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Sample records for multicellular tumor spheroids

  1. Ontogenetic growth of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, C. A.; Menchón, S. A.

    2006-11-01

    In ontogenetic growth models, the basal metabolic rate is usually assumed to depend on the individual mass following a power law. Here it is shown that, in the case of multicellular tumor spheroids, the emergence of a necrotic core invalidates this assumption. The implications of this result for spheroid growth are discussed, and a procedure to determine the growth parameters using macroscopic measurements is proposed.

  2. Semiautomatic growth analysis of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Bjoern; Hirschhaeuser, Franziska; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are routinely employed as three-dimensional in vitro models to study tumor biology. Cultivation of MCTS in spinner flasks provides better growing conditions, especially with regard to the availability of nutrients and oxygen, when compared with microtiter plates. The main endpoint of drug response experiments is spheroid size. It is common practice to analyze spheroid size manually with a microscope and an ocular micrometer. This requires removal of some spheroids from the flask, which entails major limitations such as loss of MCTS and the risk of contamination. With this new approach, the authors present an efficient and highly reproducible method to analyze the size of complete MCTS populations in culture containers with transparent, flat bottoms. MCTS sediments are digitally scanned and spheroid volumes are calculated by computerized image analysis. The equipment includes regular office hardware (personal computer, flatbed scanner) and software (Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Excel, ImageJ). The accuracy and precision of the method were tested using industrial precision steel beads with known diameter. In summary, in comparison with other methods, this approach provides benefits in terms of semiautomation, noninvasiveness, and low costs. PMID:21908797

  3. Advanced micromachining of concave microwells for long term on-chip culture of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianqing; Chien, Chia-Chi; Parkinson, Luke; Thierry, Benjamin

    2014-06-11

    A novel approach based on advanced micromachining is demonstrated to fabricate concave microwell arrays for the formation of high quality multicellular tumor spheroids. Microfabricated molds were prepared using a state-of-the-art CNC machining center, containing arrays of 3D convex micropillars with size ranging from 150 μm to 600 μm. Microscopic imaging of the micropillars machined on the mold showed smooth, curved microfeatures of a dramatic 3D shape. Agarose microwells could be easily replicated from the metallic molds. EMT-6 tumor cells seeded in the primary macrowell sedimented efficiently to the bottom of the concave microwells and formed multicellular spheroids within 48 h. Dense and homogeneous multicellular spheroids were obtained after 10 days of culture, confirming the suitability of the proposed approach. To facilitate long term spheroid culture and reliable on-chip drug assay, polydimethylsiloxane microwells were also replicated from the metallic molds. A solvent swelling method was adapted and optimized to Pluronic F127 towards physically entrapping the block copolymer molecules within the polydimethylsiloxane network and in turn to improve long term cell-binding resistance. Homogeneous multicellular spheroids were efficiently formed in the concave microwells and on-chip drug assays could be reliably carried out using curcumin as a model anti-cancer drug. Advanced micromachining provides an excellent technological solution to the fabrication of high quality concave microwells. PMID:24773458

  4. Surface acoustic streaming in microfluidic system for rapid multicellular tumor spheroids generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlHasan, Layla; Qi, Aisha; Al-Aboodi, Aswan; Rezk, Amged; Shilton, Richie R.; Chan, Peggy P. Y.; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a novel and rapid method to generate in vitro three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. A SAW device with single-phase unidirectional transducer electrodes (SPUTD) on lithium niobate substrate was fabricated using standing UV photolithography and wet-etching techniques. To generate spheroids, the SAW device was loaded with medium containing human breast carcinoma (BT474) cells, an oscillating electrical signal at resonant frequency was supplied to the SPUDT to generate acoustic radiation in the medium. Spheroids with uniform size and shape can be obtained using this method in less than 1 minute, and the size of the spheroids can be controlled through adjusting the seeding density. The resulting spheroids were used for further cultivation and were monitored using an optical microscope in real time. The viability and actin organization of the spheroids were assessed using live/dead viability staining and actin cytoskeleton staining, respectively. Compared to spheroids generated using the liquid overlay method, the SAW generated spheroids exhibited higher circularity and higher viability. The F-actin filaments of spheroids appear to aggregate compared to that of untreated cells, indicating that mature spheroids can be obtained using this method. This spheroid generating method can be useful for a variety of biological studies and clinical applications.

  5. Bridging the Gap between Mesoscopic and Macroscopic Models: The Case of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Griffa, M.; Condat, C. A.; Delsanto, S.; Morra, L.

    2005-04-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are valuable experimental tools in cancer research. By introducing an intermediate model, we have been able to successfully relate mesoscopic and macroscopic descriptions of spheroid growth. Since these descriptions stem from completely different roots (cell dynamics, and energy conservation and scaling arguments, respectively), their consistency validates both approaches and allows us to establish a direct correspondence between parameters characterizing processes occurring at different scales. Our approach may find applications as an example of bridging the gap between models at different scale levels in other contexts.

  6. Optical signature of multicellular tumor spheroid using index-mismatch-induced spherical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, G.; Weiss, P.; Ducommun, B.; Lorenzo, C.

    2014-02-01

    The development of new cancer treatments and the early prediction of their therapeutic potential are often made difficult by the lack of predictive pharmacological models. The 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model offers a level of complexity that recapitulates the three-dimensional organization of a tumor and appears to be fairly predictive of therapeutic efficiency. The use of spheroids in large-scale automated screening was recently reported to link the power of a high throughput analysis to the predictability of a 3D cell model. The spheroid has a radial symmetry; this simple geometry allows establishing a direct correlation between structure and function. The outmost layers of MCTS are composed of proliferating cells and form structurally uniform domain with an approximate thickness of 100 microns. The innermost layers are composed of quiescent cells. Finally, cells in the center of the spheroid can form a necrotic core. This latest region is structurally heterogeneous and is poorly characterized. These features make the spheroid a model of choice and a paradigm to study the optical properties of various epithelial tissues. In this study, we used an in-vitro optical technique for label-free characterization of multicellular systems based on the index- mismatch induced spherical aberrations. We achieve to monitor and characterize the optical properties of MCTS. This new and original approach might be of major interest for the development of innovative screening strategies dedicated to the identification of anticancer drugs.

  7. Spectral mapping of 3D multi-cellular tumor spheroids: time-resolved confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Saswat; Nandi, Somen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Das, Gaurav; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-07-21

    A tumor-like multi-cellular spheroid (3D) differs from a 2D cell in a number of ways. This is demonstrated using time resolved confocal microscopy. Two different tumor spheroids - HeLa (cervical cancer) and A549 (lung cancer) - are studied using 3 different fluorescent dyes - C153 (non-covalent), CPM (covalent) and doxorubicin (non-covalent, anti-cancer drug). The pattern of localization of these three fluorescent probes in the 3D tumor cell exhibits significant differences from that in the conventional 2D cells. For both the cells (HeLa and A549), the total uptake of doxorubicin in the 3D cell is much lower than that in the 2D cell. The uptake of doxorubicin molecules in the A549 spheroid is significantly different compared to the HeLa spheroid. The local polarity (i.e. emission maxima) and solvation dynamics in the 3D tumor cell differ from those in 2D cells. The covalent probe CPM exhibits intermittent fluorescence oscillations in the 1-2 s time scale. This is attributed to redox processes. These results may provide new insights into 3D tumors. PMID:27336201

  8. Enhanced transcellular penetration and drug delivery by crosslinked polymeric micelles into pancreatic multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongxu; Utama, Robert H; Kitiyotsawat, Uraiphan; Babiuch, Krzysztof; Jiang, Yanyan; Stenzel, Martina H

    2015-07-01

    Many attempts have been made in the application of multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) as a 3D tumor model to investigate their biological responses upon introduction of polymeric micelles as nanocarriers for therapeutic applications. However, the micelle penetration pathways in MCTS are not yet known. In this study, micelles (uncrosslinked, UCM) were prepared by self-assembly of block copolymer poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (P(HPMA-co-MAA)-b-PMMA). Subsequently, the shells were crosslinked to form relatively stable micelles (CKM). Both UCM and CKM penetrated deeper and delivered more doxorubicin (DOX) into MCTS than the diffusion of the free DOX. Additionally, CKM revealed higher delivery efficiency than UCM. The inhibition of caveolae-mediated endocytosis, by Filipin treatment, decreased the uptake and penetration of the micelles into MCTS. Treatment with Exo1, an exocytosis inhibitor, produced the same effect. Furthermore, movement of the micelles through the extracellular matrices (ECM), as modelled using collagen micro-spheroids, appeared to be limited to the peripheral layer of the collagen spheroids. Those results indicate that penetration of P(HPMA-co-MAA)-b-PMMA micelles depended more on transcellular transport than on diffusion through ECM between the cells. DOX-loaded CKM inhibited MCTS growth more than their UCM counterpart, due to possible cessation of endocytosis and exocytosis in the apoptotic peripheral cells, caused by faster release of DOX from UCM. PMID:26221942

  9. Effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on tumor cells viability and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakymchuk, Olena M.; Perepelytsina, Olena M.; Dobrydnev, Alexey V.; Sydorenko, Mychailo V.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the impact of different concentrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on cell viability of breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 line, and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS). Chemical composition and purity of nanotubes is controlled by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The strength and direction of the influence of SWCNTs on the tumor cell population was assessed by cell counting and measurement of the volume of multicellular tumor spheroids. Effect of SWCNTs on the formation of multicellular spheroids was compared with the results obtained by culturing tumor cells with ultra dispersed diamonds (UDDs). Our results demonstrated that SWCNTs at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 μg/ml did not have cytotoxic influence on tumor cells; instead, they had weak cytostatic effect. The increasing of SWCNTs concentration to 100 to 200 μg/ml stimulated proliferation of tumor cells, especially in suspension fractions. The result of this influence was in formation of more MTS in cell culture with SWCNTs compared with UDDs and control samples. In result, the median volume of MTS after cultivation with SWCNTs at 100 to 200 μg/ml concentrations is 3 to 5 times greater than that in samples which were incubated with the UDDs and is 2.5 times greater than that in control cultures. So, if SWCNTs reduced cell adhesion to substrate and stimulated formation of tumor cell aggregates volume near 7 · 10-3 mm3, at the same time, UDDs reduced adhesion and cohesive ability of cells and stimulated generation of cell spheroids volume no more than 4 · 10-3 mm3. Our results could be useful for the control of cell growth in three-dimensional culture.

  10. Patterning hypoxic multicellular spheroids in a 3D matrix - a promising method for anti-tumor drug screening.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyun; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Yang; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lianqing; Shi, Yang; Li, Yanfeng; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    3D multicellular spheroid models are of great value in the investigation of tumor biology and tumor responses to chemotherapy and radiation. To establish a mimicking tumor microenvironment in vitro, we developed a straightforward method by patterning hypoxic multicellular spheroids in a 3D matrix. The efficacy of this approach was evaluated by characterizing spheroid formation, invasive capability and phenotypic transition in aggressive human glioma cells. We observed enhanced cell proliferation, spheroid formation and invasive capability in U87 glioma cells transfected with hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) compared with non-treated cells. We also demonstrated that the overexpression of HIFs in hypoxic glioma cells may promote cell migration by epithelial-mesenchymal transition within the 3D matrix. Compared with conventional 3D culturing techniques, the simple operation, rapid prototyping, low cost and high throughput format of the micro-patterning method facilitates the characterization of cell proliferation, migration, phenotypic function and drug evaluation in physiologically relevant 3D microenvironments. This in vitro 3D system can recapitulate the physiologically relevant tumor microenvironment and is a promising method for 3D anti-tumor drug screening and the identification of novel targets for tumor invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:26647062

  11. Low-temperature plasma-induced antiproliferative effects on multi-cellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, Joseph-Marie; Yousfi, Mohammed; Frongia, Céline; Eichwald, Olivier; Ducommun, Bernard; Merbahi, Nofel; Lobjois, Valérie

    2014-04-01

    Biomedical applications of low-temperature plasmas are of growing interest, especially in the field of plasma-induced anti-tumor effects. The present work is aimed at investigating the regionalized antiproliferative effects of low-temperature plasmas on a multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics the 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. We report that a low-temperature plasma jet, using helium flow in open air, inhibits HCT116 colon carcinoma MCTS growth in a dose-dependent manner. This growth inhibition is associated with the loss of Ki67, and the regionalized accumulation of DNA damage detected by histone H2AX phosphorylation. This regionalized genotoxic effect leads to massive cell death and loss of the MCTS proliferative region. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS), scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and plasma-conditioned media demonstrate that the ROS generated in the media after exposure to low-temperature plasma play a major role in these observed effects. These findings strengthen the interest in the use of MCTS for the evaluation of antiproliferative strategies, and open new perspectives for studies dedicated to demonstrate the potential of low-temperature plasma in cancer therapy.

  12. Diffusion and binding of monoclonal antibody TNT-1 in multicellular tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.M.; Hansen, E.B.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1991-02-06

    Tumor spheroids of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma and A375 melanoma were established to investigate the uptake and clearance kinetics of TNT-1, a monoclonal antibody that targets necrotic cells of tumors. Our data reveal that there was rapid uptake of TNT-1 and its F(ab')2 fragment in both spheroid models, whereas an antibody of irrelevant specificity, Lym-1, and its F(ab')2 fragment bound poorly to the spheroids. Unlike previously reported monoclonal antibodies to tumor cell-surface antigens, TNT-1 showed (1) a linear uptake that increased over time without saturation in tumor spheroids and (2) an unexpected uptake by a subpopulation of cells in the viable outer rim of the spheroids. These preclinical studies provide important information concerning the therapeutic potential of TNT monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer and micrometastases.

  13. Response of human neuroblastoma and melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) to single dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.M.; Labs, L.M.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    The growth characteristics of 6 human cell line derived multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) were studied. Melanoma MTS (C32, HML-A, HML-B) were slow growing with baseline growth rates of 13.9 to 27.3 microns diameter/day. Neuroblastoma MTS (Lan-1, NB-100, NB-134) grew rapidly, with baseline growth rates of 32.1 to 40.3 microns diameter/day, that is, 1.2 to 2.9 times as fast as the melanomas. Delay constants were calculated for all six lines. The neuroblastomas were more sensitive to radiation than melanomas, as reflected in a greater value for the radiation-induced growth delay constant. One neuroblastoma line, Lan-1, was highly radioresponsive; that is, after a subcurative dose of radiation, the MTS diameter decreased beyond the original diameter, which was followed by recovery and regrowth. Irrespective of these initial changes in diameter, growth delay sensitivity (value of delay constant) was the same for Lan-1 and NB-100, an MTS line that did not show the responsive pattern.

  14. Azo-Based Iridium(III) Complexes as Multicolor Phosphorescent Probes to Detect Hypoxia in 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingli; Li, Guanying; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yu; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important characteristic of malignant solid tumors and is considered as a possible causative factor for serious resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. The exploration of novel fluorescent probes capable of detecting hypoxia in solid tumors will aid tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of “off-on” phosphorescence probes for hypoxia detection in adherent and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. All of the iridium(III) complexes incorporate an azo group as an azo-reductase reactive moiety to detect hypoxia. Reduction of non-phosphorescent probes Ir1-Ir8 by reductases under hypoxic conditions resulted in the generation of highly phosphorescent corresponding amines for detection of hypoxic regions. Moreover, these probes can penetrate into 3D multicellular spheroids over 100 μm and image the hypoxic regions. Most importantly, these probes display a high selectivity for the detection of hypoxia in 2D cells and 3D multicellular spheroids. PMID:26423609

  15. Impact of multicellular tumor spheroids as an in vivo‑like tumor model on anticancer drug response.

    PubMed

    Galateanu, Bianca; Hudita, Ariana; Negrei, Carolina; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Costache, Marieta; Stan, Miriana; Nikitovic, Dragana; Hayes, A Wallace; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Ginghina, Octav

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is higher in men than in women, amounting to 15% of cancer-related diseases as a whole. As such, undesirable effects, arising from the administration of current chemotherapeutic agents (the FOLFIRI/FOLFOX combinations), which are exerted on the remaining non-cancerous tissues and/or cells, have contributed to the occurrence of resistance to multiple drugs, thus markedly reducing their efficacy. However, the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents may be improved and their action may be more selectively targeted to diseased tissues/cells by means of developing biotechnologies and nano‑techniques. Thus, the current focus is on creating biological tissue and related tumor models, by means of three‑dimensional (3D) spheres, in an attempt to bridge the gap between results obtained in the pre‑clinical phase and promising outcomes obtained in clinical trials. For this purpose, the characterization and use of so‑called 'multicellular tumor spheroids', may prove to be invaluable. In this study, we focus on describing the efficacy of a model 3D system as compared to the traditional 2D tumor spheres in determining drug response, highlighting a potentially greater effect of the drugs following the encapsulation of respective liposomes. The results obtained demonstrate the successful preparation of a suspension of liposomes loaded with folinic acid, oxaliplatin and 5‑fluorouracil (5‑FU), and loaded with meso‑tetra (4‑sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin. Following its use on HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, an important comparative reduction was noted in the viability of the HT‑29 cells, demonstrating the efficacy of multicellular tumor spheroids carrying liposomes loaded with therapeutic drugs. These findings indicate that the method of drug encapsulation in liposomes may improve the treatment efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27035518

  16. Uptake and photo-toxicity of Foscan®, Foslip® and Fospeg® in multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Gaio, Elisa; Scheglmann, Dietrich; Reddi, Elena; Moret, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    In cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT), an efficient and homogeneous intratumoral accumulation of the photosensitizer (PS) is required to induce cell damages in the entire tumor mass after light activation. Thus, in this study we investigated penetration ability and photodynamic efficiency of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (m-THPC) in standard formulation (Foscan®) and in its non PEGylated and PEGylated liposomal formulations, Foslip® and Fospeg®, in HeLa multicellular spheroids, as in vitro avascular models of solid tumors. Confocal microscopy studies demonstrated that m-THPC fluorescence was confined in the external cell layers of spheroids with a slightly higher accumulation of Foslip® and Fospeg® with respect to Foscan®. Irradiation with red light, following 24h incubation of spheroids with the m-THPC formulations, caused however photodamages also in cells located in the central part of spheroids, as documented by transmission electron microscopy analyses. Overall, the photodynamic effects of the three m-THPC formulations on HeLa cell spheroids were comparable in terms of cell viability measured with the MTS assay. It is however worth noting that the delivery of m-THPC by liposomes significantly abolished its cytotoxicity in the dark, slightly improved the cellular uptake and, following PDT, promoted cell loss and spheroid disassembling to a higher extent when compared to Foscan®. PMID:27285816

  17. Treatment Efficiency of Free and Nanoparticle-Loaded Mitoxantrone for Magnetic Drug Targeting in Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Annkathrin; Poettler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Lyer, Stefan; Nowak, Johannes; Odenbach, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Major problems of cancer treatment using systemic chemotherapy are severe side effects. Magnetic drug targeting (MDT) employing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) loaded with chemotherapeutic agents may overcome this dilemma by increasing drug accumulation in the tumor and reducing toxic side effects in the healthy tissue. For translation of nanomedicine from bench to bedside, nanoparticle-mediated effects have to be studied carefully. In this study, we compare the effect of SPION, unloaded or loaded with the cytotoxic drug mitoxantrone (MTO) with the effect of free MTO, on the viability and proliferation of HT-29 cells within three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that both free MTO, as well as SPION-loaded MTO (SPION(MTO)) are able to penetrate into tumor spheroids and thereby kill tumor cells, whereas unloaded SPION did not affect cellular viability. Since SPION(MTO) has herewith proven its effectivity also in complex multicellular tumor structures with its surrounding microenvironment, we conclude that it is a promising candidate for further use in magnetic drug targeting in vivo. PMID:26437393

  18. Impact of multicellular tumor spheroids as an in vivo-like tumor model on anticancer drug response

    PubMed Central

    GALATEANU, BIANCA; HUDITA, ARIANA; NEGREI, CAROLINA; ION, RODICA-MARIANA; COSTACHE, MARIETA; STAN, MIRIANA; NIKITOVIC, DRAGANA; HAYES, A. WALLACE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.; GINGHINA, OCTAV

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is higher in men than in women, amounting to 15% of cancer-related diseases as a whole. As such, undesirable effects, arising from the administration of current chemotherapeutic agents (the FOLFIRI/FOLFOX combinations), which are exerted on the remaining non-cancerous tissues and/or cells, have contributed to the occurrence of resistance to multiple drugs, thus markedly reducing their efficacy. However, the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents may be improved and their action may be more selectively targeted to diseased tissues/cells by means of developing biotechnologies and nano-techniques. Thus, the current focus is on creating biological tissue and related tumor models, by means of three-dimensional (3D) spheres, in an attempt to bridge the gap between results obtained in the pre-clinical phase and promising outcomes obtained in clinical trials. For this purpose, the characterization and use of so-called ‘multicellular tumor spheroids’, may prove to be invaluable. In this study, we focus on describing the efficacy of a model 3D system as compared to the traditional 2D tumor spheres in determining drug response, highlighting a potentially greater effect of the drugs following the encapsulation of respective liposomes. The results obtained demonstrate the successful preparation of a suspension of liposomes loaded with folinic acid, oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and loaded with meso-tetra (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin. Following its use on HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, an important comparative reduction was noted in the viability of the HT-29 cells, demonstrating the efficacy of multicellular tumor spheroids carrying liposomes loaded with therapeutic drugs. These findings indicate that the method of drug encapsulation in liposomes may improve the treatment efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27035518

  19. Multicellular tumor spheroids as an in vivo-like tumor model for three-dimensional imaging of chemotherapeutic and nano material cellular penetration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-li; Jiang, Qiao; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Yan; Cui Tomshine, Jin; Wang, Dongliang; Gan, Yaling; Zou, Guozhang; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    We present a flexible and highly reproducible method using three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids to quantify chemotherapeutic and nanoparticle penetration properties in vitro. We generated HeLa cell-derived spheroids using the liquid overlay method. To properly characterize HeLa spheroids, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and multiphoton microscopy were used to obtain high-resolution 3D images of HeLa spheroids. Next, pairing high-resolution optical characterization techniques with flow cytometry, we quantitatively compared the penetration of doxorubicin, quantum dots, and synthetic micelles into 3D HeLa spheroid versus HeLa cells grown in a traditional two-dimensional culturing system. Our data revealed that 3D cultured HeLa cells acquired several clinically relevant morphologic and cellular characteristics (such as resistance to chemotherapeutics) often found in human solid tumors. These characteristic, however, could not be captured using conventional two-dimensional cell culture techniques. This study demonstrated the remarkable versatility of HeLa spheroid 3D imaging. In addition, our results revealed the capability of HeLa spheroids to function as a screening tool for nanoparticles or synthetic micelles that, due to their inherent size, charge, and hydrophobicity, can penetrate into solid tumors and act as delivery vehicles for chemotherapeutics. The development of this image-based, reproducible, and quantifiable in vitro HeLa spheroid screening tool will greatly aid future exploration of chemotherapeutics and nanoparticle delivery into solid tumors. PMID:23084249

  20. Formation of multicellular tumor spheroids induced by cyclic RGD-peptides and use for anticancer drug testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akasov, Roman; Zaytseva-Zotova, Daria; Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dontenwill, Monique; Chiper, Manuela; Vandamme, Thierry; Markvicheva, Elena

    2016-06-15

    Development of novel anticancer formulations is a priority challenge in biomedicine. However, in vitro models based on monolayer cultures (2D) which are currently used for cytotoxicity tests leave much to be desired. More and more attention is focusing on 3D in vitro systems which can better mimic solid tumors. The aim of the study was to develop a novel one-step highly reproducible technique for multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) formation using synthetic cyclic RGD-peptides, and to demonstrate availability of the spheroids as 3D in vitro model for antitumor drug testing. Cell self-assembly effect induced by addition of both linear and cyclic RGD-peptides directly to monolayer cultures was studied for 12 cell lines of various origins, including tumor cells (e.i. U-87 MG, MCF-7, M-3, HCT-116) and normal cells, in particular L-929, BNL.CL2, HepG2. Cyclo-RGDfK and its modification with triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP), namely cyclo-RGDfK(TPP) in a range of 10-100μM were found to induce spheroid formation. The obtained spheroids were unimodal with mean sizes in a range of 60-120μm depending on cell line and serum content in culture medium. The spheroids were used as 3D in vitro model, in order to evaluate cytotoxicity effects of antitumor drugs (doxorubicin, curcumin, temozolomide). The developed technique could be proposed as a promising tool for in vitro test of novel antitumor drugs. PMID:27107900

  1. Receptor tyrosine kinase targeting in multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Susan; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    While growing cells as a monolayer is the traditional method for cell culture, the incorporation of multicellular spheroids into experimental design is becoming increasingly popular. This is due to the understanding that cells grown as spheroids tend to replicate the in vivo situation more reliably than monolayer cells. Thus, the use of multicellular spheroids may be more clinically relevant than monolayer cell cultures. Here, we describe methods for multicellular 3D spheroid generation that may be used to provide samples for receptor tyrosine kinase (and other protein) detection. Methods described include the forced-floating poly-HEMA method, the hanging-drop method, and the use of ECM to form multicellular 3D spheroids. PMID:25319898

  2. In vitro confirmation of newly established lung cancer cell lines using flow cytometry and multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Takaoka, K; Endo, T; Mizuno, S; Ogawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Ohnuma, T

    1997-05-01

    We report on a simplified method of cytomorphological in vitro confirmation of newly established lung cancer cell lines by using multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and flow cytometry (FCM). Eleven cell lines were established from 11 patients with lung cancer. The MTS were produced by culturing cells in agar-coated dish. Cytomorphological studies were made using smears of crushed MTS and frozen sections of MTS. The MTS were fixed doubly with paraformaldehyde and osmic acid for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Bivariate fluorescence of fluorescein isothyocyanate (FITC, tumor associated antigen, TAA) and propidium iodide (DNA) were measured by FCM. The MTS grew anchorage-independently. Cytopathological and electron microscopic findings of MTS were similar to those of the original clinical specimens. The DNA index and TAA were useful in evaluating the presence or absence of contamination by cells of non-tumor origin. The new cell lines satisfied a minimum of four conditions to confirm their establishment: (a) they originated from humans, (b) they were cytomorphologically identified with specimens from primary lesions, (c) they showed tumorigenicity, and (d) they were free from contamination by cells of different origin. From these findings, the establishment of new cell lines can be confirmed in vitro by using MTS and FCM. PMID:9194029

  3. Tumor-penetrating peptide fused EGFR single-domain antibody enhances cancer drug penetration into 3D multicellular spheroids and facilitates effective gastric cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Huizi; Zou, Zhengyun; Xin, Kai; Bian, Xinyu; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Chen, Jiao; Chen, Gang; Huang, Leaf; Blair, Andrew M.; Cao, Peng; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Human tumors, including gastric cancer, frequently express high levels of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), which are associated with a poor prognosis. Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancerous tissues shows potential in sparing unaffected tissues. However, it has been a major challenge for drug penetration in solid tumor tissues due to the complicated tumor microenvironment. We have constructed a recombinant protein named anti-EGFR-iRGD consisting of an anti-EGFR VHH (the variable domain from the heavy chain of the antibody) fused to iRGD, a tumor-specific binding peptide with high permeability. Anti-EGFR-iRGD, which targets EGFR and αvβ3, spreads extensively throughout both the multicellular spheroids and the tumor mass. The recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD also exhibited antitumor activity in tumor cell lines, multicellular spheroids, and mice. Moreover, anti-EGFR-iRGD could improve anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), bevacizumab, nanoparticle permeability and efficacy in multicellular spheroids. This study draws attention to the importance of iRGD peptide in the therapeutic approach of anti-EGFR-iRGD. As a consequence, anti-EGFR-iRGD could be a drug candidate for cancer treatment and a useful adjunct of other anticancer drugs. PMID:25553823

  4. LA-ICP-MS imaging in multicellular tumor spheroids - a novel tool in the preclinical development of metal-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Theiner, Sarah; Schreiber-Brynzak, Ekaterina; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Koellensperger, Gunda; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-04-01

    A novel application of advanced elemental imaging offers cutting edge in vitro assays with more predictive power on the efficacy of anticancer drugs in preclinical development compared to two dimensional cell culture models. We propose LA-ICP-MS analysis of multicellular spheroids, which are increasingly being used as three dimensional (3D) models of tumors, for improving the in vitro evaluation of anticancer metallodrugs. The presented strategy is very well suited for screening drug-tumor penetration, a key issue for drug efficacy. A major advantage of tumor spheroid models is that they enable us to create a tissue-like structure and function. With respect to 2D culture on the one hand and in vivo models on the other, multicellular spheroids thus show intermediate complexity, still allowing high repeatability and adequate through-put for drug research. This strongly argues for the use of spheroids as bridging models in preclinical anticancer drug development. Probing the lateral platinum distribution within these tumor models allows visualizing the penetration depth and targeting of platinum-based complexes. In the present study, we show for the first time that spatially-resolved metal accumulation in tumor spheroids upon treatment with platinum compounds can be appropriately assessed. The optimized LA-ICP-MS setup allowed discerning the platinum localization in different regions of the tumor spheroids upon compound treatment at biologically relevant (low micromolar) concentrations. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed at the periphery as well as in the center of the spheroids. This corresponds to the proliferating outermost layers of cells and the necrotic core, respectively, indicating enhanced platinum sequestration in these regions. PMID:26806253

  5. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or −80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  6. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  7. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that O(2)(-)* and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  8. Visualizing the effect of tumor microenvironments on radiation-induced cell kinetics in multicellular spheroids consisting of HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We visualized radiation-induced cell kinetics in spheroids. •HeLa-Fucci cells were used for detection of cell-cycle changes. •Radiation-induced G2 arrest was prolonged in the spheroid. •The inner and outer cell fractions behaved differently. -- Abstract: In this study, we visualized the effect of tumor microenvironments on radiation-induced tumor cell kinetics. For this purpose, we utilized a multicellular spheroid model, with a diameter of ∼500 μm, consisting of HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (Fucci). In live spheroids, a confocal laser scanning microscope allowed us to clearly monitor cell kinetics at depths of up to 60 μm. Surprisingly, a remarkable prolongation of G2 arrest was observed in the outer region of the spheroid relative to monolayer-cultured cells. Scale, an aqueous reagent that renders tissues optically transparent, allowed visualization deeper inside spheroids. About 16 h after irradiation, a red fluorescent cell fraction, presumably a quiescent G0 cell fraction, became distinct from the outer fraction consisting of proliferating cells, most of which exhibited green fluorescence indicative of G2 arrest. Thereafter, the red cell fraction began to emit green fluorescence and remained in prolonged G2 arrest. Thus, for the first time, we visualized the prolongation of radiation-induced G2 arrest in spheroids and the differences in cell kinetics between the outer and inner fractions.

  9. Adaptable stirred-tank culture strategies for large scale production of multicellular spheroid-based tumor cell models.

    PubMed

    Santo, Vítor E; Estrada, Marta F; Rebelo, Sofia P; Abreu, Sofia; Silva, Inês; Pinto, Catarina; Veloso, Susana C; Serra, Ana Teresa; Boghaert, Erwin; Alves, Paula M; Brito, Catarina

    2016-03-10

    Currently there is an effort toward the development of in vitro cancer models more predictive of clinical efficacy. The onset of advanced analytical tools and imaging technologies has increased the utilization of spheroids in the implementation of high throughput approaches in drug discovery. Agitation-based culture systems are commonly proposed as an alternative method for the production of tumor spheroids, despite the scarce experimental evidence found in the literature. In this study, we demonstrate the robustness and reliability of stirred-tank cultures for the scalable generation of 3D cancer models. We developed standardized protocols to a panel of tumor cell lines from different pathologies and attained efficient tumor cell aggregation by tuning hydrodynamic parameters. Large numbers of spheroids were obtained (typically 1000-1500 spheroids/mL) presenting features of native tumors, namely morphology, proliferation and hypoxia gradients, in a cell line-dependent mode. Heterotypic 3D cancer models, based on co-cultures of tumor cells and fibroblasts, were also established in the absence or presence of additional physical support from an alginate matrix, with maintenance of high cell viability. Altogether, we demonstrate that 3D tumor cell model production in stirred-tank culture systems is a robust and versatile approach, providing reproducible tools for drug screening and target verification in pre-clinical oncology research. PMID:26815388

  10. Size and Surface Charge of Engineered Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers Modulate Tumor Accumulation and Penetration: A Model Study Using Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Bugno, Jason; Hsu, Hao-Jui; Pearson, Ryan M; Noh, Hyeran; Hong, Seungpyo

    2016-07-01

    An enormous effort has been put into designing nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled biodistributions, prolonged plasma circulation times, and/or enhanced tissue targeting. However, little is known about how to design NPs with precise distributions in the target tissues. In particular, understanding NP tumor penetration and accumulation characteristics is crucial to maximizing the therapeutic potential of drug molecules carried by the NPs. In this study, we employed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, given their well-controlled size (<10 nm) and surface charge, to understand how the physical properties of NPs govern their tumor accumulation and penetration behaviors. We demonstrate for the first time that the size and surface charge of PAMAM dendrimers control their distributions in both a 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model and a separate extracellular matrix (ECM) model, which mimics the tumor microenvironment. Smaller PAMAM dendrimers not only diffused more rapidly in the ECM model but also efficiently penetrated to the MCTS core compared to their larger counterparts. Furthermore, cationic, amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers exhibited the greatest accumulation in MCTS compared to either charge-neutral or anionic dendrimers. Our findings indicate that the size and surface charge of PAMAM dendrimers may tailor their tumor accumulation and penetration behaviors. These results suggest that controlled tumor accumulation and distinct intratumoral distributions can be achieved by simply controlling the size and surface charge of dendrimers, which may also be applicable for other similarly sized NPs. PMID:26828309

  11. Developing multi-cellular tumor spheroid model (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Zheng; Zhu, Yu-Xia; Ma, Hui-Chao; Chen, Si-Nan; Chao, Ji-Ye; Ruan, Wen-Ding; Wang, Duo; Du, Feng-Guang; Meng, Yue-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a 3D MCTS-CCA system was constructed by culturing multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening. The CCA scaffolds were fabricated by spray-spinning. The interactions between the components of the spray-spun fibers were evidenced by methods of Coomassie Blue stain, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Co-culture indicated that MCF-7 cells showed a spatial growth pattern of multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the CCA fibrous scaffold with increased proliferation rate and drug-resistance to MMC, ADM and 5-Aza comparing with the 2D culture cells. Significant increases of total viable cells were found in 3D MCTS groups after drug administration by method of apoptotic analysis. Glucose-lactate analysis indicated that the metabolism of MCTS in CCA scaffold was closer to the tumor issue in vivo than the monolayer cells. In addition, MCTS showed the characteristic of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is subverted by carcinoma cells to facilitate metastatic spread. These results demonstrated that MCTS in CCA scaffold possessed a more conservative phenotype of tumor than monolayer cells, and anticancer drug screening in 3D MCTS-CCA system might be superior to the 2D culture system. PMID:26952417

  12. A tumor-penetrating recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD enhance efficacy of paclitaxel in 3D multicellular spheroids and gastric cancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sha, Huizi; Li, Rutian; Bian, Xinyu; Liu, Qin; Xie, Chen; Xin, Xiaoyan; Kong, Weiwei; Qian, Xiaoping; Jiang, Xiqun; Hu, Wenjing; Liu, Baorui

    2015-09-18

    It has been a major challenge for drug penetration in solid tumor tissues because of the complicated tumor microenvironment. We have previously constructed a protein of bispecific targets and high permeability named anti-EGFR-iRGD and investigated its inhibiting cell proliferation of gastric cancer. Paclitaxel (PTX) is widely used for treating various kinds of cancer. In this paper, we investigated the effects of anti-EGFR-iRGD in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs including PTX in epidermal growth factor receptor highly expressing gastric cancer. We demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of PTX combined with anti-EGFR-iRGD on monolayer cells (2D), multicellular spheroids (3D) and tumor-bearing mice for the first time and investigated the mechanism of this synergy effect. Our results provide impetus for further studies to use anti-EGFR-iRGD with standard cytotoxic treatment regimens for enhancing therapy of gastric cancer patients. PMID:25998561

  13. Quantitative Determination of Irinotecan and the Metabolite SN-38 by Nanoflow Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Different Regions of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    A new and simple method was developed to evaluate the distribution of therapeutics in three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) by combining serial trypsinization and nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). This methodology was validated with quantitative measurements of irinotecan and its bioactive metabolite, SN-38, in distinct spatial regions of HCT 116 MCTS. Irinotecan showed a time-dependent permeability into MCTS with most of the drug accumulating in the core after 24 h of treatment. The amount of SN-38 detected was 30 times lower than that of the parent drug, and was more abundant in the outer rim and intermediate regions of MCTS where proliferating cells were present. This method can be used to investigate novel and established drugs. It enables investigation of drug penetration properties and identification of metabolites with spatial specificity in MCTS. The new approach has great value in facilitating the drug evaluation process.

  14. Quantitative Determination of Irinotecan and the Metabolite SN-38 by Nanoflow Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Different Regions of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    A new and simple method was developed to evaluate the distribution of therapeutics in three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) by combining serial trypsinization and nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). This methodology was validated with quantitative measurements of irinotecan and its bioactive metabolite, SN-38, in distinct spatial regions of HCT 116 MCTS. Irinotecan showed a time-dependent permeability into MCTS with most of the drug accumulating in the core after 24 hours of treatment. The amount of SN-38 detected was 30 times lower than that of the parent drug, and was more abundant in the outer rim and intermediate regions of MCTS where proliferating cells were present. This method can be used to investigate novel and established drugs. It enables investigation of drug penetration properties and identification of metabolites with spatial specificity in MCTS. The new approach has great value in facilitating the drug evaluation process. PMID:25604392

  15. A collagen-based multicellular tumor spheroid model for evaluation of the efficiency of nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Le, Van-Minh; Lang, Mei-Dong; Shi, Wei-Bin; Liu, Jian-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems, especially those that use nanoparticles, have been the focus of research into cancer therapy during the last decade, to improve the bioavailability and delivery of anticancer drugs to specific tumor sites, thereby reducing the toxicity and side effects to normal tissues. However, the positive antitumor effects of these nanocarriers observed in conventional monolayer cultures frequently fail in vivo, due to the lack of physical and biological barriers resembling those seen in the actual body. Therefore, the collagen-based 3-D multicellular culture system, to screen new nanocarriers for drug delivery and to obtain more adequate and better prediction of therapeutic outcomes in preclinical experiments, was developed. This 3-D culture model was successfully established using optimized density of cells. Our result showed that 3-D cell colonies were successfully developed from 95-D, U87 and HCT116 cell lines respectively, after a seven-day culture in the collagen matrix. The coumarin-conjugated nanoparticles were able to penetrate the matrix gel to reach the tumor cells. The model is supposedly more accurate in reflecting/predicting the dynamics and therapeutic outcomes of candidates for drug transport in vivo, and/or investigation of tumor biology, thus speeding up the pace of discovery of novel drug delivery systems for cancer therapy. PMID:25315504

  16. Response of 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids to single and fractionated doses of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Sano, Y; Hoshino, T; Barker, M; Deen, D F

    1984-02-01

    This study was designed to examine the relative effect of each of four fractions of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) against 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids and to compare the results of the cell survival and growth delay assays. Similar levels of cell kill resulted when BCNU was administered either as single fractions of 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, or 6.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr or as one to four fractions of 1.5 micrograms/ml that were administered sequentially for 1 hr each. Survival was increased if the assay was delayed until 24 hr after drug treatment, which indicates that 9L cells in spheroids recover from BCNU-induced potentially lethal damage. When BCNU was administered in 1.5-micrograms/ml fractions, plating efficiencies depended markedly on the interval between the fractions. The 12-hr protocol produced an overall higher cell kill. Fractionation schedules of 24 and 36 hr produced less cell kill than did the other schedules. Survival plateaued for the last three treatments with BCNU in the 36-hr schedule. Cells in S phase at the time of administration of the initial 1.5-micrograms/ml fraction of BCNU moved into G1- and G2-M phases by 12 hr after treatment. For time periods longer than 12 hr, cells began to appear in the BCNU-resistant S phase. Thus, the movement of cells into the drug-sensitive and -resistant phases after the first fraction correlates well with the corresponding overall cytotoxic effect produced by treatment with the combined BCNU (1.5 micrograms/ml) fractions. For a higher concentration (3.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr), maximum cell kill was reached within the 12- to 18-hr interval, after which cell kill plateaued. Cells were not found in the S-phase fraction 12 to 36 hr after the first treatment with 3.0 micrograms/ml; maximum cell kill for the fractionated protocols resulted at these times. Therefore, BCNU, which is classified as a cell cycle-nonspecific drug, can induce a partial synchrony in 9L spheroid cells, which determines

  17. Emulsion technologies for multicellular tumour spheroid radiation assays.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kay S; McCluskey, Anthony G; Sorensen, Annette; Boyd, Marie; Zagnoni, Michele

    2016-01-01

    A major limitation with current in vitro technologies for testing anti-cancer therapies at the pre-clinical level is the use of 2D cell culture models which provide a poor reflection of the tumour physiology in vivo. Three dimensional cell culture models, such as the multicellular spheroid, provide instead a more accurate representation. However, existing spheroid-based assessment methods are generally labour-intensive and low-throughput. Emulsion based technologies offer enhanced mechanical stability during multicellular tumour spheroid formation and culture and are scalable to enable higher-throughput assays. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of emulsion-based techniques for the formation and long term culture of multicellular UVW glioma cancer spheroids and apply these findings to assess the cytotoxic effect of radiation on spheroids. Our results showed that spheroids formed within emulsions had similar morphological and growth characteristics to those formed using traditional methods. Furthermore, we have identified the effects produced on the proliferative state of the spheroids due to the compartmentalised nature of the emulsions and applied this for mimicking tumour growth and tumour quiescence. Finally, proof of concept results are shown to demonstrate the scalability potential of the technology for developing high-throughput screening assays. PMID:26456100

  18. Development of multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) culture from breast cancer cell and a high throughput screening method using the MTT assay.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wan Yong; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Chai Ling; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    In comparison to monolayer cells, MCTS has been claimed as more suitable candidate for studying drug penetration due to the high resemblance to solid tumors. However, the cultivation of MCTS is cumbersome, time consuming, and most technique fail to generate spheroids with uniform sizes. Therefore, the application of spheroid cultures in high throughput screening has been rather limiting. Besides, the lack of a well established screening protocol method that is applicable to spheroid could also be attributed to this limitation. Here we report a simple way of cultivating homogenous MCTS cultures with compact and rigid structure from the MCF-7 cells. Besides, we had also made some modifications to the standard MTT assay to realize high throughput screening of these spheroids. Using the modified protocol, tamoxifen showed cytotoxicity effect towards MCTS cultures from MCF-7 with high consistency. The results correlated well with the cultures' response assessed by LDH release assay but the latter assay was not ideal for detecting a wide range of cytotoxicity due to high basal background reading. The MTT assay emerged as a better indicator to apoptosis event in comparison to the LDH release assay. Therefore, the method for spheroid generation and the modified MTT assay we reported here could be potentially applied to high throughput screening for response of spheroid cultures generated from MCF-7 as well as other cancer cell lines towards cytotoxic stimuli. PMID:22970274

  19. Sliced Magnetic Polyacrylamide Hydrogel with Cell-Adhesive Microarray Interface: A Novel Multicellular Spheroid Culturing Platform.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Zhou, Naizhen; Li, Yang; Ma, Siyu; Guo, Zhaobin; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qiying; Sun, Jianfei; Zhang, Tianzhu; Gu, Ning

    2016-06-22

    Cell-adhesive properties are of great significance to materials serving as extracellular matrix mimics. Appropriate cell-adhesive property of material interface can balance the cell-matrix interaction and cell-cell interaction and can promote cells to form 3D structures. Herein, a novel magnetic polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel fabricated via combining magnetostatic field induced magnetic nanoparticles assembly and hydrogel gelation was applied as a multicellular spheroids culturing platform. When cultured on the cell-adhesive microarray interface of sliced magnetic hydrogel, normal and tumor cells from different cell lines could rapidly form multicellular spheroids spontaneously. Furthermore, cells which could only form loose cell aggregates in a classic 3D cell culture model (such as hanging drop system) were able to be promoted to form multicellular spheroids on this platform. In the light of its simplicity in fabricating as well as its effectiveness in promoting formation of multicellular spheroids which was considered as a prevailing tool in the study of the microenvironmental regulation of tumor cell physiology and therapeutic problems, this composite material holds promise in anticancer drugs or hyperthermia therapy evaluation in vitro in the future. PMID:27258682

  20. Droplet-based microfluidic system to form and separate multicellular spheroids using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungjun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Minsoo; Park, Tai Hyun

    2013-04-21

    The importance of creating a three-dimensional (3-D) multicellular spheroid has recently been gaining attention due to the limitations of monolayer cell culture to precisely mimic in vivo structure and cellular interactions. Due to this emerging interest, researchers have utilized new tools, such as microfluidic devices, that allow high-throughput and precise size control to produce multicellular spheroids. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic system that can encapsulate both cells and magnetic nanoparticles within alginate beads to mimic the function of a multicellular tumor spheroid. Cells were entrapped within the alginate beads along with magnetic nanoparticles, and the beads of a relatively uniform size (diameters of 85% of the beads were 170-190 μm) were formed in the oil phase. These beads were passed through parallel streamlines of oil and culture medium, where the beads were magnetically transferred into the medium phase from the oil phase using an external magnetic force. This microfluidic chip eliminates additional steps for collecting the spheroids from the oil phase and transferring them to culture medium. Ultimately, the overall spheroid formation process can be achieved on a single microchip. PMID:23426090

  1. Rapid Generation of In Vitro Multicellular Spheroids for the Study of Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Yen T.; Barbone, Dario; Broaddus, V. Courtney; Ho, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to penetration by antibodies and immunoconjugates and are difficult to study in vitro. Cells cultured as monolayers typically exhibit less resistance to therapy than those grown in vivo. Therefore, it is important to develop an alternative research model that better represents in vivo tumors. We have developed a protocol to produce multicellular spheroids, a simple and more relevant model of in vivo tumors that allows for further investigations of the microenvironmental effects on drug penetration and tumor cell killing. The protocol is used to produce in vitro three-dimensional tumor spheroids from established human cancer cell lines and primary cancer cells isolated from patients without the use of any extracellular components. To study the ability of tumor-targeting immunoconjugates to penetrate these tumor spheroids in vitro, we have used an immunotoxin targeting mesothelin, a surface protein expressed in malignant mesotheliomas. This method for producing consistent, reproducible 3D spheroids may allow for improved testing of novel monoclonal antibodies and other agents for their ability to penetrate solid tumors for cancer therapy. PMID:22043235

  2. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  3. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Jose M; Basheer, Haneen A; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC-19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC-19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  4. Regulation of Multicellular Spheroids by MAPK and FYN Kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey; Ramos, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not progressed significantly in the past 60 years, with 5-year survival remaining at approximately 50%. The epidemic of Human Papilloma Virus and its associated SCC warrants a renewed emphasis on fully understanding this disease. We previously used the 3-dimensional multicellular spheroid (MCS) model system to evaluate SCC behavior more accurately. In this study, we determined that SCC growth in MCS approximates epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Organization of an MCS requires the full-length β6 integrin subunit and its maintenance requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Limiting FYN kinase activation results in the down-regulation of E-cadherin, β-catenin and an increase in expression of N-cadherin and SNAIL. These results indicate that the microenvironment and growth patterns in an MCS are complex and require MAPK and FYN kinase. PMID:27466485

  5. Self-diffusion of water in multicellular spheroids measured by magnetic resonance microimaging.

    PubMed

    Neeman, M; Jarrett, K A; Sillerud, L O; Freyer, J P

    1991-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging measurements of the self-diffusion coefficient of water in large (greater than 2 mm) EMT-6 multicellular spheroids were performed in order to elucidate diffusion mechanisms in tumors. Pulsed gradient spin echo-imaging methods were developed for measuring diffusion in an intravoxel multicompartment system. The self-diffusion coefficient (at 22 degrees C) for water in the medium (Dm) consisted of only a single diffusion compartment [Dm = 1.99 +/- 0.03 (SE) x 10(-5) cm2/s]. Similarly, the spheroid necrotic center showed a single water diffusion compartment with a self-diffusion coefficient (Dc) significantly lower than that of the medium (Dc = 1.54 +/- 0.05 x 10(-5) cm2/s). The spheroid viable rim region showed two distinct compartments of approximately equal volume, one with a large diffusion coefficient (1.70 +/- 0.12 x 10(-5) cm2/s) and a second with a significantly smaller diffusion coefficient (0.25 +/- 0.01 x 10(-5) cm2/s). We propose that these two experimentally distinguishable compartments correspond to the extra- and intracellular regions, respectively, of the viable rim of the spheroid. Although the diffusion coefficients were significantly different in the medium, the necrotic center, and the viable rim, the activation energy for diffusion was the same in the three regions (0.20 eV). Studies of perfused spheroids at 37 degrees C show the same dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the diffusion filter as observed for unperfused spheroids at 22 degrees C. These results demonstrate the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging to investigate diffusion at the cellular level, which will lead to a better understanding of microenvironmental regulation in tumors. PMID:1855222

  6. EMBEDDED MULTICELLULAR SPHEROIDS AS A BIOMIMETIC 3D CANCER MODEL FOR EVALUATING DRUG AND DRUG-DEVICE COMBINATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Charoen, Kristie M.; Fallica, Brian; Colson, Yolonda L.; Zaman, Muhammad H.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular aggregates of cells, termed spheroids, are of interest for studying tumor behavior and for evaluating the response of pharmacologically active agents. Spheroids more faithfully reproduce the tumor macrostructure found in vivo compared to classical 2D monolayers. We present a method for embedding spheroids within collagen gels followed by quantitative and qualitative whole spheroid and single cell analyses enabling characterization over the length scales from molecular to macroscopic. Spheroid producing and embedding capabilities are demonstrated for U2OS and MDAMB 231 cell lines, of osteosarcoma and breast adenocarncinoma origin, respectively. Finally, using the MDA-MB-231 tumor model, the chemotherapeutic response between paclitaxel delivery as a bolus dose, as practiced in the clinic, is compared to delivery within an expansile nanoparticle. The expansile nanoparticle delivery route provides a superior outcome and the results mirror those observed in a murine xenograft model. These findings highlight the synergistic beneficial results that may arise from the use of a drug delivery system, and the need to evaluate both drug candidates and delivery systems in the research and pre-clinical screening phases of a new cancer therapy development program. PMID:24360576

  7. In situ oxygen consumption rates of cells in V-79 multicellular spheroids during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Freyer, J.P.; Tustanoff, E.; Franko, A.J.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The rate of consumption of oxygen by V-79 cells in multicellular spheroids was measeured as a function of the spheroid diameter. In situ consumption was equal to that of exponentially growing cells for spheroids less than 200 ..mu..m in diameter. The rate of oxygen consumption decreased for cells in spheroids between 200 and 400 ..mu..m diameter to a value one-fourth the initial, then remained constant with further spheroid growth. Comparison of consumption rates for spheroid-derived cells before and after dissociation from the spheroid structure indicated that the spheroid microenvironment accounted for only 20% of the change in oxygen consumption rate. Cell-cell contact, cell packing, and cell volume were not critical parameters. Plateau-phase cells had a fivefold lower rate of oxygen consumption than exponential cells, and it is postulated that the spheroid quiescent cell population accounts for a large part of the intrinsic alteration in oxygen consumption of cells in spheroids. Some other mechanism must be involved in the regulation of cellular oxygen consumption in V-79 spheroids to account for the remainder of the reduction obvserved in this system.

  8. Nonlinear 3D projection printing of concave hydrogel microstructures for long-term multicellular spheroid and embryoid body culture.

    PubMed

    Hribar, K C; Finlay, D; Ma, X; Qu, X; Ondeck, M G; Chung, P H; Zanella, F; Engler, A J; Sheikh, F; Vuori, K; Chen, S C

    2015-06-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propagation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach - with an important modification of nonlinear exposure - to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  9. Nonlinear 3D Projection Printing of Concave Hydrogel Microstructures for Long-Term Multicellular Spheroid and Embryoid Body Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hribar, K.C; Finlay, D.; Ma, X.; Qu, X.; Ondeck, M. G.; Chung, P. H.; Zanella, F.; Engler, A. J.; Sheikh, F.; Vuori, K.; Chen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propogation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach – with an important modification of nonlinear exposure — to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  10. Differential penetration of targeting agents into multicellular spheroids derived from human neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mairs, R.J.; Angerson, W.J.; Babich, J.W.; Murray, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have used a multicellular tumour spheroid model for determination of the penetration of various targeting agents of potential use in the treatment of neuroblastoma. Both the radiopharmaceutical meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) and the {beta} subunit of nerve growth factor ({beta}-NGF) distributed uniformly throughout spheroids, though the latter was poorly concentrated relative to mIBG. In contrast, the anti-neuroectodermal monoclonal antibody. UJ13A bound only to peripheral cell layers with little accumulation in the spheroid interior. Differential penetration of targeting agents may influence the choice of conjugated radionuclide which is likely to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit.

