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Sample records for multibacillary leprosy patients

  1. Ovarian function in female patients with multibacillary leprosy.

    PubMed

    Neena, Khanna; Ammini, A C; Singh, Manjula; Pandhi, Ravindra Kumar

    2003-06-01

    Eighty six adult female patients with multibacillary leprosy were included to study the sex hormone profile LH, FSH, and prolactin, as well as their gynecological events like menstrual function and fertility status. A third of the patients gave a history of irregularity of periods. The mean levels of LH and FSH were significantly higher in patients with multibacilary leprosy vis-à-vis the controls. Of the 24 married women with irregularity of periods, 12 (50%) were infertile. Seven of these patients had elevated levels of FSH and LH, almost reaching castration levels. PMID:12914132

  2. Modeling both of the number of pausibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients by using bivariate poisson regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winahju, W. S.; Mukarromah, A.; Putri, S.

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by bacteria of leprosy (Mycobacterium leprae). Leprosy has become an important thing in Indonesia because its morbidity is quite high. Based on WHO data in 2014, in 2012 Indonesia has the highest number of new leprosy patients after India and Brazil with a contribution of 18.994 people (8.7% of the world). This number makes Indonesia automatically placed as the country with the highest number of leprosy morbidity of ASEAN countries. The province that most contributes to the number of leprosy patients in Indonesia is East Java. There are two kind of leprosy. They consist of pausibacillary and multibacillary. The morbidity of multibacillary leprosy is higher than pausibacillary leprosy. This paper will discuss modeling both of the number of multibacillary and pausibacillary leprosy patients as responses variables. These responses are count variables, so modeling will be conducted by using bivariate poisson regression method. Unit experiment used is in East Java, and predictors involved are: environment, demography, and poverty. The model uses data in 2012, and the result indicates that all predictors influence significantly.

  3. Mycobacterium leprae is identified in the oral mucosa from paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Morgado de Abreu, M A M; Roselino, A M; Enokihara, M; Nonogaki, S; Prestes-Carneiro, L E; Weckx, L L M; Alchorne, M M A

    2014-01-01

    In leprosy, the nasal mucosa is considered as the principal route of transmission for the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. The objective of this study was to identify M. leprae in the oral mucosa of 50 untreated leprosy patients, including 21 paucibacillary (PB) and 29 multibacillary (MB) patients, using immunohistochemistry (IHC), with antibodies against bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and phenolic glycolipid antigen-1 (PGL-1), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with MntH-specific primers for M. leprae, and to compare the results. The material was represented by 163 paraffin blocks containing biopsy samples obtained from clinically normal sites (including the tongue, buccal mucosa and soft palate) and visible lesions anywhere in the oral mucosa. All patients and 158 available samples were included for IHC study. Among the 161 available samples for PCR, 110 had viable DNA. There was viable DNA in at least one area of the oral mucosa for 47 patients. M. leprae was detected in 70% and 78% of patients using IHC and PCR, respectively, and in 94% of the patients by at least one of the two diagnostic methods. There were no differences in detection of M. leprae between MB and PB patients. Similar results were obtained using anti-BCG and anti-PGL-1 antibodies, and immunoreactivity occurred predominantly on free-living bacteria on the epithelial surface, with a predilection for the tongue. Conversely, there was no area of predilection according to the PCR results. M. leprae is present in the oral mucosa at a high frequency, implicating this site as a potential means of leprosy transmission. PMID:23473290

  4. Effect of Steroid Prophylaxis on Nerve Function Impairment in Multi-bacillary Leprosy Patients on MDT-MB.

    PubMed

    Sahay, G; Kar, H K; Gupta, R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of corticosteroids in varying doses and duration for the treatment of reaction and nerve function impairment (NFI) in leprosy have been studied extensively. However, an optimal dose and duration of steroid when used as a prophylactic agent for NFI is yet to be established. This study was aimed to determine whether addition of low dose steroid for the initial 8 months of multi drug therapy (MDT) can prevent further deterioration of nerve function (DON) in multibacillary leprosy patients. Sixty multibacillary leprosy patients were randomized into two groups and B consisting of 30 patients each. Group A received MDT-MB for 12 months with prednisolone 20 mg/day from the beginning of treatment for 6 months followed by tapering by 5 mg/2 weeks in 7th and 8th month. Group B received MDT-MB alone for 12 months. Nerve function assessment (NFA) using various modalities was done at the beginning (0 month), at the end of 8 months and at the completion of MDT (12 months). The proportion of patients showing DON was significantly higher in group B, while proportion of patients showing improvement was more in group A. This study thus shows all MB cases with or without NFI at registration should receive prophylactic steroid at least for 8 months. Since preventing deformities using; prophylactic steroids in leprosy is an important issue larger randomized control trials using longer duration of low dose steroid witha longer follow up period should be conducted. PMID:26999985

  5. Malassezia pachydermatis fungemia in an adult with multibacillary leprosy.

    PubMed

    Roman, Jorge; Bagla, Prabhava; Ren, Ping; Blanton, Lucas S; Berman, Megan A

    2016-06-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is a relatively rare agent of bloodstream infections. We describe an unusual case of Malassezia fungemia in an adult patient hospitalized for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was also found to have multibacillary leprosy. Treatment of the patient required extensive medical management but resulted in a good outcome. PMID:27354932

  6. Pauci- and Multibacillary Leprosy: Two Distinct, Genetically Neglected Diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaschignard, Jean; Grant, Audrey Virginia; Thuc, Nguyen Van; Orlova, Marianna; Cobat, Aurélie; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Thai, Vu Hong; Abel, Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    After sustained exposure to Mycobacterium leprae, only a subset of exposed individuals develops clinical leprosy. Moreover, leprosy patients show a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that extend from the paucibacillary (PB) to the multibacillary (MB) form of the disease. This "polarization" of leprosy has long been a major focus of investigation for immunologists because of the different immune response in these two forms. But while leprosy per se has been shown to be under tight human genetic control, few epidemiological or genetic studies have focused on leprosy subtypes. Using PubMed, we collected available data in English on the epidemiology of leprosy polarization and the possible role of human genetics in its pathophysiology until September 2015. At the genetic level, we assembled a list of 28 genes from the literature that are associated with leprosy subtypes or implicated in the polarization process. Our bibliographical search revealed that improved study designs are needed to identify genes associated with leprosy polarization. Future investigations should not be restricted to a subanalysis of leprosy per se studies but should instead contrast MB to PB individuals. We show the latter approach to be the most powerful design for the identification of genetic polarization determinants. Finally, we bring to light the important resource represented by the nine-banded armadillo model, a unique animal model for leprosy. PMID:27219008

  7. Pauci- and Multibacillary Leprosy: Two Distinct, Genetically Neglected Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gaschignard, Jean; Grant, Audrey Virginia; Thuc, Nguyen Van; Orlova, Marianna; Cobat, Aurélie; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Thai, Vu Hong; Abel, Laurent; Schurr, Erwin; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    After sustained exposure to Mycobacterium leprae, only a subset of exposed individuals develops clinical leprosy. Moreover, leprosy patients show a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations that extend from the paucibacillary (PB) to the multibacillary (MB) form of the disease. This “polarization” of leprosy has long been a major focus of investigation for immunologists because of the different immune response in these two forms. But while leprosy per se has been shown to be under tight human genetic control, few epidemiological or genetic studies have focused on leprosy subtypes. Using PubMed, we collected available data in English on the epidemiology of leprosy polarization and the possible role of human genetics in its pathophysiology until September 2015. At the genetic level, we assembled a list of 28 genes from the literature that are associated with leprosy subtypes or implicated in the polarization process. Our bibliographical search revealed that improved study designs are needed to identify genes associated with leprosy polarization. Future investigations should not be restricted to a subanalysis of leprosy per se studies but should instead contrast MB to PB individuals. We show the latter approach to be the most powerful design for the identification of genetic polarization determinants. Finally, we bring to light the important resource represented by the nine-banded armadillo model, a unique animal model for leprosy. PMID:27219008

  8. Multibacillary leprosy patients with high and persistent serum antibodies to leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1/LID-1: higher susceptibility to develop type 2 reactions

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguti, Danielle de Freitas; Hungria, Emerith Mayra; Freitas, Aline Araújo; Oliveira, Regiane Morillas; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Costa, Mauricio Barcelos; Sousa, Ana Lúcia Maroclo; Duthie, Malcolm S; Stefani, Mariane Martins Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy inflammatory episodes [type 1 (T1R) and type 2 (T2R) reactions] represent the major cause of irreversible nerve damage. Leprosy serology is known to be influenced by the patient's bacterial index (BI) with higher positivity in multibacillary patients (MB) and specific multidrug therapy (MDT) reduces antibody production. This study evaluated by ELISA antibody responses to leprosy Infectious Disease Research Institute diagnostic-1 (LID-1) fusion protein and phenolic glycolipid I (PGL-I) in 100 paired serum samples of 50 MB patients collected in the presence/absence of reactions and in nonreactional patients before/after MDT. Patients who presented T2R had a median BI of 3+, while MB patients with T1R and nonreactional patients had median BI of 2.5+ (p > 0.05). Anti-LID-1 and anti-PGL-I antibodies declined in patients diagnosed during T1R (p < 0.05). Anti-LID-1 levels waned in MB with T2R at diagnosis and nonreactional MB patients (p < 0.05). Higher anti-LID-1 levels were seen in patients with T2R at diagnosis (vs. patients with T1R at diagnosis, p = 0.008; vs. nonreactional patients, p = 0.020) and in patients with T2R during MDT (vs. nonreactional MB, p = 0.020). In MB patients, high and persistent anti-LID-1 antibody levels might be a useful tool for clinicians to predict which patients are more susceptible to develop leprosy T2R. PMID:26560982

  9. Multibacillary leprosy mimicking systemic lupus erythematosus: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Horta-Baas, G; Hernández-Cabrera, M F; Barile-Fabris, L A; Romero-Figueroa, M del S; Arenas-Guzmán, R

    2015-09-01

    Leprosy is an infectious chronic disease with a wide range of clinical and serological manifestations. We report a case of a woman presenting with a malar rash, painless oral ulcers, photosensitivity, arthritis, positive antinuclear antibodies test and leuko-lymphopenia. Our case illustrates an unusual presentation of leprosy initially diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). After the confirmation of multibacillary leprosy and multidrug therapy recommended by the World Health Organization, a good clinical response was observed. Recognition of rheumatic manifestations in leprosy is important as they may be confused with SLE. A literature review is presented to encourage clinicians to consider leprosy as a differential diagnosis. Specifically in patients with unusual rheumatic manifestations and persistent skin lesions, and when neurological symptoms are present. Leprosy has not been eradicated, so misdiagnosis can be frequent. It is necessary to increase medical practitioner awareness in order start proper treatment. PMID:25761657

  10. Presence of intestinal helminths decreases T helper type 1 responses in tuberculoid leprosy patients and may increase the risk for multi-bacillary leprosy.

    PubMed

    Diniz, L M; Magalhães, E F L; Pereira, F E L; Dietze, R; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, R

    2010-07-01

    Resistance to intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium leprae is dependent upon an effective T helper type 1 (Th1)-type immune response. On the other hand, intestinal helminths are known to subvert the host's immune response towards to either a Th2-type immune response or a regulatory T cell up-regulation, which may affect the host's ability to mount an effective response to mycobacteria. Here, we report a significant association between intestinal helminth infections and lepromatous leprosy [odds ratio (OR), 10.88; confidence interval (CI) 95%: 4.02-29.4; P<0.001]. We also observed that the frequency of intestinal helminths correlated strongly with the mycobacterial index (r=0.982, P<0.01). Corroborating with our hypothesis, intracellular levels of interferon-gamma were decreased significantly in leprosy patients co-infected with intestinal helminths when compared to leprosy patients without worms. Conversely, lepromatous leprosy patients with intestinal worms produced higher levels of both interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. Our results suggest that a pre-existing infection by intestinal helminths may facilitate the establishment of M. leprae infection or its progression to more severe forms of leprosy. PMID:20491787

  11. Development of a quantitative rapid diagnostic test for multibacillary leprosy using smart phone technology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite efforts to eliminate leprosy as public health problem, delayed diagnosis and disabilities still occur in many countries. Leprosy diagnosis remains based on clinical manifestations and the number of clinicians with expertise in leprosy diagnosis is in decline. We have developed a new immunochromatographic test with the goal of producing a simple and rapid system that can be used, with a minimal amount of training, to provide an objective and consistent diagnosis of multibacillary leprosy. Methods The test immobilizes two antigens that have been recognized as excellent candidates for serologic diagnosis (the PGL-I mimetic, ND-O, and LID-1), on a nitrocellulose membrane. This allows the detection of specific IgM and IgG antibodies within 20 minutes of the addition of patient sera. Furthermore, we coupled the NDO-LID® rapid tests with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader®) to provide objective interpretation that was both quantifiable and consistent. Results Direct comparison of serologic responses indicated that the rapid test detected a greater proportion of leprosy patients than a lab-based PGL-I ELISA. While positive responses were detected by PGL-I ELISA in 83.3% of multibacillary patients and 15.4% of paucibacillary patients, these numbers were increased to 87% and 21.2%, respectively, when a combination of the NDO-LID® test and Smart Reader® was used. Among multibacillary leprosy the sensitivity of NDO-LID® test assessed by Smart Reader® was 87% (95% CI, 79.2-92.7%) and the specificity was 96.1% (95% CI, 91.7- 98.6%). The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value of NDO-LID® tests were 94% (95% CI, 87.4-97.8%) and 91.4% (95% CI, 85.9-95.2%), respectively. Conclusion The widespread provision of rapid diagnostic tests to facilitate the diagnosis or prognosis of multibacillary leprosy could impact on leprosy control programs by aiding early detection, directing appropriate treatment and potentially

  12. The INFIR Cohort Study: investigating prediction, detection and pathogenesis of neuropathy and reactions in leprosy. Methods and baseline results of a cohort of multibacillary leprosy patients in north India.

    PubMed

    van Brakel, Wim H; Nicholls, Peter G; Das, Loretta; Barkataki, Pramila; Suneetha, Sujai K; Jadhav, Rupendra S; Maddali, Pranava; Lockwood, Diana N J; Wilder-Smith, Einar; Desikan, K V

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to find predictors of neuropathy and reactions, determine the most sensitive methods for detecting peripheral neuropathy, study the pathogenesis of neuropathy and reactions and create a bank of specimen, backed up by detailed clinical documentation. A multi-centre cohort study of 303 multibacillary leprosy patients in Northern India was followed for 2 years. All newly registered MB patients requiring a full course of MDT, who were smear positive and/or had six or more skin lesions and/or had two or more nerve trunks involved, were eligible. A detailed history was taken and physical and neurological examinations were performed. Nerve function was assessed at each visit with nerve conduction testing, warm and cold detection thresholds, vibrometry, dynamometry, monofilaments and voluntary muscle testing. Because the latter two are widely used in leprosy clinics, they were used as 'gold standard' for sensory and motor impairment. Other outcome events were type 1 and 2 reactions and neuritis. All subjects had a skin biopsy at registration, repeated at the time of an outcome event, along with a nerve biopsy. These were examined using a variety of immunohistological techniques. Blood sampling for serological testing was done at every 4-weekly clinic visit. At diagnosis, 115 patients had an outcome event of recent onset. Many people had skin lesions overlying a major nerve trunk, which were shown to be significantly associated with an increased of sensory or motor impairment. The most important adjusted odds ratios for motor impairment were, facial 4.5 (1.3-16) and ulnar 3.5 (1.0-8.5); for sensory impairment they were, ulnar 2.9 (1.3-6.5), median 3.6 (1.1-12) and posterior tibial 4.0 (1.8-8.7). Nerve enlargement was found in 94% of patients, while only 24% and 3% had paraesthesia and nerve tenderness on palpation, respectively. These increased the risk of reactions only marginally. Seven subjects had abnormal tendon reflexes and seven abnormal

  13. Lack of Association of the Polymorphisms IL-17A (−197G/A) and IL-17F (+7488A/G) with Multibacillary Leprosy in Mexican Patients

    PubMed Central

    Escamilla-Tilch, Mónica; Estrada-García, Iris; Granados, Julio; Arenas-Guzmán, Roberto; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Pérez-Suárez, Thalía Gabriela; Salazar, Ma. Isabel; Pérez-Lucas, Riky Luis; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Torres-Carrillo, Nora Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Background. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by the intracellular acid-fast bacilli Mycobacterium leprae; it has been determined that genetic factors of the host play an important role in the disease susceptibility. Thus, in this case-control study, we evaluated the possible association between the IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780) gene SNPs and susceptibility to leprosy disease in Mexican population. Methods. Seventy-five leprosy patients and sixty-nine control subjects were included. Both SNPs were genotyped with the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results. We found nonsignificant differences in genotype and allele frequencies related to IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780) gene SNPs in MB as well as subclinical forms of leprosy disease versus healthy individuals. Conclusions. Since the sample size is not large enough, it is difficult to sustain an association of susceptibility to leprosy with genotypes or allele frequencies of IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780), suggesting that IL-17 polymorphisms have no significant role in the genetic susceptibility to development of this disease in the Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:25431761

  14. Lack of Association of the Polymorphisms IL-17A (-197G/A) and IL-17F (+7488A/G) with Multibacillary Leprosy in Mexican Patients.

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Tilch, Mónica; Estrada-García, Iris; Granados, Julio; Arenas-Guzmán, Roberto; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Pérez-Suárez, Thalía Gabriela; Salazar, Ma Isabel; Pérez-Lucas, Riky Luis; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Torres-Carrillo, Nora Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Background. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by the intracellular acid-fast bacilli Mycobacterium leprae; it has been determined that genetic factors of the host play an important role in the disease susceptibility. Thus, in this case-control study, we evaluated the possible association between the IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780) gene SNPs and susceptibility to leprosy disease in Mexican population. Methods. Seventy-five leprosy patients and sixty-nine control subjects were included. Both SNPs were genotyped with the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results. We found nonsignificant differences in genotype and allele frequencies related to IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780) gene SNPs in MB as well as subclinical forms of leprosy disease versus healthy individuals. Conclusions. Since the sample size is not large enough, it is difficult to sustain an association of susceptibility to leprosy with genotypes or allele frequencies of IL-17A G-197A (rs227593) and IL-17F A7488G (His161Arg, rs763780), suggesting that IL-17 polymorphisms have no significant role in the genetic susceptibility to development of this disease in the Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:25431761

  15. Increased Frequency of CD4 and CD8 Regulatory T Cells in Individuals under 15 Years with Multibacillary Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Camila; Gonçalves, Heitor Sá; Cabral, Paula Brito; Pinto, Helena Câmara; Pinto, Maria Isabel Moraes; Câmara, Lilia Maria Carneiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Leprosy is a chronic disease, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which poses a serious public health problem worldwide. Its high incidence in people under 15 years old in Ceará state, Brazil, reflects the difficulty of its control. The spectrum of clinical manifestations is associated with the immune response developed, with the Th1 and Th2 responses being related to the paucibacillary and multibacillary forms, respectively. Regulatory T cells (Treg), which can suppress Th1 and Th2 response, have received special attention in the literature and have been associated with development of chronic infections. However, their role in leprosy in individuals under 15 years old has not yet been elucidated. We evaluated the frequency of CD4+/CD8+CD25highFOXP3+ and CD4+/CD8+CD25highFOXP3high cells in leprosy patients and household contacts, in both cases under 15 years old. Methodology/Principal Findings PBMC from 12 patients and 17 contacts were cultured for 72 hours with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 (activators) or with activators associated with total sonicated fraction of M. leprae. After culture, the frequency of CD4+/CD8+ Treg was identified by flow cytometry. Cells stimulated by activators and antigen from multibacillary patients showed Treg frequencies almost two times that of the contacts: CD4+FOXP3+ (21.93±8.43 vs. 13.79±8.19%, p = 0.0500), CD4+FOXP3high (10.33±5.69 vs. 5.57±4.03%, p = 0.0362), CD8+FOXP3+ (13.88±9.19 vs. 6.18±5.56%, p = 0.0230) and CD8+FOXP3high (5.36±4.17 vs. 2.23±2.68%, p = 0.0461). Furthermore, the mean fluorescence intensity of FOXP3 in Treg was higher in multibacillary patients than in the contacts. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation of the bacillary index and number of lesions with the frequency of all Treg evaluated in patients. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated for the first time that multibacillary leprosy patients under 15 years old have greater CD4+ and CD8+ Treg frequencies and these

  16. Quantiferon-Gold Tuberculosis Test Cannot Detect Latent Tuberculosis in Patients With Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rendini, Tina; Levis, William

    2015-11-01

    Five of 10 paucibacillary leprosy patients were Quantiferon Gold (Q-G) positive with negative chest X-rays. Forty multibacillary leprosy patients were negative. Reports have shown 100% cross-reactivity of ESAT6 and CFP10 between Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The Q-G test cannot detect latent tuberculosis in patients with leprosy. PMID:26209684

  17. Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Meyers, W M

    1992-01-01

    Growing out of the successful transmission of leprosy to armadillos, making available large quantities of M. leprae, there have been remarkable recent advances in the knowledge of the leprosy bacillus. These bacilli and their isolated chemical constituents provide organisms for in vitro testing of new drugs, reagents for the study of the immunologic dysfunction in leprosy patients, development of early diagnostic methods, and the preparation of candidate vaccines. Leprosy is usually transmitted by the nasorespiratory route, but occasionally, there is transplacental infection. There are reports suggesting that patients have acquired leprosy by contact with wild M. leprae-infected armadillos in Louisiana and Texas. Perturbations in lymphocyte-macrophage interaction appear to be most closely related to the defective CMI in leprosy. The helper T/suppressor T cell populations vary markedly in lesions of the various forms of leprosy, with enhanced suppression of T-cell activity in lepromatous disease. Infiltration of IL-2 and gamma-interferon seems to stimulate CMI in situ in lesions of lepromatous leprosy. Vaccination of lepromatous patients with a killed M. leprae-plus-BCG preparation stimulates CMI and clears tissues of leprosy bacilli, providing an immunotherapeutic approach to the management of leprosy. Immunoprophylactic vaccine trials are in progress, and initial results should be available in 1991. Because of drug resistance, dapsone monotherapy of leprosy is no longer recommended. Multidrug regimens, composed of dapsone, rifampin, and clofazimine or a thioamide, are now required and appear to reduce the incidence of leprosy when applied assiduously. Newer experimental drugs that may eventually be included in these regimens include the fluoroquinolones, minocycline, and clarithromycin. There is no clear evidence that the early serologic diagnosis of leprosy is generally applicable. Favorable response to therapy in multibacillary patients, however, may be assessed

  18. Comparative evaluation of antibody detection tests to facilitate the diagnosis of multibacillary leprosy.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Orcullo, Florenda M; Abbelana, Junie; Maghanoy, Armi; Balagon, Marivic F

    2016-04-01

    Despite control efforts, leprosy persists as a significant health concern in many regions. Diagnosis is achieved by a combination of clinical, histopathological, and bacteriological examinations, each of which presents a barrier to expeditious diagnosis, particularly by non-experts. Immunological investigations in research laboratories have clearly indicated that antibody detection tests could aid the diagnosis of leprosy. In this study, we detected circulating antibodies with two rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) involving immunochromatographic lateral flow platforms and one rapid ELISA system. Leprosy patients were identified with a high degree of sensitivity in each assay (over 80 % in all; over 90 % among cases with bacterial indices >1+), although critical differences were observed in specificity. While the specificity of CTK OnSite Leprosy Ab Rapid Test and InBios Leprosy Detect™ fast ELISA were high (96.4 and 93.7 % in the general population, respectively), there was a marked reduction in OrangeLife NDO-LID® RDT (only 25.0 %). As anticipated, seropositivity rates were marginally higher in contacts of leprosy patients than in endemic controls. Although we observed a slight drop in test band intensity when blood, rather than serum, was used to develop OnSite Leprosy Ab Rapid Tests, the sensitivity and specificity of these tests was unaffected. When we contrasted test performance with clinical and bacteriological information, we found that RDT and ELISA results positively correlated with the bacteriological index. These data indicate that these assays could be a ready replacement of invasive, insensitive, and time consuming skin slit smear procedures that additionally require expert microscopic examinations. We propose that, due to their speed and point of care applicability, the RDT could be used as an initial entry point to the diagnostic protocols, with confirmation of results attained in a highly quantitative manner following serum transfer to a reference

  19. Disclosure of Leprosy by Health Care Providers in South-India: Patients' Perception and Relevance to Leprosy Control, Tamil Nadu.

    PubMed

    Thilakavathi, S; Manickam, P; Mehendale, S M

    2015-01-01

    Stigma, isoIation and discrimination are typically associated with diagnosis of leprosy and its disclosure. Health care providers (HCPs) find it challenging to disclose the diagnosis of leprosy to patients and their family members. A qualitative study was done in a rural community near Chennai in Tamil Nadu, from August 2011 to March 2012, covering 155 out of 648 (23.9%) purposively selected leprosy patients from 53 out of 148 panchayats, representing 264 villages in the study area; Out of these 155 patients, 59% were males; 30% were illiterates; 70% were married; 56% were living in nuclear families; half the leprosy patients were either agricultural labourers or skilled workers (50%).Thirty two percent were multibacillary (MB) cases and 68% were pauci bacillary (PB) cases; 77% were old patients and 23% were new patients; 22% had leprosy deformity 12% had disfiguration; 23% had anaesthesia and 3% were with lagophthalmous. Of the 155 patients, 31 (20%) reported that they were not informed about diagnosis of their disease by the concerned HCPs. They were informed to be having a skin disease or a skin patch. Of these 31 patients, 22 (71%) were women; all except one with PB leprosy. Seven patients (23%) had not yet started on treatment 3 patients (10%) were given treatment when they were young and neither, them nor their parents were informed about this disease. Seven (33%) of the married patients who had the disease during their child had or when they were young, were not informed of the diagnosis by the HCPs. Ten respondents (32%) were neither bothered nor concerned about non disclosure of the disease by HCPs. Now, after knowing the diagnosis of the disease 4 females (13%) mentioned that they were having some fear, worry or stigma. As non-disclosure of leprosy by HCPs may adversely affect acceptance and adherence, to treatment by the patients, appropriate communication strategies should be developed and implemented. PMID:26999987

  20. Deformity incidence in leprosy patients treated with multidrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Subramanian, M; Subramanian, G

    1994-01-01

    The records of 2,285 (2,007 paucibacillary (PB) and 278 multibacillary (MB)) cases of leprosy which were declared as released from treatment (RFT) after multidrug therapy (MDT) and under surveillance as per the National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP) guidelines in the rural field practice area of Central Leprosy Teaching & Research Institute (CLTRI), Chengalpattu, between September 1986 and September 1993 were analyzed for collecting data on the incidence of deformity. Of the 2,285 cases 2,053 (1,947 PB and 106 MB) did not have deformity at the commencement of treatment. Three MB cases and one PB case out of the 2,053 developed deformity (all grade II) during the course of treatment. No patient developed deformity during surveillance. Thus the deformity incidence in the population of patients was 0.681 per 1000 person-years of observation. Age, sex, type of disease, prior dapsone monotherapy and nerve involvement at the commencement of treatment appear to influence the deformity incidence. The risk of development of deformity in patients treated with MDT appear to be very low and analysis of larger data sets is suggested to corroborate the above findings as the information would be useful for planning prevention and management of deformity services. PMID:7714354

  1. Hypogonadism in male Leprosy patients--a study from rural Uttar pradesh.

    PubMed

    Aggrawal, Kamal; Madhu, S V; Aggrawal, Kireet; Kannan, A T

    2005-09-01

    Hypogonadism in male patients with Leprosy is common and may identify patients with future risk for bone loss and osteoporosis. In the present study, we evaluated gonadal function in 71 male patients with Leprosy both clinically and by estimation of serum testosterone levels. The patients belonged to selected rural areas of Uttar pradesh, with majority aged less than 50 yrs (74.6%), Hindus (66.7%), illiterate (60.9%), and of low socioeconomic status (58% with per capita income < Rs.500 per month). Most patients had multibacillary Leprosy (83.1%), duration less than 2 years (75.4%) and had received antileprosy drugs for less than a year (95.6 %). Seven patients (9.9%) had clinical features of hypogonadism such as gynaecomastia, decreased sexual hair and infertility. Serum testosterone levels, estimated in 31 of the patients, revealed low values in 25.8% (8/31) patients (Mean 4.65+/-3.37 ng/ml). Age, duration of Leprosy and socioeconomic status but not type of Leprosy or treatment duration affected hypogonadism significantly. The results of the present study indicate a high frequency of hypogonadism among rural male Leprosy patients that warrants routine screening to identify patients at risk for osteoporosis and possible prevention with testosterone replacement therapy. PMID:17080706

  2. Tuberculosis in leprosy patients detected between 1902 and 1991 in French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Glaziou, P; Cartel, J L; Moulia-Pelat, J P; Ngoc, L N; Chanteau, S; Plichart, R; Grosset, J H

    1993-06-01

    From 1902 onward, notification and follow up of leprosy patients has been systematic in French Polynesia. Since 1960, a tuberculosis control program and a register has also been implemented. From 1902 to 1959, 673 cases of leprosy were detected [346 multibacillary (MB), 138 paucibacillary (PB), and 179 unclassified due to the loss of medical files by the time of classification which was done during the 1980s]. Of these 673 cases, 89 (13.2%) died from tuberculosis, giving a mean annual death rate of tuberculosis in leprosy patients of 232 per 100,000. Mortality from tuberculosis in leprosy patients detected between 1901 and 1930 was 20.7%, and decreased to 8.04% in patients detected from 1931 to 1959. In total, it was estimated that 26.4% of the leprosy cases had developed tuberculosis. From 1960 to 1991, 350 new cases of leprosy were detected (141 MB, 209 PB). Of them, 12 (3.4%) developed tuberculosis (7 before detection of leprosy, 5 after detection of leprosy). The dramatic decrease of the proportion of leprosy patients who developed tuberculosis between the periods 1902-1959 (26.4%) and 1960-1991 (3.4%) might be related to the important decline of the tuberculosis situation since 1960. From 1902 to 1959, mortality from tuberculosis occurred significantly more frequently in MB patients (13%) than in PB patients [4%, relative risk (RR) = 3.21, p = 0.003]. From 1960 to 1991, the incidence of tuberculosis seemed more frequent in MB patients (RR = 2.96, p = 0.07) whatever the sequence of detection of the two diseases. Our study suggests that lepromatous patients could share factors of susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases with patients developing tuberculosis. PMID:8371028

  3. A clinical trial for uniform multidrug therapy for leprosy patients in Brazil: rationale and design.

    PubMed

    Penna, Gerson Oliveira; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Cruz, Rossilene; Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Penna, Maria Lúcia Fernandes; Bührer-Sékula, Samira

    2012-12-01

    Leprosy will continue to be a public health problem for several decades. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that, for treatment purposes, leprosy cases be classified as either paucibacillary or multibacillary (MB). A uniform leprosy treatment regimen would simplify treatment and halve the treatment duration for MB patients. The clinical trial for uniform multidrug therapy (U-MDT) for leprosy patients (LPs) in Brazil is a randomised, open-label clinical trial to evaluate if the effectiveness of U-MDT for leprosy equals the regular regimen, to determine the acceptability of the U-MDT regimen and to identify the prognostic factors. This paper details the clinical trial methodology and patient enrolment data. The study enrolled 858 patients at two centres and 78.4% of participants were classified as MB according to the WHO criteria. The main difficulty in evaluating a new leprosy treatment regimen is that no reliable data are available for the current treatment regimen. Relapse, reaction and impaired nerve function rates have never been systematically determined, although reaction and impaired nerve function are the two major causes of nerve damage that lead to impairments and disabilities in LPs. Our study was designed to overcome the need for reliable data about the current treatment and to compare its efficacy with that of a uniform regimen. PMID:23283449

  4. Ocular Lesions in the Inmates of Leprosy Rehabilitation Centre

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, S. C.; Raju, B. D.

    2006-01-01

    A detailed eye examination of 145 inmates of a leprosy rehabilitation centre was done to determine the prevalence of ocular involvement. Age, gender of patients, type and duration of leprosy, systemic disabilities were noted. The mean age of patients was 45.8 years (range 19-70 years); 72.4% were males; 55.2% were suffering from paucibacillary leprosy. The mean duration of leprosy was 18.2 years in multibacillary type and 13.1 years in paucibacillary type. Ocular lesions related to leprosy were seen in 85.5% of patients; more often in multibacillary leprosy (92.3%). Corneal changes (80.7%) were the most frequently observed lesions followed by eye lid lesions (48.2%). Potentially sight threatening lesions such as lagophthalmos (23.4%), cornealanaesthesia (43.4%), and iridocyclitis (8.9%) were seen in both types of leprosy. Nine out of 26 (34.6%) patients with history of erythema nodosum leprosum reaction showed eye changes related to this reaction. Blindness in one eye due to lesions related to leprosy was seen in 2.7% of eyes. Age related cataract was the most common cause of blindness in patients of leprosy. The prevalence of ocular lesions was found to be high in the inmates of leprosy rehabilitation centre, and they were seen more frequently in patients with longer duration of the disease. Potentially sight threatening lesions were more often associated with systemic disabilities in these patients. PMID:23674993

  5. Endocrine dysfunction in patients of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rohit Kumar; Bhasin, Rohit; Bisht, Y. S.; Kumar, K. V. S. Hari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease and affects many internal organs in addition to the skin and peripheral nerves. Endocrine dysfunction is often silent and is often missed in patients of leprosy leading to significant morbidity. We studied the presence of occult endocrine disorders in leprosy patients and compared the same with disease parameters. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 40 patients of leprosy (aged 18–70 years, any duration) in this cross-sectional, observational study. All subjects were assessed for pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, gonadal function, and dynamic testing was done when deemed necessary. The participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Leprosy, n = 40) and Group 2 (Controls, n = 20) and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests. Results: The study participants (35 males, 5 females) had a mean age of 36.4 ± 11.3 years, and duration of the disease was 2.5 ± 5.5 years. Eleven out of 40 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4), sick euthyroid syndrome (n = 3), growth hormone (GH) deficiency (n = 2), primary hypogonadism (n = 2) and secondary hypogonadism in one patient. One patient had partial hypopituitarism (GH deficiency and secondary hypogonadism) and none of the controls showed any hormonal dysfunction. Testosterone levels showed inverse correlation with the number of skin patches (P = 0.0006). Conclusion: Occult endocrine dysfunction is seen in a quarter of patients with leprosy. Thyroid and gonadal axes abnormalities are common, and the severity is more in lepromatous forms of the disease. Further large studies are required to confirm the findings observed in our study. PMID:25932392

  6. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome in a lepromatous leprosy patient--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gavilanes, Maria Catalina; Palacio, Adriana Lucia; Chellini, Patricia Rocha; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Rego, Juliana Gonçalves

    2015-06-01

    Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) can be classified as a 'drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms' (DRESS). It has a variable course, it is not dose dependent and may present with different clinical and laboratory abnormalities. In some cases it may be fatal. We describe a 31 year old man with lepromatous leprosy in whom DHS developed 4 weeks after initiation of World Health Organization multibacillary multidrug therapy (dapsone, clofazimine and rifampin). He had fever, dehydration, diffuse rash, pain on abdominal palpation and inguinal painless lymph nodes. Severe anaemia, abnormal liver function and hyperbilirubinaemia were also found. The patient was treated with prednisone 50 mg daily. There was gradual improvement in the clinical and laboratory signs. We encourage health professionals to be aware of the risk of DHS and to have in mind the development of investigative studies related to HLA and MHC in these patients. PMID:26502691

  7. Histoid leprosy: a prospective diagnostic study in 38 patients.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, V N; Srivastava, G

    1988-01-01

    Histoid leprosy is a fascinating expression of multibacillary leprosy, the incidence of which was 3.6%. It was seen predominantly in males of the younger age group, who were on inadequate and irregular dosage of diaminodiphenyl sulfone. Papules, cutaneous and/or subcutaneous nodules and plaques appearing over apparently normal skin were its exquisite prospective clinical features. It was invariably supported by enormous, uniformly solid staining discrete bacilli from the lesions, in contrast to their virtual absence from the surrounding normal-appearing skin. Encapsulated tumorous mass, formed primarily by spindle-shaped histocytes, displayed either in intertwining, criss-cross or whorled fashion in haematoxylin-eosin-stained sections, were supplementary. The morphology of acid-fast bacilli was, however, similar to skin-slit smears. PMID:3224729

  8. [Results of 466 nerve decompressions in 123 leprosy patients during polychemotherapy with a minimum follow-up of one year. Value of preventive surgery in a leprosy control program].

