within which it can contribute significantly to national efforts to restore the American plains bison to more of its native range. PMID:26673758

  2. Genetic analysis of female gametophyte development and function.

    PubMed Central

    Drews, G N; Lee, D; Christensen, C A

    1998-01-01

    The female gametophyte is an absolutely essential structure for angiosperm reproduction. It produces the egg cell and central cell (which give rise to the embryo and endosperm, respectively) and mediates several reproductive processes including pollen tube guidance, fertilization, the induction of seed development, and perhaps also maternal control of embryo development. Although much has been learned about these processes at the cytological level, specific molecules mediating and controlling megagametogenesis and female gametophyte function have not been identified. A genetic approach to the identification of such molecules has been initiated in Arabidopsis and maize. Although genetic analyses are still in their infancy, mutations affecting female gametophyte function and specific steps of megagametogenesis have already been identified. Large-scale genetic screens aimed at identifying mutants affecting every step of megagametogenesis and female gametophyte function are in progress; the characterization of genes identified in these screens should go a long way toward defining the molecules that are required for female gametophyte development and function. PMID:9477569

  3. Genetic Analysis of the Henry Mountains Bison Herd

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, Johan T.; Derr, James

    2015-01-01

    Wild American plains bison (Bison bison) populations virtually disappeared in the late 1800s, with some remnant animals retained in what would become Yellowstone National Park and on private ranches. Some of these private bison were intentionally crossbred with cattle for commercial purposes. This forced hybridization resulted in both mitochondrial and nuclear introgression of cattle genes into some of the extant bison genome. As the private populations grew, excess animals, along with their history of cattle genetics, provided founders for newly established public bison populations. Of the US public bison herds, only those in Yellowstone and Wind Cave National Parks (YNP and WCNP) appear to be free of detectable levels of cattle introgression. However, a small free-ranging population (~350 animals) exists on public land, along with domestic cattle, in the Henry Mountains (HM) of southern Utah. This isolated bison herd originated from a founder group translocated from YNP in the 1940s. Using genetic samples from 129 individuals, we examined the genetic status of the HM population and found no evidence of mitochondrial or nuclear introgression of cattle genes. This new information confirms it is highly unlikely for free-living bison to crossbreed with cattle, and this disease-free HM bison herd is valuable for the long-term conservation of the species. This bison herd is a subpopulation of the YNP/WCNP/HM metapopulation, within which it can contribute significantly to national efforts to restore the American plains bison to more of its native range. PMID:26673758

  4. Analysis of genetic diversity of Persea bombycina "Som" using RAPD-based molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Bhau, Brijmohan Singh; Medhi, Kalyani; Das, Ambrish P; Saikia, Siddhartha P; Neog, Kartik; Choudhury, S N

    2009-08-01

    The utility of RAPD markers in assessing genetic diversity and phenetic relationships in Persea bombycina, a major tree species for golden silk (muga) production, was investigated using 48 genotypes from northeast India. Thirteen RAPD primer combinations generated 93 bands. On average, seven RAPD fragments were amplified per reaction. In a UPGMA phenetic dendrogram based on Jaccard's coefficient, the P. bombycina accessions showed a high level of genetic variation, as indicated by genetic similarity. The grouping in the phenogram was highly consistent, as indicated by high values of cophenetic correlation and high bootstrap values at the key nodes. The accessions were scattered on a plot derived from principal correspondence analysis. The study concluded that the high level of genetic diversity in the P. bombycina accessions may be attributed to the species' outcrossing nature. This study may be useful in identifying diverse genetic stocks of P. bombycina, which may then be conserved on a priority basis. PMID:19424786

  5. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-06-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  6. Population genetic analysis and trichothecene profiling of Fusarium graminearum from wheat in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Pan, D; Mionetto, A; Calero, N; Reynoso, M M; Torres, A; Bettucci, L

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (F. graminearum s.s.) is the major causal agent of Fusarium head blight of wheat worldwide, and contaminates grains with trichothecene mycotoxins that cause serious threats to food safety and animal health. An important aspect of managing this pathogen and reducing mycotoxin contamination of wheat is knowledge regarding its population genetics. Therefore, isolates of F. graminearum s.s. from the major wheat-growing region of Uruguay were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism assays, PCR genotyping, and chemical analysis of trichothecene production. Of the 102 isolates identified as having the 15-ADON genotype via PCR genotyping, all were DON producers, but only 41 strains were also 15-ADON producers, as determined by chemical analysis. The populations were genotypically diverse but genetically similar, with significant genetic exchange occurring between them. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the genetic variability resulted from differences between isolates within populations. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium analysis suggested that the isolates had a panmictic population genetic structure and that there is significant recombination occurs in F. graminearum s.s. In conclusion, tour findings provide the first detailed description of the genetic structure and trichothecene production of populations of F. graminearum s.s. from Uruguay, and expands our understanding of the agroecology of F. graminearum and of the correlation between genotypes and trichothecene chemotypes. PMID:26985955

  7. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  8. Adaptive divergence despite strong genetic drift: genomic analysis of the evolutionary mechanisms causing genetic differentiation in the island fox (Urocyon littoralis).

    PubMed

    Funk, W Chris; Lovich, Robert E; Hohenlohe, Paul A; Hofman, Courtney A; Morrison, Scott A; Sillett, T Scott; Ghalambor, Cameron K; Maldonado, Jesus E; Rick, Torben C; Day, Mitch D; Polato, Nicholas R; Fitzpatrick, Sarah W; Coonan, Timothy J; Crooks, Kevin R; Dillon, Adam; Garcelon, David K; King, Julie L; Boser, Christina L; Gould, Nicholas; Andelt, William F