  11. Cancer multicellular spheroids: volume assessment from a single 2D projection.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo; Tesei, Anna; Arienti, Chiara; Bevilacqua, Alessandro

    2015-02-01

    Volume is one of the most important features for the characterization of a tumour on a macroscopic scale. It is often used to assess the effectiveness of care treatments, thus making its correct evaluation a crucial issue for patient care. Similarly, volume is a key feature on a microscopic scale. Multicellular cancer spheroids are 3D tumour models widely employed in pre-clinical studies to test the effects of drugs and radiotherapy treatments. Very few methods have been proposed to estimate the tumour volume arising from a 2D projection of multicellular spheroids, and even fewer have been designed to provide a 3D reconstruction of the tumour shape. In this work, we propose Reconstruction and Visualization from a Single Projection (ReViSP), an automatic method conceived to reconstruct the 3D surface and estimate the volume of single cancer multicellular spheroids, or even of spheroid cultures. As the input parameter ReViSP requires only one 2D projection, which could be a widefield microscope image. We assessed the effectiveness of our method by comparing it with other approaches. To this purpose, we used a new strategy that allowed us to achieve accurate volume measurements based on the analysis of home-made 3D objects, built by mimicking the spheroid morphology. The results confirmed the effectiveness of our method for both 3D reconstruction and volume assessment. ReViSP software is distributed as an open source tool. PMID:25561413

  12. Advances in the formation, use and understanding of multi-cellular spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Toni-Marie; Meyer, Julia; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Developing in vitro models for studying cell biology and cell physiology is of great importance to the fields of biotechnology, cancer research, drug discovery, toxicity testing, as well as the emerging fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Traditional two dimensional (2D) methods of mammalian cell culture have several limitations and it is increasingly recognized that cells grown in a three dimensional (3D) environment more closely represent normal cellular function due to the increased cell-to-cell interactions, and by mimicking the in vivo architecture of natural organs and tissues. Areas Covered In this review, we discuss the methods to form 3D multi-cellular spheroids, the advantages and limitations of these methods, and assays used to characterize the function of spheroids. The use of spheroids has led to many advances in basic cell sciences, including understanding cancer cell interactions, creating models for drug discovery and cancer metastasis, and they are being investigated as basic units for engineering tissue constructs. As so, this review will focus on contributions made to each of these fields using spheroid models. Expert Opinion Multi-cellular spheroids are rich in biological content and mimic better the in vivo environment than 2D cell culture. New technologies to form and analyze spheroids are rapidly increasing their adoption and expanding their applications. PMID:22784238

  13. Rapid formation of multicellular spheroids in double-emulsion droplets with controllable microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hon Fai; Zhang, Ying; Ho, Yi-Ping; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Jung, Youngmee; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    An attractive option for tissue engineering is to use of multicellular spheroids as microtissues, particularly with stem cell spheroids. Conventional approaches of fabricating spheroids suffer from low throughput and polydispersity in size, and fail to supplement cues from extracellular matrix (ECM) for enhanced differentiation. In this study, we report the application of microfluidics-generated water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double-emulsion (DE) droplets as pico-liter sized bioreactor for rapid cell assembly and well-controlled microenvironment for spheroid culture. Cells aggregated to form size-controllable (30–80 μm) spheroids in DE droplets within 150 min and could be retrieved via a droplet-releasing agent. Moreover, precursor hydrogel solution can be adopted as the inner phase to produce spheroid-encapsulated microgels after spheroid formation. As an example, the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) spheroids in alginate and alginate-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (-RGD) microgel was demonstrated, with enhanced osteogenic differentiation further exhibited in the latter case. PMID:24322507

  14. Rapid formation of size-controllable multicellular spheroids via 3D acoustic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejie; Wu, Mengxi; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Chan, Chung Yu; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-07-01

    The multicellular spheroid is an important 3D cell culture model for drug screening, tissue engineering, and fundamental biological research. Although several spheroid formation methods have been reported, the field still lacks high-throughput and simple fabrication methods to accelerate its adoption in drug development industry. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based cell manipulation methods, which are known to be non-invasive, flexible, and high-throughput, have not been successfully developed for fabricating 3D cell assemblies or spheroids, due to the limited understanding on SAW-based vertical levitation. In this work, we demonstrated the capability of fabricating multicellular spheroids in the 3D acoustic tweezers platform. Our method used drag force from microstreaming to levitate cells in the vertical direction, and used radiation force from Gor'kov potential to aggregate cells in the horizontal plane. After optimizing the device geometry and input power, we demonstrated the rapid and high-throughput nature of our method by continuously fabricating more than 150 size-controllable spheroids and transferring them to Petri dishes every 30 minutes. The spheroids fabricated by our 3D acoustic tweezers can be cultured for a week with good cell viability. We further demonstrated that spheroids fabricated by this method could be used for drug testing. Unlike the 2D monolayer model, HepG2 spheroids fabricated by the 3D acoustic tweezers manifested distinct drug resistance, which matched existing reports. The 3D acoustic tweezers based method can serve as a novel bio-manufacturing tool to fabricate complex 3D cell assembles for biological research, tissue engineering, and drug development. PMID:27327102

  15. Resistance of Lung Cancer Cells Grown as Multicellular Tumour Spheroids to Zinc Sulfophthalocyanine Photosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Manoto, Sello Lebohang; Houreld, Nicolette Nadene; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is phototherapeutic modality used in the treatment of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. The photochemical interaction of light, photosensitizer (PS) and molecular oxygen produces singlet oxygen which induces cell death. Zinc sulfophthalocyanine (ZnPcSmix) has been shown to be effective in A549 monolayers, multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTSs) (250 µm) and not on MCTSs with a size of 500 µm. A549 cells used in this study were grown as MCTSs to a size of 500 µm in order to determine their susceptibility to PDT. ZnPcSmix distribution in MCTSs and nuclear morphology was determined using a fluorescent microscope. Changes in cellular responses were evaluated using cell morphology, viability, proliferation, cytotoxicity, cell death analysis and mitochondrial membrane potential. Untreated MCTSs, showed no changes in cellular morphology, proliferation, cytotoxicity and nuclear morphology. Photoactivated ZnPcSmix also showed no changes in cellular morphology and nuclear morphology. However, photoactivated ZnPcSmix resulted in a significant dose dependant decrease in viability and proliferation as well as an increase in cell membrane damage in MCTSs over time. ZnPcSmix photosensitization induces apoptotic cell death in MCTSs with a size of 500 µm and more resistantance when compared to monolayer cells and MCTSs with a size of 250 µm. PMID:25950764

  16. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Shreya; Mehta, Pooja; Horst, Eric N; Ward, Maria R; Rowley, Katelyn R; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-03-29

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  17. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Rowley, Katelyn R.; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  18. AnaSP: a software suite for automatic image analysis of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Today, more and more biological laboratories use 3D cell cultures and tissues grown in vitro as a 3D model of in vivo tumours and metastases. In the last decades, it has been extensively established that multicellular spheroids represent an efficient model to validate effects of drugs and treatments for human care applications. However, a lack of methods for quantitative analysis limits the usage of spheroids as models for routine experiments. Several methods have been proposed in literature to perform high throughput experiments employing spheroids by automatically computing different morphological parameters, such as diameter, volume and sphericity. Nevertheless, these systems are typically grounded on expensive automated technologies, that make the suggested solutions affordable only for a limited subset of laboratories, frequently performing high content screening analysis. In this work we propose AnaSP, an open source software suitable for automatically estimating several morphological parameters of spheroids, by simply analyzing brightfield images acquired with a standard widefield microscope, also not endowed with a motorized stage. The experiments performed proved sensitivity and precision of the segmentation method proposed, and excellent reliability of AnaSP to compute several morphological parameters of spheroids imaged in different conditions. AnaSP is distributed as an open source software tool. Its modular architecture and graphical user interface make it attractive also for researchers who do not work in areas of computer vision and suitable for both high content screenings and occasional spheroid-based experiments. PMID:25737369

  19. Generation and functional assessment of 3D multicellular spheroids in droplet based microfluidics platform.

    PubMed

    Sabhachandani, P; Motwani, V; Cohen, N; Sarkar, S; Torchilin, V; Konry, T

    2016-02-01

    Here we describe a robust, microfluidic technique to generate and analyze 3D tumor spheroids, which resembles tumor microenvironment and can be used as a more effective preclinical drug testing and screening model. Monodisperse cell-laden alginate droplets were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices that combine T-junction droplet generation and external gelation for spheroid formation. The proposed approach has the capability to incorporate multiple cell types. For the purposes of our study, we generated spheroids with breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 drug sensitive and resistant) and co-culture spheroids of MCF-7 together with a fibroblast cell line (HS-5). The device has the capability to house 1000 spheroids on chip for drug screening and other functional analysis. Cellular viability of spheroids in the array part of the device was maintained for two weeks by continuous perfusion of complete media into the device. The functional performance of our 3D tumor models and a dose dependent response of standard chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin (Dox) and standard drug combination Dox and paclitaxel (PCT) was analyzed on our chip-based platform. Altogether, our work provides a simple and novel, in vitro platform to generate, image and analyze uniform, 3D monodisperse alginate hydrogel tumors for various omic studies and therapeutic efficiency screening, an important translational step before in vivo studies. PMID:26686985

  20. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  1. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  2. miR-509-3p is clinically significant and strongly attenuates cellular migration and multi-cellular spheroids in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yinghong; Robertson, Gordon; Pedersen, Lykke; Lim, Emilia; Hernandez-Herrera, Anadulce; Rowat, Amy C; Patil, Sagar L; Chan, Clara K; Wen, Yunfei; Zhang, Xinna; Basu-Roy, Upal; Mansukhani, Alka; Chu, Andy; Sipahimalani, Payal; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Thiessen, Nina; Coarfa, Cristian; Ma, Yussanne; Moore, Richard A; Schein, Jacquie E; Mungall, Andrew J; Liu, Jinsong; Pecot, Chad V; Sood, Anil K; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Gunaratne, Preethi H

    2016-05-01

    Ovarian cancer presents as an aggressive, advanced stage cancer with widespread metastases that depend primarily on multicellular spheroids in the peritoneal fluid. To identify new druggable pathways related to metastatic progression and spheroid formation, we integrated microRNA and mRNA sequencing data from 293 tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) ovarian cancer cohort. We identified miR-509-3p as a clinically significant microRNA that is more abundant in patients with favorable survival in both the TCGA cohort (P = 2.3E-3), and, by in situ hybridization (ISH), in an independent cohort of 157 tumors (P < 1.0E-3). We found that miR-509-3p attenuated migration and disrupted multi-cellular spheroids in HEYA8, OVCAR8, SKOV3, OVCAR3, OVCAR4 and OVCAR5 cell lines. Consistent with disrupted spheroid formation, in TCGA data miR-509-3p's most strongly anti-correlated predicted targets were enriched in components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We validated the Hippo pathway effector YAP1 as a direct miR-509-3p target. We showed that siRNA to YAP1 replicated 90% of miR-509-3p-mediated migration attenuation in OVCAR8, which contained high levels of YAP1 protein, but not in the other cell lines, in which levels of this protein were moderate to low. Our data suggest that the miR-509-3p/YAP1 axis may be a new druggable target in cancers with high YAP1, and we propose that therapeutically targeting the miR-509-3p/YAP1/ECM axis may disrupt early steps in multi-cellular spheroid formation, and so inhibit metastasis in epithelial ovarian cancer and potentially in other cancers. PMID:27036018

  3. Encapsulated multicellular spheroids of rat hepatocytes produce albumin and urea in a spouted bed circulating culture system.

    PubMed

    Takabatake, H; Koide, N; Tsuji, T

    1991-12-01

    Multicellular spheroids are spherical cell-aggregates that retain tridimensional architecture and tissue-specific functions. For use of multicellular spheroids of hepatocytes in a bioreactor for hybrid artificial liver support, we studied the effect of encapsulation and circulating culture on their integrity and tissue-specific functions. Multicellular spheroids of rat hepatocytes were encapsulated into microdroplets of calcium alginate gel and were used as a bioreactor in medium circulating in a spouted bed chamber. Approximately 10% of the hepatocytes of an adult rat were entrapped in a bioreactor chamber, connected to a gas exchanger and a medium reservoir. The total bed volume of the system was 250 ml. The pH and DO2 of the hormonally defined circulating medium was maintained constantly. Albumin and urea were produced in a linear fashion for 64 h at the rates of 0.02 micrograms/microgram cell protein/day and 0.15-0.2 ng/micrograms cell protein/day, respectively. Viability and structural stability of the spheroids were well preserved after the culture period. These results indicate that these encapsulated multicellular hepatocyte spheroids will provide a useful bioreactor for the continuous production of albumin, in vitro and also a prototype hybrid artificial liver support. PMID:1763969

  4. Measuring the Mechanical Stress induced by an Expanding Multicellular Tumor System: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Valentine, M. T.; Gardel, M. L.; Andor-Ardo, D.; Dennison, S.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Weitz, D. A.; Deisboeck, T. S.

    2003-03-01

    Rapid volumetric growth and extensive invasion into brain parenchyma are hallmarks of malignant neuroepithelial tumors in vivo. Little is known, however, about the mechanical impact of the growing brain tumor on its microenvironment. To better understand the environmental mechanical response, we used multi-particle tracking and microrheological methods to probe the environment of a dynamically expanding, multicellular brain tumor spheroid that grew for six days in a three-dimensional Matrigel-based in vitro assay containing 1.0 mm latex beads. These beads act as reference markers for the gel, allowing us to image the spatial displacement of the tumor environment using high-resolution timelapse video-microscopy. The results show that the volumetrically expanding tumor spheroid pushes the gel outward and that this tumor-generated pressure propagates to a distance greater than the initial radius of the tumor spheroid. Intriguingly, beads near the tips of invasive cells are displaced inward, towards the advancing invasive cells. Furthermore, this localized cell traction correlates with a marked increase in total invasion area over the observation period. This case study presents evidence that an expanding microscopic tumor system exerts both significant mechanical pressure and significant traction on its microenvironment.

  5. Suicide gene therapy on spontaneous canine melanoma: correlations between in vivo tumors and their derived multicell spheroids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gil-Cardeza, M L; Villaverde, M S; Fiszman, G L; Altamirano, N A; Cwirenbaum, R A; Glikin, G C; Finocchiaro, L M E

    2010-01-01

    To validate the use of multicellular spheroids to predict the efficacy of herpes simplex thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSVtk/GCV) suicide gene therapy in the respective in vivo tumors, we established and characterized 15 melanoma-derived cell lines from surgically excised melanoma tumors. Three HSVtk-lipofected cell lines were not sensitive to GCV in any culture configuration, other five displayed similar sensitivity as monolayers or spheroids, and only one resulted more sensitive when grown as spheroids. Other six cell lines manifested a relative multicellular resistance (MCR) phenotype growing as spheroids, compared with the same cells growing as monolayers. The reverse correlation between the MCR and the monolayers survival to HSVtk/GCV suggests that one of the main causes of MCR would be the rapid cell repopulation after suicide gene treatment. The high correlation of MCR with the spheroids radial growth and with the mitotic index of the respective originary tumors supported this re-growth involvement. A remarkable finding was the high correlation in HSVtk/GCV sensitivity between in vivo tumor and the corresponding derived cell lines growing as spheroids (R(2) = 0.85). This strongly encourages the implementation of spheroids as highly realistic experimental model for optimizing and predicting the in vivo response of the respective tumors to therapeutic strategies. PMID:19741734

  6. Tumor cell-targeted delivery of nanoconjugated oligonucleotides in composite spheroids.

    PubMed

    Carver, Kyle; Ming, Xin; Juliano, Rudy L

    2014-12-01

    Standard tissue culture has often been a poor model for predicting the efficacy of anti-cancer agents including oligonucleotides. In contrast to the simplicity of monolayer tissue cultures, a tumor mass includes tightly packed tumor cells, tortuous blood vessels, high levels of extracellular matrix, and stromal cells that support the tumor. These complexities pose a challenge for delivering therapeutic agents throughout the tumor, with many drugs limited to cells proximal to the vasculature. Multicellular tumor spheroids are superior to traditional monolayer cell culture for the assessment of cancer drug delivery, since they possess many of the characteristics of metastatic tumor foci. However, homogeneous spheroids comprised solely of tumor cells do not account for some of the key aspects of metastatic tumors, particularly the interaction with host cells such as fibroblasts. Further, homogeneous culture does not allow for the assessment of targeted delivery to tumor versus host cells. Here we have evaluated delivery of targeted and untargeted oligonucleotide nanoconjugates and of oligonucleotide polyplexes in both homogeneous and composite tumor spheroids. We find that inclusion of fibroblasts in the spheroids reduces delivery efficacy of the polyplexes. In contrast, targeted multivalent RGD-oligonucleotide nanoconjugates were able to effectively discriminate between melanoma cells and fibroblasts, thus providing tumor-selective uptake and pharmacological effects. PMID:25238564

  7. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Grist, S M; Nasseri, S S; Cheng, E; Hwang, Y-C E; Ni, C; Cheung, K C

    2015-03-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  8. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L.; Grist, S. M.; Nasseri, S. S.; Ni, C.; Cheung, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  9. Three-dimensional culture systems in cancer research: Focus on tumor spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sritama; Devi, Gayathri R

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells propagated in three-dimensional (3D) culture systems exhibit physiologically relevant cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, gene expression and signaling pathway profiles, heterogeneity and structural complexity that reflect in vivo tumors. In recent years, development of various 3D models has improved the study of host-tumor interaction and use of high-throughput screening platforms for anti-cancer drug discovery and development. This review attempts to summarize the various 3D culture systems, with an emphasis on the most well characterized and widely applied model - multicellular tumor spheroids. This review also highlights the various techniques to generate tumor spheroids, methods to characterize them, and its applicability in cancer research. PMID:27063403

  10. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles exert different cytotoxic effects on cells grown in monolayer cell culture versus as multicellular spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theumer, Anja; Gräfe, Christine; Bähring, Franziska; Bergemann, Christian; Hochhaus, Andreas; Clement, Joachim H.

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with human blood-brain barrier-forming endothelial cells (HBMEC) in two-dimensional cell monolayers as well as in three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. The precise nanoparticle localisation and the influence of the NP on the cellular viability and the intracellular Akt signalling were studied in detail. Long-term effects of different polymer-coated nanoparticles (neutral fluidMAG-D, anionic fluidMAG-CMX and cationic fluidMAG-PEI) and the corresponding free polymers on cellular viability of HBMEC were investigated by real time cell analysis studies. Nanoparticles exert distinct effects on HBMEC depending on the nanoparticles' surface charge and concentration, duration of incubation and cellular context. The most severe effects were caused by PEI-coated nanoparticles. Concentrations above 25 μg/ml led to increased amounts of dead cells in monolayer culture as well as in multicellular spheroids. On the level of intracellular signalling, context-dependent differences were observed. Monolayer cultures responded on nanoparticle incubation with an increase in Akt phosphorylation whereas spheroids on the whole show a decreased Akt activity. This might be due to the differential penetration and distribution of PEI-coated nanoparticles.

  11. Transitioning from multi-phase to single-phase microfluidics for long-term culture and treatment of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kay S; Boyd, Marie; Zagnoni, Michele

    2016-09-21

    When compared to methodologies based on low adhesion or hanging drop plates, droplet microfluidics offers several advantages for the formation and culture of multicellular spheroids, such as the potential for higher throughput screening and the use of reduced cell numbers, whilst providing increased stability for plate handling. However, a drawback of the technology is its characteristic compartmentalisation which limits the nutrients available to cells within an emulsion and poses challenges to the exchange of the encapsulated solution, often resulting in short-term cell culture and/or viability issues. The aim of this study was to develop a multi-purpose microfluidic platform that combines the high-throughput characteristics of multi-phase flows with that of ease of perfusion typical of single-phase microfluidics. We developed a versatile system to upscale the formation and long-term culture of multicellular spheroids for testing anticancer treatments, creating an array of fluidically addressable, compact spheroids that could be cultured in either medium or within a gel scaffold. The work provides proof-of-concept results for using this system to test both chemo- and radio-therapeutic protocols using in vitro 3D cancer models. PMID:27477673

  12. Secretory prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4 sensitizes multicellular spheroids (MCS) of glioblastoma multiforme cells to tamoxifen-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jagtap, Jayashree C.; Parveen, D.; Shah, Reecha D.; Desai, Aarti; Bhosale, Dipali; Chugh, Ashish; Ranade, Deepak; Karnik, Swapnil; Khedkar, Bhushan; Mathur, Aaishwarya; Natesh, Kumar; Chandrika, Goparaju; Shastry, Padma

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant form of brain tumor and is associated with resistance to conventional therapy and poor patient survival. Prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4, a tumor suppressor, is expressed as both an intracellular and secretory/extracellular protein. Though secretory Par-4 induces apoptosis in cancer cells, its potential in drug-resistant tumors remains to be fully explored. Multicellular spheroids (MCS) of cancer cells often acquire multi-drug resistance and serve as ideal experimental models. We investigated the role of Par-4 in Tamoxifen (TAM)-induced cell death in MCS of human cell lines and primary cultures of GBM tumors. TCGA and REMBRANT data analysis revealed that low levels of Par-4 correlated with low survival period (21.85 ± 19.30 days) in GBM but not in astrocytomas (59.13 ± 47.26 days) and oligodendrogliomas (58.04 ± 59.80 days) suggesting low PAWR expression as a predictive risk factor in GBM. Consistently, MCS of human cell lines and primary cultures displayed low Par-4 expression, high level of chemo-resistance genes and were resistant to TAM-induced cytotoxicity. In monolayer cells, TAM-induced cytotoxicity was associated with enhanced expression of Par-4 and was alleviated by silencing of Par-4 using specific siRNA. TAM effectively induced secretory Par-4 in conditioned medium (CM) of cells cultured as monolayer but not in MCS. Moreover, MCS were rendered sensitive to TAM-induced cell death by exposure to conditioned medium (CM)-containing Par-4 (derived from TAM-treated monolayer cells). Also TAM reduced the expression of Akt and PKCζ in GBM cells cultured as monolayer but not in MCS. Importantly, combination of TAM with inhibitors to PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) or PKCζ resulted in secretion of Par-4 and cell death in MCS. Since membrane GRP78 is overexpressed in most cancer cells but not normal cells, and secretory Par-4 induces apoptosis by binding to membrane GRP78, secretory Par-4 is an

  13. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions seems to be a feasible alternative to localized spectroscopy since similar effects were found after radiation treatment. PMID:27200293

  14. Hydrogel thin film with swelling-induced wrinkling patterns for high-throughput generation of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziqi; Gu, Jianjun; Zhao, Yening; Guan, Ying; Zhu, X X; Zhang, Yongjun

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) multicellular spheroids (MCSs) mimic the structure and function of real tissue much better than the conventional 2D cell monolayers, however, their application was severely hindered by difficulties in their generation. An ideal method for MCS fabrication should produce spheroids with narrow size distribution and allow for control over their size. The method should also be simple, cheap, and scalable. Here, we use patterned nonadhesive poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogel films to guide the self-assembly of cells. The films were fabricated directly in the wells of cell culture plates. They were patterned spontaneously by swelling in water, without the use of any template or specialized facilities. When cell suspension is added, the cells settle down by gravity to the bottom. Because of the presence of the wrinkling pattern composed of uniformed microcaves, the cells accumulate to the center of the microcaves and gradually self-assemble into MCSs. Using this method, monodisperse MCSs were generated. The size of the spheroids can be facilely controlled by the number of cells seeded. The method is compatible with the conventional monolayer cell culture method. Thousands of spheroids can be generated in a single well. We expect this method will pave the way for the application of MCSs in various biomedical areas. PMID:25072634

  15. Enzymatically fabricated and degradable microcapsules for production of multicellular spheroids with well-defined diameters of less than 150 microm.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Ito, Sho; Ogushi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Hosoda, Natsuko; Sawae, Yoshinori; Kawakami, Koei

    2009-10-01

    Microcapsules with a single, spherical hollow core less than 150 microm in diameter were developed to obtain multicellular spheroids with well-defined sizes of less than 150 microm in diameter. An aqueous solution of phenolic hydroxyl derivative of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC-Ph) containing human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) cells and horse radish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into a coflowing stream of liquid paraffin, containing H(2)O(2), resulting in cell-enclosing CMC-Ph microparticles, 135 microm in diameter, via a peroxidase-catalyzed crosslinking reaction. The CMC-Ph microparticles were then coated with a phenolic hydroxyl derivative of alginate (Alg-Ph) gel membrane several dozen micrometers in thickness, crosslinked via the same enzymatic reaction process, followed by further crosslinking between the carboxyl groups of alginate by Sr(2+). A hollow core structure was achieved by immersing the resultant microcapsules in a medium containing cellulase, which degrades the enclosed CMC-Ph microparticles. The HepG2 cells in the microcapsules then grew and completely filled the hollow core. Multicellular spheroids the same size as the CMC-Ph microparticles, with living cells at their outer surface, were collected within 1 min by soaking them in a medium containing alginate lyase to degrade the Alg-Ph gel microcapsule membrane. PMID:19656563

  16. Inferring Growth Control Mechanisms in Growing Multi-cellular Spheroids of NSCLC Cells from Spatial-Temporal Image Data

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Margareta; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Drasdo, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative single cell-based mathematical model for multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) of SK-MES-1 cells, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, growing under various nutrient conditions: we confront the simulations performed with this model with data on the growth kinetics and spatial labeling patterns for cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM), cell distribution and cell death. We start with a simple model capturing part of the experimental observations. We then show, by performing a sensitivity analysis at each development stage of the model that its complexity needs to be stepwise increased to account for further experimental growth conditions. We thus ultimately arrive at a model that mimics the MCTS growth under multiple conditions to a great extent. Interestingly, the final model, is a minimal model capable of explaining all data simultaneously in the sense, that the number of mechanisms it contains is sufficient to explain the data and missing out any of its mechanisms did not permit fit between all data and the model within physiological parameter ranges. Nevertheless, compared to earlier models it is quite complex i.e., it includes a wide range of mechanisms discussed in biological literature. In this model, the cells lacking oxygen switch from aerobe to anaerobe glycolysis and produce lactate. Too high concentrations of lactate or too low concentrations of ATP promote cell death. Only if the extracellular matrix density overcomes a certain threshold, cells are able to enter the cell cycle. Dying cells produce a diffusive growth inhibitor. Missing out the spatial information would not permit to infer the mechanisms at work. Our findings suggest that this iterative data integration together with intermediate model sensitivity analysis at each model development stage, provide a promising strategy to infer predictive yet minimal (in the above sense) quantitative models of tumor growth, as prospectively of other tissue

  17. Inferring Growth Control Mechanisms in Growing Multi-cellular Spheroids of NSCLC Cells from Spatial-Temporal Image Data.

    PubMed

    Jagiella, Nick; Müller, Benedikt; Müller, Margareta; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E; Drasdo, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    We develop a quantitative single cell-based mathematical model for multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) of SK-MES-1 cells, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, growing under various nutrient conditions: we confront the simulations performed with this model with data on the growth kinetics and spatial labeling patterns for cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM), cell distribution and cell death. We start with a simple model capturing part of the experimental observations. We then show, by performing a sensitivity analysis at each development stage of the model that its complexity needs to be stepwise increased to account for further experimental growth conditions. We thus ultimately arrive at a model that mimics the MCTS growth under multiple conditions to a great extent. Interestingly, the final model, is a minimal model capable of explaining all data simultaneously in the sense, that the number of mechanisms it contains is sufficient to explain the data and missing out any of its mechanisms did not permit fit between all data and the model within physiological parameter ranges. Nevertheless, compared to earlier models it is quite complex i.e., it includes a wide range of mechanisms discussed in biological literature. In this model, the cells lacking oxygen switch from aerobe to anaerobe glycolysis and produce lactate. Too high concentrations of lactate or too low concentrations of ATP promote cell death. Only if the extracellular matrix density overcomes a certain threshold, cells are able to enter the cell cycle. Dying cells produce a diffusive growth inhibitor. Missing out the spatial information would not permit to infer the mechanisms at work. Our findings suggest that this iterative data integration together with intermediate model sensitivity analysis at each model development stage, provide a promising strategy to infer predictive yet minimal (in the above sense) quantitative models of tumor growth, as prospectively of other tissue

  18. Development of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a human-based model for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Jönsson-Niedziółka, Martin; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-03-01

    The emergence of human-based models is incontestably required for the study of complex physiological pathways and validation of reliable in vitro methods as alternative for in vivo studies in experimental animals for toxicity assessment. With this objective, we have developed and tested three dimensional environments for cells using different types of hydrogels including transglutaminase-cross-linked gelatin, collagen type I, and growth-factor depleted Matrigel. Cells grown in Matrigel exhibited the greatest cell proliferation and spheroid diameter. Moreover, analysis of urea and albumin biosynthesis revealed that the created system allowed the immortalized liver cell line HepG2 to re-establish normal hepatocyte-like properties which were not observed under the conditions of conventional cell cultures. This study presents a scalable technology for production of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a system which improves the predictive value of cell-based assays for safety and risk assessment. The time- and dose-dependent toxicity of nanoparticles demonstrates a higher cytotoxic effect when HepG2 cells grown as monolayer than embedded in hydrogels. The experimental setup provided evidence that the cell environment has significant influence on cell sensitivity and that liver spheroid is a useful and novel tool to examine nanoparticle dosing effect even at the level of in vitro studies. Therefore, this system can be applied to a wide variety of potentially hostile compounds in basic screening to provide initial warning of adverse effects and trigger subsequent analysis and remedial actions. PMID:26825373

  19. Evaluation of anti-HER2 scFv-conjugated PLGA-PEG nanoparticles on 3D tumor spheroids of BT474 and HCT116 cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Duong Le, Thi; Pham, Thu Hong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Giang Ngo, Thi Hong; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional culture cells (spheroids) are one of the multicellular culture models that can be applied to anticancer chemotherapeutic development. Multicellular spheroids more closely mimic in vivo tumor-like patterns of physiologic environment and morphology. In previous research, we designed docetaxel-loaded pegylated poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles conjugated with anti-HER2 single chain antibodies (scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG) and evaluated them in 2D cell culture. In this study, we continuously evaluate the cellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG on a 3D tumor spheroid model of BT474 (HER2-overexpressing) and HCT116 (HER2-underexpressing) cancer cells. The results showed that the nanoparticle formulation conjugated with scFv had a significant internalization effect on the spheroids of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells as compared to the spheroids of HER2-underexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, cytotoxic effects of targeted nanoparticles decreased the size and increased necrotic score of HER2-overexpressing tumor spheroids. Thus, these scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG nanoparticles have potential for active targeting for HER2-overexpressing cancer therapy. In addition, BT474 and HCT116 spheroids can be used as a tumor model for evaluation of targeting therapies.

  20. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T.

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  1. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  2. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Salmenperä, Pertteli; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Räsänen, Kati; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. PMID:27177832

  3. Opportunities and Challenges for use of Tumor Spheroids as Models to Test Drug Delivery and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Geeta; Hsiao, Amy Y.; Ingram, Marylou; Luker, Gary D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are three dimensional in vitro microscale tissue analogs. The current article examines the suitability of spheroids as an in vitro platform for testing drug delivery systems. Spheroids model critical physiologic parameters present in vivo, including complex multicellular architecture, barriers to mass transport, and extracellular matrix deposition. Relative to two-dimensional cultures, spheroids also provide better target cells for drug testing and are appropriate in vitro model for studies of drug penetration. Key challenges associated with creation of uniformly sized spheroids, spheroids with small number of cells and co-culture spheroids are emphasized in the article. Moreover, the assay techniques required for the characterization of drug delivery and efficacy in spheroids and the challenges associated with such studies are discussed. Examples for the use of spheroids in drug delivery and testing are also emphasized. With these challenges and the possible solutions, multicellular spheroids are becoming an increasingly useful in vitro tool for drug screening and delivery to pathological tissues and organs. PMID:22613880

  4. Combined effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha and radiation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma grown as radia spheroids.

    PubMed

    Van Moorselaar, R J; Schwachöfer, J H; Crooijmans, R P; Van Stratum, P; Debruyne, F M; Schalken, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the antiproliferative effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF) and radiation on a recently described rat renal cell tumor line grown as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS). Treatment commenced when the spheroids had reached a diameter of 250 microns. TNF was diluted in the tissue culture medium in different concentrations, ranging from 250-1000 ng/ml. TNF monotherapy had a dose-dependent inhibiting effect on spheroid growth. Single-dose irradiation with 2, 4 or 6 Gy also retarded spheroids significantly in their growth. In the combination treatment the highest dose of TNF (1000 ng/ml) was added 4 hours prior to radiation. TNF could not induce a potentiation of the radiation injury at 2 Gy. The combination with 4 Gy, however, had additive and the combination with 6 Gy synergistic antiproliferative effects; in these treatment regimens respectively 2 and 5 out of 24 spheroids were controlled, i.e. cured. These experiments suggest that TNF in combination with radiotherapy may be beneficial for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma or cancer in general. PMID:2285257

  5. In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Marley, Garry M.

    1993-01-01

    Cinostatic bioreactor promotes formation of relatively large solid tumor spheroids exhibiting diameters from 750 to 2,100 micrometers. Process useful in studying efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and of interactions between cells not constrained by solid matrices. Two versions have been demonstrated; one for anchorage-independent cells and one for anchorage-dependent cells.

  6. Transcriptome profile of the early stages of breast cancer tumoral spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Marín, Rosario; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna; Garcia-Venzor, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma B.; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen or nutrient deprivation of early stage tumoral spheroids can be used to reliably mimic the initial growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. However, cancer cell growth during the initial stages has not been fully explored using a genome-wide approach. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the transcriptome of breast cancer cells during the initial stages of tumoral growth using RNAseq in a model of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS). Network analyses showed that a metastatic signature was enriched as several adhesion molecules were deregulated, including EPCAM, E-cadherin, integrins and syndecans, which were further supported by an increase in cell migration. Interestingly, we also found that the cancer cells at this stage of growth exhibited a paradoxical hyperactivation of oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, we found a large number of regulated (long non coding RNA) lncRNAs, several of which were co-regulated with neighboring genes. The regulatory role of some of these lncRNAs on mRNA expression was demonstrated with gain of function assays. This is the first report of an early-stage MTS transcriptome, which not only reveals a complex expression landscape, but points toward an important contribution of long non-coding RNAs in the final phenotype of three-dimensional cellular models. PMID:27021602

  7. Tumor spheroid model for the biologically targeted radiotherapy of neuroblastoma micrometastases

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, K.A.; Mairs, R.; Murray, T.; Hilditch, T.E.; Wheldon, T.E.; Gregor, A.; Hann, I.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric malignancy with a poor prognosis at least partly attributable to an early pattern of dissemination. New approaches to treatment of micrometastases include targeted radiotherapy using radiolabeled antibodies or molecules which are taken up preferentially by tumor cells. Multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) resemble micrometastases during the avascular phase of their development. A human neuroblastoma cell line (NBl-G) was grown as MTS and incubated briefly with a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody ({sup 131}I-UJ13A) directed against neuroectodermal antigens. Spheroid response was evaluated in terms of regrowth delay or proportion sterilized. A dose-response relationship was demonstrated in terms of {sup 131}I activity or duration of incubation. Control experiments using unlabeled UJ13A, radiolabeled nonspecific antibody (T2.10), radiolabeled human serum albumin, and radiolabeled sodium iodide showed these to be relatively ineffective compared to {sup 131}I-UJ13A. The cell line NBl-G grown as MTS has also been found to preferentially accumulate the radiolabeled catecholamine precursor molecule m-({sup 131}I)iodobenzylguanidine compared to cell lines derived from other tumor types. NBl-G cells grown as MTS provide a promising laboratory model for targeted radiotherapy of neuroblastoma micrometastases using radiolabeled antibodies or m-iodobenzylguanidine.

  8. Transcriptome profile of the early stages of breast cancer tumoral spheroids.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Marín, Rosario; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna; Garcia-Venzor, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma B; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen or nutrient deprivation of early stage tumoral spheroids can be used to reliably mimic the initial growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. However, cancer cell growth during the initial stages has not been fully explored using a genome-wide approach. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the transcriptome of breast cancer cells during the initial stages of tumoral growth using RNAseq in a model of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS). Network analyses showed that a metastatic signature was enriched as several adhesion molecules were deregulated, including EPCAM, E-cadherin, integrins and syndecans, which were further supported by an increase in cell migration. Interestingly, we also found that the cancer cells at this stage of growth exhibited a paradoxical hyperactivation of oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, we found a large number of regulated (long non coding RNA) lncRNAs, several of which were co-regulated with neighboring genes. The regulatory role of some of these lncRNAs on mRNA expression was demonstrated with gain of function assays. This is the first report of an early-stage MTS transcriptome, which not only reveals a complex expression landscape, but points toward an important contribution of long non-coding RNAs in the final phenotype of three-dimensional cellular models. PMID:27021602

  9. DC electrical field-induced c-fos expression and growth stimulation in multicellular prostate cancer spheroids.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, H.; Hescheler, J.; Reis, D.; Diedershagen, H.; Niedermeier, W.; Wartenberg, M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of electrical direct current (DC) field pulses on c-fos expression, growth kinetics and vitality patterns of multicellular tumour spheroids (MCSs) were studied. Monitoring the membrane potential of MCSs by di-8-ANNEPS staining and confocal microscopy during DC electrical field treatment revealed a hyperpolarization at the anode-facing side and a depolarization at the cathode-facing side. When a single 500 V m(-1) electrical field pulse with a duration of 60 s was applied to MCSs (150-350 microm in diameter) an enhancement of the growth kinetics within a period of 6 days post pulse was observed. Whereas the volume doubling time amounted to 4-5 days in control samples, it was reduced to 1-2 days in electropulsed MCSs. At day 6 post pulse the diameter of the necrotic core was significantly smaller than the control. The critical diameter for the first appearance of central necrosis amounted to 350 +/- 50 microm in the control and 450 +/- 50 microm in the electropulsed MCSs. Coincidentally, the proliferating rim was increased to 107 +/- 11 microm in electropulsed MCSs as compared with 60 +/- 6 microm in the control. The growth stimulation may be mediated by the proto-oncogene c-fos as its expression increased by a factor of 2.5 within 2 h post pulse. c-fos expression declined towards control values within 8 h post pulse. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 7 PMID:9166941

  10. In silico estimates of the free energy rates in growing tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, H.; Verner, S. N.; Mills, K. L.; Kemkemer, R.; Garikipati, K.

    2010-05-01

    The physics of solid tumor growth can be considered at three distinct size scales: the tumor scale, the cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) scale and the sub-cellular scale. In this paper we consider the tumor scale in the interest of eventually developing a system-level understanding of the progression of cancer. At this scale, cell populations and chemical species are best treated as concentration fields that vary with time and space. The cells have chemo-mechanical interactions with each other and with the ECM, consume glucose and oxygen that are transported through the tumor, and create chemical by-products. We present a continuum mathematical model for the biochemical dynamics and mechanics that govern tumor growth. The biochemical dynamics and mechanics also engender free energy changes that serve as universal measures for comparison of these processes. Within our mathematical framework we therefore consider the free energy inequality, which arises from the first and second laws of thermodynamics. With the model we compute preliminary estimates of the free energy rates of a growing tumor in its pre-vascular stage by using currently available data from single cells and multicellular tumor spheroids.

  11. Quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Grünebaum, Jonas; Moosmann, Aline; Mulac, Dennis; Söbbing, Judith; Niehaus, Rebecca; Buchholz, Rebecca; Kröger, Sabrina; Wiehe, Arno; Wagner, Sylvia; Sperling, Michael; von Briesen, Hagen; Langer, Klaus; Karst, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Limited drug penetration into tumor tissue is a significant factor to the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Tumor spheroids, a 3D cell culture model system, can be used to study drug penetration for pharmaceutical development. In this study, a method for quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements by laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Different matrix-matched standards were used to develop a quantitative LA-ICP-MS method with high spatial resolution. To investigate drug penetration, tumor spheroids were incubated with platinum complexes (Pt(II)acetylacetonate, cisplatin) and the palladium tagged photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (mTHPP). Distribution and accumulation of the pharmaceuticals were determined with the developed method. PMID:27619092

  12. Changes in global gene expression associated with 3D structure of tumors: an ex vivo matrix-free mesothelioma spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heungnam; Phung, Yen; Ho, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to anti-tumor agents. Molecules involved in multicellular tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study ex vivo. Here, we generated a matrix-free tumor spheroid model using the NCI-H226 mesothelioma cell line and compared the gene expression profiles of spheroids and monolayers using microarray analysis. Microarray analysis revealed that 142 probe sets were differentially expressed between tumor spheroids and monolayers. Gene ontology analysis revealed that upregulated genes were primarily related to immune response, wound response, lymphocyte stimulation and response to cytokine stimulation, whereas downregulated genes were primarily associated with apoptosis. Among the 142 genes, 27 are located in the membrane and related to biologic processes of cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling, cellular growth and proliferation and morphology. Western blot analysis validated elevation of MMP2, BAFF/BLyS/TNFSF13B, RANTES/CCL5 and TNFAIP6/TSG-6 protein expression in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Thus, we have reported the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles using an ex vivo matrix-free spheroid model to identify genes specific to the three-dimensional biological structure of tumors. The method described here can be used for gene expression profiling of tumors other than mesothelioma. PMID:22737246

  13. Inhibition of hexokinase-2 with targeted liposomal 3-bromopyruvate in an ovarian tumor spheroid model of aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gandham, Srujan Kumar; Talekar, Meghna; Singh, Amit; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of glycolytic markers, especially hexokinase-2 (HK2), using a three-dimensional multicellular spheroid model of human ovarian adenocarcinoma (SKOV-3) cells and to develop an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted liposomal formulation for improving inhibition of HK2 and the cytotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate (3-BPA). Methods Multicellular SKOV-3 tumor spheroids were developed using the hanging drop method and expression levels of glycolytic markers were examined. Non-targeted and epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted liposomal formulations of 3-BPA were formulated and characterized. Permeability and cellular uptake of the liposomal formulations in three-dimensional SKOV-3 spheroids was evaluated using confocal microscopy. The cytotoxicity and HK2 inhibition potential of solution form of 3-BPA was compared to the corresponding liposomal formulation by using cell proliferation and HK2 enzymatic assays. Results SKOV-3 spheroids were reproducibly developed using the 96-well hanging drop method, with an average size of 900 µm by day 5. HK2 enzyme activity levels under hypoxic conditions were found to be higher than under normoxic conditions (P<0.0001, Student’s t-test, unpaired and two-tailed). Liposomal formulations (both non-targeted and targeted) of 3-BPA showed a more potent inhibitory effect (P<0.001, Student’s t-test, unpaired and two-tailed) at a dose of 50 µM than the aqueous solution form at 3, 6, and 24 hours post administration. Similarly, the cytotoxic activity 3-BPA at various concentrations (10 µM–100 µM) showed that the liposomal formulations had an enhanced cytotoxic effect of 2–5-fold (P<0.0001, Student’s t-test, unpaired and two-tailed) when compared to the aqueous solution form for both 10 µM and 25 µM concentrations. Conclusion SKOV-3 spheroids developed by the hanging drop method can be used as a tumor aerobic glycolysis model for evaluation of therapies

  14. 96-well format-based microfluidic platform for parallel interconnection of multiple multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Young; Fluri, David A; Kelm, Jens M; Hierlemann, Andreas; Frey, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we present a microfluidic platform, compatible with conventional 96-well formats, that enables facile and parallelized culturing and testing of spherical microtissues in a standard incubator. The platform can accommodate multiple microtissues (up to 66) of different cell types, formed externally by using the hanging-drop method, and enables microtissue interconnection through microfluidic channels for continuous media perfusion or dosage of substances. The platform contains 11 separate channels, and each channel has six tissue compartments. Primary rat liver tissues were cultured over 8 days, and multiple tumor tissues (HCT116) were exposed to various concentrations of 5-fluorouracil for platform characterization. PMID:25524491

  15. 3D high-content screening for the identification of compounds that target cells in dormant tumor spheroid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Carsten; Riefke, Björn; Gründemann, Stephan; Krebs, Alice; Christian, Sven; Prinz, Florian; Osterland, Marc; Golfier, Sven; Räse, Sebastian; Ansari, Nariman; Esner, Milan; Bickle, Marc; Pampaloni, Francesco; Mattheyer, Christian; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Parczyk, Karsten; Prechtl, Stefan; Steigemann, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions need to adapt to an unfavorable metabolic microenvironment. As distance from supplying blood vessels increases, oxygen and nutrient concentrations decrease and cancer cells react by stopping cell cycle progression and becoming dormant. As cytostatic drugs mainly target proliferating cells, cancer cell dormancy is considered as a major resistance mechanism to this class of anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, substances that target cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions have the potential to enhance cytostatic-based chemotherapy of solid tumors. With three-dimensional growth conditions, multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) reproduce several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, including oxygen and nutrient gradients as well as the development of dormant tumor regions. We here report the setup of a 3D cell culture compatible high-content screening system and the identification of nine substances from two commercially available drug libraries that specifically target cells in inner MCTS core regions, while cells in outer MCTS regions or in 2D cell culture remain unaffected. We elucidated the mode of action of the identified compounds as inhibitors of the respiratory chain and show that induction of cell death in inner MCTS core regions critically depends on extracellular glucose concentrations. Finally, combinational treatment with cytostatics showed increased induction of cell death in MCTS. The data presented here shows for the first time a high-content based screening setup on 3D tumor spheroids for the identification of substances that specifically induce cell death in inner tumor spheroid core regions. This validates the approach to use 3D cell culture screening systems to identify substances that would not be detectable by 2D based screening in otherwise similar culture conditions. - Highlights: • Establishment of a novel method for 3D cell culture based high-content screening. • First reported high

  16. Spheroid-plug model as a tool to study tumor development, angiogenesis, and heterogeneity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Szade, Agata; Collet, Guillaume; Kloska, Damian; Kieda, Claudine; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-02-01

    Subcutaneous injection of the tumor cell suspension is a simple and commonly used tool for studying tumor development in vivo. However, subcutaneous models poorly resemble tumor complexity due to the fast growth not reflecting the natural course. Here, we describe an application of the new spheroid-plug model to combine the simplicity of subcutaneous injection with improved resemblance to natural tumor progression. Spheroid-plug model relies on in vitro formation of tumor spheroids, followed by injection of single tumor spheroid subcutaneously in Matrigel matrix. In spheroid-plug model, tumors grow slower in comparison to tumors formed by injection of cell suspension as assessed by 3D ultrasonography (USG) and in vivo bioluminescence measurements. The slower tumor growth rate in spheroid-plug model is accompanied by reduced necrosis. The spheroid-plug model ensures increased and more stable vascularization of tumor than classical subcutaneous tumor model as demonstrated by 3D USG Power Doppler examination. Flow cytometry analysis showed that tumors formed from spheroids have enhanced infiltration of endothelial cells as well as hematopoietic and progenitor cells with stem cell phenotype (c-Kit(+) and Sca-1(+)). They also contain more tumor cells expressing cancer stem cell marker CXCR4. Here, we show that spheroid-plug model allows investigating efficiency of anticancer drugs. Treatment of spheroid-plug tumors with known antiangiogenic agent axitinib decreased their size and viability. The antiangiogenic activity of axitinib was higher in spheroid-plug model than in classical model. Our results indicate that spheroid-plug model imitates natural tumor growth and can become a valuable tool for cancer research. PMID:26385771

  17. Tensile Forces Originating from Cancer Spheroids Facilitate Tumor Invasion.

    PubMed

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S; Alcheikh, Yara; Staneva, Ralitza; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tumors and the tumor environment provide important information for the progression and characterization of cancer. Tumors are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) dominated by collagen I. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the ECM play an important role for the initial step in the formation of metastasis, presented by the migration of malignant cells towards new settlements as well as the vascular and lymphatic system. The extent of this cell invasion into the ECM is a key medical marker for cancer prognosis. In vivo studies reveal an increased stiffness and different architecture of tumor tissue when compared to its healthy counterparts. The observed parallel collagen organization on the tumor border and radial arrangement at the invasion zone has raised the question about the mechanisms organizing these structures. Here we study the effect of contractile forces originated from model tumor spheroids embedded in a biomimetic collagen I matrix. We show that contractile forces act immediately after seeding and deform the ECM, thus leading to tensile radial forces within the matrix. Relaxation of this tension via cutting the collagen does reduce invasion, showing a mechanical relation between the tensile state of the ECM and invasion. In turn, these results suggest that tensile forces in the ECM facilitate invasion. Furthermore, simultaneous contraction of the ECM and tumor growth leads to the condensation and reorientation of the collagen at the spheroid's surface. We propose a tension-based model to explain the collagen organization and the onset of invasion by forces originating from the tumor. PMID:27271249

  18. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  19. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Harney, Allison S; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  20. Colorectal cancer-derived tumor spheroids retain the characteristics of original tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Hwa; Hong, Jun Hwa; Park, Hwan Ki; Park, Jun Seok; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Jung-Yi; Jeong, Ji Yun; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Inoue, Masahiro; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, In-Kyu

    2015-10-10

    Primary cultures of cancer cells are useful for developing personalized medicine. In this study, we characterized three lines of three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids established directly from tumor tissues of patients with colorectal cancers (CRCs). Each line mainly included EpCAM-positive cells and cells expressing putative cancer stem cell markers such as CD133, CD44, CD24, ALDH1, and LGR5. These characteristic stem cell markers remained identically for months in vitro. Short tandem repeat genotyping suggested that genetic fingerprints of these tumor spheroids were similar to those of the original tumor tissues from which they were derived. Mutational analysis showed that each line had the same mutation profile for APC, KRAS, MLH1, serine-threonine kinase 11, and TP53 as its parental tumor tissue. One line harboring an activating KRAS mutation was resistant to cetuximab while the remaining two lines harboring wild-type KRAS showed different responses to cetuximab. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that xenograft tumors derived from these lines retained the histopathological and mutational patterns of their parental tumors. Collectively, these results clearly showed that 3D tumor spheroids directly generated from tumor tissues of patients with CRCs preserved the characteristics of their parental tumor tissues and could be used for developing personalized medicines for CRCs. PMID:26185002

  1. Development of three-dimensional lung multicellular spheroids in air- and liquid-interface culture for the evaluation of anticancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    MEENACH, SAMANTHA A.; TSORAS, ALEXANDRA N.; McGARRY, RONALD C.; MANSOUR, HEIDI M.; HILT, J. ZACH; ANDERSON, KIMBERLY W.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) lung multicellular spheroids (MCS) in liquid-covered culture (LCC) and air-interface culture (AIC) conditions have both been developed for the evaluation of aerosol anticancer therapeutics in solution and aerosols, respectively. The MCS were formed by seeding lung cancer cells on top of collagen where they formed spheroids due to the prevalence of cell-to-cell interactions. LCC MCS were exposed to paclitaxel (PTX) in media whereas AIC MCS were exposed to dry powder PEGylated phospholipid aerosol microparticles containing paclitaxel. The difference in viability for 2D versus 3D culture for both LCC and AIC was evaluated along with the effects of the particles on lung epithelium via transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurements. For LCC and AIC conditions, the 3D spheroids were more resistant to treatment with higher IC50 values for A549 and H358 cell lines. TEER results initially indicated a decrease in resistance upon drug or particle exposure, however, these values increased over the course of several days indicating the ability of the cells to recover. Overall, these studies offer a comprehensive in vitro evaluation of aerosol particles used in the treatment of lung cancer while introducing a new method for culturing lung cancer MCS in both LCC and AIC conditions. PMID:26846376

  2. Label-free mitosis detection in tumor spheroids using tissue dynamics imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2012-03-01

    The detection of cellular mitosis inside three-dimensional living tissue at depths up to 1 mm has been beyond the detection limits of conventional microscopies. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of motility contrast imaging and fluctuation spectroscopy to detect motional signatures that we attribute to mitotic events within groups of 100 cells in multicellular tumor spheroids. Motility contrast imaging is a coherence-domain speckle-imaging technique that uses low-coherence off-axis holography as a coherence gate to localize dynamic light scattering from selected depths inside tissue. Fluctuation spectroscopy is performed on a pervoxel basis to generate micro-spectrograms that display frequency content vs. time. Mitosis, especially in Telophase and Cytokinesis, is a relatively fast and high-amplitude phenomenon that should display energetic features within the micro-spectrograms. By choosing an appropriate frequency range and threshold, we detect energetic events with a density and rate that are comparable to the expected mitotic fraction in the UMR cell line. By studying these mitotic events in tumors of two different sizes, we show that micro-spectrograms contain characteristically different information content than macro-spectrograms (averaged over many voxels) in which the mitotic signatures (which are overall a low-probability event) are averaged out. The detection of mitotic fraction in thick living tissue has important consequences for the use of tissue-based assays for drug discovery.

  3. The RBE-LET relationship for rodent intestinal crypt cell survival, testes weight loss, and multicellular spheroid cell survival after heavy-ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Alpen, E. L.; Powers-Risius, P.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents data for survival of mouse intestinal crypt cells, mouse testes weight loss as an indicator of survival of spermatogonial stem cells, and survival of rat 9L spheroid cells after irradiation in the plateau region of unmodified particle beams ranging in mass from 4He to 139La. The LET values range from 1.6 to 953 keV/microns. These studies examine the RBE-LET relationship for two normal tissues and for an in vitro tissue model, multicellular spheroids. When the RBE values are plotted as a function of LET, the resulting curve is characterized by a region in which RBE increases with LET, a peak RBE at an LET value of 100 keV/microns, and a region of decreasing RBE at LETs greater than 100 keV/microns. Inactivation cross sections (sigma) for these three biological systems have been calculated from the exponential terminal slope of the dose-response relationship for each ion. For this determination the dose is expressed as particle fluence and the parameter sigma indicates effect per particle. A plot of sigma versus LET shows that the curve for testes weight loss is shifted to the left, indicating greater radiosensitivity at lower LETs than for crypt cell and spheroid cell survival. The curves for cross section versus LET for all three model systems show similar characteristics with a relatively linear portion below 100 keV/microns and a region of lessened slope in the LET range above 100 keV/microns for testes and spheroids. The data indicate that the effectiveness per particle increases as a function of LET and, to a limited extent, Z, at LET values greater than 100 keV/microns. Previously published results for spread Bragg peaks are also summarized, and they suggest that RBE is dependent on both the LET and the Z of the particle.

  4. Tensile Forces Originating from Cancer Spheroids Facilitate Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S.; Alcheikh, Yara; Staneva, Ralitza; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tumors and the tumor environment provide important information for the progression and characterization of cancer. Tumors are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) dominated by collagen I. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the ECM play an important role for the initial step in the formation of metastasis, presented by the migration of malignant cells towards new settlements as well as the vascular and lymphatic system. The extent of this cell invasion into the ECM is a key medical marker for cancer prognosis. In vivo studies reveal an increased stiffness and different architecture of tumor tissue when compared to its healthy counterparts. The observed parallel collagen organization on the tumor border and radial arrangement at the invasion zone has raised the question about the mechanisms organizing these structures. Here we study the effect of contractile forces originated from model tumor spheroids embedded in a biomimetic collagen I matrix. We show that contractile forces act immediately after seeding and deform the ECM, thus leading to tensile radial forces within the matrix. Relaxation of this tension via cutting the collagen does reduce invasion, showing a mechanical relation between the tensile state of the ECM and invasion. In turn, these results suggest that tensile forces in the ECM facilitate invasion. Furthermore, simultaneous contraction of the ECM and tumor growth leads to the condensation and reorientation of the collagen at the spheroid’s surface. We propose a tension-based model to explain the collagen organization and the onset of invasion by forces originating from the tumor. PMID:27271249

  5. Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid invasion assay.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of surrounding normal tissues is generally considered to be a key hallmark of malignant (as opposed to benign) tumors. For some cancers in particular (e.g., brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck - SCCHN) it is a cause of severe morbidity and can be life-threatening even in the absence of distant metastases. In addition, cancers which have relapsed following treatment unfortunately often present with a more aggressive phenotype. Therefore, there is an opportunity to target the process of invasion to provide novel therapies that could be complementary to standard anti-proliferative agents. Until now, this strategy has been hampered by the lack of robust, reproducible assays suitable for a detailed analysis of invasion and for drug screening. Here we provide a simple micro-plate method (based on uniform, self-assembling 3D tumor spheroids) which has great potential for such studies. We exemplify the assay platform using a human glioblastoma cell line and also an SCCHN model where the development of resistance against targeted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors is associated with enhanced matrix-invasive potential. We also provide two alternative methods of semi-automated quantification: one using an imaging cytometer and a second which simply requires standard microscopy and image capture with digital image analysis. PMID:25993495

  6. Three-Dimensional (3D) Tumor Spheroid Invasion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Vinci, Maria; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of surrounding normal tissues is generally considered to be a key hallmark of malignant (as opposed to benign) tumors. For some cancers in particular (e.g., brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck – SCCHN) it is a cause of severe morbidity and can be life-threatening even in the absence of distant metastases. In addition, cancers which have relapsed following treatment unfortunately often present with a more aggressive phenotype. Therefore, there is an opportunity to target the process of invasion to provide novel therapies that could be complementary to standard anti-proliferative agents. Until now, this strategy has been hampered by the lack of robust, reproducible assays suitable for a detailed analysis of invasion and for drug screening. Here we provide a simple micro-plate method (based on uniform, self-assembling 3D tumor spheroids) which has great potential for such studies. We exemplify the assay platform using a human glioblastoma cell line and also an SCCHN model where the development of resistance against targeted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors is associated with enhanced matrix-invasive potential. We also provide two alternative methods of semi-automated quantification: one using an imaging cytometer and a second which simply requires standard microscopy and image capture with digital image analysis. PMID:25993495

  7. Drug cytotoxicity and signaling pathway analysis with three-dimensional tumor spheroids in a microwell-based microfluidic chip for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-10-22

    Currently, there has been a growing need for developing in vitro models to better reflect organism response to chemotherapy at tissue level. For this reason, a microfluidic platform was developed for mimicking physiological microenvironment of solid tumor with multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) for anticancer drug screening. Importantly, the power of this system over traditional systems is that it is simple to operate and high integration in a more physiologically relevant context. As a proof of concept, long-term MTS cultures with uniform structure were realized on the microfluidic based platform. The response of doxorubicin and paclitaxel on different types of spheroids were simultaneously performed by in situ Live/Dead fluorescence stain to provide spatial distribution of dead cells as well as cytotoxicity information. In addition, the established platform combined with microplate reader was capable to determine the cytotoxicity of different sized MTS, showing a more powerful tool than cell staining examination at the end-point of assay. The HCT116 spheroids were then lysed on chip followed by signaling transduction pathway analysis. To our knowledge, the on chip drug screening study is the first to address the drug susceptibility testing and the offline detailed drug signaling pathway analysis combination on one system. Thus, this novel microfluidic platform provides a useful tool for drug screening with tumor spheroids, which is crucial for drug discovery and development. PMID:26526913

  8. The effect of co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin by transferrin-targeted PEG-PE-based mixed micelles on resistant ovarian cancer in 3-D spheroids and in vivo tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarisozen, Can; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular 3D cancer cell culture (spheroids) resemble to in vivo tumors in terms of shape, cell morphology, growth kinetics, gene expression and drug response. However, these characteristics cause very limited drug penetration into deeper parts of the spheroids. In this study, we used multi drug resistant (MDR) ovarian cancer cell spheroid and in vivo tumor models to evaluate the co-delivery of paclitaxel (PCL) and a potent NF-κB inhibitor curcumin (CUR). PCL and CUR were co-loaded into the polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) based polymeric micelles modified with Transferrin (TF) as the targeting ligand. Cytotoxicity, cellular association and accumulation into the deeper layers were investigated in the spheroids and compared with the monolayer cell culture. Comparing to non-targeted micelles, flow cytometry and confocal imaging proved significantly deeper and higher micelle penetration into the spheroids with TF-targeting. Both in monolayers and spheroids, PCL cytotoxicity was significantly increased when co-delivered with CUR in non-targeted micelles or as single agent in TF-targeted micelles, whereas TF-modification of co-loaded micelles did not further enhance the cytotoxicity. In vivo tumor inhibition studies showed good correlation with the 3D cell culture experiments, which suggests the current spheroid model can be used as an intermediate model for evaluation of co-delivery of anticancer compounds in targeted micelles. PMID:25016976

  9. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  10. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a 'more clinically relevant' tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  11. Identifications of novel mechanisms in breast cancer cells involving duct-like multicellular spheroid formation after exposure to the Random Positioning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Sascha; Slumstrup, Lasse; Corydon, Thomas J.; Sahana, Jayashree; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Islam, Tawhidul; Magnusson, Nils E.; Wehland, Markus; Bauer, Johann; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Many cell types form three-dimensional aggregates (MCS; multicellular spheroids), when they are cultured under microgravity. MCS often resemble the organ, from which the cells have been derived. In this study we investigated human MCF-7 breast cancer cells after a 2 h-, 4 h-, 16 h-, 24 h- and 5d-exposure to a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) simulating microgravity. At 24 h few small compact MCS were detectable, whereas after 5d many MCS were floating in the supernatant above the cells, remaining adherently (AD). The MCS resembled the ducts formed in vivo by human epithelial breast cells. In order to clarify the underlying mechanisms, we harvested MCS and AD cells separately from each RPM-culture and measured the expression of 29 selected genes with a known involvement in MCS formation. qPCR analyses indicated that cytoskeletal genes were unaltered in short-term samples. IL8, VEGFA, and FLT1 were upregulated in 2 h/4 h AD-cultures. The ACTB, TUBB, EZR, RDX, FN1, VEGFA, FLK1 Casp9, Casp3, PRKCA mRNAs were downregulated in 5d-MCS-samples. ESR1 was upregulated in AD, and PGR1 in both phenotypes after 5d. A pathway analysis revealed that the corresponding gene products are involved in organization and regulation of the cell shape, in cell tip formation and membrane to membrane docking. PMID:27230828

  12. A simple, low-cost staining method for rapid-throughput analysis of tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Eckerdt, Frank; Alvarez, Angel; Bell, Jonathan; Arvanitis, Constadina; Iqbal, Asneha; Arslan, Ahmet D.; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Goldman, Stewart; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are becoming an important tool for the investigation of cancer stem cell (CSC) function in tumors; thus, low-cost and high-throughput methods for drug screening of tumor spheroids are needed. Using neurospheres as non-adherent three-dimensional (3-D) cultures, we developed a simple, low-cost acridine orange (AO)–based method that allows for rapid analysis of live neurospheres by fluorescence microscopy in a 96-well format. This assay measures the cross-section area of a spheroid, which corresponds to cell viability. Our novel method allows rapid screening of a panel of anti-proliferative drugs to assess inhibitory effects on the growth of cancer stem cells in 3-D cultures. PMID:26757811

  13. Production of large numbers of size-controlled tumor spheroids using microwell plates.

    PubMed

    Razian, Golsa; Yu, Yang; Ungrin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are increasingly recognized as an important in vitro model for the behavior of tumor cells in three dimensions. More physiologically relevant than conventional adherent-sheet cultures, they more accurately recapitulate the complexity and interactions present in real tumors. In order to harness this model to better assess tumor biology, or the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, it is necessary to be able to generate spheroids reproducibly, in a controlled manner and in significant numbers. The AggreWell system consists of a high-density array of pyramid-shaped microwells, into which a suspension of single cells is centrifuged. The numbers of cells clustering at the bottom of each microwell, and the number and ratio of distinct cell types involved depend only on the properties of the suspension introduced by the experimenter. Thus, we are able to generate tumor spheroids of arbitrary size and composition without needing to modify the underlying platform technology. The hundreds of microwells per square centimeter of culture surface area in turn ensure that extremely high production levels may be attained via a straightforward, nonlabor-intensive process. We therefore expect that this protocol will be broadly useful to researchers in the tumor spheroid field. PMID:24300192

  14. Scaffold-free formation of a millimeter-scale multicellular spheroid with an internal cavity from magnetically levitated 3T3 cells that ingested iron oxide-containing microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Ho; Hur, Won

    2014-05-01

    This report describes fabrication of a millimeter-scale three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structure with a central cavity based on magnetic levitation of 3T3 cells that had ingested Fe3 O4 -containing microcapsules. Magnetically levitated cells initially formed a disc-shaped cell cluster at the air-medium interface and transformed into a spheroid (up to 2.8 mm in diameter) after 10-day incubation under a magnet. Hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained section revealed that an eosinophilic shell of cells enclosed a pale-staining core of the spheroid. Mitotic or elongated and aligned cells were found at the outer periphery of the shell, while Fe3 O4 deposits were distributed in the inner part of the shell. Surgical dissection indicated that the spheroid had a hollow interior filled with a fluid-state cell suspension. Accordingly, it was demonstrated that magnetically levitated 3T3 cells organized themselves into a tissue-like spheroid, resulting in core cell death. The spheroid can be used as a 3D tissue model and as building blocks that fused to form a more complicated structure. PMID:24254251

  15. Tumor spheroid assembly on hyaluronic acid-based structures: A review.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Marco P; Costa, Elisabete C; Miguel, Sónia P; Correia, Ilídio J

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell culture is the main methodology used for screening anticancer therapeutics. However, these 2D cellular models misrepresent the architecture of native tumors, leading, in some cases, to unsuccessful prediction of cancer cell response to drugs. To overcome such limitations, cell growth in three dimensions (3D) arises as an alternative to reproduce in vitro the cellular arrangement found in tumors. Among the 3D cancer models developed so far, spheroids are the most attractive since these are cellular aggregates that broadly mimic many features of solid tumors affecting humans, like cell-cell interactions. One of the most applied techniques for producing spheroids is the liquid overlay technique, in which cells aggregate due to their limited adhesion to certain biomaterials, usually agarose or agar. Recently, the suitability of hyaluronic acid (HA) for spheroids assembly and HA-cell surface receptor interactions has been investigated. Ergo, this review gathers a summary of different studies where HA-based structures were developed and used for tumor spheroids production in order to be used in vitro as reliable 3D tumor models for therapeutic screening purposes. PMID:27312623

  16. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  17. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  18. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications. PMID:26877244

  19. Quantification of in vitro mesenchymal stem cell invasion into tumor spheroids using selective plane illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühland, Svenja; Wechselberger, Alexandra; Spitzweg, Christine; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Harz, Hartmann

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) homing and integration into tumors are under evaluation for clinical application. This approach requires the identification of conditions for optimal tumor invasion. We describe a tool for the in vitro comparison of parameters influencing invasion. Human MSC added to experimental tumor spheroids variably migrates toward the center of the structure. To determine MSC distribution inside the three-dimensional specimen, spatial analysis was performed using selective plane illumination microscopy. A standardized method to quantify and compare the invasion potential of variably treated MSC into experimental tumor environments allows efficient screening for optimizing conditions.