    PubMed

    Ramarorazana, S; Di Schino, M; Rene, J P; Schwarz, L E

    1994-01-01

    The clinical expression of leprosy is primarily cutaneous but its serious neurologic manifestations are maiming. Mutilations mainly of limb ends are due to peripheric nerves compression and may appear before or during the clinical treatment of the illness. Their appearance which is not automatically related to multiple Hansen's bacilli, may be prevented surgically by nervous decompression. The authors report their experiences of 466 nervous decompressions of 123 patients (89 men and 34 women), among them, 14 were pauci-bacillary and 109 multi-bacillary. They conclude that very good results (complete recovery or improvement of sensitivity, disappearing of pain) have been obtained through simple and easy-to-learn surgeries. PMID:7575033

  9. Leprosy Reactions in Patients Coinfected with HIV: Clinical Aspects and Outcomes in Two Comparative Cohorts in the Amazon Region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; Jucá Neto, Fernando Octávio Machado; de Albuquerque, Nahima Castelo; Macedo, Geraldo Mariano Moraes; Batista, Keila de Nazaré Madureira; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy, caused by Mycobacterium leprae, can lead to scarring and deformities. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a lymphotropic virus with high rates of replication, leads to cell death in various stages of infection. These diseases have major social and quality of life costs, and although the relevance of their comorbidity is recognized, several aspects are still not fully understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Two cohorts of patients with leprosy in an endemic region of the Amazon were observed. We compared 40 patients with leprosy and HIV (Group 1) and 107 leprosy patients with no comorbidity (Group 2) for a minimum of 2 years. Group 1 predominantly experienced the paucibacillary classification, accounting for 70% of cases, whereas Group 2 primarily experienced the multibacillary classification (80.4% of cases). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of leprosy reactions among the two groups (37.5% for Group 1 vs. 56.1% for Group 2), and the most frequent reaction was Type 1. The appearance of Group 1 patients’ reversal reaction skin lesions was consistent with each clinical form: typically erythematous and infiltrated, with similar progression as those patients without HIV, which responded to prednisone. Patients in both groups primarily experienced a single episode (73.3% in Group 1 and 75% in Group 2), and Group 1 had shorter reaction periods (≤3 months; 93.3%), moderate severity (80%), with 93.3% of the patients in the state of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and 46.7% presenting the reaction at the time of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Conclusions/Significance This study used a large sample and makes a significant contribution to the clinical outcomes of patients in the reactive state with comorbid HIV and leprosy. The data indicate that these diseases, although concurrent, have independent courses. PMID:26029928

  10. Leprosy Reaction in Thai Population: A 20-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Suchonwanit, Poonkiat; Triamchaisri, Siripich; Wittayakornrerk, Sanchawan; Rattanakaemakorn, Ploysyne

    2015-01-01

    Background. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that presents with varying dermatological and neurological symptoms. The leprosy reactions occur over the chronic course of the disease and lead to extensive disability and morbidity. Objective. To analyze and identify the risk factors which contribute to leprosy reactions. Methods. In a retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of leprosy patients registered at the leprosy clinic, Ramathibodi Hospital, Thailand, between March 1995 and April 2015. One hundred and eight patients were included; descriptive analysis was used for baseline characteristics and a binary logistic regression model was applied for identifying risk factors correlated with leprosy reactions. Results. Of the 108 cases analyzed, 51 were male and 57 were female. The mean age of presentation was 45 years. The borderline tuberculoid type was the most common clinical form. Leprosy reactions were documented in 61 cases (56.5%). The average time to reaction was 8.9 months. From multivariate analysis, risk factors for leprosy reactions were being female, positive bacillary index status, and MB treatment regimen. Conclusions. Leprosy reactions are common complications in leprosy patients. Being female, positive bacillary index status, and multibacillary treatment regimen are significantly associated with the reactions. Early detection in cases with risk factors followed by appropriate treatment could prevent the morbidity of leprosy patients. PMID:26508912

  11. Clinical and immunological evaluation after BCG-id vaccine in leprosy patients in a 5-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Zenha, Erika Muller Ramalho; Wambier, Carlos Gustavo; Novelino, Ana Lúcia; de Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Ferreira, Maria Aparecida Nunes; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) has long been considered a stimulus for immune reactivity in leprosy household contacts. Probably, the combination of multidrug therapy with BCG could facilitate the clearance of leprosy bacilli in the host, reduce relapse rates, and shorten the duration of skin-smear positivity. Methods To investigate the mechanism of action of BCG, a study involving 19 leprosy patients, eleven multibacillary (MB) and eight paucibacillary, was performed to assess the in vitro production of interleukin (IL)-10, interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, and IL-17 in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, before and 30 days after inoculation with BCG intradermally (BCG-id). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated by Ficoll–Hypaque gradient were cultivated with Concanavalin-A (Con-A), lipopolysccharides (LPS), or BCG. The supernatant was collected for ELISA quantification of cytokines. The immunohistochemistry of IFN-γ, IL-1, IL-10, IL-12, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and TNF-α was carried out in biopsies of skin lesions of leprosy patients before and 30 days after inoculation of BCG-id. These patients were followed up for 5 years to assess the therapeutic response to multidrug therapy, the occurrence of leprosy reactions, and the results of bacterial index and anti-PGL-1 serology after the end of treatment. Results The results showed increased production of cytokines after BCG-id administration in MB and paucibacillary leprosy patients. There was statistically higher levels of TNF-α (P = 0.017) in MB patients and of IL-17 (P = 0.008) and IFN-γ (P = 0.037) in paucibacillary patients. Immunohistochemical staining, especially for TNF-α, was more intense in biopsies of MB leprosy patients taken after BCG-id administration, probably for induction of innate human immunity. The clinical evaluation suggests that BCG-id is able to induce a more effective therapeutic response, with

  12. Evaluation of the orofacial lesions in treated leprosy patients

    PubMed Central

    Pooja, VK; Vanishree, M; Ravikumar, Shamala; Koneru, Anila; Hunasgi, Santhosh; Surekha, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is primarily a disease of developmental countries. About 4 million people have or are disabled by leprosy. Eighty-six percent of leprosy patients reside in Southeast Asia and Brazil. India accounts for up to 70% of total cases. Aim: To evaluate the incidence of orofacial lesions in treated leprosy patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty treated leprosy patients were examined clinically and the percentage of orofacial lesions were evaluated. Results: On evaluating the orofacial lesions, incidence of hypopigmentation on face and oral mucosa were highest (63%) followed by depressed nasal bridge and fissured tongue (33%). The incidence of crenated tongue was seen to be the lowest (3.3%). Conclusion: Orofacial lesions in leprosy patients develop insidiously, generally are asymptomatic and are secondary to nasal changes. Oral lesions may contribute to the diagnosis of the disease and be attributed to involvement of Mycobacterium leprae. PMID:25948993

  13. Leprosy

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor will ask you questions about your medical history and the symptoms you are experiencing. He or she will probably want to remove a tiny piece of the affected skin (called a biopsy) to check for the Mycobacterium leprae bacteria. Treatment How is leprosy treated? Leprosy is treated ...

  14. The -308 bp TNF gene polymorphism influences tumor necrosis factor expression in leprosy patients in Bahia State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Joyce Moura; Rêgo, Jamile Leão; de Lima Santana, Nadja; Braz, Marcos; Jamieson, Sarra E; Vieira, Thaillamar Silva; Magalhães, Thaís Lamêgo; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Castellucci, Léa C

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is a debilitating chronic granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, with high incidence and prevalence in Brazil. The -308 bp G/A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1800629) in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) gene promoter is a proposed risk factor for leprosy. In Brazil, Northern India, Egypt and Nepal, the common G allele was associated with leprosy. In Eastern India, Thailand and Malawi the minor A allele was the risk factor. Allele A was previously associated with high TNF. We genotyped rs1800629 in 326 leprosy cases from Bahia State, Brazil, including 72 paucibacillary (PB) and 47 multibacillary (MB) without reactions, and 69 reversal reaction (RR) and 78 erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) with reactions. Logistic regression was used to compare patient groups with 331 healthy controls. Relative TNF mRNA was determined in peripheral blood leukocytes by QRTPCR, and serum TNF levels measured by ELISA. We found that TNF mRNA expression was higher (P=0.03) in leprosy patients compared to endemic controls, but did not differ significantly between clinical subgroups. Carriage of the minor A allele was associated (P=0.003) with low TNF mRNA across leprosy patients. Nevertheless, we found no evidence for either allele at this SNP as a risk factor for leprosy per se (OR=1.12, 95% CI 0.79-1.60, P=0.52), PB (OR=0.99, 95% CI 0.54-1.81, P=0.97), MB (OR=0.86, 95% CI 0.40-1.83, P=0.70), RR (OR=1.37, 95% CI 0.79-2.38, P=0.27) or ENL (OR=0.76, 95% CI 0.40-1.45, P=0.42) when compared to endemic controls. Further studies are required to determine whether the influence of the minor A allele on TNF mRNA levels determines response to treatment, particularly in the context of ENL reaction treatment with anti-TNF therapies and RR reactions where treatment with prednisolone is known to reduce TNF levels. Our findings contribute to understanding TNF as an important determinant of leprosy immunopathology in Brazil. PMID:26829382

  15. Histoid leprosy: a rare exuberant case.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Pedro Jose Secchin de; Messias, Sulamita Dos Santos Nascimento Dutra; Ferreira, Paola Cristina Brandão Oliveira; Sales, Anna Maria; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Nery, José Augusto da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a neglected disease. We point up the need of recognizing the unusual clinical presentations of the disease in order to make early diagnosis and proper treatment possible, and break the transmission chain. The authors report a rare type of multibacillary leprosy: histoid leprosy and present images of numerous well-circumscribed indurated papules and nodules distributed throughout the entire body. PMID:26560226

  16. Evaluation of the social, clinical and laboratorial profile of patients diagnosed with leprosy in a reference center in São Paulo*

    PubMed Central

    Porto, Ana Carolina Souza; Figueira, Renata Borges Fortes Costa; Barreto, Jaison Antônio; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy is the main infectious cause of disability. It is said to be eradicated in São Paulo since 2005, but diagnosis is still late. OBJECTIVES To investigate the social, clinical and laboratorial profile of leprosy patients diagnosed between 01/2007 and 12/2011, in a reference center in São Paulo. METHODS Retrospective descriptive study. Data of all new leprosy cases diagnosed between 01/2007 and 12/2011 were raised in São Paulo. RESULTS 103 men and 71 women were diagnosed, most of them were multibacillary. Mean age at diagnosis was 49 yrs; 2,2% were children; 70% had incomplete primary education; 50% were referred without diagnostic suspicion of leprosy. Mean time since first symptoms/signs and diagnosis was 2 years; 64% of patients had some degree of disability, and 26% had grade 2. 23 cases were diagnosed only after being summoned, and 80% of these had no disability. Agreement between the Ridley and Jopling and the WHO classification was 75% (kappa index = 0.44). Serology for IgM anti-PGL1 (87 patients) showed a mean value of 0.25, and an association between MB classification and test positivity (p <0.001). CONCLUSIONS Leprosy diagnosis in São Paulo is late. The disease mainly affected the socially disadvantaged and economically active population. Failure to detect the disease (41% in the last 10 years) could be due to the lack of suspicion and to decentralization. For the classification of patients with advanced leprosy, both the WHO and R&J classifications proved to be helpful tools. PMID:25830985

  17. Protective effect of intradermal BCG against leprosy; a case-control study in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M L; Silva, S A; Neto, J C; de Andrade, A L; Martelli, C M; Zicker, F

    1992-09-01

    A case-control study was undertaken to evaluate the protective efficacy of intradermal BCG against leprosy in a high-endemic area of leprosy in central Brazil. Sixty-two cases and 186 controls were included in the study. Cases were all newly diagnosed leprosy patients under 16 years of age attending an outpatient health service, and all of them were schoolchildren. Three controls under 16 years old, frequency matched by sex and age group, were selected from schools geographically located in the area from which the cases came. The presence of BCG was negatively associated with leprosy, indicating a 5.3 risk of leprosy for those nonvaccinated and protective efficacy of 81%. Paucibacillary patients were more likely to have a BCG scar than multibacillary patients. PMID:1474274

  18. Clinical and epidemiological profile of leprosy patients attended at Ceará, 2007-2011*

    PubMed Central

    Queirós, Maria Iranilda; Ramos Júnior, Alberto Novaes; Alencar, Carlos Henrique Morais; Monteiro, Lorena Dias; Sena, Amanda Lima; Barbosa, Jaqueline Caracas

    2016-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an infectious chronic condition associated with potentially serious physical, social and psychological impacts. Objectives To characterize the clinical and epidemiological profile of leprosy patients treated from 2007 to 2011 in the University Hospital of Ceará, Northeastern Brazil. Methods This is a retrospective and descriptive study. The study population consisted of residents in the state of Ceará treated in a dermatology clinic between 2007-2011. Clinical and epidemiological data analyzed were obtained from medical records and from the database of national Information System for Notifiable Diseases. Results 475 cases were analyzed, mostly women (51.8%), aged 45-59 years (35.0%) - mean of 45.2 years at diagnosis - with 6.3% of children under 15 , with low education (73.7%), white color (68.8%), residency in the city of Fortaleza (82.3%), and no defined work occupation (59.6%). At diagnosis, most patients were multibacillary (MB) (65.5%), had borderline clinical form (48.0%), and 22.7% had physical disability (8.0% with grade 2), predominantly in MB cases (p <0.001). We observe worsening of disability in 5.1% of cases post-MDT. The proportion of cases with reactional episodes was 42.7%, mainly during MDT (51.2%). Conclusion This is the first study conducted in this hospital context, revealing late diagnosis, high burden of disease, hidden endemicity, and high social vulnerability in the state of Ceará. This study reinforces the need to strengthen health care network for timely diagnosis and treatment, aiming at longitudinality of assistance. PMID:27438198

  19. Drug and Multidrug Resistance among Mycobacterium leprae Isolates from Brazilian Relapsed Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Adalgiza da Silva; Cunha, Maria das Graças; Diniz, Lucia Martins; Salgado, Claudio; Aires, Maria Araci P.; Nery, José Augusto; Gallo, Eugênia Novisck; Miranda, Alice; Magnanini, Monica M. F.; Matsuoka, Masanori; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Suffys, Philip Noel

    2012-01-01

    Skin biopsy samples from 145 relapse leprosy cases and from five different regions in Brazil were submitted for sequence analysis of part of the genes associated with Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in these genes were observed in M. leprae from 4 out of 92 cases with positive amplification (4.3%) and included a case with a mutation in rpoB only, another sample with SNPs in both folP1 and rpoB, and two cases showing mutations in folP1, rpoB, and gyrA, suggesting the existence of multidrug resistance (MDR). The nature of the mutations was as reported in earlier studies, being CCC to CGC in codon 55 in folP (Pro to Arg), while in the case of rpoB, all mutations occurred at codon 531, with two being a transition of TCG to ATG (Ser to Met), one TCG to TTC (Ser to Phe), and one TCG to TTG (Ser to Leu). The two cases with mutations in gyrA changed from GCA to GTA (Ala to Val) in codon 91. The median time from cure to relapse diagnosis was 9.45 years but was significantly shorter in patients with mutations (3.26 years; P = 0.0038). More than 70% of the relapses were multibacillary, including three of the mutation-carrying cases; one MDR relapse patient was paucibacillary. PMID:22495562

  20. [Leprosy serology: current status and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Chanteau, S; Cartel, J L; Roux, J

    1992-01-01

    The different serological tests used for leprosy are firstly the methods for the detection of antibodies (anti-PGL1, 35kD, 36kD, LAM), and secondly, the tests to detect the PGL1 antigen from the serum or urine. The antibody detection tests have a good but insufficient specificity for the diagnosis of leprosy patients and their sensitivity is generally high for the multibacillary patients but low for the paucibacillary patients. Their positive predictive value for the diagnosis of patients in a population are very low: 2.1% for the anti-PGL1 ELISA when the prevalence is 1/1000. For the early diagnosis of patients and the follow up of high risk populations, these tests are not cost effective: the number of patients detected in these populations is 10 fold lower than in the general population and the relative risks for developing the disease are not different among seropositive and among seronegative groups. In treated multibacillary patients, the IgM anti-PGL1 level decreases in correlation with the decrease of the bacillary index. For the diagnosis of M. leprae infection in a population, there was no correlation between the anti-PGL1 seroprevalence and the prevalence of the disease. Concerning the PGL1 antigen detection tests, they are specific and sensitive for the diagnosis of multibacillary patients but they cannot be used in routine for technical reasons. In conclusion and to date, the usefulness of serological tests in a leprosy control programme is quite questionable. PMID:1293913

  1. Update on the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Reibel, F; Cambau, E; Aubry, A

    2015-09-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease that has now been reported for more than 2000 years. The leprosy elimination goal set by the World Health Organization (WHO), i.e. a global prevalence rate <1 patient per 10,000 population, was achieved in the year 2000, but more than 200,000 new case patients are still reported each year, particularly in India, Brazil, and Indonesia. Leprosy is a specific infection: (i) it is a chronic infection primarily affecting the skin and peripheral nerves, (ii) Mycobacterium leprae is one of the last bacterial species of medical interest that cannot be cultured in vitro (mainly because of its reductive genome evolution), and (iii) transmission and pathophysiological data is still limited. The various presentations of the disease (Ridley-Jopling and WHO classifications) are correlated with the patient's immune response, bacillary load, and by the delay before diagnosis. Multidrug therapy (dapsone, rifampicin, with or without clofazimine) has been recommended since 1982 as the standard treatment of leprosy; 6 months for patients presenting with paucibacillary leprosy and 12 months for patients presenting with multibacillary leprosy. The worldwide use of leprosy drugs started in the 1980s and their free access since 1995 contributed to the drastic decline in the number of new case patients. Resistant strains are however emerging despite the use of multidrug therapy; identifying and monitoring resistance is still necessary. PMID:26428602

  2. Knowledge and practice of eye-care among leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Yowan, P; Danneman, Krista; Koshy, Sheena; Richard, J; Daniel, Ebenezer

    2002-01-01

    In one hundred and thirty leprosy patients attending the Schieffelin Leprosy Research and Training Center, Karigiri, Tamil Nadu, India, the knowledge, attitude and practice of eye-care were ascertained using a questionnaire developed by Mathews & Mangalam. 74.6% the patients surveyed were aware of the disease, 60% knew about the early signs of leprosy, 74.6% considered leprosy curable and 36.9% knew the duration of treatment with MDT. Less than half of the patients (40.8%) knew that blindness occurred in leprosy and was preventable. More males had this knowledge (46.5%) than females (22.6%) (P = 0.001). Knowledge on how to take care of the eyes (26.9%), that eyes become anaesthetic due to leprosy (27.7%), and that precautions should be taken if sensation is lost (27. 7%) was very poor. Knowledge on prevention of damage in eyes (57.7%) and the fact that rubbing eyes could cause damage (55.4%) was found in more than half the patients. More males (64.6%) had knowledge on the prevention of damage in eyes than females (35.5%) (P = 0.008). Only 25.4% of the patients tried some measures to prevent eye injury, 21.5% used home remedies and all had the help of family members in their eye-care. More males (26.3%) used home remedies than females (6.5%). The older age group had better knowledge on taking care of the eyes than those aged 40 and below (P = 0.026). Although more patients with existing complications knew to take care of their eyes than those who did not have complications, the knowledge and practice of eye-care in both these groups were poor. Knowledge of leprosy in illiterate patients was not different from those who had some formal schooling, but the practice of eye-care differed significantly (P = 0.02). Health education must be undertaken to increase the knowledge of eye-care among leprosy patients, especially among illiterate persons, women and younger patients. PMID:12708731

  3. Leprosy Continues to Occur in Hilly Areas of North India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of present study was to describe the profile of leprosy patients attending the outpatient department of dermatology in tertiary care hospital in Srinagar, Uttarakhand, North India. Methodology. This descriptive retrospective study. Patient data at the time of diagnosis were retrieved onto a predesigned proforma, which concerned the following variables at the time of registration: age, sex, and residence. Newly registered outpatients leprosy cases between 2009 and 2014 were included in the study. Results. It was found that 65 were multibacillary leprosy cases. Males constituted 62.8% of all leprosy cases. The majority (83.7%) belonged to the age group of 18–60 years. Of the total 48.8% of the new leprosy cases were from the Pauri district. The leprosy incidence rate in this population was 2.71 per 1000 patients. Conclusion. Leprosy still continues to be a communicable disease of concern. The lower incidence in women and children provokes the need to strengthen contact screening, early case detection, and referral activities in the population to sustain elimination. PMID:26904107

  4. Regional Anaesthesia Management in a Patient with Leprosy: Rare Case with Rare Application.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Muharrem; Şanlı, Mukadder; Özkan, Ahmet Selim; Demiröz, Duygu; Erdoğan, Mehmet Ali; Durmuş, Mahmut

    2016-02-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and affects the skin and nerves. Patients with leprosy having related peripheral neuropathy and involvement of other organs may have cardiac, respiratory dysautonomia and autonomic dysfunctions. There are very few studies regarding anaesthetic management of patients suffering from leprosy. Moreover, very few studies concerning regional anaesthesia in patients with lepromatous leprosy have been reported. In this study, we aim to assess regional anaesthesia management with combined spinal epidural anaesthesia in a patient who had been followed up with a diagnosis of leprosy for a long time and was scheduled for operation because of a femoral neck fracture. PMID:27366553

  5. Regional Anaesthesia Management in a Patient with Leprosy: Rare Case with Rare Application

    PubMed Central

    Uçar, Muharrem; Şanlı, Mukadder; Özkan, Ahmet Selim; Demiröz, Duygu; Erdoğan, Mehmet Ali; Durmuş, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and affects the skin and nerves. Patients with leprosy having related peripheral neuropathy and involvement of other organs may have cardiac, respiratory dysautonomia and autonomic dysfunctions. There are very few studies regarding anaesthetic management of patients suffering from leprosy. Moreover, very few studies concerning regional anaesthesia in patients with lepromatous leprosy have been reported. In this study, we aim to assess regional anaesthesia management with combined spinal epidural anaesthesia in a patient who had been followed up with a diagnosis of leprosy for a long time and was scheduled for operation because of a femoral neck fracture. PMID:27366553

  6. Co-infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae in human archaeological samples: a possible explanation for the historical decline of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, Helen D.; Marcsik, Antónia; Matheson, Carney; Vernon, Kim; Nuorala, Emilia; Molto, Joseph E.; Greenblatt, Charles L.; Spigelman, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe during the first millennium but thereafter leprosy declined. It is not known why this occurred, but one suggestion is that cross-immunity protected tuberculosis patients from leprosy. To investigate any relationship between the two diseases, selected archaeological samples, dating from the Roman period to the thirteenth century, were examined for both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA, using PCR. The work was carried out and verified in geographically separate and independent laboratories. Several specimens with palaeopathological signs of leprosy were found to contain DNA from both pathogens, indicating that these diseases coexisted in the past. We suggest that the immunological changes found in multi-bacillary leprosy, in association with the socio-economic impact on those suffering from the disease, led to increased mortality from tuberculosis and therefore to the historical decline in leprosy. PMID:15734693

  7. Leprosy. An update: definition, pathogenesis, classification, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Eichelmann, K; González González, S E; Salas-Alanis, J C; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2013-09-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. It primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves and is still endemic in various regions of the world. Clinical presentation depends on the patient's immune status at the time of infection and during the course of the disease. Leprosy is associated with disability and marginalization. Diagnosis is clinical and is made when the patient has at least 1 of the following cardinal signs specified by the World Health Organization: hypopigmented or erythematous macules with sensory loss; thickened peripheral nerves; or positive acid-fast skin smear or skin biopsy with loss of adnexa at affected sites. Leprosy is treated with a multidrug combination of rifampicin, clofazimine, and dapsone. Two main regimens are used depending on whether the patient has paucibacillary or multibacillary disease. PMID:23870850

  8. Study of Oxidative Stress in Different Forms of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Manchala; Tagore, Ravirala

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. India records the highest number of new leprosy cases in the world. Oxidative stress may play a significant role in leprosy. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate oxidative stress in various forms of leprosy and compared to healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Seventy newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy patients were selected as cases and sixty healthy controls. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring serum malondialdehyde (MDA) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Student's unpaired t-test and Anova (Analysis of Variance) test were used for analysis of data. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in the mean values of serum MDA level, MDA/SOD and a decrease in serum SOD activity in cases when compared to controls and the values were significantly associated with increased duration, bacterial load and multibacillary type in leprosy. Conclusion: Our study suggests that there was oxidative stress in leprosy. This warrants antioxidant supplementation to prevent tissue injury. PMID:26120177

  9. Presence of an index case in households of newly registered leprosy patients: experience from a leprosy referral centre in South India.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Vaseem; Vijayakumaran, P

    2015-12-01

    The global leprosy burden in terms of new case detection does not seem to show a declining trend. India continues to be one of the major contributors to the leprosy burden. It is well known that the presence of an index case is a risk factor for leprosy among household contacts. The Blue Peter Health and Research centre (BPHRC), a leprosy referral centre in South India, observed the presence of an index case in 27.6% of leprosy patients newly diagnosed during 2009-2013. A majority of the index cases were either parents or siblings. Early case detection is recommended in global and national strategies, but active contact screening is not in the purview of integrated leprosy services in India. Active contact screening may be considered as one of the major activities to further reduce the leprosy burden. PMID:26964435

  10. Nocardia nova mycetoma over forehead in a lepromatous leprosy patient.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, M; Kaistha, N; Bansal, N; Solanki, L S; Chander, J; Thami, G P; van de Sande, W W

    2012-07-01

    We present a case of a 31-year-old male, a known patient with lepromatous leprosy with a type 2 lepra reaction, who presented with a slowly growing asymptomatic swelling with multiple discharging sinuses over the forehead that developed over 6 months. Smears of the serosanguinous discharge on Gram staining showed Gram-positive branching filamentous bacilli, which on culture on blood agar showed chalky-white colonies. Histology of the lesion showed suppurative granulomas with polymorphs surrounding characteristic grains. The isolate was identified as Nocardia nova by gene sequencing and the patient was started on combined antibiotic therapy that resulted in complete resolution of the infection in six months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of mycetoma related to Nocardia nova in association with leprosy. PMID:22863625

  11. Therapeutic workshops and psychosocial rehabilitation for institutionalised leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Leite, Soraia Cristina Coelho; Caldeira, Antônio Prates

    2015-06-01

    Leprosy is still a major public health problem and psychosocial rehabilitation services for patients suffering from the disease remain insufficient. This study aimed to assess the impact of therapeutic workshops on quality of life and symptoms of depression among institutionalised leprosy patients. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and generic World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) were used before and after the implementation of a series of therapeutic workshops over a period of six months. Sixty-two patients participated in the study. Almost all of the sample were elderly and had a low level of education. There was a significant reduction in the symptoms of depression scores after the intervention (p < 0,001) and a positive impact was shown for the psychological (p = 0,001), physical (p = 0,03) and environment (p < 0,001) domains, but not for the social relationships (p = 0,124) domain. Therapeutic workshops appear to a useful tool for psychosocial rehabilitation work with leprosy patients. PMID:26060961

  12. T lymphocyte subsets in leprosy. A study of 24 Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Ashamalla, L; Yang, S J; Michel, M; Rafla, L

    1989-09-01

    Phenotypic analysis was done on 24 Egyptian leprosy patients and 11 healthy controls. The type of leprosy, duration of disease at the time of testing, and age were found to affect T cell subset distribution. As compared with controls, neural leprosy tended to have a decreased total T cell percentage, borderline leprosy an increased T suppressor cell percentage, and reactional borderline leprosy an increased T helper/suppressor ratio. Patients with the disease for less than 1 year had a higher mean percentage of T suppressor cells and a lower mean T helper/suppressor ratio than patients with leprosy for more than 1 year. The same was true in older (50-70 years old) versus younger (12-41 years old) patients. PMID:2528512

  13. Scabies Among Elderly Korean Patients with Histories of Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyungcheol; Lee, Chaeyoung; Park, Seungkyu; Kwon, Hyeon; Kweon, Sun-Seog

    2016-07-01

    A scabies epidemic, traced by the hospital-based surveillance system, was reported in a Korean leprosarium. A total of 200 symptomatic cases were found during 2012-2014 among 570 elderly former leprosy patients. Most of cases were classic type scabies (87%) and aged 75 years and older (72%). Surveillance system for early diagnosis and prompt intervention was applied and the scabies epidemic was controlled effectively in this long-term care facility. PMID:27114302

  14. Leprosy in French Polynesia. Epidemiological trends between 1946 and 1987.

    PubMed

    Cartel, J L; Boutin, J P; Spiegel, A; Glaziou, P; Plichart, R; Cardines, R; Grosset, J H

    1992-09-01

    The analysis of computerized data (OMSLEP system) on patients from French Polynesia followed since 1940 has shown a decrease in the mean annual detection rates for leprosy, all forms combined, from 24.73 per 100,000 inhabitants in 1946 to 8.1 per 100,000 in 1987 (y = -0.49 x + 45.83; p < 0.05). In fact, the decrease was significant (y = -1.18 x + 83.54; p < 0.05) during the first half of the study period (1946-66), but not during the second half (1967-87). Similarly, a significant decrease in all of the specific mean annual detection rates (according to the form of leprosy and to the sex and age of patients), in the proportion of multibacillary patients among the total of newly detected cases, and in the proportion of all patients with disabilities at the onset of leprosy was observed only during the first half of the study period (1946-66). Nevertheless, when comparing age-specific cumulative detection rates, calculated by 10-year age groups over the period 1946-66, to those of the period 1967-87, an ageing of the leprosy population was noted. Finally, the decrease of mean annual detection rates was greater in the smaller populations of remote islands than in the population of Tahiti, the main island, where 70% of the total population were living during the study period. This decline was shown to correspond to an effective improvement of the leprosy situation which could be attributed, among other factors (such as economic development and systematic BCG vaccination), to the implementation of a control programme for leprosy in 1950. The introduction in 1982 of multidrug therapy for all patients suffering active leprosy has raised the hope of a subsequent decline of leprosy in French Polynesia in the near future. PMID:1406017

  15. [Social reproduction of leprosy: a study of patients profile with leprosy in the city of São Paulo].

    PubMed

    Helene, Lúcia Maria Frazão; Salum, Maria Josefina Leuba

    2002-01-01

    This study discusses the relationship between work and living conditions among leprosy patients enrolled in the São Paulo municipal public health system in 1996. Social patterns were studied based on the theory of social determination of the health-disease process. The main purpose of the study was to emphasize evidence of the disease determination network, seeking new knowledge to improve public policies on leprosy. Data were gathered from a sample of leprosy patients registered in the city's public health system. Although patients' families are characterized by a common social thread, different work/life possibilities allow for a classification of patients into three social groups. The majority belong to groups that are marginalized from social production, living in areas where social exclusion is more extreme, on the outskirts of the city. If the trends in this study persist, incident leprosy cases will result from the social exclusion of migrants from Brazil's Southeast and Northeast. The study also discusses the position of young people and female patients in the determination network of this infectious disease in the city of São Paulo. PMID:11910429

  16. Effects of treatment on the histopathology of leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Cree, I A; Coghill, G; Subedi, A M; Abbot, N C; Butlin, S R; Samson, P D; Beck, J S

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To identify the histological changes in leprosy skin lesions over the first few weeks after the start of leprosy treatment and to examine their relationship to reversal reaction. METHODS--Sequential skin biopsy during treatment with multiple drug therapy. In this study, a series of 28 patients was studied, from whom two or more biopsies were taken at two week intervals. Fourteen patients had paucibacillary leprosy (PBL) and 14 had multibacillary leprosy (MBL). RESULTS--In most cases, granuloma fraction and bacterial index fell during treatment, the bacterial index being less sensitive than the granuloma fraction. Since the biopsies were fixed in buffered formalin and processed through to paraffin wax, little immunohistochemistry was feasible. However, there was strong evidence of immune activation, with increased expression of HLA-DR in the granulomas of MBL and PBL cases: the epidermis also expressed HLA-DR in several patients. Such changes may reflect gamma IFN production from granuloma lymphocytes. Patients with reversal reaction often showed HLA-DR expression on admission which decreased with corticosteroid treatment. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest that activation of cell mediated immunity in leprosy lesions occurs during treatment with multiple drug therapy and may not be restricted to those with clinical evidence of reversal reaction. Images PMID:7615846

  17. Rate of relapse in multibacillary patients after cessation of long-course dapsone monotherapy supplemented by a final supervised single dose of 1500 mg of rifampin.

    PubMed

    Cartel, J L; Naudin, J C

    1994-06-01

    When multidrug therapy was implemented in Senegal, 406 multibacillary (MB) patients who had been treated for more than 10 years by dapsone alone, and who had become clinically inactive and skin-smear negative, were released from treatment. Of these 406 patients, 298 were given a supervised single dose of 1500 mg of rifampin. Subsequently, 302 of them (229 who had been given rifampin and 73 who had not) were followed up by means of annual clinical and bacteriological examinations. Of the former 229 followed up for a mean period of 4.9 years, 34 patients relapsed (22 males and 12 females), giving a crude relapse rate of 15% and an overall risk of relapse of 3.1 per 100 patient-years. Of the latter 73 followed up for a mean period of 2.4 years, 5 relapsed (4 males and 1 female), giving a crude relapse rate of 6.8% and an overall risk of relapse of 2.9 per 100 patient-years. Such results, which are in agreement with those of a similar study conducted recently in Mali, indicate that the intake of a single dose of 1500 mg of rifampin by MB patients when they are released from long-course dapsone monotherapy does not result in a decrease of the relapse rate. Therefore, MB patients who have been treated with dapsone alone, even for long periods, should be put under multidrug therapy prior to their release from control. PMID:8046260

  18. Prediction of 'highly skin smear positive' cases among MB leprosy patients using clinical parameters.

    PubMed

    Lemaster, J W; Shwe, T; Butlin, C R; Roche, P W

    2001-03-01

    Although 'highly skin smear positive' MB leprosy cases are known to be at high risk of relapse after release from treatment, and have been recommended to receive 'prolonged duration' MDT, government field-based control programmes without skin smear facilities have no simple alternative method to detect such cases. This study reports a significant prevalence of 'highly smear positive' cases amongst 2374 new multibacillary cases recently surveyed by skin smears in Nepal, and retrospectively analyses 555 newly detected, previously untreated BL and LL cases to identify clinical and laboratory parameters that may be associated with a 'highly positive skin smear'. While some parameters showed high sensitivity in predicting 'highly positive smear' status, none showed both high sensitivity and high specificity simultaneously. PMID:11355514

  19. Gender and leprosy: case studies in Indonesia, Nigeria, Nepal and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Varkevisser, Corlien M; Lever, Peter; Alubo, Ogoh; Burathoki, Kamala; Idawani, Cut; Moreira, Tatiana M A; Patrobas, Phillip; Yulizar, Media

    2009-03-01

    There appear to be regional differences in gender ratios of leprosy patients being diagnosed and treated. In Asian countries, more men than women are registered whilst in Africa female patients outnumber males. The Netherlands Leprosy Relief (NLR) therefore initiated research into factors underlying these regional gender differences. Between 1997 and 1999, leprosy control teams in Indonesia, Nigeria, Nepal and Brazil supported by social/public health scientists, conducted comparative exploratory research. They looked at three groups of potential explanatory factors: biological, socio-cultural/economic and service-related. The studies were partially quantitative (analysis of the records of patients who according to prescription could have completed treatment) and partially qualitative (interviews/focus group discussions with patients, their relatives, community members and health staff on perceptions of leprosy, its socio-economic consequences, treatment and cure). Biological factors appeared similar in the four countries: irrespective of the M/F ratio, more men than women were registered with multibacillary (MB) leprosy. Strong traditions, the low status of women, their limited mobility, illiteracy and poor knowledge of leprosy appeared to be important sociocultural factors explaining why women were under reporting. Yet, accessible, well reputed services augmented female participation and helped to diminish stigma, which in three out of the four societies seemed greater for women than for men. These positive effects could still be higher if the services would enhance community and patient education with active participation of patients and ex-patients themselves. PMID:19472853

  20. Leprosy: review of the epidemiological, clinical, and etiopathogenic aspects - Part 1*

    PubMed Central

    Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is caused by Mycobacterium leprae and has been known since biblical times. It is still endemic in many regions of the world and a public health problem in Brazil. The prevalence rate in 2011 reached 1.54 cases per 10,000 inhabitants in Brazil. The mechanism of transmission of leprosy consists of prolonged close contact between susceptible and genetically predisposed individuals and untreated multibacillary patients. Transmission occurs through inhalation of bacilli present in upper airway secretion. The nasal mucosa is the main entry or exit route of M. leprae. The deeper understanding of the structural and biological characteristics of M. leprae, the sequencing of its genome, along with the advances in understanding the mechanisms of host immune response against the bacilli, dependent on genetic susceptibility, have contributed to the understanding of the pathogenesis, variations in the clinical characteristics, and progression of the disease. This article aims to update dermatologist on epidemiological, clinical, and etiopathogenic leprosy aspects. PMID:24770495

  1. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Junior, Eduardo R.; Arruda, Talita A.; Lopes, Jose C.; Fontes, Cor J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction) or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum). Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA) to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18–69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline) and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively). Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in patients with

  2. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes.