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms generating the tremendous biodiversity of islands have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. Genetic drift and divergent selection are predicted to be strong on islands and both could drive population divergence and speciation. Alternatively, strong genetic drift may preclude adaptation. We conducted a genomic analysis to test the roles of genetic drift and divergent selection in causing genetic differentiation among populations of the island fox (Urocyon littoralis). This species consists of six subspecies, each of which occupies a different California Channel Island. Analysis of 5293 SNP loci generated using Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing found support for genetic drift as the dominant evolutionary mechanism driving population divergence among island fox populations. In particular, populations had exceptionally low genetic variation, small Ne (range = 2.1-89.7; median = 19.4), and significant genetic signatures of bottlenecks. Moreover, islands with the lowest genetic variation (and, by inference, the strongest historical genetic drift) were most genetically differentiated from mainland grey foxes, and vice versa, indicating genetic drift drives genome-wide divergence. Nonetheless, outlier tests identified 3.6-6.6% of loci as high FST outliers, suggesting that despite strong genetic drift, divergent selection contributes to population divergence. Patterns of similarity among populations based on high FST outliers mirrored patterns based on morphology, providing additional evidence that outliers reflect adaptive divergence. Extremely low genetic variation and small Ne in some island fox populations, particularly on San Nicolas Island, suggest that they may be vulnerable to fixation of deleterious alleles, decreased fitness and reduced adaptive potential. PMID:26992010

  9. Genetic analysis of Escherichia coli RadA: functional motifs and genetic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Deani L; Boyle, Daniel C; Lovett, Susan T

    2015-01-01

    The RadA/Sms protein is a RecA-related protein found universally in eubacteria and plants, implicated in processing of recombination intermediates. Here we show that the putative Zn finger, Walker A motif, KNRXG motif and Lon protease homology domain of the Escherichia coli RadA protein are required for DNA damage survival. RadA is unlikely to possess protease activity as the putative active site serine is not required. Mutants in RadA have strong synergistic phenotypes with those in the branch migration protein RecG. Sensitivity of radA recG mutants to azidothymidine (AZT) can be rescued by blocking recombination with recA or recF mutations or by overexpression of RuvAB, suggesting that lethal recombination intermediates accumulate in the absence of RadA and RecG. Synthetic genetic interactions for survival to AZT or ciprofloxacin exposure were observed between RadA and known or putative helicases including DinG, Lhr, PriA, Rep, RuvAB, UvrD, YejH and YoaA. These represent the first affected phenotypes reported for Lhr, YejH and YoaA. The specificity of these effects sheds new light on the role of these proteins in DNA damage avoidance and repair and implicates a role in replication gap processing for DinG and YoaA and a role in double-strand break repair for YejH. PMID:25484163

  10. Analysis of Genetic and Non-Genetic Factors Influencing Timing and Time Perception.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Alex J; Meck, Warren H; Cirulli, Elizabeth T

    2015-01-01

    Performance on different psychophysical tasks measuring the sense of time indicates a large amount of individual variation in the accuracy and precision of timing in the hundredths of milliseconds-to-minutes range. Quantifying factors with an influence on timing is essential to isolating a biological (genetic) contribution to the perception and estimation of time. In the largest timing study to date, 647 participants completed a duration-discrimination task in the sub-second range and a time-production task in the supra-second range. We confirm the stability of a participant's time sense across multiple sessions and substantiate a modest sex difference on time production. Moreover, we demonstrate a strong correlation between performance on a standardized cognitive battery and performance in both duration-discrimination and time-production tasks; we further show that performance is uncorrelated with age after controlling for general intelligence. Additionally, we find an effect of ethnicity on time sense, with African Americans and possibly Hispanics in our cohort differing in accuracy and precision from other ethnic groups. Finally, a preliminary genome-wide association and exome chip study was performed on 148 of the participants, ruling out the possibility for a single common variant or groups of low-frequency coding variants within a single gene to explain more than ~18% of the variation in the sense of time. PMID:26641268

  11. Analysis of Genetic and Non-Genetic Factors Influencing Timing and Time Perception

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Alex J.; Meck, Warren H.; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.

    2015-01-01

    Performance on different psychophysical tasks measuring the sense of time indicates a large amount of individual variation in the accuracy and precision of timing in the hundredths of milliseconds-to-minutes range. Quantifying factors with an influence on timing is essential to isolating a biological (genetic) contribution to the perception and estimation of time. In the largest timing study to date, 647 participants completed a duration-discrimination task in the sub-second range and a time-production task in the supra-second range. We confirm the stability of a participant’s time sense across multiple sessions and substantiate a modest sex difference on time production. Moreover, we demonstrate a strong correlation between performance on a standardized cognitive battery and performance in both duration-discrimination and time-production tasks; we further show that performance is uncorrelated with age after controlling for general intelligence. Additionally, we find an effect of ethnicity on time sense, with African Americans and possibly Hispanics in our cohort differing in accuracy and precision from other ethnic groups. Finally, a preliminary genome-wide association and exome chip study was performed on 148 of the participants, ruling out the possibility for a single common variant or groups of low-frequency coding variants within a single gene to explain more than ~18% of the variation in the sense of time. PMID:26641268

  12. Genetic analysis of Escherichia coli RadA: functional motifs and genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Deani L; Boyle, Daniel C; Lovett, Susan T

    2015-03-01

    The RadA/Sms protein is a RecA-related protein found universally in eubacteria and plants, implicated in processing of recombination intermediates. Here we show that the putative Zn finger, Walker A motif, KNRXG motif and Lon protease homology domain of the Escherichia coli RadA protein are required for DNA damage survival. RadA is unlikely to possess protease activity as the putative active site serine is not required. Mutants in RadA have strong synergistic phenotypes with those in the branch migration protein RecG. Sensitivity of radA recG mutants to azidothymidine (AZT) can be rescued by blocking recombination with recA or recF mutations or by overexpression of RuvAB, suggesting that lethal recombination intermediates accumulate in the absence of RadA and RecG. Synthetic genetic interactions for survival to AZT or ciprofloxacin exposure were observed between RadA and known or putative helicases including DinG, Lhr, PriA, Rep, RuvAB, UvrD, YejH and YoaA. These represent the first affected phenotypes reported for Lhr, YejH and YoaA. The specificity of these effects sheds new light on the role of these proteins in DNA damage avoidance and repair and implicates a role in replication gap processing for DinG and YoaA and a role in double-strand break repair for YejH. PMID:25484163