  20. Tumor-Endothelial Cell Three-dimensional Spheroids: New Aspects to Enhance Radiation and Drug Therapeutics12

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Meenakshi; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Koonce, Nathan A; Webber, Jessica S; Sharma, Sunil K; Asea, Alexzander AA; Mader, Mathew J; Griffin, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Classic cancer research for several decades has focused on understanding the biology of tumor cells in vitro. However, extending these findings to in vivo settings has been impeded owing to limited insights on the impact of microenvironment on tumor cells. We hypothesized that tumor cell biology and treatment response would be more informative when done in the presence of stromal components, like endothelial cells, which exist in the tumor microenvironment. To that end, we have developed a system to grow three-dimensional cultures of GFP-4T1 mouse mammary tumor and 2H11 murine endothelial cells in hanging drops of medium in vitro. The presence of 2H11 endothelial cells in these three-dimensional cocultures was found to sensitize 4T1-GFP tumor cells to chemotherapy (Taxol) and, at the same time, protect cells from ionizing radiation. These spheroidal cultures can also be implanted into the dorsal skinfold window chamber of mice for fluorescence imaging of vascularization and disease progression/treatment response. We observed rapid neovascularization of the tumor-endothelial spheroids in comparison to tumor spheroids grown in nude mice. Molecular analysis revealed pronounced up-regulation of several proangiogenic factors in the tumor tissue derived from the tumor-endothelial spheroids compared with tumor-only spheroids. Furthermore, the rate of tumor growth from tumor-endothelial spheroids in mice was faster than the tumor cell-only spheroids, resulting in greater metastasis to the lung. This three-dimensional coculture model presents an improved way to investigate more pertinent aspects of the therapeutic potential for radiation and/or chemotherapy alone and in combination with antiangiogenic agents. PMID:22191001

  1. CXCR4 receptor positive spheroid forming cells are responsible for tumor invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Alexander; Song, Yao-Hua; Muehlberg, Fabian; Droll, Lilly; Beckmann, Christoph; Alt, Eckhard

    2009-07-18

    Stem cells have been found to be involved in breast cancer growth, but the specific contribution of cancer stem cells in tumor biology, including metastasis, is still uncertain. We found that murine breast cancer cell lines 4T1, 4TO7, 167Farn and 67NR contains cancer stem cells defined by CXCR4 expression and their capability of forming spheroids in suspension culture. Importantly, we showed that CXCR4 expression is essential for tumor invasiveness because both CXCR4 neutralizing antibody and shRNA knockdown of the CXCR4 receptor significantly reduced tumor cell invasion. PMID:19286309

  2. Quantitative 1H MRI and MRS Microscopy of Individual V79 Lung Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Guo, Xiuling; Wind, Robert A.

    1998-08-01

    In this Communication1H MRI and MRS microscopy experiments of individual V79 lung tumor spheroids with diameters between 550 and 650 μm are reported. The results have been used to determine theT1,T2, andDvalues as well as the concentrations of water, total choline, creatine/phosphocreatine, and mobile lipids in the viable rims and in the necrotic centers.

  3. Optimization of Aqueous Biphasic Tumor Spheroid Microtechnology for Anti-Cancer Drug Testing in 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lemmo, Stephanie; Atefi, Ehsan; Luker, Gary D.; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are three-dimensional clusters of cancer cells that exhibit characteristics of poorly perfused tumors and hence present a relevant model for testing the efficacy of anti-cancer compounds. The use of spheroids for drug screening is hindered by technological complexities for high throughput generation of consistent size spheroids individually addressable by drug compounds. Here we present and optimize a simple spheroid technology based on the use of an aqueous two-phase system. Cancer cells confined in a drop of the denser aqueous dextran phase are robotically dispensed into a microwell containing the immersion aqueous polyethylene glycol phase. Cells remain within the drop and form a viable spheroid, without a need for any external stimuli. The size of resulting spheroids is sensitive to volume variations of dispensed drops from the air displacement pipetting head of a commercial liquid handling robot. Therefore, we parametrically optimize the process of dispensing of dextran phase drops. For a given cell density, this optimization reproducibly generates consistent size spheroids in standard 96-well plates. In addition, we evaluate the use of a commercial biochemical assay to examine cellular viability of cancer cell spheroids. Spheroids show a dose-dependent response to cisplatin similar to a monolayer culture. However unlike their two-dimensional counterpart, spheroids exhibit resistance to paclitaxel treatment. This technology, which uses only commercially-available reagents and equipment, can potentially expedite anti-cancer drug discovery. Although the use of robotics makes the ATPS spheroid technology particularly useful for drug screening applications, this approach is compatible with simpler liquid handling techniques such as manual micropipetting and offers a straightforward method of 3D cell culture in research laboratories. PMID:25221631

  4. Hypoxia Responsive, Tumor Penetrating Lipid Nanoparticles for Delivery of Chemotherapeutics to Pancreatic Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Prajakta; Haldar, Manas K; Katti, Preeya; Dawes, Courtney; You, Seungyong; Choi, Yongki; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-08-17

    Solid tumors are often poorly irrigated due to structurally compromised microcirculation. Uncontrolled multiplication of cancer cells, insufficient blood flow, and the lack of enough oxygen and nutrients lead to the development of hypoxic regions in the tumor tissues. As the partial pressure of oxygen drops below the necessary level (10 psi), the cancer cells modulate their genetic makeup to survive. Hypoxia triggers tumor progression by enhancing angiogenesis, cancer stem cell production, remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and epigenetic changes in the cancer cells. However, the hypoxic regions are usually located deep in the tumors and are usually inaccessible to the intravenously injected drug carrier or the drug. Considering the designs of the reported nanoparticles, it is likely that the drug is delivered to the peripheral tumor tissues, close to the blood vessels. In this study, we prepared lipid nanoparticles (LNs) comprising the synthesized hypoxia-responsive lipid and a peptide-lipid conjugate. We observed that the resultant LNs penetrated to the hypoxic regions of the tumors. Under low oxygen partial pressure, the hypoxia-responsive lipid undergoes reduction, destabilizing the lipid membrane, and releasing encapsulated drugs from the nanoparticles. We demonstrated the results employing spheroidal cultures of the pancreatic cancer cells BxPC-3. We observed that the peptide-decorated, drug encapsulated LNs reduced the viability of pancreatic cancer cells of the spheroids to 35% under hypoxic conditions. PMID:27391789

  5. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors.

    PubMed

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Messerli, Shanta M; Miller, Daniel H; Medina, Jamie E; Hamilton, Joshua W; Messerli, Mark A; Brodsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  6. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel H.; Medina, Jamie E.; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Messerli, Mark A.; Brodsky, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  7. Predicting diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Wientjes, Michael G.; Yeung, Bertrand Z.; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; Au, Jessie L.S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is widely used in cancer research. Models that predict nanoparticle transport and delivery in tumors (including subcellular compartments) would be useful tools. This study tested the hypothesis that diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional (3D) systems can be predicted based on liposome-cell biointerface parameters (binding, uptake, retention) and liposome diffusivity.Liposomes comprising different amounts of cationic and fusogenic lipids (10-30 mol% DOTAP or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine,1-20 mol% DOPE or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, +25 to +44 mV zeta potential) were studied. We (a) measured liposome-cell biointerface parameters in monolayer cultures, and (b) calculated effective diffusivity based on liposome size and spheroid composition. The resulting parameters were used to simulate the liposome concentration-depth profiles in 3D spheroids. The simulated results agreed with the experimental results for liposomes comprising 10-30 mol% DOTAP and ≤10 mol% DOPE, but not for liposomes with higher DOPE content. For the latter, model modifications to account for time-dependent extracellular concentration decrease and liposomesize increase did not improve the predictions. The difference among low- and high-DOPE liposomessuggestsconcentration-dependent DOPE properties in 3D systems that were not captured in monolayers. Taken together, our earlier and present studies indicate the diffusive transport of neutral, anionic and cationic nanoparticles (polystyrene beads and liposomes, 20-135 nm diameter, -49 to +44 mV) in 3D spheroids, with the exception of liposomes comprising >10 mol% DOPE, can be predicted based on the nanoparticle-cell biointerface and nanoparticle diffusivity. Applying the model to low-DOPE liposomes showed that changes in surface charge affected the liposome localization in intratumoralsubcompartments within spheroids. PMID:24995948

  8. Differential Superiority of Heavy Charged-Particle Irradiation to X-Rays: Studies on Biological Effectiveness and Side Effect Mechanisms in Multicellular Tumor and Normal Tissue Models.

    PubMed

    Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to X-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review, deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis. Multicellular spheroids from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Reliable oxygen enhancement ratios could be derived to be 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, (12)C(+6) in the plateau region, and (12)C(+6) in the Bragg peak, respectively. Similarly, a relative biological effectiveness of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. These data clearly show that heavy charged particles are more efficient in sterilizing tumor cells than conventional irradiation even under hypoxic conditions. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy) of X-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in β1 integrin expression. The photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Such a hyperphosphorylation did not occur during (12)C(+6) irradiation under all conditions registered. Comparing the gene toxicity of X-rays with that of particles using the γH2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral

  9. Differential Superiority of Heavy Charged-Particle Irradiation to X-Rays: Studies on Biological Effectiveness and Side Effect Mechanisms in Multicellular Tumor and Normal Tissue Models

    PubMed Central

    Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    This review is focused on the radiobiology of carbon ions compared to X-rays using multicellular models of tumors and normal mucosa. The first part summarizes basic radiobiological effects, as observed in cancer cells. The second, more clinically oriented part of the review, deals with radiation-induced cell migration and mucositis. Multicellular spheroids from V79 hamster cells were irradiated with X-rays or carbon ions under ambient or restricted oxygen supply conditions. Reliable oxygen enhancement ratios could be derived to be 2.9, 2.8, and 1.4 for irradiation with photons, 12C+6 in the plateau region, and 12C+6 in the Bragg peak, respectively. Similarly, a relative biological effectiveness of 4.3 and 2.1 for ambient pO2 and hypoxia was obtained, respectively. The high effectiveness of carbon ions was reflected by an enhanced accumulation of cells in G2/M and a dose-dependent massive induction of apoptosis. These data clearly show that heavy charged particles are more efficient in sterilizing tumor cells than conventional irradiation even under hypoxic conditions. Clinically relevant doses (3 Gy) of X-rays induced an increase in migratory activity of U87 but not of LN229 or HCT116 tumor cells. Such an increase in cell motility following irradiation in situ could be the source of recurrence. In contrast, carbon ion treatment was associated with a dose-dependent decrease in migration with all cell lines and under all conditions investigated. The radiation-induced loss of cell motility was correlated, in most cases, with corresponding changes in β1 integrin expression. The photon-induced increase in cell migration was paralleled by an elevated phosphorylation status of the epidermal growth factor receptor and AKT-ERK1/2 pathway. Such a hyperphosphorylation did not occur during 12C+6 irradiation under all conditions registered. Comparing the gene toxicity of X-rays with that of particles using the γH2AX technique in organotypic cultures of the oral mucosa, the

  10. Active and Inactive Metabolic Pathways in Tumor Spheroids: Determination by GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Hunnewell, Michael; Forbes, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Active metabolic pathways in three-dimensional cancer-cell cultures are potential chemotherapeutic targets that would be effective throughout tumors. Chaotic vasculature creates cellular regions in tumors with distinct metabolic behavior that are only present in aggregate cell masses. To quantify cancer cell metabolism, transformed mouse fibroblasts were grown as spheroids and fed isotopically labeled culture medium. Metabolite uptake and production rates were measured as functions of time. Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry was used quantify the extent of labeling on amino acids present in cytoplasmic extracts. The labeling pattern identified several active and inactive metabolic pathways: glutaminolysis was found to be active, and malic enzyme and gluconeogenesis were inactive. Transformed cells in spheroids were also found to actively synthesize serine, cysteine, alanine, aspartate, glutamate, and proline; and not synthesize glutamine. The activities of these pathways suggest that cancer cells consume glutamine for biosynthesis and not to provide cellular energy. Determining active metabolic pathways indicates how cells direct carbon flow and may lead to the discovery of novel molecular targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:20014107

  11. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  12. Assessing the immunomodulatory role of heteroglycan in a tumor spheroid and macrophage co-culture model system.

    PubMed

    Devi, K Sanjana P; Mishra, Debasish; Roy, Bibhas; Ghosh, Sudip K; Maiti, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic benefits of glycans have garnered much attention over the last few decades with most studies being reported in 2D cultures or in animal models. The present work is therefore aimed to assess the effects of an immunomodulatory heteroglycan in a 3D milieu. Briefly, HT29 tumor spheroids were incubated with THP-1 macrophages at 1:1 ratio in a culture medium supplemented with immune stimulants such as heteroglycans or LPS. Spheroidal distortion, migration of tumor cells from the periphery of the spheroids and 46% of higher macrophage invasiveness was noted in heteroglycan-treated co-cultures with respect to control cultures. Histological sections of the treated co-cultures revealed the presence of high apoptotic tumor cells in the spheroidal periphery. CD11c and CD68 staining further suggested the predominance of macrophages in the vicinity of the apoptotic tumor cells. Such an in vitro created tissue system may thereby confirm the effectiveness of heteroglycan in activating the immune cells to exhibit tumor cytotoxic properties. PMID:25965450

  13. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  14. Digital microfluidics for spheroid-based invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Bender, Brian F; Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2016-04-21

    Cell invasion is a key process in tissue growth, wound healing, and tumor progression. Most invasion assays examine cells cultured in adherent monolayers, which fail to recapitulate the three-dimensional nuances of the tissue microenvironment. Multicellular cell spheroids have a three-dimensional (3D) morphology and mimic the intercellular interactions found in tissues in vivo, thus providing a more physiologically relevant model for studying the tissue microenvironment and processes such as cell invasion. Spheroid-based invasion assays often require tedious, manually intensive handling protocols or the use of robotic liquid handling systems, which can be expensive to acquire, operate, and maintain. Here we describe a digital microfluidic (DμF) platform that enables formation of spheroids by the hanging drop method, encapsulation of the spheroids in collagen, and the exposure of spheroids to migration-modulating agents. Collagen sol-gel solutions up to 4 mg mL(-1), which form gels with elastic moduli up to ∼50 kPa, can be manipulated on the device. In situ spheroid migration assays show that cells from human fibroblast spheroids exhibit invasion into collagen gels, which can be either enhanced or inhibited by the delivery of exogenous migration modulating agents. Exposing fibroblast spheroids to spheroid secretions from colon cancer spheroids resulted in a >100% increase in fibroblast invasion into the collagen gel, consistent with the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. These data show that DμF can be used to automate the liquid handling protocols for spheroid-based invasion assays and create a cell invasion model that mimics the tissue microenvironment more closely than two-dimensional culturing techniques do. A DμF platform that facilitates the creation and assaying of 3D in vitro tissue models has the potential to make automated 3D cell-based assays more accessible to researchers in the life sciences. PMID:27020962

  15. Scalable Differentiation of Human iPSCs in a Multicellular Spheroid-based 3D Culture into Hepatocyte-like Cells through Direct Wnt/β-catenin Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Fisher, Robert A; Mangino, Martin J; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute liver failure by cell transplantation is hindered by a shortage of human hepatocytes. Current protocols for hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) result in low yields, cellular heterogeneity, and limited scalability. In the present study, we have developed a novel multicellular spheroid-based hepatic differentiation protocol starting from embryoid bodies of hiPSCs (hiPSC-EBs) for robust mass production of human hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using two novel inhibitors of the Wnt pathway. The resultant hiPSC-EB-HLCs expressed liver-specific genes, secreted hepatic proteins such as Albumin, Alpha Fetoprotein, and Fibrinogen, metabolized ammonia, and displayed cytochrome P450 activities and functional activities typical of mature primary hepatocytes, such as LDL storage and uptake, ICG uptake and release, and glycogen storage. Cell transplantation of hiPSC-EB-HLC in a rat model of acute liver failure significantly prolonged the mean survival time and resolved the liver injury when compared to the no-transplantation control animals. The transplanted hiPSC-EB-HLCs secreted human albumin into the host plasma throughout the examination period (2 weeks). Transplantation successfully bridged the animals through the critical period for survival after acute liver failure, providing promising clues of integration and full in vivo functionality of these cells after treatment with WIF-1 and DKK-1. PMID:27616299

  16. Evolution of Tumor Metabolism might Reflect Carcinogenesis as a Reverse Evolution process (Dismantling of Multicellularity)

    PubMed Central

    Alfarouk, Khalid O.; Shayoub, Mohammed E.A.; Muddathir, Abdel Khalig; Elhassan, Gamal O.; Bashir, Adil H.H.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinogenesis occurs through a series of steps from normal into benign and finally malignant phenotype. This cancer evolutionary trajectory has been accompanied by similar metabolic transformation from normal metabolism into Pasteur and/or Crabtree-Effects into Warburg-Effect and finally Cannibalism and/or Lactate-Symbiosis. Due to lactate production as an end-product of glycolysis, tumor colonies acquire new phenotypes that rely on lactate as energetic fuel. Presence of Warburg-Effect indicates that some tumor cells undergo partial (if not complete) de-endosymbiosis and so cancer cells have been become unicellular microorganism (anti-Dollo's Law) specially when they evolve to develop cannibalism as way of metabolism while oxidative types of cells that rely on lactate, as their energetic fuel, might represent extra-endosymbiosis. Thus, at the end, the cancer colony could be considered as integrated metabolic ecosystem. Proper understanding of tumor metabolism will contribute to discover potential anticancer agents besides conventional chemotherapy. PMID:24310356

  17. Evaluation of Consistency in Spheroid Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros Castillo, Liliana R.; Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stüllein, Christian; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids embedded in a matrix represent invaluable tools to analyze cell invasion. Spheroid sizes and invasiveness are the main observables easily measurable to evaluate effects of biological or pharmaceutical manipulations on invasion. They largely account for these 3-D platforms variability, leading to flaws in data interpretation. No method has been established yet that characterizes this variability and guarantees a reliable use of 3-D platforms. Spheroid initial/end sizes and invasiveness were systematically analyzed and compared in spheroids of U87MG cells generated by three different methods and embedded at different times in a collagen matrix. A normality test was used to characterize size distribution. We introduced the linearity-over-yield analysis as a novel mathematical tool to assess end sizes and invasion reproducibility. We further provide a proof of concept by applying these tools to the analysis of a treatment known to be effective beforehand. We demonstrate that implementation of these statistical and mathematical tools warranted a confident quantification and interpretation of in 3-D conducted assays. We propose these tools could be incorporated in a guideline for generation and use of 3-D platforms. PMID:27334575

  18. Targeted nanosensor aided three-dimensional pH mapping in tumor spheroids using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Elbez, Remy; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-03-01

    Tumors are generally characterized by a pH lower than the surrounding tissues. The mapping of tumor pH is of great importance as it plays a critical role in drug delivery and its effectiveness. Here we present a pH mapping technique in tumor spheroids, using targeted, ratiometric, fluorescent, pH nano-sensor that is based on two-photon excitation. Spheroids are micro-tumors that are widely used as an in-vitro three dimensional tumor model to study the different properties of the tumor for the purpose of drug delivery, therapy etc. The nanosensor consists of 8-Hydroxypyrene- 1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS), a pH sensitive dye, encapsulated in polyacrylamide hydrogel nanoparticle matrix and F3 peptide, conjugated to the nanoparticle's surface. The nanosensor has an average size of 68nm and contains approximately 0.5% dye by weight. The fluorescence intensity ratio, at the two-photon excitation wavelengths of 900nm and 750nm, increases linearly in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 and is used to determine the pH of the local environment. Our study reveals the pH distribution inside human cervix cancer spheroids (of different sizes) during the various stages of their formation. This information can be used to develop more efficient drug delivery mechanisms. The two-photon excitation used for this purpose is especially useful as it drastically minimizes both photobleaching and autofluorescence, thus leading to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. It also enables deep tissue imaging due to higher photon penetration depth.

  19. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  20. Generation of a tumor spheroid in a microgravity environment as a 3D model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Bernadette; Messina, Jane L; Heller, Richard

    2009-10-01

    An in vitro 3D model was developed utilizing a synthetic microgravity environment to facilitate studying the cell interactions. 2D monolayer cell culture models have been successfully used to understand various cellular reactions that occur in vivo. There are some limitations to the 2D model that are apparent when compared to cells grown in a 3D matrix. For example, some proteins that are not expressed in a 2D model are found up-regulated in the 3D matrix. In this paper, we discuss techniques used to develop the first known large, free-floating 3D tissue model used to establish tumor spheroids. The bioreactor system known as the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARVs) was used to provide a microgravity environment. The HARVs promoted aggregation of keratinocytes (HaCaT) that formed a construct that served as scaffolding for the growth of mouse melanoma. Although there is an emphasis on building a 3D model with the proper extracellular matrix and stroma, we were able to develop a model that excluded the use of matrigel. Immunohistochemistry and apoptosis assays provided evidence that this 3D model supports B16.F10 cell growth, proliferation, and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Immunofluorescence showed that melanoma cells interact with one another displaying observable cellular morphological changes. The goal of engineering a 3D tissue model is to collect new information about cancer development and develop new potential treatment regimens that can be translated to in vivo models while reducing the use of laboratory animals. PMID:19533253

  1. Multi-parametric imaging of tumor spheroids with ultra-bright and tunable nanoparticle O2 probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergey M.; Jenkins, James; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal probes allow for flexible choice of imaging equipment when performing quenched-phosphorescence O2 measurements: one- or two-photon, PLIM or intensity-based ratiometric read-outs. Spectral and temporal (e.g. FLIMPLIM) discrimination can be used to image O2 together with pH, Ca2+, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell death markers or cell/organelle specific markers. However, the main challenge of existing nanoparticle probes is their limited diffusion across thick (> 20-50 μm) 3D cell models such as tumor spheroids. Here, we present new class of polymeric nanoparticle probes having tunable size, charge, cell-penetrating ability, and reporter dyes. Being spectrally similar to the recently described MM2, PA2 and other O2 probes, they are 5-10 times brighter, demonstrate improved ratiometric response and their surface chemistry can be easily modified. With cultures of 2D and 3D cell models (fibroblasts, PC12 aggregates, HCT116 human colon cancer spheroids) we found cell-specific staining by these probes. However, the efficient staining of model of interest can be tuned by changing number of positive and negative surface groups at nanoparticle, to allow most efficient loading. We also demonstrate how real-time monitoring of oxygenation can be used to select optimal spheroid production with low variability in size and high cell viability.

  2. 3D tumor spheroid models for in vitro therapeutic screening: a systematic approach to enhance the biological relevance of data obtained.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Michele; Piccinini, Filippo; Arienti, Chiara; Zamagni, Alice; Santi, Spartaco; Polico, Rolando; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a spheroid tumor model composed of cells in different proliferative and metabolic states for the development of new anticancer strategies has been amply demonstrated. However, there is little or no information in the literature on the problems of reproducibility of data originating from experiments using 3D models. Our analyses, carried out using a novel open source software capable of performing an automatic image analysis of 3D tumor colonies, showed that a number of morphology parameters affect the response of large spheroids to treatment. In particular, we found that both spheroid volume and shape may be a source of variability. We also compared some commercially available viability assays specifically designed for 3D models. In conclusion, our data indicate the need for a pre-selection of tumor spheroids of homogeneous volume and shape to reduce data variability to a minimum before use in a cytotoxicity test. In addition, we identified and validated a cytotoxicity test capable of providing meaningful data on the damage induced in large tumor spheroids of up to diameter in 650 μm by different kinds of treatments. PMID:26752500

  3. 3D tumor spheroid models for in vitro therapeutic screening: a systematic approach to enhance the biological relevance of data obtained

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Michele; Piccinini, Filippo; Arienti, Chiara; Zamagni, Alice; Santi, Spartaco; Polico, Rolando; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a spheroid tumor model composed of cells in different proliferative and metabolic states for the development of new anticancer strategies has been amply demonstrated. However, there is little or no information in the literature on the problems of reproducibility of data originating from experiments using 3D models. Our analyses, carried out using a novel open source software capable of performing an automatic image analysis of 3D tumor colonies, showed that a number of morphology parameters affect the response of large spheroids to treatment. In particular, we found that both spheroid volume and shape may be a source of variability. We also compared some commercially available viability assays specifically designed for 3D models. In conclusion, our data indicate the need for a pre-selection of tumor spheroids of homogeneous volume and shape to reduce data variability to a minimum before use in a cytotoxicity test. In addition, we identified and validated a cytotoxicity test capable of providing meaningful data on the damage induced in large tumor spheroids of up to diameter in 650 μm by different kinds of treatments. PMID:26752500

  4. Theoretical analysis of antibody targeting of tumor spheroids: importance of dosage for penetration, and affinity for retention.

    PubMed

    Graff, Christilyn P; Wittrup, K Dane

    2003-03-15

    The interplay among antibody/antigen binding kinetics, antibody diffusion, and antigen metabolic turnover together determines the depth of penetration of antitumor antibodies into prevascular tumor spheroid cell clumps. A sharp boundary between an outer shell of bound high-affinity antibody and an inner antibody-free core has been previously observed and mathematically modeled and was termed the "binding site barrier." We show here that this process is well described by a simplified shrinking core model wherein binding equilibration is much more rapid than diffusion. This analysis provides the following experimentally testable predictions: (a) the binding site barrier is a moving boundary whose velocity is proportional to the time integral of antibody concentration at the spheroid surface (i.e. plasma antibody AUC); (b) the velocity of this moving boundary is independent of binding affinity, if the affinity is sufficiently high to strongly favor antibody/antigen complex formation at prevailing antibody concentrations; and (c) maximum tumor retention is achieved when the antibody/antigen dissociation rate approaches the rate of antigen metabolic turnover. The consistency of these predictions with published experimental results is demonstrated. The shrinking core model provides a simple analytic relationship predicting the effects of altered antibody pharmacokinetics, antibody molecular weight, antigen turnover rate, antigen expression level, and micrometastasis size on antibody penetration and retention. For example, a formula is provided for predicting the bolus dose necessary to accomplish tumor saturation as a function of antibody and tumor properties. Furthermore, this analysis indicates certain attributes necessary for an optimal tumor targeting agent. PMID:12649189

  5. Spontaneously-forming spheroids as an in vitro cancer cell model for anticancer drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Theodoraki, Maria A.; Rezende, Celso O.; Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Corben, Adriana D.; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.; Alpaugh, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The limited translational value in clinic of analyses performed on 2-D cell cultures has prompted a shift toward the generation of 3-dimensional (3-D) multicellular systems. Here we present a spontaneously-forming in vitro cancer spheroid model, referred to as spheroidsMARY-X, that precisely reflects the pathophysiological features commonly found in tumor tissues and the lymphovascular embolus. In addition, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive means to evaluate response following drug treatment where spheroid dissolution indices from brightfield image analyses are used to construct dose-response curves resulting in relevant IC50 values. Using the spheroidsMARY-X model, we demonstrate the unique ability of a new class of molecules, containing the caged Garcinia xanthone (CGX) motif, to induce spheroidal dissolution and apoptosis at IC50 values of 0.42 +/−0.02 μM for gambogic acid and 0.66 +/−0.02 μM for MAD28. On the other hand, treatment of spheroidsMARY-X with various currently approved chemotherapeutics of solid and blood-borne cancer types failed to induce any response as indicated by high dissolution indices and subsequent poor IC50 values, such as 7.8 +/−3.1 μM for paclitaxel. Our studies highlight the significance of the spheroidsMARY-X model in drug screening and underscore the potential of the CGX motif as a promising anticancer pharmacophore. PMID:26101913

  6. Spontaneously-forming spheroids as an in vitro cancer cell model for anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria A; Rezende, Celso O; Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Corben, Adriana D; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Alpaugh, Mary L

    2015-08-28

    The limited translational value in clinic of analyses performed on 2-D cell cultures has prompted a shift toward the generation of 3-dimensional (3-D) multicellular systems. Here we present a spontaneously-forming in vitro cancer spheroid model, referred to as spheroids(MARY-X), that precisely reflects the pathophysiological features commonly found in tumor tissues and the lymphovascular embolus. In addition, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive means to evaluate response following drug treatment where spheroid dissolution indices from brightfield image analyses are used to construct dose-response curves resulting in relevant IC50 values. Using the spheroids(MARY-X) model, we demonstrate the unique ability of a new class of molecules, containing the caged Garcinia xanthone (CGX) motif, to induce spheroidal dissolution and apoptosis at IC50 values of 0.42 +/-0.02 μM for gambogic acid and 0.66 +/-0.02 μM for MAD28. On the other hand, treatment of spheroids(MARY-X) with various currently approved chemotherapeutics of solid and blood-borne cancer types failed to induce any response as indicated by high dissolution indices and subsequent poor IC50 values, such as 7.8 +/-3.1 μM for paclitaxel. Our studies highlight the significance of the spheroids(MARY-X) model in drug screening and underscore the potential of the CGX motif as a promising anticancer pharmacophore. PMID:26101913

  7. An in vitro assessment of liposomal topotecan simulating metronomic chemotherapy in combination with radiation in tumor-endothelial spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Jyoti, Amar; Fugit, Kyle D.; Sethi, Pallavi; McGarry, Ronald C.; Anderson, Bradley D.; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Low dose metronomic chemotherapy (LDMC) refers to prolonged administration of low dose chemotherapy designed to minimize toxicity and target the tumor endothelium, causing tumor growth inhibition. Topotecan (TPT) when administered at its maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is often associated with systemic hematological toxicities. Liposomal encapsulation of TPT enhances efficacy by shielding it from systemic clearance, allowing greater uptake and extended tissue exposure in tumors. Extended release of TPT from liposomal formulations also has the potential to mimic metronomic therapies with fewer treatments. Here we investigate potential toxicities of equivalent doses of free and actively loaded liposomal TPT (LTPT) and compare them to a fractionated low dose regimen of free TPT in tumor-endothelial spheroids (TES) with/without radiation exposure for a prolonged period of 10 days. Using confocal microscopy, TPT fluorescence was monitored to determine the accumulation of drug within TES. These studies showed TES, being more reflective of the in vivo tumor microenvironment, were more sensitive to LTPT in comparison to free TPT with radiation. More importantly, the response of TES to low-dose metronomic TPT with radiation was comparable to similar treatment with LTPT. This TES study suggests nanoparticle formulations designed for extended release of drug can simulate LDMC in vivo. PMID:26468877

  8. An in vitro assessment of liposomal topotecan simulating metronomic chemotherapy in combination with radiation in tumor-endothelial spheroids.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, Amar; Fugit, Kyle D; Sethi, Pallavi; McGarry, Ronald C; Anderson, Bradley D; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Low dose metronomic chemotherapy (LDMC) refers to prolonged administration of low dose chemotherapy designed to minimize toxicity and target the tumor endothelium, causing tumor growth inhibition. Topotecan (TPT) when administered at its maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is often associated with systemic hematological toxicities. Liposomal encapsulation of TPT enhances efficacy by shielding it from systemic clearance, allowing greater uptake and extended tissue exposure in tumors. Extended release of TPT from liposomal formulations also has the potential to mimic metronomic therapies with fewer treatments. Here we investigate potential toxicities of equivalent doses of free and actively loaded liposomal TPT (LTPT) and compare them to a fractionated low dose regimen of free TPT in tumor-endothelial spheroids (TES) with/without radiation exposure for a prolonged period of 10 days. Using confocal microscopy, TPT fluorescence was monitored to determine the accumulation of drug within TES. These studies showed TES, being more reflective of the in vivo tumor microenvironment, were more sensitive to LTPT in comparison to free TPT with radiation. More importantly, the response of TES to low-dose metronomic TPT with radiation was comparable to similar treatment with LTPT. This TES study suggests nanoparticle formulations designed for extended release of drug can simulate LDMC in vivo. PMID:26468877

  9. Fully Automated One-Step Production of Functional 3D Tumor Spheroids for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Monjaret, François; Fernandes, Mathieu; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Argento, Amelie; Degot, Sébastien; Young, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of spheroids within high-content screening (HCS) has lagged behind high-throughput screening (HTS) due to issues with running complex assays on large three-dimensional (3D) structures.To enable multiplexed imaging and analysis of spheroids, different cancer cell lines were grown in 3D on micropatterned 96-well plates with automated production of nine uniform spheroids per well. Spheroids achieve diameters of up to 600 µm, and reproducibility was experimentally validated (interwell and interplate CV(diameter) <5%). Biphoton imaging confirmed that micropatterned spheroids exhibit characteristic cell heterogeneity with distinct microregions. Furthermore, central necrosis appears at a consistent spheroid size, suggesting standardized growth.Using three reference compounds (fluorouracil, irinotecan, and staurosporine), we validated HT-29 micropatterned spheroids on an HCS platform, benchmarking against hanging-drop spheroids. Spheroid formation and imaging in a single plate accelerate assay workflow, and fixed positioning prevents structures from overlapping or sticking to the well wall, augmenting image processing reliability. Furthermore, multiple spheroids per well increase the statistical confidence sufficiently to discriminate compound mechanisms of action and generate EC50 values for endpoints of cell death, architectural change, and size within a single-pass read. Higher quality data and a more efficient HCS work chain should encourage integration of micropatterned spheroid models within fundamental research and drug discovery applications. PMID:26385905

  10. Three-Dimensional Spheroid Cell Culture Model for Target Identification Utilizing High-Throughput RNAi Screens.

    PubMed

    Iles, LaKesla R; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey A

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic limitations of 2D monolayer cell culture models have prompted the development of 3D cell culture model systems for in vitro studies. Multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) models closely simulate the pathophysiological milieu of solid tumors and are providing new insights into tumor biology as well as differentiation, tissue organization, and homeostasis. They are straightforward to apply in high-throughput screens and there is a great need for the development of reliable and robust 3D spheroid-based assays for high-throughput RNAi screening for target identification and cell signaling studies highlighting their potential in cancer research and treatment. In this chapter we describe a stringent standard operating procedure for the use of MCTS for high-throughput RNAi screens. PMID:27581289

  11. An mDia2/ROCK Signaling Axis Regulates Invasive Egress from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Pettee, Krista M.; Dvorak, Kaitlyn M.; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L.; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-cellular spheroids are enriched in ascites of epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) patients. They represent an invasive and chemoresistant cellular population fundamental to metastatic dissemination. The molecular mechanisms triggering single cell invasive egress from spheroids remain enigmatic. mDia formins are Rho GTPase effectors that are key regulators of F-actin cytoskeletal dynamics. We hypothesized that mDia2-driven F-actin dynamics promote single cell invasive transitions in clinically relevant three-dimensional (3D) OvCa spheroids. The current study is a dissection of the contribution of the F-actin assembly factor mDia2 formin in invasive transitions and using a clinically relevant ovarian cancer spheroid model. We show that RhoA-directed mDia2 activity is required for tight spheroid organization, and enrichment of mDia2 in the invasive cellular protrusions of collagen-embedded OVCA429 spheroids. Depleting mDia2 in ES-2 spheroids enhanced invasive dissemination of single amoeboid-shaped cells. This contrasts with spheroids treated with control siRNA, where a mesenchymal invasion program predominated. Inhibition of another RhoA effector, ROCK, had no impact on ES-2 spheroid formation but dramatically inhibited spheroid invasion through induction of a highly elongated morphology. Concurrent inhibition of ROCK and mDia2 blocked single cell invasion from ES-2 spheroids more effectively than inhibition of either protein alone, indicating that invasive egress of amoeboid cells from mDia2-depleted spheroids is ROCK-dependent. Our findings indicate that multiple GTPase effectors must be suppressed in order to fully block invasive egress from ovarian cancer spheroids. Furthermore, tightly regulated interplay between ROCK and mDia2 signaling pathways dictates the invasive capacities and the type of invasion program utilized by motile spheroid-derived ovarian cancer cells. As loss of the gene encoding mDia2, DRF3, has been linked to cancer progression and

  12. Restructuring dynamics of DU 145 and LNCaP prostate cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong; Jain, Shamik K; Enmon, Richard M; O'Connor, Kim C

    2004-01-01

    Neoplastic cells acquire multidrug resistance as they assemble into multicellular spheroids. Image analysis and Monte Carlo simulation provided an insight into the adhesion and motility events during spheroid restructuring in liquid-overlay culture of DU 145 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Irregularly shaped, two-dimensional aggregates restructured through incremental cell movements into three-dimensional spheroids. Of the two cultures examined, restructuring was more pronounced for DU 145 aggregates. Motile DU 145 cells formed spheroids with a minimum cell overlay of 30% for 25-mers as estimated by simulation versus 5% for adhesive LNCaP cells in aggregates of the same size. Over 72 h, the texture ratio increased from 0.55 +/- 0.05 for DU 145 aggregates with projected areas exceeding 2000 microm2 to a value approaching 0.75 +/- 0.02 (P < 0.05). For LNCaP aggregates of comparable size, the increase in texture ratio was more modest, less than 15% during the same time period (P < 0.05). Combined, these data suggest that motility events govern the overall rate of spheroid restructuring. This information has application to the chemosensitization of solid tumors and kinetic modeling of spheroid production. PMID:15723561

  13. Microcavity substrates casted from self-assembled microsphere monolayers for spheroid cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Keyue; Lee, Jungwoo; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are an important 3-dimensional cell culture model that reflects many key aspects of in vivo microenvironments. This paper presents a scalable, self-assembly based approach for fabricating microcavity substrates for multicellular spheroid cell culture. Hydrophobic glass microbeads were self-assembled into a tightly packed monolayer through the combined actions of surface tension, gravity, and lateral capillary forces at the water-air interface of a polymer solution. The packed bead monolayer was subsequently embedded in the dried polymer layer. The surface was used as a template for replicating microcavity substrates with perfect spherical shapes. We demonstrated the use of the substrate in monitoring the formation process of tumor spheroids, a proof-of-concept scale-up fabrication procedure into standard microplate formats, and its application in testing cancer drug responses in the context of bone marrow stromal cells. The presented technique offers a simple and effective way of forming high-density uniformlysized spheroids without microfabrication equipment for biological and drug screening applications. PMID:24781882

  14. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Lee, Jaehwa; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell–cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145), testis (F9), embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3), muscle (C2C12), embryonic kidney (293T), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3), embryonic cell (PA317), and osteosarcoma (U-2OS) cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 μM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be visualized only 4 days after treatment. In 293T cells, CDDP failed to kill entirely the culture and ATP generation was only partially blocked after 1 day. This suggests potential CDDP resistance of 293T cells or metabolic clearance of the drug. Real-time monitoring and ATP

  15. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Lee, Jaehwa; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell-cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145), testis (F9), embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3), muscle (C2C12), embryonic kidney (293T), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3), embryonic cell (PA317), and osteosarcoma (U-2OS) cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 μM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be visualized only 4 days after treatment. In 293T cells, CDDP failed to kill entirely the culture and ATP generation was only partially blocked after 1 day. This suggests potential CDDP resistance of 293T cells or metabolic clearance of the drug. Real-time monitoring and ATP

  16. Phenylboronic Acid-Mediated Tumor Targeting of Chitosan Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Tang, Huang; Wang, Chongzhi; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2016-01-01

    The phenylboronic acid-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by particle surface modification. The size, zeta potential and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurement and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular uptake, tumor penetration, biodistribution and antitumor activity of the nanoparticles were evaluated by using monolayer cell model, 3-D multicellular spheroid model and H22 tumor-bearing mice. The incorporation of phenylboronic acid group into chitosan nanoparticles impart a surface charge-reversible characteristic to the nanoparticles. In vitro evaluation using 2-D and 3-D cell models showed that phenylboronic acid-decorated nanoparticles were more easily internalized by tumor cells compared to non-decorated chitosan nanoparticles, and could deliver more drug into tumor cells due to the active targeting effect of boronic acid group. Furthermore, the phenylboronic acid-decorated nanoparticles displayed a deeper penetration and persistent accumulation in the multicellular spheroids, resulting in better inhibition growth to multicellular spheroids than non-decorated nanoparticles. Tumor penetration, drug distribution and near infrared fluorescence imaging revealed that phenylboronic acid-decorated nanoparticles could penetrate deeper and accumulate more in tumor area than non-decorated ones. In vivo antitumor examination demonstrated that the phenylboronic acid-decorated nanoparticles have superior efficacy in restricting tumor growth and prolonging the survival time of tumor-bearing mice than free drug and drug-loaded chitosan nanoparticles. PMID:27375786

  17. Phenylboronic Acid-Mediated Tumor Targeting of Chitosan Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Tang, Huang; Wang, Chongzhi; Zhang, Jialiang; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2016-01-01

    The phenylboronic acid-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by particle surface modification. The size, zeta potential and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurement and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular uptake, tumor penetration, biodistribution and antitumor activity of the nanoparticles were evaluated by using monolayer cell model, 3-D multicellular spheroid model and H22 tumor-bearing mice. The incorporation of phenylboronic acid group into chitosan nanoparticles impart a surface charge-reversible characteristic to the nanoparticles. In vitro evaluation using 2-D and 3-D cell models showed that phenylboronic acid-decorated nanoparticles were more easily internalized by tumor cells compared to non-decorated chitosan nanoparticles, and could deliver more drug into tumor cells due to the active targeting effect of boronic acid group. Furthermore, the phenylboronic acid-decorated nanoparticles displayed a deeper penetration and persistent accumulation in the multicellular spheroids, resulting in better inhibition growth to multicellular spheroids than non-decorated nanoparticles. Tumor penetration, drug distribution and near infrared fluorescence imaging revealed that phenylboronic acid-decorated nanoparticles could penetrate deeper and accumulate more in tumor area than non-decorated ones. In vivo antitumor examination demonstrated that the phenylboronic acid-decorated nanoparticles have superior efficacy in restricting tumor growth and prolonging the survival time of tumor-bearing mice than free drug and drug-loaded chitosan nanoparticles. PMID:27375786

  18. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  19. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-17

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  20. Mini-pillar array for hydrogel-supported 3D culture and high-content histologic analysis of human tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jihoon; Lee, Dong Woo; Hwang, Hyun Ju; Yeon, Sang-Eun; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-06-21

    Three-dimensional (3D) cancer cell culture models mimic the complex 3D organization and microenvironment of human solid tumor tissue and are thus considered as highly predictive models representing avascular tumor regions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for monitoring drug penetration and therapeutic responses in 3D tumor models; however, photonic attenuation at increasing imaging depths and limited penetration of common fluorescence tracers are significant technical challenges to imaging. Immunohistological staining would be a good alternative, but the preparation of tissue sections from rather fragile spheroids through fixing and embedding procedures is challenging. Here we introduce a novel 3 × 3 mini-pillar array chip that can be utilized for 3D cell culturing and sectioning for high-content histologic analysis. The mini-pillar array chip facilitated the generation of 3D spheroids of human cancer cells within hydrogels such as alginate, collagen, and Matrigel. As expected, visualization of the 3D distribution of calcein AM and doxorubicin by optical sectioning was limited by photonic attenuation and dye penetration. The integrity of the 3D microtissue section was confirmed by immunostaining on paraffin sections and cryo-sections. The applicability of the mini-pillar array for drug activity evaluation was tested by measuring viability changes in spheroids exposed to anti-cancer agents, 5-fluorouracil and tirapazamine. Thus, our novel mini-pillar array platform can potentially promote high-content histologic analysis of 3D cultures and can be further optimized for field-specific needs. PMID:27194205

  1. The influence of NIR femtosecond laser radiation on the viability of 3D stem cell clusters and tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Gorjup, Erwin; LeHarzic, Ronan; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Adult human and rat pancreas stem cells as well as tumor spheroids were irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range at high transient GW/cm2 and TW/cm2 intensities. The cellular response to the laser exposure was probed by the detection of modifications of NAD(P)H autofluorescence, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA strand breaks (TUNEL-assay), and viability (live/dead test). The results confirm that long-term scanning of stem cells can be performed at appropriate laser exposure parameters without a measurable impact on the cellular metabolism and vitality. In addition, it was proven that a targeted inactivation of a particular single stem cells or a single tumour cell inside a 3D cell cluster using single point illumination at TW/cm2 laser intensities can be performed without affecting neighbouring cells. Therefore multiphoton microscopes can be considered as biosafe tools for long-term analysis of stem cells as well as highly precise optical knocking out of single cells within cell clusters and tissues.

  2. Looking into Living Cell Systems: Planar Waveguide Microfluidic NMR Detector for in Vitro Metabolomics of Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kalfe, Ayten; Telfah, Ahmad; Lambert, Jörg; Hergenröder, Roland

    2015-07-21

    The complex cell metabolism and its link to oncogenic signaling pathways have received huge interest within the last few years. But the lack of advanced analytical tools for the investigation of living cell metabolism is still a challenge to be faced. Therefore, we designed and fabricated a novel miniaturized microslot NMR detector with on-board heater integrated with a microfluidic device as NMR sample holder. For the first time, a tumor spheroid of 500 μm diameter and consisting of 9000 cells has been studied noninvasively and online for 24 h. The dynamic processes of production and degradation of 23 intra- and extracellular metabolites were monitored. Remarkably high concentrations of lactate and alanine were observed, being an indicator for a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism. In summary, this methodical development has proven to be a successful analytical tool for the elucidation of cellular functions and their corresponding biochemical pathways. Additionally, the planar geometry of the microslot NMR detector allows the hyphenation with versatile lab-on-a chip (LOC) technology. This opens a new window for metabolomics studies on living cells and can be implemented into new application fields in biotechnology and life sciences. PMID:26121119

  3. Organotypic Culture of Breast Tumor Explants as a Multicellular System for the Screening of Natural Compounds with Antineoplastic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Carranza-Torres, Irma Edith; Guzmán-Delgado, Nancy Elena; Coronado-Martínez, Consuelo; Bañuelos-García, José Inocente; Viveros-Valdez, Ezequiel; Morán-Martínez, Javier; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women worldwide. The search for novel compounds with antitumor activity, with less adverse effects and higher efficacy, and the development of methods to evaluate their toxicity is an area of intense research. In this study we implemented the preparation and culture of breast tumor explants, which were obtained from precision-cut breast tumor slices. In order to validate the model we are proposing to screen antineoplastic effect of natural compounds, we selected caffeic acid, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid. Using the Krumdieck tissue slicer, precision-cut tissue slices were prepared from breast cancer samples; from these slices, 4 mm explants were obtained and incubated with the selected compounds. Viability was assessed by Alamar Blue assay, LDH release, and histopathological criteria. Results showed that the viability of the explants cultured in the presence of paclitaxel (positive control) decreased significantly (P < 0.05); however, tumor samples responded differently to each compound. When the explants were coincubated with paclitaxel and compounds, a synergic effect was observed. This study shows that ex vivo culture of breast cancer explants offers a suitable alternative model for evaluating natural or synthetic compounds with antitumor properties within the complex microenvironment of the tumor. PMID:26075250

  4. Effect of an osmotic stress on multicellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Monnier, Sylvain; Delarue, Morgan; Brunel, Benjamin; Dolega, Monika E; Delon, Antoine; Cappello, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that multicellular structures respond to mechanical cues, such as the confinement and compression exerted by the surrounding environment. In order to understand the response of tissues to stress, we investigate the effect of an isotropic stress on different biological systems. The stress is generated using the osmotic pressure induced by a biocompatible polymer. We compare the response of multicellular spheroids, individual cells and matrigel to the same osmotic perturbation. Our findings indicate that the osmotic pressure occasioned by polymers acts on these systems like an isotropic mechanical stress. When submitted to this pressure, the volume of multicellular spheroids decreases much more than one could expect from the behavior of individual cells. PMID:26210402

  5. Cetuximab Reconstitutes Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretions and Tumor-Infiltrating Capabilities of sMICA-Inhibited NK Cells in HNSCC Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Klöss, Stephan; Chambron, Nicole; Gardlowski, Tanja; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Esser, Ruth; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Morgan, Michael A; Arseniev, Lubomir; Seitz, Oliver; Köhl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive factors, such as soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related peptide A (sMICA) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), are involved in tumor immune escape mechanisms (TIEMs) exhibited by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) and may represent opportunities for therapeutic intervention. In order to overcome TIEMs, we investigated the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), cytokine release and retargeted tumor infiltration of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells expressing Fcγ receptor IIIa (FcγRIIIa, CD16a) in the presence of cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared to healthy controls, relapsed HNSCC patients (n = 5), not currently in treatment revealed decreased levels of circulating regulatory NK cell subsets in relation to increased cytotoxic NK cell subpopulations. Elevated sMICA and TGF-β1 plasma levels correlated with diminished TNFα and IFN-γ release and decreased NKG2D (natural killer group 2 member D)-dependent killing of HNSCC cells by NK cells. Incubation of IL-2-activated patient NK cells with patient plasma containing elevated sMICA or sMICA analogs (shed MICA and recombinant MICA) significantly impaired NKG2D-mediated killing by down-regulation of NKG2D surface expression. Of note, CD16 surface expression levels, pro-apoptotic and activation markers, and viability of patient and healthy donor NK cell subpopulations were not affected by this treatment. Accordingly, cetuximab restored killing activity of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells against cetuximab-coated primary HNSCC cells via ADCC in a dose-dependent manner. Rapid reconstitution of anti-tumor recognition and enhanced tumor infiltration of treated NK cells was monitored by 24 h co-incubation of HNSCC tumor spheroids with cetuximab (1 μg/ml) and was characterized by increased IFN-γ and TNFα secretion. This data show that the impaired NK cell-dependent tumor

  6. Cetuximab Reconstitutes Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretions and Tumor-Infiltrating Capabilities of sMICA-Inhibited NK Cells in HNSCC Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Klöss, Stephan; Chambron, Nicole; Gardlowski, Tanja; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Esser, Ruth; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Morgan, Michael A.; Arseniev, Lubomir; Seitz, Oliver; Köhl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive factors, such as soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related peptide A (sMICA) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), are involved in tumor immune escape mechanisms (TIEMs) exhibited by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) and may represent opportunities for therapeutic intervention. In order to overcome TIEMs, we investigated the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), cytokine release and retargeted tumor infiltration of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells expressing Fcγ receptor IIIa (FcγRIIIa, CD16a) in the presence of cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared to healthy controls, relapsed HNSCC patients (n = 5), not currently in treatment revealed decreased levels of circulating regulatory NK cell subsets in relation to increased cytotoxic NK cell subpopulations. Elevated sMICA and TGF-β1 plasma levels correlated with diminished TNFα and IFN-γ release and decreased NKG2D (natural killer group 2 member D)-dependent killing of HNSCC cells by NK cells. Incubation of IL-2-activated patient NK cells with patient plasma containing elevated sMICA or sMICA analogs (shed MICA and recombinant MICA) significantly impaired NKG2D-mediated killing by down-regulation of NKG2D surface expression. Of note, CD16 surface expression levels, pro-apoptotic and activation markers, and viability of patient and healthy donor NK cell subpopulations were not affected by this treatment. Accordingly, cetuximab restored killing activity of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells against cetuximab-coated primary HNSCC cells via ADCC in a dose-dependent manner. Rapid reconstitution of anti-tumor recognition and enhanced tumor infiltration of treated NK cells was monitored by 24 h co-incubation of HNSCC tumor spheroids with cetuximab (1 μg/ml) and was characterized by increased IFN-γ and TNFα secretion. This data show that the impaired NK cell-dependent tumor

  7. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C

    2016-08-19

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary 'ratchets', limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431522

  8. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L.; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary ‘ratchets’, limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The major synthetic evolutionary transitions’. PMID:27431522

  9. Spectroscopic imaging system for high-throughput viability assessment of ovarian spheroids or microdissected tumor tissues (MDTs) in a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Georges-Robillard, A.; Masse, M.; Kendall-Dupont, J.; Strupler, M.; Patra, B.; Jermyn, M.; Mes-Masson, A.-M.; Leblond, F.; Gervais, T.

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing effort in the biomicrosystems community to develop a personalized treatment response assay for cancer patients using primary cells, patient-derived spheroids, or live tissues on-chip. Recently, our group has developed a technique to cut tumors in 350 μm diameter microtissues and keep them alive on-chip, enabling multiplexed in vitro drug assays on primary tumor tissue. Two-photon microscopy, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry are the current standard to assay tissue chemosensitivity on-chip. While these techniques provide microscopic and molecular information, they are not adapted for high-throughput analysis of microtissues. We present a spectroscopic imaging system that allows rapid quantitative measurements of multiple fluorescent viability markers simultaneously by using a liquid crystal tunable filter to record fluorescence and transmittance spectra. As a proof of concept, 24 spheroids composed of ovarian cancer cell line OV90 were formed in a microfluidic chip, stained with two live cell markers (CellTrackerTM Green and Orange), and imaged. Fluorescence images acquired were normalized to the acquisition time and gain of the camera, dark noise was removed, spectral calibration was applied, and spatial uniformity was corrected. Spectral un-mixing was applied to separate each fluorophore's contribution. We have demonstrated that rapid and simultaneous viability measurements on multiple spheroids can be achieved, which will have a significant impact on the prediction of a tumor's response to multiple treatment options. This technique may be applied as well in drug discovery to assess the potential of a drug candidate directly on human primary tissue.