    PubMed

    Morato-Conceicao, Yvelise T; Alves-Junior, Eduardo R; Arruda, Talita A; Lopes, Jose C; Fontes, Cor J F

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction) or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum). Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA) to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18-69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline) and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively). Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in patients with type

  3. Thermographic analysis and autonomic response in the hands of patients with leprosy*

    PubMed Central

    Cavalheiro, Aretusa Lopes; da Costa, Debora Tacon; de Menezes, Ana Luiza Ferro; Pereira, Janser Moura; de Carvalho, Eliane Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Low temperatures and slow blood flow may result from peripheral neuropathy caused by leprosy, and the simple detection of cold fingers could already be a preliminary classification for these patients. Objective To investigate whether infrared thermography would be able to measure this change in temperature in the hands of people with leprosy. Method The study assessed 17 leprosy patients who were under treatment at the National Reference Center for Sanitary Dermatology and Leprosy, Uberlândia/MG, and 15 people without leprosy for the control group. The infrared camera FLIR A325 and Therma CAM Researcher Professional 2.9 software were used to measure the temperature. The room was air-conditioned, maintaining the temperature at 25°C; the distance between the camera and the limb was 70 cm. The vasomotor reflex of patients was tested by a cold stress on the palm. Results The study showed a significant interaction between the clinical form of leprosy and temperature, where the control group and the borderline-borderline form revealed a higher initial temperature, while borderline-lepromatous and lepromatous leprosy showed a lower temperature. Regarding vasomotor reflex, lepromatous leprosy patients were unable to recover the initial temperature after cold stress, while those with the borderline-tuberculoid form not only recovered but exceeded the initial temperature. Conclusion Thermography proved a potential tool to assist in the early detection of neuropathies, helping in the prevention of major nerve damage and the installation of deformities and disabilities that are characteristic of leprosy. PMID:27438192

  4. The +3187A/G HLA-G polymorphic site is associated with polar forms and reactive reaction in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Lucena-Silva, N; Teixeira, M A G; Ramos, A de L; de Albuquerque, R S; Diniz, G T N; Mendes-Junior, C T; Castelli, E C; Donadi, E A

    2013-01-01

    Considering that variability in immune response genes has been associated with susceptibility to leprosy and with disease severity, leprosy presents clinicopathological variants that are highly associated with the immune response, HLA-G has a well-recognized role in the modulation of the immune response, and polymorphisms at the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the HLA-G gene may influence HLA-G production, we studied the polymorphic sites at the 3′ UTR of the HLA-G gene in leprosy and their association with disease severity. We evaluated by sequencing analysis the allele, genotype, and haplotype frequencies of the 3′ UTR HLA-G polymorphic sites (14-bpINDEL/+3003C-T/+3010C-G/+3027A-C/+3035C-T/+3142C-G/+3187A-G/+3196C-G) in 146 individuals presenting reactive leprosy from a highly endemic area, and associated with bacillary load and the type of reactive leprosy. A total of 128 healthy subjects were also studied. Allele, genotype, and haplotype frequencies for the 3′ UTR HLA-G polymorphisms in leprosy patients did not differ from those observed in healthy donors. The +3187A allele was responsible for protection against the development of multibacillary leprosy in a dominant model (AA + AG)/GG, OR = 0.11, P = 0.018), and the +3187A allele and +3187A-A genotype were overrepresented in type II reactive leprosy reaction. The effect of genetic factors on leprosy susceptibility may be hidden by environmental components in highly endemic areas. The HLA-G + 3187A polymorphic site, which is related to unstable mRNA production, was associated with the development of polar forms of leprosy and reactive leprosy reaction. PMID:24498610

  5. Soluble serum interleukin 2 receptor levels in leprosy patients

    PubMed Central

    Tung, K. S. K.; Umland, Edith; Matzner, P.; Nelson, K.; Schauf, Victoria; Rubin, L.; Wagner, D.; Scollard, D.; Vithayasai, Prakong; Vithayasai, Vicharn; Worobec, Sophie; Smith, T.; Suriyanond, Vinai

    1987-01-01

    Soluble interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2R) in sera of leprosy patients from Chiang Mai, Thailand, were quantified with a solid phase enzyme immunoassay using two monoclonal antibodies to the IL-2R. The IL-2R levels of untreated lepromatous, borderline lepromatous or midborderline patients and treated lepromatous and borderline lepromatous or treated borderline tuberculoid and tuberculoid patients were comparable to those of the Thai household or nonhousehold contacts; and they were significantly higher than the levels of USA control subjects. In contrast, IL-2R of untreated tuberculoid or borderline tuberculoid patients were significantly reduced. Patients with ongoing reversal reaction had very high circulating IL-2R, the levels of which correlated with fever and extent of skin lesions. Although erythrema nodosum leprosum patients also had elevated IL-2R levels, they were significantly below those of patients with reversal reaction. When treated with corticosteroid, precipitous reduction of IL-2R was noted in all patients with reversal reaction but not in patients with erythema nodosum leprosum. PMID:3115652

  6. Enoxaparin-induced hemorrhagic bullous dermatosis in a leprosy patient.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Savaş; Can, Ilkay; Erden, Ilker; Akyol, Hadice; Solmaz, Ozgen Aslan

    2015-01-01

    Enoxaparin is a low-molecular-weight heparin that has been used widely to prevent and treat thromboembolic disorders for at least 30 years. The most common adverse skin reactions to enoxaparin are ecchymosis and skin necrosis due to vasculitis, urticaria, angioedema and erythema. Side effects from heparin administration are rare and usually located at the injection site. However, recent reports have suggested that they can also occur at a distance from the site of injection. Moreover, the etiopathogenesis has not been fully explained. In this article, we present a case of hemorrhagic bullous dermatosis associated with enoxaparin for the treatment of ischemic heart disease that developed in a patient with a past history of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:25198402

  7. Primary oral tuberculosis in a patient with lepromatous leprosy: Diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Vithiya; Mandal, Jharna

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the most common form of TB. Primary infection can also affect the pharynx, cervical lymph node, intestine, or oral mucosa. Historically, the observed incidence of concomitant infection with leprosy and TB is high. However, reports of concomitant infection in modern literature remain scarce. Most cases reported in the literature had borderline/lepromatous leprosy and pulmonary tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is reported in only 3.2% of leprosy cases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of primary oral tuberculosis of the tongue in a patient with lepromatous leprosy with Type 2 lepra reaction. The patient was referred to Directly Observed Treatment, Short-Course clinic and started on Category I treatment. She received oral prednisolone for lepra reaction, which was subsequently tapered and stopped, however, she continued to receive other antileprotic drugs (thalidomide and clofazimine). The patient's general condition improved and she is on regular follow up. PMID:26927999

  8. Rapid quantitative serological test for detection of infection with Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Duthie, Malcolm S; Balagon, Marivic F; Maghanoy, Armi; Orcullo, Florenda M; Cang, Marjorie; Dias, Ronaldo Ferreira; Collovati, Marco; Reed, Steven G

    2014-02-01

    Leprosy remains an important health problem in a number of regions. Early detection of infection, followed by effective treatment, is critical to reduce disease progression. New sensitive and specific tools for early detection of infection will be a critical component of an effective leprosy elimination campaign. Diagnosis is made by recognizing clinical signs and symptoms, but few clinicians are able to confidently identify these. Simple tests to facilitate referral to leprosy experts are not widely available, and the correct diagnosis of leprosy is often delayed. In this report, we evaluate the performance of a new leprosy serological test (NDO-LID). As expected, the test readily detected clinically confirmed samples from patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy, and the rate of positive results declined with bacterial burden. NDO-LID detected larger proportions of MB and paucibacillary (PB) leprosy than the alternative, the Standard Diagnostics leprosy test (87.0% versus 81.7% and 32.3% versus 6.5%, respectively), while also demonstrating improved specificity (97.4% versus 90.4%). Coupled with a new cell phone-based test reader platform (Smart Reader), the NDO-LID test provided consistent, objective test interpretation that could facilitate wider use in nonspecialized settings. In addition, results obtained from sera at the time of diagnosis, versus at the end of treatment, indicated that the quantifiable nature of this system can also be used to monitor treatment efficacy. Taken together, these data indicate that the NDO-LID/Smart Reader system can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of MB leprosy and can detect a significant number of earlier-stage infections. PMID:24478496

  9. Mycobacterium haemophilum Masquerading as Leprosy in a Renal Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Nathanial K; Arora, Navin S; Ferguson, Tomas M

    2013-01-01

    Opportunistic infections following immunosuppression in solid organ transplant (SOT) patients are common complications with the skin being a common sight of infection. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rare but potential causes of skin infection in SOT patients. We present a case of an adult male immunosuppressed following renal transplantation who presented with an asymptomatic rash for several months. The patient's skin eruption consisted of erythematous papules and plaques coalescing into an annular formation. After failure of the initial empiric therapy, a punch biopsy was performed that demonstrated nerve involvement suspicious for Mycobacterium leprae. However, culture of the biopsy specimen grew acid-fast bacilli that were subsequently identified as M. haemophilum. His rash improved after a prolonged course of clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin. Both organisms are potential causes of opportunistic skin infections and can be difficult to distinguish with similar predilection for skin and other biochemical and genetic similarities. Ultimately they can be distinguished with culture as M. haemophilum will grow in culture and M. leprae will not. This case was unique due to nerve involvement on biopsy which is classically seen on biopsies of leprosy. PMID:24369511

  10. Kinship and Leprosy in the Contacts of Leprosy Patients: Cohort at the Souza Araújo Outpatient Clinic, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 1987–2010

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Daiane Santos; Duppre, Nadia Cristina; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Hacker, Mariana Andréa

    2013-01-01

    A broad variety of factors have been associated with leprosy among contacts, including socioeconomic, epidemiological, and genetic characteristics. Data from 7,174 contacts of leprosy patients from a leprosy outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1987–2010, were analyzed to investigate the effects of kinship, individual, and contextual factors on leprosy. Multivariate analyses were performed using a robust estimation method. In the prevalence analysis, close kinship (sibling OR = 2.75, offspring OR = 2.00, and other relatives OR = 1.70), socioeconomic factors, and the duration of exposure to the bacillus were associated to leprosy. In the incidence analysis, significant risks were found for all categories of kinship (parents RR = 10.93, spouse, boyfriend/girlfriend, and bride/groom RR = 7.53, sibling RR = 7.03, offspring RR = 5.34, and other relatives RR = 3.71). Once the treatment of the index case was initiated, other factors lost their significance, and the index case bacteriological index and BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine) protection had a greater impact. Our findings suggested that both genetic susceptibility and physical exposure play an important role in the epidemiology of leprosy, but it was not possible establishing the role of genetic factor. Analyses of other factors related to the genotype of individuals, such as genetic polymorphisms, are needed. PMID:23690793

  11. Clinical ocular study in leprosy patients at a sanitary dermatological hospital in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oréfice, F; Boratto, L M

    1998-01-01

    This study is based upon the observation f 363 leprosy patients having different types of the disease. At the time of the examination, we did not have any previous knowledge about the type of leprosy the patients were having. Thus, the eye examination was done without the knowledge of clinical diagnosis. The ocular examination protocol covered the following: visual activity, facial muscle function, eyebrows, eyelashes, lacrimal system, pupil, eye motility, corneal sensitivity, Schirmir's test and study of the anterior segment of the ocular bulb with a slit-lamp. The study patients included 275 cases of lepromatous leprosy, 57 tuberculoid, 29 indeterminate and two dimorphous cases. The age of the patients ranged between 18 and 82 years, and 229 of them were males. Among those patients, 183 were whites, 23 were black and 157 were mulatto. PMID:9724854

  12. [Characterization of chronic plantar ulcers in former leprosy patients].

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Gentile, B; Chevallard, A; Cartel, J L

    1994-01-01

    Between 1988 and 1992, 21 biopsies for pathological examination were taken from 20 Senegalese leprosy patients suffering from chronic plantar ulcers (CPU) suspected of malignant transformation. The diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma was effectively made in 13 cases and that of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in the remaining 8 cases. The mean period of time between the onset of CPU and that of malignant transformation was 10 years (range: 1 to 15 years); the mean annual frequency of the malignant transformation was 2 per 1,000 CPU. In countries where pathological examination is not available, below knee amputation could be considered whenever main clinical signs of malignant transformation are present. In countries where pathological examination is available, the therapeutic decision may differ according to the diagnosis: below knee amputation supplemented with block dissection of inguinal lymph nodes whenever possible in cases of carcinoma; below knee amputation depending on the function status of the foot and on the volume of tumor in case of pseudo-epitheliomatous hyperplasia. PMID:8209625

  13. Allopurinol induced granuloma annulare in a patient of lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Manchanda, Kajal; Bhayana, Aakash Amar; Verma, Anurag

    2013-01-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a benign, inflammatory dermatosis involving dermis or subcutis with unknown etiology and poorly understood pathology. GA has characteristic histological features of necrobiosis, granuloma formation and abundant mucin deposition. Various predisposing factors, systemic diseases and drugs have been implicated in the etiology. We hereby describe a case of 70 year old male who was a known case of lepromatous leprosy, taking multidrug therapy for 6 months presented with multiple discrete, annular, firm, non tender, smooth surfaced skin colored papular lesions ranging in size from 0.5-1 cm over back for 1 month. There was past history of intake of allopurinol for hyperuricemia which was started 1 year back. There was history of similar lesions 6 months back which healed within 1 month of stopping allopurinol and he started taking the drug for the past 4 months on his own without any medical advice. Histopathological examination showed superficial and deep perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate with numerous histiocytes scattered in the intersititum of reticular dermis and abundant mucin in between the histiocytes. Allopurinol was implicated as an etiological agent and dramatic improvement was seen after stopping the drug for a period of 4 weeks. Naranjo's algorithm showed a probable association with a score of 6. Thus the final diagnosis of allopurinol induced generalised interstitial granuolma annulare was made. Patient was advised to continue antileprotic drugs, low purine diet and avoid allopurinol intake. PMID:23761716

  14. Allopurinol induced granuloma annulare in a patient of lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra Kumar; Manchanda, Kajal; Bhayana, Aakash Amar; Verma, Anurag

    2013-04-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is a benign, inflammatory dermatosis involving dermis or subcutis with unknown etiology and poorly understood pathology. GA has characteristic histological features of necrobiosis, granuloma formation and abundant mucin deposition. Various predisposing factors, systemic diseases and drugs have been implicated in the etiology. We hereby describe a case of 70 year old male who was a known case of lepromatous leprosy, taking multidrug therapy for 6 months presented with multiple discrete, annular, firm, non tender, smooth surfaced skin colored papular lesions ranging in size from 0.5-1 cm over back for 1 month. There was past history of intake of allopurinol for hyperuricemia which was started 1 year back. There was history of similar lesions 6 months back which healed within 1 month of stopping allopurinol and he started taking the drug for the past 4 months on his own without any medical advice. Histopathological examination showed superficial and deep perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate with numerous histiocytes scattered in the intersititum of reticular dermis and abundant mucin in between the histiocytes. Allopurinol was implicated as an etiological agent and dramatic improvement was seen after stopping the drug for a period of 4 weeks. Naranjo's algorithm showed a probable association with a score of 6. Thus the final diagnosis of allopurinol induced generalised interstitial granuolma annulare was made. Patient was advised to continue antileprotic drugs, low purine diet and avoid allopurinol intake. PMID:23761716

  15. [Prevalence of disability among leprosy patients and effectiveness of leprosy reaction services with standard prednisolone treatment at field level in an endemic country--some data from joint leprosy research collaboration in Myanmar].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yutaka

    2009-09-01

    Prevalence of disability among leprosy patients and effectiveness of standard predonisolone treatment for leprosy reaction at field level in some place of Myanmar are shown in this paper as results of joint leprosy research collaboration. WHO disability grading was measured for all newly registered leprosy patients through 2007 in 5 selected townships of Ayeyarwaddy Division, with the results of G0 = 66.3%, GI = 18.9%, GII = 14.7% (N = 95). The cross-sectional disability survey at selected 9 townships in Mandalay, Sagaing and Magway Division for all registered patients who had completed WHO/MDT done by JICA project in 2003/4 showed G0 = 62.5%, GI = 2.4%, GII = 35.1% (N = 10,528). From these two data, it is supposed that considerable number of patients with G1 at registered time developed worsening of disability from G1 to G2. Proportion of G0 also reduced a little bit in patients who completed WHO/MDT. Early detection and proper treatment of leprosy reaction are one of the main issues of prevention of disability. Effectiveness of leprosy reaction services were evaluated at Mandalay Special Skin Clinic, where WHO fixed regimen of prednisolone were given as routine service. 100 cases were evaluated who developed leprosy reactions from 1st December 2007 to 31st December 2008 and identified severe reaction who needed oral prednisolone treatment. Evaluation criteria of "effective" was defined as "no more signs and symptoms of reactions were present after treatment. And "less effective" was defined as "more than one of signs and symptoms were still remained after treatment". Over all "effective" was 36 (36%) and "less effective" was 64 (64%). It was also found that rates of improvement of nerve functions, either in sensory or in motor, were little after the standard treatment. PMID:19803379

  16. Comparison between histopathologic features of leprosy in reaction lesions in HIV coinfected and non-coinfected patients*

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Carla Andréa Avelar; de Miranda, Mario Fernando Ribeiro; Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; de Brito, Arival Cardoso; Xavier, Marília Brasil

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy and HIV are diseases that have a major impact on public health in Brazil. Patients coinfected with both diseases, appear to be at higher risk to develop leprosy reactions. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to describe the histopathological aspects of cutaneous lesions during reactional states in a group of patients with HIV-leprosy coinfection, compared to patients with leprosy, without coinfection. METHODS Two groups were established: group 1 comprised of 40 patients coinfected with HIV-leprosy; group 2, comprised of 107 patients with leprosy only. Patients presenting reactional states of leprosy had their lesions biopsied and comparatively evaluated. RESULTS Reversal reaction was the most frequent feature in both groups, with dermis edema as the most common histopathological finding. Giant cells were seen in all group 1 histopathological examinations. Dermis edema was the most common finding in patients with erythema nodosum leprosum. CONCLUSION Few histopathological differences were found in both groups, with reversal reaction as the most significant one, although this fact should be analyzed considering the predominant BT clinical form in the coinfected group and BB form in the group without HIV. Larger prospective studies in patients with HIV-leprosy coinfection are needed to confirm and broaden these results. PMID:25672296

  17. Leprosy and the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Misch, Elizabeth A.; Berrington, William R.; Vary, James C.; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Despite the availability of effective treatment for several decades, leprosy remains an important medical problem in many regions of the world. Infection with Mycobacterium leprae can produce paucibacillary disease, characterized by well-formed granulomas and a Th1 T-cell response, or multibacillary disease, characterized by poorly organized cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokines. These diametric immune responses confer states of relative resistance or susceptibility to leprosy, respectively, and have well-defined clinical manifestations. As a result, leprosy provides a unique opportunity to dissect the genetic basis of human in vivo immunity. A series of studies over the past 40 years suggests that host genes influence the risk of leprosy acquisition and the predilection for different clinical forms of the disease. However, a comprehensive, cellular, and molecular view of the genes and variants involved is still being assembled. In this article, we review several decades of human genetic studies of leprosy, including a number of recent investigations. We emphasize genetic analyses that are validated by the replication of the same phenotype in independent studies or supported by functional experiments demonstrating biological mechanisms of action for specific polymorphisms. Identifying and functionally exploring the genetic and immunological factors that underlie human susceptibility to leprosy have yielded important insights into M. leprae pathogenesis and are likely to advance our understanding of the immune response to other pathogenic mycobacteria. This knowledge may inform new treatment or vaccine strategies for leprosy or tuberculosis. PMID:21119019

  18. Borderline tuberculoid leprosy and type 1 leprosy reaction in a hepatitis C patient during treatment with interferon and ribavirin*

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Mônica; Franco, Emily dos Santos; Ferreira, Paulo Luis da Costa; Braga, Wornei Silva Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C is an inflammatory disease of the liver caused by a single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Hepacivirus genus in the Flaviviridae family, called the hepatitis C virus. After initial infection, 70% to 85% of the patients develop chronic hepatitis C with hepatic fibrosis. In addition to specific liver changes, various extrahepatic manifestations have been associated with the hepatitis C virus infection or with medications used to treat the condition. We report the case of a patient with chronic hepatitis C who presented with the signs and symptoms of borderline tuberculoid leprosy and type 1 reaction four months after the start of treatment with a pegylated interferon/ribavirin combination. PMID:24346894

  19. Borderline tuberculoid leprosy and type 1 leprosy reaction in a hepatitis C patient during treatment with interferon and ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mônica; Franco, Emily dos Santos; Ferreira, Paulo Luis da Costa; Braga, Wornei Silva Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C is an inflammatory disease of the liver caused by a single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the Hepacivirus genus in the Flaviviridae family, called the hepatitis C virus. After initial infection, 70% to 85% of the patients develop chronic hepatitis C with hepatic fibrosis. In addition to specific liver changes, various extrahepatic manifestations have been associated with the hepatitis C virus infection or with medications used to treat the condition. We report the case of a patient with chronic hepatitis C who presented with the signs and symptoms of borderline tuberculoid leprosy and type 1 reaction four months after the start of treatment with a pegylated interferon/ribavirin combination. PMID:24346894

  20. Association of TNF -1031 C/C as a potential protection marker for leprosy development in Amazonas state patients, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, G A V; Ramasawmy, R; Boechat, A L; Morais, A C; Carvalho, B K S; Sousa, K B A; Souza, V C; Cunha, M G S; Barletta-Naveca, R H; Santos, M P; Naveca, F G

    2015-03-01

    Polymorphisms present in the TNF promoter region has shown to influence the gene transcription. Leprosy displays different clinical manifestations according to the immune responses of the individual infected with Mycobacterium leprae. In this study, we evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) -238 G/A (rs361525), -308 G/A (rs1800629), -857 C/T (rs1799724), -863 A/C (rs1800630) and -1031 T/C (rs1799964) in the promoter region of the TNF to see whether these SNPs influence host-susceptibility to leprosy and the different clinical manifestation. Nucleotide sequencing was performed with DNA samples from 108 leprosy patients and 253 control subjects. An association between -1031 C/C genotype and protection from leprosy was observed when leprosy patients were compared to controls (OR 0.11; 95% CI=0.01-0.82; p=0.012). The -857 C/T genotype may be associated with susceptibility to leprosy (OR=1.81; 95% CI=1.09-3.00; p=0.028). Similar genotype and allele frequencies for the SNPs -308 G/A and -238 G/A were observed between leprosy patients and control subjects. Altogether, TNF polymorphisms in the promoter region may be predictive of leprosy outcome. PMID:25636570

  1. Gene Set Signature of Reversal Reaction Type I in Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Orlova, Marianna; Cobat, Aurélie; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Spencer, John; Nédélec, Yohann; Barreiro, Luis; Thai, Vu Hong; Abel, Laurent; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Schurr, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy reversal reactions type 1 (T1R) are acute immune episodes that affect a subset of leprosy patients and remain a major cause of nerve damage. Little is known about the relative importance of innate versus environmental factors in the pathogenesis of T1R. In a retrospective design, we evaluated innate differences in response to Mycobacterium leprae between healthy individuals and former leprosy patients affected or free of T1R by analyzing the transcriptome response of whole blood to M. leprae sonicate. Validation of results was conducted in a subsequent prospective study. We observed the differential expression of 581 genes upon exposure of whole blood to M. leprae sonicate in the retrospective study. We defined a 44 T1R gene set signature of differentially regulated genes. The majority of the T1R set genes were represented by three functional groups: i) pro-inflammatory regulators; ii) arachidonic acid metabolism mediators; and iii) regulators of anti-inflammation. The validity of the T1R gene set signature was replicated in the prospective arm of the study. The T1R genetic signature encompasses genes encoding pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators of innate immunity. This suggests an innate defect in the regulation of the inflammatory response to M. leprae antigens. The identified T1R gene set represents a critical first step towards a genetic profile of leprosy patients who are at increased risk of T1R and concomitant nerve damage. PMID:23874223

  2. Brazilian clinical trial of uniform multidrug therapy for leprosy patients: the correlation between clinical disease types and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Bührer-Sékula, Samira; Cruz, Rossilene; Almeida, Paulo Cesar; Moraes, Maria Elisabete Amaral de; Penna, Gerson Oliveira

    2012-12-01

    This study sought to verify the correlation between leprosy types and the adverse effects of treatment drugs. This quantitative, prospective, nested study was developed at the Dona Libânia Dermatology Centre in Fortaleza, Brazil. Data were collected from November 2007-November 2008. During this period, 818 leprosy patients were diagnosed and began treatment. Forty patients with tuberculoid leprosy (TT) were selected. Twenty patients followed a standard therapy of dapsone and rifampicin and 20 were administered dapsone, rifampicin and clofazimine (U-MDT). Twenty patients with borderline lepromatous (BL) and lepromatous leprosy (LL) were also selected and treated with U-MDT. All of the subjects received six doses. With the exception of haemolytic anaemia, there was a low incidence of adverse effects in all the groups. We did not observe any differences in the incidence of haemolytic anaemia or other side effects across groups of patients with TT, BL or LL treated with U-MDT. PMID:23283457

  3. Neuropathic Pain and Psychological Morbidity in Patients with Treated Leprosy: A Cross-Sectional Prevalence Study in Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Lasry-Levy, Estrella; Hietaharju, Aki; Pai, Vivek; Ganapati, Ramaswamy; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Haanpää, Maija; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. Conclusions/Significance One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8%) had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%), tingling (68.2%), hypoesthesia to touch (81.2%) and pinprick (72.7%). Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity. PMID:21408111

  4. Patients' Perceptions on the Performance of a Local Health System to Eliminate Leprosy, Paraná State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pieri, Flávia Meneguetti; Touso, Michelle Mosna; Rodrigues, Ludmila Barbosa Bandeira; Yamamura, Mellina; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Dessunti, Elma Mathias; Crispim, Juliane de Almeida; Ramos, Antônio Carlos Vieira; Arroyo, Luiz Henrique; Neto, Marcelino Santos; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Silveira, Tatiane Ramos dos Santos; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background In Brazil, leprosy has been listed among the health priorities since 2006, in a plan known as the “Pact for life” (Pacto pela Vida). It is the sole country on the American continent that has not reached the global goal of disease elimination. Local health systems face many challenges to achieve this global goal. The study aimed to investigate how patients perceive the local health system's performance to eliminate leprosy and whether these perceptions differ in terms of the patients' income. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional study was conducted in Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil. Interviews were performed with the leprosy patients. The local health system was assessed through a structured and adapted tool, considering the domains judged as good quality of health care. The authors used univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and nineteen patients were recruited for the study, 50.4% (60) of them were male, 54.0% (64) were between 42 and 65 years old and 66.3% (79) had finished elementary school. The results showed that patients used the Primary Health Care service near their place of residence but did not receive the leprosy diagnosis there. Important advances of this health system were verified for the elimination of leprosy, verifying protocols for good care delivery to the leprosy patients, but these services did not develop collective health actions and did not engage the patients' family members and community. Conclusions/Significance The patients' difficulty was observed to have access to the diagnosis and treatment at health services near their homes. Leprosy care is provided at the specialized level, where the patients strongly bond with the teams. The care process is individual, with limited perspectives of integration among the health services for the purpose of case management and social mobilization of the community to the leprosy problem. PMID:25412349

  5. Immunoglobulin class specific antibodies to M. leprae in leprosy patients, including the indeterminate group and healthy contacts as a step in the development of methods for sero-diagnosis of leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Melsom, R; Harboe, M; Myrvang, B; Godal, T; Belehu, A

    1982-01-01

    IgA, IgM and IgG anti-M. leprae antibody activity was quantitated by solid phase radioimmunoassay in groups of untreated leprosy patients throughout the spectrum, in lepromatous leprosy patients treated for more than 10 years, in an indeterminate leprosy group, and in a non-leprosy control group. IgA, IgM and IgG anti-M. leprae antibody activity increased from the group of healthy individuals exposed to M. leprae but without clinical signs of leprosy to tuberculoid (BT and BT/TT) and further to lepromatous (BL to LL) leprosy. There was a considerable overlap in IgA antibody activity, while the overlap between controls and tuberculoid and lepromatous leprosy was less than 20% in the IgM and IgG assays. After more than 10 years of treatment, the IgG anti-M. leprae activity had decreased markedly, whereas there was less effect in the IgA assay and no significant change in the IgM assay. In contrast to earlier findings, the group of 'strictly indeterminate leprosy' showed signs of an active humoral immune response against M. leprae. The IgM anti-M. leprae activity was higher in indeterminate leprosy than in the control group with virtually no overlap. IgA anti-M. leprae was higher in indeterminate leprosy, but with considerable overlap with the controls. No difference between these two groups was found in the IgG assay. The results are discussed in relation to the value of the various immunoglobulin specific anti-M. leprae assays for different purposes, including development of techniques for sero-diagnosis of leprosy. PMID:7042137

  6. Progression of leprosy neuropathy: a case series study

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Robson T; Illarramendi, Ximena; Nascimento, Osvaldo; Hacker, Mariana A; Sarno, Euzenir N; Jardim, Marcia R

    2012-01-01

    A need still exists to determine the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of leprosy neuropathy at distinct times of the disease by different methods that measure the various nerve fiber functions. A prospective clinical study was performed with 10 paucibacillary (PB) and 12 multibacillary (MB) patients evaluated at diagnosis and one year after cessation of multidrug therapy (MDT). Peripheral nerve function was assessed clinically and by means of the sympathetic skin response, skin vasomotor reflex, and nerve conduction study (NCS). At diagnosis, 73% of the total 22 patients had nerve function impairment (NFI). Autonomic function (χ2= 5.5, P= 0.019) and NCS (χ2= 7.765, P= 0.01) were significantly more altered in MB than PB patients. At final evaluation, NFI of the MB patients had worsened, especially among the six who had leprosy reaction. As the NFI of PB patients showed improvement, a significant difference between the two groups (χ2= 12.320, P= 0.001) was observed. A high prevalence of neuropathy was observed in newly diagnosed patients. Associating different tests with a thorough clinical neurological evaluation increases detection rates. PMID:22741099

  7. Progression of leprosy neuropathy: a case series study.

    PubMed

    Vital, Robson T; Illarramendi, Ximena; Nascimento, Osvaldo; Hacker, Mariana A; Sarno, Euzenir N; Jardim, Marcia R

    2012-05-01

    A need still exists to determine the clinical and neurophysiological characteristics of leprosy neuropathy at distinct times of the disease by different methods that measure the various nerve fiber functions. A prospective clinical study was performed with 10 paucibacillary (PB) and 12 multibacillary (MB) patients evaluated at diagnosis and one year after cessation of multidrug therapy (MDT). Peripheral nerve function was assessed clinically and by means of the sympathetic skin response, skin vasomotor reflex, and nerve conduction study (NCS). At diagnosis, 73% of the total 22 patients had nerve function impairment (NFI). Autonomic function (χ(2)= 5.5, P= 0.019) and NCS (χ(2)= 7.765, P= 0.01) were significantly more altered in MB than PB patients. At final evaluation, NFI of the MB patients had worsened, especially among the six who had leprosy reaction. As the NFI of PB patients showed improvement, a significant difference between the two groups (χ(2)= 12.320, P= 0.001) was observed. A high prevalence of neuropathy was observed in newly diagnosed patients. Associating different tests with a thorough clinical neurological evaluation increases detection rates. PMID:22741099

  8. Pure neuritic leprosy in patients from a high endemic region of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gerzain; Pinto, Rafael; Gomez, Yenny; Rengifo, Maria Leonor; Estrada, Olga Lucia; Sarmiento, Marta; Lopez, Fernando; Beltran-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Cardona-Castro, Nora

    2013-03-01

    Agua de Dios was a leprosarium for leprosy patients' obligatory isolation (1872-1961). Its leprosy incidence is the highest in Colombia (1.5-7/10000). Relapses are common. Government grant of US$ 200 per month subsidy is available to patients with disabilities. Spontaneous consultation with neural symptoms is frequent and simulation to get the subsidy has to be considered. We studied 36 subjects (2007-2009), with ages from 29-78, 19 of them men, with neural symptoms of 6 months to 20 years evolution. All had clinical examination, bacteriological examination, skin and nerve biopsies, electromyography (EMG), PCR for M. leprae, IgM anti-PGL1, and lepromin A. All but two are household contacts of leprosy patients. Symptoms were hypoesthesia of the hands and feet, and difficulty using hands with loss of muscular strength. None had skin lesions. Three had thickening of ulnar nerve. Lepromin was positive in all; bacteriology and biopsies were negative in all. The speed and amplitude of neural conduction were altered in 34 patients; two women had normal EMG and were considered to be feigning the disease; 21 were diagnosed as PNL by clinical, epidemiological and EMG findings; five of them had a positive PCR and one, high titers for IgM anti PGL1. Nine other subjects had diabetes and six carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Slow progression of disease, the lack of neural enlargement and the neural biopsies without inflammation suggest that most of these patients could have spontaneously cured PNL, as happens with other cases of paucibacillary leprosy. Diabetes and CTS are important differential diagnoses of PNL. Patients were treated with MDT and received the state subsidy. PMID:23741881

  9. Complement activation in leprosy: a retrospective study shows elevated circulating terminal complement complex in reactional leprosy.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, N; Hakobyan, S; Ramaglia, V; Geluk, A; Morgan, B Paul; Das, P Kumar; Baas, F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium leprae infection gives rise to the immunologically and histopathologically classified spectrum of leprosy. At present, several tools for the stratification of patients are based on acquired immunity markers. However, the role of innate immunity, particularly the complement system, is largely unexplored. The present retrospective study was undertaken to explore whether the systemic levels of complement activation components and regulators can stratify leprosy patients, particularly in reference to the reactional state of the disease. Serum samples from two cohorts were analysed. The cohort from Bangladesh included multi-bacillary (MB) patients with (n = 12) or without (n = 46) reaction (R) at intake and endemic controls (n = 20). The cohort from Ethiopia included pauci-bacillary (PB) (n = 7) and MB (n = 23) patients without reaction and MB (n = 15) patients with reaction. The results showed that the activation products terminal complement complex (TCC) (P ≤ 0·01), C4d (P ≤ 0·05) and iC3b (P ≤ 0·05) were specifically elevated in Bangladeshi patients with reaction at intake compared to endemic controls. In addition, levels of the regulator clusterin (P ≤ 0·001 without R; P < 0·05 with R) were also elevated in MB patients, irrespective of a reaction. Similar analysis of the Ethiopian cohort confirmed that, irrespective of a reaction, serum TCC levels were increased significantly in patients with reactions compared to patients without reactions (P ≤ 0·05). Our findings suggests that serum TCC levels may prove to be a valuable tool in diagnosing patients at risk of developing reactions. PMID:26749503

  10. Pathogen-specific epitopes as epidemiological tools for defining the magnitude of Mycobacterium leprae transmission in areas endemic for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marcia V S B; Guimarães, Marjorie M da S; Spencer, John S; Hacker, Mariana A V B; Costa, Luciana S; Carvalho, Fernanda M; Geluk, Annemieke; van der Ploeg-van Schip, Jolien J; Pontes, Maria A A; Gonçalves, Heitor S; de Morais, Janvier P; Bandeira, Tereza J P G; Pessolani, Maria C V; Brennan, Patrick J; Pereira, Geraldo M B

    2012-01-01

    During recent years, comparative genomic analysis has allowed the identification of Mycobacterium leprae-specific genes with potential application for the diagnosis of leprosy. In a previous study, 58 synthetic peptides derived from these sequences were tested for their ability to induce production of IFN-γ in PBMC from endemic controls (EC) with unknown exposure to M. leprae, household contacts of leprosy patients and patients, indicating the potential of these synthetic peptides for the diagnosis of sub- or preclinical forms of leprosy. In the present study, the patterns of IFN-γ release of the individuals exposed or non-exposed to M. leprae were compared using an Artificial Neural Network algorithm, and the most promising M. leprae peptides for the identification of exposed people were selected. This subset of M. leprae-specific peptides allowed the differentiation of groups of individuals from sites hyperendemic for leprosy versus those from areas with lower level detection rates. A progressive reduction in the IFN-γ levels in response to the peptides was seen when contacts of multibacillary (MB) patients were compared to other less exposed groups, suggesting a down modulation of IFN-γ production with an increase in bacillary load or exposure to M. leprae. The data generated indicate that an IFN-γ assay based on these peptides applied individually or as a pool can be used as a new tool for predicting the magnitude of M. leprae transmission in a given population. PMID:22545169

  11. Pathogen-Specific Epitopes as Epidemiological Tools for Defining the Magnitude of Mycobacterium leprae Transmission in Areas Endemic for Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, John S.; Hacker, Mariana A. V. B.; Costa, Luciana S.; Carvalho, Fernanda M.; Geluk, Annemieke; van der Ploeg-van Schip, Jolien J.; Pontes, Maria A. A.; Gonçalves, Heitor S.; de Morais, Janvier P.; Bandeira, Tereza J. P. G.; Pessolani, Maria C. V.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Pereira, Geraldo M. B.