  13. Analysis of Dengue Virus Genetic Diversity during Human and Mosquito Infection Reveals Genetic Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Sessions, October M.; Wilm, Andreas; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Choy, Milly M.; Chow, Angelia; Chong, Yuwen; Ong, Xin Mei; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Cook, Alex R.; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening acute disease throughout the tropical world. While drug development efforts are underway, there are concerns that resistant strains will emerge rapidly. Indeed, antiviral drugs that target even conserved regions in other RNA viruses lose efficacy over time as the virus mutates. Here, we sought to determine if there are regions in the DENV genome that are not only evolutionarily conserved but genetically constrained in their ability to mutate and could hence serve as better antiviral targets. High-throughput sequencing of DENV-1 genome directly from twelve, paired dengue patients’ sera and then passaging these sera into the two primary mosquito vectors showed consistent and distinct sequence changes during infection. In particular, two residues in the NS5 protein coding sequence appear to be specifically acquired during infection in Ae. aegypti but not Ae. albopictus. Importantly, we identified a region within the NS3 protein coding sequence that is refractory to mutation during human and mosquito infection. Collectively, these findings provide fresh insights into antiviral targets and could serve as an approach to defining evolutionarily constrained regions for therapeutic targeting in other RNA viruses. PMID:26327586

  14. The multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm: Analysis and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cedeno, W.

    1995-09-01

    The ability of organisms to evolve and adapt to the environment has provided mother nature with a rich and diverse set of species. Only organisms well adapted to their environment can survive from one generation to the next, transferring on the traits, that made them successful, to their offspring. Competition for resources and the ever changing environment drives some species to extinction and at the same time others evolve to maintain the delicate balance in nature. In this disertation we present the multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm, a computational metaphor to the survival of species in ecological niches in the face of competition. The multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm maintains stable subpopulations of solutions in multiple niches in multimodal landscapes. The algorithm introduces the concept of crowding selection to promote mating among members with qirnilar traits while allowing many members of the population to participate in mating. The algorithm uses worst among most similar replacement policy to promote competition among members with similar traits while allowing competition among members of different niches as well. We present empirical and theoretical results for the success of the multiniche crowding genetic algorithm for multimodal function optimization. The properties of the algorithm using different parameters are examined. We test the performance of the algorithm on problems of DNA Mapping, Aquifer Management, and the File Design Problem. Applications that combine the use of heuristics and special operators to solve problems in the areas of combinatorial optimization, grouping, and multi-objective optimization. We conclude by presenting the advantages and disadvantages of the algorithm and describing avenues for future investigation to answer other questions raised by this study.

  15. Genetic diversity, population structure and association analysis in cut chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.).

    PubMed

    Li, Pirui; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Wang, Haibin; Su, Jiangshuo; Fang, Weimin; Guan, Zhiyong; Chen, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Characterizing the genetic diversity present in a working set of plant germplasm can contribute to its effective management and genetic improvement. The cut flower chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat.) is an economically important ornamental species. With the repeated germplasm exchange and intensive breeding activities, it remains a major task in genetic research. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the genetic diversity and the population structure of a worldwide collection of 159 varieties, and to apply an association mapping approach to identify DNA-based markers linked to five plant architecture traits and six inflorescence traits. The genotyping demonstrated that there was no lack of genetic diversity in the collection and that pair-wise kinship values were relatively low. The clustering based on a Bayesian model of population structure did not reflect known variation in either provenance or inflorescence type. A principal coordinate analysis was, however, able to discriminate most of the varieties according to both of these criteria. About 1 in 100 marker pairs exhibited a degree of linkage disequilibrium. The association analysis identified a number of markers putatively linked to one or more of the traits. Some of these associations were robust over two seasons. The findings provide an in-depth understanding of genetic diversity and population structure present in cut flower chrysanthemum varieties, and an insight into the genetic control of plant architecture and inflorescence-related traits. PMID:26780102

  16. Integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic data with application to cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, Shabnam; Hobbs, Brian P; Ma, Liangsuo; Nielsen, David A; Moeller, F Gerard; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran

    2016-01-15

    Neuroimaging and genetic studies provide distinct and complementary information about the structural and biological aspects of a disease. Integrating the two sources of data facilitates the investigation of the links between genetic variability and brain mechanisms among different individuals for various medical disorders. This article presents a general statistical framework for integrative Bayesian analysis of neuroimaging-genetic (iBANG) data, which is motivated by a neuroimaging-genetic study in cocaine dependence. Statistical inference necessitated the integration of spatially dependent voxel-level measurements with various patient-level genetic and demographic characteristics under an appropriate probability model to account for the multiple inherent sources of variation. Our framework uses Bayesian model averaging to integrate genetic information into the analysis of voxel-wise neuroimaging data, accounting for spatial correlations in the voxels. Using multiplicity controls based on the false discovery rate, we delineate voxels associated with genetic and demographic features that may impact diffusion as measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) obtained from DTI images. We demonstrate the benefits of accounting for model uncertainties in both model fit and prediction. Our results suggest that cocaine consumption is associated with FA reduction in most white matter regions of interest in the brain. Additionally, gene polymorphisms associated with GABAergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmitters and receptors were associated with FA. PMID:26484829

  17. Analysis of Genetic Toggle Switch Systems Encoded on Plasmids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loinger, Adiel; Biham, Ofer

    2009-08-01

    Genetic switch systems with mutual repression of two transcription factors, encoded on plasmids, are studied using stochastic methods. The plasmid copy number is found to strongly affect the behavior of these systems. More specifically, the average time between spontaneous switching events quickly increases with the number of plasmids. It was shown before that for a single copy encoded on the chromosome, the exclusive switch is more stable than the general switch. Here we show that when the switch is encoded on a sufficiently large number of plasmids, the situation is reversed and the general switch is more stable than the exclusive switch. These predictions can be tested experimentally using methods of synthetic biology.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  19. Functional Analysis of the Human Genome:. Study of Genetic Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-04-01

    I will divide my remarks into 3 parts. First, I will give a brief summary of the Human Genome Project. Second, I will describe our work on human chromosome 7 to illustrate how we could contribute to the Project and disease research. Third, I would like to bring across the argument that study of genetic disease is an integral component of the Human Genome Project. In particular, I will use cystic fibrosis as an example to elaborate why I consider disease study is a part of functional genomics.