  10. Novel Morphologic and Genetic Analysis of Cancer Cells in a 3D Microenvironment Identifies STAT3 as a Regulator of Tumor Permeability Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Chul; Jeong, Hyobin; Son, Sung Hwa; Kim, YounHa; Han, Daeyoung; Goughnour, Peter C; Kang, Taehee; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Moon, Hyo Eun; Paek, Sun Ha; Hwang, Daehee; Seol, Ho Jun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-03-01

    Tumor permeability is a critical determinant of drug delivery and sensitivity, but systematic methods to identify factors that perform permeability barrier functions in the tumor microenvironment are not yet available. Multicellular tumor spheroids have become tractable in vitro models to study the impact of a three-dimensional (3D) environment on cellular behavior. In this study, we characterized the spheroid-forming potential of cancer cells and correlated the resulting spheroid morphologies with genetic information to identify conserved cellular processes associated with spheroid structure. Spheroids generated from 100 different cancer cell lines were classified into four distinct groups based on morphology. In particular, round and compact spheroids exhibited highly hypoxic inner cores and permeability barriers against anticancer drugs. Through systematic and correlative analysis, we reveal JAK-STAT signaling as one of the signature pathways activated in round spheroids. Accordingly, STAT3 inhibition in spheroids generated from the established cancer cells and primary glioblastoma patient-derived cells altered the rounded morphology and increased drug sensitivity. Furthermore, combined administration of the STAT3 inhibitor and 5-fluorouracil to a mouse xenograft model markedly reduced tumor growth compared with monotherapy. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the ability to integrate 3D culture and genetic profiling to determine the factors underlying the integrity of the permeability barrier in the tumor microenvironment, and may help to identify and exploit novel mechanisms of drug resistance. PMID:26676754

  11. SMIFH2-mediated mDia formin functional inhibition potentiates chemotherapeutic targeting of human ovarian cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ziske, Megan A; Pettee, Krista M; Khaing, MaNada; Rubinic, Kaitlin; Eisenmann, Kathryn M

    2016-03-25

    Due to a lack of effective screening or prevention protocol for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), there is a critical unmet need to develop therapeutic interventions for EOC treatment. EOC metastasis is unique. Initial dissemination is not primarily hematogenous, yet is facilitated through shedding of primary tumor cells into the peritoneal fluid and accumulating ascites. Increasingly, isolated patient spheroids point to a clinical role for spheroids in EOC metastasis. EOC spheroids are highly invasive structures that disseminate upon peritoneal mesothelium, and visceral tissues including liver and omentum. Selection for this subset of chemoresistant EOC cells could influence disease progression and/or recurrence. Thus, targeting spheroid integrity/structure may improve the chemotherapeutic responsiveness of EOC. We discovered a critical role for mammalian Diaphanous (mDia)-related formin-2 in maintaining EOC spheroid structure. Both mDia2 and the related mDia1 regulate F-actin networks critical to maintain cell-cell contacts and the integrity of multi-cellular epithelial sheets. We investigated if mDia2 functional inhibition via a small molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 combined with chemotherapeutics, such as taxol and cisplatin, inhibits the viability of EOC monolayers and clinically relevant spheroids. SMIFH2-mediated mDia formin inhibition significantly reduced both ES2 and Skov3 EOC monolayer viability while spheroid viability was minimally impacted only at the highest concentrations. Combining either cisplatin or taxol with SMIFH2 did not significantly enhance the effects of either drug alone in ES2 monolayers, while Skov3 monolayers treated with taxol or cisplatin and SMIFH2 showed significant additive inhibition of viability. ES2 spheroids were highly responsive with clear additive anti-viability effects with dual taxol or cisplatin when combined with SMIFH2 treatments. While combined taxol with SMIFH2 in spheroids showed an additive effect relative to single

  12. Biocompatible nanoparticles sensing the matrix metallo-proteinase 2 for the on-demand release of anticancer drugs in 3D tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Biondi, Marco; Belli, Valentina; Profeta, Martina; Raiola, Luca; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-11-01

    The balance between dose-dependent tolerability, effectiveness and toxicity of systemically administered antitumor drugs is extremely delicate. This issue highlights the striking need for targeted release of chemotherapeutic drugs within tumors. In this work, a smart strategy of drug targeting to tumors relying upon biodegradable/biocompatible nanoparticles releasing cytotoxic drugs after sensing physiological variations intrinsic to the very nature of tumor tissues is exploited. Here, the well-known over-expression of matrix metallo-proteinase 2 (MMP2) enzyme in tumors has been chosen as a trigger for the release of a cytotoxic drug. Nanoparticles made up of a biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)--block--polyethylene glycol (PEG) copolymer (namely PELGA), blended with a tumor-activated prodrug (TAP) composed of a MMP2-sensitive peptide bound to doxorubicin (Dox) and to PLGA chain have been produced. The obtained devices are able to release Dox specifically upon MMP2 cleavage of the TAP. More interestingly, they can sense the differences in the expression levels of endogenous MMP2 protein, thus modulating drug penetration within a three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid matrix, accordingly. Therefore, the proposed nanoparticles hold promise as a useful tool for in vivo investigations aimed at an improved therapeutic efficacy of the conjugated drug payload. PMID:26340360

  13. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. PMID:25510471

  14. Robustness in multicellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Joao

    2011-03-01

    Cells and organisms cope with the task of maintaining their phenotypes in the face of numerous challenges. Much attention has recently been paid to questions of how cells control molecular processes to ensure robustness. However, many biological functions are multicellular and depend on interactions, both physical and chemical, between cells. We use a combination of mathematical modeling and molecular biology experiments to investigate the features that convey robustness to multicellular systems. Cell populations must react to external perturbations by sensing environmental cues and acting coordinately in response. At the same time, they face a major challenge: the emergence of conflict from within. Multicellular traits are prone to cells with exploitative phenotypes that do not contribute to shared resources yet benefit from them. This is true in populations of single-cell organisms that have social lifestyles, where conflict can lead to the emergence of social ``cheaters,'' as well as in multicellular organisms, where conflict can lead to the evolution of cancer. I will describe features that diverse multicellular systems can have to eliminate potential conflicts as well as external perturbations.

  15. I. Embryonal vasculature formation recapitulated in transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted pseudo-orthotopicly into mouse dorsal skin fold: the organoblasts concept

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate understanding of cancer biology is a problem. This work focused on cellular mechanisms of tumor vascularization. According to earlier studies, the tumor vasculature derives from host endothelial cells (angiogenesis) or their precursors of bone marrow origin circulating in the blood (neo-vasculogenesis) unlike in embryos. In this study, we observed the neo-vasculature form in multiple ways from local precursor cells. Recapitulation of primitive as well as advanced embryonal stages of vasculature formation followed co-implantation of avascular ( in vitro cultured) N202 breast tumor spheroids and homologous tissue grafts into mouse dorsal skin chambers. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical analysis of tissue sections exposed the interactions between the tumor and the graft tissue stem cells. It revealed details of vasculature morphogenesis not seen before in either tumors or embryos. A gradual increase in complexity of the vascular morphogenesis at the tumor site reflected a range of steps in ontogenic evolution of the differentiating cells. Malignant- and surgical injury repair-related tissue growth prompted local cells to initiate extramedullar erythropoiesis and vascular patterning. The new findings included: interdependence between the extramedullar hematopoiesis and assembly of new vessels (both from the locally differentiating precursors); nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion (karyolysis) as the mechanism of erythroblast enucleation; the role of megakaryocytes and platelets in vascular pattern formation before emergence of endothelial cells; lineage relationships between hematopoietic and endothelial cells; the role of extracellular calmyrin in tissue morphogenesis; and calmyrite, a new ultrastructural entity associated with anaerobic energy metabolism. The central role of the extramedullar erythropoiesis in the formation of new vasculature (blood and vessels) emerged here as part of the tissue building process including the lymphatic system and nerves

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), heat shock proteins (HSPs) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression in co-culture of colon tumor spheroids with normal cells after incubation with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and/or camptothecin (CPT-11).

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Niedziela, Piotr

    2010-04-01

    Tumor chemoresistance and metastasis are some of the most important problems in colon cancer therapy. In the present study, co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids, obtained from different grades of tumor, with human colon epithelium, myofibroblast and endothelial cell monolayers were performed. The purpose of these co-cultures was to reflect, in in vitro conditions, different stages of colon tumor development. In order to investigate the invasive capacities of the tumor cells and their resistance to chemotherapy, HGF, HSP27, HSP72 and MRP levels were analyzed after incubation of the co-cultures with IL-1beta and irinotecan (CPT-11) added as single agents or in combination. Myofibroblasts produced significantly higher amounts of HGF than epithelial cells. Tumor cells released trace amounts of this molecule. In cocultures, IL-1beta induced HGF release, while CPT-11 alone or combined with IL-1beta decreased HGF secretion. An immunoblotting analysis followed by densitometry revealed that the combination of IL-1beta plus CPT-11 added to the cocultures led to a decrease in HSPs and MRP levels. In conclusion, direct and paracrine interactions of colon tumor cell spheroids with normal cells and exogenously added CPT-11 change HSP27, HSP72 and MRP expression in comparison to monocultures. IL-1beta and CPT-11, dependent on whether they are added separately or jointly, differentially modulate HGF expression in monocultures of colon tumor spheroids or normal cells and their co-cultures. PMID:20726333

  17. Elevated CDCP1 predicts poor patient outcome and mediates ovarian clear cell carcinoma by promoting tumor spheroid formation, cell migration and chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Wu, A C; Harrington, B S; Davies, C M; Wallace, S J; Adams, M N; Palmer, J S; Roche, D K; Hollier, B G; Westbrook, T F; Hamidi, H; Konecny, G E; Winterhoff, B; Chetty, N P; Crandon, A J; Oliveira, N B; Shannon, C M; Tinker, A V; Gilks, C B; Coward, J I; Lumley, J W; Perrin, L C; Armes, J E; Hooper, J D

    2016-01-28

    Hematogenous metastases are rarely present at diagnosis of ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCC). Instead dissemination of these tumors is characteristically via direct extension of the primary tumor into nearby organs and the spread of exfoliated tumor cells throughout the peritoneum, initially via the peritoneal fluid, and later via ascites that accumulates as a result of disruption of the lymphatic system. The molecular mechanisms orchestrating these processes are uncertain. In particular, the signaling pathways used by malignant cells to survive the stresses of anchorage-free growth in peritoneal fluid and ascites, and to colonize remote sites, are poorly defined. We demonstrate that the transmembrane glycoprotein CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) has important and inhibitable roles in these processes. In vitro assays indicate that CDCP1 mediates formation and survival of OCC spheroids, as well as cell migration and chemoresistance. Disruption of CDCP1 via silencing and antibody-mediated inhibition markedly reduce the ability of TOV21G OCC cells to form intraperitoneal tumors and induce accumulation of ascites in mice. Mechanistically our data suggest that CDCP1 effects are mediated via a novel mechanism of protein kinase B (Akt) activation. Immunohistochemical analysis also suggested that CDCP1 is functionally important in OCC, with its expression elevated in 90% of 198 OCC tumors and increased CDCP1 expression correlating with poor patient disease-free and overall survival. This analysis also showed that CDCP1 is largely restricted to the surface of malignant cells where it is accessible to therapeutic antibodies. Importantly, antibody-mediated blockade of CDCP1 in vivo significantly increased the anti-tumor efficacy of carboplatin, the chemotherapy most commonly used to treat OCC. In summary, our data indicate that CDCP1 is important in the progression of OCC and that targeting pathways mediated by this protein may be useful for the management of OCC

  18. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Liu, Dongmei; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaohui; You, Minli; Ren, Hui; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Evodiamine (EVO) and rutaecarpine (RUT) are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs' IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4-44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8-138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds. PMID:27455219

  19. Games of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Kamran; Veller, Carl; Nowak, Martin A

    2016-08-21

    Evolutionary game dynamics are often studied in the context of different population structures. Here we propose a new population structure that is inspired by simple multicellular life forms. In our model, cells reproduce but can stay together after reproduction. They reach complexes of a certain size, n, before producing single cells again. The cells within a complex derive payoff from an evolutionary game by interacting with each other. The reproductive rate of cells is proportional to their payoff. We consider all two-strategy games. We study deterministic evolutionary dynamics with mutations, and derive exact conditions for selection to favor one strategy over another. Our main result has the same symmetry as the well-known sigma condition, which has been proven for stochastic game dynamics and weak selection. For a maximum complex size of n=2 our result holds for any intensity of selection. For n≥3 it holds for weak selection. As specific examples we study the prisoner's dilemma and hawk-dove games. Our model advances theoretical work on multicellularity by allowing for frequency-dependent interactions within groups. PMID:27179461

  20. Recreating the tumor microenvironment in a bilayer, hyaluronic acid hydrogel construct for the growth of prostate cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian; Gurski, Lisa A; Zhang, Chu; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cells cultured in physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) matrices can recapture many essential features of native tumor tissues. In this study, a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based bilayer hydrogel system that not only supports the tumoroid formation from LNCaP prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but also simulates their reciprocal interactions with the tumor-associated stroma was developed and characterized. HA hydrogels were prepared by mixing solutions of HA precursors functionalized with acrylate groups (HA-AC) and reactive thiols (HA-SH) under physiological conditions. The resultant viscoelastic gels have an average elastic modulus of 234 ± 30 Pa and can be degraded readily by hyaluronidase. The orthogonal and cytocompatible nature of the crosslinking chemistry permits facile incorporation of cytokine-releasing particles and PCa cells. In our bilayer hydrogel construct, the top layer contains heparin (HP)-decorated, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) capable of releasing heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in a sustained manner at a rate of 2.5 wt%/day cumulatively. LNCaP cells embedded in the bottom layer receive the growth factor signals from the top, and in response form enlarging tumoroids with an average diameter of 85 μm by day 7. Cells in 3D hydrogels assemble into spherical tumoroids, form close cellular contacts through E-cadherin, and show cortical organization of F-actin, whereas those plated as 2D monolayers adopt a spread-out morphology. Compared to cells cultured on 2D, the engineered tumoroids significantly increased the expression of two pro-angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF(165)) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), both at mRNA and protein levels. Overall, the HA model system provides a useful platform for the study of tumor cell responses to growth factors and for screening of anticancer drugs targeting these pathways. PMID:22999468

  1. Recreating the Tumor Microenvironment in a Bilayer, Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Construct for the Growth of Prostate Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xian; Gurski, Lisa A.; Zhang, Chu; Harrington, Daniel A.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells cultured in physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) matrices can recapture many essential features of native tumor tissues. In this study, a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based bilayer hydrogel system that not only supports the tumoroid formation from LNCaP prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but also simulates their reciprocal interactions with the tumor-associated stroma was developed and characterized. HA hydrogels were prepared by mixing solutions of HA precursors functionalized with acrylate groups (HA-AC) and reactive thiols (HA-SH) under physiological conditions. The resultant viscoelastic gels have an average elastic modulus of 234 ± 30 Pa and can be degraded readily by hyaluronidase. The orthogonal and cytocompatible nature of the crosslinking chemistry permits facile incorporation of cytokine-releasing particles and PCa cells. In our bilayer hydrogel construct, the top layer contains heparin (HP)-decorated, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) capable of releasing heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in a sustained manner at a rate of 2.5wt%/day cumulatively. LNCaP cells embedded in the bottom layer receive the growth factor signals from the top, and in response form enlarging tumoroids with an average diameter of 85 μm by day 7. Cells in 3D hydrogels assemble into spherical tumoroids, form close cellular contacts through E-cadherin, and show cortical organization of F-actin, whereas those plated as 2D monolayers adopt a spread-out morphology. Compared to cells cultured on 2D, the engineered tumoroids significantly increased the expression of two pro-angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF165) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), both at mRNA and protein levels. Overall, the HA model system provides a useful platform for the study of tumor cell responses to growth factors and for screening of anticancer drugs targeting these pathways. PMID:22999468

  2. The effect of motexafin gadolinium on ALA photodynamic therapy in glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Marlon S.; Sanchez, Rogelio; Sun, Chung-Ho; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2008-02-01

    Following surgical removal of malignant brain tumors 80% of all cases develop tumor recurrence within 2 cm of the resected margin. The aim of postoperative therapy is therefore elimination of nests of tumor cells remaining in the margins of the resection cavity. Light attenuation in tissue makes it difficult for adequate light fluences to reach depths of 1-2 cm in the resection margin making it difficult for standard intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) to accomplish this goal. Thus additional agents are required that either increase the efficacy of low fluence PDT or inhibit cellular repair, to enhance effectiveness of PDT in the tumor resection cavity. Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is one such agent previously reported to enhance the cytotoxic potential of radiation therapy, as well as several chemotherapeutic agents by causing redox stress to cancerous cells. MGd is well tolerated with tumor specific uptake in clinical studies. The authors evaluated MGd as a potential PDT enhancing agent at low light fluences using an in vitro model. Multicellular Glioma spheroids (MGS) of approximately 300 micron diameter, obtained from ACBT cell lines were subjected to acute PDT treatments at 6J, 12J, and 18J light fluences. Growth was determined by measuring diameters in two axes. At four weeks a dose dependent inhibition of spheroid growth was seen in 33%, 55%, and 83% of the MGS at 6J, 12J, and 18J respectively, while inhibition followed by a partial reversal of growth was seen in 17%, 33%, and 17% respectively. This study provides a rationale for the use of this drug as a PDT enhancer in the management of brain tumors.

  3. Collective Behavior of Brain Tumor Cells: the Role of Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Katakowski, Mark; Hopkins, Scott; Szalad, Alexandra; Zheng, Xuguang; Jiang, Feng; Chopp, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We consider emergent collective behavior of a multicellular biological system. Specifically we investigate the role of hypoxia (lack of oxygen) in migration of brain tumor cells. We performed two series of cell migration experiments. The first set of experiments was performed in a typical wound healing geometry: cells were placed on a substrate, and a scratch was done. In the second set of experiments, cell migration away from a tumor spheroid was investigated. Experiments show a controversy: cells under normal and hypoxic conditions have migrated the same distance in the ``spheroid'' experiment, while in the ``scratch'' experiment cells under normal conditions migrated much faster than under hypoxic conditions. To explain this paradox, we formulate a discrete stochastic model for cell dynamics. The theoretical model explains our experimental observations and suggests that hypoxia decreases both the motility of cells and the strength of cell-cell adhesion. The theoretical predictions were further verified in independent experiments.

  4. Investigating the effects of combined photodynamic and anti-angiogenic therapies using a three-dimensional in-vivo brain tumor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Magalhães, Nzola; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Li, Linda; Liogys, Angela; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2006-02-01

    An in-vivo tumor model composed of multicellular human glioma spheroids implanted on a shell-less chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), has been developed. Following removal of a portion of the ectodermal epithelium layer of the CAM, human glioma spheroids were implanted on day 7 of embryonic development. Tumor invasion, rapid growth and vasculature formation were observed 7 days post implantation. Single tumor cell migration towards blood vessels, angiogenesis and satellite tumor growth were also evident. The human tumor/CAM model is being used to examine the effects of combined ALA PDT and anti-angiogenic agents. The shell-less CAM is well suited for topical, i.p. and i.v. photosensitizer and/or drug application.

  5. Biological soliton in multicellular movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Ishida, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Solitons have been observed in various physical phenomena. Here, we show that the distinct characteristics of solitons are present in the mass cell movement of non-chemotactic mutants of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum. During starvation, D. discoideum forms multicellular structures that differentiate into spore or stalk cells and, eventually, a fruiting body. Non-chemotactic mutant cells do not form multicellular structures; however, they do undergo mass cell movement in the form of a pulsatile soliton-like structure (SLS). We also found that SLS induction is mediated by adhesive cell-cell interactions. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms of biological solitons in multicellular movement.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonial antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues which are not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. In brief, MCS combine the relevance or organized tissues with in vitro methodology making the MCS a good model system to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and thereby provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide an important base of scientific information for future comparative studies on the effects of hypergravity and simulated microgravity environments on cell-cell interactions. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g. cellular products) which may be useful for the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of one undergraduate and one graduate student; thus, it will also assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in gravitational biology research.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  8. Analysis of Gene Expression in 3D Spheroids Highlights a Survival Role for ASS1 in Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Barbone, Dario; Van Dam, Loes; Follo, Carlo; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Zhang, Shu-Dong; Richards, William G.; Bueno, Raphael; Fennell, Dean A.; Broaddus, V. Courtney

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the underlying causes of chemoresistance in malignant pleural mesothelioma, we have studied mesothelioma cell lines as 3D spheroids, which acquire increased chemoresistance compared to 2D monolayers. We asked whether the gene expression of 3D spheroids would reveal mechanisms of resistance. To address this, we measured gene expression of three mesothelioma cell lines, M28, REN and VAMT, grown as 2D monolayers and 3D spheroids. A total of 209 genes were differentially expressed in common by the three cell lines in 3D (138 upregulated and 71 downregulated), although a clear resistance pathway was not apparent. We then compared the list of 3D genes with two publicly available datasets of gene expression of 56 pleural mesotheliomas compared to normal tissues. Interestingly, only three genes were increased in both 3D spheroids and human tumors: argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1), annexin A4 (ANXA4) and major vault protein (MVP); of these, ASS1 was the only consistently upregulated of the three genes by qRT-PCR. To measure ASS1 protein expression, we stained 2 sets of tissue microarrays (TMA): one with 88 pleural mesothelioma samples and the other with additional 88 pleural mesotheliomas paired with matched normal tissues. Of the 176 tumors represented on the two TMAs, ASS1 was expressed in 87 (50%; staining greater than 1 up to 3+). For the paired samples, ASS1 expression in mesothelioma was significantly greater than in the normal tissues. Reduction of ASS1 expression by siRNA significantly sensitized mesothelioma spheroids to the pro-apoptotic effects of bortezomib and of cisplatin plus pemetrexed. Although mesothelioma is considered by many to be an ASS1-deficient tumor, our results show that ASS1 is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in mesothelioma 3D spheroids and in human pleural mesotheliomas. We also have uncovered a survival role for ASS1, which may be amenable to targeting to undermine mesothelioma multicellular resistance. PMID:26982031

  9. Spherical Cancer Models in Tumor Biology1

    PubMed Central

    Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Bellet, Dominique; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type. PMID:25622895

  10. Spheroid-Based In Vitro Angiogenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Larissa; Korff, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In vitro models mimicking capillary sprouting are important tools to investigate the tumor angiogenesis, developmental blood vessel formation, and pathophysiological remodeling processes of the capillary system in the adult. With this focus, in 1998 Korff et al. introduced endothelial cell (EC) spheroids as a three-dimensional in vitro model resembling angiogenic responses and sprouting behavior [1]. As such, EC spheroids are capable of giving rise to capillary-like sprouts which are relatively close to the physiologically and genetically programmed arrangement of endothelial cells in vessels. Co-culture spheroids consisting of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells form a spheroidal core composed of smooth muscle cells and an outer monolayer of endothelial cells, similar to the physiological architecture of larger blood vessels. In practise, a defined number of endothelial cells are cultured in a round-bottom well plate or in "hanging drops" to allow the formation and arrangement of the spheroidal three-dimensional structure. Subsequently, they are harvested and embedded in a collagen gel to allow outgrowth of endothelial cell sprouts originating from each spheroid. To evaluate the pro- or antiangiogenic impact of a cytokine or compound, the number and length of sprouts is determined. PMID:27172953

  11. Study on the effects of nylon-chitosan-blended membranes on the spheroid-forming activity of human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsiao, Wen-Chu; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Yu, Hsin-Su; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Lai, Juin-Yih; Young, Tai-Horng

    2006-10-01

    Though reported limitedly in tissue engineering, modification of cellular functions can be achieved by culturing them into multicellular spheroids. We have shown melanocytes form spheroids on chitosan surface. However, how biomaterials promote spheroid formation has never been systemically investigated. In this work, nylon, which inhibits melanocyte spheroid formation, and chitosan, which promotes melanocyte spheroid formation, are used to prepare nylon/chitosan-blended membranes. Membranes composed of pure nylon, pure chitosan and various ratios of nylon and chitosan are employed to examine their effects on spheroid formation. Melanocytes show better adhesion to nylon membranes than that to chitosan membranes. In blended membranes, as more nylon is incorporated, cell adhesion increases and the trend for spheroid formation decreases. Melanocytes can only form spheroids on membranes with poorer cell adhesion. Examining the surface of the blended membranes shows phase separation of nylon and chitosan. As nylon content increases, the nylon phase on the membrane surface increases and thereby enhances cell adhesion. The opposite trend for cell adhesion and spheroid formation substantiates our hypothesis of spheroid formation on biomaterials: a balance between cell-substrate interaction and cell-cell interaction. The decrease in cell-substrate interaction tilts the balance to a state more favorable for spheroid formation. Our work can serve as a model to investigate the relative strengths of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and also pave way to design blended membranes with desired physical properties while preserving the spheroid-forming activity. PMID:16777216

  12. Development of Three-Dimensional Multicellular Tissue-Like Constructs for Mutational Analysis Using Macroporous Microcarriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jacqueline A.; Fraga, Denise N.; Gonda, Steve R.

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), tissue-like model was developed for the genotoxic assessment of space environment. In previous experiments, we found that culturing mammalian cells in a NASA-designed bioreactor, using Cytodex-3 beads as a scaffold, generated 3-D multicellular spheroids. In an effort to generate scaffold-free spheroids, we developed a new 3-D tissue-like model by coculturing fibroblast and epithelial cell in a NASA bioreactor using macroporous Cultispher-S(TradeMark) microcarriers. Big Blue(Registered Trademark) Rat 2(Lambda) fibroblasts, genetically engineered to contain multiple copies (>60 copies/cell) of the Lac I target gene, were cocultured with radio-sensitive human epithelial cells, H184F5. Over an 8-day period, samples were periodically examined by microscopy and histology to confirm cell attachment, growth, and viability. Immunohistochemistry and western analysis were used to evaluate the expression of specific cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins. Key cell culture parameters (glucose, pH, and lactate concentrations) were monitored daily. Controls were two-dimensional mono layers of fibroblast or epithelial cells cultured in T-flasks. Analysis of 3-D spheroids from the bioreactor suggests fibroblast cells attached to and completely covered the bead surface and inner channels by day 3 in the bioreactor. Treatment of the 3-day spheroids with dispase II dissolved the Cultisphers(TradeMark) and produced multicellular, bead-less constructs. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of vi.mentin, cytokeratin and E-cadherin in treated spheroids. Examination of the dispase II treated spheroids with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also showed the presence of desmosomes. These results suggest that the controlled enzymatic degradation of an artificial matrix in the low shear environment of the NASA-designed bioreactor can produce 3-D tissue-like spheroids. 2

  13. Physiologically Low Oxygen Enhances Biomolecule Production and Stemness of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Shearier, Emily; Xing, Qi; Qian, Zichen; Zhao, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) spheroids have been demonstrated to be valuable in a variety of applications, including cartilage regeneration, wound healing, and neoangiogenesis. Physiological relevant low oxygen culture can significantly improve in vitro hMSC expansion by preventing cell differentiation. We hypothesize that hypoxia-cultured hMSC spheroids can better maintain the regenerative properties of hMSCs. In this study, hMSC spheroids were fabricated using hanging drop method and cultured under 2% O2 and 20% O2 for up to 96 h. Spheroid diameter and viability were examined, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) components and growth factor levels between the two oxygen tensions at different time points. Stemness was measured among the spheroid culture conditions and compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Spheroid viability and structural integrity were studied using different needle gauges to ensure no damage would occur when implemented in vivo. Spheroid attachment and integration within a tissue substitute were also demonstrated. The results showed that a three-dimensional hMSC spheroid cultured at low oxygen conditions can enhance the production of ECM proteins and growth factors, while maintaining the spheroids' stemness and ability to be injected, attached, and potentially be integrated within a tissue. PMID:26830500

  14. Magnetic manipulation and spatial patterning of multi-cellular stem cell aggregates†

    PubMed Central

    Bratt-Leal, Andrés M.; Kepple, Kirsten L.; Carpenedo, Richard L.; Cooke, Marissa T.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    The controlled assembly and organization of multi-cellular systems to mimic complex tissue structures is critical to the engineering of tissues for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Recent advances in micro-scale technologies to control multi-cellular aggregate formation typically require chemical modification of the interface between cells and materials and lack multi-scale flexibility. Here we demonstrate that simple physical entrapment of magnetic microparticles within the extracellular space of stem cells spheroids during initial formation enables scaffold-free immobilization, translocation and directed assembly of multi-cellular aggregates across multiple length and time scales, even under dynamic suspension culture conditions. The response of aggregates to externally applied magnetic fields was a direct function of microparticle incorporation, allowing for rapid and transient control of the extracellular environment as well as separation of heterogeneous populations. In addition, spatial patterning of heterogeneous spheroid populations as well as individual multi-cellular aggregates was readily achieved by imposing temporary magnetic fields. Overall, this approach provides novel routes to examine stem cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis with applications that encompass the creation of new model systems for developmental biology, scaffold-free tissue engineering strategies and scalable bioprocessing technologies. PMID:22076329

  15. Stiffening of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroid Microenvironments Induced by Incorporation of Gelatin Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Cooke, Marissa T.; Saeed, Rabbia; Kinney, Melissa A.; Fridley, Krista M.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    Culturing multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells as 3D aggregates augments their differentiation potential and paracrine activity. One caveat of stem cell spheroids, though, can be the limited diffusional transport barriers posed by the inherent 3D structure of the multicellular aggregates. In order to circumvent such limitations, polymeric microparticles have been incorporated into stem cell aggregates as a means to locally control the biochemical and physical properties of the 3D microenvironment. However, the introduction of biomaterials to the 3D stem cell microenvironment could alter the mechanical forces sensed by cells within aggregates, which in turn could impact various cell behaviors and overall spheroid mechanics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of biomaterial incorporation within mesenchymal stem cell spheroids on aggregate structure and mechanical properties. The results of this study demonstrate that although gelatin microparticle incorporation results in similar multi-cellular organization within human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids, the introduction of gelatin materials significantly impacts spheroid mechanical properties. The marked differences in spheroid mechanics induced by microparticle incorporation may hold major implications for in vitro directed differentiation strategies and offer a novel route to engineer the mechanical properties of tissue constructs ex vivo. PMID:22658155

  16. Method to measure the radio and chemosensitivity of human spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, J.; Nederman, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method based on the spontaneous outgrowth of cells from spheroids was tested. Different outgrowth patterns were seen depending on the types of spheroids and on the radiation or drug doses. The method allowed dose-effect relations to be determined. Spheroid survival was defined as when the outgrowing monolayers contained at least thousand cells within five weeks. The method was used as an alternative to cloning of isolated single cells. The glioma and osteosarcoma spheroids could not be disintegrated to single cell suspensions since they resisted enzymatic and mechanical treatments for cell separation. Detection of differences in radio and chemosensitivity between different types of spheroids of human origin might be valuable for the understanding of the large variations in therapeutical response often seen between different types of tumors.

  17. How 5000 independent rowers coordinate their strokes in order to row into the sunlight: Phototaxis in the multicellular green alga Volvox

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The evolution of multicellular motile organisms from unicellular ancestors required the utilization of previously evolved tactic behavior in a multicellular context. Volvocine green algae are uniquely suited for studying tactic responses during the transition to multicellularity because they range in complexity from unicellular to multicellular genera. Phototactic responses are essential for these flagellates because they need to orientate themselves to receive sufficient light for photosynthesis, but how does a multicellular organism accomplish phototaxis without any known direct communication among cells? Several aspects of the photoresponse have previously been analyzed in volvocine algae, particularly in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas. Results In this study, the phototactic behavior in the spheroidal, multicellular volvocine green alga Volvox rousseletii (Volvocales, Chlorophyta) was analyzed. In response to light stimuli, not only did the flagella waveform and beat frequency change, but the effective stroke was reversed. Moreover, there was a photoresponse gradient from the anterior to the posterior pole of the spheroid, and only cells of the anterior hemisphere showed an effective response. The latter caused a reverse of the fluid flow that was confined to the anterior hemisphere. The responsiveness to light is consistent with an anterior-to-posterior size gradient of eyespots. At the posterior pole, the eyespots are tiny or absent, making the corresponding cells appear to be blind. Pulsed light stimulation of an immobilized spheroid was used to simulate the light fluctuation experienced by a rotating spheroid during phototaxis. The results demonstrated that in free-swimming spheroids, only those cells of the anterior hemisphere that face toward the light source reverse the beating direction in the presence of illumination; this behavior results in phototactic turning. Moreover, positive phototaxis is facilitated by gravitational forces. Under

  18. On the evolution of bacterial multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Nicholas A; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Multicellularity is one of the most prevalent evolutionary innovations and nowhere is this more apparent than in the bacterial world, which contains many examples of multicellular organisms in a surprising array of forms. Due to their experimental accessibility and the large and diverse genomic data available, bacteria enable us to probe fundamental aspects of the origins of multicellularity. Here we discuss examples of multicellular behaviors in bacteria, the selective pressures that may have led to their evolution, possible origins and intermediate stages, and whether the ubiquity of apparently convergent multicellular forms argues for its inevitability. PMID:25597443

  19. On The Evolution of Bacterial Multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Nicholas A.; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity is one of the most prevalent evolutionary innovations and nowhere is this more apparent than in the bacterial world, which contains many examples of multicellular organisms in a surprising array of forms. Due to their experimental accessibility and the large and diverse genomic data available, bacteria enable us to probe fundamental aspects of the origins of multicellularity. Here we discuss examples of multicellular behaviors in bacteria, the selective pressures that may have led to their evolution, possible origins and intermediate stages, and whether the ubiquity of apparently convergent multicellular forms argues for its inevitability. PMID:25597443

  20. Spheroid formation of human thyroid cancer cells under simulated microgravity: a possible role of CTGF and CAV1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) formed scaffold-free under microgravity are of high interest for research and medicine. Their formation mechanism can be studied in space in real microgravity or on Earth using ground-based facilities (GBF), which simulate microgravity. On Earth, these experiments are more cost-efficient and easily performable. However, each GBF might exert device-specific and altered superimposingly gravity-dependent effects on the cells. Results FTC-133 human thyroid cancer cells were cultivated on a 2D clinostat (CN) and a random positioning machine (RPM) and compared with corresponding 1 g control cells. Harvested cell samples were investigated by microscopy, quantitative realtime-PCR and Multi-Analyte Profiling. Spheroid formation and growth occurred during 72 h of cultivation on both devices. Cytokine secretion and gene activation patterns frequently altered in different ways, when the cells were cultured either on the RPM or the CN. A decreased expression of CAV1 and CTGF in MCTS compared to adherent cells was observed after cultivation on both machines. Conclusion The development of MCTS proceeds similarly on the RPM and the CN resembling the situation observed under real microgravity conditions, while no MCTS formation was observed at 1 g under identical experimental conditions. Simultaneously, changes in the regulation of CTGF and CAV1 appeared in a comparable manner on both machines. A relationship between these molecules and MCTS formation is discussed. PMID:24885050

  1. Light Scattering by Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-Ming; Ji, Xia

    Nowadays, with the development of technology, particles with size at nanoscale have been synthesized in experiments. It is noticed that anisotropy is an unavoidable problem in the production of nanospheres. Besides, nonspherical nanoparticles have also been extensively used in experiments. Comparing with spherical model, spheroidal model can give a better description for the characteristics of nonspherical particles. Thus the study of analytical solution for light scattering by spheroidal particles has practical implications. By expanding incident, scattered, and transmitted electromagnetic fields in terms of appropriate vector spheroidal wave functions, an analytic solution is obtained to the problem of light scattering by spheroids. Unknown field expansion coefficients can be determined with the combination of boundary conditions and rotational-translational addition theorems for vector spheroidal wave functions. Based on the theoretical derivation, a Fortran code has been developed to calculate the extinction cross section and field distribution, whose results agree well with those obtain by FDTD simulation. This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 91230203.

  2. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  3. Effects of photodynamic therapy on human glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Chu, Eugene A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1999-07-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with malignant brain neoplasm has led to a search for better treatment modalities. Although gliomas are considered to be disseminated tumors in the brain, most recur at the site of the previous tumor resection. Improved local control would thus be of clear benefit. The utility of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of brain neoplasms is investigated using a human glioma spheroid model. Specifically, the effects of PDT on human glioma spheroids are investigated using PhotofrinTM and 56-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The effects of various irradiation schemes were monitored using a simple growth assay. A growth delay was observed at an optical fluence of approximately 35 J cm-2 for spheroids incubated in Photofrin. Spheroids incubated in ALA were unaffected by the PDT treatment regimens examined in this study. This was most likely a result of inadequate photosensitizer concentration.

  4. Heterogeneity in multicell spheroids induced by alterations in the external oxygen and glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Freyer, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Multicell tumor spheroids are currently being used as in vitro models for investigations of tumor therapy, based on the concept that spheroids exhibit many of the growth characteristics and cell subpopulations of tumors in vivo. At present, the factors which regulate cell proliferation, clonogenicity and viability in spheroids are unknown, as are the effects of alterations in these critical factors on therapeutic results. The symmetrical structure of the EMT6/Ro spheroid and the ease of manipulating the external environment are key features of this spheroid system which are used to investigate the role of oxygen and glucose in the control of spheroid growth and the development of cell subpopulations. A technique is developed for selectivity dissociating a spheroid population into fractions of cells originating from known locations in the spheroid structure. Characterization of these cell subpopulations demonstrates that outer cells are similar to an exponential cell population, while inner region cells are not proliferating and have a reduced cell volume and clonogenic capacity. Oxygen and glucose concentrations at critical depths in the spheroid were determined. It is concluded that the oxygen and glucose supply to cells in spheroids is critical in determining the initial onset of central necrosis. 217 references, 32 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

  5. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAb's) to surface molecules involved in the cell-cell interactions of mammalian cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). MCS are highly organized 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics in vivo tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. They also provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. In brief, MCS combine the relevance of organized tissues with the accuracy of in vitro methodology. Further, one can manipulate these MCS experimentally to discern important information about their biology.

  6. Directed Self-Assembly of Large Scaffold-free Multicellular Honeycomb Structures

    PubMed Central

    Tejavibulya, Nalin; Youssef, Jacquelyn; Bao, Brian; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Morgan, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    A significant challenge to the field of biofabrication is the rapid construction of large three dimensional (3D) living tissues and organs. Multi-cellular spheroids have been used as building blocks. In this paper, we create large multi-cellular honeycomb building blocks using directed self-assembly, whereby cell-to-cell adhesion, in the context of the shape and obstacles of a micromold, drives the formation of a 3D structure. Computer aided design, rapid prototyping and replica molding were used to fabricate honeycomb-shaped micro-molds. Nonadhesive hydrogels cast from these micro-molds were equilibrated in cell culture medium and seeded with two types of mammalian cells. The cells settled into the honeycomb recess, were unable to attach to the nonadhesive hydrogel and so cell-to-cell adhesion drove the self-assembly of a large multicellular honeycomb within 24 hours. Distinct morphological changes occurred to the honeycomb and its cells indicating the presence of significant cell-mediated tension. Unlike the spheroid, whose size is constrained by a critical diffusion distance needed to maintain cell viability, the overall size of the honeycomb is not limited. The rapid production of the honeycomb building unit, with its multiple rings of high density cells and open lumen spaces, offers interesting new possibilities for biofabrication strategies. PMID:21828905

  7. A Synthetic Multicellular Memory Device.

    PubMed

    Urrios, Arturo; Macia, Javier; Manzoni, Romilde; Conde, Núria; Bonforti, Adriano; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc; Solé, Ricard

    2016-08-19

    Changing environments pose a challenge to living organisms. Cells need to gather and process incoming information, adapting to changes in predictable ways. This requires in particular the presence of memory, which allows different internal states to be stored. Biological memory can be stored by switches that retain information on past and present events. Synthetic biologists have implemented a number of memory devices for biological applications, mostly in single cells. It has been shown that the use of multicellular consortia provides interesting advantages to implement biological circuits. Here we show how to build a synthetic biological memory switch using an eukaryotic consortium. We engineered yeast cells that can communicate and retain memory of changes in the extracellular environment. These cells were able to produce and secrete a pheromone and sense a different pheromone following NOT logic. When the two strains were cocultured, they behaved as a double-negative-feedback motif with memory. In addition, we showed that memory can be effectively changed by the use of external inputs. Further optimization of these modules and addition of other cells could lead to new multicellular circuits that exhibit memory over a broad range of biological inputs. PMID:27439436

  8. Constraint Based Modeling Going Multicellular

    PubMed Central

    Martins Conde, Patricia do Rosario; Sauter, Thomas; Pfau, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Constraint based modeling has seen applications in many microorganisms. For example, there are now established methods to determine potential genetic modifications and external interventions to increase the efficiency of microbial strains in chemical production pipelines. In addition, multiple models of multicellular organisms have been created including plants and humans. While initially the focus here was on modeling individual cell types of the multicellular organism, this focus recently started to switch. Models of microbial communities, as well as multi-tissue models of higher organisms have been constructed. These models thereby can include different parts of a plant, like root, stem, or different tissue types in the same organ. Such models can elucidate details of the interplay between symbiotic organisms, as well as the concerted efforts of multiple tissues and can be applied to analyse the effects of drugs or mutations on a more systemic level. In this review we give an overview of the recent development of multi-tissue models using constraint based techniques and the methods employed when investigating these models. We further highlight advances in combining constraint based models with dynamic and regulatory information and give an overview of these types of hybrid or multi-level approaches. PMID:26904548

  9. The origin of multicellularity in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are one of the oldest and morphologically most diverse prokaryotic phyla on our planet. The early development of an oxygen-containing atmosphere approximately 2.45 - 2.22 billion years ago is attributed to the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria. Furthermore, they are one of the few prokaryotic phyla where multicellularity has evolved. Understanding when and how multicellularity evolved in these ancient organisms would provide fundamental information on the early history of life and further our knowledge of complex life forms. Results We conducted and compared phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences from a large sample of taxa representing the morphological and genetic diversity of cyanobacteria. We reconstructed ancestral character states on 10,000 phylogenetic trees. The results suggest that the majority of extant cyanobacteria descend from multicellular ancestors. Reversals to unicellularity occurred at least 5 times. Multicellularity was established again at least once within a single-celled clade. Comparison to the fossil record supports an early origin of multicellularity, possibly as early as the "Great Oxygenation Event" that occurred 2.45 - 2.22 billion years ago. Conclusions The results indicate that a multicellular morphotype evolved early in the cyanobacterial lineage and was regained at least once after a previous loss. Most of the morphological diversity exhibited in cyanobacteria today —including the majority of single-celled species— arose from ancient multicellular lineages. Multicellularity could have conferred a considerable advantage for exploring new niches and hence facilitated the diversification of new lineages. PMID:21320320

  10. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  11. Ovarian cancer spheroids use myosin-generated force to clear the mesothelium

    PubMed Central

    Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Davidowitz, Rachel A.; Ng, Mei Rosa; Besser, Achim; Muranen, Taru; Merritt, Melissa; Danuser, Gaudenz; Ince, Tan; Brugge, Joan S.

    2011-01-01

    Dissemination of ovarian tumors involves the implantation of cancer spheroids into the mesothelial monolayer on the walls of peritoneal and pleural cavity organs. Biopsies of tumors attached to peritoneal organs show that mesothelial cells are not present under tumor masses. We have developed a live, image-based in vitro model in which interactions between tumor spheroids and mesothelial cells can be monitored in real time to provide spatial and temporal understanding of mesothelial clearance. Here we provide evidence that ovarian cancer spheroids utilize integrin – and talin - dependent activation of myosin and traction force to promote mesothelial cells displacement from underneath a tumor cell spheroid. These results suggest that ovarian tumor cell clusters gain access to the sub-mesothelial environment by exerting force on the mesothelial cells lining target organs, driving migration and clearance of the mesothelial cells. PMID:22303516

  12. The Multiple Origins of Complex Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Andrew H.

    2011-05-01

    Simple multicellularity has evolved numerous times within the Eukarya, but complex multicellular organisms belong to only six clades: animals, embryophytic land plants, florideophyte red algae, laminarialean brown algae, and two groups of fungi. Phylogeny and genomics suggest a generalized trajectory for the evolution of complex multicellularity, beginning with the co-optation of existing genes for adhesion. Molecular channels to facilitate cell-cell transfer of nutrients and signaling molecules appear to be critical, as this trait occurs in all complex multicellular organisms but few others. Proliferation of gene families for transcription factors and cell signals accompany the key functional innovation of complex multicellular clades: differentiated cells and tissues for the bulk transport of oxygen, nutrients, and molecular signals that enable organisms to circumvent the physical limitations of diffusion. The fossil records of animals and plants document key stages of this trajectory.

  13. The multicellularity genes of dictyostelid social amoebas.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Gernot; Lawal, Hajara M; Felder, Marius; Singh, Reema; Singer, Gail; Weijer, Cornelis J; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity enabled specialization of cells, but required novel signalling mechanisms for regulating cell differentiation. Early multicellular organisms are mostly extinct and the origins of these mechanisms are unknown. Here using comparative genome and transcriptome analysis across eight uni- and multicellular amoebozoan genomes, we find that 80% of proteins essential for the development of multicellular Dictyostelia are already present in their unicellular relatives. This set is enriched in cytosolic and nuclear proteins, and protein kinases. The remaining 20%, unique to Dictyostelia, mostly consists of extracellularly exposed and secreted proteins, with roles in sensing and recognition, while several genes for synthesis of signals that induce cell-type specialization were acquired by lateral gene transfer. Across Dictyostelia, changes in gene expression correspond more strongly with phenotypic innovation than changes in protein functional domains. We conclude that the transition to multicellularity required novel signals and sensors rather than novel signal processing mechanisms. PMID:27357338

  14. The multicellularity genes of dictyostelid social amoebas

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Gernot; Lawal, Hajara M.; Felder, Marius; Singh, Reema; Singer, Gail; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity enabled specialization of cells, but required novel signalling mechanisms for regulating cell differentiation. Early multicellular organisms are mostly extinct and the origins of these mechanisms are unknown. Here using comparative genome and transcriptome analysis across eight uni- and multicellular amoebozoan genomes, we find that 80% of proteins essential for the development of multicellular Dictyostelia are already present in their unicellular relatives. This set is enriched in cytosolic and nuclear proteins, and protein kinases. The remaining 20%, unique to Dictyostelia, mostly consists of extracellularly exposed and secreted proteins, with roles in sensing and recognition, while several genes for synthesis of signals that induce cell-type specialization were acquired by lateral gene transfer. Across Dictyostelia, changes in gene expression correspond more strongly with phenotypic innovation than changes in protein functional domains. We conclude that the transition to multicellularity required novel signals and sensors rather than novel signal processing mechanisms. PMID:27357338

  15. Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasloff, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to fend off a wide range of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. What sorts of molecules are they? How are they employed by animals in their defence? As our need for new antibiotics becomes more pressing, could we design anti-infective drugs based on the design principles these molecules teach us?

  16. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    SciTech Connect

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  17. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-01

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  18. Multicellularity makes somatic differentiation evolutionarily stable

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Mary E.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Many multicellular organisms produce two cell lineages: germ cells, whose descendants produce the next generation, and somatic cells, which support, protect, and disperse the germ cells. This germ-soma demarcation has evolved independently in dozens of multicellular taxa but is absent in unicellular species. A common explanation holds that in these organisms, inefficient intercellular nutrient exchange compels the fitness cost of producing nonreproductive somatic cells to outweigh any potential benefits. We propose instead that the absence of unicellular, soma-producing populations reflects their susceptibility to invasion by nondifferentiating mutants that ultimately eradicate the soma-producing lineage. We argue that multicellularity can prevent the victory of such mutants by giving germ cells preferential access to the benefits conferred by somatic cells. The absence of natural unicellular, soma-producing species previously prevented these hypotheses from being directly tested in vivo: to overcome this obstacle, we engineered strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that differ only in the presence or absence of multicellularity and somatic differentiation, permitting direct comparisons between organisms with different lifestyles. Our strains implement the essential features of irreversible conversion from germ line to soma, reproductive division of labor, and clonal multicellularity while maintaining sufficient generality to permit broad extension of our conclusions. Our somatic cells can provide fitness benefits that exceed the reproductive costs of their production, even in unicellular strains. We find that nondifferentiating mutants overtake unicellular populations but are outcompeted by multicellular, soma-producing strains, suggesting that multicellularity confers evolutionary stability to somatic differentiation. PMID:27402737

  19. Multicellularity makes somatic differentiation evolutionarily stable.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Mary E; Murray, Andrew W

    2016-07-26

    Many multicellular organisms produce two cell lineages: germ cells, whose descendants produce the next generation, and somatic cells, which support, protect, and disperse the germ cells. This germ-soma demarcation has evolved independently in dozens of multicellular taxa but is absent in unicellular species. A common explanation holds that in these organisms, inefficient intercellular nutrient exchange compels the fitness cost of producing nonreproductive somatic cells to outweigh any potential benefits. We propose instead that the absence of unicellular, soma-producing populations reflects their susceptibility to invasion by nondifferentiating mutants that ultimately eradicate the soma-producing lineage. We argue that multicellularity can prevent the victory of such mutants by giving germ cells preferential access to the benefits conferred by somatic cells. The absence of natural unicellular, soma-producing species previously prevented these hypotheses from being directly tested in vivo: to overcome this obstacle, we engineered strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that differ only in the presence or absence of multicellularity and somatic differentiation, permitting direct comparisons between organisms with different lifestyles. Our strains implement the essential features of irreversible conversion from germ line to soma, reproductive division of labor, and clonal multicellularity while maintaining sufficient generality to permit broad extension of our conclusions. Our somatic cells can provide fitness benefits that exceed the reproductive costs of their production, even in unicellular strains. We find that nondifferentiating mutants overtake unicellular populations but are outcompeted by multicellular, soma-producing strains, suggesting that multicellularity confers evolutionary stability to somatic differentiation. PMID:27402737

  20. Bacterial Ventures into Multicellularity: Collectivism through Individuality.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Simon; Ackermann, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes can perform functions that exceed the possibilities of an individual cell. These functions emerge through interactions between differentiated cells that are precisely arranged in space. Bacteria also form multicellular collectives that consist of differentiated but genetically identical cells. How does the functionality of these collectives depend on the spatial arrangement of the differentiated bacteria? In a previous issue of PLOS Biology, van Gestel and colleagues reported an elegant example of how the spatial arrangement of differentiated cells gives rise to collective behavior in Bacillus subtilus colonies, further demonstrating the similarity of bacterial collectives to higher multicellular organisms. PMID:26038821

  1. Bacterial Ventures into Multicellularity: Collectivism through Individuality

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Simon; Ackermann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes can perform functions that exceed the possibilities of an individual cell. These functions emerge through interactions between differentiated cells that are precisely arranged in space. Bacteria also form multicellular collectives that consist of differentiated but genetically identical cells. How does the functionality of these collectives depend on the spatial arrangement of the differentiated bacteria? In a previous issue of PLOS Biology, van Gestel and colleagues reported an elegant example of how the spatial arrangement of differentiated cells gives rise to collective behavior in Bacillus subtilus colonies, further demonstrating the similarity of bacterial collectives to higher multicellular organisms. PMID:26038821

  2. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaonan; de Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gullbo, Joachim; D’Arcy, Padraig; Linder, Stig

    2015-01-01

    The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations. PMID:26580606

  3. The Evolution of Multicellular Plants and Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Traces the evolution of unicellular organisms to the multi-cellular plants and animals in existence today. Major events are depicted in a geologic timetable. Organisms, extinct and recent, are classified by taxonomic group. (MA)

  4. The simplest integrated multicellular organism unveiled.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Yoko; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Hamamura, Yuki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Noga, Akira; Hirono, Masafumi; Olson, Bradley J S C; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Volvocine green algae represent the "evolutionary time machine" model lineage for studying multicellularity, because they encompass the whole range of evolutionary transition of multicellularity from unicellular Chlamydomonas to >500-celled Volvox. Multicellular volvocalean species including Gonium pectorale and Volvox carteri generally have several common morphological features to survive as integrated multicellular organisms such as "rotational asymmetry of cells" so that the cells become components of the individual and "cytoplasmic bridges between protoplasts in developing embryos" to maintain the species-specific form of the multicellular individual before secretion of new extracellular matrix (ECM). However, these morphological features have not been studied in the four-celled colonial volvocine species Tetrabaena socialis that is positioned in the most basal lineage within the colonial or multicellular volvocine greens. Here we established synchronous cultures of T. socialis and carried out immunofluorescence microscopic and ultrastructural observations to elucidate these two morphological attributes. Based on immunofluorescence microscopy, four cells of the mature T. socialis colony were identical in morphology but had rotational asymmetry in arrangement of microtubular rootlets and separation of basal bodies like G. pectorale and V. carteri. Ultrastructural observations clearly confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic bridges between protoplasts in developing embryos of T. socialis even after the formation of new flagella in each daughter protoplast within the parental ECM. Therefore, these two morphological attributes might have evolved in the common four-celled ancestor of the colonial volvocine algae and contributed to the further increase in cell number and complexity of the multicellular individuals of this model lineage. T. socialis is one of the simplest integrated multicellular organisms in which four identical cells constitute the individual. PMID

  5. The Simplest Integrated Multicellular Organism Unveiled

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Yoko; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Hamamura, Yuki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Noga, Akira; Hirono, Masafumi; Olson, Bradley J. S. C.; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Volvocine green algae represent the “evolutionary time machine” model lineage for studying multicellularity, because they encompass the whole range of evolutionary transition of multicellularity from unicellular Chlamydomonas to >500-celled Volvox. Multicellular volvocalean species including Gonium pectorale and Volvox carteri generally have several common morphological features to survive as integrated multicellular organisms such as “rotational asymmetry of cells” so that the cells become components of the individual and “cytoplasmic bridges between protoplasts in developing embryos” to maintain the species-specific form of the multicellular individual before secretion of new extracellular matrix (ECM). However, these morphological features have not been studied in the four-celled colonial volvocine species Tetrabaena socialis that is positioned in the most basal lineage within the colonial or multicellular volvocine greens. Here we established synchronous cultures of T. socialis and carried out immunofluorescence microscopic and ultrastructural observations to elucidate these two morphological attributes. Based on immunofluorescence microscopy, four cells of the mature T. socialis colony were identical in morphology but had rotational asymmetry in arrangement of microtubular rootlets and separation of basal bodies like G. pectorale and V. carteri. Ultrastructural observations clearly confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic bridges between protoplasts in developing embryos of T. socialis even after the formation of new flagella in each daughter protoplast within the parental ECM. Therefore, these two morphological attributes might have evolved in the common four-celled ancestor of the colonial volvocine algae and contributed to the further increase in cell number and complexity of the multicellular individuals of this model lineage. T. socialis is one of the simplest integrated multicellular organisms in which four identical cells constitute the

  6. Colorectal cancer derived organotypic spheroids maintain essential tissue characteristics but adapt their metabolism in culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Organotypic tumor spheroids, a 3D in vitro model derived from patient tumor material, preserve tissue heterogeneity and retain structural tissue elements, thus replicating the in vivo tumor more closely than commonly used 2D and 3D cell line models. Such structures harbour tumorigenic cells, as revealed by xenograft implantation studies in animal models and maintain the genetic makeup of the original tumor material. The aim of our work was a morphological and proteomic characterization of organotypic spheroids derived from colorectal cancer tissue in order to get insight into their composition and associated biology. Results Morphological analysis showed that spheroids were of about 250 μm in size and varied in structure, while the spheroid cells differed in shape and size and were tightly packed together by desmosomes and tight junctions. Our proteomic data revealed significant alterations in protein expression in organotypic tumor spheroids cultured as primary explants compared to primary colorectal cancer tissue. Components underlying cellular and tissue architecture were changed; nuclear DNA/ chromatin maintenance systems were up-regulated, whereas various mitochondrial components were down-regulated in spheroids. Most interestingly, the mesenchymal cells appear to be substantial component in such cellular assemblies. Thus the observed changes may partly occur in this cellular compartment. Finally, in the proteomics analysis stem cell-like characteristics were observed within the spheroid cellular assembly, reflected by accumulation of Alcam, Ctnnb1, Aldh1, Gpx2, and CD166. These findings were underlined by IHC analysis of Ctnnb1, CD24 and CD44, therefore warranting closer investigation of the tumorigenic compartment in this 3D culture model for tumor tissue. Conclusions Our analysis of organotypic CRC tumor spheroids has identified biological processes associated with a mixture of cell types and states, including protein markers for mesenchymal

  7. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Santagiuliana, R; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, B A

    2015-01-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution. PMID:25427284

  8. A tumor growth model with deformable ECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Santagiuliana, R.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Existing tumor growth models based on fluid analogy for the cells do not generally include the extracellular matrix (ECM), or if present, take it as rigid. The three-fluid model originally proposed by the authors and comprising tumor cells (TC), host cells (HC), interstitial fluid (IF) and an ECM, considered up to now only a rigid ECM in the applications. This limitation is here relaxed and the deformability of the ECM is investigated in detail. The ECM is modeled as a porous solid matrix with Green-elastic and elasto-visco-plastic material behavior within a large strain approach. Jauman and Truesdell objective stress measures are adopted together with the deformation rate tensor. Numerical results are first compared with those of a reference experiment of a multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) growing in vitro, then three different tumor cases are studied: growth of an MTS in a decellularized ECM, growth of a spheroid in the presence of host cells and growth of a melanoma. The influence of the stiffness of the ECM is evidenced and comparison with the case of a rigid ECM is made. The processes in a deformable ECM are more rapid than in a rigid ECM and the obtained growth pattern differs. The reasons for this are due to the changes in porosity induced by the tumor growth. These changes are inhibited in a rigid ECM. This enhanced computational model emphasizes the importance of properly characterizing the biomechanical behavior of the malignant mass in all its components to correctly predict its temporal and spatial pattern evolution.