    2012-01-01

    During recent years, comparative genomic analysis has allowed the identification of Mycobacterium leprae-specific genes with potential application for the diagnosis of leprosy. In a previous study, 58 synthetic peptides derived from these sequences were tested for their ability to induce production of IFN-γ in PBMC from endemic controls (EC) with unknown exposure to M. leprae, household contacts of leprosy patients and patients, indicating the potential of these synthetic peptides for the diagnosis of sub- or preclinical forms of leprosy. In the present study, the patterns of IFN-γ release of the individuals exposed or non-exposed to M. leprae were compared using an Artificial Neural Network algorithm, and the most promising M. leprae peptides for the identification of exposed people were selected. This subset of M. leprae-specific peptides allowed the differentiation of groups of individuals from sites hyperendemic for leprosy versus those from areas with lower level detection rates. A progressive reduction in the IFN-γ levels in response to the peptides was seen when contacts of multibacillary (MB) patients were compared to other less exposed groups, suggesting a down modulation of IFN-γ production with an increase in bacillary load or exposure to M. leprae. The data generated indicate that an IFN-γ assay based on these peptides applied individually or as a pool can be used as a new tool for predicting the magnitude of M. leprae transmission in a given population. PMID:22545169

  12. Leprosy in a University Hospital in Southern Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Adma Silva; Pinto, Karin Cristine; Bona, Míryan Priscilla Santos; de Mattos, Suelen Mayara Lopes; Hoffmann, Marina Portiolli; Mulinari-Brenner, Fabiane Andrade; Ottoboni, Vanessa Cristhine Dallolmo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy is an infectious disease that may lead to irreversible nerve damage, compromising patient's quality of life and leading to loss of working years. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the epidemiological profile of patients followed at a University Hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a retrospective observational study, based on a review of medical records. We studied the clinical and epidemiological features of patients with leprosy monitored at the Hospital de Clínicas of the Federal University of Paraná between January 2005 and January 2010. RESULTS The mean age was 47.51, while 35.94% of patients were aged 41-60. The male:female rate was 1.8:1. The most prevalent occupations were: retired, students or rural workers. Patients came mainly from Curitiba or nearby areas, but there were also patients from the countryside. The mean diagnostic delay was 24.57 months. Multibacillary forms prevailed, with the lepromatous variety being the most common, closely followed by the borderline type. Neural enlargement was found in more than 50% of the patients and 48.44% of them developed reactional states. Hemolysis was the most commonly detected drug side effect. Initial functional evaluation was possible in 70% of patients, 55% of whom had disabilities upon diagnosis. The most prevalent associated disease was hypertension. CONCLUSIONS This study showed an important diagnostic delay and a high rate of sequelae in this specific population. Brazil is one of the few remaining countries that has not yet eradicated leprosy and it is important to improve health policies in order to prevent sequelae and achieve eradication. PMID:26560210

  13. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae in saliva and the evaluation of oral sensitivity in patients with leprosy

    PubMed Central

    da Rosa, Fernanda Borowsky; de Souza, Victor Costa; de Almeida, Tatiana Amaral Pires; do Nascimento, Valdinete Alves; Vásquez, Felicien Gonçalves; Cunha, Maria da Graça Souza; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sensitivity disorders in the oral cavity related to the presence of Mycobacterium leprae in the saliva of treatment-naïve patients with leprosy in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 subjects with leprosy. The subjects were interviewed to evaluate the sensitivity of the oral cavity. For the detection of M. leprae, saliva and slit-skin smear samples were collected. The samples were analysed using a bacteriological index (BI) protocol and the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results indicated that 15 of the 45 (33.3%) subjects with leprosy showed decreased oral sensitivity, which confirmed the importance of the oral cavity sensitivity evaluation. There was not a direct relationship between the presence of M. leprae in saliva and changes in oral sensitivity. Positive saliva qPCR results from six (31.6%) of 19 paucibacillary (PB) patients suggested the possibility of a new site for sample collection. Positive results using these diagnostic techniques (BI, slit-skin smear and saliva qPCR) increased to 55.5%, thus opening the possibility of combining these different techniques to increase the rate of positive diagnoses, especially in PB patients. PMID:23903971

  14. [Borderline leprosy as a rare differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Trawinski, Henning; Brüning, Jan-Hinnerk; Baum, Petra; Ziemer, Mirjana; Schubert, Stefan; Lübbert, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    History and clinical findings | A 42-year-old migrant from Brazil presented with persistent sensory disturbances, skin discolorations and local alopecia in the upper limbs. Decisive for the presentation in our Tropical Medicine Clinic were new occurrences of severe pain and redness and swelling in the area of the lesions that had already been assessed by a number of medical specialists without a clear diagnosis could be made. Investigations and diagnosis | The histological analysis of skin biopsies showed perivascular, perineural, periadnexial lymphocytic and granulomatous dermatitis. In a direct microbiological preparation individual acid fast bacilli could be detected (Ziehl-Neelsen stain). The electroneurographical examination demonstrated a sensitive peripheral-neurogenic damage with emphasis on the right median nerve and the left ulnar and radial nerves. Thermography revealed an increased heating or cooling threshold. The serological investigation by ELISA for IgM antibodies against the phenolic glycolipid (PGL-1) was positive (titer 1 : 1200). In summary, the diagnosis of borderline leprosy (infection with Mycobacterium leprae) with transition to multibacillary leprosy (according to WHO) and leprosy reaction type 1 was made. Treatment and course | We initiated an oral antimycobacterial therapy (multidrug therapy, MDT) with rifampin, clofazimine and dapsone for 12 months (WHO regimen for multibacillary leprosy). Leprosy reaction type 1 was treated with prednisolone and by increasing the dose of clofazimine. Analgesic therapy on demand was carried out with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen). MDT and successful management of leprosy reaction lead to a rapid improvement of symptoms. Conclusions | Leprosy is an infectious disease occurring only rarely in Germany (average incidence of 1-2 cases per year) that is diagnosed almost exclusively among migrants. Main symptoms comprise non-itchy, reddish, touch insensitive skin lesions or nerve deficits. The

  15. Evaluation of Apoptosis in Skin Biopsies of Patients of Borderline Leprosy and Lepra Type 1 Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Nivedita; Agarwal, Sarla; Sharma, Sonal; Sharma, Satendra; Pandhi, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of apoptosis is not clear in leprosy and lepra reactions. Objectives: To evaluate frequency of apoptosis in skin lesions of borderline leprosy and Type 1 lepra reaction. Methods: Sixty patients with borderline leprosy (30 with clinically diagnosed Type 1 reaction (T1R) (Group I) and 30 without clinical evidence of reaction (Group II)) were analyzed in this prospective study. Apoptosis was detected by two different methods for comparison, that is, histopathologic examination (HPE) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation and electrophoresis. Quantification of apoptotic bodies/10 high power fields (HPF) was also done. Results: Out of 30 cases, apoptosis was detected in 29 cases in Group I and 24 cases in Group II by HPE (P = 0.103), whereas, with the use of DNA electrophoresis it was detected in 24 cases in Group I and 18 cases in Group II (P = 0.091). On quantitative estimation it was found that number of apoptotic bodies are higher in Group I in comparison to Group II (2.77 vs 1.99), which is statistically significant. Conclusions: There was moderate agreement (κ = 0.47) between the two methods of apoptosis detection. Apoptosis was seen more in patients with T1R both qualitatively (statistically nonsignificant) and quantitatively (statistically significant). Clinical significance of this novel finding is that apoptosis can be used as one of the variables for diagnosis of T1R to increase detection rate. PMID:25657399

  16. Evolution of early lesions in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, B; Mukherjee, A; Girdhar, A; Husain, S; Malaviya, G N; Girdhar, B K

    1993-09-01

    We observed 29 patients presenting with vague peripheral neurological symptoms for 6 months or more. During this period, 16 developed clinical leprosy, 3 developed borderline tuberculoid leprosy and the other 13 developed neuritic leprosy. Of these 13 cases 11 subsequently developed skin lesions similar to those seen in indeterminate and in borderline tuberculoid leprosy. Based on the above observations, an attempt has been made to explain the evolution of early lesions of leprosy. PMID:8231606

  17. Primary Motor Cortex Representation of Handgrip Muscles in Patients with Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Maria Luíza Sales; Sanchez, Tiago Arruda; Moreira, Filipe Azaline; Hoefle, Sebastian; Souto, Inaiacy Bittencourt; da Cunha, Antônio José Ledo Alves

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an endemic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that predominantly attacks the skin and peripheral nerves, leading to progressive impairment of motor, sensory and autonomic function. Little is known about how this peripheral neuropathy affects corticospinal excitability of handgrip muscles. Our purpose was to explore the motor cortex organization after progressive peripheral nerve injury and upper-limb dysfunction induced by leprosy using noninvasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Methods In a cross-sectional study design, we mapped bilaterally in the primary motor cortex (M1) the representations of the hand flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), as well as of the intrinsic hand muscles abductor pollicis brevis (APB), first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). All participants underwent clinical assessment, handgrip dynamometry and motor and sensory nerve conduction exams 30 days before mapping. Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney tests were performed with an alpha-value of p<0.05. Findings Dynamometry performance of the patients’ most affected hand (MAH), was worse than that of the less affected hand (LAH) and of healthy controls participants (p = 0.031), confirming handgrip impairment. Motor threshold (MT) of the FDS muscle was higher in both hemispheres in patients as compared to controls, and lower in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH when compared to that of the LAH. Moreover, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes collected in the FDS of the MAH were higher in comparison to those of controls. Strikingly, MEPs in the intrinsic hand muscle FDI had lower amplitudes in the hemisphere contralateral to MAH as compared to those of the LAH and the control group. Taken together, these results are suggestive of a more robust representation of an extrinsic hand flexor and impaired intrinsic hand muscle function in the hemisphere contralateral to the MAH due to leprosy. Conclusion Decreased

  18. Dermatologists combat leprosy in Yemen.

    PubMed

    al-Qubati, Y; al-Kubati, A S

    1997-12-01

    In the Republic of Yemen, leprosy patients face social stigmatization and considerable suffering. Diagnosis and treatment are delayed by the poor health infrastructure, difficult terrain, and political instability, resulting in unnecessary complications and deformities. The National Leprosy Control Program, established in 1982 with the support of the German Leprosy Relief Association and the World Health Organization, has sought to reach people in remote rural areas. 63 leprosy clinics have been established in 14 regions; 60 of these clinics are integrated into the primary health care system. In addition, dermatologists, with support from international nongovernmental organizations, have campaigned through the media and mobile teams for an end to the ostracism of leprosy patients and urged their reintegration into the community. Other interventions have included the production of posters for health education, construction of an orthopedic workshop, reconstructive surgeries performed by an international corps of volunteer physicians, training courses for medical personnel, and a rehabilitation program to teach sewing to women with leprosy. As a result of early passive detection and other leprosy control efforts, Yemen's leprosy caseload has declined from a peak of 2314 registered for treatment in 1989 to 765 in 1996. The prevalence of leprosy has declined from 1.9/10,000 population in 1989 to 0.5/10,000 in 1996. A combined leprosy-tuberculosis pilot project is under development. By the year 2000, leprosy should be eliminated as a public health problem in Yemen. PMID:9466198

  19. [Should biopsy be done on the sensory branch of the radial nerve in leprosy patients? Apropos of 112 cases].

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Dieye, M; Mane, I; Cartel, J L

    1997-01-01

    Biopsies of the superficial sensory branch of the radial nerve are contested. Some authors mention it to be simple and without harm, but others are formally against this procedure. At ILAD, 274 biopsies were made between 1986 to 1992. We present a review of 112 leprosy patients for whom biopsy was done. On 112 reexamined patients, we observed 2 benign neuroma, hence 2%. The comparison of nerve function before biopsy and after, of 63 of the 112 patients, reexamination shows no significant modification of the functional score. Given even the occurrence of benign neuroma in only 2% of the cases, the authors do not recommend the biopsy of the superficial sensory branch of the radial nerve. For research purposes on neuritis in leprosy, as well as to assure diagnosis in primary neuritic leprosy, we propose the biopsy of the sensory branch of the musculo cutaneous nerve at elbow level. PMID:9131938

  20. Evaluation of National Leprosy Eradication Program after Integration into General Health System in Rajkot District, Gujarat from 2003 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chudasama, Rajesh K; Lakkad, S G; Patel, Umed V; Sheth, Ankit; Thakkar, Dhara; Rangoonwala, Matib

    2016-01-01

    Background: National Leprosy Eradication Program (NLEP) was launched in 1983 with the goal of elimination of leprosy as a public health problem. Aim: To evaluate the NLEP performance after integration into general health system from April 2003 to March 2014. Material and Methods: A retrospective record based study was conducted by obtaining data from Rajkot district leprosy center. Prevalence rate (PR), new case detection rate (NCDR), proportion of female cases, child cases, multibacillary (MB) cases, Grade II disability among new cases and release from treatment (RFT) cases were evaluated from April 2003 to March 2014 and analyzed by using Chi-square for trend analysis test. Results: The PR of leprosy per 10,000 populations was significantly declined (P < 0.001) from 0.44 in 2003–2004 to 0.15 during March 2014. Reduction in NCDR trend was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The proportion of female cases among newly detected cases showed fluctuation from 36.23% in 2003–2004 to 37.10% in 2013–2014 (P > 0.05). The proportion of child cases also showed significantly declining trend from 12.08% in 2003–2004 to 6.70% in 2013–2014 (P < 0.05). Significant number of MB cases decreased from 122 (2003–2004) to 69 (2013–2014) (P < 0.001). Grade II disability proportion was 1.45% in the year 2003–2004, increased to 5.2% in 2009–2010 and then again decreased to 3.4% in 2013–2014 (P > 0.05). Proportion of patients RFT showed fluctuation from 66.66% (2003–2004) to 45.68% (2009–2010) and then 64.66% (2013–2014) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The NLEP is having a favorable impact on the problem of leprosy by maintaining the elimination level of leprosy in Rajkot district over a decade. PMID:26955096

  1. [The originality and creativity of leprosy sequelae patients in regard to dental care].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masatsugu; Shimizu, Akemi

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy sequelae patients surmount the inconvenience by the handicap. When people with the handicap are able to do the same act as healthy people, we may not pay attention to the originality and creativity for it. Therefore, we are not able to notice some risks which are hidden. We turned our attention to the denture in the oral region. The methods of putting in and taking out the denture of leprosy sequelae patients are characteristic. Even a partial denture, there are many patients who take out their denture using only their tongue, without touching a clasp with a finger. And they put in the denture by biting. But we had never not announced the details of their methods. So, we investigated how to handle their denture in National Sanatorium Nagashima Aiseien. We explain their methods and show the results. On the other hand, there are a lot of cases of the denture breakage in National Sanatorium Nagashima Aiseien. We think most of these matters occur due to their handicaps. We researched on the cases with dentures broken. In addition, we also describe our countermeasure. PMID:27008825

  2. Epidermotropism of lepra bacilli in a patient with histoid Hansen's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Rita V.; Pilani, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Histoid leprosy is a rare form of multibacillary leprosy with distinct clinical and histopathological features. It is a variant of lepromatous leprosy with a very high bacillary load. It appears in patients as relapse after dapsone monotherapy and resistance or rarely, “de novo.” Although leprosy is slowly declining the exact mode of transmission is unclear. At least until recently, the most widely held belief was that the disease was transmitted by contact between cases of leprosy and healthy persons. Transmission by the respiratory route is also gaining ground. There are other possibilities such as transmission through insects, which cannot be completely ruled out. However, the present case report possibly suggests the role of skin as a portal of both exit and entry for the bacillus in histoid leprosy transmission. De novo form of histoid leprosy has numerous solid staining bacteria inside the epidermis. The reports show that these bacilli can be eliminated from the intact epidermis, which indicate an unusual role of the skin in the transmission of leprosy. PMID:25396142

  3. Epidermotropism of lepra bacilli in a patient with histoid Hansen's disease.

    PubMed

    Vora, Rita V; Pilani, Abhishek

    2014-10-01

    Histoid leprosy is a rare form of multibacillary leprosy with distinct clinical and histopathological features. It is a variant of lepromatous leprosy with a very high bacillary load. It appears in patients as relapse after dapsone monotherapy and resistance or rarely, "de novo." Although leprosy is slowly declining the exact mode of transmission is unclear. At least until recently, the most widely held belief was that the disease was transmitted by contact between cases of leprosy and healthy persons. Transmission by the respiratory route is also gaining ground. There are other possibilities such as transmission through insects, which cannot be completely ruled out. However, the present case report possibly suggests the role of skin as a portal of both exit and entry for the bacillus in histoid leprosy transmission. De novo form of histoid leprosy has numerous solid staining bacteria inside the epidermis. The reports show that these bacilli can be eliminated from the intact epidermis, which indicate an unusual role of the skin in the transmission of leprosy. PMID:25396142

  4. Vitamin D receptor expression levels determine the severity and complexity of disease progression among leprosy reaction patients

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, D.; Reja, A.H.H.; Biswas, N.; Bhattacharyya, P.; Patra, P.K.; Bhattacharya, B.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the roles of vitamin D and its receptor, VDR, in the progression of leprosy. The majority of individuals with leprosy from Kolkata, India, with a type 1 or type 2 reaction have low levels of vitamin D3 in serum samples. Interestingly, individuals with a type 2 reaction associated with neuritis/erythema nodosum leprosum had very low VDR mRNA expression levels, ranging from 5% to 10%, compared to that of healthy control subjects; these patients also had a high bacilli index, ranging from 3+ to 5+. This is the first report to indicate that VDR expression levels may determine the complexity and severity of the progression of leprosy. PMID:26106480

  5. Vitamin D receptor expression levels determine the severity and complexity of disease progression among leprosy reaction patients.

    PubMed

    Mandal, D; Reja, A H H; Biswas, N; Bhattacharyya, P; Patra, P K; Bhattacharya, B

    2015-07-01

    We studied the roles of vitamin D and its receptor, VDR, in the progression of leprosy. The majority of individuals with leprosy from Kolkata, India, with a type 1 or type 2 reaction have low levels of vitamin D3 in serum samples. Interestingly, individuals with a type 2 reaction associated with neuritis/erythema nodosum leprosum had very low VDR mRNA expression levels, ranging from 5% to 10%, compared to that of healthy control subjects; these patients also had a high bacilli index, ranging from 3+ to 5+. This is the first report to indicate that VDR expression levels may determine the complexity and severity of the progression of leprosy. PMID:26106480

  6. Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Lepromatous Leprosy Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sendrasoa, F. A.; Ranaivo, I. M.; Raharolahy, O.; Andrianarison, M.; Ramarozatovo, L. S.; Rapelanoro Rabenja, F.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of leprosy and pulmonary tuberculosis is reported infrequently in the modern era. We report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed in patient being treated with glucocorticoids for complications of leprosy (type II reaction). Physicians should recognize that the leprosy patients treated with glucocorticoid may develop tuberculosis. PMID:26504603

  7. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in trophic ulcers in leprosy patients. A 28-case study.

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Mane, I; Cartel, J L

    1996-09-01

    Between 1984 and 1993, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia developing in chronic ulcers were observed in 28 former Senegalese leprosy patients, which amounts to an annual frequency of 1.9 per 1000 ulcers. Correct diagnosis could only be made by histopathological examination of specimens taken from the depth of the lesion. Amputation was carried out on 17 patients and local excision on the other 10. Recurrence of growth was observed in 8 of the 10 patients treated by excision; in all of these 8 cases below knee amputation had to be subsequently performed. From our experience, it may be assumed that local excision should be carried out only in the case of small tumours. Since the aim of surgical procedure is to allow the patient to have physical autonomy, below knee amputation, followed by adaptation of prosthesis, should be the procedure chosen in the other cases. PMID:8885614

  8. LEPROSY NEPHROPATHY: A REVIEW OF CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL FEATURES

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geraldo Bezerra; Daher, Elizabeth De Francesco; Pires, Roberto da Justa; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Meneses, Gdayllon Cavalcante; Araújo, Sônia Maria Holanda Almeida; Barros, Elvino José Guardão

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, highly incapacitating, and with systemic involvement in some cases. Renal involvement has been reported in all forms of the disease, and it is more frequent in multibacillary forms. The clinical presentation is variable and is determined by the host immunologic system reaction to the bacilli. During the course of the disease there are the so called reactional states, in which the immune system reacts against the bacilli, exacerbating the clinical manifestations. Different renal lesions have been described in leprosy, including acute and chronic glomerulonephritis, interstitial nephritis, secondary amyloidosis and pyelonephritis. The exact mechanism that leads to glomerulonephritis in leprosy is not completely understood. Leprosy treatment includes rifampicin, dapsone and clofazimine. Prednisone and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be used to control acute immunological episodes. PMID:25651321

  9. Awareness about the persons with disability act among leprosy patients and other disabled persons.

    PubMed

    Robins, R; Martin, D; Raj, K Durai; Raju, M S

    2006-01-01

    To assess the level of awareness about the different provisions of the Persons with Disability Act (PWD Act) among leprosy patients and other disabled, 233 disabled persons from the self-help groups formed by Vadathorasalur Leprosy Control Unit have been interviewed using a structured interview checklist. The results show that 74.7% of the respondents were aware that identity cards are available for the disabled, 56.2% were aware of the free education benefit to the disabled, as low as 35.6% were aware of the scholarships, 33% knew about the employment reservations, 24.9% heard about the housing scheme of the government for the disabled, but 24.5% only knew about law against discrimination, 31.8% came in contact with institutions for the severely disabled and only 16% were aware of the unemployment allowance to the disabled. The level of awareness is low among women with regard to all components of the Act. It was found that students studying up to secondary level were not aware of the availability of scholarships and free education, which needs to be seriously looked into, especially by educational institutions. The level of formal education played a significant role in increasing awareness about the Act among literates. The knowledge is low among persons of all occupations. The study showed that there is a great need for an educational intervention programme to publicize the provisions of the Act among the disabled and their families. PMID:17120505

  10. Influence of Genetic Ancestry on INDEL Markers of NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1, IL4 and CYP19A1 Genes in Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pablo; Salgado, Claudio; Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; Santos, Sidney; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Leprosy is an insidious infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular bacteria Mycobacterium leprae, and host genetic factors can modulate the immune response and generate distinct categories of leprosy susceptibility that are also influenced by genetic ancestry. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the possible effects of CYP19A1 [rs11575899], NFKβ1 [rs28362491], IL1α [rs3783553], CASP8 [rs3834129], UGT1A1 [rs8175347], PAR1 [rs11267092], CYP2E1 [INDEL 96pb] and IL4 [rs79071878] genes in a group of 141 leprosy patients and 180 healthy individuals. The INDELs were typed by PCR Multiplex in ABI PRISM 3130 and analyzed with GeneMapper ID v3.2. The NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and IL4 INDELs were associated with leprosy susceptibility, while NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and CYP19A1 were associated with the MB (Multibacilary) clinical form of leprosy. Conclusions/Significance NFKβ1 [rs28362491], CASP8 [rs3834129], PAR1 [rs11267092] and IL4 [rs79071878] genes are potential markers for susceptibility to leprosy development, while the INDELs in NFKβ1, CASP8, PAR1 and CYP19A1 (rs11575899) are potential markers for the severe clinical form MB. Moreover, all of these markers are influenced by genetic ancestry, and European contribution increases the risk to leprosy development, in other hand an increase in African contribution generates protection against leprosy. PMID:26367014

  11. Enoyl-Coenzyme A Hydratase and Antigen 85B of Mycobacterium habana Are Specifically Recognized by Antibodies in Sera from Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Serafín-López, J.; Talavera-Paulin, M.; Amador-Molina, J. C.; Alvarado-Riverón, M.; Vilchis-Landeros, M. M.; Méndez-Ortega, P.; Fafutis-Morris, M.; Paredes-Cervantes, V.; López-Santiago, R.; León, C. I.; Guerrero, M. I.; Ribas-Aparicio, R. M.; Mendoza-Hernández, G.; Carreño-Martínez, C.; Estrada-Parra, S.; Estrada-García, I.

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, which is a noncultivable bacterium. One of the principal goals of leprosy research is to develop serological tests that will allow identification and early treatment of leprosy patients. M. habana is a cultivable nonpathogenic mycobacterium and candidate vaccine for leprosy, and several antigens that cross-react between M. leprae and M. habana have been discovered. The aim of the present study was to extend the identification of cross-reactive antigens by identifying M. habana proteins that reacted by immunoblotting with antibodies in serum samples from leprosy patients but not with antibodies in sera from tuberculosis (TB) patients or healthy donors (HDs). A 28-kDa antigen that specifically reacted with sera from leprosy patients was identified. To further characterize this antigen, protein spots were aligned in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels and Western blots. Spots cut out from the gels were then analyzed by mass spectrometry. Two proteins were identified: enoyl-coenzyme A hydratase (lipid metabolism; ML2498) and antigen 85B (Ag85B; mycolyltransferase; ML2028). These proteins represent promising candidates for the design of a reliable tool for the serodiagnosis of lepromatous leprosy, which is the most frequent form in Mexico. PMID:21613461

  12. Human Polymorphisms as Clinical Predictors in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Prado Montes de Oca, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Genetic and serum markers in human host can predict leprosy susceptibility per se as well as be useful in classification and/or prediction of clinical variants and immunological responses in leprosy. Adequate and timely assessment of potential risks associated with these 38 host leprosy genes could diminish epidemiological burden and improve life quality of patients with this still prevalent mycobacterial disease. PMID:22220182

  13. Lymph node abscess and cardiac involvement in a patient with nodular lepromatous leprosy (LL) with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL): a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Bakshi, S K; Sharma, Veena

    2015-03-01

    With the world's focus on reducing the leprosy patient load to the extent of elimination, finding and reporting the rarer presentations of leprosy becomes important for prompt treatment. Also, these untreated patients may serve as a potential source of infection in community. We report a 35-year old man diagnosed to have lepromatous leprosy and erythema nodosum leprosum with inguinal lymph node abscess and suspected cardiac involvement that proved fatal. We stress the importance of detailed workup to look for associated systemic involvement for timely intervention and favourable outcome. PMID:26065155

  14. Brazilian Society of Dermatology against leprosy*

    PubMed Central

    Lastória, Joel Carlos; de Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian Society of Dermatology promoted a national campaign against leprosy in 2012, involving their State Regional, Accredited Services of Dermatology and Referral Services in Leprosy. Consisted of clarification to the population about the disease and a day of medical voluntary service. Ninety services (57 Accredited Services and 33 Reference Services) participated, distributed in 23 states. The campaign examined 3,223 people and 421 new cases were diagnosed, 54,4% female, 74,3% between 19 and 64 years and 8,3% in children under 15 years. Of the 217 classified cases, 58,5% was paucibacillary and 41,5% was multibacillary. The results were posted on the Brazilian Society of Dermatology website. PMID:27438217

  15. Comparison of Bacillary Index on Slit Skin Smear with Bacillary Index of Granuloma in Leprosy and its Relevance to Present Therapeutic Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Sendhil M; Bhat, Ishwara P; Madhukara, J; Rout, Pritilata; Elizabeth, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: As the world moves toward elimination of leprosy, persistence of infective cases in endemic pockets remains a significant problem. The use of clinical criteria to decide the paucibacillary (PB) versus multibacillary (MB) regimens has greatly simplified therapy at the field setting. However, a small but significant risk of under-treatment of so-called “PB” cases which actually have significant bacillary load exists. This study was undertaken to assess this risk and compare two methods of assessment of bacillary load, namely bacillary index on slit skin smear (BIS) versus bacillary index of granuloma (BIG). Aims: To compare BIS with BIG on skin biopsy in consecutive untreated cases of leprosy. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted over a period of 12 months, wherein new untreated patients with leprosy were consecutively recruited. After a thorough clinical examination, each patient underwent slit skin smear (SSS) where the BIS was calculated. The same patient also underwent a skin biopsy from a clinical lesion where, the BIG was calculated. SSS and skin biopsy for BIS and BIG respectively were repeated for all patients at the end of therapy for comparison. All patients received therapy according to World Health Organization-Multidrug Therapy Guidelines. Results: The BIG was positive in all cases where the BIS was positive. Significantly, BIG was positive in three cases of borderline tuberculoid leprosy with <5 lesions who received PB regimen, whereas the BIS was negative in all three cases. Conclusion: This study suggests that BIG may be a better indicator of the true bacillary load in leprosy as compared to BIS. Its role in management is significant, at least in tertiary care centers to prevent “under-treatment” of so called PB cases, which may actually warrant MB regimens. PMID:25657397

  16. Asymmetric Nerve Enlargement: A Characteristic of Leprosy Neuropathy Demonstrated by Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Marques Jr., Wilson; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2015-01-01

    Background Neurological involvement occurs throughout the leprosy clinical spectrum and is responsible for the most feared consequences of the disease. Ultrasonography (US) provides objective measurements of nerve thickening and asymmetry. We examined leprosy patients before beginning multi-drug therapy aiming to describe differences in US measurements between classification groups and between patients with and without reactions. Methodology/Principal Findings Eleven paucibacillary (PB) and 85 multibacillary (MB) patients underwent nerve US. Twenty-seven patients had leprosy reactions (type 1, type 2 and/or acute neuritis) prior to US. The ulnar (at the cubital tunnel–Ut–and proximal to the tunnel–Upt), median (M) and common fibular (CF) nerves were scanned to measure cross-sectional areas (CSAs) in mm2 and to calculate the asymmetry indexes ΔCSA (absolute difference between right and left CSAs) and ΔUtpt (absolute difference between Upt and Ut CSAs). MB patients showed greater (p<0.05) CSAs than PB at Ut (13.88±11.4/9.53±6.14) and M (10.41±5.4/6.36±0.84). ΔCSAs and ΔUtpt were similar between PB and MB. The CSAs, ΔCSAs and ΔUtpt were similar between PB patients with reactions compared to PB patients without reactions. MB patients with reactions showed significantly greater CSAs (Upt, Ut and M), ΔCSAs (Upt and Ut) and ΔUtpt compared to MB patients without reactions. PB and MB showed similar frequencies of abnormal US measurements. Patients with reactions had higher frequency of nerve thickening and similar frequency of asymmetry to those without reactions. Conclusions/Significance This is the first study to investigate differences in nerve involvement among leprosy classification groups using US before treatment. The magnitude of thickening was greater in MB and in patients with reactions. Asymmetry indexes were greater in patients with reactions and did not significantly differ between PB and MB, demonstrating that asymmetry is a characteristic of

  17. Annular bullous lesions with atypical erythema multiforme in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aishani; Mahajan, Rashmi; Ninama, Kishan; Bilimoria, Freny

    2014-09-01

    Erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) is an immune complex-mediated reaction that may complicate the course of multibacillary leprosy. Bullous lesions in Type II reaction, though reported, are exceedingly rare. We report the case of a 32 year old female patient who presented initially at our OPD with erythema nodosum. Cutaneous examination revealed impaired sensation over dorsum of right foot and thickened right lateral popliteal nerve. Slit skin smear (SSS) from ear lobes revealed AFB with a bacteriological index of 2+. She was started on MDT, tablet ofloxacin 200 mg twice a day, and 30 mg oral prednisolone. Two months later, she presented with generalised pruritus, large target lesions over the back, and hemorrhagic bullae over lower extremities and annular pattern of bullae, over both arms. A SSS was repeated which was positive for AFB. Histopathology from bullous lesions was consistent with ENL. Direct Immunofluorescence (DIF) study was negative. Our patient improved rapidly after she was started on thalidomide 100 mg twice daily, with withdrawal of ofloxacin. Erythema Multiforme (EMF) and annular bullous lesions have been reported in patients on treatment with ofloxacin. This case is being presented due to the unusual and varied manifestation of Type II lepra reaction in a 34 year old female patient. PMID:25509721

  18. The GATA3 gene is involved in leprosy susceptibility in Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Priscila; da Silva, Weber Laurentino; de Oliveira Gimenez, Bruna Beatriz; Vallezi, Keren Bastos; Moraes, Milton Ozório; de Souza, Vânia Niéto Brito; Latini, Ana Carla Pereira

    2016-04-01

    Leprosy outcome is a complex trait and the host-pathogen-environment interaction defines the emergence of the disease. Host genetic risk factors have been successfully associated to leprosy. The 10p13 chromosomal region was linked to leprosy in familial studies and GATA3 gene is a strong candidate to be part of this association. Here, we tested tag single nucleotide polymorphisms at GATA3 in two case-control samples from Brazil comprising a total of 1633 individuals using stepwise strategy. The A allele of rs10905284 marker was associated with leprosy resistance. Then, a functional analysis was conducted and showed that individuals carrying AA genotype express higher levels of GATA-3 protein in lymphocytes. So, we confirmed that the rs10905284 is a locus associated to leprosy and influences the levels of this transcription factor in the Brazilian population. PMID:26807920

  19. Association of the solute carrier family 11 member 1 gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to leprosy in a Brazilian sample.