  20. Genetic Analysis of Digestive Physiology Using Fluorescent Phospholipid Reporters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Steven A.; Pack, Michael; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Johnson, Iain D.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Dosch, Roland; Mullins, Mary C.; Hendrickson, H. Stewart; Hendrickson, Elizabeth K.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2001-05-01

    Zebrafish are a valuable model for mammalian lipid metabolism; larvae process lipids similarly through the intestine and hepatobiliary system and respond to drugs that block cholesterol synthesis in humans. After ingestion of fluorescently quenched phospholipids, endogenous lipase activity and rapid transport of cleavage products results in intense gall bladder fluorescence. Genetic screening identifies zebrafish mutants, such as fat free, that show normal digestive organ morphology but severely reduced phospholipid and cholesterol processing. Thus, fluorescent lipids provide a sensitive readout of lipid metabolism and are a powerful tool for identifying genes that mediate vertebrate digestive physiology.

  1. Genetic Analysis of Sporadic and Familial Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in understanding the biology and clinical course of interstitial pneumonia, the etiology of this disease remains elusive. Epidemiologic studies have consistently identified cigarette smoke as an important exposure; however, most smokers do not develop interstitial pneumonia and many individuals with interstitial pneumonia do not smoke cigarettes. Moreover, interstitial pneumonias have been reported to cluster in families. Thus, a more thorough understanding of the genetic etiology of interstitial pneumonia may prove critically important in defining the biology and clinical course of this complex human disease. PMID:18403331

  2. Genetic variants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Cui, Long; Tam, Wing Hung; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) share common genetic polymorphisms. We conducted meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of all available variants and determined the effects of confounding and experimental components on the genetic association of GDM. Any case-controlled or cohort studies with genotype distribution compared GDM cases with controls were included. In total, 28 articles including 8,204 cases and 15,221 controls for 6 polymorphisms were studied. rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1) were significantly associated with the increased GDM risk. The association of rs4402960(IGF2BP2) and rs1800629(TNF-α) was significant only when the studies with control allele frequency deviation and publication bias were excluded. Further subgroup analysis showed the risk alleles of rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significantly associated with the GDM risk only in Asian, but not in Caucasian population. The OGTT test using 100 g, but not 75 g; and genotype detection by other assays, but not Taqman method, were also significantly associated with increased GDM risk in rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2). Overall GDM was associated with rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1), but only rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significant in Asian populations. While rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2) were significantly affected by OGTT protocol and genotyping methods. PMID:27468700

  3. Genetic analysis of 7 medieval skeletons from Aragonese Pyrenees

    PubMed Central

    Núńez, Carolina; Sosa, Cecilia; Baeta, Miriam; Geppert, Maria; Turnbough, Meredith; Phillips, Nicole; Casalod, Yolanda; Bolea, Miguel; Roby, Rhonda; Budowle, Bruce; Martínez-Jarreta, Begońa

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform a genetic characterization of 7 skeletons from medieval age found in a burial site in the Aragonese Pyrenees. Methods Allele frequencies of autosomal short tandem repeats (STR) loci were determined by 3 different STR systems. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplogroups were determined by sequencing of the hypervariable segment 1 of mtDNA and typing of phylogenetic Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNP) markers, respectively. Possible familial relationships were also investigated. Results Complete or partial STR profiles were obtained in 3 of the 7 samples. Mitochondrial DNA haplogroup was determined in 6 samples, with 5 of them corresponding to the haplogroup H and 1 to the haplogroup U5a. Y-chromosome haplogroup was determined in 2 samples, corresponding to the haplogroup R. In one of them, the sub-branch R1b1b2 was determined. mtDNA sequences indicated that some of the individuals could be maternally related, while STR profiles indicated no direct family relationships. Conclusions Despite the antiquity of the samples and great difficulty that genetic analyses entail, the combined use of autosomal STR markers, Y-chromosome informative SNPs, and mtDNA sequences allowed us to genotype a group of skeletons from the medieval age. PMID:21674829

  4. Genetic, molecular, and morphological analysis of compound leaf development.

    PubMed

    Goliber, T; Kessler, S; Chen, J J; Bharathan, G; Sinha, N

    1999-01-01

    Leaves, the plant organs responsible for capturing and converting most of the 170 billion metric tons of carbon fixed globally each year, can be broadly grouped into two morphological categories: simple and compound. Although simple-leaved species such as corn and Arabidopsis have traditionally been favored model systems for studying leaf development, recent years have seen an increase in genetic and molecular studies of compound leaf development. Two compound-leaved species in particular have emerged as model systems: tomato and pea. A variety of mutations which alter leaf morphology in these species have been described, and analyses of these mutations have allowed the construction of testable models of leaf development. Also, the knotted-like homeobox (KNOX) genes, which were originally discovered as regulators of meristem function, now appear to have a role in compound leaf development. In addition to the recent genetic and molecular analyses of tomato and pea, insight into the nature of compound leaf development may be gained through the study of (a) heteroblasty and heterophylly, phenomena in which a range of leaf forms can be produced by a single shoot, and (b) the evolutionary origins of compound leaves. PMID:9891889

  5. Genetic analysis of salt-tolerant mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, V; Ponce, M R; Micol, J L

    2000-01-01

    Stress caused by the increased salinity of irrigated fields impairs plant growth and is one of the major constraints that limits crop productivity in many important agricultural areas. As a contribution to solving such agronomic problems, we have carried out a large-scale screening for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants induced on different genetic backgrounds by EMS treatment, fast neutron bombardment, or T-DNA insertions. From the 675,500 seeds we screened, 17 mutant lines were isolated, all but one of which yielded 25-70% germination levels on 250 mm NaCl medium, a condition in which their ancestor ecotypes are unable to germinate. Monogenic recessive inheritance of NaCl-tolerant germination was displayed with incomplete penetrance by all the selected mutants, which fell into five complementation groups. These were named SALOBRENO (SAN) and mapped relative to polymorphic microsatellites, the map positions of three of them suggesting that they are novel genes. Strains carrying mutations in the SAN1-SAN4 genes display similar responses to both ionic effects and osmotic pressure, their germination being NaCl and mannitol tolerant but KCl and Na(2)SO(4) sensitive. In addition, NaCl-, KCl-, and mannitol-tolerant as well as abscisic-acid-insensitive germination was displayed by sañ5, whose genetic and molecular characterization indicates that it carries an extremely hypomorphic or null allele of the ABI4 gene, its deduced protein product lacking the APETALA2 DNA binding domain. PMID:10629000

  6. A genetic analysis of microtubule assembly and function in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, F.; Guenette, S.; Kirkpatrick, D.; Praitis, V.; Weinstein, B.; Archer, J.