  9. Cell-sized condensed collagen microparticles for preparing microengineered composite spheroids of primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masumi; Hori, Ayaka; Sugaya, Sari; Yajima, Yuya; Utoh, Rie; Yamato, Masayuki; Seki, Minoru

    2015-10-01

    The reconstitution of extracellular matrix (ECM) components in three-dimensional (3D) cell culture environments with microscale precision is a challenging issue. ECM microparticles would potentially be useful as solid particulate scaffolds that can be incorporated into 3D cellular constructs, but technologies for transforming ECM proteins into cell-sized stable particles are currently lacking. Here, we describe new processes to produce highly condensed collagen microparticles by means of droplet microfluidics or membrane emulsification. Droplets of an aqueous solution of type I collagen were formed in a continuous phase of polar organic solvent followed by rapid dissolution of water molecules into the continuous phase because the droplets were in a non-equilibrium state. We obtained highly unique, disc-shaped condensed collagen microparticles with a final collagen concentration above 10% and examined factors affecting particle size and morphology. After testing the cell-adhesion properties on the collagen microparticles, composite multicellular spheroids comprising the particles and primary rat hepatocytes were formed using microfabricated hydrogel chambers. We found that the ratio of the cells and particles is critical in terms of improvement of hepatic functions in the composite spheroids. The presented methodology for incorporating particulate-form ECM components in multicellular spheroids would be advantageous because of the biochemical similarity with the microenvironments in vivo. PMID:26308935

  10. Axisymmetric scattering of scalar waves by spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lekner, John; Boyack, Rufus

    2011-06-01

    A phase shift formulation of scattering by oblate and prolate spheroids is presented, in parallel with the partial-wave theory of scattering by spherical obstacles. The crucial step is application of a finite Legendre transform to the Helmholtz equation in spheroidal coordinates. In the long-wavelength limit the spheroidal analog of the spherical scattering length immediately gives the cross section. Analytical results are readily obtained for scattering of Schrödinger particle waves by impenetrable spheroids, and for scattering of sound waves by acoustically soft spheroidal objects. The method is restricted to scattering by spheroids whose symmetry axis is coincident with the direction of the incident plane wave. PMID:21682372

  11. Origins of multicellular evolvability in snowflake yeast.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, William C; Fankhauser, Johnathon D; Rogers, David W; Greig, Duncan; Travisano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Complex life has arisen through a series of 'major transitions' in which collectives of formerly autonomous individuals evolve into a single, integrated organism. A key step in this process is the origin of higher-level evolvability, but little is known about how higher-level entities originate and gain the capacity to evolve as an individual. Here we report a single mutation that not only creates a new level of biological organization, but also potentiates higher-level evolvability. Disrupting the transcription factor ACE2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevents mother-daughter cell separation, generating multicellular 'snowflake' yeast. Snowflake yeast develop through deterministic rules that produce geometrically defined clusters that preclude genetic conflict and display a high broad-sense heritability for multicellular traits; as a result they are preadapted to multicellular adaptation. This work demonstrates that simple microevolutionary changes can have profound macroevolutionary consequences, and suggests that the formation of clonally developing clusters may often be the first step to multicellularity. PMID:25600558

  12. Limits to Chemically Guided Multicellular Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue requires both multicellular sensing of chemical gradients and coordinated mechanical action. Examples from morphogenesis and cancer metastasis demonstrate that clusters of migratory cells are extremely sensitive, responding to gradients of less than 1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell body. While the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, the ensuing consequences for coherent migration remain poorly understood. We develop a model of multicellular sensing and migration based on the cellular Potts model. Multicellular sensing of noisy chemical gradients is modeled as a process of local excitation and global inhibition (LEGI) among communicating cells. The output of the sensing process is coupled to individual cells' polarization to model migratory behavior. We find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias. At the same time, larger clusters are also accompanied by less coherent collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimally efficient cluster size. We discuss how our results relate to cancer metastasis.

  13. Smart Superstructures with Ultrahigh pH-Sensitivity for Targeting Acidic Tumor Microenvironment: Instantaneous Size Switching and Improved Tumor Penetration.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Jun; Du, Jin-Zhi; Liu, Jing; Du, Xiao-Jiao; Shen, Song; Zhu, Yan-Hua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ye, Xiaodong; Nie, Shuming; Wang, Jun

    2016-07-26

    The currently low delivery efficiency and limited tumor penetration of nanoparticles remain two major challenges of cancer nanomedicine. Here, we report a class of pH-responsive nanoparticle superstructures with ultrasensitive size switching in the acidic tumor microenvironment for improved tumor penetration and effective in vivo drug delivery. The superstructures were constructed from amphiphilic polymer directed assembly of platinum-prodrug conjugated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, in which the amphiphilic polymer contains ionizable tertiary amine groups for rapid pH-responsiveness. These superstructures had an initial size of ∼80 nm at neutral pH (e.g., in blood circulation), but once deposited in the slightly acidic tumor microenvironment (pH ∼6.5-7.0), they underwent a dramatic and sharp size transition within a very narrow range of acidity (less than 0.1-0.2 pH units) and dissociated instantaneously into the dendrimer building blocks (less than 10 nm in diameter). This rapid size-switching feature not only can facilitate nanoparticle extravasation and accumulation via the enhanced permeability and retention effect but also allows faster nanoparticle diffusion and more efficient tumor penetration. We have further carried out comparative studies of pH-sensitive and insensitive nanostructures with similar size, surface charge, and chemical composition in both multicellular spheroids and poorly permeable BxPC-3 pancreatic tumor models, whose results demonstrate that the pH-triggered size switching is a viable strategy for improving drug penetration and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:27244096

  14. Magnetically and pH dual responsive dendrosomes for tumor accumulation enhanced folate-targeted hybrid drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Li, Jingjing; Li, Xuejuan; Mu, Hongjie; Zhang, Xuemei; Shi, Yanan; Chu, Yongchao; Wang, Aiping; Wu, Zimei; Sun, Kaoxiang

    2016-06-28

    Dendrosomes are new tumor targeted drug delivery systems to improve safety and therapeutic effects of antitumor agents. In this study we designed and synthesized magnetically and pH dual responsive dendrosomes with magnetic nanoparticles and folate-targeted dendrimers encapsulated in long-circulating pH sensitive liposomes. Cellular uptake and tissue penetration were assessed on cell lines and tumor spheroids respectively. Xenograft mice were used to study tumor accumulation. The dendrosomes were stable at pH7.4, but responsively released their content at acidic pH. In slightly acid environments, the hybrid vectors showed similar cytotoxicity and cellular uptake to the free folate-dendrimers conjugate due to rapid release. The dendrosomes showed a greater cellular uptake by HeLa cells (FA receptor positive) due to the conjugation with folic acid (FA). In multicellular tumor spheroid tests, a slightly acidic environment and the application of magnet both promoted the permeation efficiency of the hybrid vectors. In the xenograft mice model both in vivo images and tissue distribution assessment indicated that the dendrosomes had higher peak intensity and a longer residence time. Through the synergistic effects of magnetic responsiveness and both passive and active targeting properties, the multi-functional dendrosomes were demonstrated to have great potential as a promising anticancer drug delivery platform. PMID:27090165

  15. OVCAR-3 Spheroid-Derived Cells Display Distinct Metabolic Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A.; Wang, Lijuan; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F.; Styczynski, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells. Methods To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines. Results These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines. Conclusions Overall, we demonstrate for the

  16. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-il; Lee, Jisu; Kwon, Ju-Lee; Park, Hong-Bum; Lee, Su-Yel; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Sung, Jaekye; Kim, Jin Man; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs) and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs) and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D) scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α) by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation. PMID:26947885

  17. Nitroxoline impairs tumor progression in vitro and in vivo by regulating cathepsin B activity.

    PubMed

    Mirković, Bojana; Markelc, Boštjan; Butinar, Miha; Mitrović, Ana; Sosič, Izidor; Gobec, Stanislav; Vasiljeva, Olga; Turk, Boris; Čemažar, Maja; Serša, Gregor; Kos, Janko

    2015-08-01

    Cathepsin B is a ubiquitously expressed lysosomal cysteine protease that participates in protein turnover within lysosomes. However, its protein and activity levels have been shown to be increased in cancer. Cathepsin B endopeptidase activity is involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix, a process that promotes tumor invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Previously, we reported an established antibiotic nitroxoline as a potent and selective inhibitor of cathepsin B. In the present study, we elucidated its anti-tumor properties in in vitro and in vivo tumor models. Tumor and endothelial cell lines with high levels of active cathepsin B were selected for functional analysis of nitroxoline in vitro. Nitroxoline significantly reduced extracellular DQ-collagen IV degradation by all evaluated cancer cell lines using spectrofluorimetry. Nitroxoline also markedly decreased tumor cell invasion monitored in real time and reduced the invasive growth of multicellular tumor spheroids, used as a 3D in vitro model of tumor invasion. Additionally, endothelial tube formation was significantly reduced by nitroxoline in an in vitro angiogenesis assay. Finally, nitroxoline significantly abrogated tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis in vivo in LPB fibrosarcoma and MMTV-PyMT breast cancer mouse models. Overall, our results designate nitroxoline as a promising drug candidate for anti-cancer treatment. PMID:25848918

  18. Extracellular signaling and multicellularity in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Shank, Elizabeth Anne; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis regulates its ability to differentiate into distinct, co-existing cell types in response to extracellular signaling molecules produced either by itself, or present in its environment. The production of molecules by B. subtilis cells, as well as their response to these signals, is not uniform across the population. There is specificity and heterogeneity both within genetically identical populations as well as at the strain-level and species-level. This review will discuss how extracellular signaling compounds influence B. subtilis multicellularity with regard to matrix-producing cannibal differentiation, germination, and swarming behavior, as well as the specificity of the quorum-sensing peptides ComX and CSF. It will also highlight how imaging mass spectrometry can aid in identifying signaling compounds and contribute to our understanding of the functional relationship between such compounds and multicellular behavior. PMID:22024380

  19. Extracellular signaling and multicellularity in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Anne Shank, Elizabeth; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacillus subtilis regulates its ability to differentiate into distinct, co-existing cell types in response to extracellular signaling molecules produced either by itself, or present in its environment. The production of molecules by B. subtilis cells, as well as their response to these signals, is not uniform across the population. There is specificity and heterogeneity both within genetically identical populations as well as at the strain- and species-levels. This review will discuss how extracellular signaling compounds influence B. subtilis multicellularity with regard to matrix-producing cannibal differentiation, germination, and swarming behavior, as well as the specificity of the quorum-sensing peptides ComX and CSF. It will also highlight how imaging mass spectrometry can aid in identifying signaling compounds and contribute to our understanding of the functional relationship between such compounds and multicellular behavior. PMID:22024380

  20. Cooperation, clumping and the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Biernaskie, Jay M; West, Stuart A

    2015-08-22

    The evolution of multicellular organisms represents one of the major evolutionary transitions in the history of life. A potential advantage of forming multicellular clumps is that it provides an efficiency benefit to pre-existing cooperation, such as the production of extracellular 'public goods'. However, this is complicated by the fact that cooperation could jointly evolve with clumping, and clumping could have multiple consequences for the evolution of cooperation. We model the evolution of clumping and a cooperative public good, showing that (i) when considered separately, both clumping and public goods production gradually increase with increasing genetic relatedness; (ii) in contrast, when the traits evolve jointly, a small increase in relatedness can lead to a major shift in evolutionary outcome—from a non-clumping state with low public goods production to a cooperative clumping state with high values of both traits; (iii) high relatedness makes it easier to get to the cooperative clumping state and (iv) clumping can be inhibited when it increases the number of cells that the benefits of cooperation must be shared with, but promoted when it increases relatedness between those cells. Overall, our results suggest that public goods sharing can facilitate the formation of well-integrated cooperative clumps as a first step in the evolution of multicellularity. PMID:26246549

  1. Collective Chemotaxis through Noisy Multicellular Gradient Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue occurs in many biological processes such as morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Clusters of migratory cells in these systems are capable of responding to gradients of less than 1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell length. Multicellular systems are extremely sensitive to their environment and while the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, how this information leads to coherent migration remains poorly understood. We develop a computational model of multicellular sensing and migration in which groups of cells collectively measure noisy chemical gradients. The output of the sensing process is coupled to individual cells polarization to model migratory behavior. Through the use of numerical simulations, we find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias, but larger clusters also induce more drag on collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimal cluster size for most efficient migration. We discuss how our model could be validated using simple, phenomenological experiments.

  2. Collective Chemotaxis through Noisy Multicellular Gradient Sensing.

    PubMed

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue occurs in many biological processes such as morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Clusters of migratory cells in these systems are capable of responding to gradients of <1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell length. Multicellular systems are extremely sensitive to their environment, and although the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, how this information leads to coherent migration remains poorly understood. We develop a computational model of multicellular sensing and migration in which groups of cells collectively measure noisy chemical gradients. The output of the sensing process is coupled to the polarization of individual cells to model migratory behavior. Through the use of numerical simulations, we find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias, but larger clusters also induce more drag on collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimal cluster size for most efficient migration. We discuss how our model could be validated using simple, phenomenological experiments. PMID:27508447

  3. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  4. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  5. Light scattering by randomly oriented spheroidal particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asano, S.; Sato, M.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the light scattering properties of randomly oriented, identical spheroidal particles is presented. A computation method was developed to integrate the Asano and Yamomoto solution (1975) for scattering from a homogeneous spheroid over all particle orientations; the extinction and scattering cross-sections, the asymmetry factor, and scattering matrix elements are calculated for randomly oriented prolate and oblate spheroids and compared with the calculations for spheres and laboratory measurements. The angular scattering behavior of spheroids is found to be different from that of the spheres for side scattering to backscattering directions, and prolate and oblate spheroids of the same shape parameter have similar angular scattering patterns.

  6. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Shelton, S; Gray, WG; Miller, CT; Hussain, F; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, BA

    2014-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behaviour of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT). A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TC), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HC); and an interstitial fluid (IF) for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a Finite Element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behaviour: initially, the rapidly growing tumor cells tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable tumor cells whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case – mostly due to the relative adhesion of the tumor and healthy cells to the ECM, and the less favourable transport of nutrients. In particular, for tumor cells adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced

  7. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models. PMID:24636868

  8. Cancer stem cell marker-expressing cell-rich spheroid fabrication from PANC-1 cells using alginate microcapsules with spherical cavities templated by gelatin microparticles.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Inamoto, Kazuya; Ashida, Tomoaki; Takamura, Ryo; Taya, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are rare subpopulations of cancer cells. The development of three-dimensional tissues abundant in CSCs is important to both the understanding and establishment of novel therapeutics targeting them. Here, we describe the fabrication of multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) abundant in CSCs by employing alginate microcapsules with spherical cavities templated by cell-enclosing gelatin microparticles. Encapsulated human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 cells grew for 14 days until they filled the cavities. The percentage of cells expressing reported CSC markers CD24, CD44, and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA), increased during this growth period. The percentage at 24 days of incubation, 22%, was 1.6 times higher than that of MTSs formed on a nonadherent surface in the same period of incubation. The MTSs in microcapsules could be cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen using a conventional method. No significant difference in the content of CSC marker-expressing cells was detected at 3 days of incubation when thawed after cryopreservation for 2 weeks, compared with cells incubated without prior cryopreservation. PMID:26013961

  9. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than those in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. In conclusion, these findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures.

  10. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than thosemore » in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. In conclusion, these findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures.« less

  11. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than those in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. These findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures. PMID:26323570

  12. A hydrodynamics approach to the evolution of multicellularity: flagellar motility and germ-soma differentiation in volvocalean green algae.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Kessler, John O; Michod, Richard E

    2006-04-01

    During the unicellular-multicellular transition, there are opportunities and costs associated with larger size. We argue that germ-soma separation evolved to counteract the increasing costs and requirements of larger multicellular colonies. Volvocalean green algae are uniquely suited for studying this transition because they range from unicells to multicellular individuals with germ-soma separation. Because Volvocales need flagellar beating for movement and to avoid sinking, their motility is modeled and analyzed experimentally using standard hydrodynamics. We provide comparative hydrodynamic data of an algal lineage composed of organisms of different sizes and degrees of complexity. In agreement with and extending the insights of Koufopanou, we show that the increase in cell specialization as colony size increases can be explained in terms of increased motility requirements. First, as colony size increases, soma must evolve, the somatic-to-reproductive cell ratio increasing to keep colonies buoyant and motile. Second, increased germ-soma specialization in larger colonies increases motility capabilities because internalization of nonflagellated germ cells decreases colony drag. Third, our analysis yields a limiting maximum size of the volvocalean spheroid that agrees with the sizes of the largest species known. Finally, the different colony designs in Volvocales reflect the trade-offs between reproduction, colony size, and motility. PMID:16670996

  13. Cell adhesion, multicellular morphology, and magnetosome distribution in the multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Fernanda; Silva, Karen Tavares; Leão, Pedro; Guedes, Iame Alves; Keim, Carolina Neumann; Farina, Marcos; Lins, Ulysses

    2013-06-01

    Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis is an uncultured magnetotactic multicellular prokaryote composed of 17-40 Gram-negative cells that are capable of synthesizing organelles known as magnetosomes. The magnetosomes of Ca. M. multicellularis are composed of greigite and are organized in chains that are responsible for the microorganism's orientation along magnetic field lines. The characteristics of the microorganism, including its multicellular life cycle, magnetic field orientation, and swimming behavior, and the lack of viability of individual cells detached from the whole assembly, are considered strong evidence for the existence of a unique multicellular life cycle among prokaryotes. It has been proposed that the position of each cell within the aggregate is fundamental for the maintenance of its distinctive morphology and magnetic field orientation. However, the cellular organization of the whole organism has never been studied in detail. Here, we investigated the magnetosome organization within a cell, its distribution within the microorganism, and the intercellular relationships that might be responsible for maintaining the cells in the proper position within the microorganism, which is essential for determining the magnetic properties of Ca. M. multicellularis during its life cycle. The results indicate that cellular interactions are essential for the determination of individual cell shape and the magnetic properties of the organism and are likely directly associated with the morphological changes that occur during the multicellular life cycle of this species. PMID:23551897

  14. Characterizing the Role of Nanoparticle Design on Tumor Transport and Stability in the Extracellular Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albanese, Alexandre

    Nanotechnology has emerged as an exciting strategy for the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents into established tumors. Advancements in nanomaterial synthesis have generated an extensive number of nanoparticle designs made from different materials. Unfortunately, it remains impossible to predict a design's effectiveness for in vivo tumor accumulation. Little is known about how a nanoparticle's morphology and surface chemistry affect its interactions with cells and proteins inside the tumor tissue. This thesis focuses on the development of in vitro experimental tools to evaluate how nanoparticle design affects transport in a three-dimensional tumor tissue and stability in the tumor microenvironment. Nanoparticle transport was evaluated using a novel 'tumor-on-a-chip' system where multicellular tumor spheroids were immobilized in a microfluidic channel. This setup created a three-dimensional tumor environment displaying physiological cell density, extracellular matrix organization, and interstitial flow rates. The tumor-on-a-chip demonstrated that accumulation of nanoparticles was limited to diameters below 110 nm and was improved by receptor targeting. Nanoparticle stability in the tumor microenvironment was evaluated using media isolated from different tumor cell lines. Nanoparticle diameter and surface chemistry were important determinants of stability in cancer cell-conditioned media. Small nanoparticles with unstable surface chemistries adsorbed cellular proteins on their surface and were prone to aggregation. Nanoparticle aggregation altered cellular interactions leading to changes in cell uptake. Using a novel technique to generate different aggregate sizes possessing a uniform surface composition, it was determined that aggregation can change receptor affinity, cell internalization mechanisms and sub-cellular sequestration patterns. Data from this thesis characterize the behavior of nanoparticles within modeled tumor environments and provide some

  15. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  16. Aneuploidy underlies a multicellular phenotypic switch

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhihao; Hays, Michelle; Cromie, Gareth A.; Jeffery, Eric W.; Scott, Adrian C.; Ahyong, Vida; Sirr, Amy; Skupin, Alexander; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2013-01-01

    Although microorganisms are traditionally used to investigate unicellular processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the ability to form colonies with highly complex, multicellular structures. Colonies with the “fluffy” morphology have properties reminiscent of bacterial biofilms and are easily distinguished from the “smooth” colonies typically formed by laboratory strains. We have identified strains that are able to reversibly toggle between the fluffy and smooth colony-forming states. Using a combination of flow cytometry and high-throughput restriction-site associated DNA tag sequencing, we show that this switch is correlated with a change in chromosomal copy number. Furthermore, the gain of a single chromosome is sufficient to switch a strain from the fluffy to the smooth state, and its subsequent loss to revert the strain back to the fluffy state. Because copy number imbalance of six of the 16 S. cerevisiae chromosomes and even a single gene can modulate the switch, our results support the hypothesis that the state switch is produced by dosage-sensitive genes, rather than a general response to altered DNA content. These findings add a complex, multicellular phenotype to the list of molecular and cellular traits known to be altered by aneuploidy and suggest that chromosome missegregation can provide a quick, heritable, and reversible mechanism by which organisms can toggle between phenotypes. PMID:23812752

  17. Aneuploidy underlies a multicellular phenotypic switch.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhihao; Hays, Michelle; Cromie, Gareth A; Jeffery, Eric W; Scott, Adrian C; Ahyong, Vida; Sirr, Amy; Skupin, Alexander; Dudley, Aimée M

    2013-07-23

    Although microorganisms are traditionally used to investigate unicellular processes, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the ability to form colonies with highly complex, multicellular structures. Colonies with the "fluffy" morphology have properties reminiscent of bacterial biofilms and are easily distinguished from the "smooth" colonies typically formed by laboratory strains. We have identified strains that are able to reversibly toggle between the fluffy and smooth colony-forming states. Using a combination of flow cytometry and high-throughput restriction-site associated DNA tag sequencing, we show that this switch is correlated with a change in chromosomal copy number. Furthermore, the gain of a single chromosome is sufficient to switch a strain from the fluffy to the smooth state, and its subsequent loss to revert the strain back to the fluffy state. Because copy number imbalance of six of the 16 S. cerevisiae chromosomes and even a single gene can modulate the switch, our results support the hypothesis that the state switch is produced by dosage-sensitive genes, rather than a general response to altered DNA content. These findings add a complex, multicellular phenotype to the list of molecular and cellular traits known to be altered by aneuploidy and suggest that chromosome missegregation can provide a quick, heritable, and reversible mechanism by which organisms can toggle between phenotypes. PMID:23812752

  18. Collective Calcium Signaling of Defective Multicellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A communicating multicellular network processes environmental cues into collective cellular dynamics. We have previously demonstrated that, when excited by extracellular ATP, fibroblast monolayers generate correlated calcium dynamics modulated by both the stimuli and gap junction communication between the cells. However, just as a well-connected neural network may be compromised by abnormal neurons, a tissue monolayer can also be defective with cancer cells, which typically have down regulated gap junctions. To understand the collective cellular dynamics in a defective multicellular network we have studied the calcium signaling of co-cultured breast cancer cells and fibroblast cells in various concentrations of ATP delivered through microfluidic devices. Our results demonstrate that cancer cells respond faster, generate singular spikes, and are more synchronous across all stimuli concentrations. Additionally, fibroblast cells exhibit persistent calcium oscillations that increase in regularity with greater stimuli. To interpret these results we quantitatively analyzed the immunostaining of purigenic receptors and gap junction channels. The results confirm our hypothesis that collective dynamics are mainly determined by the availability of gap junction communications.

  19. Deciphering unusual uncultured magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes through genomics

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Fernanda; Morillo, Viviana; Nascimento, Fabrícia F; Werneck, Clarissa; Cantão, Mauricio Egidio; Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Lefèvre, Christopher T; Bazylinski, Dennis A; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Lins, Ulysses

    2014-01-01

    Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis (Ca. M. multicellularis) is a member of a group of uncultured magnetotactic prokaryotes that possesses a unique multicellular morphology. To better understand this organism's physiology, we used a genomic approach through pyrosequencing. Genomic data analysis corroborates previous structural studies and reveals the proteins that are likely involved in multicellular morphogenesis of this microorganism. Interestingly, some detected protein sequences that might be involved in cell adhesion are homologues to phylogenetically unrelated filamentous multicellular bacteria proteins, suggesting their contribution in the early development of multicellular organization in Bacteria. Genes related to the behavior of Ca. M. multicellularis (chemo-, photo- and magnetotaxis) and its metabolic capabilities were analyzed. On the basis of the genomic–physiologic information, enrichment media were tested. One medium supported chemoorganoheterotrophic growth of Ca. M. multicellularis and allowed the microorganisms to maintain their multicellular morphology and cell cycle, confirming for the first time that the entire life cycle of the MMP occurs in a multicellular form. Because Ca. M. multicellularis has a unique multicellular life style, its cultivation is an important achievement for further studies regarding the multicellular evolution in prokaryotes. PMID:24196322

  20. Multicellular density fluctuations in epithelial monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehnder, Steven M.; Wiatt, Marina K.; Uruena, Juan M.; Dunn, Alison C.; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    2015-09-01

    Changes in cell size often accompany multicellular motion in tissue, and cell number density is known to strongly influence collective migration in monolayers. Density fluctuations in other forms of active matter have been explored extensively, but not the potential role of density fluctuations in collective cell migration. Here we investigate collective motion in cell monolayers, focusing on the divergent component of the migration velocity field to probe density fluctuations. We find spatial patterns of diverging and converging cell groups throughout the monolayers, which oscillate in time with a period of approximately 3-4 h. Simultaneous fluorescence measurements of a cytosol dye within the cells show that fluid passes between groups of cells, facilitating these oscillations in cell density. Our findings reveal that cell-cell interactions in monolayers may be mediated by intercellular fluid flow.

  1. Spheroid culture of LuCaP 136 patient-derived xenograft enables versatile preclinical models of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valta, Maija P; Zhao, Hongjuan; Saar, Matthias; Tuomela, Johanna; Nolley, Rosalie; Linxweiler, Johannes; Sandholm, Jouko; Lehtimäki, Jaakko; Härkönen, Pirkko; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S; Corey, Eva; Peehl, Donna M

    2016-04-01

    LuCaP serially transplantable patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are valuable preclinical models of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Using spheroid culture methodology, we recently established cell lines from several LuCaP PDXs. Here, we characterized in depth the features of xenografts derived from LuCaP 136 spheroid cultures and found faithful retention of the phenotype of the original PDX. In vitro culture enabled luciferase transfection into LuCaP 136 spheroids, facilitating in vivo imaging. We showed that LuCaP 136 spheroids formed intratibial, orthotopic, and subcutaneous tumors when re-introduced into mice. Intratibial tumors responded to castration and were highly osteosclerotic. LuCaP 136 is a realistic in vitro-in vivo preclinical model of a subtype of bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26873136

  2. Three-dimensional imaging and uptake of the anticancer drug combretastatin in cell spheroids and photoisomerization in gels with multiphoton excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Kathrin M.; Bisby, Roger H.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Hadfield, John A.; Haycock, John W.; Parker, Anthony W.

    2015-07-01

    The uptake of E-combretastatins, potential prodrugs of the anticancer Z-isomers, into multicellular spheroids has been imaged by intrinsic fluorescence in three dimensions using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging with 625-nm ultrafast femtosecond laser pulses. Uptake is initially observed at the spheroid periphery but extends to the spheroid core within 30 min. Using agarose gels as a three-dimensional model, the conversion of Z(trans)→E(cis) via two-photon photoisomerization is demonstrated and the location of this photochemical process may be precisely selected within the micron scale in all three dimensions at depths up to almost 2 mm. We discuss these results for enhanced tissue penetration at longer near-infrared wavelengths for cancer therapy and up to three-photon excitation and imaging using 930-nm laser pulses with suitable combretastatin analogs.

  3. Multicellular computing using conjugation for wiring.

    PubMed

    Goñi-Moreno, Angel; Amos, Martyn; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Recent efforts in synthetic biology have focussed on the implementation of logical functions within living cells. One aim is to facilitate both internal "re-programming" and external control of cells, with potential applications in a wide range of domains. However, fundamental limitations on the degree to which single cells may be re-engineered have led to a growth of interest in multicellular systems, in which a "computation" is distributed over a number of different cell types, in a manner analogous to modern computer networks. Within this model, individual cell type perform specific sub-tasks, the results of which are then communicated to other cell types for further processing. The manner in which outputs are communicated is therefore of great significance to the overall success of such a scheme. Previous experiments in distributed cellular computation have used global communication schemes, such as quorum sensing (QS), to implement the "wiring" between cell types. While useful, this method lacks specificity, and limits the amount of information that may be transferred at any one time. We propose an alternative scheme, based on specific cell-cell conjugation. This mechanism allows for the direct transfer of genetic information between bacteria, via circular DNA strands known as plasmids. We design a multi-cellular population that is able to compute, in a distributed fashion, a Boolean XOR function. Through this, we describe a general scheme for distributed logic that works by mixing different strains in a single population; this constitutes an important advantage of our novel approach. Importantly, the amount of genetic information exchanged through conjugation is significantly higher than the amount possible through QS-based communication. We provide full computational modelling and simulation results, using deterministic, stochastic and spatially-explicit methods. These simulations explore the behaviour of one possible conjugation-wired cellular computing

  4. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin; Rodesney, Chris; Roberts, Aled E. L.; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation. PMID:27006463

  5. Multicellular Computing Using Conjugation for Wiring

    PubMed Central

    Goñi-Moreno, Angel; Amos, Martyn; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Recent efforts in synthetic biology have focussed on the implementation of logical functions within living cells. One aim is to facilitate both internal “re-programming” and external control of cells, with potential applications in a wide range of domains. However, fundamental limitations on the degree to which single cells may be re-engineered have led to a growth of interest in multicellular systems, in which a “computation” is distributed over a number of different cell types, in a manner analogous to modern computer networks. Within this model, individual cell type perform specific sub-tasks, the results of which are then communicated to other cell types for further processing. The manner in which outputs are communicated is therefore of great significance to the overall success of such a scheme. Previous experiments in distributed cellular computation have used global communication schemes, such as quorum sensing (QS), to implement the “wiring” between cell types. While useful, this method lacks specificity, and limits the amount of information that may be transferred at any one time. We propose an alternative scheme, based on specific cell-cell conjugation. This mechanism allows for the direct transfer of genetic information between bacteria, via circular DNA strands known as plasmids. We design a multi-cellular population that is able to compute, in a distributed fashion, a Boolean XOR function. Through this, we describe a general scheme for distributed logic that works by mixing different strains in a single population; this constitutes an important advantage of our novel approach. Importantly, the amount of genetic information exchanged through conjugation is significantly higher than the amount possible through QS-based communication. We provide full computational modelling and simulation results, using deterministic, stochastic and spatially-explicit methods. These simulations explore the behaviour of one possible conjugation-wired cellular

  6. Geometry Shapes Evolution of Early Multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Eric; Ratcliff, William; Travisano, Michael; Kerr, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Organisms have increased in complexity through a series of major evolutionary transitions, in which formerly autonomous entities become parts of a novel higher-level entity. One intriguing feature of the higher-level entity after some major transitions is a division of reproductive labor among its lower-level units in which reproduction is the sole responsibility of a subset of units. Although it can have clear benefits once established, it is unknown how such reproductive division of labor originates. We consider a recent evolution experiment on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a unique platform to address the issue of reproductive differentiation during an evolutionary transition in individuality. In the experiment, independent yeast lineages evolved a multicellular “snowflake-like” cluster formed in response to gravity selection. Shortly after the evolution of clusters, the yeast evolved higher rates of cell death. While cell death enables clusters to split apart and form new groups, it also reduces their performance in the face of gravity selection. To understand the selective value of increased cell death, we create a mathematical model of the cellular arrangement within snowflake yeast clusters. The model reveals that the mechanism of cell death and the geometry of the snowflake interact in complex, evolutionarily important ways. We find that the organization of snowflake yeast imposes powerful limitations on the available space for new cell growth. By dying more frequently, cells in clusters avoid encountering space limitations, and, paradoxically, reach higher numbers. In addition, selection for particular group sizes can explain the increased rate of apoptosis both in terms of total cell number and total numbers of collectives. Thus, by considering the geometry of a primitive multicellular organism we can gain insight into the initial emergence of reproductive division of labor during an evolutionary transition in individuality. PMID:25233196

  7. Drug screening and grouping by sensitivity with a panel of primary cultured cancer spheroids derived from endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiyohara, Yumiko; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kubota, Satoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Endo, Hiroko; Ueda, Yutaka; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kimura, Tadashi; Kamiura, Shoji; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Several molecular targeting drugs are being evaluated for endometrial cancer; selecting patients whose cancers are sensitive to these agents is of paramount importance. Previously, we developed the cancer tissue-originated spheroid method for primary cancer cells taken from patients' tumors as well as patient-derived xenografts. In this study, we successfully prepared and cultured cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers. Characteristics of the original tumors were well retained in cancer tissue-originated spheroids including morphology and expression of p53 or neuroendocrine markers. We screened 79 molecular targeting drugs using two cancer tissue-originated spheroid lines derived from endometrioid adenocarcinoma grade 3 and serous adenocarcinoma. Among several hits, we focused on everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor, and YM155, a survivin inhibitor. When sensitivity to everolimus or YM155 was assessed in 12 or 11 cancer tissue-originated spheroids, respectively, from different endometrial cancer patients, the sensitivity varied substantially. The cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to everolimus showed remarkable suppression of proliferation. The phosphorylation status of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 downstream molecules before and after everolimus treatment did not predict the effect of the drug. In contrast, the cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to YM155 showed remarkable cell death. The effect of YM155 was also confirmed in vivo. The histological type correlated with YM155 sensitivity; non-endometrioid adenocarcinomas were sensitive and endometrioid adenocarcinomas were resistant. Non-canonical autophagic cell death was the most likely cause of cell death in a sensitive cancer tissue-originated spheroid. Thus, sensitivity assays using cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers may be useful for screening drugs and finding biomarkers. PMID:26825848

  8. Calcium Electroporation: Evidence for Differential Effects in Normal and Malignant Cell Lines, Evaluated in a 3D Spheroid Model

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Moinecha; Gehl, Julie; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill efficacy–and normal cell sensitivity. Methods Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). Results The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p<0.0001) or electrochemotherapy using bleomycin (p<0.0001). Strikingly, the size of normal fibroblast spheroids was neither affected after calcium electroporation nor electrochemotherapy using bleomycin, indicating that calcium electroporation, like electrochemotherapy, will have limited adverse effects on the surrounding normal tissue when treating with calcium electroporation. The intracellular ATP level, which has previously been shown to be depleted after calcium electroporation, was measured in the spheroids after treatment. The results showed a dramatic decrease in the intracellular ATP level (p<0.01) in all four spheroid types—malignant as well as normal. Conclusion In conclusion, calcium electroporation seems to be more effective in inducing cell death in cancer cell spheroids than in a normal fibroblast spheroid, even though intracellular ATP level is depleted in all spheroid types after treatment. These results may indicate an important therapeutic window for this therapy; although further studies are needed in vivo and in patients to investigate the effect of calcium electroporation on

  9. Multicellular architecture of malignant breast epithelia influences mechanics.

    PubMed

    Venugopalan, Gautham; Camarillo, David B; Webster, Kevin D; Reber, Clay D; Sethian, James A; Weaver, Valerie M; Fletcher, Daniel A; El-Samad, Hana; Rycroft, Chris H

    2014-01-01

    Cell-matrix and cell-cell mechanosensing are important in many cellular processes, particularly for epithelial cells. A crucial question, which remains unexplored, is how the mechanical microenvironment is altered as a result of changes to multicellular tissue structure during cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the influence of the multicellular tissue architecture on mechanical properties of the epithelial component of the mammary acinus. Using creep compression tests on multicellular breast epithelial structures, we found that pre-malignant acini with no lumen (MCF10AT) were significantly stiffer than normal hollow acini (MCF10A) by 60%. This difference depended on structural changes in the pre-malignant acini, as neither single cells nor normal multicellular acini tested before lumen formation exhibited these differences. To understand these differences, we simulated the deformation of the acini with different multicellular architectures and calculated their mechanical properties; our results suggest that lumen filling alone can explain the experimentally observed stiffness increase. We also simulated a single contracting cell in different multicellular architectures and found that lumen filling led to a 20% increase in the "perceived stiffness" of a single contracting cell independent of any changes to matrix mechanics. Our results suggest that lumen filling in carcinogenesis alters the mechanical microenvironment in multicellular epithelial structures, a phenotype that may cause downstream disruptions to mechanosensing. PMID:25111489

  10. Multicellular Architecture of Malignant Breast Epithelia Influences Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Kevin D.; Reber, Clay D.; Sethian, James A.; Weaver, Valerie M.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; El-Samad, Hana; Rycroft, Chris H.

    2014-01-01

    Cell–matrix and cell–cell mechanosensing are important in many cellular processes, particularly for epithelial cells. A crucial question, which remains unexplored, is how the mechanical microenvironment is altered as a result of changes to multicellular tissue structure during cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the influence of the multicellular tissue architecture on mechanical properties of the epithelial component of the mammary acinus. Using creep compression tests on multicellular breast epithelial structures, we found that pre-malignant acini with no lumen (MCF10AT) were significantly stiffer than normal hollow acini (MCF10A) by 60%. This difference depended on structural changes in the pre-malignant acini, as neither single cells nor normal multicellular acini tested before lumen formation exhibited these differences. To understand these differences, we simulated the deformation of the acini with different multicellular architectures and calculated their mechanical properties; our results suggest that lumen filling alone can explain the experimentally observed stiffness increase. We also simulated a single contracting cell in different multicellular architectures and found that lumen filling led to a 20% increase in the “perceived stiffness” of a single contracting cell independent of any changes to matrix mechanics. Our results suggest that lumen filling in carcinogenesis alters the mechanical microenvironment in multicellular epithelial structures, a phenotype that may cause downstream disruptions to mechanosensing. PMID:25111489

  11. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems. PMID:26708088

  12. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciumè, G.; Shelton, S.; Gray, W. G.; Miller, C. T.; Hussain, F.; Ferrari, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behavior of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory. A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TCs), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HCs); and an interstitial fluid for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a finite element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTSs) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behavior: initially, the rapidly growing TCs tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable TCs whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case—mostly due to the relative adhesion of the TCs and HCs to the ECM, and the less favorable transport of nutrients. In particular, for HCs adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced as the malignant mass grows, whereas TC

  13. Infection and cancer in multicellular organisms

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Paul W.; Swain Ewald, Holly A.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary considerations suggest that oncogenic infections should be pervasive among animal species. Infection-associated cancers are well documented in humans and domestic animals, less commonly reported in undomesticated captive animals, and rarely documented in nature. In this paper, we review the literature associating infectious agents with cancer to evaluate the reasons for this pattern. Non-malignant infectious neoplasms occur pervasively in multicellular life, but oncogenic progression to malignancy is often uncertain. Evidence from humans and domestic animals shows that non-malignant infectious neoplasms can develop into cancer, although generally with low frequency. Malignant neoplasms could be difficult to find in nature because of a low frequency of oncogenic transformation, short survival after malignancy and reduced survival prior to malignancy. Moreover, the evaluation of malignancy can be ambiguous in nature, because criteria for malignancy may be difficult to apply consistently across species. The information available in the literature therefore does not allow for a definitive assessment of the pervasiveness of infectious cancers in nature, but the presence of infectious neoplasias and knowledge about the progression of benign neoplasias to cancer is consistent with a widespread but largely undetected occurrence. PMID:26056368

  14. Multicellular oxidant defense in unicellular organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, M; Eaton, J W

    1992-01-01

    Although catalase is thought to be a major defense against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the catalase activity within individual Escherichia coli fails to protect against exogenous H2O2. Contrary to earlier reports, we find that dilute suspensions of wild-type and catalase-deficient E. coli are identical in their sensitivity to H2O2, perhaps because even wild-type, catalase-positive E. coli cannot maintain an internal/external concentration gradient of this highly diffusible oxidant. However, concentrated suspensions or colonies of catalase-positive E. coli do preferentially survive H2O2 challenge and can even cross-protect adjacent catalase-deficient organisms. Furthermore, high-density catalase-positive--but not catalase-negative--E. coli can survive and multiply in the presence of competitive, peroxide-generating streptococci. These observations support the concept that bacterial catalase may defend colonial, but not individual, E. coli against environmental H2O2. Group protection by the activity of enzymes that mitigate oxidative stress may have been a driving force in the evolution of multicellular organisms. Images PMID:1518815

  15. Infection and cancer in multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Paul W; Swain Ewald, Holly A

    2015-07-19

    Evolutionary considerations suggest that oncogenic infections should be pervasive among animal species. Infection-associated cancers are well documented in humans and domestic animals, less commonly reported in undomesticated captive animals, and rarely documented in nature. In this paper, we review the literature associating infectious agents with cancer to evaluate the reasons for this pattern. Non-malignant infectious neoplasms occur pervasively in multicellular life, but oncogenic progression to malignancy is often uncertain. Evidence from humans and domestic animals shows that non-malignant infectious neoplasms can develop into cancer, although generally with low frequency. Malignant neoplasms could be difficult to find in nature because of a low frequency of oncogenic transformation, short survival after malignancy and reduced survival prior to malignancy. Moreover, the evaluation of malignancy can be ambiguous in nature, because criteria for malignancy may be difficult to apply consistently across species. The information available in the literature therefore does not allow for a definitive assessment of the pervasiveness of infectious cancers in nature, but the presence of infectious neoplasias and knowledge about the progression of benign neoplasias to cancer is consistent with a widespread but largely undetected occurrence. PMID:26056368

  16. Apprehending multicellularity: regulatory networks, genomics, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Anantharaman, Vivek; Venancio, Thiago M

    2009-06-01

    The genomic revolution has provided the first glimpses of the architecture of regulatory networks. Combined with evolutionary information, the "network view" of life processes leads to remarkable insights into how biological systems have been shaped by various forces. This understanding is critical because biological systems, including regulatory networks, are not products of engineering but of historical contingencies. In this light, we attempt a synthetic overview of the natural history of regulatory networks operating in the development and differentiation of multicellular organisms. We first introduce regulatory networks and their organizational principles as can be deduced using ideas from the graph theory. We then discuss findings from comparative genomics to illustrate the effects of lineage-specific expansions, gene-loss, and nonprotein-coding DNA on the architecture of networks. We consider the interaction between expansions of transcription factors, and cis regulatory and more general chromatin state stabilizing elements in the emergence of morphological complexity. Finally, we consider a case study of the Notch subnetwork, which is present throughout Metazoa, to examine how such a regulatory system has been pieced together in evolution from new innovations and pre-existing components that were originally functionally distinct. PMID:19530132

  17. Apprehending multicellularity: regulatory networks, genomics and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L.; Anantharaman, Vivek; Venancio, Thiago M.

    2009-01-01

    The genomic revolution has provided the first glimpses of the architecture of regulatory networks. Combined with evolutionary information, the “network view” of life processes leads to remarkable insights into how biological systems have been shaped by various forces. This understanding is critical because biological systems, including regulatory networks, are not products of engineering but of historical contingencies. In this light, we attempt a synthetic overview of the natural history of regulatory networks operating in the development and differentiation of multicellular organisms. We first introduce regulatory networks and their organizational principles as can be deduced using ideas from the graph theory. We then discuss findings from comparative genomics to illustrate the effects of lineage-specific expansions, gene-loss, and non-protein-coding DNA on the architecture of networks. We consider the interaction between expansions of transcription factors, and cis regulatory and more general chromatin state stabilizing elements in the emergence of morphological complexity. Finally, we consider a case study of the Notch sub-network, which is present throughout Metazoa, to examine how such a regulatory system has been pieced together in evolution from new innovations and pre-existing components that were originally functionally distinct. PMID:19530132

  18. Programmed packaging of mesoporous silica nanocarriers for matrix metalloprotease 2-triggered tumor targeting and release.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhen; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Dinggeng; Wang, Kemin; Qing, Zhihe; Yang, Xue; Wen, Li; Xiong, Jun; Li, Liling; Cai, Linli

    2015-07-01

    The development of multifunctional nanocarrier with each unit functioning at the correct time and location is a challenge for clinical applications. With this in mind, a type of intelligent mesoporous silica nanocarrier (PGFMSN) is proposed for matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP 2)-triggered tumor targeting and release by integrating programmed packing and MMP 2-degradable gelatin. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) are first functionalized with folic acid (FA) as a target ligand to improve cell uptake. Then gelatin is introduced onto FA-MSN via temperature-induced gelation, where gelatin layer blocks drugs inside the mesopores and protects the targeting ligand. To prolong blood-circulation lifetime, PEG is further decorated to obtain PGFMSN. All units are programmatically incorporated in a simple way and coordinated in an optimal fashion. Cells, multicellular spheroids and in vivo results demonstrate that PGFMSN is shielded against nonspecific uptake. After circulating to tumor tissue, the up-regulated MMP-2 hydrolyzes gelatin layer to deshield PEG and switch on the function of FA, which facilitate the selective uptake by tumor cells through folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis. Meanwhile, the packaged drug is released due to the shedding of gelatin layer. It is shown that doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded exhibits superior tumor targeting, drug internalization, cytotoxicity, and antitumor efficacy over free DOX, non-PEGylated and non-targeted nanoparticles, which provides potential applications for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:25941780

  19. Aggregative multicellularity evolved independently in the eukaryotic supergroup Rhizaria.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew W; Kolisko, Martin; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Roger, Andrew J

    2012-06-19

    Multicellular forms of life have evolved many times, independently giving rise to a diversity of organisms such as animals, plants, and fungi that together comprise the visible biosphere. Yet multicellular life is far more widespread among eukaryotes than just these three lineages. A particularly common form of multicellularity is a social aggregative fruiting lifestyle whereby individual cells associate to form a "fungus-like" sorocarp. This complex developmental process that requires the interaction of thousands of cells working in concert was made famous by the "cellular slime mold"Dictyostelium discoideum, which became an important model organism. Although sorocarpic protistan lineages have been identified in five of the major eukaryote groups, the ubiquitous and globally distributed species Guttulinopsis vulgaris has eluded proper classification. Here we demonstrate, by phylogenomic analyses of a 159-protein data set, that G. vulgaris is a member of Rhizaria and is thus the first member of this eukaryote supergroup known to be capable of aggregative multicellularity. PMID:22608512

  20. Mechanical Trade-offs in Experimentally Evolved Multicellular Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobeen, Shane; Pentz, Jennifer; Ratcliff, William; Yunker, Peter

    The evolution of multicellularity as much about physics as it is about biology, as selection acts on the physical properties of multicellular bodies. Nascent multicellular organisms are confronted by internal and external forces that act on large length scales and are capable of fracturing intercellular bonds. We study the evolution of the mechanical properties of multicellular `snowflake' yeast that were selected for increased size over ~1,500 generations. While these snowflakes evolve to be larger by mitigating internal forces, they also become more susceptible to fracturing when faced with external compressive forces. Using confocal microscopy and direct mechanical measurements, we investigate the physical underpinnings and consequences of this strength-toughness trade-off.

  1. Collective behavior of brain tumor cells: The role of hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Katakowski, Mark; Hopkins, Scott; Szalad, Alexandra; Zheng, Xuguang; Jiang, Feng; Chopp, Michael

    2011-03-01

    We consider emergent collective behavior of a multicellular biological system. Specifically, we investigate the role of hypoxia (lack of oxygen) in migration of brain tumor cells. We performed two series of cell migration experiments. In the first set of experiments, cell migration away from a tumor spheroid was investigated. The second set of experiments was performed in a typical wound-healing geometry: Cells were placed on a substrate, a scratch was made, and cell migration into the gap was investigated. Experiments show a surprising result: Cells under normal and hypoxic conditions have migrated the same distance in the “spheroid” experiment, while in the “scratch” experiment cells under normal conditions migrated much faster than under hypoxic conditions. To explain this paradox, we formulate a discrete stochastic model for cell dynamics. The theoretical model explains our experimental observations and suggests that hypoxia decreases both the motility of cells and the strength of cell-cell adhesion. The theoretical predictions were further verified in independent experiments.

  2. Evaluation of drug penetration with cationic micelles and their penetration mechanism using an in vitro tumor model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Bae, You Han

    2016-08-01

    Elevated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) and abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM) are major factors causing significant barriers to penetration of nanomedicines in solid tumors. To better understand the barriers, various in vitro tumor models including multicellular spheroids and multilayered cell cultures (MCCs) have been developing. Recently, we have established a unique in vitro tumor model composed of a MCC and an Ussing chamber system which is modified to add a hydraulic pressure gradient through the MCC. In this study, we evaluated the drug penetration ability of cationic micelles using the unique in vitro tumor model. The doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded cationic micelles, which are formed from a triblock copolymer of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-branched polyethyleneimine-block-poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide), deeply penetrated and released the DOX throughout the MCC against convectional flow caused by a hydraulic pressure gradient. The studies using endocytosis markers and inhibitors showed that the micelles utilized mainly macropinocytosis as an internalization pathway. Furthermore, the penetration was apparently inhibited by treatment with exocytosis inhibitor Exo1. These results suggest that the active penetration of the cationic micelles is induced by iterative transcytosis via macropinocytosis and exocytosis. Our findings could be beneficial information to improve intratumoral penetration in new nanomedicines for solid tumors. PMID:27182814

  3. Global gene expression analysis of early response to chemotherapy treatment in ovarian cancer spheroids

    PubMed Central

    L'Espérance, Sylvain; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Tetu, Bernard; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2008-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy (CT) resistance in ovarian cancer (OC) is broad and encompasses diverse unrelated drugs, suggesting more than one mechanism of resistance. To better understand the molecular mechanisms controlling the immediate response of OC cells to CT exposure, we have performed gene expression profiling in spheroid cultures derived from six OC cell lines (OVCAR3, SKOV3, TOV-112, TOV-21, OV-90 and TOV-155), following treatment with 10,0 μM cisplatin, 2,5 μM paclitaxel or 5,0 μM topotecan for 72 hours. Results Exposure of OC spheroids to these CT drugs resulted in differential expression of genes associated with cell growth and proliferation, cellular assembly and organization, cell death, cell cycle control and cell signaling. Genes, functionally involved in DNA repair, DNA replication and cell cycle arrest were mostly overexpressed, while genes implicated in metabolism (especially lipid metabolism), signal transduction, immune and inflammatory response, transport, transcription regulation and protein biosynthesis, were commonly suppressed following all treatments. Cisplatin and topotecan treatments triggered similar alterations in gene and pathway expression patterns, while paclitaxel action was mainly associated with induction of genes and pathways linked to cellular assembly and organization (including numerous tubulin genes), cell death and protein synthesis. The microarray data were further confirmed by pathway and network analyses. Conclusion Most alterations in gene expression were directly related to mechanisms of the cytotoxics actions in OC spheroids. However, the induction of genes linked to mechanisms of DNA replication and repair in cisplatin- and topotecan-treated OC spheroids could be associated with immediate adaptive response to treatment. Similarly, overexpression of different tubulin genes upon exposure to paclitaxel could represent an early compensatory effect to this drug action. Finally, multicellular growth conditions that are

  4. Oncolytic newcastle disease virus triggers cell death of lung cancer spheroids and is enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lulu; Sun, Sulan; Wang, Tianpeng; Li, Yingchun; Jiang, Ke; Lin, Guibin; Ma, Yan; Barr, Martin P; Song, Fei; Zhang, Guirong; Meng, Songshu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been isolated from lung cancer patient samples and have been reported to be responsible for tumor initiation, treatment resistance and tumor recurrence. We have previously shown that oncolytic Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain FMW (NDV/FMW) induces apoptosis in drug-resistant lung cancer cells. However, how NDV exerts its oncolytic effect on lung CSCs remains to be investigated. Here we show that NDV/FMW replicates in, and lyses CSC-enriched lung cancer spheroids and inhibits the 3D growth potential of lung cancer spheroid and agar colonies. We demonstrate that NDV/FMW triggers caspase-dependent apoptosis in lung cancer spheroids as shown by increased caspase-3 processing and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Notably, NDV/FMW infection results in the degradation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) II and P62, two hallmarks of autophagy maturation, indicating that NDV/FMW promotes autophagy flux in lung cancer cell spheroids. This was further confirmed by the appearance of an increased number of double-membrane vesicles as detected by transmission electron microscopy. We also show that NDV/FMW promotes autophagy degradation in lung cancer spheroids via inhibition of the AKT/mTOR pathway. In addition, treatment of spheroids with the autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine increases NDV/FMW-induced cytotoxicity. Collectively, our data show that oncolytic NDV/FMW may be a potential strategy in targeting lung CSCs. PMID:26885450

  5. Rapid Formation of Cell Aggregates and Spheroids Induced by a "Smart" Boronic Acid Copolymer.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Adérito J R; Pasparakis, George

    2016-09-01

    Cell surface engineering has emerged as a powerful approach to forming cell aggregates/spheroids and cell-biomaterial ensembles with significant uses in tissue engineering and cell therapeutics. Herein, we demonstrate that cell membrane remodeling with a thermoresponsive boronic acid copolymer induces the rapid formation of spheroids using either cancer or cardiac cell lines under conventional cell culture conditions at minute concentrations. It is shown that the formation of well-defined spheroids is accelerated by at least 24 h compared to non-polymer-treated controls, and, more importantly, the polymer allows for fine control of the aggregation kinetics owing to its stimulus response to temperature and glucose content. On the basis of its simplicity and effectiveness to promote cellular aggregation, this platform holds promise in three-dimensional tissue/tumor modeling and tissue engineering applications. PMID:27571512

  6. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  7. Approximating spheroid inductive responses using spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank

    2003-12-12

    The response of high permeability ({mu}{sub r} {ge} 50) conductive spheroids of moderate aspect ratios (0.25 to 4) to excitation by uniform magnetic fields in the axial or transverse directions is approximated by the response of spheres of appropriate diameters, of the same conductivity and permeability, with magnitude rescaled based on the differing volumes, D.C. magnetizations, and high frequency limit responses of the spheres and modeled spheroids.

  8. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and resonant orbital coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.; Miller, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The structural properties of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way may be strongly affected by their time-dependent interactions with the 'tidal' field of the Milky Way. A low Q resonance of the tidal driving force with collective oscillation modes of the dwarf system can produce many of the observed properties of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including large velocity dispersions that would normally be interpreted as indicating large dynamical masses.

  9. α2β1 integrin affects metastatic potential of ovarian carcinoma spheroids by supporting disaggregation and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Shield, Kristy; Riley, Clyde; Quinn, Michael A; Rice, Gregory E; Ackland, Margaret L; Ahmed, Nuzhat

    2007-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer is characterized by a wide-spread intra-abdominal metastases which represents a major clinical hurdle in the prognosis and management of the disease. A significant proportion of ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal ascites exist as multicellular aggregates or spheroids. We hypothesize that these cellular aggregates or spheroids are invasive with the capacity to survive and implant on the peritoneal surface. This study was designed to elucidate early inherent mechanism(s) of spheroid survival, growth and disaggregation required for peritoneal metastases Methods In this study, we determined the growth pattern and adhesive capacity of ovarian cancer cell lines (HEY and OVHS1) grown as spheroids, using the well established liquid overlay technique, and compared them to a normal ovarian cell line (IOSE29) and cancer cells grown as a monolayer. The proteolytic capacity of these spheroids was compared with cells grown as a monolayer using a gelatin zymography assay to analyze secreted MMP-2/9 in conditioned serum-free medium. The disaggregation of cancer cell line spheroids was determined on extracellular matrices (ECM) such as laminin (LM), fibronectin (FN) and collagen (CI) and the expression of α2, α3, αv, α6 and β1 interin was determined by flow cytometric analysis. Neutralizing antibodies against α2, β1 subunits and α2β1 integrin was used to inhibit disaggregation as well as activation of MMPs in spheroids. Results We demonstrate that ovarian cancer cell lines grown as spheroids can sustain growth for 10 days while the normal ovarian cell line failed to grow beyond 2 days. Compared to cells grown as a monolayer, cancer cells grown as spheroids demonstrated no change in adhesion for up to 4 days, while IOSE29 cells had a 2–4-fold loss of adhesion within 2 days. Cancer cell spheroids disaggregated on extracellular matrices (ECM) and demonstrated enhanced expression of secreted pro-MMP2 as well as activated MMP2/MMP9 with no such

  10. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a tumor is cancer , possible treatments may include: Chemotherapy Radiation Surgery Targeted cancer therapy Biologic therapy Other treatment options

  11. Comparison of IgG diffusion and extracellular matrix composition in rhabdomyosarcomas grown in mice versus in vitro as spheroids reveals the role of host stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Davies, C de L; Berk, D A; Pluen, A; Jain, R K

    2002-01-01

    The tumour extracellular matrix acts as a barrier to the delivery of therapeutic agents. To test the hypothesis that extracellular matrix composition governs the penetration rate of macromolecules in tumour tissue, we measured the diffusion coefficient of nonspecific IgG in three rhabdomyosarcoma subclones growing as multicellular spheroids in vitro or as subcutaneous tumours in dorsal windows in vivo. In subcutaneous tumours, the diffusion coefficient decreased with increasing content of collagen and sulphated glycosaminoglycans. When grown as multicellular spheroids, no differences in either extracellular matrix composition or diffusion coefficient were found. Comparison of in vitro vs in vivo results suggests an over-riding role of host stromal cells in extracellular matrix production subjected to modulation by tumour cells. Penetration of therapeutic macromolecules through tumour extracellular matrix might thus be largely determined by the host organ. Hence, caution must be exercised in extrapolating drug penetrability from spheroids and multilayer cellular sandwiches consisting of only tumour cells to tumours in vivo. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1639–1644. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600270 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085216

  12. Spreading and spontaneous motility of multicellular aggregates on soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    We first describe the biomechanics of multicellular aggregates, a model system for tissues and tumors. We first characterize the tissue mechanical properties (surface tension, elasticity, viscosity) by a new pipette aspiration technique. The aggregate exhibits a viscoelastic response but, unlike an inert fluid, we observe aggregate reinforcement with pressure, which for a narrow range of pressures results in pulsed contractions or shivering. We interpret this reinforcement as a mechanosensitive active response of the acto-myosin cortex. Such an active behavior has previously been found to cause tissue pulsation during dorsal closure of Drosophila embryo. We then describe the spreading of aggregates on rigid glass substrates, varying both intercellular and substrate adhesion. We find both partial and complete wetting regimes. For the dynamics, we find a universal spreading law at short time, analogous to that of a viscoelastic drop. At long time, we observe, for strong substrate adhesion, a precursor film spreading around the aggregate. Depending on aggregate cohesion, this precursor film can be a dense cellular monolayer (liquid state) or consist of individual cells escaping from the aggregate body (gas state). The transition from liquid to gas state appears also to be present in the progression of a tumor from noninvasive to metastatic, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we describe the effect of the substrate rigidity on the phase diagram of wetting. On soft gels decorated with fibronectin and strongly cohesive aggregates, we have observed a wetting transition induced by the substrate rigidity: on ultra soft gels, below an elastic modulus Ec the aggregates do not spread, whereas above Ec we observe a precursor film expending with a diffusive law. The diffusion coefficient D(E) present a maximum for E =Em. A maximum of mobility versus the substrate rigidity had also been observed for single cells. Near Em, we observe a new phenomenon: a cell

  13. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Domozych, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In “ulvophytes,” uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell’s signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity. PMID:25477895

  14. Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Matthew D.; Hackett, Jeremiah D.; Aylward, Frank O.; Michod, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary transitions in individuality (ETIs) underlie the watershed events in the history of life on Earth, including the origins of cells, eukaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi. Each of these events constitutes an increase in the level of complexity, as groups of individuals become individuals in their own right. Among the best-studied ETIs is the origin of multicellularity in the green alga Volvox, a model system for the evolution of multicellularity and cellular differentiation. Since its divergence from unicellular ancestors, Volvox has evolved into a highly integrated multicellular organism with cellular specialization, a complex developmental program, and a high degree of coordination among cells. Remarkably, all of these changes were previously thought to have occurred in the last 50–75 million years. Here we estimate divergence times using a multigene data set with multiple fossil calibrations and use these estimates to infer the times of developmental changes relevant to the evolution of multicellularity. Our results show that Volvox diverged from unicellular ancestors at least 200 million years ago. Two key innovations resulting from an early cycle of cooperation, conflict and conflict mediation led to a rapid integration and radiation of multicellular forms in this group. This is the only ETI for which a detailed timeline has been established, but multilevel selection theory predicts that similar changes must have occurred during other ETIs. PMID:19223580

  15. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex.