    PubMed

    Brochado, Maria José Franco; Gatti, Maria Fernanda Chociay; Zago, Marco Antônio; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-02-01

    Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1/solute carrier family 11 member 1 gene (Nramp1/Slc11a1) is a gene that controls the susceptibility of inbred mice to intracellular pathogens. Polymorphisms in the human Slc11a1/Nramp1 gene have been associated with host susceptibility to leprosy. This study has evaluated nine polymorphisms of the Slc11a1/Nramp1 gene [(GT)n, 274C/T, 469+14G/C, 577-18G/A, 823C/T, 1029 C/T, 1465-85G/A, 1703G/A, and 1729+55del4] in 86 leprosy patients (67 and 19 patients had the multibacillary and the paucibacillary clinical forms of the disease, respectively), and 239 healthy controls matched by age, gender, and ethnicity. The frequency of allele 2 of the (GT)n polymorphism was higher in leprosy patients [p = 0.04, odds ratio (OR) = 1.49], whereas the frequency of allele 3 was higher in the control group (p = 0.03; OR = 0.66). Patients carrying the 274T allele (p = 0.04; OR = 1.49) and TT homozygosis (p = 0.02; OR = 2.46), such as the 469+14C allele (p = 0.03; OR = 1.53) of the 274C/T and 469+14G/C polymorphisms, respectively, were more frequent in the leprosy group. The leprosy and control groups had similar frequency of the 577-18G/A, 823C/T, 1029C/T, 1465-85G/A, 1703G/A, and 1729+55del4 polymorphisms. The 274C/T polymorphism in exon 3 and the 469+14G/C polymorphism in intron 4 were associated with susceptibility to leprosy, while the allele 2 and 3 of the (GT)n polymorphism in the promoter region were associated with susceptibility and protection to leprosy, respectively. PMID:26814595

  20. The Use of Ozone in High Frequency Device to Treat Hand Ulcers in Leprosy: a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe J.J.; Correia, Helia; Nagen, Roberto; Gomes, Maria Kátia

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy leads to chronic granulomatous inflammation in skin and peripheral nerves that can lead to sensory, motor and autonomic impairments. Autonomic dysfunctions may result in dryness and cracking of the skin. In this study, we present the use of ozone provided by a high-frequency device to treat hand ulcers (wounds) in an 80-year-old man who was diagnosed as multibacillary in 2007. In the first visit, the patient was evaluated and received verbal and written instructions about self-care. Treatment consisted of five sessions, once per week. The ozone provided by a high-frequency device seemed to be useful in the treatment of ulcers, thus, contributing to the healing process. Research that investigates the use of high frequencies in the treatment of ulcers associated or not with other interventions (self-care strategies, protective clothing, adapted tools and footwear adaptation) is strongly recommended. PMID:26543396

  1. Health information system model for monitoring treatment and surveillance for leprosy patients in indonesia (case study in Pekalongan District, Central Java, Indonesia).

    PubMed

    Rachmani, Enny; Kurniadi, Arif; Hsu, Chien Yeh

    2013-01-01

    After India and Brazil, Indonesia has the third highest incidence/prevalence of leprosy in the world. Every year thousands of new cases and case with grade-2 disability are reported and, while the recovery rate lingers only 80-90 %. Therefore, more than 10 % of leprosy patients drop out of treatment and can be a source of new infections in the community. Our research was aimed at determining apparent difficulties in the leprosy control program as well as how a health information system (HIS) could assist the Indonesian leprosy control program. We used qualitative method with deep interview and observation of document. One of the difficulties which the Indonesian leprosy control program faces is discontinuity of patient's data due to rotating staff as well as the treatment monitoring and queries patients which should be monitored after treatment has ceased. Technology implementation is feasible through short message service (sms) reminders and web base applications. The leprosy control program urgently needs to implement continuous monitoring and recording of patients because of the particular characteristics of this contagious disease. PMID:23920870

  2. The Use of Assistive Technology to Promote Care of the Self and Social Inclusion in Patients with Sequels of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background This study is about the contribution of occupational therapy inside a rehabilitation group, and we focus on the autonomy of patients with disabilities due to leprosy. There are few studies on the use of assistive technology by leprosy patients; to our knowledge, none of them aim to have a subjective approach of care. Our purpose was to analyze the repercussions of assistive technology on autonomy of care of the self in patients with sequels of leprosy. Methods A qualitative, descriptive exploratory study with a semi-structured interview and a field observation as a research method was conducted between November 2014 and February 2015 at a University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Findings Eight patients from the service of Occupational Therapy were interviewed, and 44 hours of observation were performed. Interviews followed a semi-structured script and a field journal was used to take notes. Analysis was conducted by the hermeneutic approach. Costs were obtained after a global cost analysis of the fixed and variable expenses and direct and indirect costs to the manufactured products with an amount of 100 dollars. Results were grouped according to the following categories: contribution of the adapted devices for the care of the self and feelings and sensations provoked by the use of self-help devices. The reports revealed feelings, perceptions and meaningful contents about the social, familiar and individual dimensions, also the stigma coupled with leprosy. However, forms of re-signification were elaborated. Conclusions Assistive technology empowers the subject to perform care of the self and promotes social inclusion. PMID:27124408

  3. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. PMID:26773623

  4. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Høyvoll, Liv R; Fløisand, Yngvar; Orrem, Hilde Lang; Gunnarsson, Ragnar; Landrø, Linn; Brevig, Trine; Gaustad, Peter; Nordøy, Ingvild

    2015-12-01

    A patient from Southeast Asia was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus. One year later, she experienced exacerbation of skin lesions and was diagnosed with erythema nodosum leprosum. Upon treatment, the patient developed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with multi-organ failure and died from invasive fungal infection. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis has to our knowledge, not previously been reported in leprosy. PMID:26964439

  5. Prevention of repeated episodes of type 2 reaction of leprosy with the use of thalidomide 100 mg/day*

    PubMed Central

    Putinatti, Maria Stella de Mello Ayres; Lastória, Joel Carlos; Padovani, Carlos Roberto

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy can have its course interrupted by type 1 and 2 reactional episodes, the last named of erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). Thalidomide has been the medication of choice for the control of ENL episodes since 1965. OBJECTIVES These episodes can repeat and cause damages to the patient. In order to prevent these episodes, an extra dose of 100 mg/day thalidomide was used during six months, followed by a follow-up period of six more months after thalidomide discontinuation. METHODS We included 42 patients with multibacillary (MB) leprosy who had episodes of ENL. They were male and female patients aged between 18 and 84 years. RESULTS Of the 42 patients, 39 (92.85%) had the lepromatous form and three (7.15%) had the borderline form. We found that 100% of patients had no reactional episode during the use of the drug. During the follow-up period after thalidomide discontinuation, 33 (78.57%) patients had no reactional episode and nine (21.43%), all of them with the lepromatous form, had mild episodes, which were controlled using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory. There were no thalidomide-related side effects. CONCLUSION A maintenance dose of 100 mg/day of thalidomide showed to be effective to prevent repeated type 2 reactional episodes of ENL. PMID:24770503

  6. Detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA by polymerase chain reaction in the blood of individuals, eight years after completion of anti-leprosy therapy.

    PubMed

    Santos, A R; Balassiano, V; Oliveira, M L; Pereira, M A; Santos, P B; Degrave, W M; Suffys, P N

    2001-11-01

    Thirty eight patients with indeterminate leprosy (HI), at least 4 to 6 years after discharge from multibacillary (MB) or paucibacillary (PB) schemes of anti leprosy multidrug therapy (MDT), were submitted to traditional diagnostic procedures for leprosy and to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of different clinical samples for detection of Mycobacterium leprae DNA. No significant difference was observed for any of the parameters analyzed between PB or MB schemes of treatment and no indications were found for more efficient outcome of HI using the MB scheme. Remarkably, 18 (54.5%) of the individuals were PCR positive in at least one of the samples: positivity of PCR was highest in blood samples and four individuals were PCR positive in blood and some other sample. Upon comparison of PCR results with clinical and histopathological parameters, no correlation was found between PCR-positivity and eventual relapse. This is the first report on detection of M. leprae DNA in PB patients, more than half a decade after completion of MDT, suggesting that live bacilli are present and circulating much longer than expected, although reinfection of the individuals can not be excluded. Overall, we feel that because of the high sensitivity of the assay, extreme care should be taken about association of PCR results, efficacy of treatment and disease status. PMID:11784934

  7. Changes in plantar load distribution and gait pattern following foot drop correction in leprosy affected patients.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Mrinmoy; Joshua, Jerry; Mahato, Nidhu

    2015-09-01

    This study was done to compare the changes in plantar load (weight distribution) and gait patterns before and after tibialis posterior transfer surgery in people affected by leprosy. Changes in gait patterns were observed and proportionate changes in plantar load were quantified using data captured by a baropodometer. All the eight patients who underwent tibialis posterior transfer surgery in 2013 in our hospital were included in the study. In addition to the regular pre-operative and post-operative assessments, the patients also underwent baropodometric evaluation. There was a significant change in plantar load at the heel, lateral border and forefoot. Using the foot pressure scan, it was noted that the progression of the centre of mass (displayed graphically as 'the gait line') was also affected by the altered pattern of weight distribution. This study reiterates the importance of tibialis posterior transfer because: it restores the normal gait pattern of 1, 2, 3 (where 1 is heel strike, 2 is mid foot contact and 3 is forefoot contact) and provides a more uniform distribution of planter load. PMID:26665356

  8. Leprosy and AIDS: a review of the literature and speculations on the impact of CD4+ lymphocyte depletion on immunity to Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A

    1991-12-01

    The potent effects of HIV infection on the human immune system, the complexity of the host-parasite interaction in leprosy, and the paucity of current information on the natural history of co-infected patients makes this area a fertile ground for clinical and immunologic investigation. Several studies have now validated the prediction that there exists a large cohort of patients, particularly in Africa, who are concurrently infected with HIV and M. leprae. Sparse but tantalizing evidence suggests that infection with HIV may increase the incidence of leprosy among individuals with subclinical infection with M. leprae, either through shortening the incubation period or by increasing disease penetrance. Similarly, active mycobacterial disease may accelerate the course of HIV disease, as has been postulated to occur during concurrent infections with certain other viral and bacterial pathogens in HIV-positive patients. A subtle and complex interplay between HIV and leprosy may thus result which will impact the observed epidemiology of both illnesses in regions where both are prevalent. Possible effects of the HIV epidemic on leprosy control programs have been outlined by the World Health Organization and in an editorial by Turk and Rees. The published experience provides few guidelines for the clinical care of co-infected patients. The initial response to conventional therapeutic regimens appears to be excellent, but no follow-up data have been included. The possible absence of ENL in these patients would simplify care for multibacillary disease, if this observation is confirmed in larger field studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1687045

  9. Migration among individuals with leprosy: a population-based study in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Murto, Christine; Ariza, Liana; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Chichava, Olga André; Oliveira, Alexcian Rodrigues; Kaplan, Charles; Silva, Luciana Ferreira Marques da; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates social and clinical factors associated with migration among individuals affected by leprosy. A cross-sectional study was conducted among those newly diagnosed with leprosy (2006-2008), in 79 endemic municipalities in the state of Tocantins, Brazil (N = 1,074). In total, 76.2% were born in a municipality different from their current residence. In the five years before diagnosis 16.7% migrated, and 3.6% migrated after leprosy diagnosis. Findings reflect aspects associated with historical rural-urban population movement in Brazil. Indicators of poverty were prominent among before-diagnosis migrants but not after-diagnosis migrants. Migration after diagnosis was associated with prior migration. The association of multibacillary leprosy with migration indicates healthcare access may be an obstacle to early diagnosis among before-diagnosis migrants, which may also be related to the high mobility of this group. PMID:24714939

  10. Haematological profile in leprosy. Part I--general findings.

    PubMed

    Karat, A B; Rao, P S

    1977-04-01

    Haematological studies in 904 adult leprosy patients with different types of leprosy, in various stages of the disease and treatment are described. Haemoglobin, packed cell volume, serum albumin and serum iron are significantly lower among lepromatous leprosy patients as compared with non-lepromatous patients. The serum B12 levels were significantly higher among the lepromatous group. Acid fast bacilli have been demonstrated in skin smear negative leprosy patients with indeterminate and tuberculoid leprosy, suggesting occurrence of bacillaemia in these groups of patients. PMID:909286

  11. Improved leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from lepromatous leprosy patients with hapten modified M. leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Fotedar, A; Mustafa, A S; Narang, B S; Talwar, G P

    1982-01-01

    Two acetoacetylated derivatives of Mycobacterium leprae with variable hapten groups and a conjugate with tetanus toxoid were prepared. These were tested as antigens along with unmodified M. leprae in the leucocyte migration inhibition response of leucocytes from clinically, bacteriologically and histopathologically confirmed cases of lepromatous leprosy. LMI response was poor with M. leprae, but was significantly enhanced with acetoacetylated M. leprae. PMID:6751637

  12. Haplotypes of the IL10 Gene as Potential Protection Factors in Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patricia; Alencar, Dayse; Pinto, Pablo; Santos, Ney; Salgado, Claudio; Sortica, Vinicius A.; Hutz, Mara H.; Santos, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae characterized by dermatoneurological signs and symptoms that has a large number of new cases worldwide. Several studies have associated interleukin 10 with susceptibility/resistance to several diseases. We investigated haplotypes formed by three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the IL10 gene (A-1082G, C-819T, and C-592A) in order to better understand the susceptibility to and severity of leprosy in an admixed northern Brazil population, taking into account estimates of interethnic admixture. We observed the genotypes ACC/ACC (P = 0.021, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 0.290 [0.085 to 0823]) and ACC/GCC (P = 0.003, OR [95% CI] = 0.220 [0.504 to 0.040]) presenting significant results for protection against leprosy development, framed in the profiles of low and medium interleukin production, respectively. Therefore, we suggest that genotypes A-1082G, C-819T, and C-592A formed by interleukin-10 polymorphisms are closely related to protection of the leprosy development in an admixed northern Brazil population, in particular ACC/ACC and ACC/GCC genotypes. PMID:23966553

  13. Leprosy elimination: A myth busted

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Dashatwar, Digambar; Singh, Neha; Prasad, Kameshwar; Kesari, Vikash

    2014-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is mainly a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The disease mainly affects the skin, the peripheral nerves, mucosa of the upper respiratory tract and eyes. Though the target of leprosy elimination was achieved at national level in 2006 even then a large proportion of leprosy cases reported globally still constitute from India. Aim and Objective: To study the clinico-epidemiological profile of new cases of leprosy in a rural tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five newly diagnosed cases of leprosy presented in out-patient/admitted in the department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy (between September 2012 and August 2013) were included in the study. Detailed history regarding leprosy, deformity, sensory loss, skin smear for AFB and histopathological examination were done in every patient. Results: The incidence was more in age group of 20 to 39 years (48.57%) and 40 to 59 years (37.14%). 68.57% were males. 48.57% cases were found to have facial deformity and ear lobe thickening was found to be pre-dominant form of facial deformity. Ulnar (88.87%) and common peroneal nerve (34.28%) were the most commonly involved nerves. The split skin smear examination was found to be positive in 27 out of 35 cases. On histopathological examination 10 patients (28.57%) were of lepromatous pole (LL), 4 (11.43%) were of indeterminate, 6 (17.14%) were of tuberculoid type (TT), 4 BT (11.4%) and 1 BL type (2.8%). Conclusions: This study helps in concluding that leprosy is still not eliminated. Active surveillance is still needed to detect the sub-clinical cases and undiagnosed cases. PMID:25540534

  14. Response of Mycobacterium habana vaccine in patients with lepromatous leprosy and their household contacts. A pilot clinical study.

    PubMed

    Wakhlu, A; Gaur, S P; Kaushal, G P; Misra, A; Asthana, P; Sircar, A R

    2001-06-01

    Single dose vaccination was carried out with Mycobacterium habana vaccine, 31 lepromatous leprosy cases receiving 1.5 mg (1.5 mg = 6.27 x 10(8) bacilli) and 36 household contacts randomly receiving 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 mg vaccine intradermally. Duration of study was 18 weeks. Vaccination induced lepromin conversion in 100% of lepromatous leprosy cases and lepromin negative household contacts and augmentation of lepromin reactivity in 100% of lepromin positive household contacts, which was stable for the 15 weeks duration of follow-up. The maximum augmentation in lepromin reactivity was obtained with 1.5 mg of vaccine, which is probably the supramaximal dose. Overall, post-vaccination, those without prior BCG vaccination scars showed higher mean values of lepromin augmentation. Local vaccination site changes included induration, ulceration, itching, pain and uncomplicated regional lymphadenopathy, all of which remitted spontaneously by 15 weeks. Systemic side-effects noted were pyrexia, ENL and jaundice, and were seen with no greater frequency than that reported in other vaccine trials. Overall, systemic side-effects were easily controlled and were not accompanied by clinically detectable nerve or ocular damage. The safety profile investigations revealed an increase in the mean values of Hb%, RBC count and PCV in household contacts and of PCV in lepromatous patients, post-vaccination. Alterations in the liver function tests were also observed in patients of lepromatous leprosy. Thus, M. habana vaccine appears to be useful in stimulating specific CMI against M. leprae as evidenced by increased lepromin reactivity. PMID:11495449

  15. A comparison of monocyte oxidative responses in leprosy patients and healthy subjects as influenced by mycobacterial lipid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Vachula, M; Worobec, S; Andersen, B R

    1990-09-01

    Superoxide anion (O2-) release by monocytes from leprosy patients in a paired study was lower than that released by monocytes from healthy controls. Pretreatment of healthy control monocytes with phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) of Mycobacterium leprae resulted in the release of less O2- than released by buffer-treated cells or cells pretreated with structurally similar lipids. However, pretreatment of patient monocytes with PGL-I did not affect the O2- generation, perhaps because the cells already had a lower capacity to produce O2-. Upon further examination of the data from the patient population, monocytes from lepromatous patients released significantly less O2- than cells from normal controls, while tuberculoid patient cells released O2- in amounts similar to that generated by cells from normal controls. In addition, monocytes from patients with a high bacterial index had a lower capacity to generate O2- when compared to cells from healthy individuals. PMID:2169513

  16. Serology in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, J. Oliveira

    1970-01-01

    A critical survey of the literature on serology in leprosy has shown that sera taken from lepromatous patients display some striking differences in comparison with sera from tuberculoid patients. The tests most frequently employed were complement-fixation, haemagglutination, electrophoresis, precipitation and immunofluorescence, together with a variety of antigens not only from lepromas but also from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinomycetales. With the exception of the Rubino test, all these serological tests are lacking in specificity for leprosy since leprous sera have a broad range of reactivity with different antigens, including those employed in the serological diagnosis of syphilis. Some features of the leprous sera could be related to a hypersensitivity state involving circulating immune complexes, low levels of complement and the presence of antibodies similar to those found in sera from patients with autoimmune diseases. PMID:20604357

  17. [External canthopexy using the Edgerton-Montandon procedure in lagophthalmos of leprosy patients. Technique and indications. Apropos of 30 cases].

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Saboye, J; Cartel, J L

    1996-08-01

    This paper deals with the results observed in 21 ancient leprosy patients suffering from lagophthalmos (13 of whom suffered from bilateral lagophthalmos) and treated by the Edgerton-Montandon surgical procedure which associates lateral canthopexy and tarsorraphy. Eighteen of the 21 treated patients were reviewed at one month after the procedure and, overall, results could be evaluated for 30 eyes. Improvement was noted in all of the 30 eyes and, globally, the residual palpebral fissure (during voluntary closing of the eyes by the patient) decreased from 6.7 mm before the procedure to 1.8 after the procedure. The following recommendations may be proposed. For young patients with intact corneal sensation, the Gillies procedure remains the procedure of choice to correct lagophthalmos. For older patients with corneal anesthesia, at high risk of blindness, the Edgerton-Montandon procedure should be recommended. PMID:9183881

  18. T cell response to purified filtrate antigen 85 from Mycobacterium bovis Bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in leprosy patients.

    PubMed Central

    Launois, P; Huygen, K; De Bruyn, J; N'Diaye, M; Diouf, B; Sarthouj, L; Grimaud, J; Millan, J

    1991-01-01

    T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 25 healthy controls and 39 leprosy patients were tested against BCG-bacilli and culture filtrate. Mycobacterium leprae and purified antigen 85 (the major secreted 30-32 kD protein antigen) from M. bovis strain BCG. In lepromin negative healthy controls, blastogenesis was low to M. leprae and completely negative to antigen 85. IFN-gamma levels were very low, close to detection limits. In all lepromin positive controls, significant proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion was found in response to M. leprae and antigen 85. In the group of lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients, 25/29 of patients (with either positive (13) or negative (12) lymphoproliferative response to BCG) were unreactive to M. leprae or to antigen 85. Four LL patients with positive T cell response to BCG responded with detectable lymphoproliferative response and IFN-gamma secretion to antigen 85. All tuberculoid (TT) leprosy patients responded to BCG, M. leprae and antigen 85. Hence, T cells from leprosy patients and controls demonstrate a marked parallelism of responsiveness towards whole M. leprae and purified antigen 85 from M. bovis BCG, suggesting strong cross-reactivity between the two species and underlining the biological importance of such secreted antigens. PMID:1934596

  19. Mathematical modelling of leprosy and its control.

    PubMed

    Blok, David J; de Vlas, Sake J; Fischer, Egil A J; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae. The annual number of new leprosy cases registered worldwide has remained stable over the past years at over 200,000. Early case finding and multidrug therapy have not been able interrupt transmission completely. Elimination requires innovation in control and sustained commitment. Mathematical models can be used to predict the course of leprosy incidence and the effect of intervention strategies. Two compartmental models and one individual-based model have been described in the literature. Both compartmental models investigate the course of leprosy in populations and the long-term impact of control strategies. The individual-based model focusses on transmission within households and the impact of case finding among contacts of new leprosy patients. Major improvement of these models should result from a better understanding of individual differences in exposure to infection and developing leprosy after exposure. Most relevant are contact heterogeneity, heterogeneity in susceptibility and spatial heterogeneity. Furthermore, the existing models have only been applied to a limited number of countries. Parameterization of the models for other areas, in particular those with high incidence, is essential to support current initiatives for the global elimination of leprosy. Many challenges remain in understanding and dealing with leprosy. The support of mathematical models for understanding leprosy epidemiology and supporting policy decision making remains vital. PMID:25765193

  20. Application of the SRQ20 and the protocol of psychological assessment in patients with leprosy in a Reference Centre in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Marília Aparecida De Souza; Antunes, Douglas Eulálio; Da Silveira, Ricardo Wagner Machado; Goulart, Isabela Maria Bernardes

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to apply the protocol of psychological assessment (PAP) and the SRQ-20 to analyse the psychological profile of 130 leprosy patients, in order to evaluate the incidence of Common Mental Disorders (CMD), and screen patients with higher risk of psychological distress. The following results were found in the PAP: 31.53%, 23.8% and 16.9% reported an unsatisfactory childhood, adolescence and adulthood, respectively; 31.53% are afraid of being discriminated against and 16.9% experienced discrimination. Also, 13.07% reported drastic life changes due to leprosy; 29.23% have low self-esteem, 31.53% have real fear and 22.3% have phantasmal fear. In the SRQ-20, the prevalence of CMDs was 32.3%, with the majority being female, married, with low education (primary education), low self-esteem, and with a drastic change in life. Conclusion: This is one of the few studies on the psychological profile of leprosy patients demonstrating the importance of the application of investigative technologies in psychopathological screening, aiming on adherence to treatment and psychotherapy planning. Furthermore, it provides support for reflection on the integrality of healthcare for leprosy patients and the importance of psychologists in health teams. PMID:26665358

  1. Genome-Wide Screening of mRNA Expression in Leprosy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Belone, Andrea de Faria F.; Rosa, Patrícia S.; Trombone, Ana P. F.; Fachin, Luciana R. V.; Guidella, Cássio C.; Ura, Somei; Barreto, Jaison A.; Pinilla, Mabel G.; de Carvalho, Alex F.; Carraro, Dirce M.; Soares, Fernando A.; Soares, Cleverson T.

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy, an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, affects millions of people worldwide. However, little is known regarding its molecular pathophysiological mechanisms. In this study, a comprehensive assessment of human mRNA was performed on leprosy skin lesions by using DNA chip microarrays, which included the entire spectrum of the disease along with its reactional states. Sixty-six samples from leprotic lesions (10TT, 10BT, 10BB, 10BL, 4LL, 14R1, and 10R2) and nine skin biopsies from healthy individuals were used as controls (CC) (ages ranged from 06 to 83 years, 48 were male and 29 female). The evaluation identified 1580 differentially expressed mRNAs [Fold Change (FC) ≥ 2.0, p ≤ 0.05] in diseased lesions vs. healthy controls. Some of these genes were observed in all forms of the disease (CD2, CD27, chit1, FA2H, FAM26F, GZMB, MMP9, SLAMF7, UBD) and others were exclusive to reactional forms (Type “1” reaction: GPNMB, IL1B, MICAL2, FOXQ1; Type “2” reaction: AKR1B10, FAM180B, FOXQ1, NNMT, NR1D1, PTX3, TNFRSF25). In literature, these mRNAs have been associated with numerous pathophysiological processes and signaling pathways and are present in a large number of diseases. The role of these mRNAs maybe studied in the context of developing new diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for leprosy. PMID:26635870

  2. Association of polymorphism at COL3A and CTLA4 loci on chromosome 2q31-33 with the clinical phenotype and in-vitro CMI status in healthy and leprosy subjects: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, G; Sachdeva, G; Bhutani, L K; Bamezai, R

    1997-07-01

    Two genetic loci, viz. COL3A and CTLA4, located within the chromosome 2q31-33 region in the vicinity of the proposed syntenic site of the mouse "Bcg" locus were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction in leprosy patients and healthy individuals. All the subjects studied were assessed as in-vitro responders/non-responders to mycobacterial antigens. Simple sequence length polymorphism analysis revealed five (236 to 312 bp) and eight (84 to 120 bp) allelomorphs for COL3A and CTLA4, respectively. Our preliminary analysis showed a significant association between the 250-bp COL3A allelomorph in the homozygous condition and the multibacillary form of leprosy (P < 0.05: relative risk = 5.5). Another allelic (312 bp) variant of COL3A was significantly correlated with non-responsiveness to M. leprae antigens in vitro (P < 0.01). The 104-bp allelomorph of CTLA4 was not observed in any of the 25 cases of leprosy. This absence was statistically significant (P < 0.05) when compared with normal healthy controls and depicted a high relative risk (RR = 25.83). An additional observation of the predominance of a unique 84-bp CTLA4/CTLA4-like allelomorph was observed in the Indian subjects studied. PMID:9225967

  3. [Nurses engaged in the fight against leprosy].

    PubMed

    Guyon, Patrick; Hourlier, Juliette; Manco, Noémi

    2015-01-01

    Even now in the 21st century, leprosy is still rife, notably among poor populations. In the regions of the world concerned, nurses specialised in the disease play an essential role in supporting the screening, treatment and reintegration of patients. In more than twenty countries, the Order of Malta France is acting to fight against leprosy. PMID:26365644

  4. [How does one treat the osteitis and osteoarthritis of the extremities in older leprosy patients using granulated table sugar?].

    PubMed

    Grauwin, M Y; Cartel, J L; Lepers, J P

    1999-01-01

    A common problem of osteitis and septic arthritis is the recurrent bone infection after surgical debridement, a problem frequently encountered in patients with sequela leprosy. In these cases the authors propose the use of an ancient method of post surgical wound care based on the treatment with ordinary granulated sugar. The hyperosmolar climate created this way in the wounds inhibits the bacterial growth, enhances bacterial death and therefore permits the growth of granulation tissue in order to recover the debrided nude bones. At ILAD (Leprosy Institute of Dakar), 36 osteitis and septic arthritis were treated and healed during the last 2 years from March 1995 to March 1997 using this technic. All the wounds healed in the mean-time of 44 days. Only two of them needed a second debridement and healed afterwards. Up to now the method using ordinary sugar was applied in the treatment of infected wounds, eschars and postsurgical infections. Our experience shows that it also can be indicated to treat bone infections. This method is easy to apply also under often difficult field conditions and is very cheap. PMID:10987045

  5. History of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro*

    PubMed Central

    Avelleira, João Carlos Regazzi; Bernardes, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; Vianna, Francisco Reis

    2014-01-01

    The record of the first cases of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro dates from the seventeenth century. The first local host of leprosy patients was created from 1741, and the first colonies hospitals were built in the early twentieth century, in order to avoid contagion of the population. The first structures dedicated to research also date from this time: the Leprosy International Institute, the Leprology Institute, and the Leprosy Laboratory of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, where the most prestigious leprologists of Rio de Janeiro worked. Currently, investigations are focused on the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation; additionally, leprosy patients are treated at municipal health centers and state hospitals, and former colony hospitals only accept patients with severe disabilities. PMID:24937834

  6. The epidemiological consequences of leprosy-tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, N; Voss-Böhme, A

    2013-02-01

    While in antiquity both leprosy and tuberculosis were prevalent in Europe, leprosy declined thereafter and, simultaneously, tuberculosis prevalence increased. Since both diseases are caused by mycobacterial infections, it has been suggested that there might be a causal relationship between both epidemics. Chaussinand observed the inverse prevalence of leprosy and tuberculosis and suggested that individuals with a latent tuberculosis infection are protected from acquiring leprosy. His cross-immunity hypothesis has been countered more recently by a co-infection hypothesis. The latter suggestion, proposed by Donoghue, states that people being infected with multi-bacillary leprosy are more susceptible to tuberculosis, which leads to increased mortality from the disease. This study utilizes mathematical modeling to explore the epidemiological consequences of the co-infection hypothesis for realistically confined parameter values. While the co-infection hypothesis appears plausible at first glance, a second thought reveals that it comprises also substantial consequences for tuberculosis epidemics: if co-infection raises the mortality rate above that of purely tuberculosis infected persons, then tuberculosis might as well be eradicated by leprosy. It is the specific interplay of both increased susceptibility towards tuberculosis and increased death rate when co-infected that determines the epidemiological fate. As a result of this analysis, it is shown that there is a large parameter region where the eventual disappearance of leprosy could indeed be explained by co-infection. This parameter region is considerably larger than that predicted by the cross-immunity hypothesis. This shows that the co-infection hypothesis should be considered a significant alternative to the cross-immunity hypothesis. The time scales at which the effects of co-infection are observed depend critically on the spatial distribution of the individuals but reach epidemiologically realistic values for

  7. Histoid leprosy: case report.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Ola Ahmed; Attia, Aballa Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Histoid leprosy is a rare but well-defined entity with specific clinical, histopathologic, and bacteriologic features. We present a case of histoid leprosy in an 84-year-old Egyptian male in view of the rarity of this condition. The patient presented with erythematous itchy discrete and coalescent papules that were distributed bilaterally and symmetrically on the front and back of the trunk. Before approaching us, he was initially misdiagnosed as a case of pityriasis rosea. There was no mucosal or facial affection and the patient's general examination was normal. Routine hematologic investigations, urine analysis, liver and renal function tests were all normal. Slit skin smear revealed acid-fast bacilli of BI - 6+ and MI - 50-60%. Histopathologic examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained section revealed atrophic epidermis with flattened rete ridges and dermal infiltration by nodular granulomata formed of spindle shaped histiocytes with pyknotic nuclei oriented in a storiform pattern. Fite's stain for lepra bacilli showed plenty of acid fast bacilli. So, the diagnosis of histoid leprosy was made. Therefore, ROM therapy (rifampicin 600 mg, ofloxacin 400 mg, minocycline 200 mg) was started and followed by multi-drug therapy for 2 years. PMID:23317487

  8. Temporalis Muscle Transfer for the Treatment of Lagophthalmos in Patients With Leprosy: Refinement in Surgical Techniques to Prevent Postoperative Ptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Yul; Park, Hyang Joon; Kim, Jong Pill; Park, Tae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Facial paralysis resulting from leprosy has a serious impact on the entire face especially in the areas innervated by the facial nerves. In particular, lagophthalmos in patients with leprosy causes exposure keratitis, corneal, and conjunctival dryness, which can progress to blindness and disfigurement. Recently, we conducted 4 different temporalis muscle transfer (TMT) methods over the last 4 years to reduce ptosis. The methods used included Brown-McDowell, McCord-Codner, modified Gillies-Anderson, and modified Gillies. Seventy-five TMT operations in 60 patients were performed between 2011 and 2014. The mean age was 70.1. Fifteen patients had bilateral TMT procedures. As a result, ptosis appeared in 14(18.7%) of 75 TMT procedures for 4 years. To prevent or correct this complication, the following 4 technical refinements have simplified the surgery and yield better surgical outcomes. First, an increase in the length of the temporalis muscle flap to approximately 8 cm with a parallel course to the lateral canthus will reduce oblique pull. Second, the width of the fascia sling in the upper eyelid is narrowed (3-4 mm) to reduce weight on the eyelid. Third, the fascia sling in the upper lid should not be located along the full length of the upper lid but terminate 3.5 cm medial to lateral canthal tendon and in other words, should not be tied at the medial canthal tendon to reduce tension and weight. Lastly, the fascia sling in the eyelid should be located shallow (probably in subdermal layer) and as near as possible to the lid margin to prevent any functional disturbance in levator aponeurosis. PMID:26674897

  9. Leprosy: Social implications from antiquity to the present.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sak, Jarosław; Pawlikowski, Jakub; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important dermatologic diseases from the sociologic viewpoint has been leprosy. Those with leprosy were isolated, excluded from society, and stigmatized. Such a stigma indicates the strong feeling that a leprosy patient is shameful and should not be accepted by society. During the first millennium, leprosy was rapidly inscribed in the system of religious prohibitions-the disease was a punishment by God for wrongdoing, and the disease was associated with the lower spheres of the society. Social perception of leprosy gradually changed during the time of Crusades. The care for lepers became a Christian obligation, and celebrating Holy Masses as for the dead was forsaken. The sick were forced to stay at leprosaria, particularly from the 14th through the 19th centuries when fear of leprosy was at a high point. Admission to a leprosarium was mandatory not only for patients with leprosy but also even those suspected of having the disease. PMID:26773617

  10. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients. PMID:27088926

  11. Florid reactive periostitis ossificans of long bones and digits associated with reaction in a patient with leprosy.

    PubMed

    Chakma, Joy Kumar; Malaviya, G N; Girdhar, Anita; Hussein, Sajid

    2012-03-01

    Florid reactive periostitis ossificans is a rare bone lesion usually occurring in the small, tubular bones of the hands and feet. This entity is a benign and aggressive periosteal reaction associated with soft tissue swelling that appears similar to a bone lesion that radiographically and clinically mimics an infectious or neoplastic process. Typically the lesions occurs in an adolescent or young adult and presents as a small area of painful swelling and erythema over the affected bone. The cause of florid reactive periostitis ossificans is not exactly known though many authors have postulated varied etiopathogenesis for the same condition. In this report, is a very rare and unusual example of this entity that has been observed in association with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) a type 2 lepra reaction in a Leprosy patient. PMID:22655475

  12. Analysis of Antibody Responses to Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid I, Lipoarabinomannan, and Recombinant Proteins To Define Disease Subtype-Specific Antigenic Profiles in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, John S.; Kim, Hee Jin; Wheat, William H.; Chatterjee, Delphi; Balagon, Marivic V.; Cellona, Roland V.; Tan, Esterlina V.; Gelber, Robert; Saunderson, Paul; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Reece, Stephen T.; Burman, William; Belknap, Robert; Mac Kenzie, William R.; Geluk, Annemieke; Oskam, Linda; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    A simple serodiagnostic test based on the Mycobacterium leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid I(PGL-I), for individuals with leprosy is nearly universally positive in leprosy patients with high bacillary loads but cannot be used as a stand-alone diagnostic test for the entire spectrum of the disease process. For patients with early infection with no detectable acid-fast bacilli in lesions or with low or no antibody titer to PGL-I, as in those at the tuberculoid end of the disease spectrum, this diagnostic approach has limited usefulness. To identify additional M. leprae antigens that might enhance the serological detection of these individuals, we have examined the reactivity patterns of patient sera to PGL-I, lipoarabinomannan (LAM), and six recombinant M. leprae proteins (ML1877, ML0841, ML2028, ML2038, ML0380, and ML0050) by Western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Overall, the responses to ML2028 (Ag85B) and ML2038 (bacterioferritin) were consistently high in both multibacillary and paucibacillary groups and weak or absent in endemic controls, while responses to other antigens showed considerable variability, from strongly positive to completely negative. This analysis has given a clearer understanding of some of the differences in the antibody responses between individuals at opposite ends of the disease spectrum, as well as illustrating the heterogeneity of antibody responses toward protein, carbohydrate, and glycolipid antigens within a clinical group. Correlating these response patterns with a particular disease state could allow for a more critical assessment of the form of disease within the leprosy spectrum and could lead to better patient management. PMID:21177913

  13. Delayed Diagnosis, Leprosy Reactions, and Nerve Injury Among Individuals With Hansen's Disease Seen at a United States Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Kristoffer E.; Jacob, Jesse T.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Wu, Henry M.; Fairley, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is uncommon in the United States. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with HD in a US clinic, including an assessment of delays in diagnosis and HD reactions, which have both been associated with nerve damage. Methods. A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at an HD clinic in the southern United States between January 1, 2002 and January 31, 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics were summarized, including delays in diagnosis, frequency of reactions, and other complications including peripheral neuropathy. Results. Thirty patients were seen during the study time period. The majority of patients were male (73%) and had multibacillary disease (70%). Brazil, Mexico, and the United States were the most frequent of the 14 countries of origin. Hansen's disease “reactions”, severe inflammatory complications, were identified among 75% of patients, and nerve damage was present at diagnosis in 36% of patients. The median length of time between symptom onset and diagnosis was long at 12 months (range, 1–96), but no single factor was associated with a delay in diagnosis. Conclusions. The diagnosis of HD was frequently delayed among patients referred to our US clinic. The high frequency of reactions and neuropathy at diagnosis suggests that further efforts at timely diagnosis and management of this often unrecognized disease is needed to prevent the long-term sequelae associated with irreversible nerve damage. PMID:27186586