    1993-12-31

    The major goal of our laboratory`s research is to understand how cells organize their cytoskeletons to produce motility: specific patterns of shape change, intracellular motility and locomotion. We focus primarily on microtubules. We appreciate that results from several laboratories including our own, suggest that microtubule function is expressed in part through interactions with other elements of the cytoskeleton and other cellular compartments, such as the plasma membrane. However, focusing on microtubules represents a justifiable reduction, since a wide variety of drug interference and localization experiments support the notion that intact microtubules are essential for each of these motile phenomena. The primary problem facing this field is understanding how microtubule structure and function is regulated in vivo. Although there are a variety of excellent experimental systems which permit detailed analyses of behavior in vitro, the extrapolation of these results to the situation in the cytoplasm is problematic. These efforts have been boosted significantly in the last several years by two advances: first, traditionally excellent genetic organisms, such as the yeasts, have been enlisted in the study of motility; second, molecular biology has enabled {open_quotes}pseudo-genetic{close_quotes} approaches in animal cells which display the most interesting of motile phenomena. Our laboratory is involved in both of these efforts. In the present report, we will summarize our present approaches using yeast.

  7. Genetic analysis of incurvata mutants reveals three independent genetic operations at work in Arabidopsis leaf morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Cartagena, J; Candela, H; Robles, P; Ponce, M R; Pérez-Pérez, J M; Piqueras, P; Micol, J L

    2000-01-01

    In an attempt to identify genes involved in the control of leaf morphogenesis, we have studied 13 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with curled, involute leaves, a phenotype herein referred to as Incurvata (Icu), which were isolated by G. Röbbelen and belong to the Arabidopsis Information Service Form Mutants collection. The Icu phenotype was inherited as a single recessive trait in 10 mutants, with semidominance in 2 mutants and with complete dominance in the remaining 1. Complementation analyses indicated that the studied mutations correspond to five genes, representative alleles of which were mapped relative to polymorphic microsatellites. Although most double-mutant combinations displayed additivity of the Icu phenotypes, those of icu1 icu2 and icu3 icu4 double mutants were interpreted as synergistic, which suggests that the five genes studied represent three independent genetic operations that are at work for the leaf to acquire its final form at full expansion. We have shown that icu1 mutations are alleles of the Polycomb group gene CURLY LEAF (CLF) and that the leaf phenotype of the icu2 mutant is suppressed in an agamous background, as is known for clf mutants. In addition, we have tested by means of multiplex RT-PCR the transcription of several floral genes in Icu leaves. Ectopic expression of AGAMOUS and APETALA3 was observed in clf and icu2, but not in icu3, icu4, and icu5 mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that CLF and ICU2 play related roles, the latter being a candidate to belong to the Polycomb group of regulatory genes. We propose that, as flowers evolved, a new major class of genes, including CLF and ICU2, may have been recruited to prevent the expression of floral homeotic genes in the leaves. PMID:11063708

  8. Genetic variability analysis of Zymomonas mobilis strains from the UFPEDA microorganisms collection.

    PubMed

    Silva, L C N; Araújo, J M; Azevedo, J L; Padilha, R J S A; Yara, R

    2015-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a Gram-negative bacterium that has drawn attention in the bioethanol industry. Besides bioethanol, this bacterium also produces other biotechnological products such as levans, which show antitumor activity. Molecular studies involving Z. mobilis have advanced to the point that allows us to characterize interspecies genetic diversity and understand their metabolism, and these data are essential for better utilization of this species. In this study, the genetic diversity of 24 strains from the Microorganisms Collection of Departamento de Antibióticos (UFPEDA) from Universidade Federal de Pernambuco were characterized. The methods used were amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and diversity analysis of the internally transcribed 16S-23S rDNA spacer region (ISR). These analyses revealed low genetic variability of the 16S rDNA gene. These data confirm that these isolates are, or are closely related to, Z. mobilis. Moreover, the analysis of the ISR confirmed the genetic variability of strains deposited in the UFPEDA collection of microorganisms and grouped these strains into ten ribotypes, which can be used in the future for breeding programs and for the preservation of biodiversity. Furthermore, this study characterized the genetic variability between the UFPEDA 205/ ZAP, UFPEDA 98/AG11, and ZAG strains, which were obtained by spheroplast fusion among them. The data also indicate that there is genetic variability among the UFPEDA 202/CP4 and UFPEDA 633/ ZM4 strains, demonstrating that these important Z. mobilis strains are distinct, as suggested in previous studies. PMID:25730020

  9. Poppr: an R package for genetic analysis of populations with mixed (clonal/sexual) reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poppr is an R package for analysis of population genetic data. It extends the adegenet package and provides several novel tools, particularly with regard to analysis of data from admixed, clonal, and/or sexual populations. Currently, poppr can be used for dominant/codominant and haploid/diploid gene...

  10. Analysis of genetic data on Jewish populations. I. Historical background, demographic features, and genetic markers.

    PubMed Central

    Bonné-Tamir, B; Karlin, S; Kenett, R

    1979-01-01

    Part I describes the data sets on which the analysis of Part II is based. This covers the nature of the populations sampled, the extent to which the samples are representative, and a brief review of historical and demographic facts on the populations involved. PMID:380329

  11. Genetic association analysis and meta-analysis of imputed SNPs in longitudinal studies

    PubMed Central

    Subirana, Isaac; González, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new method to analyze time-to-event data in longitudinal genetic studies. This method address the fundamental problem of incorporating uncertainty when analyzing survival data and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genomewide association studies (GWAS). Our method incorporates uncertainty in the likelihood function, the opposite of existing methods that incorporate the uncertainty in the design matrix. Through simulation studies and real data analyses, we show that our proposed method is unbiased and provides powerful results. We also show how combining results from different GWAS (meta-analysis) may lead to wrong results when effects are not estimated using our approach. The model is implemented in an R package that is designed to analyze uncertainty not only arising from imputed SNPs, but also from copy number variants (CNVs). PMID:23595425