    PubMed

    Domozych, David S; Domozych, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In "ulvophytes," uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell's signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity. PMID:25477895

  16. Evaluation of bioreductive drugs in multicell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Durand, R E; Olive, P L

    1992-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of a variety of bioreductive agents, including misonidazole, RSU-1069, NFVO, mitomycin C, porfiromycin, and SR-4233 was evaluated using Chinese hamster V79 multicell spheroids in vitro. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting techniques were used to selectively recover cells from various depths within the spheroids to measure the differential cytotoxicity in the cells near the hypoxic core of the spheroid relative to the well oxygenated peripheral cells. At the high cell density found in spheroids (as in tissues in vivo) the differential toxicity observed was typically much less than expected, based on data from single cell systems. In some cases, this was due to lack of sufficient hypoxia in the spheroids; in other cases, drug treatment itself produced reoxygenation through metabolic or toxic effects during treatment. An unexpected observation of considerable concern was rapid bioreduction of the more active agents; this sometimes occurred at rates that exceeded drug delivery, resulting in considerably less efficacy when large hypoxic fractions were present (e.g. mitomycin C, NFVO, and SR-4233). This suggests that induction of hypoxia prior to bioreductive agent therapy may not be the most productive approach. Though none of the agents showed "ideal" properties, porfiromycin was judged to give the best combination of differential toxicity, longevity in situ, and ability to reach the entire hypoxic cell subpopulation. PMID:1544838

  17. A conceptual framework for the evolutionary origins of multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libby, Eric; Rainey, Paul B.

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular counterparts involved a transition in Darwinian individuality from single cells to groups. A particular challenge is to understand the nature of the earliest groups, the causes of their evolution, and the opportunities for emergence of Darwinian properties. Here we outline a conceptual framework based on a logical set of possible pathways for evolution of the simplest self-replicating groups. Central to these pathways is the recognition of a finite number of routes by which genetic information can be transmitted between individual cells and groups. We describe the form and organization of each primordial group state and consider factors affecting persistence and evolution of the nascent multicellular forms. Implications arising from our conceptual framework become apparent when attempting to partition fitness effects at individual and group levels. These are discussed with reference to the evolutionary emergence of individuality and its manifestation in extant multicellular life—including those of marginal Darwinian status.

  18. Development of size-customized hepatocarcinoma spheroids as a potential drug testing platform using a sacrificial gelatin microsphere system.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wenyan; Kremer, Antje; Wang, Dong-An

    2016-06-01

    Sacrificial gelatin microspheres can be developed as a cell delivery vehicle for non-anchorage dependent cells - its incorporation into a macroscopic scaffold system not only allows the cells to be cultured in suspension within cavities left behind by the sacrificial material, it also allows scaffold-free tissue development to be confined within the cavities. In this study, dense and highly viable hepatocarcinoma spheroids were developed by means of encapsulation in sacrificial gelatin microspheres produced via a simple water-in-oil emulsion technique. By initial selection of microsphere size and distribution, spheroid size can be controlled for various applications such as uniform tumor spheroids as a reproducible three-dimensional drug screening and testing platform that better mimics the in vivo nature of tumors (instead of conventional monolayer culture), as this study has suggested as a proof-of-concept with chemotherapy drug Doxorubicin. PMID:27040260

  19. Radiation-induced bystander effect in non-irradiated glioblastoma spheroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Faqihi, Fahime; Neshastehriz, Ali; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Shabani, Robabeh; Eivazzadeh, Nazila

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs) are detected in cells that are not irradiated but receive signals from treated cells. The present study explored these bystander effects in a U87MG multicellular tumour spheroid model. A medium transfer technique was employed to induce the bystander effect, and colony formation assay was used to evaluate the effect. Relative changes in expression of BAX, BCL2, JNK and ERK genes were analysed using RT-PCR to investigate the RIBE mechanism. A significant decrease in plating efficiency was observed for both bystander and irradiated cells. The survival fraction was calculated for bystander cells to be 69.48% and for irradiated cells to be 34.68%. There was no change in pro-apoptotic BAX relative expression, but anti-apoptotic BCL2 showed downregulation in both irradiated and bystander cells. Pro-apoptotic JNK in bystander samples and ERK in irradiated samples were upregulated. The clonogenic survival data suggests that there was a classic RIBE in U87MG spheroids exposed to 4 Gy of X-rays, using a medium transfer technique. Changes in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes indicate involvement of both intrinsic apoptotic and MAPK pathways in inducing these effects. PMID:26160180

  20. Multiscale modeling of the dynamics of multicellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2011-03-01

    Describing the biomechanical properties of cellular systems, regarded as complex highly viscoelastic materials, is a difficult problem of great conceptual and practical value. Here we present a novel approach, referred to as the Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) method, for: (i) quantitatively relating biomechanical properties at the cell level to those at the multicellular and tissue level, and (ii) describing and predicting the time evolution of multicellular systems that undergo biomechanical relaxations. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. Cell and multicellular level biomechanical properties (e.g., viscosity, surface tension and shear modulus) are determined through the combined use of experiments and theory of continuum viscoelastic media. The same biomechanical properties are also ``measured'' computationally by employing the CPD method, the results being expressed in terms of CPD parameters. Once these parameters have been calibrated experimentally, the formalism provides a systematic framework to predict the time evolution of complex multicellular systems during shape-changing biomechanical transformations. By design, the CPD method is rather flexible and most suitable for multiscale modeling of multicellular system. The spatial level of detail of the system can be easily tuned by changing the number of CPs in a cell. Thus, CPD can be used equally well to describe both cell level processes (e.g., the adhesion of two cells) and tissue level processes (e.g., the formation of 3D constructs of millions of cells through bioprinting). Work supported by NSF [FIBR-0526854 and PHY-0957914

  1. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, J.; Theuwissen, K.; Laffont, L.; Véron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions.

  2. Electrostatic disruption of a charged conducting spheroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. R.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic disruption of elongated parent grains following sudden charging to high electrostatic potentials is proposed as a specific mechanism for the appearance of striae or pseudosynchronic bands which have been observed in several comets. The polar and equatorial electrostatic tension for axis ratios between 0.01 and 1000 are calculated, and the polar pressure is found to be larger than the equatorial pressure for prolate spheroids. The electrostatic polar pressure profile along the polar axis for prolate spheroids is calculated, and the pressure is found to increase monotonically from a minimum at the center to a maxima at the ends. This indicates that as a prolate spheroid of uniform tensile strength is charged up, it will continue to chip off at the ends when the electrostatic pressure there exceeds the uniform tensile strength of the grain. The result can be a prolate grain or a grain which continues chipping until it explodes.

  3. Prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    As a modification of the oblate spheroidal case, a recursive method is developed to compute the point value and a few low-order derivatives of the prolate spheroidal harmonics of the second kind, Q{sub nm} (y), namely the unnormalized associated Legendre function (ALF) of the second kind with its argument in the domain, 1 < y < ∞. They are required in evaluating the prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of the gravitational field in addition to the point value and the low-order derivatives of P-bar {sub nm}(t), the 4π fully normalized ALF of the first kind with its argument in the domain, |t| ≤ 1. The new method will be useful in the gravitational field computation of elongated celestial objects.

  4. The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Andromeda I

    SciTech Connect

    Mould, J.; Kristian, J. Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    Images of Andromeda I in the visual and near-infrared show a giant branch characteristic of galactic globular clusters of intermediate metallicity. The distance of the galaxy is estimated from the tip of the giant branch to be 790 + or - 60 kpc. The physical dimensions and luminosity are similar to those of the dwarf spheroidal in Sculptor. There is no evidence for an intermediate age population in Andromeda I, and appropriate upper limits are specified. There is marginal evidence for a color gradient in the galaxy, a phenomenon not previously noted in a dwarf spheroidal. 21 refs.

  5. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  6. The reverse evolution from multicellularity to unicellularity during carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han; Lin, Fangqin; Xing, Ke; He, Xionglei

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical reasoning suggests that cancer may result from a knockdown of the genetic constraints that evolved for the maintenance of metazoan multicellularity. By characterizing the whole-life history of a xenograft tumour, here we show that metastasis is driven by positive selection for general loss-of-function mutations on multicellularity-related genes. Expression analyses reveal mainly downregulation of multicellularity-related genes and an evolving expression profile towards that of embryonic stem cells, the cell type resembling unicellular life in its capacity of unlimited clonal proliferation. Also, the emergence of metazoan multicellularity ~600 Myr ago is accompanied by an elevated birth rate of cancer genes, and there are more loss-of-function tumour suppressors than activated oncogenes in a typical tumour. These data collectively suggest that cancer represents a loss-of-function-driven reverse evolution back to the unicellular 'ground state'. This cancer evolution model may account for inter-/intratumoural genetic heterogeneity, could explain distant-organ metastases and hold implications for cancer therapy. PMID:25751731

  7. Regulated aggregative multicellularity in a close unicellular relative of metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Irimia, Manuel; del Campo, Javier; Parra-Acero, Helena; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of metazoans from their unicellular ancestors was one of the most important events in the history of life. However, the cellular and genetic changes that ultimately led to the evolution of multicellularity are not known. In this study, we describe an aggregative multicellular stage in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of metazoans. Remarkably, transition to the aggregative stage is associated with significant upregulation of orthologs of genes known to establish multicellularity and tissue architecture in metazoans. We further observe transitions in regulated alternative splicing during the C. owczarzaki life cycle, including the deployment of an exon network associated with signaling, a feature of splicing regulation so far only observed in metazoans. Our results reveal the existence of a highly regulated aggregative stage in C. owczarzaki and further suggest that features of aggregative behavior in an ancestral protist may had been co-opted to develop some multicellular properties currently seen in metazoans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01287.001 PMID:24368732

  8. Kinetic Monte Carlo and cellular particle dynamics simulations of multicellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flenner, Elijah; Janosi, Lorant; Barz, Bogdan; Neagu, Adrian; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2012-03-01

    Computer modeling of multicellular systems has been a valuable tool for interpreting and guiding in vitro experiments relevant to embryonic morphogenesis, tumor growth, angiogenesis and, lately, structure formation following the printing of cell aggregates as bioink particles. Here we formulate two computer simulation methods: (1) a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and (2) a cellular particle dynamics (CPD) method, which are capable of describing and predicting the shape evolution in time of three-dimensional multicellular systems during their biomechanical relaxation. Our work is motivated by the need of developing quantitative methods for optimizing postprinting structure formation in bioprinting-assisted tissue engineering. The KMC and CPD model parameters are determined and calibrated by using an original computational-theoretical-experimental framework applied to the fusion of two spherical cell aggregates. The two methods are used to predict the (1) formation of a toroidal structure through fusion of spherical aggregates and (2) cell sorting within an aggregate formed by two types of cells with different adhesivities.

  9. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  10. Engineered three-dimensional microfluidic device for interrogating cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hockemeyer, K.; Janetopoulos, C.; Terekhov, A.; Hofmeister, W.; Vilgelm, A.; Costa, Lino; Wikswo, J. P.; Richmond, A.

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play a key role in the metastatic properties of a tumor. It is recognized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells secrete factors capable of influencing tumor cell migration into the blood or lymphatic vessels. We developed a microfluidic device that can be used to image the interactions between stromal cells and tumor cell spheroids in a three dimensional (3D) microenvironment while enabling external control of interstitial flow at an interface, which supports endothelial cells. The apparatus couples a 200-μm channel with a semicircular well to mimic the interface of a blood vessel with the stroma, and the design allows for visualization of the interactions of interstitial flow, endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts with the tumor cells. We observed that normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) contribute to the “single file” pattern of migration of tumor cells from the spheroid in the 3D microenvironment. In contrast, CAFs induce a rapid dispersion of tumor cells out of the spheroid with migration into the 3D matrix. Moreover, treatment of tumor spheroid cultures with the chemokine CXCL12 mimics the effect of the CAFs, resulting in similar patterns of dispersal of the tumor cells from the spheroid. Conversely, addition of CXCL12 to co-cultures of NAFs with tumor spheroids did not mimic the effects observed with CAF co-cultures, suggesting that NAFs produce factors that stabilize the tumor spheroids to reduce their migration in response to CXCL12. PMID:25379090

  11. Engineered three-dimensional microfluidic device for interrogating cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hockemeyer, K; Janetopoulos, C; Terekhov, A; Hofmeister, W; Vilgelm, A; Costa, Lino; Wikswo, J P; Richmond, A

    2014-07-01

    Stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play a key role in the metastatic properties of a tumor. It is recognized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells secrete factors capable of influencing tumor cell migration into the blood or lymphatic vessels. We developed a microfluidic device that can be used to image the interactions between stromal cells and tumor cell spheroids in a three dimensional (3D) microenvironment while enabling external control of interstitial flow at an interface, which supports endothelial cells. The apparatus couples a 200-μm channel with a semicircular well to mimic the interface of a blood vessel with the stroma, and the design allows for visualization of the interactions of interstitial flow, endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts with the tumor cells. We observed that normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) contribute to the "single file" pattern of migration of tumor cells from the spheroid in the 3D microenvironment. In contrast, CAFs induce a rapid dispersion of tumor cells out of the spheroid with migration into the 3D matrix. Moreover, treatment of tumor spheroid cultures with the chemokine CXCL12 mimics the effect of the CAFs, resulting in similar patterns of dispersal of the tumor cells from the spheroid. Conversely, addition of CXCL12 to co-cultures of NAFs with tumor spheroids did not mimic the effects observed with CAF co-cultures, suggesting that NAFs produce factors that stabilize the tumor spheroids to reduce their migration in response to CXCL12. PMID:25379090

  12. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems. PMID:27575790

  13. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems. PMID:27575790

  14. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Associates with Maintenance of Stemness in Spheroid-Derived Stem-Like Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Feng; Zhang, Shi; Zhang, Fu-Cheng; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Lan, Tian-Yun; Lu, Hui-Qiong; Wei, Hong-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Despite earlier studies demonstrating characteristics of colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) and the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor development, it remains controversial as to the relationship between CCSCs and EMT. In this study, in order to present an insight into this relationship in colon cancer, we developed HCT116 and HT29 sphere models, which are known to be the cells enriching cancer stem cells. Compared to their parental counterparts, spheroid cells displayed lower homotypic/heterotypic adhesion but higher in vitro migratory/invasive capacity, as well as higher tumorigenic and metastatic potential in vivo. The spheroid cells also demonstrated down-regulated E-cadherin and up-regulated α-SMA and Vimentin expression, which is the typical phenotype of EMT. In order to explore whether this phenomenon is associated to activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we detected several key signaling molecules. Compared with their parental cells, HCT116 and HT29 spheroid cells demonstrated down-regulated expression of GSK3β, but up-regulated expression of Slug and Snail. And also, the up-regulation of nucleus β-catenin in spheroid cells indicated that the free β-catenin transferred from cytoplasm to cell nucleus. Our findings indicate that spheroid cells have the characteristics of colon cancer stem cells, and EMT may account for their stemness and malignancy. And persistent activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway may play an important role in the EMT of CCSCs. PMID:24039918

  15. Multi-cellular, three-dimensional living mammalian tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a multicellular, three-dimensional, living mammalian tissue. The tissue is produced by a co-culture process wherein two distinct types of mammalian cells are co-cultured in a rotating bioreactor which is completely filled with culture media and cell attachment substrates. As the size of the tissue assemblies formed on the attachment substrates changes, the rotation of the bioreactor is adjusted accordingly.

  16. Detecting tree-like multicellular life on extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Christopher E; Wolf, Adam

    2010-11-01

    Over the next two decades, NASA and ESA are planning a series of space-based observatories to find Earth-like planets and determine whether life exists on these planets. Previous studies have assessed the likelihood of detecting life through signs of biogenic gases in the atmosphere or a red edge. Biogenic gases and the red edge could be signs of either single-celled or multicellular life. In this study, we propose a technique with which to determine whether tree-like multicellular life exists on extrasolar planets. For multicellular photosynthetic organisms on Earth, competition for light and the need to transport water and nutrients has led to a tree-like body plan characterized by hierarchical branching networks. This design results in a distinct bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) that causes differing reflectance at different sun/view geometries. BRDF arises from the changing visibility of the shadows cast by objects, and the presence of tree-like structures is clearly distinguishable from flat ground with the same reflectance spectrum. We examined whether the BRDF could detect the existence of tree-like structures on an extrasolar planet by using changes in planetary albedo as a planet orbits its star. We used a semi-empirical BRDF model to simulate vegetation reflectance at different planetary phase angles and both simulated and real cloud cover to calculate disk and rotation-averaged planetary albedo for a vegetated and non-vegetated planet with abundant liquid water. We found that even if the entire planetary albedo were rendered to a single pixel, the rate of increase of albedo as a planet approaches full illumination would be comparatively greater on a vegetated planet than on a non-vegetated planet. Depending on how accurately planetary cloud cover can be resolved and the capabilities of the coronagraph to resolve exoplanets, this technique could theoretically detect tree-like multicellular life on exoplanets in 50 stellar systems

  17. The evolution of cell death programs as prerequisites of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Huettenbrenner, Simone; Maier, Susanne; Leisser, Christina; Polgar, Doris; Strasser, Stephan; Grusch, Michael; Krupitza, Georg

    2003-06-01

    One of the hallmarks of multicellularity is that the individual cellular fate is sacrificed for the benefit of a higher order of life-the organism. The accidental death of cells in a multicellular organism results in swelling and membrane-rupture and inevitably spills cell contents into the surrounding tissue with deleterious effects for the organism. To avoid this form of necrotic death the cells of metazoans have developed complex self-destruction mechanisms, collectively called programmed cell death, which see to an orderly removal of superfluous cells. Since evolution never invents new genes but plays variations on old themes by DNA mutations, it is not surprising, that some of the genes involved in metazoan death pathways apparently have evolved from homologues in unicellular organisms, where they originally had different functions. Interestingly some unicellular protozoans have developed a primitive form of non-necrotic cell death themselves, which could mean that the idea of an altruistic death for the benefit of genetically identical cells predated the invention of multicellularity. The cell death pathways of protozoans, however, show no homology to those in metazoans, where several death pathways seem to have evolved in parallel. Mitochondria stands at the beginning of several death pathways and also determines, whether a cell has sufficient energy to complete a death program. However, the endosymbiotic bacterial ancestors of mitochondria are unlikely to have contributed to the recent mitochondrial death machinery and therefore, these components may derive from mutated eukaryotic precursors and might have invaded the respective mitochondrial compartments. Although there is no direct evidence, it seems that the prokaryotic-eukaryotic symbiosis created the space necessary for sophisticated death mechanisms on command, which in their distinct forms are major factors for the evolution of multicellular organisms. PMID:12787815

  18. Detecting Tree-like Multicellular Life on Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Wolf, Adam

    2010-11-01

    Over the next two decades, NASA and ESA are planning a series of space-based observatories to find Earth-like planets and determine whether life exists on these planets. Previous studies have assessed the likelihood of detecting life through signs of biogenic gases in the atmosphere or a red edge. Biogenic gases and the red edge could be signs of either single-celled or multicellular life. In this study, we propose a technique with which to determine whether tree-like multicellular life exists on extrasolar planets. For multicellular photosynthetic organisms on Earth, competition for light and the need to transport water and nutrients has led to a tree-like body plan characterized by hierarchical branching networks. This design results in a distinct bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) that causes differing reflectance at different sun/view geometries. BRDF arises from the changing visibility of the shadows cast by objects, and the presence of tree-like structures is clearly distinguishable from flat ground with the same reflectance spectrum. We examined whether the BRDF could detect the existence of tree-like structures on an extrasolar planet by using changes in planetary albedo as a planet orbits its star. We used a semi-empirical BRDF model to simulate vegetation reflectance at different planetary phase angles and both simulated and real cloud cover to calculate disk and rotation-averaged planetary albedo for a vegetated and non-vegetated planet with abundant liquid water. We found that even if the entire planetary albedo were rendered to a single pixel, the rate of increase of albedo as a planet approaches full illumination would be comparatively greater on a vegetated planet than on a non-vegetated planet. Depending on how accurately planetary cloud cover can be resolved and the capabilities of the coronagraph to resolve exoplanets, this technique could theoretically detect tree-like multicellular life on exoplanets in 50 stellar systems.

  19. Dielectric and phase behavior of dipolar spheroids.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Benight, Stephanie J; Barnes, Robin; Robinson, Bruce H

    2015-04-23

    The Stockmayer fluid, composed of dipolar spheres, has a well-known isotropic-ferroelectric phase transition at high dipole densities. However, there has been little investigation of the ferroelectric transition in nearly spherical fluids at dipole densities corresponding to those found in many polar solvents and in guest-host organic electro-optic materials. In this work, we examine the transition to ordered phases of low-aspect-ratio spheroids under both unperturbed and poled conditions, characterizing both the static dielectric response and thermodynamic properties of spheroidal systems. Spontaneous ferroelectric ordering was confined to a small region of aspect ratios about unity, indicating that subtle changes in sterics can have substantial influence on the behavior of coarse-grained liquid models. Our results demonstrate the importance of molecular shape in obtaining even qualitatively correct dielectric responses and provide an explanation for the success of the Onsager model as a phenomenological representation for the dielectric behavior of polar organic liquids. PMID:25821921

  20. Long waves induced motions to rigid spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2015-05-01

    Responses of unconstrained and rigid spheroidal bodies subjected to long sound waves are analyzed by means of approaching hydrodynamic method. It is shown that in the low-frequency approximation the amplitude of translational velocity is completely determined by the density as well as the acoustic added mass which is equal to hydrodynamic one associated with the body. The inconformity of responses to sound waves in virtue of geometric asymmetry is also presented. In addition, rotational movement engendered by acoustic oblique incidence is discussed, and it represents as the modulated angular oscillation similar to the beat-frequency vibration. All these analyses on acoustically induced motions provide a theoretical evidence for developing spheroidal inertial vector receivers.

  1. Phase behavior of shape-changing spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P. I. C.; Masters, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a simple model for a biaxial nematic liquid crystal. This consists of hard spheroids that can switch shape between prolate (rodlike) and oblate (platelike) subject to an energy penalty Δ ɛ . The spheroids are approximated as hard Gaussian overlap particles and are treated at the level of Onsager's second-virial description. We use both bifurcation analysis and a numerical minimization of the free energy to show that, for additive particle shapes, (i) there is no stable biaxial phase even for Δ ɛ =0 (although there is a metastable biaxial phase in the same density range as the stable uniaxial phase) and (ii) the isotropic-to-nematic transition is into either one of two degenerate uniaxial phases, rod rich or plate rich. We confirm that even a small amount of shape nonadditivity may stabilize the biaxial nematic phase.

  2. Quantitative multivariate analysis of dynamic multicellular morphogenic trajectories.

    PubMed

    White, Douglas E; Sylvester, Jonathan B; Levario, Thomas J; Lu, Hang; Streelman, J Todd; McDevitt, Todd C; Kemp, Melissa L

    2015-07-01

    Interrogating fundamental cell biology principles that govern tissue morphogenesis is critical to better understanding of developmental biology and engineering novel multicellular systems. Recently, functional micro-tissues derived from pluripotent embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates have provided novel platforms for experimental investigation; however elucidating the factors directing emergent spatial phenotypic patterns remains a significant challenge. Computational modelling techniques offer a unique complementary approach to probe mechanisms regulating morphogenic processes and provide a wealth of spatio-temporal data, but quantitative analysis of simulations and comparison to experimental data is extremely difficult. Quantitative descriptions of spatial phenomena across multiple systems and scales would enable unprecedented comparisons of computational simulations with experimental systems, thereby leveraging the inherent power of computational methods to interrogate the mechanisms governing emergent properties of multicellular biology. To address these challenges, we developed a portable pattern recognition pipeline consisting of: the conversion of cellular images into networks, extraction of novel features via network analysis, and generation of morphogenic trajectories. This novel methodology enabled the quantitative description of morphogenic pattern trajectories that could be compared across diverse systems: computational modelling of multicellular structures, differentiation of stem cell aggregates, and gastrulation of cichlid fish. Moreover, this method identified novel spatio-temporal features associated with different stages of embryo gastrulation, and elucidated a complex paracrine mechanism capable of explaining spatiotemporal pattern kinetic differences in ESC aggregates of different sizes. PMID:26095427

  3. Division of labour and the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Ackermann, Martin; Doebeli, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the emergence and evolution of multicellularity and cellular differentiation is a core problem in biology. We develop a quantitative model that shows that a multicellular form emerges from genetically identical unicellular ancestors when the compartmentalization of poorly compatible physiological processes into component cells of an aggregate produces a fitness advantage. This division of labour between the cells in the aggregate occurs spontaneously at the regulatory level owing to mechanisms present in unicellular ancestors and does not require any genetic predisposition for a particular role in the aggregate or any orchestrated cooperative behaviour of aggregate cells. Mathematically, aggregation implies an increase in the dimensionality of phenotype space that generates a fitness landscape with new fitness maxima, in which the unicellular states of optimized metabolism become fitness saddle points. Evolution of multicellularity is modelled as evolution of a hereditary parameter: the propensity of cells to stick together, which determines the fraction of time a cell spends in the aggregate form. Stickiness can increase evolutionarily owing to the fitness advantage generated by the division of labour between cells in an aggregate. PMID:22158952

  4. Dipolophoresis of dielectric spheroids under asymmetric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Itzchak; Yossifon, Gilad; Miloh, Touvia

    2012-01-01

    Non-spherical particles are common in colloidal science. Spheroidal shapes are particularly convenient for the analysis of the pertinent electrostatic and hydrodynamic problems and are thus widely used to model the manipulation of biological cells as well as deformed drops and bubbles. We study the rotary motion of a dielectric spheroidal micro-particle which is freely suspended in an unbounded electrolyte solution in the presence of a uniform applied electric field, assuming a thin Debye layer. For the common case of a uniform distribution of the native surface-charge density, the rotary motion of the particle is generated by the contributions of the induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) slip and the dielectrophoresis associated with the distribution of the Maxwell stress, respectively. Series solutions are obtained by using spheroidal (prolate or oblate) coordinates. Explicit results are presented for the angular velocity of particles spanning the entire spectrum from rod-like to disk-like shapes. These results demonstrate the non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the eccentricity of particle shape and the singularity of the multiple limits corresponding to conducting (ideally polarizable) particles of extreme eccentricity (e ≈ 1). The non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the particle dielectric permittivity is related to the induced-charge contribution. We apply these results to describe the motion of particles subject to a uniform field rotating in the plane. For a sufficiently slow rotation rate, prolate particles eventually become "locked" to the external field with their stationary relative orientation in the plane of rotation being determined by the particle eccentricity and dielectric constant. This effect may be of potential use in the manipulation of poly-disperse suspensions of dielectric non-spherical particles. Oblate spheroids invariably approach a uniform orientation with their symmetry axes directed normal to the external

  5. Ruthenium(II) Complexes with 2-Phenylimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline Derivatives that Strongly Combat Cisplatin-Resistant Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Leli; Chen, Yu; Liu, Jiangping; Huang, Huaiyi; Guan, Ruilin; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin was the first metal-based therapeutic agent approved for the treatment of human cancers, but its clinical activity is greatly limited by tumor drug resistance. This work utilized the parent complex [Ru(phen)2(PIP)]2+ (1) to develop three Ru(II) complexes (2–4) with different positional modifications. These compounds exhibited similar or superior cytotoxicities compared to cisplatin in HeLa, A549 and multidrug-resistant (A549R) tumor cell lines. Complex 4, the most potent member of the series, was highly active against A549R cancer cells (IC50 = 0.8 μM). This complex exhibited 178-fold better activity than cisplatin (IC50 = 142.5 μM) in A549R cells. 3D multicellular A549R tumor spheroids were also used to confirm the high proliferative and cytotoxic activity of complex 4. Complex 4 had the greatest cellular uptake and had a tendency to accumulate in the mitochondria of A549R cells. Further mechanistic studies showed that complex 4 induced A549R cell apoptosis via inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), elevated intracellular ROS levels, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell cycle arrest, making it an outstanding candidate for overcoming cisplatin resistance. PMID:26763798

  6. Morphological and Immunohistochemical Characterization of Canine Osteosarcoma Spheroid Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Gebhard, C; Gabriel, C; Walter, I

    2016-06-01

    Spheroid cell culture emerges as powerful in vitro tool for experimental tumour research. In this study, we established a scaffold-free three-dimensional spheroid system built from canine osteosarcoma (OS) cells (D17). Spheroids (7, 14 and 19 days of cultivation) and monolayer cultures (2 and 7 days of cultivation) were evaluated and compared on light and electron microscopy. Monolayer and spheroid cultures were tested for vimentin, cytokeratin, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and collagen I by means of immunohistochemistry. The spheroid cell culture exhibited a distinct network of collagen I in particular after 19-day cultivation, whereas in monolayer cultures, collagen I was arranged as a lamellar basal structure. Necrotic centres of large spheroids, as observed in 14- and 19-day cultures, were characterized by significant amounts of osteocalcin. Proliferative activity as determined by Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed an even distribution in two-dimensional cultures. In spheroids, proliferation was predominating in the peripheral areas. Metastasis-associated markers ezrin and S100A4 were shown to be continuously expressed in monolayer and spheroid cultures. We conclude that the scaffold-free spheroid system from canine OS cells has the ability to mimic the architecture of the in vivo tumour, in particular cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:26287450

  7. Rapid prototyping of concave microwells for the formation of 3D multicellular cancer aggregates for drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ting-Yuan; Wang, Zhe; Bai, Jing; Sun, Wei; Peng, Weng Kung; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Kamm, Roger D.

    2014-01-01

    Microwell technology has revolutionized many aspects of in vitro cellular studies from 2-dimensional (2D) traditional cultures to 3-dimensional (3D) in vivo-like functional assays. However, existing lithography-based approaches are often costly and time-consuming. This study presents a rapid, low-cost prototyping method of CO2 laser ablation of a conventional untreated culture dish to create concave microwells used for generating multicellular aggregates, which can be readily available for general laboratories. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polystyrene (PS) microwells were investigated, and each produced distinctive microwell features. Among these three materials, PS cell culture dishes produced the optimal surface smoothness and roundness. A549 lung cancer cells were grown to form cancer aggregates of controllable size from ~40 to ~80 μm in PS microwells. Functional assays of spheroids were performed to study migration on 2D substrates and in 3D hydrogel conditions as a step towards recapitulating the dissemination of cancer cells. Preclinical anti-cancer drug screening was investigated and revealed considerable differences between 2D and 3D conditions, indicating the importance of assay type as well as the utility of the present approach. PMID:23983140

  8. Rapid prototyping of concave microwells for the formation of 3D multicellular cancer aggregates for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ting-Yuan; Wang, Zhe; Bai, Jing; Sun, Wei; Peng, Weng Kung; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Kamm, Roger D

    2014-04-01

    Microwell technology has revolutionized many aspects of in vitro cellular studies from 2D traditional cultures to 3D in vivo-like functional assays. However, existing lithography-based approaches are often costly and time-consuming. This study presents a rapid, low-cost prototyping method of CO2 laser ablation of a conventional untreated culture dish to create concave microwells used for generating multicellular aggregates, which can be readily available for general laboratories. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and polystyrene (PS) microwells are investigated, and each produces distinctive microwell features. Among these three materials, PS cell culture dishes produce the optimal surface smoothness and roundness. A549 lung cancer cells are grown to form cancer aggregates of controllable size from ≈40 to ≈80 μm in PS microwells. Functional assays of spheroids are performed to study migration on 2D substrates and in 3D hydrogel conditions as a step towards recapitulating the dissemination of cancer cells. Preclinical anti-cancer drug screening is investigated and reveals considerable differences between 2D and 3D conditions, indicating the importance of assay type as well as the utility of the present approach. PMID:23983140

  9. Experimental evolution of an alternating uni- and multicellular life cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, William C.; Herron, Matthew D.; Howell, Kathryn; Pentz, Jennifer T.; Rosenzweig, Frank; Travisano, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity enabled the evolution of large, complex organisms, but early steps in this transition remain poorly understood. Here we show that multicellular complexity, including development from a single cell, can evolve rapidly in a unicellular organism that has never had a multicellular ancestor. We subject the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to conditions that favour multicellularity, resulting in the evolution of a multicellular life cycle in which clusters reproduce via motile unicellular propagules. While a single-cell genetic bottleneck during ontogeny is widely regarded as an adaptation to limit among-cell conflict, its appearance very early in this transition suggests that it did not evolve for this purpose. Instead, we find that unicellular propagules are adaptive even in the absence of intercellular conflict, maximizing cluster-level fecundity. These results demonstrate that the unicellular bottleneck, a trait essential for evolving multicellular complexity, can arise rapidly via co-option of the ancestral unicellular form. PMID:24193369

  10. Janus magnetic cellular spheroids for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mattix, Brandon M.; Olsen, Timothy R.; Casco, Megan; Reese, Laura; Poole, John T.; Zhang, Jing; Visconti, Richard P.; Simionescu, Agneta; Simionescu, Dan T.; Alexis, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Cell aggregates, or spheroids, have been used as building blocks to fabricate scaffold-free tissues that can closely mimic the native three-dimensional in vivo environment for broad applications including regenerative medicine and high throughput testing of drugs. The incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into spheroids permits the manipulation of spheroids into desired shapes, patterns, and tissues using magnetic forces. Current strategies incorporating MNPs often involve cellular uptake, and should therefore be avoided because it induces adverse effects on cell activity, viability, and phenotype. Here, we report a Janus structure of magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCS) with spatial control of MNPs to form two distinct domains: cells and extracellular MNPs. This separation of cells and MNPs within magnetic cellular spheroids was successfully incorporated into cellular spheroids with various cellular and extracellular compositions and contents. The amount of cells that internalized MNPs was quantified and showed that JMCSs resulted in significantly lower internalization (35%) compared to uptake spheroids (83%, p < 0.05). Furthermore, the addition of MNPs to cellular spheroids using the Janus method has no adverse effects on cellular viability up to seven weeks, with spheroids maintaining at least 82% viability over 7 weeks when compared to control spheroids without MNPs. By safely incorporating MNPs into cellular spheroids, results demonstrated that JMCSs were capable of magnetic manipulation, and that magnetic forces used during magnetic force assembly mediate fusion into controlled patterns and complex tissues. Finally, JMCSs were assembled and fused into a vascular tissue construct 5 mm in diameter using magnetic force assembly. PMID:24183699

  11. Global Landslides on Rapidly Spinning Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheeres, Daniel J.; Sanchez, P.

    2013-10-01

    The angle of repose and conditions for global landslides on the surfaces of small, rapidly spinning, spheroidal asteroids are studied. Applying techniques of soil mechanics, we develop a theory for, and examples of, how regolith will fail and flow in this microgravity environment. Our motivation is to develop an understanding of the "top-shaped" class of asteroids based on analytical soil mechanics. Our analysis transforms the entire asteroid surface into a local frame where we can model it as a conventional granular pile with a surface slope, acceleration and height variations as a function of the body's spin rate, shape and density. A general finding is that the lowest point on a rapidly spinning spheroid is at the equator with the effective height of surface material monotonically increasing towards the polar regions, where the height can be larger than the physical radius of the body. We study the failure conditions of both cohesionless and cohesive regolith, and develop specific predictions of the surface profile as a function of the regolith angle of friction and the maximum spin rate experienced by the body. The theory also provides simple guidelines on what the shape may look like, although we do not analyze gravitationally self-consistent evolution of the body shape. The theory is tested with soft-sphere discrete element method granular mechanics simulations to better understand the dynamical aspects of global asteroid landslides. We find significant differences between failure conditions for cohesive and cohesionless regolith. In the case of cohesive regolith, we show that extremely small values of strength (much less than that found in lunar regolith) can stabilize a surface even at very rapid spin rates. Cohesionless surfaces, as expected, fail whenever their surface slopes exceed the angle of friction. Based on our analysis we propose that global landslides and the flow of material towards the equator on spheroidal bodies are precipitated by exogenous

  12. The Birth of Animal Development: Multicellularity and the Germline.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Hugh R

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multicellular animals has been attributed to many kinds of selective advantage; here I suggest that the evolution of somatic cells to feed and protect the germline was central to the appearance of animals. This would have been driven by selection for extreme anisogamy-the evolution of sperm and egg. Evidence is adduced from the germline stem cells of simple animals (defining germline as any cell that normally produces the next generation via the sexual process) and from the control circuitry ubiquitous in animal germlines. With the soma and its elaboration came animal development, as we understand it. PMID:26970004

  13. Waltzing Volvox/: Orbiting Bound States of Flagellated Multicellular Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, K.; Leptos, K.; Pedley, T. J.; Goldstein, R. E.; Ishikawa, T.

    2008-11-01

    The spherical colonial alga Volvox swims by means of flagella on thousands of surface somatic cells. This geometry and its large size makes it a model organism for the fluid dynamics of multicellularity. Remarkably, when two nearby colonies swim close to a solid surface, they are attracted together and can form a stable bound state in which they continuously waltz around each other. A surface-mediated hydrodynamic attraction between colonies combined with the rotational motion of bottom-heavy Volvox are shown to explain the stability and dynamics of the bound state. This phenomenon is suggested to underlie observed clustering of colonies at surfaces.

  14. Cancer across the tree of life: cooperation and cheating in multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Aktipis, C. Athena; Boddy, Amy M.; Jansen, Gunther; Hibner, Urszula; Hochberg, Michael E.; Maley, Carlo C.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity is characterized by cooperation among cells for the development, maintenance and reproduction of the multicellular organism. Cancer can be viewed as cheating within this cooperative multicellular system. Complex multicellularity, and the cooperation underlying it, has evolved independently multiple times. We review the existing literature on cancer and cancer-like phenomena across life, not only focusing on complex multicellularity but also reviewing cancer-like phenomena across the tree of life more broadly. We find that cancer is characterized by a breakdown of the central features of cooperation that characterize multicellularity, including cheating in proliferation inhibition, cell death, division of labour, resource allocation and extracellular environment maintenance (which we term the five foundations of multicellularity). Cheating on division of labour, exhibited by a lack of differentiation and disorganized cell masses, has been observed in all forms of multicellularity. This suggests that deregulation of differentiation is a fundamental and universal aspect of carcinogenesis that may be underappreciated in cancer biology. Understanding cancer as a breakdown of multicellular cooperation provides novel insights into cancer hallmarks and suggests a set of assays and biomarkers that can be applied across species and characterize the fundamental requirements for generating a cancer. PMID:26056363

  15. Cancer across the tree of life: cooperation and cheating in multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Aktipis, C Athena; Boddy, Amy M; Jansen, Gunther; Hibner, Urszula; Hochberg, Michael E; Maley, Carlo C; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2015-07-19

    Multicellularity is characterized by cooperation among cells for the development, maintenance and reproduction of the multicellular organism. Cancer can be viewed as cheating within this cooperative multicellular system. Complex multicellularity, and the cooperation underlying it, has evolved independently multiple times. We review the existing literature on cancer and cancer-like phenomena across life, not only focusing on complex multicellularity but also reviewing cancer-like phenomena across the tree of life more broadly. We find that cancer is characterized by a breakdown of the central features of cooperation that characterize multicellularity, including cheating in proliferation inhibition, cell death, division of labour, resource allocation and extracellular environment maintenance (which we term the five foundations of multicellularity). Cheating on division of labour, exhibited by a lack of differentiation and disorganized cell masses, has been observed in all forms of multicellularity. This suggests that deregulation of differentiation is a fundamental and universal aspect of carcinogenesis that may be underappreciated in cancer biology. Understanding cancer as a breakdown of multicellular cooperation provides novel insights into cancer hallmarks and suggests a set of assays and biomarkers that can be applied across species and characterize the fundamental requirements for generating a cancer. PMID:26056363

  16. [Structural and functional polarity of porcine hepatocyte cultured spheroids].

    PubMed

    Lorenti, Alicia S; Hidalgo, Alejandra M; Barbich, Mariana R; Torres, José; Batalle, Juan; Izaguirre, María F; Fiorucci, María Paula; Casco, Víctor; Gadano, Adrián; Argibay, Pablo F

    2006-06-01

    Hepatocytes are epithelial cells that show a complex polarity in vivo. However, hepatocytes isolated and cultured in vitro normally lose both their differentiated properties and polarity. Culturing hepatocyte spheroids seems to be the accurate approach to maintain tissue level of organization. The structural and functionalpolarities of pig liver spheroids were analyzed in this work. Swine liver cells were isolated and cultured as spheroids. Their metabolic activity was proved through the metabolism of diazepam, ammonium and synthesis of albumin. Several structural features show the presence of polarity in the cells inside the spheroids. Reticular and collagen fibers, as well as Ck19(+) cells forming duct-like structures were found. _eta and _-catenins and pancadherins were positive in different regions of the spheroids, mainly in the outer cell layers, which have cuboidal epithelia features. The scanning electron microscopy showed a tightly compacted architecture, with smooth surface. The transmission electron microscopy analysis showed bile canaliculi with microvilli, tight junctions, zonula adherens and desmosome-like junctions. Well-maintained cellular organelles, as mitochondria, nucleus, nucleolus, peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, were seen in the spheroids. A complex inner bile canaliculi network was shown by using a fluorescent bile acid analogue incorporated and excreted by the spheroids. Furthermore, excretion of a normal pattern of bile acids was demonstrated. The morphology and functionality of the spheroids may provide an appropriate model for applications where the maintenance of liver-specific functions is crucial, as a bioartificial liver device. PMID:16859079

  17. What Do We Learn from Spheroid Culture Systems? Insights from Tumorspheres Derived from Primary Colon Cancer Tissue.

    PubMed

    Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Ullmann, Pit; Rodriguez, Fabien; Frasquilho, Sónia; Nazarov, Petr V; Haan, Serge; Letellier, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the fact that the identification and culturing of TICs is still a subject of extensive debate. Floating three-dimensional spheroid cultures (SC) that grow in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors are supposed to be enriched in TICs. We generated SC from fresh clinical tumor specimens and compared them to SC isolated from CRC cell-lines as well as to adherent differentiated counterparts. Patient-derived SC display self-renewal capacity and can induce serial transplantable tumors in immuno-deficient mice, which phenotypically resemble the tumor of origin. In addition, the original tumor tissue and established SC retain several similar CRC-relevant mutations. Primary SC express key stemness proteins such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG and LGR5 and importantly show increased chemoresistance ability compared to their adherent differentiated counterparts and to cell line-derived SC. Strikingly, cells derived from spheroid or adherent differentiating culture conditions displayed similar self-renewal capacity and equally formed tumors in immune-deficient mice, suggesting that self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacity of TICs is not restricted to phenotypically immature spheroid cells, which we describe to be highly plastic and able to reacquire stem-cell traits even after long differentiation processes. Finally, we identified two genes among a sphere gene expression signature that predict disease relapse in CRC patients. Here we propose that SC derived from fresh patient tumor tissue present interesting phenotypic features that may have clinical relevance for chemoresistance and disease relapse and therefore represent a valuable tool to test for new CRC-therapies that overcome drug resistance. PMID:26745821

  18. What Do We Learn from Spheroid Culture Systems? Insights from Tumorspheres Derived from Primary Colon Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Ullmann, Pit; Rodriguez, Fabien; Frasquilho, Sónia; Nazarov, Petr V.; Haan, Serge; Letellier, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the fact that the identification and culturing of TICs is still a subject of extensive debate. Floating three-dimensional spheroid cultures (SC) that grow in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors are supposed to be enriched in TICs. We generated SC from fresh clinical tumor specimens and compared them to SC isolated from CRC cell-lines as well as to adherent differentiated counterparts. Patient-derived SC display self-renewal capacity and can induce serial transplantable tumors in immuno-deficient mice, which phenotypically resemble the tumor of origin. In addition, the original tumor tissue and established SC retain several similar CRC-relevant mutations. Primary SC express key stemness proteins such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG and LGR5 and importantly show increased chemoresistance ability compared to their adherent differentiated counterparts and to cell line-derived SC. Strikingly, cells derived from spheroid or adherent differentiating culture conditions displayed similar self-renewal capacity and equally formed tumors in immune-deficient mice, suggesting that self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacity of TICs is not restricted to phenotypically immature spheroid cells, which we describe to be highly plastic and able to reacquire stem-cell traits even after long differentiation processes. Finally, we identified two genes among a sphere gene expression signature that predict disease relapse in CRC patients. Here we propose that SC derived from fresh patient tumor tissue present interesting phenotypic features that may have clinical relevance for chemoresistance and disease relapse and therefore represent a valuable tool to test for new CRC-therapies that overcome drug resistance. PMID:26745821

  19. Microfluidics-enabled phenotyping, imaging, and screening of multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Crane, Matthew M; Chung, Kwanghun; Stirman, Jeffrey; Lu, Hang

    2010-06-21

    This paper reviews the technologies that have been invented in the last few years on high-throughput phenotyping, imaging, screening, and related techniques using microfluidics. The review focuses on the technical challenges and how microfluidics can help to solve these existing problems, specifically discussing the applications of microfluidics to multicellular model organisms. The challenges facing this field include handling multicellular organisms in an efficient manner, controlling the microenvironment and precise manipulation of the local conditions to allow the phenotyping, screening, and imaging of the small animals. Not only does microfluidics have the proper length scale for manipulating these biological entities, but automation has also been demonstrated with these systems, and more importantly the ability to deliver stimuli or alter biophysical/biochemical conditions to the biological entities with good spatial and temporal controls. In addition, integration with and interfacing to other hardware/software allows quantitative approaches. We include several successful examples of microfluidics solving these high-throughput problems. The paper also highlights other applications that can be developed in the future. PMID:20383347

  20. Transport by Collective Flagellar Beating Facilitates Evolutionary Transitions to Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Martin; Powers, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A central problem underlying the evolution from single cells to multicellular organisms is the relationship between metabolic requirements and environmental metabolite exchange with increasing size. For organisms that form spherical colonies such as the volvocalean green algae, there is a bottleneck if diffusion alone governs nutrient uptake as they increase in size, for the diffusive flux is linear in the radius while the requirements of surface somatic cells grow quadratically. Using Volvox as a model organism, we examine experimentally and theoretically the role that advection of fluid by surface flagella plays in enhancing nutrient uptake. We show that the fluid flow driven by the coordinated beating of those flagella produces a boundary layer in the concentration of a diffusing solute which renders the metabolite exchange rate quadratic in the colony radius. This bypasses the diffusive bottleneck, facilitating evolutionary transitions to multicellularity which may be driven by other environmental factors. These results suggest that flagella may have evolved not only for motility, but also to enhance metabolite exchange.

  1. Design of a Uranium Dioxide Spheroidization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavender, Daniel P.; Mireles, Omar R.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) fuel cermets. The PSS process improves particle spherocity and surface morphology for coating by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Angular fully dense particles melt in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet at between 32-36 kW, and become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Particles range in size from 100 - 50 microns in diameter. Student s t-test and hypothesis testing of two proportions statistical methods were applied to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders show great than 800% increase in the number of spherical particles over the stock powder with the mean spherocity only mildly improved. It is recommended that powders be processed two-three times in order to reach the desired spherocity, and that process parameters be optimized for a more narrow particles size range. Keywords: spherocity, spheroidization, plasma, uranium-dioxide, cermet, nuclear, propulsion

  2. Electron Microscopy of Chromatophores of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, K. D.

    1965-01-01

    Gibson, K. D. (St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, London, England). Electron microscopy of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides. J. Bacteriol. 90:1059–1072. 1965.—Fixed and stained chromatophores and whole cells of anaerobically grown Rhodopseudomonas spheroides were examined in thin sections in the electron microscope. Both purified chromatophores and intracellular membrane-bound vesicles had exactly the same appearance, namely that of spheres or ellipsoids with a thin electron-dense shell surrounding an electron-lucent interior. The distribution of diameters in the two types of structure was also found to be the same, and was compatible with a normal distribution, with a mean of 570 A and a standard deviation 40 A. Negatively stained chromatophores appeared like discs or collapsed spheres. The presence of invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane in this species was confirmed, and a new structure resembling a twin chromatophore was observed. The bearing of these results on theories of the origin of chromatophores is discussed, and it is concluded that they offer some support for each one of the three main theories about the origin of particulate organelles. Images PMID:5847796

  3. On Convergence Aspects of Spheroidal Monogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, S.; Morais, J.

    2011-09-01

    Orthogonal polynomials have found wide applications in mathematical physics, numerical analysis, and other fields. Accordingly there is an enormous amount of variety of such polynomials and relations that describe their properties. The paper's main results are the discussion of approximation properties for monogenic functions over prolate spheroids in R3 in terms of orthogonal monogenic polynomials and their interdependences. Certain results are stated without proof for now. The motivation for the present study stems from the fact that these polynomials play an important role in the calculation of the Bergman kernel and Green's monogenic functions in a spheroid. Once these functions are known, it is possible to solve both basic boundary value and conformal mapping problems. Interestingly, most of the used methods have a n-dimensional counterpart and can be extended to arbitrary ellipsoids. But such a procedure would make the further study of the underlying ellipsoidal monogenics somewhat laborious, and for this reason we shall not discuss these general cases here. To the best of our knowledge, this does not appear to have been done in literature before.

  4. GEMS: The destiny of Blue Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häußler, Boris; Bell, Eric F.; Barden, Marco; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Borch, Andrea; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Caldwell, John A. R.; Heymans, Catherine; Jahnke, Knud; Jogee, Shardha; Koposov, Sergey E.; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Peng, Chien Y.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Wolf, Christian

    2007-05-01

    One of the key predictions of hierarchical galaxy formation models is that a significant fraction of elliptical galaxies form in late merging events. One of the most important observations of such an assembly is the existence of blue spheroidal galaxies, which have spheroid-dominated morphologies and blue colors indicating recent star formation, as an intermediate step in the evolution of elliptical galaxies. We present results from the GEMS survey showing the properties of these galaxies derived from 2-D galaxy fitting of the ˜8000 galaxies with photometric redshifts in the 28'x28' HST mosaic. For the first time we were able to divide the observed population of blue elliptical galaxies into sub-populations of different stellar masses. We found that massive blue ellipticals are likely to be the progenitors of red elliptical galaxies while low-mass blue ellipticals have half-light radii considerably in excess of those measured for low-mass present day elliptical galaxies and instead have larger sizes similar to present-day disk-dominated systems with substantial bulges (see Figure)

  5. Three-dimensional spheroid cell model of in vitro adipocyte inflammation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul A; Tang, Yi; Weiss, Stephen J; Janorkar, Amol V

    2015-06-01

    To improve treatment of obesity, a contributing factor to multiple systemic and metabolic diseases, a better understanding of metabolic state and environmental stress at the cellular level is essential. This work presents development of a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro model of adipose tissue displaying induced lipid accumulation as a function of fatty acid supplementation that, subsequently, investigates cellular responses to a pro-inflammatory stimulus, thereby recapitulating key stages of obesity progression. Three-dimensional spheroid organization of adipose cells was induced by culturing 3T3-L1 mouse preadipocytes on an elastin-like polypeptide-polyethyleneimine (ELP-PEI)-coated surface. Results indicate a more differentiated phenotype in 3D spheroid cultures relative to two-dimensional (2D) monolayer analogues based on triglyceride accumulation, CD36 and CD40 protein expression, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and adiponectin mRNA expression. The 3T3-L1 adipocyte spheroid model was then used to test the effects of a pro-inflammatory microenvironment, namely maturation in the presence of elevated fatty acid levels followed by acute exposure to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Under these conditions, we demonstrate that metabolic function was reduced across all cultures exposed to TNF-α, especially so when pre-exposed to linoleic acid. Further, in response to TNF-α, enhanced lipolysis, monitored as increased extracellular glycerol and fatty acids levels, was observed in adipocytes cultured in the presence of exogenous fatty acids. Taken together, our 3D spheroid model showed enhanced adipogenic differentiation and presents a platform for elucidating the key phenotypic responses that occur in pro-inflammatory microenvironments that characterize obesogenic states. PMID:25781458

  6. Scalable production of controllable dermal papilla spheroids on PVA surfaces and the effects of spheroid size on hair follicle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ching; Chan, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Ting; Chiu, Hsien-Yi; Tsai, Ren-Yeu; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Chan, Jung-Yi; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Organ size and numbers are vital issues in bioengineering for hair follicle (HF) regeneration. Murine HF dermal papilla (DP) cells are able to induce HF neogenesis when transplanted as aggregates. However, how the preparation of murine and human DP aggregates affects HF inductivity and the size of regenerated HF is yet to be determined. Here we report a scalable method for production of controllable human and rat DP spheroids in general labs for reproducible experiments. Compared with more hydrophobic polyethylene and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), DP cells are poorly adhesive to hydrophilic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Seeded in PVA-coated 96-welled commercial PCR tube arrays, DP cells quickly aggregate into single spheroids with progressive compaction. Varying seeded cell numbers and culture periods enables us to control the size and cell number of the spheroids. The spheroids obtained have high viability and preserve DP characters. A proof of principle experiment was conducted to examine the size effect on the efficiency and efficacy of HF regeneration. We found that both human and rat DP spheroids are able to induce HF neogenesis and larger DP spheroids exhibit higher HF inductivity. However, the average diameter of regenerated hair fiber did not significantly change with the increasing size of transplanted DP spheroids. The result suggests that an appropriate size of DP spheroid is essential for HF inductivity, but its size cannot be directly translated to a thicker regenerated hair. Our results also have implications on the efficiency and efficacy in the regeneration of other epithelial organs. PMID:23092862

  7. Generation of three-dimensional multiple spheroid model of olfactory ensheathing cells using floating liquid marbles

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Raja K.; Ooi, Chin H.; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Tello Velasquez, Johana; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; St John, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel protocol for three-dimensional culturing of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which can be used to understand how OECs interact with other cells in three dimensions. Transplantation of OECs is being trialled for repair of the paralysed spinal cord, with promising but variable results and thus the therapy needs improving. To date, studies of OEC behaviour in a multicellular environment have been hampered by the lack of suitable three-dimensional cell culture models. Here, we exploit the floating liquid marble, a liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and placed on a liquid bath. The presence of the liquid bath increases the humidity and minimises the effect of evaporation. Floating liquid marbles allow the OECs to freely associate and interact to produce OEC spheroids with uniform shapes and sizes. In contrast, a sessile liquid marble on a solid surface suffers from evaporation and the cells aggregate with irregular shapes. We used floating liquid marbles to co-culture OECs with Schwann cells and astrocytes which formed natural structures without the confines of gels or bounding layers. This protocol can be used to determine how OECs and other cell types associate and interact while forming complex cell structures. PMID:26462469

  8. Generation of three-dimensional multiple spheroid model of olfactory ensheathing cells using floating liquid marbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadivelu, Raja K.; Ooi, Chin H.; Yao, Rebecca-Qing; Tello Velasquez, Johana; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; St John, James A.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a novel protocol for three-dimensional culturing of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), which can be used to understand how OECs interact with other cells in three dimensions. Transplantation of OECs is being trialled for repair of the paralysed spinal cord, with promising but variable results and thus the therapy needs improving. To date, studies of OEC behaviour in a multicellular environment have been hampered by the lack of suitable three-dimensional cell culture models. Here, we exploit the floating liquid marble, a liquid droplet coated with hydrophobic powder and placed on a liquid bath. The presence of the liquid bath increases the humidity and minimises the effect of evaporation. Floating liquid marbles allow the OECs to freely associate and interact to produce OEC spheroids with uniform shapes and sizes. In contrast, a sessile liquid marble on a solid surface suffers from evaporation and the cells aggregate with irregular shapes. We used floating liquid marbles to co-culture OECs with Schwann cells and astrocytes which formed natural structures without the confines of gels or bounding layers. This protocol can be used to determine how OECs and other cell types associate and interact while forming complex cell structures.

  9. THE SPLASH SURVEY: KINEMATICS OF ANDROMEDA's INNER SPHEROID

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, Claire E.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; and others

    2012-06-20

    The combination of large size, high stellar density, high metallicity, and Sersic surface brightness profile of the spheroidal component of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) within R{sub proj} {approx} 20 kpc suggests that it is unlike any subcomponent of the Milky Way. In this work we capitalize on our proximity to and external view of M31 to probe the kinematical properties of this 'inner spheroid'. We employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis of resolved stellar kinematics from Keck/DEIMOS spectra of 5651 red giant branch stars to disentangle M31's inner spheroid from its stellar disk. We measure the mean velocity and dispersion of the spheroid in each of five spatial bins after accounting for a locally cold stellar disk as well as the Giant Southern Stream and associated tidal debris. For the first time, we detect significant spheroid rotation (v{sub rot} {approx} 50 km s{sup -1}) beyond R{sub proj} {approx} 5 kpc. The velocity dispersion decreases from about 140 km s{sup -1} at R{sub proj} = 7 kpc to 120 km s{sup -1} at R{sub proj} = 14 kpc, consistent to 2{sigma} with existing measurements and models. We calculate the probability that a given star is a member of the spheroid and find that the spheroid has a significant presence throughout the spatial extent of our sample. Lastly, we show that the flattening of the spheroid is due to velocity anisotropy in addition to rotation. Though this suggests that the inner spheroid of M31 more closely resembles an elliptical galaxy than a typical spiral galaxy bulge, it should be cautioned that our measurements are much farther out (2-14r{sub eff}) than for the comparison samples.

  10. Plant architecture without multicellularity: quandaries over patterning and the soma-germline divide in siphonous algae.