  14. Delayed Diagnosis, Leprosy Reactions, and Nerve Injury Among Individuals With Hansen's Disease Seen at a United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Jacob, Jesse T; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Wu, Henry M; Fairley, Jessica K

    2016-03-01

    Background.  Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is uncommon in the United States. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with HD in a US clinic, including an assessment of delays in diagnosis and HD reactions, which have both been associated with nerve damage. Methods.  A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at an HD clinic in the southern United States between January 1, 2002 and January 31, 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics were summarized, including delays in diagnosis, frequency of reactions, and other complications including peripheral neuropathy. Results.  Thirty patients were seen during the study time period. The majority of patients were male (73%) and had multibacillary disease (70%). Brazil, Mexico, and the United States were the most frequent of the 14 countries of origin. Hansen's disease "reactions", severe inflammatory complications, were identified among 75% of patients, and nerve damage was present at diagnosis in 36% of patients. The median length of time between symptom onset and diagnosis was long at 12 months (range, 1-96), but no single factor was associated with a delay in diagnosis. Conclusions.  The diagnosis of HD was frequently delayed among patients referred to our US clinic. The high frequency of reactions and neuropathy at diagnosis suggests that further efforts at timely diagnosis and management of this often unrecognized disease is needed to prevent the long-term sequelae associated with irreversible nerve damage. PMID:27186586

  15. Teaching of leprosy: current challenges*

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Cynthia Rossetti Portela; Ribeiro, Maria Mônica Freitas; Melo, Elza Machado; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi

    2014-01-01

    In the context of declining leprosy endemicity worldwide, keeping the interest in knowledge and expertise in leprosy alive has been a matter of concern. Approaching the problem only in primary care, without the proper integration with other levels of care in the health system fails to account for the complexity of the disease. Training professionals to work at different levels of health care is a current challenge. The objective of this review was to look for experiences related to the teaching of leprosy both in undergraduate courses in the field of health sciences and in training programs for professionals who work in patient care. We highlight the role of the dermatologist in the management of control programs, diagnosis and treatment of the disease, as well as in the continuous education of other health professionals. PMID:24937820

  16. Protecting people against leprosy: chemoprophylaxis and immunoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Oskam, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Elimination of leprosy cannot be achieved by multidrug therapy alone, and new tools are needed to prevent leprosy. A randomized controlled trial with chemoprophylaxis for contacts of leprosy patients using a single dose of rifampicin (SDR) has shown an overall protective effect of approximately 60%, effective in the first 2 years after the intervention. When a contact who previously received bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination also receives SDR, the protective effect is additive, approximating 80%. Vaccine trials have been conducted with BCG, often in combination with Mycobacterium leprae or related Mycobacterium vaccines as immunoprophylaxis for contacts of leprosy patients, with BCG giving the best results. Meta-analysis shows that the protective effect of BCG vaccination is larger in observational studies than in trials, 60% versus 41%, and is higher among contacts of leprosy patients than among the general population, 68% versus 53%. We believe that a future leprosy control strategy should include contact management, consisting of a contact survey, at which time preventive interventions could be added, such as chemoprophylaxis and immunoprophylaxis. Modeling studies have shown that both interventions will lower the incidence of leprosy in the population. Implementation studies of such contact-based strategy are now called for. PMID:25432807

  17. The demystification of leprosy: a multifactorial problem.

    PubMed

    Kato, L

    1990-01-01

    Abolishment of misbeliefs and misconceptions, unfounded fear and prejudice are factors as important in leprosy control as prevention, early detection and therapy. Concrete measures of demystification are proposed. Identify and divulge the absolute truth about leprosy. Calling leprosy "Hansen's disease" did not result in demystification. Patients know that the two terms are identical. Treating them as human beings attracts more patients to the healers than the Hansenologian ritual. Contrary to statements, no major advances are being made in the field of bacteriology, immunology, molecular biology, mode of transmission and epidemiology of leprosy. Not a single new drug has been discovered in 26 years. Vaccination is a dubious venture. The question arises as to whether the right priorities are promoted in leprosy research. Cultivation of the leprosy bacillus is the sine qua non of any further progress. This field of research is a lost and totally neglected priority. Consequently we have no pharmacological model for badly needed of ultrapotent antileprosy drugs. Syphilis is now cured with a single dose of penicillin. A drug as potent against leprosy should not be a mission impossible if an appropriate pharmacological model--the in vitro culture--is available. The multifactorial problem of demystification is a difficult but not an impossible task. Less sensationalism, more real progress in research, selecting the right priorities, achieving the "ultimate drug", shelter, food, shoes, soap and broom for every human on this planet constitute the road to demystification. PMID:2220303

  18. A Randomized Controlled Double Blind Trial of Ciclosporin versus Prednisolone in the Management of Leprosy Patients with New Type 1 Reaction, in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Saba M.; Alembo, Digafe T.; Nigusse, Shimelis D.; Yamuah, Lawrence K.; Walker, Stephen L.; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Leprosy Type 1 (T1R) reactions are immune-mediated events leading to nerve damage and preventable disability affecting hands, feet and eyes. Type 1 Reactions are treated with oral corticosteroids. There is little evidence on alternative treatments for patients who do not respond to steroids or experience steroid adverse effects. We report the results of a randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy and adverse effect profile of ciclosporin and prednisolone (CnP) in comparison to prednisolone only (P) in patients with new T1R in Ethiopia. Ciclosporin is a potent immunosuppressant. Outcomes were measured using a clinical severity score, recurrence rate, adverse events and quality of life. Results Seventy three patients with new T1R were randomized to receive CnP or P for 20 weeks. Recovery rates in skin signs was similar in both groups (91% vs 88%). Improvements in nerve function both, new and old, sensory (66% vs 49%) and motor (75% vs 74%) loss were higher (but not significantly so) in the patients on CnP. Recurrences rates of T1R (85%) were high in both groups, and recurrences occurred significantly earlier (8 weeks) in patients CnP, who needed 10% more additional prednisolone. Serious major and minor adverse events rates were similar in patients in the two treatment arms of the study. Both groups had a significant improvement in their quality of life after the study, measured by the SF-36. Conclusions This is the first double-blind RCT assessing ciclosporin, in the management of T1R in Africa. Ciclosporin could be a safe alternative second-line drug for patients with T1R who are not improving with prednisolone or are experiencing adverse events related to prednisolone. This study illustrates the difficulty in switching off leprosy inflammation. Better treatment agents for leprosy patients with reactions and nerve damage are needed. PMID:27046330

  19. Project REENCONTRO: ethical aspects of genetic identification in families separated by the compulsory isolation of leprosy patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Claudia Lee Williams; Biondi, Flávia Costa; Maricato, Glaucia Cristina; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experience of a team of geneticists, working in partnership with a Brazilian social movement aimed at promoting the rights of victims of Hansen's disease. These university researchers propose to use DNA test results to ascertain kinship connections and thereby reunite families that were sundered apart by draconian state policies of the mid-twentieth century that decreed the forced segregation of leprosy patients and the institutionalization of their children. The team's aim is to help revert stigma and reinforce positive group identity as well as to facilitate judicial claims to moral and financial reparation from the Brazilian state. We will discuss how, notwithstanding the voluntary nature of tests, mediated at all times through the social movement, the geneticists take care to follow clear ethical guidelines in the collection and stocking of DNA samples as well as in the devolution of test results. The subsequent inclusion of anthropologists in the team brings to the fore new ethical dilemmas ranging from procedures in field research to the possible consequences of research results. PMID:25966990

  20. Plastic footwear for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Antia, N H

    1990-03-01

    The anaesthetic foot in leprosy poses the most major problem in the rehabilitation of its patients. Various attempts have been made to produce protective footwear such as the microcellular rubber-car-tyre sandals. Unfortunately these attempts have had little success on a large scale because of the inability to produce them in large numbers and the stigma attached to such unusual footwear. While such footwear may be superior to the 'tennis' shoe in protecting the foot from injury by the penetration of sharp objects, it fails to distribute the weight-bearing forces which is the major cause of plantar damage and ulceration in the anaesthetic foot. This can be achieved by providing rigidity to the sole, as demonstrated by the healing of ulcers in plaster of paris casts or the rigid wooden clog. A new type of moulded plastic footwear has been evolved in conjunction with the plastic footwear industry which provides footwear that can be mass produced at a low price and which overcomes the stigma of leprosy. Controlled rigidity is provided by the incorporation of a spring steel shank between the sponge insole and the hard wearing plastic sole. Trials have demonstrated both the acceptability of the footwear and its protective effects as well as its hard wearing properties. PMID:2319903

  1. Type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome-like presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Chiaratti, Francielle Chiavelli; Daxbacher, Egon Luiz Rodrigues; Neumann, Antonielle Borges Faria; Jeunon, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease characterized by manifestations in the peripheral nerves and skin. The course of the disease may be interrupted by acute phenomena called reactions. This article reports a peculiar case of type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome-like features as the first clinical manifestation of leprosy, resulting in a delay in the diagnosis due to unusual clinical presentation. The patient had clinical and histopathological features reminiscent of Sweet's syndrome associated with clusters of vacuolated histiocytes containing acid-fast bacilli isolated or forming globi. Herein, it is discussed how to recognize type 2 leprosy reaction with Sweet's syndrome features, the differential diagnosis with type 1 leprosy reaction and the treatment options. When this kind of reaction is the first clinical presentation of leprosy, the correct diagnosis might be not suspected clinically, and established only with histopathologic evaluation. PMID:27438203

  2. Leprosy in the Bible.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Nita, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the biblical term tzaraat has referred to leprosy. In fact, the disease or diseases described under this name have no relationship to leprosy, as it was known in the Middle Ages or today; moreover, the term referred not only to skin disease, but also to the state of the ritual impurity and punishment for the sins. Although the real nature of tzaraat remains unknown, the differential diagnosis might include the following: Psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, favus, dermatophyte infections, nummular dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, crusted scabies, syphilis, impetigo, sycosis barbae, alopecia areata, furuncles, scabies, neurodermatitis, scarlet fever, lupus erythematosus, lichen sclerosus et atrophicus, folliculitis decalvans, morphea, sarcoidosis, and lichen planopilaris. Leprosy became interchangeable with the biblical leprosy due to two inaccurate translations: The Hebrew tzaraat was first translated into Greek as leprosy in the sixth century, and later, the word leprosy was translated into Arabic as lepra in the ninth century. PMID:26773616

  3. Arthritis and diagnosis of leprosy: a case report and review of the literature*

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tania Rita Moreno de Oliveira; Korinfskin, Juliana Pedrosa; Espíndola, Mariana Mercês Mesquita; Corrêa, Lis Moreno de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is clinically characterized by involvement of peripheral nerves and skin. The immunological profile of the individual defines the diversity of clinical manifestations, from skin disorders to systemic manifestations, especially the articulation ones, common in multibacillary forms, which may mimic collagen diseases and often posing diagnostic difficulties in endemic areas. This is a case report of asymmetric polyarthritis of small and large articulations associated with skin lesions which had been treated by a rheumatologist for 2 years with initial clinical diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, and later, with the appearance of skin lesions, of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24770512

  4. Autochthonous borderline tuberculoid leprosy in a man from Florida.

    PubMed

    Villada, Gabriel; Zarei, Mina; Romagosa, Ricardo; Forgione, Patrizia; Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Romanelli, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Leprosy (Hansen's disease) is a chronic contagious granulomatous disease principally affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system, caused by Mycobacterium leprae. In this report, we present a case of autochthonous leprosy in a man from Florida as the first human case reported from this region. Authors believe dermatologists need to be aware of the possibility of autochthonous transmission of leprosy in the Eastern-Southern United States, and should consider leprosy in any patient with atypical skin lesions, even when a history of contact with armadillo is missing. PMID:27255063

  5. CLUES TO HISTOPATHOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF TREATED LEPROSY

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajiv

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current recommendations for multidrug therapy (MDT) of leprosy follow a fixed duration of treatment regardless of clearance of skin lesions or presence or absence of acid-fast bacilli in the skin. A fairly high percentage of patients with leprosy who complete recommended duration of multi-drug therapy are left with residual skin lesions which are a great source of anxiety to the patient and the family. A small percentage of patients go on to develop new lesions after completion of treatment which may be either late reactions or relapse. Many such patients undergo skin biopsy to assess ‘activity’ of the disease. Hardly any literature exists on the histological findings in biopsies taken from patients who have completed MDT. Materials and Methods: This article describes histomorphological findings in patients with treated leprosy who underwent skin biopsies after completion of MDT because they either had persistent lesions or developed new lesions on follow-up. Results: Histology of treated leprosy may show findings that are diagnostic for leprosy (histology active) or findings that by themselves are not diagnostic for leprosy (histology inactive) but may be used as clues in confirming that the persistent skin lesions are histologically inactive and need no further treatment. These findings may be divided into 1. Epidermal findings, 2. Alterations in dermal stroma, and 3. Morphological characteristics of the dermal inflammatory infiltrate. Conclusion: Awareness of histomorphological changes that occur in skin lesions of leprosy after completion of treatment can aid the pathologist to determine whether the lesions are active or inactive histologically and assist the clinician to convince the patient that his disease is inactive and does not need further treatment. PMID:22121264

  6. Biometals in skin and sera of leprosy patients and their correlation to trace element contents of M. leprae and histological types of the disease; a comparative study with cutaneous tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jain, A; Mukherjee, A; Chattopadhya, D; Saha, K

    1995-06-01

    The present study has provided information on the biometal contents of killed and dried Mycobacterium leprae as well as dermal granulomas induced by the invading mycobacteria in various histological types of leprosy patients. For comparison, the biometal contents of the contralateral leprosy-unaffected skin of the same patients also were measured. The study also reports changes of serum levels of the biometals in these patients which were compared with those in healthy control subjects and patients with skin tuberculosis. These data show that M. leprae is rich in zinc. During the course of the evolution of the disease there is gross alteration of the dynamics of the inflammatory cell population that infiltrates into leprosy granulomas, resulting in the alterations of trace element contents of the disease-affected skin lesions. Interestingly, the changes of the biometal contents in the granulomas of the patients with skin tuberculosis are similar to those in leprosy patients. It is postulated that the significant decrease of the contents of copper, zinc, iron, calcium and magnesium in the disease-affected skin in comparison to that of the contralateral healthy skin is a local effect, perhaps due to erosion or influx of biometal-deficient inflammatory cells into the affected skin with eventual loss of connective tissue of skin and mobilization of tissue-bound microelements into the vascular compartment. On the contrary, the changes in biometal levels in the sera of leprosy patients appear to be a general effect perhaps due to the release of interleukin-1, a product of inflammatory cells, causing hypercupremic, hypozincemic and hypoferremic responses in the hosts. Moreover, growth and multiplication of M. leprae, especially in polar lepromatous leprosy patients with a high bacillary load, demand essential biometals which may be mobilized into the bacterial bodies from the hosts. This perhaps results in the change in the homeostasis of the essential biometals in the

  7. Leprosy: a glossary.

    PubMed

    Virmond, Marcos; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Virmond, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy continues to afflict residents from a number of countries in Africa, South America, and southeast Asia, despite the marked reduction in the number of cases of leprosy worldwide, after the introduction of the multidrug regimens as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO-MDT). With the increasing immigration of individuals from risk areas to Europe and the United States, knowledge of the basic concepts of leprosy would be helpful to clinicians caring for immigrants in nonendemic areas. We present a comprehensive, updated, and critical glossary of the most relevant terms related to leprosy. PMID:25432806

  8. Epidemiological aspects of leprosy in Juazeiro-BA, from 2002 to 2012*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria Eduarda Gomes da Cruz; de Souza, Carlos Dornels Freire; Silva, Susanne Pinheiro Costa e; da Costa, Flávia Monteiro; do Carmo, Rodrigo Feliciano

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, able to infect large numbers of people. This work is relevant to Juazeiro-BA, a hyper-endemic area for leprosy, since unravel the behavior of the disease in the area, may suggest the decision making for sectors of surveillance, establishing strategies, organizing and evaluating programs and services. OBJECTIVES To analyze the epidemiology of leprosy in Juazeiro-BA, from 2002 to 2012. METHODS A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted based in data of the Diseases Notification System, assigned by the service of Epidemiology from Juazeiro-BA, between 2002 and 2012. RESULTS 1,916 new cases of leprosy were detected between 2002 and 2012, of which 921 (48.07%) represented male sex, 995 (51.93%) female, and there was a reduction in the incidence rate of leprosy per 100,000 inhabitants. Most carriers were brown individuals, with low levels of education, living in the urban area, being more prevalent in the economically active age group. Through statistical analysis we found that there are more chances of developing sequelae among men, and multibacillary individuals older than 45 years. CONCLUSIONS The work serves to direct efforts to control this disease, and highlights the importance of active search for new cases to achieve an early diagnosis, reducing the number of sequels and allowing breaking the chain of disease transmission. PMID:26734859

  9. Interactions between HIV infection and leprosy: a paradox.

    PubMed

    Ustianowski, Andrew P; Lawn, Stephen D; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2006-06-01

    Early in the HIV epidemic it was feared that the disease would undermine leprosy control, as has occurred with tuberculosis. It was predicted that patients with leprosy and HIV coinfection would have an increased risk of lepromatous disease and a faster clinical evolution, and that the leprosy would be more difficult to treat. None of these concerns have materialised and the interaction between HIV and Mycobacterium leprae seems to be far more subtle than that between HIV and tuberculosis. We review the epidemiological, clinical, and pathological data relating to leprosy/HIV coinfection. The published epidemiological data are limited in quality but show neither an increased HIV prevalence among leprosy cases nor an alteration in clinical spectrum of leprosy among coinfected patients. Some data suggest that immune-mediated reactions that complicate leprosy occur at a higher frequency in coinfected patients. Leprosy has now been reported presenting as immune reconstitution disease among patients commencing highly active antiretroviral treatment. Histopathological observations reveal a normal spectrum of appearances in biopsies of leprosy lesions from coinfected patients, even among those with advanced immunodeficiency. These observations suggest that cell-mediated immune responses to M leprae are preserved at the site of disease despite evidence that these responses are abrogated systemically, by contrast with tuberculosis, in which the host granulomatous response is impaired by HIV coinfection. We speculate that this paradox may relate to differences between the activation state and rates of cell turnover within leprosy and tuberculosis granulomas that differentially affect the susceptibility of the granulomas to HIV. The interactions between leprosy and HIV have been little studied and further research on the clinical, pathological, and management aspects of this coinfection is warranted. PMID:16728321

  10. T-cell-epitope mapping of the major secreted mycobacterial antigen Ag85A in tuberculosis and leprosy.

    PubMed

    Launois, P; DeLeys, R; Niang, M N; Drowart, A; Andrien, M; Dierckx, P; Cartel, J L; Sarthou, J L; Van Vooren, J P; Huygen, K

    1994-09-01

    Lymphoproliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) secretion in response to 28 overlapping 20-mer synthetic peptides covering the complete sequence of the mature (295-amino-acid) 85A component of the major secreted, fibronectin-binding antigen 85 complex from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG (MTAg85A) was examined by using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures from healthy tuberculin- and lepromin-positive volunteers and from patients with tuberculosis and leprosy. Peptide recognition was largely promiscuous, with a variety of human leukocyte antigen haplotypes reacting to the same peptides. PBMC from all tuberculin-positive subjects reacted to Ag85, and the majority proliferated in response to peptide 6 (amino acids 51 to 70), peptides 13, 14, and 15 (amino acids 121 to 160), or peptides 20 and 21 (amino acids 191 to 220). PBMC from tuberculosis patients demonstrated a variable reactivity to Ag85 and its peptides, and the strongest proliferation was observed against peptide 7 (amino acids 61 to 80). MTAg85A peptides were also recognized by PBMC from healthy lepromin-positive volunteers and paucibacillary leprosy patients (again in a promiscuous manner), but despite a 90% homology between the 85A proteins of M. leprae and M. tuberculosis, the peptides recognized were different. PBMC from lepromin-positive healthy contacts reacted against peptide 2 (amino acids 11 to 30), peptide 5 (amino acids 41 to 60), and peptides 25 and 26 (amino acids 241 to 270). PBMC from paucibacillary patients reacted preferentially against peptide 1 (amino acids 1 to 20) and peptide 5. Multibacillary patients were not reactive to Ag85 or the MT85A peptides. IFN-gamma production was generally detected simultaneously with positive lymphoproliferative responses, although peptide 1 mostly stimulated proliferation and peptides 27 and 28 mostly elicited an IFN-gamma response. In conclusion, regions 41 to 80 and 241 to 295 demonstrated powerful and promiscuous

  11. Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of ulcers in patients with leprosy sequelae and the effect of low level laser therapy on wound healing: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium leprae is the only pathogenic bacteria able to infect peripheral nerves. Neural impairment results in a set of sensitive, motor and autonomic disturbances, with ulcers originating primarily on the hands and feet. The study objectives were to analyze the clinic-epidemiological characteristics of patients attended at one specialized dressing service from a leprosy-endemic region of the Brazilian Amazon and to evaluate the effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on wound healing of these patients. Methods Clinic-epidemiological evaluation of patients with leprosy sequelae was performed at the reference unit in sanitary dermatology of the state of Pará in Brazil. We conducted anamnesis, identification of the regions affected by the lesions and measurement of ulcer depth and surface area. After that, we performed a randomized clinical trial. Fifty-one patients with ulcers related to leprosy were evaluated, twenty-five of them were randomly assigned to a low level laser therapy group or a control group. Patients were treated 3 times per week for 12 weeks. Outcome measures were ulcer surface area, ulcer depth and the pressure ulcer scale for healing score (PUSH). Results Ninety-seven ulcers were identified, with a mean (SD) duration of 97.6 (111.7) months, surface area of 7.3 (11.5) cm2, and depth of 6.0 (6.2) mm. Statistical analysis of the data determined that there were no significant differences in the variables analyzed before and after treatment with low level laser therapy. Conclusions Ulcers in patients with leprosy remain a major source of economic and social losses, even many years after they have been cured of M. leprae infection. Our results indicate that it is necessary to develop new and more effective therapeutic tools, as low level laser therapy did not demonstrate any additional benefits to ulcer healing with the parameters used in this study. Trial Registration The trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00860717. PMID

  12. A case of leprosy in Malawi. Making the final push towards eradication: a clinical and public health perspective.

    PubMed

    Roe, Cieron; May, Lucy Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Statistically speaking, Malawi has achieved the World Health Organisation's target for the elimination of leprosy (<1 case per 10 000 people), yet the disease is still considered a leading cause of long term physical disability. In this case study the authors discuss the presentation of a 39-year-old gentleman to a district hospital in Malawi with multibacillary, lepromatous leprosy. The condition was initially managed in the community as an 'allergy' which suggests that local barriers currently hinder the detection of leprosy in this developing primary care system. Leprosy is a multi-system disease and this gentleman demonstrated evidence of lepromatous orchitis. Promoting an awareness of these systemic manifestations will increase the the detection of complications and circumvent long term morbidity. Efforts to optimise systems of detection, management and public and professional education are essential to drive eradication in these at-risk populations. At an international level, we must strive to fulfil the objectives outlined by the 'Enhanced Global Strategy for Further Reducing the Disease Burden due to Leprosy for 2011-2015'. At a national level, local research should delineate community factors that impede the eradication of leprosy. Developing new diagnostic and epidemiologic tools, more efficacious chemoprophylactic regimens and vaccination for endemic regions would facilitate these efforts. PMID:27585828

  13. Leprosy situation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tomimori-Yamashita, Jane

    2006-09-01

    We present the situation of leprosy in Brazil, reporting about epidemiology, clinical criteria for classification, multidrugtherapy and special situations, as co-infection. This material was presented in the 79th Annual Meeting of Japanese Hansen's Disease Association in May 2006, during a discussion about the Japanese Guidelines for leprosy treatment. PMID:17037380

  14. Citrus leprosis research update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus leprosis is one of the oldest citrus diseases, but is also one of the most important emerging citrus diseases in South and Central America, and it is apparently spreading northward towards the U.S. Research in our labs and by others has shown that citrus leprosis disease is caused by a compl...

  15. Towards an immunodiagnostic test for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Romulo; Honoré, Nadine; Banu, Sayera; Demangel, Caroline; Cissoko, Yakouba; Arama, Charles; Uddin, Mohammad Khaja Mafij; Hadi, S K Abdul; Monot, Marc; Cho, Sang-Nae; Ji, Baohong; Brennan, Patrick J; Sow, Samba; Cole, Stewart T

    2006-07-01

    In addition to multidrug therapy, elimination of leprosy requires improved diagnostic methods. Using a comparative genomics approach, 17 potential protein antigens (MLP) that are restricted to Mycobacterium leprae, or of limited distribution, were produced and tested for antigen-specific immune responses on leprosy patients, healthy contacts of leprosy patients, and tuberculosis patients in Mali and Bangladesh, as well as on non-endemic controls. T-cell antigenicity of MLP was confirmed by IFN-gamma production in whole-blood assays with the highest responses observed in paucibacillary leprosy patients and healthy contacts. Four MLP behaved well in both countries and induced significantly different responses between the study groups. Peptides carrying T cell epitopes from one of the antigens gave promising results in restimulation assays in mice and immune responses were not influenced by prior exposure to BCG or environmental mycobacteria. This study provides the immunological framework for the development of a specific, peptide-based immunodiagnostic test for leprosy. PMID:16797206

  16. Medical and social concerns of leprosy cured after integration in India.

    PubMed

    Raju, M S; Rao, P S S

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand nature of the medical and society related problems of leprosy cured individuals from various socio-cultural groups and develop proper system to address the current needs of leprosy cured, data have been collected from leprosy cured, employing qualitative methods such as FGDs, open ended interviews and participant observation and a quantitative survey method. The findings show that there has been not much change in the socio-cultural and economic situation of the leprosy cured especially the disabled ones, except a recognition in the health system that their anti-leprosy treatment is completed. In the present integrated health care system, disabled leprosy patients are also expected to seek their own health care by themselves along with general public, which is not happening because the leprosy cured are not yet perceived to be cured of leprosy by community as well as by themselves. Though some of the problems of leprosy cured seem to be poverty related, qualitative analysis shows, a vast gap between poverty problem of leprosy afflicted and non leprosy afflicted. Any special programme to bridge the gap between PHC and leprosy community is required and the new functionaries like ASHA in National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) and similar developments could be of vital use to make them cured in totality. PMID:22443077

  17. Effects of clofazimine alone or combined with dapsone on neutrophil and lymphocyte functions in normal individuals and patients with lepromatous leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    van Rensburg, C E; Gatner, E M; Imkamp, F M; Anderson, R

    1982-01-01

    The effects of clofazimine on neutrophil activities such as random motility, migration to the leukoattractants endotoxin-activated serum and N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine phagocytosis of Candida albicans, postphagocytic hexose-monophosphate shunt activity, and myeloperoxidase-mediated iodination and the effects of clofazimine on lymphocyte transformation to mitogens were assessed in vitro and after ingestion of the drug by normal individuals and patients with lepromatous leprosy. For in vitro studies, the concentration range of the drug investigated was 10(-6) M to 10(-2) M. for in vivo studies, subjects ingested 200 mg of clofazimine daily for a period of 5 days. At concentrations of 5 X 10(-6) M to 5 X 10(-3) M clofazimine caused a progressive dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil motility without detectable effects on phagocytosis, postphagocytic hexose-monophosphate shunt activity, or myeloperoxidase-mediated iodination. Over the same concentration range, clofazimine inhibited lymphocyte transformation. The inhibitory effect on neutrophil motility was associated with a spontaneous stimulation of oxidative metabolism and could be prevented by coincubation of dapsone with clofazimine. after ingestion of clofazimine responsiveness of lymphocytes to mitogens was decreased in normal volunteers and leprosy patients: neutrophil motility in normal individuals was likewise inhibited. PMID:7049077

  18. Lsr2 of Mycobacterium leprae and Its Synthetic Peptides Elicit Restitution of T Cell Responses in Erythema Nodosum Leprosum and Reversal Reactions in Patients with Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Chaman; Prasad, H. K.; Rani, Rajni; Murtaza, A.; Misra, Namita; Shanker Narayan, N. P.

    2013-01-01

    The Lsr2 protein of Mycobacterium leprae and its synthetic peptides have been shown to elicit lymphoproliferation and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with lepromatous leprosy (M. Chaduvula, A. Murtaza, N. Misra, N. P. Narayan, V. Ramesh, H. K. Prasad, R. Rani, R. K. Chinnadurai, I. Nath, Infect. Immun. 80:742–752, 2012). PBMCs from 16 patients with lepromatous leprosy who were undergoing erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) (type 2) and 5 patients with reversal reactions (RR) (type 1) were stimulated with M. leprae, recombinant Lsr2, and six end-to-end synthetic peptides (A through F) spanning the Lsr2 sequence. During the reaction all patients with ENL showed lymphoproliferation (stimulation index, >2) in response to peptides A and F, with other peptides eliciting responses in 75 to 88% of the subjects. In PBMC cultures, both lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ release for peptide E were significantly higher than for peptides B and C and recombinant Lsr2 (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Five patients with RR also showed enhanced lymphoproliferative responses and IFN-γ release in response to Lsr2, M. leprae, and peptide E. Six months postreaction, 14 patients with ENL continued to exhibit responses to Lsr2 and its peptides, with the highest responses being elicited by peptide E. However, 5 subjects showed no lymphoproliferation and had reduced IFN-γ release in response to Lsr2 peptides (P < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test) but responded to recombinant Lsr2. Six patients with ENL had HLA-A*68.01, which the STFPEITHI program showed to have high peptide-binding scores of 20 to 21 for peptides E, B, and C. Eleven patients had HLA-DRB1*1501 and HLA-DRB1*1502, which had high binding scores for peptides C and E. Thus, Lsr2 and its peptides are recognized in leprosy reactions during and well after the subsidence of clinical signs. PMID:23446220

  19. [Leprosy: stigma and prejudice lived by institucionalized patients in Santa Catarina State, Brazil (1940-1960)].

    PubMed

    Borenstein, Miriam Süssking; Padilha, Maria Itayra; Costa, Eliani; Gregório, Vitória Regina Petters; Koerich, Ana Maria Espíndola; Ribas, Dorotéa Löes

    2008-01-01

    This study is a qualitative research with a socio-historic approach whose objective was to know the prejudice and stigma lived by the institutionalized patients/residents with hanseniase. To achieve this goal, three patients were intervewed who lived in a colony hospital during the research period, utilizing the oral history method. Data were collected and were further analysed, utilizing the stigma referencial. The results indicated that after the entry in the institution, these patients got their family bonds broken, lost their rights as citizens, regarding the situation, they took upon a new life, in a new environment. Concluding that, the nosocomial isolation for a long period of time (years of confinement and dismissal), caused the symbolic death of many patients that lived with the hope to cohabit with family and/or society. PMID:19009112

  20. Different Mechanisms for Heterogeneity in Leprosy Susceptibility Can Explain Disease Clustering within Households

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Egil; De Vlas, Sake; Meima, Abraham; Habbema, Dik; Richardus, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of leprosy is characterized by heterogeneity in susceptibility and clustering of disease within households. We aim to assess the extent to which different mechanisms for heterogeneity in leprosy susceptibility can explain household clustering as observed in a large study among contacts of leprosy patients. We used a microsimulation model, parameterizing it with data from over 20,000 contacts of leprosy patients in Bangladesh. We simulated six mechanisms producing heterogeneity in susceptibility: (1) susceptibility was allocated at random to persons (i.e. no additional mechanism), (2) a household factor, (3, 4) a genetic factor (dominant or recessive), or (5, 6) half a household factor and half genetic. We further assumed that a fraction of 5%, 10%, and 20% of the population was susceptible, leading to a total of 18 scenarios to be fitted to the data. We obtained an acceptable fit for each of the six mechanisms, thereby excluding none of the possible underlying mechanisms for heterogeneity of susceptibility to leprosy. However, the distribution of leprosy among contacts did differ between mechanisms, and predicted trends in the declining leprosy case detection were dependent on the assumed mechanism, with genetic-based susceptibility showing the slowest decline. Clustering of leprosy within households is partially caused by an increased transmission within households independent of the leprosy susceptibility mechanism. Even a large and detailed data set on contacts of leprosy patients could not unequivocally reveal the mechanism most likely responsible for heterogeneity in leprosy susceptibility. PMID:21124916

  1. Ocular Complications of Leprosy in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Raga A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to identify the main ocular- and vision-threatening complications of leprosy in Yemen. Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational study which took place from February to July 2010. Leprosy patients attending the Skin and Venereal Diseases Hospital in the City of Light in Taiz, Yemen, who consented to participate in the study, were enrolled. Detailed demographic and medical histories were taken and clinical examination findings were recorded. A detailed eye examination, including visual acuity (VA), slit-lamp, and fundus examinations, was conducted on each patient by a qualified ophthalmologist. Results: A total of 192 patients (180 male, 12 female, with a male to female ratio of 15:1) were included in the study. The majority of the patients (157; 81.8%) were over 40 years. Over two-thirds of the patients (129; 67.2%) had had leprosy for more than 20 years. Ocular complications were found in 97% of cases; 150 (39.1%) of the patients’ eyes had at least one pathology. Eyelid involvement was the most common problem observed in 102 (26.5%) patients. Half of the eyes (192; 50%) had a VA of <6/60. The main cause of blindness among these patients was corneal opacity detected in 69 out of 192 patients (35.9%). Conclusion: Ocular complications are frequent among leprosy patients in Yemen. They are true vision-threatening lesions. It is important to prevent these lesions through early diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:23275842

  2. Nerve abscess in primary neuritic leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dheeraj; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Goel, Madhu Mati; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Arun Kumar; Jain, Amita; Kohli, Neera; Singh, Shailesh Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Nerve abscess is an infrequently reported complication of leprosy. We describe a patient with a pure neuritic type of leprosy with multiple nerve abscesses, who presented with tingling and numbness in the medial aspect of his right forearm and hand. Subsequently he developed pain, redness and swelling over the medial side of his right elbow and the flexor aspect of his right wrist. High-resolution ultrasound showed diffuse thickening of the right ulnar nerve with hypoechoic texture housing a cystic lesion with internal debris suggesting an abscess, at the cubital tunnel. Histopathological examination of the pus and tissue obtained from the abscess revealed presence of granulomas with lepra bacilli. The patient responded to surgery and multidrug therapy. In conclusion, the nerve abscess as the first manifestation of leprosy is uncommon and a high index of suspicion is required to make a correct diagnosis. PMID:24171239

  3. Field trial on efficacy of supervised monthly dose of 600 mg rifampin, 400 mg ofloxacin and 100 mg minocycline for the treatment of leprosy; first results.

    PubMed

    Mane, I; Cartel, J L; Grosset, J H

    1997-06-01

    In 1995, a field trial was implemented in Senegal in order to evaluate the efficacy of a regimen based on the monthly supervised intake of rifampin 600 mg, ofloxacin 400 mg and minocycline 100 mg to treat leprosy. During the first year of the trial, 220 patients with active leprosy (newly detected or relapsing after dapsone monotherapy) were recruited: 102 paucibacillary (PB) (60 males and 42 females) and 118 multibacillary (MB) (71 males and 47 females). All of them accepted the new treatment (none requested to be preferably put under standard WHO/MDT), no clinical sign which could be considered as a toxic effect of the drug was noted, and none of the patients refused to continue treatment because of any clinical trouble. The compliance was excellent: the 113 patients (PB and MB) detected during the first 6 months of the trial have taken six monthly doses in 6 months, as planned. The rate of clearance and the progressive decrease of cutaneous lesions was satisfactory. Although it is too soon to give comprehensive results, it should be noted that no treatment failure was observed in the 56 PB patients who have completed treatment and have been followed up for 6 months. The long-term efficacy of the new regimen is to be evaluated on the rate of relapse during the years following the cessation of treatment. If that relapse rate is acceptable (similar to that observed in patients after treatment with current standard WHO/ MDT), the new regimen could be a solution to treat, for instance, patients very irregular and/or living in remote or inaccessible areas since no selection of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae should be possible (a monthly dose of ofloxacin and minocycline being as effective as a dose of dapsone and clofazimine taken daily for 1 month). Nevertheless, until longer term results of this and other trials become available, there is no justification for any change in the treatment strategy, and all leprosy patients should be put under standard WHO

  4. [Leprosy trends in Tocantins, a hyperendemic State in the North of Brazil, 2001-2012].