  12. Tools for the genetic analysis of germ cells.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Shirley S; Matin, Angabin

    2009-09-01

    Germ cells are essential for the propagation of individual species. Studies on germ cell development in mice highlight important biological paradigms. Beginning with their first appearance around embryonic day 7 (E7), germ cells undergo specific cellular changes at different stages of their embryonic and adult development. Germ cells migrate through the hind-regions of the embryo to eventually home into the developing gonads. Further differentiation and development of germ cells differ in males and females. The processes involved in germ cell development and their eventual differentiation into sperm and oocytes have been under extensive investigation in recent years. Studies on germ cells have shed light on the cellular and molecular processes involved in their specification, migration, proliferation, death, and differentiation. These studies have also revealed much about maintenance of stem cell populations and fertility. Here we review the genetic tools that are at present available to study germ cells in the mouse. PMID:19548313

  13. A spatial and genetic analysis of Cowbird host selection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, D.C.; Sedgwick, J.A.; Painter, I.S.; Casna, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    Our study of brood parasitism patterns in forest communities revealed the egg-laying frequency and host selection patterns of female cowbirds. By integrating molecular genetics and spatial data, we have the first published estimate on cowbird laying rates in field studies. The 29 females in the study laid only 1-5 eggs each, much lower than previous estimates from captive cowbirds and extrapolations from ovarian development in capture/recapture studies that had suggested that as many as 40 eggs could be laid per individual cowbird. Cowbird females also were shown for the first time to lay significantly more eggs within the home range areas they established rather than outside the home range. No patterns were uncovered for individual females preferentially parasitizing particular host species

  14. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  15. 'The genetic analysis of functional connectomics in Drosophila'

    PubMed Central

    Meinertzhagen, Ian A.; Lee, Chi-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Fly and vertebrate nervous systems share many organization characteristics, such as layers, columns and glomeruli, and utilize similar synaptic components, such ion channels and receptors. Both also exhibit similar network features. Recent technological advances, especially in electron microscopy, now allow us to determine synaptic circuits and identify pathways cell-by-cell, as part of the fly’s connectome. Genetic tools provide the means to identify synaptic components, as well as to record and manipulate neuronal activity, adding function to the connectome. This review discusses technical advances in these emerging areas of functional connectomics, offering prognoses in each and identifying the challenges in bridging structural connectomics to molecular biology and synaptic physiology, thereby determining fundamental computation mechanisms that underlie behaviour. PMID:23084874

  16. Cytological image analysis with a genetic fuzzy finite state machine.

    PubMed

    Estévez, J; Alayón, S; Moreno, L; Sigut, J; Aguilar, R

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this research is to design a pattern recognition system based on a Fuzzy Finite State Machine (FFSM). We try to find an optimal FFSM with Genetic Algorithms (GA). In order to validate this system, the classifier has been applied to a real problem: distinction between normal and abnormal cells in cytological breast fine needle aspirate images and cytological peritoneal fluid images. The characteristic used in the discrimination between normal and abnormal cells is a texture measurement of the chromatin distribution in cellular nuclei. Furthermore, the effectiveness of this method as a pattern classifier is compared with other existing supervised and unsupervised methods and evaluated with Receiver Operating Curves (ROC) methodology. PMID:16520142

  17. Genetic analysis of the freshwater crayfish Cherax tenuimanus.

    PubMed

    Imgrund, J; Groth, D; Wetherall, J

    1997-08-01

    The marron (Cherax tenuimanus) is one of the few species of freshwater crayfish native to Australia that is suitable for aquaculture and occurs only in the southwest of Western Australia. This study describes polymorphic microsatellite markers which differentiate marron populations from several geographically distinct regions (including rivers and streams, dams, and commercial marron farms) throughout Western Australia. Twenty microsatellite loci, primarily of the (CA)n. (GT)n type, were isolated and sequenced from a marron cosmid library. Three of these loci were characterised further. Two loci exhibited extensive polymorphism and one was monomorphic. The polymorphic loci exhibited Mendelian codominant inheritance in the family group comprising two individual parents and approximately 100 offspring bred for this study. These loci permitted differentiation between the five geographically distinct populations studied and thus provide a basis for genetic characterisation of marron stock in Western Australia. PMID:9378141

  18. Historical analysis of Newfoundland dog fur colour genetics

    PubMed Central

    Bondeson, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article makes use of digitized historic newspapers to analyze Newfoundland dog fur colour genetics, and fur colour variations over time. The results indicate that contrary to the accepted view, the ‘Solid’ gene was introduced into the British population of Newfoundland dogs in the 1840s. Prior to that time, the dogs were white and black (Landseer) or white and brown, and thus spotted/spotted homozygotes. Due to ‘Solid’ being dominant over ‘spotted’, and selective breeding, today the majority of Newfoundland dogs are solid black. Whereas small white marks on the chest and/or paw appears to be a random event, the historical data supports the existence of an ‘Irish spotted’ fur colour pattern, with white head blaze, breast, paws and tail tip, in spotted/spotted homozygotes. PMID:26623371

  19. Functional and Genetic Analysis of Spectraplakins in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Ines; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Sánchez-Soriano, Natalia; Prokop, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic network of filamentous protein polymers required for virtually all cellular processes. It consists of three major classes, filamentous actin (F-actin), intermediate filaments, and microtubules, all displaying characteristic structural properties, functions, cellular distributions, and sets of interacting regulatory proteins. One unique class of proteins, the spectraplakins, bind, regulate, and integrate the functions of all three classes of cytoskeleton proteins. Spectraplakins are giant, evolutionary conserved multidomain proteins (spanning up to 9000 aa) that are true members of the plakin, spectrin, and Gas2-like protein families. They have OMIM-listed disease links to epidermolysis bullosa and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy. Their role in disease is likely underrepresented since studies in model animal systems have revealed critical roles in polarity, morphogenesis, differentiation and maintenance, migration, signaling, and intracellular trafficking in a variety of tissues. This enormous diversity of spectraplakin function is consistent with the numerous isoforms produced from single genomic loci that combine different sets of functional domains in distinct cellular contexts. To study the broad range of functions and complexity of these proteins, Drosophila is a powerful model. Thus, the fly spectraplakin Short stop (Shot) acts as an actin-microtubule linker and plays important roles in many developmental processes, which provide experimentally amenable and relevant contexts in which to study spectraplakin functions. For these studies, a versatile range of relevant experimental resources that facilitate genetics and transgenic approaches, highly refined genomics tools, and an impressive set of spectraplakin-specific genetic and molecular tools are readily available. Here, we use the example of Shot to illustrate how the various tools and strategies available for Drosophila can be employed to decipher and dissect