    PubMed

    Coneva, Viktoriya; Chitwood, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity has independently evolved numerous times throughout the major lineages of life. Often, multicellularity can enable complex, macroscopic organismal architectures but it is not required for the elaboration of morphology. Several alternative cellular strategies have arisen as solutions permitting exquisite forms. The green algae class Ulvophyceae, for example, contains truly multicellular organisms, as well as macroscopic siphonous cells harboring one or multiple nuclei, and siphonocladous species, which are multinucleate and multicellular. These diverse cellular organizations raise a number of questions about the evolutionary and molecular mechanisms underlying complex organismal morphology in the green plants. Importantly, how does morphological patterning arise in giant coenocytes, and do nuclei, analogous to cells in multicellular organisms, take on distinct somatic and germline identities? Here, we comparatively explore examples of patterning and differentiation in diverse coenocytic and single-cell organisms and discuss possible mechanisms of development and nuclear differentiation in the siphonous algae. PMID:25964794

  11. Plant architecture without multicellularity: quandaries over patterning and the soma-germline divide in siphonous algae

    PubMed Central

    Coneva, Viktoriya; Chitwood, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity has independently evolved numerous times throughout the major lineages of life. Often, multicellularity can enable complex, macroscopic organismal architectures but it is not required for the elaboration of morphology. Several alternative cellular strategies have arisen as solutions permitting exquisite forms. The green algae class Ulvophyceae, for example, contains truly multicellular organisms, as well as macroscopic siphonous cells harboring one or multiple nuclei, and siphonocladous species, which are multinucleate and multicellular. These diverse cellular organizations raise a number of questions about the evolutionary and molecular mechanisms underlying complex organismal morphology in the green plants. Importantly, how does morphological patterning arise in giant coenocytes, and do nuclei, analogous to cells in multicellular organisms, take on distinct somatic and germline identities? Here, we comparatively explore examples of patterning and differentiation in diverse coenocytic and single-cell organisms and discuss possible mechanisms of development and nuclear differentiation in the siphonous algae. PMID:25964794

  12. Mass Modelling of dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentowski, Jarosław; Łokas, Ewa L.; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Prada, Francisco; Mayer, Lucio; Mamon, Gary A.

    2008-05-01

    We study the origin and properties of unbound stars in the kinematic samples of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. For this purpose we have run a high resolution N-body simulation of a two-component dwarf galaxy orbiting in a Milky Way potential. We create mock kinematic data sets by observing the dwarf in different directions. When the dwarf is observed along the tidal tails the kinematic samples are strongly contaminated by unbound stars from the tails. However, most of the unbound stars can be removed by the method of interloper rejection proposed by den Hartog & Katgert. We model the velocity dispersion profiles of the cleaned-up kinematic samples using solutions of the Jeans equation. We show that even for such a strongly stripped dwarf the Jeans analysis, when applied to cleaned samples, allows us to reproduce the mass and mass-to-light ratio of the dwarf with accuracy typically better than 25%.

  13. Studies of local group dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleyna, Jan Thomas

    We present several research topics concerning the dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies around the Milky Way. In Chapter 1, we briefly review the qualities of the dSphs; in Chapter 2, we use extant scanned photographic plate survey data to place limits on the population of undiscovered dSphs; in Chapter 3, we describe the first complete CCD survey of a dSph (Ursa Minor), and we analyze the asymmetry and bimodality of its light distribution; in Chapter 4, we present CCD survey data for the UMi and Draco dSphs; in Chapter 5, we compute the constraints that can be placed on the dSph velocity dispersion and dark matter distribution using additional velocity measurements near the tidal radius; and in Chapter 6, we present a deeper survey of Ursa Minor (V ~ 24.5), and develop an objective maximum likelihood technique for fitting theoretical isochrones to its color magnitude diagram.

  14. Anisotropic star on pseudo-spheroidal spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanpal, B. S.; Thomas, V. O.; Pandya, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    A new class of exact solutions of Einstein's field equations representing anisotropic distribution of matter on pseudo-spheroidal spacetime is obtained. The parameters appearing in the model are restricted through physical requirements of the model. It is found that the models given in the present work is compatible with observational data of a wide variety of compact objects like 4U 1820-30, PSR J1903+327, 4U 1608-52, Vela X-1, PSR J1614-2230, SMC X-4, Cen X-3. A particular model of pulsar PSR J1614-2230 is studied in detail and found that it satisfies all physical requirements needed for physically acceptable model.

  15. Eaten alive: novel insights into autophagy from multicellular model systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Baehrecke, Eric H.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy delivers cytoplasmic material to lysosomes for degradation. First identified in yeast, the core genes that control this process are conserved in higher organisms. Studies of mammalian cell cultures have expanded our understanding of the core autophagy pathway, but cannot reveal the unique animal-specific mechanisms for the regulation and function of autophagy. Multicellular organisms have different types of cells that possess distinct composition, morphology, and organization of intracellular organelles. In addition, the autophagic machinery integrates signals from other cells and environmental conditions to maintain cell, tissue and organism homeostasis. Here, we highlight how studies of autophagy in flies and worms have identified novel core autophagy genes and mechanisms, and provided insight into the context-specific regulation and function of autophagy. PMID:25862458

  16. Thinking About Bacillus subtilis as a Multicellular Organism

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Claudio; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Summary Initial attempts to use colony morphogenesis as a tool to investigate bacterial multicellularity were limited by the fact that laboratory strains often have lost many of their developmental properties. Recent advances in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying colony morphogenesis have been made possible through the use of undomesticated strains. In particular, Bacillus subtilis has proven to be a remarkable model system to study colony morphogenesis because of it well-characterized developmental features. Genetic screens that analyze mutants defective in colony morphology have led to the discovery of an intricate regulatory network that controls the production of an extracellular matrix. This matrix is essential for the development of complex colony architecture characterized by aerial projections that serve as preferential sites for sporulation. While much progress has been made, the challenge for future studies will be to determine the underlying mechanisms that regulate development such that differentiation occurs in a spatially and temporally organized manner. PMID:17977783

  17. Nascent multicellular life and the emergence of individuality.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Silvia; Rainey, Paul B

    2014-04-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular ancestors involves a shift in the level at which selection operates. It is usual to think about this shift in terms of the emergence of traits that cause heritable differences in reproductive output at the level of nascent collectives. Defining these traits and the causes of their origin lies at the heart of understanding the evolution of multicellular life. In working toward a mechanistic, take-nothing-for-granted account, we begin by recognizing that the standard Lewontin formulation of properties necessary and sufficient for evolution by natural selection does not necessarily encompass Darwinian evolution in primitive collectives where parent-offspring relationships may have been poorly defined. This, we suggest, limits the ability to conceptualize and capture the earliest manifestations of Darwinian properties. By way of solution we propose a relaxed interpretation of Lewontin's conditions and present these in the form of a set of necessary requirements for evolution by natural selection based upon the establishment of genealogical connections between recurrences of collectives. With emphasis on genealogy - as opposed to reproduction - it is possible to conceive selection acting on collectives prior to any manifestation of heritable variance in fitness. Such possibility draws attention to the evolutionary emergence of traits that strengthen causal relationships between recurrences - traits likely to underpin the emergence of forms of multiplication that establish parent-offspring relationships. Application of this framework to collectives of marginal status, particularly those whose recurrence is not defined by genealogy, makes clear that change at the level of collectives need not arise from selection acting at the higher level. We conclude by outlining applicability of our framework to loosely defined collectives of cells, such as those comprising the slugs of social amoeba and microbes that constitute

  18. Coupling Gd-DTPA with a bispecific, recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD complex improves tumor targeting in MRI

    PubMed Central

    XIN, XIAOYAN; SHA, HUIZI; SHEN, JINGTAO; ZHANG, BING; ZHU, BIN; LIU, BAORUI

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant anti-epidermal growth factor receptor-internalizing arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (anti-EGFR single-domain antibody fused with iRGD peptide) protein efficiently targets the EGFR extracellular domain and integrin αvβ/β5, and shows a high penetration into cells. Thus, this protein may improve penetration of conjugated drugs into the deep zone of gastric cancer multicellular 3D spheroids. In the present study, a novel tumor-targeting contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was developed, by coupling gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) with the bispecific recombinant anti-EGFR-iRGD protein. The anti-EGFR-iRGD protein was extracted from Escherichia coli and Gd was loaded onto the recombinant protein by chelation using DTPA anhydride. Single-targeting agent anti-EGFR-DTPA-Gd, which served as the control, was also prepared. The results of the present study showed that anti-EGFR-iRGD-DTPA-Gd exhibited no significant cyto toxicity to human gastric carcinoma cells (BGC-823) under the experimental conditions used. Compared with a conventional contrast agent (Magnevist), anti-EGFR-iRGD-DTPA-Gd showed higher T1 relaxivity (10.157/mM/sec at 3T) and better tumor-targeting ability. In addition, the signal intensity and the area under curve for the enhanced signal time in tumor, in vivo, were stronger than Gd-DTPA alone or the anti-EGFR-Gd control. Thus, Gd-labelled anti-EGFR-iRGD has potential as a tumor-targeting contrast agent for improved MRI. PMID:27035336

  19. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Modify the Response of Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen and Anti-Androgens in Three-Dimensional Spheroid Culture.

    PubMed

    Eder, Theresa; Weber, Anja; Neuwirt, Hannes; Grünbacher, Georg; Ploner, Christian; Klocker, Helmut; Sampson, Natalie; Eder, Iris E

    2016-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) targeting remains the gold standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa); however, treatment resistance remains a major clinical problem. To study the therapeutic effects of clinically used anti-androgens we characterized herein a tissue-mimetic three-dimensional (3D) in vitro model whereby PCa cells were cultured alone or with PCa-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Notably, the ratio of PCa cells to CAFs significantly increased in time in favor of the tumor cells within the spheroids strongly mimicking PCa in vivo. Despite this loss of CAFs, the stromal cells, which were not sensitive to androgen and even stimulated by the anti-androgens, significantly influenced the sensitivity of PCa cells to androgen and to the anti-androgens bicalutamide and enzalutamide. In particular, DuCaP cells lost sensitivity to enzalutamide when co-cultured with CAFs. In LAPC4/CAF and LNCaP/CAF co-culture spheroids the impact of the CAFs was less pronounced. In addition, 3D spheroids exhibited a significant increase in E-cadherin and substantial expression of vimentin in co-culture spheroids, whereas AR levels remained unchanged or even decreased. In LNCaP/CAF spheroids we further found increased Akt signaling that could be inhibited by the phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, thereby overcoming the anti-androgen resistance of the spheroids. Our data show that CAFs influence drug response of PCa cells with varying impact and further suggest this spheroid model is a valuable in vitro drug testing tool. PMID:27598125

  20. Electrical behavior and pore accumulation in a multicellular model for conventional and supra-electroporation

    SciTech Connect

    Gowrishankar, T.R.; Weaver, James C. . E-mail: jcw@mit.edu

    2006-10-20

    Extremely large but very short (20 kV/cm, 300 ns) electric field pulses were reported recently to non-thermally destroy melanoma tumors. The stated mechanism for field penetration into cells is pulse characteristic times faster than charge redistribution (displacement currents). Here we use a multicellular model with irregularly shaped, closely spaced cells to show that instead overwhelming pore creation (supra-electroporation) is dominant, with field penetration due to pores (ionic conduction currents) during most of the pulse. Moreover, the model's maximum membrane potential (about 1.2 V) is consistent with recent experimental observations on isolated cells. We also use the model to show that conventional electroporation resulting from 100 microsecond, 1 kV/cm pulses yields a spatially heterogeneous electroporation distribution. In contrast, the melanoma-destroying pulses cause nearly homogeneous electroporation of cells and their nuclear membranes. Electropores can persist for times much longer than the pulses, and are likely to be an important mechanism contributing to cell death.

  1. Imaging Sensitivity of Quiescent Cancer Cells to Metabolic Perturbations in Bone Marrow Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Neely, Taylor; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant cells from breast cancer and other common cancers such as prostate and melanoma may persist in bone marrow as quiescent, non-dividing cells that remain viable for years or even decades before resuming proliferation to cause recurrent disease. This phenomenon, referred to clinically as tumor dormancy, poses tremendous challenges to curing patients with breast cancer. Quiescent tumor cells resist chemotherapy drugs that predominantly target proliferating cells, limiting success of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapies. We recently developed a 3D spheroid model of quiescent breast cancer cells in bone marrow for mechanistic and drug testing studies. We combined this model with optical imaging methods for label-free detection of cells preferentially utilizing glycolysis versus oxidative metabolism to investigate the metabolic state of co-culture spheroids with different bone marrow stromal and breast cancer cells. Through imaging and biochemical assays, we identified different metabolic states of bone marrow stromal cells that control metabolic status and flexibilities of co-cultured breast cancer cells. We tested metabolic stresses and targeted inhibition of specific metabolic pathways to identify approaches to preferentially eliminate quiescent breast cancer cells from bone marrow environments. These studies establish an integrated imaging approach to analyze metabolism in complex tissue environments to identify new metabolically-targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27478871

  2. Lycopene's Effects on Cancer Cell Functions within Monolayer and Spheroid Cultures.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, Nina Pauline; Holzapfel, Boris Michael; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Kaemmerer, Elke; Rausch, Tamara; Feldthusen, Jesper; Champ, Simon; Clements, Judith Ann; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner; Loessner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene, a compound that blocks the action of free radicals and oxygen molecules, is found in tomatoes and tomato-based products and linked to a reduced incidence of cancer. Increasing willingness of patients to maintain a healthy lifestyle by supplemental intake of nutrients and acceptance of alternative therapeutics has boosted research into nutraceuticals. The potential of lycopene to prevent or treat cancer has been investigated, but outcomes are inconsistent and its mode of action is still unknown. Further studies are needed to understand the role of lycopene in cancer prevention and treatment. The impact of lycopene on viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion of five different cancer cell lines was determined using monolayer and spheroid cultures. Cell viability was significantly reduced upon lycopene treatment at physiologically attainable concentrations. Cell proliferation, migration, and invasion did not change upon lycopene treatment. Ovarian cancer spheroids initially showed a decreased proliferation and after 14 days increased cell viability upon lycopene treatment, confirming the potential of lycopene to reduce cancer cell growth in short-term cultures and also indicate enhanced cell viability over prolonged exposure. This study cannot substantiate that lycopene inhibits cell functions associated with tumor growth, even in a 3D cancer model that mimics the natural tumor microenvironment. PMID:27015041

  3. Cusp diffraction catastrophe from spheroids: generalized rainbows and inverse scattering.

    PubMed

    Marston, P L

    1985-12-01

    The angular location of the recently discovered cusp pattern in the far-field scattering from an oblate spheroid is calculated as a function of the aspect ratio D/H. The calculation assumes the diameter D > lambda and is limited to illumination perpendicular to the short axis of the spheroid. It agrees with observations for water drops in the range 1.22 < D/H < 1.37 with D ~ 1 mm. PMID:19730494

  4. Wave Dark Matter and Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, Alan R.

    We explore a model of dark matter called wave dark matter (also known as scalar field dark matter and boson stars) which has recently been motivated by a new geometric perspective by Bray. Wave dark matter describes dark matter as a scalar field which satisfies the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. These equations rely on a fundamental constant Upsilon (also known as the "mass term'' of the Klein-Gordon equation). Specifically, in this dissertation, we study spherically symmetric wave dark matter and compare these results with observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies as a first attempt to compare the implications of the theory of wave dark matter with actual observations of dark matter. This includes finding a first estimate of the fundamental constant Upsilon. In the introductory Chapter 1, we present some preliminary background material to define and motivate the study of wave dark matter and describe some of the properties of dwarf spheroidal galaxies. In Chapter 2, we present several different ways of describing a spherically symmetric spacetime and the resulting metrics. We then focus our discussion on an especially useful form of the metric of a spherically symmetric spacetime in polar-areal coordinates and its properties. In particular, we show how the metric component functions chosen are extremely compatible with notions in Newtonian mechanics. We also show the monotonicity of the Hawking mass in these coordinates. Finally, we discuss how these coordinates and the metric can be used to solve the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations. In Chapter 3, we explore spherically symmetric solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations, the defining equations of wave dark matter, where the scalar field is of the form f(t, r) = eiotF(r) for some constant o ∈ R and complex-valued function F(r). We show that the corresponding metric is static if and only if F( r) = h(r)eia for some constant alpha ∈ R and real-valued function h(r). We describe the

  5. Biological magnetic cellular spheroids as building blocks for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Mattix, Brandon; Olsen, Timothy R.; Gu, Yu; Casco, Megan; Herbst, Austin; Simionescu, Dan T.; Visconti, Richard P.; Kornev, Konstantin G.; Alexis, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), primarily iron oxide nanoparticles, have been incorporated into cellular spheroids to allow for magnetic manipulation into desired shapes, patterns and 3-D tissue constructs using magnetic forces. However, the direct and long-term interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with cells and biological systems can induce adverse effects on cell viability, phenotype and function, and remain a critical concern. Here we report the preparation of biological magnetic cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin, a biological MNP, capable of serving as a biological alternative to iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids as tissue engineered building blocks. Magnetoferritin NPs were incorporated into 3-D cellular spheroids with no adverse effects on cell viability up to 1 week. Additionally, cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin NPs were magnetically patterned and fused into a tissue ring to demonstrate its potential for tissue engineering applications. These results present a biological approach that can serve as an alternative to the commonly used iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids, which often require complex surface modifications of iron oxide NPs to reduce the adverse effects on cells. PMID:24176725

  6. Biological magnetic cellular spheroids as building blocks for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Mattix, Brandon; Olsen, Timothy R; Gu, Yu; Casco, Megan; Herbst, Austin; Simionescu, Dan T; Visconti, Richard P; Kornev, Konstantin G; Alexis, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), primarily iron oxide nanoparticles, have been incorporated into cellular spheroids to allow for magnetic manipulation into desired shapes, patterns and 3-D tissue constructs using magnetic forces. However, the direct and long-term interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with cells and biological systems can induce adverse effects on cell viability, phenotype and function, and remain a critical concern. Here we report the preparation of biological magnetic cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin, a biological MNP, capable of serving as a biological alternative to iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids as tissue engineered building blocks. Magnetoferritin NPs were incorporated into 3-D cellular spheroids with no adverse effects on cell viability up to 1 week. Additionally, cellular spheroids containing magnetoferritin NPs were magnetically patterned and fused into a tissue ring to demonstrate its potential for tissue engineering applications. These results present a biological approach that can serve as an alternative to the commonly used iron oxide magnetic cellular spheroids, which often require complex surface modifications of iron oxide NPs to reduce the adverse effects on cells. PMID:24176725

  7. Radiation torque exerted on a spheroid: Analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Lock, James A.; Gouesbet, Gérard; Tropea, Cameron

    2008-07-01

    As a companion work to our previous study [F. Xu, , Phys. Rev. E. 75, 026613 (2007)] on radiation force prediction for a homogeneous spheroid, we provide in this paper the analytical solution to the radiation torque exerted by an arbitrarily shaped beam on a spheroid, which can be prolate or oblate, transparent or absorbing. Calculations based upon this theoretical development are performed for both linearly and circularly polarized incident beams, and the results are compared to those of a sphere. Stable orientations of spheroids inside a linearly and a circularly polarized Gaussian beam are predicted. We analyze two physical mechanisms, the polarization torque and the reaction force torque, which do not exist or have no contribution to the torque on a sphere but cause rotation of a spheroid. As verification, the dipole method is also developed for the torque calculation for spheroids of size much less than the wavelength, and geometrical optics is developed to qualitatively analyze the torque exerted on spheroids of large size.

  8. The oblate spheroidal harmonics under coordinate system rotation and translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panou, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Several recent studies in geodesy and related sciences make use of oblate spheroidal harmonics. For instance, the Earth's external gravitational potential can be mathematically expanded in an oblate spheroidal harmonic series which converges outside any spheroid enclosing all the masses. In this presentation, we develop the exact relations between the solid oblate spheroidal harmonics in two coordinate systems, related to each other by an arbitrary rotation or translation. We start with the relations which exist between the spherical harmonics in the two coordinate systems. This problem has received considerable attention in the past and equivalent results have been independently derived by several investigators. Then, combining the previous results with the expressions which relate the solid spherical harmonics and the solid spheroidal harmonics, we obtain the relations under consideration. For simplicity, complex notation has been adopted throughout the work. This approach is also suitable and easy to use in the zonal harmonic expansions. The spherical harmonics under coordinate system rotation and translation are obtained as a degenerate case. The above theory can be used in any spheroidal harmonic model. Finally, some simple examples are given, in order to illuminate the mathematical derivations.

  9. Development of cell differentiation in the transition to multicellularity: a dynamical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Mora Van Cauwelaert, Emilio; Arias Del Angel, Juan A; Benítez, Mariana; Azpeitia, Eugenio M

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity has emerged and continues to emerge in a variety of lineages and under diverse environmental conditions. In order to attain individuality and integration, multicellular organisms must exhibit spatial cell differentiation, which in turn allows cell aggregates to robustly generate traits and behaviors at the multicellular level. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that may lead to the development of cellular differentiation and patterning in emerging multicellular organisms remain unclear. We briefly review two conceptual frameworks that have addressed this issue: the cooperation-defection framework and the dynamical patterning modules (DPMs) framework. Then, situating ourselves in the DPM formalism first put forward by S. A. Newman and collaborators, we state a hypothesis for cell differentiation and arrangement in cellular masses of emerging multicellular organisms. Our hypothesis is based on the role of the generic cell-to-cell communication and adhesion patterning mechanisms, which are two fundamental mechanisms for the evolution of multicellularity, and whose molecules seem to be well-conserved in extant multicellular organisms and their unicellular relatives. We review some fundamental ideas underlying this hypothesis and contrast them with empirical and theoretical evidence currently available. Next, we use a mathematical model to illustrate how the mechanisms and assumptions considered in the hypothesis we postulate may render stereotypical arrangements of differentiated cells in an emerging cellular aggregate and may contribute to the variation and recreation of multicellular phenotypes. Finally, we discuss the potential implications of our approach and compare them to those entailed by the cooperation-defection framework in the study of cell differentiation in the transition to multicellularity. PMID:26157427

  10. Development of cell differentiation in the transition to multicellularity: a dynamical modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Mora Van Cauwelaert, Emilio; Arias Del Angel, Juan A.; Benítez, Mariana; Azpeitia, Eugenio M.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity has emerged and continues to emerge in a variety of lineages and under diverse environmental conditions. In order to attain individuality and integration, multicellular organisms must exhibit spatial cell differentiation, which in turn allows cell aggregates to robustly generate traits and behaviors at the multicellular level. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that may lead to the development of cellular differentiation and patterning in emerging multicellular organisms remain unclear. We briefly review two conceptual frameworks that have addressed this issue: the cooperation-defection framework and the dynamical patterning modules (DPMs) framework. Then, situating ourselves in the DPM formalism first put forward by S. A. Newman and collaborators, we state a hypothesis for cell differentiation and arrangement in cellular masses of emerging multicellular organisms. Our hypothesis is based on the role of the generic cell-to-cell communication and adhesion patterning mechanisms, which are two fundamental mechanisms for the evolution of multicellularity, and whose molecules seem to be well-conserved in extant multicellular organisms and their unicellular relatives. We review some fundamental ideas underlying this hypothesis and contrast them with empirical and theoretical evidence currently available. Next, we use a mathematical model to illustrate how the mechanisms and assumptions considered in the hypothesis we postulate may render stereotypical arrangements of differentiated cells in an emerging cellular aggregate and may contribute to the variation and recreation of multicellular phenotypes. Finally, we discuss the potential implications of our approach and compare them to those entailed by the cooperation-defection framework in the study of cell differentiation in the transition to multicellularity. PMID:26157427

  11. Computational modeling of multicellular constructs with the material point method.

    PubMed

    Guilkey, James E; Hoying, James B; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    Computational modeling of the mechanics of cells and multicellular constructs with standard numerical discretization techniques such as the finite element (FE) method is complicated by the complex geometry, material properties and boundary conditions that are associated with such systems. The objectives of this research were to apply the material point method (MPM), a meshless method, to the modeling of vascularized constructs by adapting the algorithm to accurately handle quasi-static, large deformation mechanics, and to apply the modified MPM algorithm to large-scale simulations using a discretization that was obtained directly from volumetric confocal image data. The standard implicit time integration algorithm for MPM was modified to allow the background computational grid to remain fixed with respect to the spatial distribution of material points during the analysis. This algorithm was used to simulate the 3D mechanics of a vascularized scaffold under tension, consisting of growing microvascular fragments embedded in a collagen gel, by discretizing the construct with over 13.6 million material points. Baseline 3D simulations demonstrated that the modified MPM algorithm was both more accurate and more robust than the standard MPM algorithm. Scaling studies demonstrated the ability of the parallel code to scale to 200 processors. Optimal discretization was established for the simulations of the mechanics of vascularized scaffolds by examining stress distributions and reaction forces. Sensitivity studies demonstrated that the reaction force during simulated extension was highly sensitive to the modulus of the microvessels, despite the fact that they comprised only 10.4% of the volume of the total sample. In contrast, the reaction force was relatively insensitive to the effective Poisson's ratio of the entire sample. These results suggest that the MPM simulations could form the basis for estimating the modulus of the embedded microvessels through a parameter

  12. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella and the Evolution of Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    Flagella, among the most highly conserved structures in eukaryotes, are responsible for such tasks as fluid transport, motility and phototaxis, establishment of embryonic left-right asymmetry, and intercellular communication, and are thought to have played a key role in the development of multicellularity. These tasks are usually performed by the coordinated action of groups of flagella (from pairs to thousands), which display various types of spatio-temporal organization. The origin and quantitative characterization of flagellar synchronization has remained an important open problem, involving interplay between intracellular biochemistry and interflagellar mechanical/hydrodynamic coupling. The Volvocine green algae serve as useful model organisms for the study of these phenomena, as they form a lineage spanning from unicellular Chlamydomonas to germ-soma differentiated Volvox, having as many as 50,000 biflagellated surface somatic cells. In this talk I will describe extensive studies [1], using micromanipulation and high-speed imaging, of the flagellar synchronization of two key species - Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri - over tens of thousands of cycles. With Chlamydomonas we find that the flagellar dynamics moves back and forth between a stochastic synchronized state consistent with a simple model of hydrodynamically coupled noisy oscillators, and a deterministic one driven by a large interflagellar frequency difference. These results reconcile previously contradictory studies, based on short observations, showing only one or the other of these two states, and, more importantly, show that the flagellar beat frequencies themselves are regulated by the cell. Moreover, high-resolution three-dimensional tracking of swimming cells provides strong evidence that these dynamical states are related to reorientation events in the trajectories, yielding a eukaryotic equivalent of the ``run and tumble'' motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria. The degree

  13. Cooperatively Generated Stresslet Flows Supply Fresh Fluid to Multicellular Choanoflagellate Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Marcus; Dayel, Mark J.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2013-05-01

    The flagellated protozoan Salpingoeca rosetta is one of the closest relatives of multicellular animals. Unicellular S. rosetta can be induced to form multicellular colonies, but colonies swim more slowly than individual cells so the advantages conferred by colony formation are uncertain. Here we use theoretical models to show that hydrodynamic cooperation between cells can increase the fluid supply to the colony, an important predictor of feeding rate. Our results suggest that hydrodynamic benefits may have been an important selective factor in the evolution of early multicellular animals.

  14. Electron spin resonance microscopic imaging of oxygen concentration in cancer spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, Mada; Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Neufeld, Gera; Neeman, Michal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-07-01

    relationship between morphological and physiological alterations in the spheroids, which would help understand the oxygen metabolism in solid tumors and its correlation with the susceptibility of tumors to various oncologic treatments.

  15. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by spheroidal particles: a novel approach exploiting the scr(T) matrix computed in spheroidal coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, F. Michael; Stamnes, Knut Stamnes, Jakob A.

    1998-11-01

    A method other than the extended-boundary-condition method (EBCM) to compute the {ital T} matrix for electromagnetic scattering is presented. The separation-of-variables method (SVM) is used to solve the electromagnetic scattering problem for a spheroidal particle and to derive its scr(T) matrix in spheroidal coordinates. A transformation is developed for transforming the scr(T) matrix in spheroidal coordinates into the corresponding T matrix in spherical coordinates. The T matrix so obtained can be used for analytical calculation of the optical properties of ensembles of randomly oriented spheroids of arbitrary shape by use of an existing method to average over orientational angles. The optical properties obtained with the SVM and the EBCM are compared for different test cases. For mildly aspherical particles the two methods yield indistinguishable results. Small differences appear for highly aspherical particles. The new approach can be used to compute optical properties for arbitrary values of the aspect ratio. To test the accuracy of the expansion coefficients of the spheroidal functions for arbitrary arguments, a new testing method based on the completeness relation of the spheroidal functions is developed. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  16. Mass and Substructure in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Matthew G.

    2006-12-01

    I present results from a large spectroscopic survey of individual stars in dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies, conducted using the Michigan/MIKE Fiber System (MMFS) at the Magellan Telescopes. dSph galaxies have come under intense scrutiny because they represent the lower extreme of the galaxy mass function, and thereby provide important constraints on models of structure formation. The proximity of the Milky Way's (MW's) dSph satellites allows us to study the resolved stellar populations of these systems in detail. Toward this end I have acquired MMFS spectra (5140-5180 Angstroms at resolution 20000) for more than 5000 stars in the MW dSphs Carina, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans. The spectra yield measurements of both radial velocity (median precision ± 1.8 km/s) and [Fe/H] metallicity (± 0.2 dex). I present radial velocity dispersion profiles for each dSph, as well as halo mass profiles derived using a variety of models and nonparametric estimation techniques. In some cases, the bulk stellar component is separable into populations following distinct distributions in position, kinematics, and chemistry, indicating a surprising level of complexity in these diminutive galaxies. Taking advantage of the fine spatial sampling of the MMFS data, I identify regions showing tentative evidence of localized chemo-dynamical substructure. This work is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the University of Michigan.

  17. Testing Modified Gravity with Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, Hosein; Amiri, Vahid

    2016-08-01

    The observed velocity dispersion of the classical dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Milky Way (MW) requires the Newtonian stellar mass-to-light (M★/L) ratios in the range of about 10 to more than 100 solar units, that are well outside the acceptable limit predicted by stellar population synthesis (SPS) models. Using Jeans analysis, we calculate the line-of-sight velocity dispersion (σ _ph {los}) of stars in eight MW dSphs in the context of the Modified Gravity (MOG) theory of Moffat, assuming a constant M★/L ratio without invoking the exotic cold dark matter. First, we use the weak field approximation of MOG and assume the two parameters α and μ of the theory to be constant as has already been inferred from fitting to the observed rotational data of the THINGS catalog of galaxies. We find that the derived M★/L ratios for almost all dSphs are too large to be explained by the stellar population values. In order to fit the line-of-sight velocity dispersions of the dSph with reasonable M★/L values we must vary α and μ on a case by case basis. A common pair of values cannot be found for all dSphs. Comparing with the values found from rotation curve fitting, it appears that μ correlates strongly with galaxy luminosity, shedding doubt on it as a universal constant.

  18. Multicellular contractility contributes to the emergence of mesothelioma nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirok, Andras

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) nodules arise from the mesothelial lining of the pleural cavity by a poorly understood mechanism. We demonstrate that macroscopic multicellular aggregates, reminiscent of the MPM nodules found in patients, develop when MPM cell lines are cultured at high cell densities for several weeks. Surprisingly, the nodule-like aggregates do not arise by excessive local cell proliferation, but by myosin II-driven cell contractility. Contractile nodules contain prominent actin cables that can span several cells. Several features of the in vitro MPM nodule development can be explained by a computational model that assumes uniform and steady intercellular contractile forces within a monolayer of cells, and a mechanical load-dependent lifetime of cell-cell contacts. The model behaves as a self-tensioned Maxwell fluid and exhibits an instability that leads to pattern formation. Altogether, our findings suggest that inhibition of the actomyosin system may provide a hitherto not utilized therapeutic approach to affect MPM growth. NIH R01-GM102801.

  19. Biocellion: accelerating computer simulation of multicellular biological system models

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seunghwa; Kahan, Simon; McDermott, Jason; Flann, Nicholas; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biological system behaviors are often the outcome of complex interactions among a large number of cells and their biotic and abiotic environment. Computational biologists attempt to understand, predict and manipulate biological system behavior through mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Discrete agent-based modeling (in combination with high-resolution grids to model the extracellular environment) is a popular approach for building biological system models. However, the computational complexity of this approach forces computational biologists to resort to coarser resolution approaches to simulate large biological systems. High-performance parallel computers have the potential to address the computing challenge, but writing efficient software for parallel computers is difficult and time-consuming. Results: We have developed Biocellion, a high-performance software framework, to solve this computing challenge using parallel computers. To support a wide range of multicellular biological system models, Biocellion asks users to provide their model specifics by filling the function body of pre-defined model routines. Using Biocellion, modelers without parallel computing expertise can efficiently exploit parallel computers with less effort than writing sequential programs from scratch. We simulate cell sorting, microbial patterning and a bacterial system in soil aggregate as case studies. Availability and implementation: Biocellion runs on x86 compatible systems with the 64 bit Linux operating system and is freely available for academic use. Visit http://biocellion.com for additional information. Contact: seunghwa.kang@pnnl.gov PMID:25064572

  20. Cooperation and conflict in the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Michod, R E; Roze, D

    2001-01-01

    Multicellular organisms probably originated as groups of cells formed in several ways, including cell proliferation from a group of founder cells and aggregation. Cooperation among cells benefits the group, but may be costly (altruistic) or beneficial (synergistic) to individual cooperating cells. In this paper, we study conflict mediation, the process by which genetic modifiers evolve that enhance cooperation by altering the parameters of development or rules of formation of cell groups. We are particularly interested in the conditions under which these modifiers lead to a new higher-level unit of selection with increased cooperation among group members and heritable variation in fitness at the group level. By sculpting the fitness variation and opportunity for selection at the two levels, conflict modifiers create new functions at the organism level. An organism is more than a group of cooperating cells related by common descent; organisms require adaptations that regulate conflict within. Otherwise their continued evolution is frustrated by the creation of within-organism variation and conflict between levels of selection. The evolution of conflict modifiers is a necessary prerequisite to the emergence of individuality and the continued well being of the organism. Conflict leads--through the evolution of adaptations that reduce i--to greater individuality and harmony for the organism. PMID:11298810

  1. Noise-induced coherence in multicellular circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Ullner, Ekkehard; Buceta, Javier; Díez-Noguera, Antoni; García-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2009-05-01

    In higher organisms, circadian rhythms are generated by a multicellular genetic clock that is entrained very efficiently to the 24-h light-dark cycle. Most studies done so far of these circadian oscillators have considered a perfectly periodic driving by light, in the form of either a square wave or a sinusoidal modulation. However, in natural conditions, organisms are subject to nonnegligible fluctuations in the light level all through the daily cycle. In this article, we investigate how the interplay between light fluctuations and intercellular coupling affects the dynamics of the collective rhythm in a large ensemble of nonidentical, globally coupled cellular clocks modeled as Goodwin oscillators. On the basis of experimental considerations, we assume an inverse dependence of the cell-cell coupling strength on the light intensity, in such a way that the larger the light intensity, the weaker the coupling. Our results show a noise-induced rhythm generation for constant light intensities at which the clock is arrhythmic in the noise-free case. Importantly, the rhythm shows a resonancelike phenomenon as a function of the noise intensity. Such improved coherence can be only observed at the level of the overt rhythm and not at the level of the individual oscillators, thus suggesting a cooperative effect of noise, coupling, and the emerging synchronization between the oscillators. PMID:19413962

  2. Novel species and expanded distribution of ellipsoidal multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-ran; Zhang, Wen-yan; Zhou, Ke; Pan, Hong-miao; Du, Hai-jian; Xu, Cong; Xu, Jian-hong; Pradel, Nathalie; Santini, Claire-Lise; Li, Jin-hua; Huang, Hui; Pan, Yong-xin; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-fei

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs) are a peculiar group of magnetotactic bacteria, each comprising approximately 10-100 cells of the same phylotype. Two morphotypes of MMP have been identified, including several species of globally distributed spherical mulberry-like MMPs (s-MMPs), and two species of ellipsoidal pineapple-like MMPs (e-MMPs) from China (Qingdao and Rongcheng cities). We recently collected e-MMPs from Mediterranean Sea sediments (Six-Fours-les-Plages) and Drummond Island, in the South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MMPs from Six-Fours-les-Plages and the previously reported e-MMP Candidatus Magnetananas rongchenensis have 98.5% sequence identity and are the same species, while the MMPs from Drummond Island appear to be a novel species, having > 7.1% sequence divergence from the most closely related e-MMP, Candidatus Magnetananas tsingtaoensis. Identification of the novel species expands the distribution of e-MMPs to Tropical Zone. Comparison of nine physical and chemical parameters revealed that sand grain size and the content of inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium and nitrite) in the sediments from Rongcheng City and Six-Fours-les-Plages were similar, and lower than found for sediments from the other two sampling sites. The results of the study reveal broad diversity and wide distribution of e-MMPs. PMID:26711721

  3. Origins of multicellular complexity: Volvox and the volvocine algae.

    PubMed

    Herron, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    The collection of evolutionary transformations known as the 'major transitions' or 'transitions in individuality' resulted in changes in the units of evolution and in the hierarchical structure of cellular life. Volvox and related algae have become an important model system for the major transition from unicellular to multicellular life, which touches on several fundamental questions in evolutionary biology. The Third International Volvox Conference was held at the University of Cambridge in August 2015 to discuss recent advances in the biology and evolution of this group of algae. Here, I highlight the benefits of integrating phylogenetic comparative methods and experimental evolution with detailed studies of developmental genetics in a model system with substantial genetic and genomic resources. I summarize recent research on Volvox and its relatives and comment on its implications for the genomic changes underlying major evolutionary transitions, evolution and development of complex traits, evolution of sex and sexes, evolution of cellular differentiation and the biophysics of motility. Finally, I outline challenges and suggest future directions for research into the biology and evolution of the volvocine algae. PMID:26822195

  4. MicroRNAs in a multicellular green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingrui; Wu, Yang; Qi, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key components in the eukaryotic gene regulatory network. We and others have previously identified many miRNAs in a unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. To investigate whether miRNA-mediated gene regulation is a general mechanism in green algae and how miRNAs have been evolved in the green algal lineage, we examined small RNAs in Volvox carteri, a multicellular species in the same family with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We identified 174 miRNAs in Volvox, with many of them being highly enriched in gonidia or somatic cells. The targets of the miRNAs were predicted and many of them were subjected to miRNA-mediated cleavage in vivo, suggesting that miRNAs play regulatory roles in the biology of green algae. Our catalog of miRNAs and their targets provides a resource for further studies on the evolution, biological functions, and genomic properties of miRNAs in green algae. PMID:24369344

  5. Multicellularity and the Functional Interdependence of Motility and Molecular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, C.; Ganguly, S.; Kessler, J. O.; Michod, R.; Goldstein, R. E.

    2006-03-01

    Benefits, costs and requirements accompany the transition from motile totipotent unicellular organisms to multicellular organisms having cells specialized into reproductive (germ) and vegetative (sterile soma) functions such as motility. In flagellated colonial organisms such as the volvocalean green algae, organized beating by the somatic cells' flagella yields propulsion important in phototaxis and chemotaxis. It has not been generally appreciated that for the larger colonies, flagellar stirring of boundary layers and remote transport are fundamental for maintaining a sufficient rate of metabolite turnover, one not attainable by diffusive transport alone. We describe experiments that quantify the role of advective dynamics in enhancing productivity in germ-soma differentiated colonies. First, experiments with suspended deflagellated colonies of Volvox carteri show that forced advection improves productivity. Second, Particle Imaging Velocimetry of fluid motion around colonies reveals flow fields with very large characteristic velocities U extending to length scales comparable to the colony radius R. For a typical metabolite diffusion constant D, the Peclet number Pe=2UR/D 1, indicative of the dominance of advection over diffusion, with striking augmentation at the cell division stage.

  6. Multicellularity and the functional interdependence of motility and molecular transport.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Ganguly, Sujoy; Kessler, John O; Michod, Richard E; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2006-01-31

    Benefits, costs, and requirements accompany the transition from motile totipotent unicellular organisms to multicellular organisms having cells specialized into reproductive (germ) and vegetative (sterile soma) functions such as motility. In flagellated colonial organisms such as the volvocalean green algae, organized beating by the somatic cells' flagella yields propulsion important in phototaxis and chemotaxis. It has not been generally appreciated that for the larger colonies flagellar stirring of boundary layers and remote transport are fundamental for maintaining a sufficient rate of metabolite turnover, one not attainable by diffusive transport alone. Here, we describe experiments that quantify the role of advective dynamics in enhancing productivity in germ soma-differentiated colonies. First, experiments with suspended deflagellated colonies of Volvox carteri show that forced advection improves productivity. Second, particle imaging velocimetry of fluid motion around colonies immobilized by micropipette aspiration reveals flow fields with very large characteristic velocities U extending to length scales exceeding the colony radius R. For a typical metabolite diffusion constant D, the associated Peclet number Pe = 2UR/D > 1, indicative of the dominance of advection over diffusion, with striking augmentation at the cell division stage. Near the colony surface, flows generated by flagella can be chaotic, exhibiting mixing due to stretching and folding. These results imply that hydrodynamic transport external to colonies provides a crucial boundary condition, a source for supplying internal diffusional dynamics. PMID:16421211

  7. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Donato; Gregoletto, Luca; Reano, Simone; Pietronave, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Talmon, Maria; Novelli, Eugenio; Diena, Marco; Nicoletti, Carmine; Musarò, Antonio; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Follenzi, Antonia; Prat, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM). We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol. PMID:26375957

  8. Dwarf spheroidal satellite formation in a reionized Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljević, Miloš; Bromm, Volker

    2014-05-01

    Dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies have emerged a powerful probe of small-scale dark matter clustering and of cosmic reionization. They exhibit structural and chemical continuity with dwarf irregular galaxies in the field and with spheroidal galaxies in high-density environments. By combining empirical constraints derived for star formation at low gas column densities and metallicities in the local Universe with a model for dark matter and baryonic mass assembly, we provide an analytical description of how the dwarf spheroidals acquired their stellar content. Their progenitors formed stars until the gas content, initially reduced from the cosmic average by the thermal pressure of the reionized intergalactic medium, was finally ram pressure stripped during the progenitors' accretion on to the host galaxy. Dwarf spheroidal satellites of differing luminosities seem to share very similar most massive progenitor histories that reach thresholds for gas cooling by atomic line emission at epochs at which the Lagrangian volume of the Local Group should have been reionized. We hypothesize that dwarf spheroidals formed the bulk of their stars in partially rotationally supported H I discs in a reionized universe. This model provides an explanation for the `common mass scale' relation and reproduces the empirical luminosity-size and luminosity-metallicity relations. Explosive feedback phenomena, such as outflows driven by the concerted action of supernovae, need not have been significant in the dwarf spheroidals' formation. We further speculate that the true pre-reionization fossils should exhibit a structure distinct from that of the dwarf spheroidals, e.g. in the form of dense isolated or nuclear star clusters.

  9. Phylogeny of Opisthokonta and the evolution of multicellularity and complexity in Fungi and Metazoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Mónica; Collins, Allen G.; Taylor, John W.; Valentine, James W.; Lipps, Jere H.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2003-07-01

    While early eukaryotic life must have been unicellular, multicellular lifeforms evolved multiple times from protistan ancestors in diverse eukaryotic lineages. The origins of multicellularity are of special interest because they require evolutionary transitions towards increased levels of complexity. We have generated new sequence data from the nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA gene (LSU rDNA) and the SSU rDNA gene of several unicellular opisthokont protists - a nucleariid amoeba (Nuclearia simplex) and four choanoflagellates (Codosiga gracilis, Choanoeca perplexa, Proterospongia choanojuncta and Stephanoeca diplocostata) to provide the basis for re-examining relationships among several unicellular lineages and their multicellular relatives (animals and fungi). Our data indicate that: (1) choanoflagellates are a monophyletic rather than a paraphyletic assemblage that independently gave rise to animals and fungi as suggested by some authors and (2) the nucleariid filose amoebae are the likely sister group to Fungi. We also review published information regarding the origin of multicellularity in the opisthokonts.

  10. Multicellular group formation in response to predators in the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R M; Bell, T; West, S A

    2016-03-01

    A key step in the evolution of multicellular organisms is the formation of cooperative multicellular groups. It has been suggested that predation pressure may promote multicellular group formation in some algae and bacteria, with cells forming groups to lower their chance of being eaten. We use the green alga Chlorella vulgaris and the protist Tetrahymena thermophila to test whether predation pressure can initiate the formation of colonies. We found that: (1) either predators or just predator exoproducts promote colony formation; (2) higher predator densities cause more colonies to form; and (3) colony formation in this system is facultative, with populations returning to being unicellular when the predation pressure is removed. These results provide empirical support for the hypothesis that predation pressure promotes multicellular group formation. The speed of the reversion of populations to unicellularity suggests that this response is due to phenotypic plasticity and not evolutionary change. PMID:26663204

  11. Potential impact of gene regulatory mechanisms on the evolution of multicellularity in the volvocine algae.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how multicellular organisms can arise from their single-celled precursors. The evolution of multicellularity requires the adoption of new traits in unicellular ancestors that allows the generation of form by, for example, increasing the size and developing new cell types. But what are the genetic, cellular and biochemical bases underlying the evolution of multicellularity? Recent advances in evolutionary developmental biology suggest that the regulation of gene expression by cis-regulatory factors, gene duplication and alternative splicing contribute to phenotypic evolution. These mechanisms enable different degrees of phenotypic divergence and complexity with variation in traits from genomes with similar gene contents. In addition, signaling pathways specific to cell types are developed to guarantee the modulation of cellular and developmental processes matched to the cell types as well as the maintenance of multicellularity. PMID:26479715

  12. An epithelial tissue in Dictyostelium challenges the traditional origin of metazoan multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Daniel J; Nelson, W James; Weis, William I

    2012-10-01

    We hypothesize that aspects of animal multicellularity originated before the divergence of metazoans from fungi and social amoebae. Polarized epithelial tissues are a defining feature of metazoans and contribute to the diversity of animal body plans. The recent finding of a polarized epithelium in the non-metazoan social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum demonstrates that epithelial tissue is not a unique feature of metazoans, and challenges the traditional paradigm that multicellularity evolved independently in social amoebae and metazoans. An alternative view, presented here, is that the common ancestor of social amoebae, fungi, and animals spent a portion of its life cycle in a multicellular state and possessed molecular machinery necessary for forming an epithelial tissue. Some descendants of this ancestor retained multicellularity, while others reverted to unicellularity. This hypothesis makes testable predictions regarding tissue organization in close relatives of metazoans and provides a novel conceptual framework for studies of early animal evolution. PMID:22930590

  13. Noncanonical roles of membranous lysyl-tRNA synthetase in transducing cell-substrate signaling for invasive dissemination of colon cancer spheroids in 3D collagen I gels

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Seo Hee; Kim, Doyeun; Lee, Mi-Sook; Lee, Doohyung; Kwak, Tae Kyoung; Kang, Minkyung; Ryu, Jihye; Kim, Hye-Jin; Song, Haeng Eun; Choi, Jungeun; Lee, Gyu-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Park, Song Hwa; Kim, Dae Gyu; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Kim, Tai Young; Thiery, Jean Paul; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Jung Weon

    2015-01-01

    The adhesion properties of cells are involved in tumor metastasis. Although KRS at the plasma membrane is shown important for cancer metastasis, additionally to canonical roles of cytosolic KRS in protein translation, how KRS and its downstream effectors promote the metastatic migration remains unexplored. Disseminative behaviors (an earlier metastatic process) of colon cancer cell spheroids embedded in 3D collagen gels were studied with regards to cell adhesion properties, and relevance in KRS−/+ knocked-down animal and clinical colon cancer tissues. Time-lapse imaging revealed KRS-dependent cell dissemination from the spheroids, whereas KRS-suppressed spheroids remained static due to the absence of outbound movements supported by cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion. While keeping E-cadherin at the outward disseminative cells, KRS caused integrin-involved intracellular signaling for ERK/c-Jun, paxillin, and cell-ECM adhesion-mediated signaling to modulate traction force for crawling movement. KRS-suppressed spheroids became disseminative following ERK or paxillin re-expression. The KRS-dependent intracellular signaling activities correlated with the invasiveness in clinical colon tumor tissues and in KRS−/+ knocked-down mice tissues. Collectively, these observations indicate that KRS at the plasma membrane plays new roles in metastatic migration as a signaling inducer, and causes intracellular signaling for cancer dissemination, involving cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion, during KRS-mediated metastasis. PMID:26091349

  14. Evolution of multicellularity coincided with increased diversification of cyanobacteria and the Great Oxidation Event

    PubMed Central

    Schirrmeister, Bettina E.; de Vos, Jurriaan M.; Antonelli, Alexandre; Bagheri, Homayoun C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are among the most diverse prokaryotic phyla, with morphotypes ranging from unicellular to multicellular filamentous forms, including those able to terminally (i.e., irreversibly) differentiate in form and function. It has been suggested that cyanobacteria raised oxygen levels in the atmosphere around 2.45–2.32 billion y ago during the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), hence dramatically changing life on the planet. However, little is known about the temporal evolution of cyanobacterial lineages, and possible interplay between the origin of multicellularity, diversification of cyanobacteria, and the rise of atmospheric oxygen. We estimated divergence times of extant cyanobacterial lineages under Bayesian relaxed clocks for a dataset of 16S rRNA sequences representing the entire known diversity of this phylum. We tested whether the evolution of multicellularity overlaps with the GOE, and whether multicellularity is associated with significant shifts in diversification rates in cyanobacteria. Our results indicate an origin of cyanobacteria before the rise of atmospheric oxygen. The evolution of multicellular forms coincides with the onset of the GOE and an increase in diversification rates. These results suggest that multicellularity could have played a key role in triggering cyanobacterial evolution around the GOE. PMID:23319632

  15. Development and testing of spheroidal inorganic sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.L.; Anderson, K.K.

    1998-01-29

    The general objectives of this task are to develop, prepare, and test spheroidal inorganic ion exchangers made by the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine) internal gelation process to remove radionuclides and heavy metals from waste streams occurring at the various DOE sites. Inorganic ion-exchange materials, such as sodium silicotitanate, sodium titanate, ammonium molybdeophosphate, phosphotungstic acid, hexacyanoferrates, titanium monohydrogen phosphate, hydrous titanium oxide, polyantimonic acid, magnesium oxide, etc. have high selectivities and efficiencies for separating and removing radionuclides (e.g., cesium, strontium, technetium, iodine, europium, cerium, ruthenium, and zirconium), actinides, and other elements (such as lead, mercury, silver, nickel, zinc, chromium, and fluoride) from aqueous waste streams. The development of cesium specific spherical sorbents for treatment of acidic, high-salt waste solutions was initiated in FY 1998. Acid-side treatment is important at INEEL and could become important if acidic sludge washing were to become a treatment option at Hanford, Savannah River, or Oak Ridge. Zirconium monohydrogen phosphates (ZrHP) embedded with ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) was the cesium selective inorganic sorbent chosen for making microspheres. AMP is known to be a very effective sorbent for removing cesium from waste streams over a wide range of acidity and salinity, and it has very rapid loading kinetics. The cesium can also be eluted from AMP with ammonium salt solutions. AMP cannot be used as a sorbent at pHs above 7 because it decomposes. In the pH range of 1 to 7, ZrHP is also a very effective sorbent for removing Cs, Sr, Th, U(VI), Pu(IV), AM(III), Hg, and Pb from streams of lower ionic concentrations.

  16. The transitional wake behind an inclined prolate spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fengjian; Gallardo, José P.; Andersson, Helge I.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-09-01

    The wake behind a 6:1 prolate spheroid at 45° incidence has been studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNSs). The Reynolds number based on the minor axis of the spheroid was 3000 as compared to 1000 in our preceding study [Jiang et al., "The laminar wake behind a 6:1 prolate spheroid at 45° incidence angle," Phys. Fluids 26, 113602 (2014)]. The resulting wake is no longer laminar and the transitional wake is fundamentally unsteady and highly asymmetric from the very beginning. A substantial side force resulted from the asymmetric pressure field. No signs of vortex shedding could be observed. The forces and the flow field around the spheroid exhibited a dominant periodicity with a surprisingly low Strouhal number of 0.0733. One part of the counter-rotating vortex pair which dominated the near-wake broke down into small-scale vortices as soon as the vortex left the shadow behind the spheroid. The other part appeared as a helical vortex inside which the mechanical energy was conserved over a substantial length. The axial flow within this vortex tube experienced a sudden change from having maximum to minimum at the vortex center while maintaining the sign of the circulation. The severe asymmetry of the wake is ascribed to a global instability and may impact on submarine maneuverability.

  17. A microfluidic device for uniform-sized cell spheroids formation, culture, harvesting and flow cytometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Chen, Ying-Hua; Peng, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Culture of cells as three-dimensional (3D) aggregates, named spheroids, possesses great potential to improve in vitro cell models for basic biomedical research. However, such cell spheroid models are often complicated, cumbersome, and expensive compared to conventional Petri-dish cell cultures. In this work, we developed a simple microfluidic device for cell spheroid formation, culture, and harvesting. Using this device, cells could form uniformly sized spheroids due to strong cell-cell interactions and the spatial confinement of microfluidic culture chambers. We demonstrated cell spheroid formation and culture in the designed devices using embryonic stem cells, carcinoma cells, and fibroblasts. We further scaled up the device capable of simultaneously forming and culturing 5000 spheroids in a single chip. Finally, we demonstrated harvesting of the cultured spheroids from the device with a simple setup. The harvested spheroids possess great integrity, and the cells can be exploited for further flow cytometry assays due to the ample cell numbers. PMID:24396525

  18. CONCENTRIC MACLAURIN SPHEROID MODELS OF ROTATING LIQUID PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, W. B.

    2013-05-01

    I present exact expressions for the interior gravitational potential V of a system of N concentric constant-density (Maclaurin) spheroids. I demonstrate an iteration procedure to find a self-consistent solution for the shapes of the interfaces between spheroids, and for the interior gravitational potential. The external free-space potential, expressed as a multipole expansion, emerges as part of the self-consistent solution. The procedure is both simpler and more precise than perturbation methods. One can choose the distribution and mass densities of the concentric spheroids so as to reproduce a prescribed barotrope to a specified accuracy. I demonstrate the method's efficacy by comparing its results with several published test cases.

  19. A numerical study of separation on a spheroid at incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, M.; Israeli, M.; Wolfshtein, M.

    1986-01-01

    The three-dimensional incompressible, steady and laminar flow field around a prolate spheroid at incidence is considered. The parabolized Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically. The method can handle vortex types as well as bubble type flow separation because the pressure is one of the dependent variables. Here, the distribution of the skin friction is reported for two test cases. The first test case is a prolate spheroid of aspect ratio of 4:1 at 6 degrees incidence and Reynolds number of 1 million (based on half the major axis). The second case is a spheroid with a 6:1 aspect ratio at 10 degrees incidence and Reynolds number of 0.8 x 1 million. The properties of the flow field near the body are discussed on the basis of the pattern of the skin friction lines, and the shape of the separation lines. Favorable agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  20. The gravimetric boundary value problem in spheroidal approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panou, Georgios

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation the linear gravimetric boundary value problem is discussed in spheroidal approximation. The input to the problem is gravity disturbances, using the known Earth's topography as boundary and corresponds to an oblique derivative problem. From the physical viewpoint, it has many advantages and can serve as the basis in establishing a world vertical datum. Adopting the spheroidal approximation in this boundary value problem, an integral equation results which can be solved analytically using successive approximations. However, the mathematical model becomes simpler and can be solved more easily by applying certain permissible approximations: neglecting the Earth's topography, a spheroidal normal derivative (Neumann) problem is obtained. Under the spherical approximation, the result is a normal derivative problem plus suitable corrections. In this case, neglecting the Earth's topography, the solution corresponds to the well-known spherical Hotine integral. Finally, the relative errors in the above approximations and derivations are quantitatively estimated.

  1. Cellular Uptake and Movement in 2D and 3D Multicellular Breast Cancer Models of Fructose-Based Cylindrical Micelles That Is Dependent on the Rod Length.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiacheng; Lu, Hongxu; Xiao, Pu; Stenzel, Martina H

    2016-07-01

    While the shape effect of nanoparticles on cellular uptake has been frequently studied, no consistent conclusions are available currently. The controversy mainly focuses on the cellular uptake of elongated (i.e., filaments or rod-like micelles) as compared to spherical (i.e., micelles and vesicles) nanoparticles. So far, there is no clear trend that proposes the superiority of spherical or nonspherical nanoparticles with conflicting reports available in the literature. One of the reasons is that these few reports available deal with nanoparticles of different shapes, surface chemistries, stabilities, and aspects ratios. Here, we investigated the effect of the aspect ratio of cylindrical micelles on the cellular uptake by breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Cylindrical micelles, also coined rod-like micelles, of various length were prepared using fructose-based block copolymers poly(1-O-methacryloyl-β-d-fructopyranose)-b-poly(methyl methacrylate). The critical water content, temperature, and stirring rate that trigger the morphological transition from spheres to rods of various aspect ratios were identified, allowing the generation of different kinetically trapping morphologies. High shear force as they are found with high stirring rates was observed to inhibit the formation of long rods. Rod-like micelles with length of 500-2000 nm were subsequently investigated toward their ability to translocate in breast cancer cells and penetrate into MCF-7 multicellular spheroid models. It was found that shorter rods were taken up at a higher rate than longer rods. PMID:27286273

  2. Optical properties of core-mantle spheroidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsikov, Vadim V.; Farafonov, Victor G.