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Lorena Dias; Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Brito, Aline Lima; Lima, Mauricélia da Silveira; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2015-05-01

    Leprosy is hyperendemic in the State of Tocantins, Brazil. The aim of the study was to analyze trends in leprosy indicators in Tocantins from 2001 to 2012, based on analysis of data from the Information System for Notifiable Diseases (SINAN), including incident cases living in Tocantins. The study calculated leprosy indicators and analyzed time trends using polynomial regression. There was a significant downward trend in overall case detection (R2 = 0.40; p < 0.05) and proportion of paucibacillary cases (R2 = 0.81). Detection rates remained stable in individuals < 15 years (R2 = 0.48; p > 0.05) and cases with grade 2 physical disability (R2 = 0.37; p > 0.05), as did the proportion of grade 2 cases (R2 = 0.49; p > 0.05). There were significant increases in the proportions of cases with grade 1 disability (R2 = 0.82; p < 0.05) and multibacillary cases (R2 = 0.81; p < 0.05). Tocantins has regions with high transmission and late diagnosis of leprosy, indicating heterogeneous dissemination of the disease in the time trend analysis. PMID:26083172

  5. Leprosy associated with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Raiol, Theisla Kely Azevedo; Volpato, Solange Emanuelle; Santana, Jaci Maria; Ferreira, Isabelle Sousa Medeiros Torres; Takano, Daniela Mayumi

    2015-12-01

    Reported cases of leprosy and psoriasis coexistence are uncommon in the literature. Studies suggest a negative association between these two diseases. A case of association between these disorders has been reported. PMID:26964432

  6. Complications of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Karat, A B

    1978-07-01

    Leprosy is essentially a systemic disease and is a great "mimicker" of many other diseases. It affects apart from skin and peripheral nerves, haemopoietic, reticulo-endothelial and endocrine systems as well as eyes, bones and muscles. PMID:212642

  7. Leprosy treatment dropout: a sistematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease endemic in some undeveloped areas, and still represents a public health problem in Brazil. Therefore, the control of this endemic disease depends necessarily on the institution of correct treatment and containment of treatment dropout. This study aims to conduct a systematic review of published studies on treatment dropout of leprosy. Methods We conducted a systematic review of articles on treatment dropout of leprosy, published between january 2005 and april 2013, on MEDLINE and SciELO databases. The search was performed using the MeSH terms: “leprosy”; “patients dropouts” and the keywords: “leprosy, treatment” and “noncompliance, leprosy” in association, beside the equivalents in Portuguese. Results There were originally 196 references. After analyzing the titles and abstracts of articles, 20 articles were obtained and included in the final sample. Discussion Leprosy is a notifiable disease known as its disfiguring capability and the high rate of non-compliance to treatment. The low adhesion is responsible for the remaining potential sources of infection, irreversible complications, incomplete cure and, additionally, may lead to resistance to multiple drugs. Many factors are responsible for the interruption or dropout treatment: socioeconomic factors, education level, knowledge about the disease, lack of efficiency of health services, demographics, side effects of drugs, alcoholism, among others. Conclusion The recent scientific literature about the subject diverge regarding the factors that most affect the dropout problem in treating leprosy patients. However, better integration between professionals and users, and greater commitment of the patient, are common points among the authors of the studies. PMID:24000954

  8. Leprosy of the past and today.

    PubMed

    Grange, John M; Lethaby, Julie I

    2004-06-01

    Despite enhanced disease control efforts, leprosy remains an important cause of disability in several countries. Being based on case detection, the exact prevalence of the disease is not easily estimated. Currently around 600,000 new cases are treated annually. Advances in immunology and molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the disease and to hopes for improved diagnostic tests and vaccination strategies. The major advance, though, is the development of highly effective combination drug regimens which, provided all doses are taken, rarely fails to cure. The challenge to leprosy control services is to overcome the stigma associated with the disease so that patients present with minimal lesions and before disabilities have developed. Although it is hoped that leprosy as a serious public health problem will be eliminated within a few years, continuing care for those suffering from deformity and rejection by society will be required for several decades. PMID:16088469

  9. New Biomarkers with Relevance to Leprosy Diagnosis Applicable in Areas Hyperendemic for Leprosy1

    PubMed Central

    Geluk, Annemieke; Bobosha, Kidist; van der Ploeg-van Schip, Jolien J.; Spencer, John S.; Banu, Sayera; Martins, Marcia Brandao; Cho, Sang-Nae; Franken, Kees L.M.C.; Kim, Hee Jin; Bekele, Yonas; Uddin, Mohammad K. M.; Hadi, Sheikh Abdul; Aseffa, Abraham; Pessolani, Maria C.V.; Pereira, Geraldo M. B.; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is not eradicable with currently available diagnostics or interventions as evidenced by its stable incidence. Early diagnosis of Mycobacterium leprae infection should therefore be emphasized in leprosy-research. It remains challenging to develop tests based on immunological biomarkers that distinguish individuals controlling bacterial replication from those developing disease. To identify biomarkers for field-applicable diagnostics, we determined cytokines/chemokines induced by M. leprae proteins in blood of leprosy patients and controls (EC) from high leprosy-prevalence areas (Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia) and from South Korea where leprosy is not endemic anymore. M. leprae- sonicate induced IFN-γ was similar for all groups, excluding M. leprae/IFN-γ as a diagnostic read-out. By contrast, ML2478 and ML0840 induced high IFN-γ concentrations in Bangladeshi EC, which were completely absent for South Korean controls. Importantly, ML2478/IFN-γ could indicate distinct degrees of M. leprae exposure, and thereby the risk of infection and transmission, in different parts of Brazilian and Ethiopian cities. Notwithstanding these discriminatory responses, M. leprae proteins did not distinguish patients from EC in one leprosy endemic area based on IFN-γ. Analyses of additional cytokines/chemokines showed that M. leprae and ML2478 induced significantly higher concentrations of MCP-1, MIP-1β and IL-1β in patients compared to EC, whereas IP-10, like IFN-γ, differed between EC from areas with dissimilar leprosy prevalence. This study identifies M. leprae-unique antigens, particularly ML2478, as biomarker tools to measure M. leprae exposure using IFN-γ or IP-10, and also shows that MCP-1, MIP-1β and IL-1β can potentially distinguish pathogenic immune responses from those induced during asymptomatic exposure to M. leprae. PMID:22504648

  10. Renal amyloidosis in leprosy, an infrequent cause of nephrotic syndrome in Europe.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Martín, Noelia; Samillán-Sosa, Kelly Del Rocío; De Miguel, Julio; Martínez-Miguel, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae The main clinical manifestations involve the skin and the peripheral nervous system. Several types of nephropathy have been described in leprosy. One frequent form of renal involvement is amyloidosis, especially in patients with lepromatous leprosy. In these patients, end-stage renal disease is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality. Here, we present the case of a patient with nephrotic syndrome caused by secondary amyloidosis, chronic peripheral neuropathy and a history of leprosy. The patient was correctly treated in her youth, which is the best way to avoid renal pathology, but she developed a nephrotic syndrome years later. PMID:27489069

  11. Quality of life in patients with erythema nodosum leprosum in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Felix B.; Kiung, Sze T.; Yap, Jeffrey B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of data on quality of life issues in patients with leprosy suffering from erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). Thus, we aim to study the effect of ENL on quality of life. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Hansen's Clinic, Hospital Kuala Lumpur between January 2010 and December 2013 among patients with multibacillary leprosy using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Results: A total of 153 patients participated with 31.4% suffering from ENL. The mean age at presentation was 40.5 ± 16.49 years. The mean DLQI was 7.1 ± 3.72. Patients with ENL were younger (mean age 36.5 vs. 42.4, P = 0.026), had higher mean bacteriologic index (4.3 vs. 3.8, P = 0.004), had physical deformities (47.9% vs. 31.4%, P = 0.049), and had higher mean DLQI score (9.1 vs. 6.2, P < 0.001). All the DLQI domains were higher in patients suffering from ENL except the treatment domain. Symptoms and feeling was the domain with the largest effect followed by daily activities and leisure. Personal relationship had the lowest effect. Conclusion: Quality of life impairment in patients with leprosy in Malaysia is moderate, with larger effect among patients with ENL. The impairment in ENL is comparable to itchy skin conditions such as urticarial and is worse than chronic skin disease such as psoriasis. Thus, it is essential that management of leprosy incorporate quality of life issues. PMID:27559497

  12. Low serum levels of cathelicidin LL-37 in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Michael; Al Samie, Abdul Rahim; Winkler, Heide-Maria; Nemeth, Johannes; Grasnek, Andreas; Indra, Alexander; Bieglmayer, Christian; Winkler, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin LL-37 possesses antituberculous activity, its association with other mycobacterial diseases, such as leprosy, is unknown. We studied serum cathelicidin and 25OH-vitamin D3 levels in 29 leprosy patients and 19 healthy individuals from Yemen. Cathelicidin levels were significantly lower in both treated (n=15) and untreated leprosy patients (n=14) when compared to controls (P<0.001). Within leprosy patients, levels were lower in those who very recently developed disease (untreated group) when compared to already treated patients (P<0.05). 25OH-vitamin D3 levels were not different between groups. The results suggest a potential association of cathelicidin LL-37 with Mycobacterium leprae infection. PMID:20887706

  13. T-Cell Regulation in Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Bobosha, Kidist; Wilson, Louis; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Bekele, Yonas; Zewdie, Martha; van der Ploeg- van Schip, Jolien J.; Abebe, Markos; Hussein, Jemal; Khadge, Saraswoti; Neupane, Kapil D.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; Aseffa, Abraham; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Geluk, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are known for their role in maintaining self-tolerance and balancing immune reactions in autoimmune diseases and chronic infections. However, regulatory mechanisms can also lead to prolonged survival of pathogens in chronic infections like leprosy and tuberculosis (TB). Despite high humoral responses against Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae), lepromatous leprosy (LL) patients have the characteristic inability to generate T helper 1 (Th1) responses against the bacterium. In this study, we investigated the unresponsiveness to M. leprae in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of LL patients by analysis of IFN-γ responses to M. leprae before and after depletion of CD25+ cells, by cell subsets analysis of PBMC and by immunohistochemistry of patients' skin lesions. Depletion of CD25+ cells from total PBMC identified two groups of LL patients: 7/18 (38.8%) gained in vitro responsiveness towards M. leprae after depletion of CD25+ cells, which was reversed to M. leprae-specific T-cell unresponsiveness by addition of autologous CD25+ cells. In contrast, 11/18 (61.1%) remained anergic in the absence of CD25+ T-cells. For both groups mitogen-induced IFN-γ was, however, not affected by depletion of CD25+ cells. In M. leprae responding healthy controls, treated lepromatous leprosy (LL) and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (BT) patients, depletion of CD25+ cells only slightly increased the IFN-γ response. Furthermore, cell subset analysis showed significantly higher (p = 0.02) numbers of FoxP3+ CD8+CD25+ T-cells in LL compared to BT patients, whereas confocal microscopy of skin biopsies revealed increased numbers of CD68+CD163+ as well as FoxP3+ cells in lesions of LL compared to tuberculoid and borderline tuberculoid leprosy (TT/BT) lesions. Thus, these data show that CD25+ Treg cells play a role in M. leprae-Th1 unresponsiveness in LL. PMID:24722473

  14. Huntington's disease and leprosy in a New Guinea Highlander.

    PubMed Central

    Scrimgeour, E M

    1983-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) was observed in a 45-year-old male Melanesian patient from the Eastern Highlands Province of Papua New Guinea. The patient had multiple peripheral nerve palsies as a result of tuberculoid leprosy and had been resident in the leprosy ward of Goroka Base Hospital for over 6 years. During this time his HD had remained undiagnosed. This is the first report of HD in the Highlands of New Guinea. Images PMID:6228663

  15. Leprosy and genetics*

    PubMed Central

    Beiguelman, Bernardo

    1967-01-01

    The few geneticists who are interested in leprosy have been working in this field only since 1962, and have made little progress in solving the problems presented by susceptibility to this disease. This paper reviews the research that has been conducted, with particular reference to the search for associations between leprosy and certain genetic markers. In each area, the advantages and limitations of different techniques are described, and attention is drawn to sources of bias that may invalidate many of the results that have been published. Of particular interest is the discussion of a new technique for evaluating resistance to-leprosy. The proposed technique is based upon the in vitro transformation of blood monocytes into macrophages, and the observation of their behaviour against Mycobacterium leprae. PMID:5301388

  16. Double jeopardy: women and leprosy in India.

    PubMed

    Vlassoff, C; Khot, S; Rao, S

    1996-01-01

    This article presents evidence from two states of India, Bihar and Maharashtra, on the process of "dehabilitation" among male and female leprosy patients, and suggests gender-sensitive interventions to address existing problems in leprosy control. While the study investigated a wide range of gender differences in the impact of leprosy, this article focuses on only two-marriage and family reactions. Important gender differences were apparent in the impact of the disease. While both men and women were negatively affected in terms of their family and marital lives, women suffered more isolation and rejection. Psychologically, women appeared more vulnerable because they were deprived of personal contact with others in the domestic environment where they were accustomed to receiving their greatest emotional rewards. Women reported that indifference to them by other family members, or seeming negation of their presence, caused them the greatest suffering. This underscores the importance of providing information to both leprosy patients and their families about the disease and its treatment, including the possibility of cure with MDT (multi-drug therapy) and of counselling family members about their crucial role in helping patients cope and recover. This support is even more critical for women, who often lack access to the variety of outside advice and assistance available to men. The evidence presented in the article demonstrates the importance of analysing leprosy from a gender perspective, not only because this approach helps to inform our understanding of the determinants and consequences of the disease, but also because it provides new insights for improved disease control. PMID:9050190

  17. Laryngeal involvement causing dysphonia in a 29 year old nursing mother with lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Fwoloshi, Sombo; Machona, Sharon Musonda; Mudenda, Victor; Ngalamika, Owen

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a granulomatous disease that mainly affects the skin and peripheral nerves. It is caused by infection with mycobacterium leprae or mycobacterium lepromatosus. In most instances, diagnosis of leprosy can easily be made based on the clinical signs and symptoms. However, when patients present with atypical features, clinical diagnosis can be a challenge. We report a case of a nursing mother with lepromatous leprosy who presented with dysphonia and skin lesions initially thought to be a deep cutaneous mycosis. PMID:26327983

  18. Mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Scollard, David M; Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J

    2015-01-01

    All patients with leprosy have some degree of nerve involvement. Perineural inflammation is the histopathologic hallmark of leprosy, and this localization may reflect a vascular route of entry of Mycobacterium leprae into nerves. Once inside nerves, M. leprae are ingested by Schwann cells, with a wide array of consequences. Axonal atrophy may occur early in this process; ultimately, affected nerves undergo segmental demyelination. Knowledge of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy has been greatly limited by the minimal opportunities to study affected nerves in man. The nine-banded armadillo provides the only animal model of the pathogenesis of M. leprae infection. New tools available for this model enable the study and correlation of events occurring in epidermal nerve fibers, dermal nerves, and nerve trunks, including neurophysiologic parameters, bacterial load, and changes in gene transcription in both neural and inflammatory cells. The armadillo model is likely to enhance understanding of the mechanisms of nerve injury in leprosy and offers a means of testing proposed interventions. PMID:25432810

  19. Leprosis in Guatemala

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leprosis is a disease caused by a rhabdovirus and transmitted by mites of the genus Brevipalpus. It causes severe damages mostly in sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis L.). In Guatemala it was detected around 1995 for the first time but did not become a problem until about 2002. It was first detected ...

  20. Association of TNF, MBL, and VDR polymorphisms with leprosy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Bishwa R; Macdonald, Murdo; Berrington, William R; Misch, E Ann; Ranjit, Chaman; Siddiqui, M Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R

    2010-10-01

    Although genetic variants in tumor necrosis factor (TNF), mannose binding lectin (MBL), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) have been associated with leprosy clinical outcomes, these findings have not been extensively validated. We used a case-control study design with 933 patients in Nepal, which included 240 patients with type I reversal reaction (RR), and 124 patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) reactions. We compared genotype frequencies in 933 cases and 101 controls of seven polymorphisms, including a promoter region variant in TNF (G -308A), three polymorphisms in MBL (C154T, G161A and G170A), and three variants in VDR (FokI, BsmI, and TaqI). We observed an association between TNF -308A and protection from leprosy with an odds ratio of 0.52 (95% confidence interval = 0.29-0.95, p = 0.016). MBL polymorphism G161A was associated with protection from lepromatous leprosy (odds ratio = 0.33, 95% confidence interval = 0.12-0.85, p = 0.010). VDR polymorphisms were not associated with leprosy phenotypes. These results confirm previous findings of an association of TNF -308A with protection from leprosy and MBL polymorphisms with protection from lepromatous leprosy. The statistical significance was modest and will require further study for conclusive validation. PMID:20650301

  1. Association of TNF, MBL, and VDR Polymorphisms with Leprosy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Bishwa R.; Macdonald, Murdo; Berrington, William R.; Misch, E. Ann; Ranjit, Chaman; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although genetic variants in tumor necrosis factor (TNF), mannose binding lectin (MBL), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) have been associated with leprosy clinical outcomes these findings have not been extensively validated. Methods We used a case-control study design with 933 patients in Nepal, which included 240 patients with type I reversal reaction (RR), and 124 patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) reactions. We compared genotype frequencies in 933 cases and 101 controls of 7 polymorphisms, including a promoter region variant in TNF (G−308A), three polymorphisms in MBL (C154T, G161A and G170A), and three variants in VDR (FokI, BsmI, and TaqI). Results We observed an association between TNF −308A and protection from leprosy with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.29 to 0.95, P = 0.016). MBL polymorphism G161A was associated with protection from lepromatous leprosy (OR (95% CI) = 0.33 (0.12–0.85), P = 0.010). VDR polymorphisms were not associated with leprosy phenotypes. Conclusion These results confirm previous findings of an association of TNF −308A with protection from leprosy and MBL polymorphisms with protection from lepromatous leprosy. The statistical significance was modest and will require further study for conclusive validation. PMID:20650301

  2. Leprosy in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    White, Cassandra; Franco-Paredes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in leprosy (Hansen's disease) treatment and outlook for patients since the introduction of multidrug therapy (MDT) 3 decades ago, the global incidence remains high, and patients often have long-term complications associated with the disease. In this article, we discuss recent findings related to genetics, susceptibility, and disease reservoirs and the implications of these findings for Hansen's disease control and health outcomes for patients. We describe the continued difficulties associated with treatment of inflammatory episodes known as "leprosy reactions," which cause much of the disability associated with the disease and can affect people for many years after MDT is complete. We also discuss some of the contemporary challenges for physicians and patients, including international and internal migration of people affected by the disease. We suggest some important areas of focus for future Hansen's disease research. PMID:25567223

  3. Leprosy in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite significant improvements in leprosy (Hansen's disease) treatment and outlook for patients since the introduction of multidrug therapy (MDT) 3 decades ago, the global incidence remains high, and patients often have long-term complications associated with the disease. In this article, we discuss recent findings related to genetics, susceptibility, and disease reservoirs and the implications of these findings for Hansen's disease control and health outcomes for patients. We describe the continued difficulties associated with treatment of inflammatory episodes known as “leprosy reactions,” which cause much of the disability associated with the disease and can affect people for many years after MDT is complete. We also discuss some of the contemporary challenges for physicians and patients, including international and internal migration of people affected by the disease. We suggest some important areas of focus for future Hansen's disease research. PMID:25567223

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of leprosy type 1 (reversal) reaction.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sarah M; Kobayashi, Todd T

    2015-04-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae that primarily affects the skin and peripheral nerves. Leprosy has several distinct clinical presentations ranging from moderate to severe, with the extent of disease generally depending on the host's immune response to the infection. Treatment typically involves antimicrobials (eg, clofazimine, dapsone, rifampin). Once treatment is started, an important aspect of patient care is the recognition of possible reversal reactions. We report the case of a 44-year-old man who repeatedly developed physical findings consistent with a type 1 (reversal) reaction after undergoing multiple treatments for leprosy. A discussion of leprosy along with its clinical manifestations, treatment methods, and management of reversal reactions also is provided. PMID:25942024

  5. Newer Management Options in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P Narasimha; Jain, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Newer management options are needed for leprosy control even at present, as it is predicted that new cases of leprosy will continue to appear for many more years in future. This article detail newer methods of clinical grading of peripheral nerve involvement (thickening, tenderness and nerve pain which are subjective in nature) and the advances made in the use of Ultrasonography and Colour Doppler as an objective imaging tool for nerves in leprosy. It also briefly discusses the newer drugs and alternative regimens as therapeutic management options which hold promise for leprosy in future. PMID:23372204

  6. On the Age of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Silva, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae and the newly discovered Mycobacterium lepromatosis. Human leprosy has been documented for millennia in ancient cultures. Recent genomic studies of worldwide M. leprae strains have further traced it along global human dispersals during the past ∼100,000 years. Because leprosy bacilli are strictly intracellular, we wonder how long humans have been affected by this disease-causing parasite. Based on recently published data on M. leprae genomes, M. lepromatosis discovery, leprosy bacilli evolution, and human evolution, it is most likely that the leprosy bacilli started parasitic evolution in humans or early hominids millions of years ago. This makes leprosy the oldest human-specific infection. The unique adaptive evolution has likely molded the indolent growth and evasion from human immune defense that may explain leprosy pathogenesis. Accordingly, leprosy can be viewed as a natural consequence of a long parasitism. The burden of leprosy may have affected minor selection on human genetic polymorphisms. PMID:24551248

  7. Induction and treatment of anergy in murine leprosy.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Ortega, Mario; Hernandez, Víctor G; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Villanueva, Enrique B; Aguilar-Santelises, Miguel; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2015-02-01

    Leprosy is a disease consisting of a spectrum of clinical, bacteriological, histopathological and immunological manifestations. Tuberculoid leprosy is frequently recognized as the benign polar form of the disease, while lepromatous leprosy is regarded as the malignant form. The different forms of leprosy depend on the genetic and immunological characteristics of the patient and on the characteristics of the leprosy bacillus. The malignant manifestations of lepromatous leprosy result from the mycobacterial-specific anergy that develops in this form of the disease. Using murine leprosy as a model of anergy in this study, we first induced the development of anergy to Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) in mice and then attempted to reverse it by the administration of dialysable leucocyte extracts (DLE) prepared from healthy (HLT), BCG-inoculated and MLM-inoculated mice. Mice inoculated with either MLM or BCG developed a robust cell-mediated immune response (CMI) that was temporary in the MLM-inoculated group and long-lasting in the BCG-inoculated group. DLE were prepared from the spleens of MLM- and BCG-inoculated mice at the peak of CMI. Independent MLM intradermally-inoculated groups were treated every other day with HLT-DLE, BCG-DLE or MLM-DLE, and the effect was documented for 98 days. DLE administered at a dose of 1.0 U (1 × 10(6) splenocytes) did not affect the evolution of leprosy, while DLE given at a dose of 0.1 U showed beneficial effects regardless of the DLE source. The dose but not the specificity of DLE was the determining factor for reversing anergy. PMID:25529580

  8. Leprosy in China: epidemiological trends between 1949 and 1998.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X. S.; Li, W. Z.; Jiang, C.; Ye, G. Y.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the epidemiological trends of leprosy in China from 1949 to 1998. METHOD: Data for the study were obtained from the computerized database of the National System of Leprosy Surveillance. FINDINGS: A total of 474,774 leprosy patients were detected during this 50-year period. Case detection rates per 100,000 population were highest in the 1950s and 1960s, with peaks appearing in 1957-58, 1963-66, 1969-70, and 1983-84, corresponding to mass surveys or screening surveys carried out in most areas or selected areas of the country. While the duration of the disease at the time of detection fell over the period, the disability rates, which were > 50% in the early 1950s, have decreased gradually to 20.8% by 1997-98 but are still too high. More than 50% of cases were found through active methods in the periods 1955-58, 1965-66, and 1969-76, but in recent years cases are mostly detected through dermatological clinics or by voluntary reporting. The peak prevalences of the 1960s (i.e. > 2 per 10,000 population) decreased annually from the 1970s onwards. By the end of 1998 the prevalence was 0.05 per 10,000 population. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that leprosy was well controlled in China and that the WHO goal of elimination of leprosy as a public health problem has been achieved at the national and subnational levels. However, leprosy is still unevenly distributed in the country. According to the criterion for leprosy elimination in China--defined as a prevalence of < 1 per 100,000 in county or city--there are still more than 10% of counties or cities where this target has not yet been reached. Special attention must therefore be given to achieve elimination and final eradication of leprosy in China. PMID:11357209

  9. Induction and treatment of anergy in murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Ortega, Mario; Hernandez, Víctor G; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Villanueva, Enrique B; Aguilar-Santelises, Miguel; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease consisting of a spectrum of clinical, bacteriological, histopathological and immunological manifestations. Tuberculoid leprosy is frequently recognized as the benign polar form of the disease, while lepromatous leprosy is regarded as the malignant form. The different forms of leprosy depend on the genetic and immunological characteristics of the patient and on the characteristics of the leprosy bacillus. The malignant manifestations of lepromatous leprosy result from the mycobacterial-specific anergy that develops in this form of the disease. Using murine leprosy as a model of anergy in this study, we first induced the development of anergy to Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) in mice and then attempted to reverse it by the administration of dialysable leucocyte extracts (DLE) prepared from healthy (HLT), BCG-inoculated and MLM-inoculated mice. Mice inoculated with either MLM or BCG developed a robust cell-mediated immune response (CMI) that was temporary in the MLM-inoculated group and long-lasting in the BCG-inoculated group. DLE were prepared from the spleens of MLM- and BCG-inoculated mice at the peak of CMI. Independent MLM intradermally-inoculated groups were treated every other day with HLT-DLE, BCG-DLE or MLM-DLE, and the effect was documented for 98 days. DLE administered at a dose of 1.0 U (1 × 106 splenocytes) did not affect the evolution of leprosy, while DLE given at a dose of 0.1 U showed beneficial effects regardless of the DLE source. The dose but not the specificity of DLE was the determining factor for reversing anergy. PMID:25529580

  10. Association of the LRRK2 genetic polymorphisms with leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Xu, L; Lv, L; Su, L-Y; Fan, Y; Zhang, D-F; Bi, R; Yu, D; Zhang, W; Li, X-A; Li, Y-Y; Yao, Y-G

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious and neurological disease that is caused by infection of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). A recent genome-wide association study indicated a suggestive association of LRRK2 genetic variant rs1873613 with leprosy in Chinese population. To validate this association and further identify potential causal variants of LRRK2 with leprosy, we genotyped 13 LRRK2 variants in 548 leprosy patients and 1078 healthy individuals from Yunnan Province and (re-)analyzed 3225 Han Chinese across China. Variants rs1427267, rs3761863, rs1873613, rs732374 and rs7298930 were significantly associated with leprosy per se and/or paucibacillary leprosy (PB). Haplotype A-G-A-C-A was significantly associated with leprosy per se (P=0.018) and PB (P=0.020). Overexpression of the protective allele (Thr2397) of rs3761863 in HEK293 cells led to a significantly increased nuclear factor of activated T-cells' activity compared with allele Met2397 after lipopolysaccharides stimulation. Allele Thr2397 could attenuate 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine-induced autophagic activity in U251 cells. These data suggest that the protective effect of LRRK2 variant p.M2397T on leprosy might be mediated by increasing immune response and decreasing neurotoxicity after M. leprae loading. Our findings confirm that LRRK2 is a susceptible gene to leprosy in Han Chinese population. PMID:25521227

  11. Leprosy in a Texan

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Garrett L.; Tillman, Erica A.

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man from Texas with an unremarkable past medical history presented with a 2-year history of a diffuse, spreading annular eruption involving most of his trunk. He noticed progressive numbness of his hands and feet but no other systemic symptoms. He had never traveled outside of the United States. Skin biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of leprosy, and he was initiated on appropriate therapy. PMID:25829664

  12. Leprosy in a texan.

    PubMed

    Vick, Garrett L; Tillman, Erica A; Fiala, Katherine H

    2015-04-01

    A 69-year-old man from Texas with an unremarkable past medical history presented with a 2-year history of a diffuse, spreading annular eruption involving most of his trunk. He noticed progressive numbness of his hands and feet but no other systemic symptoms. He had never traveled outside of the United States. Skin biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of leprosy, and he was initiated on appropriate therapy. PMID:25829664

  13. Genotyping of Mycobacterium leprae present on Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopic slides and in skin biopsy samples from leprosy patients in different geographic regions of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Araujo, Marcelo Ivens de; Albuquerque, Edson Cláudio Araripe de; Baptista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Moura, Maria Manuela da Fonseca; Rezende, Denise Silva; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Lara, Flávio Alves; Pontes, Maria Araci de Andrade; Gonçalves, Heitor de Sá; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes; Vissa, Varalakshmi D; Brennan, Patrick J; Suffys, Philip Noel

    2012-12-01

    We analysed 16 variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) and three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in Mycobacterium leprae present on 115 Ziehl-Neelsen (Z-N)-stained slides and in 51 skin biopsy samples derived from leprosy patients from Ceará (n = 23), Pernambuco (n = 41), Rio de Janeiro (n = 22) and Rondônia (RO) (n = 78). All skin biopsies yielded SNP-based genotypes, while 48 of the samples (94.1%) yielded complete VNTR genotypes. We evaluated two procedures for extracting M. leprae DNA from Z-N-stained slides: the first including Chelex and the other combining proteinase and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Of the 76 samples processed using the first procedure, 30.2% were positive for 16 or 15 VNTRs, whereas of the 39 samples processed using the second procedure, 28.2% yielded genotypes defined by at least 10 VNTRs. Combined VNTR and SNP analysis revealed large variability in genotypes, but a high prevalence of SNP genotype 4 in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Our observation of two samples from RO with an identical genotype and seven groups with similar genotypes, including four derived from residents of the same state or region, suggest a tendency to form groups according to the origin of the isolates. This study demonstrates the existence of geographically related M. leprae genotypes and that Z-N-stained slides are an alternative source for M. leprae genotyping. PMID:23283465

  14. [Leprosy and medicine I--proposal of an isolation policy and its background].

    PubMed

    Mori, Shuichi; Ishii, Norihisa

    2006-02-01

    The leprosy policy of Japan began from when the government enacted "law No. 11 (The leprosy prevention act)" in 1907 (Meiji 40) and several leprosy sanatoriums were built and the patient who wanders about was received. Then, in rise of totalitarianism, the isolation policy of Japan gained national support under a slogan "Patient Relief", and it would become the big factor to which enactment of "Leprosy Prevention Law" in 1931 (Showa 6) and leprosy policy changed to segregation which aimed at internment of all leprosy patients. From today's research on the leprosy policy of Japan, it is internment of all leprosy patients, whole life isolation, social defense and neglect of patients' human-rights and led to many tragedy of patient. However, there is little research which can reply clearly to the question of whether the leprosy policy of Japan was really original and what the factors of led to the formation of the segregation policy. This paper focuses on the relation between leprosy policy and medicine, and from this, I make clear the similarity, or peculiarity of the isolation policy between Japan and the vest of the world, and clarify the factors of progress of the absolute isolation policy. The processes are historical and medical historical the verification of the relation between the formation of the national medicine and the progress of the isolation policy of Meiji Era, the proposal of the isolation policy by Dr. Keizo Dohi, Dr. Shibasaburo Kitasato, and Dr. Masatsugu Yamane, and the application by Dr. Kensuke Mitsuda, the decision to enact this policy and its support by the Health and Medical Bureau and the Department of the Interior, as well as many factors. PMID:16562495

  15. T regulatory cells (TREG)(TCD4+CD25+FOXP3+) distribution in the different clinical forms of leprosy and reactional states*

    PubMed Central

    Parente, José Napoleão Tavares; Talhari, Carolina; Schettini, Antônio Pedro Mendes; Massone, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy is characterized histologically by a spectrum of different granulomatous skin lesions, reflecting patients' immune responses to Mycobacterium leprae. Although CD4+CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells are pivotal in the immuneregulation, presence, frequency, and distribution of Tregs in leprosy, its reactional states have been investigated in few studies. OBJECTIVES This study aimed to verify the frequency and distribution of regulatory T cells in different clinical forms and reactional states of leprosy. METHODS We performed an immunohistochemical study on 96 leprosy cases [Indeterminate (I): 9 patients; tuberculoid tuberculoid: 13 patients; borderline tuberculoid: 26 patients; borderline borderline: 3 patients; borderline lepromatous: 8 patients; lepromatous lepromatous: 27 patients; reversal reaction: 8 patients; and erythema nodosum leprosum: 2 patients]. RESULTS FoxP3-positive cells were present in 100% of the cases with an average density of 2.82% of the infiltrate. Their distribution was not related to granulomatous structures or special locations. There was a statistically significant increment of FoxP3 expression in patients with leprosy reversal reactions when compared with patients presenting with type I leprosy (P= 0.0228); borderline tuberculoid leprosy (P = 0.0351) and lepromatous leprosy (P = 0.0344). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that Tregs play a relevant role in the etiopathogenesis of leprosy, mainly in type I leprosy reaction. PMID:25672298

  16. Zoonotic Leprosy in the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rahul; Singh, Pushpendra; Loughry, W.J.; Lockhart, J. Mitchell; Inman, W. Barry; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Pena, Maria T.; Marcos, Luis A.; Scollard, David M.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are naturally infected with Mycobacterium leprae and have been implicated in zoonotic transmission of leprosy. Early studies found this disease mainly in Texas and Louisiana, but armadillos in the southeastern United States appeared to be free of infection. We screened 645 armadillos from 8 locations in the southeastern United States not known to harbor enzootic leprosy for M. leprae DNA and antibodies. We found M. leprae–infected armadillos at each location, and 106 (16.4%) animals had serologic/PCR evidence of infection. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism variable number tandem repeat genotyping/genome sequencing, we detected M. leprae genotype 3I-2-v1 among 35 armadillos. Seven armadillos harbored a newly identified genotype (3I-2-v15). In comparison, 52 human patients from the same region were infected with 31 M. leprae types. However, 42.3% (22/52) of patients were infected with 1 of the 2 M. leprae genotype strains associated with armadillos. The geographic range and complexity of zoonotic leprosy is expanding. PMID:26583204

  17. Zoonotic Leprosy in the Southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Singh, Pushpendra; Loughry, W J; Lockhart, J Mitchell; Inman, W Barry; Duthie, Malcolm S; Pena, Maria T; Marcos, Luis A; Scollard, David M; Cole, Stewart T; Truman, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    Nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are naturally infected with Mycobacterium leprae and have been implicated in zoonotic transmission of leprosy. Early studies found this disease mainly in Texas and Louisiana, but armadillos in the southeastern United States appeared to be free of infection. We screened 645 armadillos from 8 locations in the southeastern United States not known to harbor enzootic leprosy for M. leprae DNA and antibodies. We found M. leprae-infected armadillos at each location, and 106 (16.4%) animals had serologic/PCR evidence of infection. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism variable number tandem repeat genotyping/genome sequencing, we detected M. leprae genotype 3I-2-v1 among 35 armadillos. Seven armadillos harbored a newly identified genotype (3I-2-v15). In comparison, 52 human patients from the same region were infected with 31 M. leprae types. However, 42.3% (22/52) of patients were infected with 1 of the 2 M. leprae genotype strains associated with armadillos. The geographic range and complexity of zoonotic leprosy is expanding. PMID:26583204

  18. Indigenous Cases of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) in Southern Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis A; Dobbs, Thomas; Walker, Sue; Waller, William; Stryjewska, Barbara M

    2015-07-01

    Hansen's disease or leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. In the U.S., leprosy is mainly reported in immigrants, but indigenous leprosy cases have been also reported in this country, especially in semitropical southern states (i.e., Texas, Louisiana). The objective of this series of cases is to describe indigenous leprosy cases reported in southern Mississippi (MS) during the period 2012-2014. Information was collected from medical records at Hattiesburg Clinic and the MS Department of Health. Four cases were reported during the period of study (3 Caucasian males, 1 African-American woman). Non of visited endemic leprosy country. The age ranged from 60 to 83 years (median: 75.5 years). Of the four cases, three presented with a slowly progressive erythematous rash disseminated mainly on the thorax and abdomen, with a lesser degree on the extremities. The time between onset of rash until the diagnosis ranged from 5 to 16 months (median: 7 months). Only one case had direct contact with armadillos (blood exposure). Non of these patients had a history of immunosuppression. The most common symptoms were neuropathic pain (n=2), generalized pruritus (n=2) and loss of sensation in extremities (n=2). One case had severe peripheral neuropathy with muscle weakness, atrophy in left arm, and wasting on left hand. Skin biopsies showed diffuse granulomatous infiltrate with foamy histiocytes along with acid fast bacilli by Fite stain. By Ridley-Jopling classification system, three cases were diagnosis as lepromatous leprosy, and one, borderline lepromatous. Treatment included clofazimine, dapsone and rifampin that was offered free of charge by the National Hansen's Diseases Program, Baton Rouge, L.A. One patient did not tolerate therapy. In conclusion, a slowly progressive disseminated erythematous skin rash on the trunk should raise suspicion for leprosy in the elderly population in south MS. PMID:26434167

  19. Erythema nodosum leprosum and reversal reaction in 2 cases of imported leprosy.

    PubMed

    Pulido-Pérez, A; Mendoza-Cembranos, M D; Avilés-Izquierdo, J A; Suárez-Fernández, R

    2013-12-01

    Leprosy reactions, which are abrupt changes in the clinical condition of patients with immunologically unstable forms of the disease, can mask the cardinal signs of leprosy, delaying both diagnosis and treatment. The main complications that arise from delayed diagnosis reflect the characteristic features of the disease, involving impaired nerve function and both local (ulcers, pyogenic infection, osteomyelitis) and systemic compromise. Through clinical examination, sensory testing, and, where necessary, histopathology and microbiology, are essential when leprosy is suspected. Rapid initiation of anti-inflammatory treatment reduces the risk of functional impairment, the main concern in leprosy. We describe type 1 and type 2 leprosy reactions in 2 patients who had not yet been diagnosed with the disease. PMID:23177396

  20. [Leprosy and medicine II--progress and establishment of an absolute isolation policy].