  20. Analysis of the genetic diversity of super sweet corn inbred lines using SSR and SSAP markers.

    PubMed

    Ko, W R; Sa, K J; Roy, N S; Choi, H-J; Lee, J K

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared the efficiency of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence specific amplified polymorphism (SSAP) markers for analyzing genetic diversity, genetic relationships, and population structure of 87 super sweet corn inbred lines from different origins. SSR markers showed higher average gene diversity and Shannon's information index than SSAP markers. To assess genetic relationships and characterize inbred lines using SSR and SSAP markers, genetic similarity (GS) matrices were constructed. The dendrogram using SSR marker data showed a complex pattern with nine clusters and a GS of 53.0%. For SSAP markers, three clusters were observed with a GS of 50.8%. Results of combined marker data showed six clusters with 53.5% GS. To analyze the genetic population structure of SSR and SSAP marker data, the 87 inbred lines were divided into groups I, II, and admixed based on the membership probability threshold of 0.8. Using combined marker data, the population structure was K = 3 and was divided into groups I, II, III, and admixed. This study represents a comparative analysis of SSR and SSAP marker data for the study of genetic diversity and genetic relationships in super sweet corn inbred lines. Our results would be useful for maize-breeding programs in Korea. PMID:26909914

  1. A theoretical analysis of population genetics of plants on restored habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Bogoliubov, A.G.; Loehle, C.

    1997-07-01

    Seed and propagules used for habitat restoration are not likely to be closely adapted to local site conditions. Rapid changes of genotypes frequencies on local microsites and/or microevolution would allow plants to become better adapted to a site. These same factors would help to maintain genetic diversity and ensure the survival of small endangered populations. The authors used population genetics models to examine the selection of genotypes during establishment on restored sites. Vegetative spread was shown to affect selection and significantly reduce genetic diversity. To study general microevolution, the authors linked a model of resource usage with a genetics model and analyzed competition between genotypes. A complex suite of feasible ecogenetic states was shown to result. The state actually resulting would depend strongly on initial conditions. This analysis indicated that genetic structure can vary locally and can produce overall genetic variability that is not simply the result of microsite adaptations. For restoration activities, the implication is that small differences in seed source could lead to large differences in local genetic structure after selection.

  2. A theoretical analysis of population genetics of plants on restored habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Bogoliubov, A.G.; Loehle, C.

    1995-02-01

    Seed and propagules used for habitat restoration are not likely to be closely adapted to local site conditions. Rapid changes of genotypes frequencies on local microsites and/or microevolution would allow plants to become better adapted to a site. These same factors would help to maintain genetic diversity and ensure the survival of small endangered populations. We used population genetics models to examine the selection of genotypes during establishment on restored sites. Vegetative spread was shown to affect selection and significantly reduce genetic diversity. To study general microevolution, we linked a model of resource usage with a genetics model and analyzed competition between genotypes. A complex suite of feasible ecogenetic states was shown to result. The state actually resulting would depend strongly on initial conditions. This analysis indicated that genetic structure can vary locally and can produce overall genetic variability that is not simply the result of microsite adaptations. For restoration activities, the implication is that small differences in seed source could lead to large differences in local genetic structure after selection.

  3. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    PubMed Central

    Küpper Cardoso Perseguini, Juliana Morini; Chioratto, Alisson Fernando; Zucchi, Maria Imaculada; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Moraes; Costa Mondego, Jorge Mauricio; Gazaffi, Rodrigo; Franco Garcia, Antonio Augusto; de Campos, Tatiana; de Souza, Anete Pereira; Rubiano, Luciana Benchimol

    2011-01-01

    A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats – SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms – AFLPs) for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger’s modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively) than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm. PMID:21637550

  4. Analysis of genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei using microsatellite markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Weiji; Li, Weiya; Zhang, Quanqi; Kong, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Seven microsatellite markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei, which were introduced from Central and South America to China. All seven microsatellite loci were polymorphic, with polymorphism information content ( PIC) values ranging from 0.593 to 0.952. Totally 92 alleles were identified, and the number of alleles ( Na) and effective alleles ( Ne) varied between 4 and 21 and 2.7 and 14.6, respectively. Observed heterozygosity ( H o) values were lower than the expected heterozygosity ( H e) values (0.526-0.754), which indicated that the seven stocks possessed a rich genetic diversity. Thirty-seven tests were detected for reasonable significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. F is values were positive at five loci, suggesting that there was a relatively high degree of inbreeding within stocks. Pairwise F st values ranged from 0.0225 to 0.151, and most of the stock pairs were moderately differentiated. Genetic distance and cluster analysis using UPGMA revealed a close genetic relationship of L. vannamei between Pop2 and Pop3. AMOVA indicated that the genetic variation among stocks (11.3%) was much lower than that within stocks (88.7%). Although the seven stocks had a certain degree of genetic differentiation and a rich genetic diversity, there is an increasing risk of decreased performance due to inbreeding in subsequent generations.