    PubMed

    Mori, Shuichi; Ishii, Norihisa

    2007-02-01

    The leprosy policy of Japan began from when the government enacted "law No. 11 (The leprosy prevention act)" in 1907 (Meiji 40) and several leprosy sanatoriums were built to receive previously homeless patients. Then, with the rise of totalitarianism, the isolation policy of Japan gained national support under the slogan "Patient Relief", which would become a major factor behind the enactment of "Leprosy Prevention Law" in 1931 (Showa 6) by which the leprosy policy was changed to one of absolute isolation aimed at the internment of all leprosy patients. From recent research on the leprosy policy of Japan, the internment of all leprosy patients, isolation for life, social defense, and neglect of patients' human-rights had tragic results in many cases. However, there is little research which can reply clearly to the question of whether the leprosy policy of Japan was really original and what factors led to the formation of the absolute isolation policy. This paper focuses on the relation between leprosy policy and treatment, and from this, I make clear the similarities, or peculiarities, of the isolation policy between Japan and the rest of the world, while clarifying the factors associated with the progress of the absolute isolation policy. The processes involved were historical and medical historical in that the relation between the formation of a national health system and the progress of the isolation policy of Meiji Era, the proposal of the isolation policy by Dr. Keizo Dohi, Dr. Shibasaburo Kitasato, and Dr. Masatsugu Yamane; the practical application of this policy by Dr. Kensuke Mitsuda, and the decision to enact this policy and its support by the Health and Medical Bureau and the Department of the Interior, as well as many other factors, all contributed to the final implementation of the absolute isolation policy. PMID:17315749

  1. Global strategy for further reducing the leprosy burden and sustaining leprosy control activities 2006-2010. Operational guidelines.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    The Global Strategy for further reducing the leprosy burden and sustaining leprosy control activities (2006 - 2010) has been widely welcomed and endorsed. The overall goal is to provide access to quality leprosy services for all affected communities following the principles of equity and social justice. The purpose of these Operational Guidelines is to help managers of national health services to implement the new Global Strategy in their own countries. This will be done as they develop detailed policies applicable to their own situation, and revise their National Manual for Leprosy Control. Leprosy services are being integrated into the general health services throughout the world; a new emphasis is given here to the need for an effective referral system, as part of an integrated programme. Good communication between all involved in the management of a person with leprosy or leprosy- related complications is essential. These Guidelines should help managers to choose which activities can be carried out at the primary health care level and for which aspects of care patients will have to be referred. This will depend on the nature of the complication and the capacity of the health workers to provide appropriate care at different levels of the health system. The promotion of self-reporting is now crucial to case detection, as case- finding campaigns become less and less cost-effective. It is important to identify and remove barriers that may prevent new cases from coming forward. The procedures for establishing the diagnosis of leprosy remain firmly linked to the cardinal signs of the disease, but the accuracy of diagnosis must be monitored. The Guidelines suggest a greater emphasis on the assessment of disability at diagnosis, so that those at particular risk can be recognized and managed appropriately. The treatment of leprosy with MDT has been a continuing success; neither relapse nor drug-resistance are significant problems and the regimens are well- tolerated

  2. On the origin of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Monot, Marc; Honoré, Nadine; Garnier, Thierry; Araoz, Romulo; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Lacroix, Céline; Sow, Samba; Spencer, John S; Truman, Richard W; Williams, Diana L; Gelber, Robert; Virmond, Marcos; Flageul, Béatrice; Cho, Sang-Nae; Ji, Baohong; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Convit, Jacinto; Young, Saroj; Fine, Paul E; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Brennan, Patrick J; Cole, Stewart T

    2005-05-13

    Leprosy, a chronic human disease with potentially debilitating neurological consequences, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae. This unculturable pathogen has undergone extensive reductive evolution, with half of its genome now occupied by pseudogenes. Using comparative genomics, we demonstrated that all extant cases of leprosy are attributable to a single clone whose dissemination worldwide can be retraced from analysis of very rare single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The disease seems to have originated in Eastern Africa or the Near East and spread with successive human migrations. Europeans or North Africans introduced leprosy into West Africa and the Americas within the past 500 years. PMID:15894530

  3. Ulcerating type 1 lepra reaction mimicking lazarine leprosy: an unusual presentation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramesh; Pinto, Malcolm; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Kambil, Srinath

    2013-12-01

    Leprosy maybe "unmasked" in the context of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and treating dermatologists, particularly in highly endemic areas for Hansen's disease, need to be cognizant to this possibility. It may also reflect emergence of a previously clinically silent infection in the course of immunologic restoration. PMID:24216029

  4. Epidemiology of tuberculosis and leprosy, Sabah, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dony, Jiloris F; Ahmad, Jamaliah; Khen Tiong, Yap

    2004-01-01

    The objectives in this epidemiology review are to measure and report the extent of morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis (TB), the proportion of new sputum smear positive cases in districts and the status of cohort analysis as of 1999. As for leprosy, the main objective is to determine morbidity and the treatment outcomes of Multiple Drug Therapy (MDT). Based on the results obtained, a comprehensive action plan for prevention, control and monitoring of tuberculosis and leprosy cases and patients is being produced and implemented throughout the state. The analysis concentrated on patients diagnosed at all out-patient units and admitted in all of the state's hospitals. The patient particulars were recorded using a standardized format based on TB and Leprosy Health Management Information System (TB HMIS). TB was the second highest by notification of communicable diseases in Malaysia in 2001. 29% or about one-third of the national TB cases are from Sabah. However, it has been noted that there was an average decline of 2.6% in annual notification since 10 years ago to date. There was also a reduction of 11.4% in 2001 as compared to annual notification in 2000. Immigrants contribute more than 24% in detection of new cases since 1990. Treatment success rate in term of completion of treatment to date is 82%. Mortality rate has steadily declined from 14 deaths to 7 deaths per 100,000 population. Leprosy in Sabah also contributes to 30% of the yearly total caseload of Malaysia and has the highest notification rate of 2 per every 100,000 population as compared to other states. The average registered leprosy cases over the past 5 years are 239 cases and the prevalence rate is 0.7/10,000 population. The state has successfully achieved its goal to decrease leprosy as per the World Health Organization (WHO) goal of yearly overall prevalence rate of less than 1 case for every 10,000 population. However, the districts of Kudat, Tawau, Lahad Datu, Kota Kinabalu and Semporna

  5. Association of vitamin D receptor genotype with leprosy type.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Frodsham, A; Saha, B; Hazra, S K; Mascie-Taylor, C G; Hill, A V

    1999-01-01

    Host genetic factors including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms influence both susceptibility to leprosy per se and also to leprosy type. Non-MHC genes may play an important role, but such genes remain undefined. The influence of two non-MHC candidate genes was assessed in a case-control study of Bengali leprosy patients from Calcutta. Recent studies have implicated variation in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene in susceptibility to several diseases, including osteoporosis and pulmonary tuberculosis. In this population, homozygotes for the alternate alleles of the VDR polymorphism are associated, respectively, with lepromatous and tuberculoid leprosy. The NRAMP1 (natural resistance associated macrophage protein 1) gene may influence human mycobacterial disease susceptibility based on studies with the murine homologue Nramp1. However, no significant association was found between NRAMP1 and leprosy susceptibility. This study suggests that the VDR polymorphism may influence susceptibility to some diseases by affecting the type and the strength of the host immune response. PMID:9841838

  6. [Leprosy--a stigma in the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Falus, Orsolya

    2011-02-13

    For the initiation of the French journalist Raoul Follereau in 1954 the UNO inaugurated the Leprosy Day (Martyr's Day) that is celebrated on the last Sunday of January every year. Although the bacterium that causes leprosy was isolated by the Norwegian scientist Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen in 1873 and from 1982 this disease can be cured with a special pharmaceutical complex, still 219.826 new leprous are detected on Earth every year, according to the data published in August, 2010 by WHO-experts. Ancient Chinese and Hindu source-strings from 600 B. C. are referring to leprosy, however, the disease was imported by the army of Alexander the Great from India around 327-326 B. C. Even the Old and the New Testament from the Holy Bible are mentioning leprosy in several details. During the Middle Ages the Military and Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem, established in the Holy Land in 72 A. D., did pioneer work in nursing leprous. In the process of time the medical attendance concerning leprous was organized in special hospitals called "leprosoriums" built on river-banks. Special office and even services were organized for the treatment and isolation of the people infected. Although medical science has prevailed against leprosy, and almost simultaneously even jurisprudence defended the patients' rights via legislation, still mankind can regrettably not get rid of this disease that stigmatizes seriously. PMID:21296733

  7. HIV, HCV & Leprosy co-infection.

    PubMed

    George, A; Kanish, B

    2014-01-01

    In the era where Hansen's disease has achieved elimination status in India, co-infection with HIV can possibly cause a resurgence of this disease. A young intravenous drug abuser was found to have triple affliction, where HIV and HCV infection were discovered on testing after the patient was clinically diagnosed to have Hansen's disease. To our knowledge, there has been no case reported where leprosy was seen with HIV and HCV infection. We are reporting a patient with lepromatous Hansen's disease in type 2 reaction in whom HIV and HCV was incidentally diagnosed. PMID:26118224

  8. Biological agents: investigation into leprosy and other infectious diseases before indication*

    PubMed Central

    Antônio, João Roberto; Soubhia, Rosa Maria Cordeiro; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco; Amarante, Carolina Forte; Travolo, Ana Regina Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Biological agents are widely used for various immune-mediated diseases, with remarkable effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease. However, attention needs to be drawn to the adverse effects of these therapies and the risk of reactivating underlying granulomatous infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy, syphilis, leishmaniasis, among others. The objective of this paper is to describe a case of leprosy in a patient with RA using anti-TNF alfa, demonstrating the need for systematic investigation of skin lesions suggestive of leprosy in patients who require rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic treatment, especially in endemic regions like Brazil. PMID:24346871

  9. Biological agents: investigation into leprosy and other infectious diseases before indication.

    PubMed

    Antônio, João Roberto; Soubhia, Rosa Maria Cordeiro; Paschoal, Vania Del Arco; Amarante, Carolina Forte; Travolo, Ana Regina Franchi

    2013-01-01

    Biological agents are widely used for various immune-mediated diseases, with remarkable effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease. However, attention needs to be drawn to the adverse effects of these therapies and the risk of reactivating underlying granulomatous infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, leprosy, syphilis, leishmaniasis, among others. The objective of this paper is to describe a case of leprosy in a patient with RA using anti-TNF alfa, demonstrating the need for systematic investigation of skin lesions suggestive of leprosy in patients who require rheumatoid arthritis therapeutic treatment, especially in endemic regions like Brazil. PMID:24346871

  10. The Hoffmann reflex of the soleus muscle. A study in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Sebille, A

    1980-03-01

    The H reflex of the soleus muscle was used to investigate the monosynaptic reflex arc of two groups of leprosy patients compared with a similar group of normal subjects. The H reflex recordings show two abnormalities: (1) An increase in the latency of the reflex without difference between lepromatous and borderline patients. (2) A decrease of the Hmax:Mmax amplitude ratio more pronounced in the lepromatous group. The discrepancy between these results and the commonly described preservation of the deep tendon reflexes in leprosy is discussed and the hypothesis that leprosy neuropathy would affect all nerve trunks related to blood vessel changes in suggested. PMID:7365508

  11. Diet-Related Risk Factors for Leprosy: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Inge; van Muiden, Lisanne; Alam, Khorshed; Bowers, Robert; Hossain, Md. Anwar; Kispotta, Kolpona; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Background Food shortage was associated with leprosy in two recent studies investigating the relation between socioeconomic factors and leprosy. Inadequate intake of nutrients due to food shortage may affect the immune system and influence the progression of infection to clinical leprosy. We aimed to identify possible differences in dietary intake between recently diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects. Methods In a leprosy endemic area of Bangladesh, newly diagnosed leprosy patients and control subjects were interviewed about their socioeconomic situation, health and diet. Dietary intakes were recorded with a 24-hour recall, from which a Dietary Diversity Score (DDS) was calculated. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) was filled out for every participant. Using logistic regression, a univariate, block wise multivariate, and an integrated analysis were carried out. Results 52 leprosy cases and 100 control subjects were included. Food shortage was more common, dietary diversity was lower and household food insecurity was higher in the patient group. Patients consumed significantly less items from the DDS food groups ‘Meat and fish’ and ‘Other fruits and vegetables.’ Lower food expenditure per capita, lower BMI, lower DDS and absence of household food stocks are the main factors associated with an increased risk of having leprosy. Conclusion Low income families have only little money to spend on food and consequently have a low intake of highly nutritious non-rice foods such as meat, fish, milk, eggs, fruits and vegetables. Development of clinical leprosy could be explained by deficiencies of the nutrients that these foods normally provide. PMID:25965879

  12. Fixed duration MDT in paucibacillary leprosy.

    PubMed

    Mathai, R; George, S; Jacob, M

    1991-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended a fixed duration of multidrug therapy (MDT) for paucibacillary leprosy which is currently widely implemented in India. A clinico-pathological study was initiated in 1984 to assess the efficacy of this regimen. The clinical and histological responses of the patients to MDT were assessed at the end of 6 months, when their treatment was stopped, and at 2 1/2 years, when they were released from surveillance, and compared with the responses of a matched patient group to conventional dapsone (DDS) monotherapy during the same period. Of 28 patients who completed the MDT schedule, there was less than 60% improvement in 33% of them when treatment was stopped at the end of 6 months and in 20% of them at the end of 2 1/2 years. Of 26 patients receiving DDS monotherapy, 37% showed less than 60% improvement at the end of 6 months but only 8.8% had less than 60% improvement at 2 1/2 years. It is concluded that MDT for paucibacillary leprosy as recommended by WHO may not have a major advantage over DDS monotherapy, since about 20% of those patients on MDT continue to have evidence of active disease when discharged from surveillance. PMID:2071980

  13. Viral Co-infection and Leprosy Outcomes: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Paulo R. L.; Machado, Lídia M.; Shibuya, Mayume; Rego, Jamile; Johnson, Warren D.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of the host immunity in determining leprosy clinical forms and complications is well recognized, implying that changes in the immune status may interfere with several aspects of the disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that the presence of viral co-infections and associated immunological changes will have a clinical impact on leprosy outcomes. The aim of our study was to determine the clinical impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection on the development of reactions, neuritis, neuropathy and relapses. Methodology/Principal Findings Cohort study in 245 leprosy subjects from Bahia, Brazil. Patients were followed from the time of diagnosis until at least the end of multidrug therapy. Viral co-infection was detected in 36 out of the 245 patients (14.7%). Specific co-infection rates were 10.6% for HBV, 2.9% for HIV, 2.5% for HTLV-1 and 0.8% for HCV. All four groups of co-infected patients had higher rates of neuritis and nerve function impairment compared to non co-infected leprosy subjects. The relapse rate was also higher in the co-infected group (8.3%) versus patients without co-infection (1.9%); relative risk 4.37, 95% confidence interval 1.02–18.74. Conclusions/Significance Leprosy patients should be screened for HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV-1 co-infections. Besides contributing to better health care, this measure will facilitate the early detection of severe complications through targeting of higher risk patients. PMID:26267882

  14. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-01

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs. PMID:22948066

  15. Stakeholders perspectives on perceived needs and priorities for leprosy control and care, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Jaeggi, T; Manickam, P; Weiss, M G; Gupte, M D

    2012-01-01

    Although leprosy has been declared as eliminated in India, treated patients with persisting disabilities still require care. With the shift from vertical to integrated services, questions remain about case detection and maintaining the quality of patient care. We conducted a qualitative study to clarify the perceived status of elimination, patient care and other aspects of leprosy control from the perspective of various stakeholders. We interviewed leprosy programme managers, Non-governmental organization directors, healthcare providers, patients and community leaders from Kanchipuram district, Tamil Nadu. Consensus endorsed the current approach to integration of leprosy in primary healthcare, but healthcare personnel acknowledged problems from shortage of medicines and failure to fill key positions. Patients were concerned about limited clinic hours, long waits and delayed treatment. Disabled patients indicated how they were troubled by stigmatization of their condition. Programme managers mentioned limited support for needed research and some emphasized the potential threat of emerging drug resistance. Although consensus supports an integrated approach for leprosy services in primary care, the relative priority of different aspects of leprosy control vary among stakeholders. Perspectivist approaches to methodologically sound operational research could guide planning for effective case detection and patient care during the post-elimination era. PMID:23484332

  16. Translating leprosy: the expert and the public in Stanley Stein's anti-stigmatization campaigns, 1931-60.

    PubMed

    John, Heather Varughese

    2013-10-01

    This article examines three campaigns through which patient activist Stanley Stein sought to combat the stigmatized connotations of the word "leprosy." In 1931, soon after starting the first patient newspaper at the U.S. national leprosy hospital at Carville, Stein became convinced of the necessity of finding an alternative to "leprosy." His ensuing campaign to promote the use of the words "Hansen's Disease" to describe the condition from which he and fellow Carville patients suffered became his most passionate and life-long project. In the 1950s, Stein became involved in efforts to change the translation of "leprosy" in the Bible. Finally, in 1960, he waged a campaign to de-stigmatize encyclopedia entries on leprosy. These campaigns illustrate how even elevation of the medical expert and a seeming disdain for the public can function as a protest of medical authority and reveal a presumption that a significant degree of authority actually resides with the public. PMID:24106217

  17. The Continuing Challenges of Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Scollard, D. M.; Adams, L. B.; Gillis, T. P.; Krahenbuhl, J. L.; Truman, R. W.; Williams, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    Leprosy is best understood as two conjoined diseases. The first is a chronic mycobacterial infection that elicits an extraordinary range of cellular immune responses in humans. The second is a peripheral neuropathy that is initiated by the infection and the accompanying immunological events. The infection is curable but not preventable, and leprosy remains a major global health problem, especially in the developing world, publicity to the contrary notwithstanding. Mycobacterium leprae remains noncultivable, and for over a century leprosy has presented major challenges in the fields of microbiology, pathology, immunology, and genetics; it continues to do so today. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of M. leprae and the host response to it, especially concerning molecular identification of M. leprae, knowledge of its genome, transcriptome, and proteome, its mechanisms of microbial resistance, and recognition of strains by variable-number tandem repeat analysis. Advances in experimental models include studies in gene knockout mice and the development of molecular techniques to explore the armadillo model. In clinical studies, notable progress has been made concerning the immunology and immunopathology of leprosy, the genetics of human resistance, mechanisms of nerve injury, and chemotherapy. In nearly all of these areas, however, leprosy remains poorly understood compared to other major bacterial diseases. PMID:16614253

  18. [The history of Yunosawa village and the policy of leprosy of Japan. II].

    PubMed

    Mori, Shuichi; Kato, Saburo; Yokoyama, Hideo; Tanaka, Umekichi; Kaneda, Shigeru

    2003-02-01

    There was a village which was called Yunosawa, lots of leprosy patients lived, existed from 1887 to 1941, Kusatu town, Gunma Prefecture, Japan. It was the only place continued securing self-government to the last as area was free from the isolation policy of State in prewar days there. The aim of this study will make clear the dynamism of "The protection from the tension of the society of leprosy patient currently persecuted" to "The defense of the society from the leprosy patient who is a source of infection". In this study, explained the history of the Yunosawa village and the shift of the policy of leprosy by State had relation to the village. In addition, the effort of residents and Christianity persons' activity are drawn in this paper. Moreover also drew what is desired how it is going to live under adverse circumstances, and showed worth of free medical-treatment area here. PMID:12710046

  19. [The history of Yunosawa village and the policy of leprosy of Japan III].

    PubMed

    Mori, Shuichi; Kato, Saburo; Yokoyama, Hideo; Tanaka, Umekichi; Kaneda, Shigeru

    2003-08-01

    There was a village which was called Yunosawa, lots of leprosy patients lived, existed from 1887 to 1941, Kusatu town, Gunnma Prefecture, Japan. It was the only place continued securing self-government to the last as area was free from the isolation policy of State in prewar days there. The aim of this study will make clear the dynamism of "The protection from the tension of the society of leprosy patient currently persecuted" to "The defense of the society from the leprosy patient who is a source of infection". In this study, explained the history of the Yunosawa village and the shift of the policy of leprosy by State had relation to the village. In addition, showed worth of free medical-treatment area here. PMID:14598631

  20. Negligible risk of inducing resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with single-dose rifampicin as post-exposure prophylaxis for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Mieras, Liesbeth; Anthony, Richard; van Brakel, Wim; Bratschi, Martin W; van den Broek, Jacques; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Cavaliero, Arielle; Kasang, Christa; Perera, Geethal; Reichman, Lee; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Saunderson, Paul; Steinmann, Peter; Yew, Wing Wai

    2016-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for leprosy is administered as one single dose of rifampicin (SDR) to the contacts of newly diagnosed leprosy patients. SDR reduces the risk of developing leprosy among contacts by around 60 % in the first 2-3 years after receiving SDR. In countries where SDR is currently being implemented under routine programme conditions in defined areas, questions were raised by health authorities and professional bodies about the possible risk of inducing rifampicin resistance among the M. tuberculosis strains circulating in these areas. This issue has not been addressed in scientific literature to date. To produce an authoritative consensus statement about the risk that SDR would induce rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis, a meeting was convened with tuberculosis (TB) and leprosy experts. The experts carefully reviewed and discussed the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and risk factors for the development of (multi) drug-resistance in M. tuberculosis with a view to the special situation of the use of SDR as PEP for leprosy. They concluded that SDR given to contacts of leprosy patients, in the absence of symptoms of active TB, poses a negligible risk of generating resistance in M. tuberculosis in individuals and at the population level. Thus, the benefits of SDR prophylaxis in reducing the risk of developing leprosy in contacts of new leprosy patients far outweigh the risks of generating drug resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:27268059

  1. Association of genetic polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 antigens with the susceptibility to lepromatous leprosy

    PubMed Central

    ESCAMILLA-TILCH, MONICA; TORRES-CARRILLO, NORA MAGDALENA; PAYAN, ROSALIO RAMOS; AGUILAR-MEDINA, MARIBEL; SALAZAR, MA ISABEL; FAFUTIS-MORRIS, MARY; ARENAS-GUZMAN, ROBERTO; ESTRADA-PARRA, SERGIO; ESTRADA-GARCIA, IRIS; GRANADOS, JULIO

    2013-01-01

    Despite the introduction of multidrug therapy and the overall reduction of leprosy prevalence in Mexico, the disease remains endemic in certain regions of the country. A genetic basis for the immune susceptibility to Mycobacterium leprae has already been established in different populations worldwide. In this study, we investigated the possible association of the HLA-DRB1 alleles with leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. The results demonstrated that the HLA-DRB1*01 allele is associated with lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy [P<0.001, odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.8–11.4; and P=0.03, OR=6.2, 95% CI: 1.1–31.6, respectively] and the frequency of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele was found to be significantly lower among leprosy patients compared to controls (P=0.046, OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1–5.8). In conclusion, although the association of the HLA-DR locus with leprosy has been established in different populations and several studies have demonstrated significant differences in the DR alleles, this study demonstrated an association of the HLA-DRB1*01 allele with susceptibility to lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy, as well as an association of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele with protection against leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:24649058

  2. An historical and clinical review of the interaction of leprosy and pregnancy: a cycle to be broken.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M E

    1993-08-01

    Since earliest history the person with leprosy has been shut out from society. Laws have prohibited marriage and allowed divorce of those with leprosy. Segregation of the sufferer from the rest of society has been followed by separation of the sexes, and of leprous parents from their children. With the advent of antileprotic drugs, first dapsone then multidrug therapy (MDT), infection can be treated, individuals made non-infectious, and the pool of infection in the community reduced. The clinical signs of leprosy are due not to the degree of infection but to the immunological status of the host. Hormonal changes at puberty and in pregnancy can cause variation of the host's immune status. Pregnancy in women with leprosy is a hazardous undertaking. First appearance of leprosy, reactivation of the disease and relapse in 'cured' patients is likely to occur particularly in the third trimester of pregnancy. Leprosy reactions caused by variation in cell mediated and humoral immunity are triggered off by pregnancy: type 1 reaction (reversal reaction, RR) occurs post partum, while type 2 reaction (erythema nodosum leprosum, ENL) peaks in late pregnancy. Both types of reaction continue long into lactation. Neuritis with loss of both sensory and motor function is associated with relapse and reaction. Relapse, reaction and nerve damage, especially 'silent neuritis', with subsequent deformity and disability, occur not only in women on apparently effective treatment but also in those who have received MDT and have been released from treatment (RFT). To prevent disability, research is urgently needed into the mechanisms of early and late reaction and neuritis. Pregnancy is not only a trigger factor for reaction but an ideal in vivo model for research. Up to 20% of children born to mothers with leprosy may develop leprosy by puberty. While early leprosy in young children is self-healing, when marriage and childbearing take place at an early age the daughters of mothers with

  3. Community care of the physically disabled due to leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Ganapati, R.

    2011-01-01

    This preliminary presentation based on extensive field studies carried out by Bombay Leprosy Project, a research-oriented NGO, portrays the alarming dimensions of the disease burden felt by rural communities and recommends a cost effective field model. This study in an adopted rural population in Shahapur “taluka” of Thane District assumes tremendous significance and is worthy of replication in comparable situations. This is particularly so in the background of the absence in the literature of any similar field studies based entirely on community care of the physically disabled due to leprosy. The magnitude of the problem posed by leprosy patients with disabilities and their rehabilitation is highly challenging and is expected to pose a heavy burden on the community as well as unprecedented strain on the PHCs managed by the government. The health planners should rethink on future strategies in such a manner that human rights of the downtrodden patients suffering from the “neglected disease” of leprosy are not sidelined PMID:23130228

  4. Leprosy Mimicking Common Rheumatologic Entities: A Trial for the Clinician in the Era of Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Shrinath; Kundu, Bijit Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis, which make up the lion's share of cases attending a rheumatology clinic, are relatively easy to diagnose. However, when an entity of infective aetiology like leprosy known to be a great mimic of different autoimmune conditions presents with features similar to these, the possibility of it being diagnosed at the outset is very slim indeed. The ease with which the diagnosis of leprosy can be missed assumes sinister proportions as the use of disease modifying agents can have deleterious effects in these patients. In the era of increasing availability and use of biologic disease modifying agents, it is imperative not only to actively rule out the presence of leprosy but also to make it a part of the prebiologic screening of patients in whom biologics are being planned to be administered, especially in leprosy endemic areas. PMID:25431725

  5. [Leprosy and human rights: trends in Japan and in the world].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yozo

    2014-12-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, has long been regarded as an incurable and dreadful contagious disease. The patients have been forcefully hospitalized and deprived of many basic human rights. Their family members have often been discriminated against due to stigma associated with this disease. Soon after the Second World War, a specific remedy called "multi-drug therapy" (MDT) was discovered and leprosy became a relatively easily curable disease. Despite this medical development, it took time to change the policy and legislation of forceful hospitalization of leprosy patients. The stigma surrounding leprosy and consequent discrimination have continued. In Japan, it was only in 1996 that the legislation requiring forceful hospitalization of leprosy patients was repealed. The Government decided to provide remedies to the former patients who had suffered from this policy. At the United Nations, the General Assembly adopted a resolution to eradicate discrimination against persons affected by leprosy and their family members. It is hoped that discrimination associated with Hansen's disease will soon be overcome by the efforts of all concerned, particularly doctors and nurses who are specialists of this disease. PMID:25826851

  6. Histoid leprosy: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous inflammation primarily of the peripheral nervous system, skin, and reticuloendothelial system caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It presents clinically as an erythematous or hypopigmented anesthetic patch and a thickened and/or tender cutaneous nerve trunk. Leprosy is also called Hansen disease. Leprosy is a great imitator of other skin diseases, and it can present with different morphological lesions, which is why an expert eye is needed to diagnose it. One of the important clinical presentations of leprosy is histoid leprosy, which is very difficult to diagnose due to different clinical and histopathological findings that mimic, e.g., a fibromatous disorder. Histoid leprosy is a very rare clinicopathological variant of leprosy. It is clinically characterized by skin-colored, soft, succulent nodules, and plaques on apparently normal skin and histologically by a dense bundle of histiocytes arranged in storiform. Though histoid leprosy is a very rare type of leprosy, the higher load of lepra bacilli in these cases makes it a concern as a reservoir for leprosy. PMID:26094829

  7. Antigen discovery: a postgenomic approach to leprosy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Romulo; Honoré, Nadine; Cho, Sungae; Kim, Jong-Pill; Cho, Sang-Nae; Monot, Marc; Demangel, Caroline; Brennan, Patrick J; Cole, Stewart T

    2006-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious, neurodegenerative disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Despite effective control programs, the incidence of leprosy remains stubbornly high, suggesting that transmission may be more common than expected. The rationale of this work was to use bioinformatics and comparative genomics to identify potentially antigenic proteins for diagnostic purposes. This approach defined three classes of proteins: those restricted to M. leprae (class I), those present in M. leprae with orthologues in other organisms besides mycobacteria (class II), and exported or surface-exposed proteins (class III). Twelve genes (two class I, four class II, and six class III proteins) were cloned in Escherichia coli, and their protein products were purified. Six of these proteins were detected in cell extracts of M. leprae by immunoblotting. The immunogenicity of each recombinant protein was then investigated in leprosy patients by measuring the reactivity of circulating antibody and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) responses in T-cell restimulation assays. Several class II and class III proteins were recognized by circulating antibodies. Importantly, most class II proteins elicited IFN-gamma responses that were significantly stronger than those produced by previously identified antigens. Among them, two class II proteins, ML0308 and ML2498, showed marked humoral and cellular immunogenicity, therefore providing promising candidates for the diagnosis of both tuberculoid and lepromatous forms of leprosy. PMID:16368971

  8. Antigen Discovery: a Postgenomic Approach to Leprosy Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Aráoz, Romulo; Honoré, Nadine; Cho, Sungae; Kim, Jong-Pill; Cho, Sang-Nae; Monot, Marc; Demangel, Caroline; Brennan, Patrick J.; Cole, Stewart T.

    2006-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious, neurodegenerative disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Despite effective control programs, the incidence of leprosy remains stubbornly high, suggesting that transmission may be more common than expected. The rationale of this work was to use bioinformatics and comparative genomics to identify potentially antigenic proteins for diagnostic purposes. This approach defined three classes of proteins: those restricted to M. leprae (class I), those present in M. leprae with orthologues in other organisms besides mycobacteria (class II), and exported or surface-exposed proteins (class III). Twelve genes (two class I, four class II, and six class III proteins) were cloned in Escherichia coli, and their protein products were purified. Six of these proteins were detected in cell extracts of M. leprae by immunoblotting. The immunogenicity of each recombinant protein was then investigated in leprosy patients by measuring the reactivity of circulating antibody and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses in T-cell restimulation assays. Several class II and class III proteins were recognized by circulating antibodies. Importantly, most class II proteins elicited IFN-γ responses that were significantly stronger than those produced by previously identified antigens. Among them, two class II proteins, ML0308 and ML2498, showed marked humoral and cellular immunogenicity, therefore providing promising candidates for the diagnosis of both tuberculoid and lepromatous forms of leprosy. PMID:16368971

  9. Atraumatic Main-En-Griffe due to Ulnar Nerve Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Aswani, Yashant; Saifi, Shenaz

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Leprosy is the most common form of treatable peripheral neuropathy. However, in spite of effective chemotherapeutic agents, neuropathy and associated deformities are seldom ameliorated to a significant extent. This necessitates early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical examination of peripheral nerves is highly subjective and inaccurate. Electrophysiological studies are painful and expensive. Ultrasonography circumvents these demerits and has emerged as the preferred modality for probing peripheral nerves. Case Report We describe a 23-year-old male who presented with weakness and clawing of the medial digits of the right hand (main-en-griffe) and a few skin lesions since eighteen months. The right ulnar nerve was thickened and exquisitely tender on palpation. Ultrasonography revealed an extensive enlargement of the nerve with presence of intraneural color Doppler signals suggestive of acute neuritis. Skin biopsy was consistent with borderline tuberculoid leprosy with type 1 lepra reaction. The patient was started on WHO multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy along with antiinflammatory drugs. Persistence of vascular signals at two months’ follow-up has led to continuation of the steroid therapy. The patient is compliant with the treatment and is on monthly follow-up. Conclusions In this manuscript, we review multitudinous roles of ultrasonography in examination of peripheral nerves in leprosy. Ultrasonography besides diagnosing enlargement of nerves in leprosy and acute neuritis due to lepra reactions, guides the duration of anti-inflammatory therapy in lepra reactions. Further, it is relatively inexpensive, non-invasive and easily available. All these features make ultrasonography a preferred modality for examination of peripheral nerves. PMID:26788223

  10. Identification of Urban Leprosy Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Paschoal, José Antonio Armani; Paschoal, Vania Del'Arco; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ismael, Manuela Gallo y Sanches; Sichieri, Eduvaldo Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Overpopulation of urban areas results from constant migrations that cause disordered urban growth, constituting clusters defined as sets of people or activities concentrated in relatively small physical spaces that often involve precarious conditions. Aim. Using residential grouping, the aim was to identify possible clusters of individuals in São José do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil, who have or have had leprosy. Methods. A population-based, descriptive, ecological study using the MapInfo and CrimeStat techniques, geoprocessing, and space-time analysis evaluated the location of 425 people treated for leprosy between 1998 and 2010. Clusters were defined as concentrations of at least 8 people with leprosy; a distance of up to 300 meters between residences was adopted. Additionally, the year of starting treatment and the clinical forms of the disease were analyzed. Results. Ninety-eight (23.1%) of 425 geocoded cases were located within one of ten clusters identified in this study, and 129 cases (30.3%) were in the region of a second-order cluster, an area considered of high risk for the disease. Conclusion. This study identified ten clusters of leprosy cases in the city and identified an area of high risk for the appearance of new cases of the disease. PMID:24288467