  5. Genetic analysis of albuminuria in collaborative cross and multiple mouse intercross populations.

    PubMed

    Thaisz, Jill; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Feng, Minjie; Philip, Vivek M; Zhang, Yunyu; Yanas, Liane; Sheehan, Susan; Xu, Lingfei; Miller, Darla R; Paigen, Beverly; Chesler, Elissa J; Churchill, Gary A; Dipetrillo, Keith

    2012-10-01

    Albuminuria is an important marker of nephropathy that increases the risk of progressive renal and chronic cardiovascular diseases. The genetic basis of kidney disease is well-established in humans and rodent models, but the causal genes remain to be identified. We applied several genetic strategies to map and refine genetic loci affecting albuminuria in mice and translated the findings to human kidney disease. First, we measured albuminuria in mice from 33 inbred strains, used the data for haplotype association mapping (HAM), and detected 10 genomic regions associated with albuminuria. Second, we performed eight F(2) intercrosses between genetically diverse strains to identify six loci underlying albuminuria, each of which was concordant to kidney disease loci in humans. Third, we used the Oak Ridge National Laboratory incipient Collaborative Cross subpopulation to detect an additional novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying albuminuria. We also performed a ninth intercross, between genetically similar strains, that substantially narrowed an albuminuria QTL on Chromosome 17 to a region containing four known genes. Finally, we measured renal gene expression in inbred mice to detect pathways highly correlated with albuminuria. Expression analysis also identified Glcci1, a gene known to affect podocyte structure and function in zebrafish, as a strong candidate gene for the albuminuria QTL on Chromosome 6. Overall, these findings greatly enhance our understanding of the genetic basis of albuminuria in mice and may guide future studies into the genetic basis of kidney disease in humans. PMID:22859403

  6. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  7. Genetic analysis of a Sicilian population using 15 short tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Calò, C M; Garofano, L; Mameli, A; Pizzamiglio, M; Vona, G

    2003-04-01

    The genetic structure of the population of Alia (Sicily, Italy) was analyzed using 15 short tandem repeats: TPOX, D2S1338, D3S1358, FIBRA, D5S818, CSF1PO, D7S820, D8S1179, TH01, VWA, D13S317, D16S539, D18S51, D19S433, and D21S11. Two of these markers, D2S1338 and D19S433, have never before been used in research on population genetics and only recently have they been put to use in forensic medicine. Results of the analysis underline the genetic isolation of the Alia population and show it to be a recent bottleneck as a consequence of a cholera epidemic in 1837. While comparing the Alia population with other populations from Sicily, a genetic heterogeneity within Sicily was uncovered, thus confirming previous results obtained from the analysis of classical markers. This heterogeneity underlines the existence of genetic boundaries within the island. Comparisons with other Italian, Mediterranean, and European populations highlight the differentiation of the Sicilian population, reflecting the presence of a genetic boundary that separates Sicily from northern and central Italy and from the western Mediterranean basin. PMID:12943156

  8. Comparative analysis of patterns of localization of mobile genetic elements in selection-genetic experiments on Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil`eva, L.A.; Ratner, V.A. |; Zabanov, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    A comparative selection-genetic analysis of three heterogeneous lines of Drosophila melanogaster with an interrupted longitudinal wing vein was performed. In the control line, riC, and two selection lines, riSP and riSN, overall patterns of localization of six families mobile genetic elements (MGE) (MDG1, MDG2, MDG3, MDG4, copia, and 297) were compared. In all, the lines contained 220 sites (copies) in 153 segments of the Bridges` map. According to response to selection, six classes of sites were identified: strong positive (P), weak positive (p), neutral (0), weak negative (n), strong negative (N), and abnormal (A). More than 50% of the sites (P + N + p + n) were shown to respond to selection; the contrasting classes (P and N and p and n) counterbalanced each other. These sites are assumed to mark actual parts of the genome, where polygenes are located. In other words, more than 50% of the total number of the genome sites act as polygenes controlling this quantitative character and respond to selection. Pleiotropy of polygenes in such a system must be very high. 22.2% of sites are neutral (class 0); apparently, they do not mark polygenes. The remaining 21.8% of sites (class A) show an anomalous response to selection. They are assumed to mark the polygenes of another genetic system, which participated in the maintenance of homeostasis in the original line riC. On the basis of this evidence, the concept of oligogenes and polygenes is developed. Oligogenes and polygenes are genes that occupy respectively limiting and nonlimiting positions in systems of expression. Adaptive properties of oligogenes are evaluated first and evolve rapidly. Adaptive properties of polygenes are evaluated only with regard to their total set and are limited by oligogenes. Variation of polygenic systems is generated by polygenic combination and spontaneous transpositions and excisions of MGE. 26 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Factor analysis models for structuring covariance matrices of additive genetic effects: a Bayesian implementation

    PubMed Central

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Gianola, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Multivariate linear models are increasingly important in quantitative genetics. In high dimensional specifications, factor analysis (FA) may provide an avenue for structuring (co)variance matrices, thus reducing the number of parameters needed for describing (co)dispersion. We describe how FA can be used to model genetic effects in the context of a multivariate linear mixed model. An orthogonal common factor structure is used to model genetic effects under Gaussian assumption, so that the marginal likelihood is multivariate normal with a structured genetic (co)variance matrix. Under standard prior assumptions, all fully conditional distributions have closed form, and samples from the joint posterior distribution can be obtained via Gibbs sampling. The model and the algorithm developed for its Bayesian implementation were used to describe five repeated records of milk yield in dairy cattle, and a one common FA model was compared with a standard multiple trait model. The Bayesian Information Criterion favored the FA model. PMID:17897592

  10. Optimization of Volumetric Computed Tomography for Skeletal Analysis of Model Genetic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Sergio X.; Hansen, Mark S.; Bahadur, Ali N.; Hockin, Matthew F.; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Nevell, Lisa; Wu, Isabel Q.; Grunwald, David J.; Weinstein, David M.; Jones, Greg M.; Johnson, Christopher R.; Vandeberg, John L.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Keller, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Forward and reverse genetics now allow researchers to understand embryonic and postnatal gene function in a broad range of species. Although some genetic mutations cause obvious morphological change, other mutations can be more subtle and, without adequate observation and quantification, might be overlooked. For the increasing number of genetic model organisms examined by the growing field of phenomics, standardized but sensitive methods for quantitative analysis need to be incorporated into routine practice to effectively acquire and analyze ever-increasing quantities of phenotypic data. In this study, we present platform-independent parameters for the use of microscopic x-ray computed tomography (microCT) for phenotyping species-specific skeletal morphology of a variety of different genetic model organisms. We show that microCT is suitable for phenotypic characterization for prenatal and postnatal specimens across multiple species. PMID:18286615