    1994-12-01

    The new solution of the problem of light scattering by coated spheroids was used to calculate the optical properties of prolate and oblate particles. The solution was obtained by the method of separation of variables for confocal spheroids. We consider the silicate core ice mantle particles and present the extinction cross-sections for prolate and oblate spheroids with the refractive indices mcore equals 1.7 + Oi, 1.7 + 0.1i and mmantle equals 1.3, the aspect ratio (a/b)mantle equals 2 and various volume ratios Vcore/Vtotal. The results are plotted for different size parameters xv equals 2(pi) rv/(lambda) , where rv is the radius of equivolume sphere and (lambda) is the wavelength of incident radiation. The main conclusions are: (a) if Vcore/Vtotal equals 0.5, the optical properties of a core-mantle particle are determined mainly by its core: for prolate non-absorbing spheroids when xv spheroids when xv 10, for oblate absorbing and non-absorbing spheroids when xv

  3. The size and structure of the spheroid of IC 1613

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battinelli, P.; Demers, S.; Artigau, É.

    2007-05-01

    Context: Nearby galaxies, spirals as well as irregulars, have been found to be much larger than previously believed. The structure of the huge spheroid surrounding dwarf galaxies could give clues to their past gravitational history. Thanks to wide field imagers, nearby galaxies with diameter of dozens of arcmin can be effectively surveyed. Aims: We obtain, from the CFHT archives, a series of i' and g' MegaCam images of IC 1613 in order to determine the stellar surface density of the field and determine the shape of its spheroid. Methods: From the colour magnitude diagram we select some 36 000 stars, in the first three magnitudes of the red giant branch. The spatial distribution of these stars is used to establish the structure of the spheroid. Results: The position angle of the major axis of the stellar spheroid is found to be ≈90°, some 30° from the major axis of the HI cloud surrounding IC 1613. The surface density profile of the spheroid is not exponential over all the length of the major axis. A King profile, with a core radius of 4.5' and a tidal radius of 24' fits the data. The tidal truncation of the spheroid suggests that IC 1613 is indeed a satellite of M 31. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  4. Hepatocyte spheroid culture on fibrous scaffolds with grafted functional ligands as an in vitro model for predicting drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shili; Wei, Jiaojun; Liu, Yaowen; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Jianmei; Li, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    The identification of a biologic substrate for maintaining hepatocyte functions is essential to provide reliable and predictable models for in vitro drug screening. In the current study, a three-dimensional culture of hepatocytes was established on highly porous fibrous scaffolds with grafted galactose and RGD to afford extensive cell-cell and cell-scaffold interactions spatially. The pore size and ligand densities indicated significant effects on the formation of hepatocyte spheroids in balancing the cell retention, adhesion, and migration on fibrous scaffolds. Fibrous scaffolds with an average pore size of 60 μm and surface grafting densities of galactose at 5.9 nmol/cm(2) and RGD at 6.9 pmol/cm(2) provided optimal microenvironments for hepatocyte infiltration and multicellular spheroid formation. Significant promotions were also demonstrated in the syntheses of albumin and urea and the activities of phase I (CYP 3A11 and CYP 2C9) and phase II enzymes. The in vitro metabolism tests on testosterone and acetaminophen by hepatocytes on the optimal scaffolds indicated the predicated clearance rates of 50.7 and 22.6 ml/min/kg, respectively, which were comparable to the in vivo values of rats. The in vitro hepatotoxicity tests on amiodarone hydrochloride and acetaminophen predicted the half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) to reflect the in vivo toxic plasma concentrations in human. In addition, the enzyme activities, predicted clearance rates and hepatotoxicity values of hepatocytes on the optimal scaffolds experienced sensitive responsiveness to specific inducers or inhibitors of CYP 3A11 and phase II enzymes, exhibiting in vivo-in vitro correlations to a certain extent. These results demonstrate the feasibility of hepatocyte spheroid culture on fibrous scaffolds as an potential in vitro testing model to predict the in vivo drug metabolism, hepatotoxicity, and drug-drug interactions. PMID:26409440

  5. Liquid-based three-dimensional tumor models for cancer research and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ham, Stephanie L; Joshi, Ramila; Thakuri, Pradip S; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    Tumors are three-dimensional tissues where close contacts between cancer cells, intercellular interactions between cancer and stromal cells, adhesion of cancer cells to the extracellular matrix, and signaling of soluble factors modulate functions of cancer cells and their response to therapeutics. Three-dimensional cultures of cancer cells overcome limitations of traditionally used monolayer cultures and recreate essential characteristics of tumors such as spatial gradients of oxygen, growth factors, and metabolites and presence of necrotic, hypoxic, quiescent, and proliferative cells. As such, three-dimensional tumor models provide a valuable tool for cancer research and oncology drug discovery. Here, we describe different tumor models and primarily focus on a model known as tumor spheroid. We summarize different technologies of spheroid formation, and discuss the use of spheroids to address the influence of stromal fibroblasts and immune cells on cancer cells in tumor microenvironment, study cancer stem cells, and facilitate compound screening in the drug discovery process. We review major techniques for quantification of cellular responses to drugs and discuss challenges ahead to enable broad utility of tumor spheroids in research laboratories, integrate spheroid models into drug development and discovery pipeline, and use primary tumor cells for drug screening studies to realize personalized cancer treatment. PMID:27072562

  6. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D

  7. Polarization of cosmic dust simulated with the rough spheroid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Das, Himadri Sekhar; Dubovik, Oleg; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Yang, Ping

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic dust is a polydisperse mixture of irregular, often aggregated, particles. Previous attempts have tried to simulate polarimetric properties of this dust using aggregate dust models, but it has not been possible to consider particle sizes larger than a couple of microns due to limitations of computer memory and processing power. Attempts have also been made to replace aggregates by polydisperse regular particles (spheres, spheroids, cylinders), but those models could not consistently reproduce the observed photopolarimetric characteristics. In this study, we introduce to the astronomical community the software package developed by Dubovik et al. (2006) for modeling light scattering by a polydisperse mixture of randomly oriented smooth and rough spheroids of a variety of aspect ratios. The roughness of spheroids is defined by a normal distribution of the surface slopes, and its degree depends on the standard deviation of the distribution (which is zero for smooth surface and greater than zero for rough surface). The pre-calculated kernels in the software package allow for fast, accurate, and flexible modeling of different size and shape distributions. We present our results of a systematic investigation of polarization obtained with the rough and smooth spheroid models; we study differences in their phase angle dependence and how those differences change with the particle size distribution. We found that the difference between smooth and rough particles increases with increasing effective size parameter and affects mainly the value and position of the maximum polarization. Negative polarization was found to be typical only for silicate-like refractive indexes and only when the particles have size parameters within 2.5-25. As an example of an application of the rough spheroid model, we made computations for rough spheroids that have a size distribution and composition typical for cometary dust. We found that a mixture of porous rough spheroids made of absorbing

  8. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression levels are differentially regulated in three-dimensional spheroids of liver cancer cells compared to two-dimensional monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Jun; Goto, Shinpei; Hattori, Hiroki; Hoshi, Sawaka; Ushirokawa, Midori; Kudo, Kenzo; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2015-12-01

    Compared to two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tumor cell culture models are thought to be structurally more similar to the in vivo tumor microenvironment. We investigated the regulation of the expression of genes encoding the drug-metabolizing enzymes CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in 3D spheroids comprised of cells of the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell JHH1, Huh7, and HepG2. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in the spheroids was higher than that in 2D cultured cells. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 is regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in 2D cultured cells. Knockdown of AhR in spheroids suppressed CYP1A1 expression; however, CYP1A2 expression levels remained unchanged. Moreover, we found that pregnane X receptor (PXR) likely regulated CYP1A2 expression in JHH1, HepG2, and Huh7 spheroids and that CYP1A1 expression in JHH1 and Huh7 3D spheroids is regulated not only by AhR but also by PXR. It is well known that gene expression levels are different between 3D spheroids and 2D monolayer cultured cells, and our results indicate that the regulation of gene expression also varies between the two culture conditions. Taken together, these results underlie a novel finding regarding the regulation of drug-metabolizing enzyme expression in liver cancer cells growing as 3D spheroids. PMID:26643992

  9. Tumor-induced remote ECM network orientation steers angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Balcioglu, Hayri E.; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we use automated sequential microprinting of tumor and endothelial cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds to study its mechanical aspects. Quantitative reflection microscopy shows that tumor spheroids induce radial orientation of the surrounding collagen fiber network up to a distance of five times their radius. Across a panel of ~20 different human tumor cell lines, remote collagen orientation is correlated with local tumor cell migration behavior. Tumor induced collagen orientation requires contractility but is remarkably resistant to depletion of collagen-binding integrins. Microvascular endothelial cells undergo directional migration towards tumor spheroids once they are within the tumor-oriented collagen fiber network. Laser ablation experiments indicate that an intact physical connection of the oriented network with the tumor spheroid is required for mechanical sensing by the endothelial cells. Together our findings indicate that, in conjunction with described activities of soluble angiogenic factors, remote physical manipulation of the ECM network by the tumor can help to steer angiogenesis. PMID:26931404

  10. A Conserved Signalling Pathway for Amoebozoan Encystation that was Co-Opted for Multicellular Development

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Schilde, Christina; Du, Qingyou; Schaap, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity required novel mechanisms for intercellular communication, but their origin is unclear. Dictyostelium cells exchange signals to position specialized cell types in multicellular spore-bearing structures. These signals activate complex pathways that converge on activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Genes controlling PKA were detected in the Dictyostelid unicellular ancestors, which like most protists form dormant cysts when experiencing environmental stress. We deleted PKA and the adenylate cyclases AcrA and AcgA, which synthesize cAMP for PKA activation, in the intermediate species Polysphondylium, which can develop into either cysts or into multicellular structures. Loss of PKA prevented multicellular development, but also completely blocked encystation. Loss of AcrA and AcgA, both essential for sporulation in Dictyostelium, did not affect Polysphondylium sporulation, but prevented encystation. We conclude that multicellular cAMP signalling was co-opted from PKA regulation of protist encystation with progressive refunctionalization of pathway components. PMID:25881075

  11. A conserved signalling pathway for amoebozoan encystation that was co-opted for multicellular development.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Schilde, Christina; Du, Qingyou; Schaap, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity required novel mechanisms for intercellular communication, but their origin is unclear. Dictyostelium cells exchange signals to position specialized cell types in multicellular spore-bearing structures. These signals activate complex pathways that converge on activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Genes controlling PKA were detected in the Dictyostelid unicellular ancestors, which like most protists form dormant cysts when experiencing environmental stress. We deleted PKA and the adenylate cyclases AcrA and AcgA, which synthesize cAMP for PKA activation, in the intermediate species Polysphondylium, which can develop into either cysts or into multicellular structures. Loss of PKA prevented multicellular development, but also completely blocked encystation. Loss of AcrA and AcgA, both essential for sporulation in Dictyostelium, did not affect Polysphondylium sporulation, but prevented encystation. We conclude that multicellular cAMP signalling was co-opted from PKA regulation of protist encystation with progressive refunctionalization of pathway components. PMID:25881075

  12. A general allometric and life-history model for cellular differentiation in the transition to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Kessler, John O; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-03-01

    The transition from unicellular, to colonial, to larger multicellular organisms has benefits, costs, and requirements. Here we present a model inspired by the volvocine green algae that explains the dynamics involved in the unicellular-multicellular transition using life-history theory and allometry. We model the two fitness components (fecundity and viability) and compare the fitness of hypothetical colonies of different sizes with varying degrees of cellular differentiation to understand the general principles that underlie the evolution of multicellularity. We argue that germ-soma separation may have evolved to counteract the increasing costs and requirements of larger multicellular colonies. The model shows that the cost of investing in soma decreases with size. For lineages such as the Volvocales, as reproduction costs increase with size for undifferentiated colonies, soma specialization benefits the colony indirectly by decreasing such costs and directly by helping reproductive cells acquire resources for their metabolic needs. Germ specialization is favored once soma evolves and takes care of vegetative functions. To illustrate the model, we use some allometric relationships measured in Volvocales. Our analysis shows that the cost of reproducing an increasingly larger group has likely played an important role in the transition to multicellularity and cellular differentiation. PMID:23448886

  13. Emergent multicellular life cycles in filamentous bacteria owing to density-dependent population dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Valentina; Filippini, Manuela; Svercel, Miroslav; Barbour, A. D.; Bagheri, Homayoun C.

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria are the oldest and simplest known multicellular life forms. By using computer simulations and experiments that address cell division in a filamentous context, we investigate some of the ecological factors that can lead to the emergence of a multicellular life cycle in filamentous life forms. The model predicts that if cell division and death rates are dependent on the density of cells in a population, a predictable cycle between short and long filament lengths is produced. During exponential growth, there will be a predominance of multicellular filaments, while at carrying capacity, the population converges to a predominance of short filaments and single cells. Model predictions are experimentally tested and confirmed in cultures of heterotrophic and phototrophic bacterial species. Furthermore, by developing a formulation of generation time in bacterial populations, it is shown that changes in generation time can alter length distributions. The theory predicts that given the same population growth curve and fitness, species with longer generation times have longer filaments during comparable population growth phases. Characterization of the environmental dependence of morphological properties such as length, and the number of cells per filament, helps in understanding the pre-existing conditions for the evolution of developmental cycles in simple multicellular organisms. Moreover, the theoretical prediction that strains with the same fitness can exhibit different lengths at comparable growth phases has important implications. It demonstrates that differences in fitness attributed to morphology are not the sole explanation for the evolution of life cycles dominated by multicellularity. PMID:21593029

  14. Hepatocyte-derived cultured cells with unusual cytoplasmic keratin-rich spheroid bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Delavalle, Pierre-Yves; Alsaleh, Khaled; Pillez, Andre; Cocquerel, Laurence; Allet, Cecile; Dumont, Patrick; Loyens, Anne; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Omary, M. Bishr; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouille, Yves; Wychowski, Czeslaw

    2011-11-01

    Cytoplasmic inclusions are found in a variety of diseases that are characteristic morphological features of several hepatic, muscular and neurodegenerative disorders. They display a predominantly filamentous ultrastructure that is also observed in malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT). A cellular clone containing an intracytoplasmic body was isolated from hepatocyte cell culture, and in the present study we examined whether this body might be related or not to Mallory-Denk body (MDB), a well characterized intracytoplasmic inclusion, or whether this cellular clone was constituted by malignant rhabdoid tumor cells. The intracytoplasmic body was observed in electron microscopy (EM), confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and several proteins involved in the formation of its structure were identified. Using light microscopy, a spheroid body (SB) described as a single regular-shaped cytoplasmic body was observed in cells. During cytokinesis, the SB was disassembled and reassembled in a way to reconstitute a unique SB in each progeny cell. EM examination revealed that the SB was not surrounded by a limiting membrane. However, cytoplasmic filaments were concentrated in a whorled array. These proteins were identified as keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18), which formed the central core of the SB surrounded by a vimentin cage-like structure. This structure was not related to Mallory-Denk body or aggresome since no aggregated proteins were located in SB. Moreover, the structure of SB was not due to mutations in the primary sequence of K8/K18 and vimentin since no difference was observed in the mRNA sequence of their genes, isolated from Huh-7 and Huh-7w7.3 cells. These data suggested that cellular factor(s) could be responsible for the SB formation process. Aggregates of K18 were relocated in the SB when a mutant of K18 inducing disruption of K8/K18 IF network was expressed in the cellular clone. Furthermore, the INI1 protein, a remodeling-chromatin factor deficient in rhabdoid cells, which

  15. Convective diffusion and adsorption in a swarm of spheroidal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coutelieris, F.A.; Burganos, V.N.; Payatakes, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    The problem of mass transfer from a Newtonian fluid to a swarm of spheroidal adsorbers under creeping flow conditions is considered using the spheroid-in-cell model to represent the swarm. The flow field within the fluid envelope for the Kuwabara type of boundary conditions is obtained from the analytical solution of Dassios et al. (1994). The complete convective diffusion equation is used to describe mass transport within the envelope so that moderate and strong diffusion terms can be taken into account. A new set of boundary conditions is used that respects mass flux and concentration continuity across the outer surface of the cell and maximizes the applicability of the spheroid-in-cell model in the convection-to-diffusion transition regime. The resulting elliptic problem in two dimensions is solved numerically. Results for the upstream and downstream concentration profiles reveal that tangential diffusion is very significant and should not be neglected for moderate and low Peclet number values. Also, the classical Levich-type of formulation, which is theoretically valid for very weak diffusional terms only, can in practice be modified to predict with fair accuracy the overall Sherwood number and the adsorption efficiency of prolate and oblate spheroids-in-cell even in moderate Peclet number cases.

  16. X-Ray Sources in the Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy DRACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonbas, E.; Dhuga, K.; Rangelov, B.; Kargaltsev, O.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a spectral analysis of X - ray sources in Draco, a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy recently observed by XMM-Newton. While most of the sources exhibit properties consistent with AGN, few of them possess characteristics of LMXBs and CVs. We also discuss the possibility of the existence of a central IMBH in Draco.

  17. Cisplatin and CCNU synergism in spheroid cell subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of two antineoplastic drugs, cisplatin and CCNU, was evaluated in Chinese hamster V79 multicell spheroids using the drugs as single agents or combinations. Cells obtained from different depths within spheroids 550-750 microns in diameter showed different sensitivities to the two agents; the external cells of the spheroids were more sensitive than the internal cells to cisplatin, whereas the internal cells were most effectively killed by CCNU. Combining the two agents produced the expected 'complementary' activity, and in addition, synergism was observed between the drugs at exposure levels practical for clinical use. For the combination treatments, both the net pattern of cell killing through the spheroid and the degree of interaction between the agents (quantified using the combination index method) were a function of the dose ratio of the two drugs, and of overall treatment intensity. BCNU produced patterns of cell killing similar to CCNU, but showed little interaction with cisplatin. Our results suggest significant clinical potential in using CCNU with cisplatin, particularly since CCNU-cisplatin combinations were synergistic even in the cell subpopulations most resistant to each drug as a single agent. PMID:2257225

  18. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  19. Which Way Is Jerusalem? Navigating on a Spheroid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Given two points on a spheroidal planet, what is the direction from the first to the second? The answer depends, of course, on what path you take. This paper compares two paths which suggest themselves, namely, the loxodrome, which is the path in which the direction stays constant, and the geodesic, which is the shortest path. The geodesic does…

  20. Void nucleation in spheroidized steels during tensile deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jr, J R

    1980-04-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of various mechanical and material parameters on void formation at cementite particles in axisymmetric tensile specimens of spheroidized plain carbon steels. Desired microstructures for each of three steel types were obtained. Observations of void morphology with respect to various microstructural features were made using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Analytical Equation for Estimating Terminal Velocities of Spheroidal Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Douglas W.

    2007-06-01

    An analytical method for estimating the terminal velocities of spheroidal particles in a fluid medium has been derived form a graphical approach proposed by Haider and Levenspiel. Using an analytical equation enables the researcher to calculate the terminal velocities without resorting to graphical interpolations, thereby reducing errors and enabling terminal velocities to be estimated in automated calculations.

  2. Improvement of Mechanical Properties of Spheroidized 1045 Steel by Induction Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minwook; Shin, Jung-Ho; Choi, Young; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2016-04-01

    The effects of induction heat treatment on the formation of carbide particles and mechanical properties of spheroidized 1045 steel were investigated by means of microstructural analysis and tensile testing. The induction spheroidization accelerated the formation of spherical cementite particles and effectively softened the steel. The volume fraction of cementite was found to be a key factor that affected the mechanical properties of spheroidized steels. Further tests showed that sequential spheroidization by induction and furnace heat treatments enhanced elongation within a short spheroidization time, resulting in better mechanical properties. This was due to the higher volume fraction of spherical cementite particles that had less diffusion time for particle coarsening.

  3. Plasma spheroidization of iron powders in a non-transferred DC thermal plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Selvarajan, V

    2008-06-15

    In this paper, the results of plasma spheroidization of iron powders using a DC non-transferred plasma spray torch are presented. The morphology of the processed powders was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The percentages of spheroidized powders were calculated by the shape factors such as the Irregularity Parameter (IP) and Roundness (RN). A maximum of 83% of spheroidization can be achieved. The spheroidization results are compared with the theoretical estimation and they are found to be in good agreement. The phase composition of the spheroidized powder was analyzed by XRD. The effect of plasma jet temperature and plasma gas flow rate on spheroidization is discussed. At low plasma gas flow rates and at high plasma jet temperatures, the percentage of spheroidization is high.

  4. ASC Spheroid Geometry and Culture Oxygenation Differentially Impact Induction of Preangiogenic Behaviors in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skiles, Matthew L.; Hanna, Brandon; Rucker, Lindsay; Tipton, Allison; Brougham-Cook, Aidan; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Blanchette, James O.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based angiogenic therapies offer potential for the repair of ischemic injuries, while avoiding several of the limitations associated with material-based growth factor delivery strategies. Evidence supports that applying MSCs as spheroids rather than dispersed cells can improve retention and enhance therapeutic effect through increased secretion of angiogenic factors due to hypoxia. However, while spheroid culture appears to modulate MSC behavior, there has been little investigation of how major culture parameters that affect cellular oxygen tension, such as external oxygenation and culture size, impact the angiogenic potential of spheroids. We cultured equal numbers of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) as spheroids containing 10,000 (10k) or 60,000 (60k) cells each, in 20% and 2% oxygen. VEGF secretion varied among the sample groups, with 10k, 2% O2 spheroids exhibiting the highest production. Spheroid-conditioned media was applied to HUVEC monolayers, and proliferation was assessed. Spheroids of either size in 2% oxygen induced comparable proliferation compared to a 2 ng/ml VEGF control sample, while spheroids in 20% oxygen induced less proliferation. Spheroids were also applied in coculture with HUVEC monolayers, and induction of migration through a Transwell membrane was evaluated. Sixty thousand, 2% O2 spheroids induced similar levels of migration as VEGF controls, while 10k, 2% O2 spheroids induced significantly more. Ten thousand, 20% spheroids performed no better than VEGF-free controls. We conclude that the therapeutic ability of ASC spheroids to stimulate angiogenesis in endothelial cells is affected by both culture size and oxygenation parameters, suggesting that, while ASC spheroids offer potential in the treatment of injured and ischemic tissues, careful consideration of culture size in respect to in vivo local oxygen tension will be necessary for optimal results. PMID:25197983

  5. Cell cycle arrest or survival signaling through αv integrins, activation of PKC and ERK1/2 lead to anoikis resistance of ovarian cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Carduner, Ludovic; Picot, Cédric R; Leroy-Dudal, Johanne; Blay, Lyvia; Kellouche, Sabrina; Carreiras, Franck

    2014-01-15

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer mainly due to spheroids organization of cancer cells that disseminate within the peritoneal cavity. We have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which ovarian cancer spheroids resist anoikis, choosing as models the 2 well-characterized human ovarian cancer cell lines IGROV1 and SKOV3. These cell lines have the propensity to float as clusters, and were isolated from tumor tissue and ascites, respectively. To form spheroids, IGROV1 and SKOV3 ovarian adenocarcinoma cells were maintained under anchorage-independent culture conditions, in which both lines survive at least a week. A short apoptotic period prior to a survival signaling commitment was observed for IGROV1 cells whereas SKOV3 cells entered G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. This difference in behavior was due to different signals. With regard to SKOV3 cells, activation of p38 and an increase in p130/Rb occurred once anchorage-independent culture was established. Analyses of the survival signaling pathway switched on by IGROV1 cells showed that activation of ERK1/2 was required to evade apoptosis, an effect partly dependent on PKC activation and αv integrins. αv-integrin expression is essential for survival through activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The above data indicate that ovarian cancer cells can resist anoikis in the spheroid state by arrest in the cell cycle or through activation of αv-integrin-ERK-mediated survival signals. Such signaling might result in the selection of resistant cells within disseminating spheroids, favoring further relapse in ovarian cancers. PMID:24291221

  6. Peritoneal Dissemination Requires an Sp1-Dependent CXCR4/CXCL12 Signaling Axis and Extracellular Matrix-Directed Spheroid Formation.

    PubMed

    Kasagi, Yuta; Harada, Yui; Morodomi, Yosuke; Iwai, Toshiki; Saito, Satoru; Yoshida, Kumi; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Ohgaki, Kippei; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-15

    Peritonitis carcinomatosa is an advanced and intractable state of gastrointestinal and ovarian cancer, where mechanistic elucidation might enable the development of more effective therapies. Peritoneal dissemination of this type of malignancy has been generally thought to initiate from "milky spots" of primitive lymphoid tissues in the peritoneal cavity. In this study, we offer evidence challenging this idea, based on the finding that tumor implantation and directional dissemination was not required for the presence of milky spots, but rather SCF/CXCL12-expressing niche-like cells located at the border regions of perivascular adipose tissue. Interestingly, we found that peritoneal cavity lavage fluid, which specifically contains peritoneal collagen type IV and plasma fibronectin, dramatically facilitated spheroid formation of murine and human colon cancer cells. Spheroid formation strongly induced the expression of CXCR4 in an Sp1-dependent manner to promote niche-directed metastasis. Notably, disrupting sphere formation or inhibiting Sp1 activity was sufficient to suppress tumor dissemination and potentiated chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil. Our findings illuminate mechanisms of peritoneal cancer dissemination and highlight the Sp1/CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling axis as a rational target for the development of therapeutics to manage this intractable form of malignancy. PMID:26744523

  7. The Gonium pectorale genome demonstrates co-option of cell cycle regulation during the evolution of multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Hanschen, Erik R.; Marriage, Tara N.; Ferris, Patrick J.; Hamaji, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Neme, Rafik; Noguchi, Hideki; Minakuchi, Yohei; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Smith, David R.; Sparks, Halle; Anderson, Jaden; Bakarić, Robert; Luria, Victor; Karger, Amir; Kirschner, Marc W.; Durand, Pierre M.; Michod, Richard E.; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Olson, Bradley J. S. C.

    2016-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity has occurred numerous times in all domains of life, yet its initial steps are poorly understood. The volvocine green algae are a tractable system for understanding the genetic basis of multicellularity including the initial formation of cooperative cell groups. Here we report the genome sequence of the undifferentiated colonial alga, Gonium pectorale, where group formation evolved by co-option of the retinoblastoma cell cycle regulatory pathway. Significantly, expression of the Gonium retinoblastoma cell cycle regulator in unicellular Chlamydomonas causes it to become colonial. The presence of these changes in undifferentiated Gonium indicates extensive group-level adaptation during the initial step in the evolution of multicellularity. These results emphasize an early and formative step in the evolution of multicellularity, the evolution of cell cycle regulation, one that may shed light on the evolutionary history of other multicellular innovations and evolutionary transitions. PMID:27102219

  8. Multicellularity arose several times in the evolution of eukaryotes (response to DOI 10.1002/bies.201100187).

    PubMed

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Lahr, Daniel J G

    2013-04-01

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium has cell-cell connections similar in structure, function, and underlying molecular mechanisms to animal epithelial cells. These similarities form the basis for the proposal that multicellularity is ancestral to the clade containing animals, fungi, and Amoebozoa (including Dictyostelium): Amorphea (formerly "unikonts"). This hypothesis is intriguing and if true could precipitate a paradigm shift. However, phylogenetic analyses of two key genes reveal patterns inconsistent with a single origin of multicellularity. A single origin in Amorphea would also require loss of multicellularity in each of the many unicellular lineages within this clade. Further, there are numerous other origins of multicellularity within eukaryotes, including three within Amorphea, that are not characterized by these structural and mechanistic similarities. Instead, convergent evolution resulting from similar selective pressures for forming multicellular structures with motile and differentiated cells is the most likely explanation for the observed similarities between animal and dictyostelid cell-cell connections. PMID:23315654

  9. The Gonium pectorale genome demonstrates co-option of cell cycle regulation during the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Hanschen, Erik R; Marriage, Tara N; Ferris, Patrick J; Hamaji, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Neme, Rafik; Noguchi, Hideki; Minakuchi, Yohei; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Smith, David R; Sparks, Halle; Anderson, Jaden; Bakarić, Robert; Luria, Victor; Karger, Amir; Kirschner, Marc W; Durand, Pierre M; Michod, Richard E; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Olson, Bradley J S C

    2016-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity has occurred numerous times in all domains of life, yet its initial steps are poorly understood. The volvocine green algae are a tractable system for understanding the genetic basis of multicellularity including the initial formation of cooperative cell groups. Here we report the genome sequence of the undifferentiated colonial alga, Gonium pectorale, where group formation evolved by co-option of the retinoblastoma cell cycle regulatory pathway. Significantly, expression of the Gonium retinoblastoma cell cycle regulator in unicellular Chlamydomonas causes it to become colonial. The presence of these changes in undifferentiated Gonium indicates extensive group-level adaptation during the initial step in the evolution of multicellularity. These results emphasize an early and formative step in the evolution of multicellularity, the evolution of cell cycle regulation, one that may shed light on the evolutionary history of other multicellular innovations and evolutionary transitions. PMID:27102219

  10. Manipulation of cellular spheroid composition and the effects on vascular tissue fusion.

    PubMed

    Olsen, T R; Mattix, B; Casco, M; Herbst, A; Williams, C; Tarasidis, A; Simionescu, D; Visconti, R P; Alexis, F

    2015-02-01

    Cellular spheroids were investigated as tissue-engineered building blocks that can be fused to form functional tissue constructs. While spheroids can be assembled using passive contacts for the fusion of complex tissues, physical forces can be used to promote active contacts to improve tissue homogeneity and accelerate tissue fusion. Understanding the mechanisms affecting the fusion of spheroids is critical to fabricating tissues. Here, manipulation of the spheroid composition was used to accelerate the fusion process mediated by magnetic forces. The Janus structure of magnetic cellular spheroids spatially controls iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to form two distinct domains: cells and extracellular MNPs. Studies were performed to evaluate the influence of extracellular matrix (ECM) content and cell number on the fusion of Janus magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCSs). Results showed that the integration of iron oxide MNPs into spheroids increased the production of collagen over time when compared to spheroids without MNPs. The results also showed that ring tissues composed of JMCSs with high ECM concentrations and high cell numbers fused together, but exhibited less contraction when compared to their lower concentration counterparts. Results from spheroid fusion in capillary tubes showed that low ECM concentrations and high cell numbers experienced more fusion and cellular intermixing over time when compared to their higher counterparts. These findings indicate that cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions play an important role in regulating fusion, and this understanding sets the rationale of spheroid composition to fabricate larger and more complex tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:25463485

  11. Bioelectrical Signals and Ion Channels in the Modeling of Multicellular Patterns and Cancer Biophysics

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Javier; Alcaraz, Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical signals and ion channels are central to spatial patterns in cell ensembles, a problem of fundamental interest in positional information and cancer processes. We propose a model for electrically connected cells based on simple biological concepts: i) the membrane potential of a single cell characterizes its electrical state; ii) the long-range electrical coupling of the multicellular ensemble is realized by a network of gap junction channels between neighboring cells; and iii) the spatial distribution of an external biochemical agent can modify the conductances of the ion channels in a cell membrane and the multicellular electrical state. We focus on electrical effects in small multicellular ensembles, ignoring slow diffusional processes. The spatio-temporal patterns obtained for the local map of cell electric potentials illustrate the normalization of regions with abnormal cell electrical states. The effects of intercellular coupling and blocking of specific channels on the electrical patterns are described. These patterns can regulate the electrically-induced redistribution of charged nanoparticles over small regions of a model tissue. The inclusion of bioelectrical signals provides new insights for the modeling of cancer biophysics because collective multicellular states show electrical coupling mechanisms that are not readily deduced from biochemical descriptions at the individual cell level. PMID:26841954

  12. Bioelectrical Signals and Ion Channels in the Modeling of Multicellular Patterns and Cancer Biophysics.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Javier; Alcaraz, Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical signals and ion channels are central to spatial patterns in cell ensembles, a problem of fundamental interest in positional information and cancer processes. We propose a model for electrically connected cells based on simple biological concepts: i) the membrane potential of a single cell characterizes its electrical state; ii) the long-range electrical coupling of the multicellular ensemble is realized by a network of gap junction channels between neighboring cells; and iii) the spatial distribution of an external biochemical agent can modify the conductances of the ion channels in a cell membrane and the multicellular electrical state. We focus on electrical effects in small multicellular ensembles, ignoring slow diffusional processes. The spatio-temporal patterns obtained for the local map of cell electric potentials illustrate the normalization of regions with abnormal cell electrical states. The effects of intercellular coupling and blocking of specific channels on the electrical patterns are described. These patterns can regulate the electrically-induced redistribution of charged nanoparticles over small regions of a model tissue. The inclusion of bioelectrical signals provides new insights for the modeling of cancer biophysics because collective multicellular states show electrical coupling mechanisms that are not readily deduced from biochemical descriptions at the individual cell level. PMID:26841954

  13. Sponge cell reaggregation: Cellular structure and morphogenetic potencies of multicellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Andrey I; Kosevich, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are one of the most ancient extant multicellular animals and can provide valuable insights into origin and early evolution of Metazoa. High plasticity of cell differentiations and anatomical structure is characteristic feature of sponges. Present study deals with sponge cell reaggregation after dissociation as the most outstanding case of sponge plasticity. Dynamic of cell reaggregation and structure of multicellular aggregates of three demosponge species (Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Haliclona aquaeductus (Sсhmidt, 1862), and Halisarca dujardinii Johnston, 1842) were studied. Sponge tissue dissociation was performed mechanically. Resulting cell suspensions were cultured at 8-10°C for at least 5 days. Structure of multicellular aggregates was studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Studied species share common stages of cell reaggregation-primary multicellular aggregates, early-stage primmorphs and primmorphs, but the rate of reaggregation varies considerably among species. Only cells of H. dujardinii are able to reconstruct functional and viable sponge after primmorphs formation. Sponge reconstruction in this species occurs due to active cell locomotion. Development of H. aquaeductus and H. panicea cells ceases at the stages of early primmorphs and primmorphs, respectively. Development of aggregates of these species is most likely arrested due to immobility of the majority of cells inside them. However, the inability of certain sponge species to reconstruct functional and viable individuals during cell reaggregation may be not a permanent species-specific characteristic, but depends on various factors, including the stage of the life cycle and experimental conditions. PMID:26863993

  14. Biological response to nonuniform distributions of (210)Po in multicellular clusters.

    PubMed

    Neti, Prasad V S V; Howell, Roger W

    2007-09-01

    Radionuclides are distributed nonuniformly in tissue. The present work examined the impact of nonuniformities at the multicellular level on the lethal effects of (210)Po. A three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture model was used wherein V79 cells were labeled with (210)Po-citrate and mixed with unlabeled cells, and multicellular clusters were formed by centrifugation. The labeled cells were located randomly in the cluster to achieve a uniform distribution of radioactivity at the macroscopic level that was nonuniform at the multicellular level. The clusters were maintained at 10.5 degrees C for 72 h to allow alpha-particle decays to accumulate and then dismantled, and the cells were seeded for colony formation. Unlike typical survival curves for alpha particles, two-component exponential dose-response curves were observed for all three labeling conditions. Furthermore, the slopes of the survival curves for 100, 10 and 1% labeling were different. Neither the mean cluster absorbed dose nor a semi-empirical multicellular dosimetry approach could accurately predict the lethal effects of (210)Po-citrate. PMID:17705637

  15. Cellular Particle Dynamics simulation of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCune, Matthew; Kosztin, Ioan

    2013-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is a theoretical-computational-experimental framework for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multi-cellular systems, such as fusion, sorting and compression. In CPD, cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through numerical integration of their equations of motion. Here we present CPD simulation results for the fusion of both spherical and cylindrical multi-cellular aggregates. First, we calibrate the relevant CPD model parameters for a given cell type by comparing the CPD simulation results for the fusion of two spherical aggregates to the corresponding experimental results. Next, CPD simulations are used to predict the time evolution of the fusion of cylindrical aggregates. The latter is relevant for the formation of tubular multi-cellular structures (i.e., primitive blood vessels) created by the novel bioprinting technology. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  16. Prediction of the multicellular flow regime of natural convection in fenestration glazing cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Goss, W.P.; Curcija, D.

    1997-12-31

    In this work, gas-filled tall rectangular cavities, typically found in insulating glazing units (IGUs) of fenestration systems, with constant temperatures at the side walls and zero heat flux at the top and bottom, were investigated. Critical Rayleigh numbers, Ra{sub c}, at which multicellular flow begins to form were determined for aspect ratios from 10.7 to 80. Using a general-purpose fluid flow and heat transfer finite-element analysis computer program (FDI 1993), numerical calculations were performed over the range of aspect ratios, A, from 10 to 80 with Rayleigh numbers, Ra, varying within the laminar flow regime. The calculations revealed that for aspect ratios between 10.7 and 30, the multicellular flow pattern dies out before the flow enters the turbulent flow regime. In addition, the lowest aspect ratio at which multicellular flow patterns existed was 10.7, which is lower than the lowest limit (A = 12) published by other researchers. The resulting critical Rayleigh numbers are plotted on a graph as a function of the aspect ratio and the Rayleigh numbers. The overall heat transfer results in terms of the average, or integrated, Nusselt numbers, Nu, are compared with available numerical and experimental data on multicellular flow in rectangular cavities, and good agreement was found. Also, streamline contour plots and temperature profiles are plotted for selected cases.

  17. Experimental evolution reveals that high relatedness protects multicellular cooperation from cheaters

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaans, Eric; Debets, Alfons J. M.; Aanen, Duur K.

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, there is a potential risk that cheating mutants gain access to the germline. Development from a single-celled zygote resets relatedness among cells to its maximum value each generation, which should accomplish segregation of cheating mutants from non-cheaters and thereby protect multicellular cooperation. Here we provide the crucial direct comparison between high- and low-relatedness conditions to test this hypothesis. We allow two variants of the fungus Neurospora crassa to evolve, one with and one without the ability to form chimeras with other individuals, thus generating two relatedness levels. While multicellular cooperation remains high in the high-relatedness lines, it significantly decreases in all replicate low-relatedness lines, resulting in an average threefold decrease in spore yield. This reduction is caused by cheating mutants with reduced investment in somatic functions, but increased competitive success when fusing with non-cheaters. Our experiments demonstrate that high genetic relatedness is crucial to sustain multicellular cooperation. PMID:27139112

  18. Transcription factor evolution in eukaryotes and the assembly of the regulatory toolkit in multicellular lineages

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Alex; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Šestak, Martin Sebastijan; Matejčić, Marija; Torruella, Guifré; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are the main players in transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes. However, it remains unclear what role TFs played in the origin of all of the different eukaryotic multicellular lineages. In this paper, we explore how the origin of TF repertoires shaped eukaryotic evolution and, in particular, their role into the emergence of multicellular lineages. We traced the origin and expansion of all known TFs through the eukaryotic tree of life, using the broadest possible taxon sampling and an updated phylogenetic background. Our results show that the most complex multicellular lineages (i.e., those with embryonic development, Metazoa and Embryophyta) have the most complex TF repertoires, and that these repertoires were assembled in a stepwise manner. We also show that a significant part of the metazoan and embryophyte TF toolkits evolved earlier, in their respective unicellular ancestors. To gain insights into the role of TFs in the development of both embryophytes and metazoans, we analyzed TF expression patterns throughout their ontogeny. The expression patterns observed in both groups recapitulate those of the whole transcriptome, but reveal some important differences. Our comparative genomics and expression data reshape our view on how TFs contributed to eukaryotic evolution and reveal the importance of TFs to the origins of multicellularity and embryonic development. PMID:24277850

  19. The evo-devo of multinucleate cells, tissues, and organisms, and an alternative route to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Cobb, Edward D; Crawford, David R

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleate cells, tissues, or organisms occur in 60 families of land plants and in five otherwise diverse algal lineages (Rhodophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Charophyceae). Inspection of a morphospace constructed out of eight developmental processes reveals a large number of possible variants of multinucleate cells and organisms that, with two exceptions, are represented by one or more plant species in one or more clades. Thus, most of these permutations of developmental processes exist in nature. Inspection of the morphospace also shows how the siphonous body plan (a multinucleate cell with the capacity for indeterminate growth in size) can theoretically serve as the direct progenitor of a multicellular organism by a process similar to segregative cell division observed in siphonocladean algae. Using molecular phylogenies of algal clades, different evolutionary scenarios are compared to see how the multicellular condition may have evolved from a multinucleate unicellular progenitor. We also show that the siphonous progenitor of a multicellular organism has previously passed through the alignment-of-fitness phase (in which genetic similarity among cells/nuclei minimizes internal genomic conflict) and the export-of-fitness phase (in which genetically similar cells/nuclei collaborate to achieve a reproductively integrated multicellular organism). All that is theoretically required is the evolutionary acquisition of the capacity to compartmentalize its cytoplasm. PMID:24261447

  20. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm-3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm-1, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  1. Experimental evolution reveals that high relatedness protects multicellular cooperation from cheaters.

    PubMed

    Bastiaans, Eric; Debets, Alfons J M; Aanen, Duur K

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, there is a potential risk that cheating mutants gain access to the germline. Development from a single-celled zygote resets relatedness among cells to its maximum value each generation, which should accomplish segregation of cheating mutants from non-cheaters and thereby protect multicellular cooperation. Here we provide the crucial direct comparison between high- and low-relatedness conditions to test this hypothesis. We allow two variants of the fungus Neurospora crassa to evolve, one with and one without the ability to form chimeras with other individuals, thus generating two relatedness levels. While multicellular cooperation remains high in the high-relatedness lines, it significantly decreases in all replicate low-relatedness lines, resulting in an average threefold decrease in spore yield. This reduction is caused by cheating mutants with reduced investment in somatic functions, but increased competitive success when fusing with non-cheaters. Our experiments demonstrate that high genetic relatedness is crucial to sustain multicellular cooperation. PMID:27139112

  2. A Novel Laboratory Activity for Teaching about the Evolution of Multicellularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, William C.; Raney, Allison; Westreich, Sam; Cotner, Sehoya

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of complexity remains one of the most challenging topics in biology to teach effectively. We present a novel laboratory activity, modeled on a recent experimental breakthrough, in which students experimentally evolve simple multicellularity using single-celled yeast ("Saccharomyces cerevisiae"). By simply selecting for…

  3. Implantable Three-Dimensional Salivary Spheroid Assemblies Demonstrate Fluid and Protein Secretory Responses to Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Harrington, Daniel A.; Duncan, Randall L.; Jia, Xinqiao; Witt, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation treatment in patients with head and neck tumors commonly results in hyposalivation and xerostomia due to the loss of fluid-secreting salivary acinar cells. Patients develop susceptibility to oral infections, dental caries, impaired speech and swallowing, reducing the quality of life. Clinical management is largely unsatisfactory. The development of a tissue-engineered, implantable salivary gland will greatly benefit patients suffering from xerostomia. This report compares the ability of a 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) and a three-dimensional (3D) hyaluronic acid (HA)-based culture system to support functional salivary units capable of producing fluid and phenotypic proteins. Parotid cells seeded on 2.5D, as well as those encapsulated in 3D HA hydrogels, self-assembled into acini-like structures and expressed functional neurotransmitter receptors. Structures in 3D hydrogels merged to form organized 50 μm spheroids that could be maintained in culture for over 100 days and merged to form structures over 500 μm in size. Treatment of acini-like structures with the β-adrenergic agonists norepinephrine or isoproterenol increased granule production and α-amylase staining in treated structures, demonstrating regain of protein secretion. Upon treatment with the M3 muscarinic agonist acetylcholine, acini-like structures activated the fluid production pathway by increasing intracellular calcium levels. The increase in intracellular calcium seen in structures in the 3D hydrogel culture system was more robust and prolonged than that in 2.5D. To compare the long-term survival and retention of acini-like structures in vivo, cell-seeded 2.5D and 3D hydrogels were implanted into an athymic rat model. Cells in 2.5D failed to maintain organized acini-like structures and dispersed in the surrounding tissue. Encapsulated cells in 3D retained their spheroid structure and structural integrity, along with the salivary biomarkers and maintained viability for over 3 weeks in vivo

  4. Adhesive Wear Behavior of Heat Treated Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, M.; Shama, S.; Mozumder, Y. H.; Behera, R. K.; P, Sindhoora L.; Pattanaik, A.; Mishra, S. C.; Sen, S.

    2015-02-01

    Spheroidal graphite cast iron is one of the most favorable materials in cast iron family due to its wide range of mechanical and tribological properties. In the current research priority is given towards the investigation of wear system response of spheroidal graphite cast iron subjected to various heat treatment conditions. Pearlitic/ferritic and upper bainitic matrix was obtained through normalizing and austempering treatment for an austenitizing temperature of 1000°C. Dry sliding wear test was performed at 10N, 20N, 30N for a sliding distance of 7.54m. With increase in load weight loss was observed for as-cast specimen whereas normalized specimen showed very less weight loss with increasing load. On the other hand the austempered specimen observed to lose weight when operated at 10N, whereas at 20N and 30N drastic gain in weight was observed.

  5. Two step continuous method to synthesize colloidal spheroid gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Chandra, S; Doran, J; McCormack, S J

    2015-12-01

    This research investigated a two-step continuous process to synthesize colloidal suspension of spheroid gold nanorods. In the first step; gold precursor was reduced to seed-like particles in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone and ascorbic acid. In continuous second step; silver nitrate and alkaline sodium hydroxide produced various shape and size Au nanoparticles. The shape was manipulated through weight ratio of ascorbic acid to silver nitrate by varying silver nitrate concentration. The specific weight ratio of 1.35-1.75 grew spheroid gold nanorods of aspect ratio ∼1.85 to ∼2.2. Lower weight ratio of 0.5-1.1 formed spherical nanoparticle. The alkaline medium increased the yield of gold nanorods and reduced reaction time at room temperature. The synthesized gold nanorods retained their shape and size in ethanol. The surface plasmon resonance was red shifted by ∼5 nm due to higher refractive index of ethanol than water. PMID:26298283

  6. A method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics using spheroidal kernels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulbright, Michael S.; Benz, Willy; Davies, Melvyn B.

    1995-01-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) designed to model systems dominated by deformation along a preferential axis. These systems cause severe problems for SPH codes using spherical kernels, which are best suited for modeling systems which retain rough spherical symmetry. Our method allows the smoothing length in the direction of the deformation to evolve independently of the smoothing length in the perpendicular plane, resulting in a kernel with a spheroidal shape. As a result the spatial resolution in the direction of deformation is significantly improved. As a test case we present the one-dimensional homologous collapse of a zero-temperature, uniform-density cloud, which serves to demonstrate the advantages of spheroidal kernels. We also present new results on the problem of the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole.

  7. The Dark Halo - Spheroid Conspiracy Reloaded: Evolution with Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The total density profiles of elliptical galaxies can be fit by a single power law, i.e., ρtot ~ r γ with γ ~ -2. While strong lensing observations show a tendency for the slopes to become flatter with increasing redshift, simulations indicate an opposite trend. To understand this discrepancy, we study a set of simulated spheroids formed within the cosmological framework. From our simulations we find that the steepness of the total density slope correlates with the compactness of the stellar component within the half-mass radius, and that spheroidal galaxies tend to be more compact at high redshifts than their present-day counterparts. While both these results are in agreement with observations, the observed trend of the total density slope with redshift remains in contradiction to the results from simulations.

  8. Chemical Analysis of Fornax dwarf spheroidal with VLT/FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letarte, B.; Hill, V.; Tolstoy, E.

    The Fornax dSph is a nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxy with five globular clusters and a complex star formation history. It is one of the most massive dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. Using the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph on the VLT, we have obtained high resolution (R˜20 000) spectra for 80 Red Giant Branch stars in the central 25' of the Fornax dSph. We present abundance ratios for some of the elements we have in our analysis, including alpha (Mg and Ca), iron-peak (Fe and Ni) and heavy (Y, Ba, Eu) elements. We compare our results with the Milky Way (MW) and our recent VLT/UVES abundance determinations of nine individual stars in Fornax globular clusters.

  9. Numerical Simulations of the Metallicity Distribution in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Ripamonti, Emanuele; Tolstoy, E.; Helmi, A.; Battaglia, G.; Abel, T.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-12-12

    Recent observations show that the number of stars with very low metallicities in the dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way is low, despite the low average metallicities of stars in these systems. We undertake numerical simulations of star formation and metal enrichment of dwarf galaxies in order to verify whether this result can be reproduced with ''standard'' assumptions. The answer is likely to be negative, unless some selection bias against very low metallicity stars is present in the observations.

  10. Shift of microRNA profile upon orthotopic xenografting of glioblastoma spheroid cultures.

    PubMed

    Halle, Bo; Thomassen, Mads; Venkatesan, Ranga; Kaimal, Vivek; Marcusson, Eric G; Munthe, Sune; Sørensen, Mia D; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Jensen, Stine S; Meyer, Morten; Kruse, Torben A; Christiansen, Helle; Schmidt, Steffen; Mollenhauer, Jan; Schulz, Mette K; Andersen, Claus; Kristensen, Bjarne W

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastomas always recur despite surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. A key player in the therapeutic resistance may be immature tumor cells with stem-like properties (TSCs) escaping conventional treatment. A group of promising molecular targets are microRNAs (miRs). miRs are small non-coding RNAs exerting post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In this study we aimed to identify over-expressed TSC-related miRs potentially amenable for therapeutic targeting. We used non-differentiated glioblastoma spheroid cultures (GSCs) containing TSCs and compared these to xenografts using a NanoString nCounter platform. This revealed 19 over-expressed miRs in the non-differentiated GSCs. Additionally, non-differentiated GSCs were compared to neural stem cells (NSCs) using a microarray platform. This revealed four significantly over-expressed miRs in the non-differentiated GSCs in comparison to the NSCs. The three most over-expressed miRs in the non-differentiated GSCs compared to xenografts were miR-126, -137 and -128. KEGG pathway analysis suggested the main biological function of these over-expressed miRs to be cell-cycle arrest and diminished proliferation. To functionally validate the profiling results suggesting association of these miRs with stem-like properties, experimental over-expression of miR-128 was performed. A consecutive limiting dilution assay confirmed a significantly elevated spheroid formation in the miR-128 over-expressing cells. This may provide potential therapeutic targets for anti-miRs to identify novel treatment options for GBM patients. PMID:27063952

  11. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Profumo, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    We constrain the parameters of a self-interacting massive dark matter scalar particle in a condensate using the kinematics of the eight brightest dwarf spheroidal satellites of the Milky Way. For the case of a repulsive self-interaction, the condensate develops a mass density profile with a characteristic scale radius that is closely related to the fundamental parameters of the theory. We find that the velocity dispersion of dwarf spheroidal galaxies suggests a scale radius of the order of 1 kpc, in tension with previous results found using the rotational curve of low-surface-brightness and dwarf galaxies. The new value is however favored marginally by the constraints coming from the number of relativistic species at big bang nucleosynthesis. We discuss the implications of our findings for the particle dark matter model and argue that while a single classical coherent state can correctly describe the dark matter in dwarf spheroidal galaxies, it cannot play, in general, a relevant role for the description of dark matter in bigger objects.

  12. Mergers and the outside-in formation of dwarf spheroidals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Llambay, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Abadi, M. G.; Gottlöber, S.; Yepes, G.; Hoffman, Y.; Steinmetz, M.

    2016-02-01

    We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of the Local Group to explore the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We find that a number of simulated dwarfs form `outside-in', with an old, metal-poor population that surrounds a younger, more concentrated metal-rich component, reminiscent of dwarf spheroidals like Sculptor or Sextans. We focus on a few examples where stars form in two populations distinct in age in order to elucidate the origin of these gradients. The spatial distributions of the two components reflect their diverse origin; the old stellar component is assembled through mergers, but the young population forms largely in situ. The older component results from a first episode of star formation that begins early but is quickly shut off by the combined effects of stellar feedback and reionization. The younger component forms when a late accretion event adds gas and reignites star formation. The effect of mergers is to disperse the old stellar population, increasing their radius and decreasing their central density relative to the young population. We argue that dwarf-dwarf mergers offer a plausible scenario for the formation of systems with multiple distinct populations and, more generally, for the origin of age and metallicity gradients in dwarf spheroidals.

  13. Sound scattering by rigid oblate spheroids, with implication to pressure gradient microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciulaitis, A.; Seiner, J.; Norum, T. D.

    1976-01-01

    The frequency limit below which sound scattering by a microphone body is sufficiently small to permit accurate pressure gradient measurements was determined. The sound pressure was measured at various points on the surface of a rigid oblate spheroid illuminated by spherical waves generated by a point source at a large distance from the spheroid, insuring an essentially plane sound field. The measurements were made with small pressure microphones flush mounted from the inside of the spheroid model. Numerical solutions were obtained for a variety of spheroid shapes, including that of the experimental model. Very good agreement was achieved between the experimental and theoretical results. It was found that scattering effects are insignificant if the ratio of the major circumference of the spheroid to the wavelength of the incident sound is less than about 0.7, this number being dependent upon the shape of the spheroid. This finding can be utilized in the design of pressure gradient microphones.

  14. Magnetic Flattening of Stem-Cell Spheroids Indicates a Size-Dependent Elastocapillary Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuel, Francois; Reffay, Myriam; Du, Vicard; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Rieu, Jean-Paul; Wilhelm, Claire

    2015-03-01

    Cellular aggregates (spheroids) are widely used in biophysics and tissue engineering as model systems for biological tissues. In this Letter we propose novel methods for molding stem-cell spheroids, deforming them, and measuring their interfacial and elastic properties with a single method based on cell tagging with magnetic nanoparticles and application of a magnetic field gradient. Magnetic molding yields spheroids of unprecedented sizes (up to a few mm in diameter) and preserves tissue integrity. On subjecting these spheroids to magnetic flattening (over 150 g ), we observed a size-dependent elastocapillary transition with two modes of deformation: liquid-drop-like behavior for small spheroids, and elastic-sphere-like behavior for larger spheroids, followed by relaxation to a liquidlike drop.

  15. Spheroidal models of the exterior gravitational field of Asteroids Bennu and Castalia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebera, Josef; Bezděk, Aleš; Pešek, Ivan; Henych, Tomáš

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational field of small bodies can be modeled e.g. with mascons, a polyhedral model or in terms of harmonic functions. If the shape of a body is close to the spheroid, it is advantageous to employ the spheroidal basis functions for expressing the gravitational field. Spheroidal harmonic models, similarly to the spherical ones, may be used in navigation and geophysical tasks. We focus on modeling the exterior gravitational field of oblate-like Asteroid (101955) Bennu and prolate-like Asteroid (4769) Castalia with spheroidal harmonics. Using the Gauss-Legendre quadrature and the spheroidal basis functions, we converted the gravitational potential of a particular polyhedral model of a constant density into the spheroidal harmonics. The results consist of (i) spheroidal harmonic coefficients of the exterior gravitational field for the Asteroids Bennu and Castalia, (ii) spherical harmonic coefficients for Bennu, and (iii) the first and second-order Cartesian derivatives in the local spheroidal South-East-Up frame for both bodies. The spheroidal harmonics offer biaxial flexibility (compared with spherical harmonics) and low computational costs that allow high-degree expansions (compared with ellipsoidal harmonics). The obtained spheroidal models for Bennu and Castalia represent the exterior gravitational field valid on and outside the Brillouin spheroid but they can be used even under this surface. For Bennu, 5 m above the surface the agreement with point-wise integration was 1% or less, while it was about 10% for Castalia due to its more irregular shape. As the shape models may produce very high frequencies, it was crucial to use higher maximum degree to reduce the aliasing. We have used the maximum degree 360 to achieve 9-10 common digits (in RMS) when reconstructing the input (the gravitational potential) from the spheroidal coefficients. The physically meaningful maximum degree may be lower (≪ 360) but its particular value depends on the distance and/or on the

  16. Coupling Gd‑DTPA with a bispecific, recombinant protein anti‑EGFR‑iRGD complex improves tumor targeting in MRI.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiaoyan; Sha, Huizi; Shen, Jingtao; Zhang, Bing; Zhu, Bin; Liu, Baorui

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant anti‑epidermal growth factor receptor‑internalizing arginine‑glycine‑aspartic acid (anti‑EGFR single‑domain antibody fused with iRGD peptide) protein efficiently targets the EGFR extracellular domain and integrin αvβ/β5, and shows a high penetration into cells. Thus, this protein may improve penetration of conjugated drugs into the deep zone of gastric cancer multicellular 3D spheroids. In the present study, a novel tumor‑targeting contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was developed, by coupling gadolinium‑diethylene triamine pentaacetate (Gd‑DTPA) with the bispecific recombinant anti‑EGFR‑iRGD protein. The anti‑EGFR‑iRGD protein was extracted from Escherichia coli and Gd was loaded onto the recombinant protein by chelation using DTPA anhydride. Single‑targeting agent anti‑EGFR‑DTPA‑Gd, which served as the control, was also prepared. The results of the present study showed that anti‑EGFR‑iRGD‑DTPA‑Gd exhibited no significant cyto-toxicity to human gastric carcinoma cells (BGC‑823) under the experimental conditions used. Compared with a conventional contrast agent (Magnevist), anti‑EGFR‑iRGD‑DTPA‑Gd showed higher T1 relaxivity (10.157/mM/sec at 3T) and better tumor‑targeting ability. In addition, the signal intensity and the area under curve for the enhanced signal time in tumor, in vivo, were stronger than Gd‑DTPA alone or the anti‑EGFR‑Gd control. Thus, Gd‑labelled anti‑EGFR‑iRGD has potential as a tumor‑targeting contrast agent for improved MRI. PMID:27035336

  17. The role of endogenous proteins in the protein-free maintenance of 3 distinct tumor-cell lines invitro.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Chigira, M

    1992-09-01

    We established new two protein-free culture subclones from murine well-characterized Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and P815 mastocytoma using intermittent protein-free culture performed previously for a protein-free subclone of fibrosarcoma (Gc-4 PF). The Ehrlich protein-free subclone (Ehrlich PF) grew much more slowly than the original cell line and showed a proliferative response to FCS. On the other hand, like Gc-4 PF, the P815 protein-free subclone (P815 PF) showed a similar growth rate to that of the original counterpart. Interestingly the original P815 mastocytoma cells also grew exponentially in protein-free medium. Although the protein-free culture exhibited cells that were more spheroid and spread less in each of these three cell lines, the major structure protein bands demonstrated on SDS-PAGE were virtually identical between the original and protein-free culture cells. In contrast to the structural peptides, the distribution of the secretory peptide differed among the three protein-free culture cell lines, which may reflect their state of differentiation. Growth-inhibiting activities were detected from the supernatant of all three protein-free culture cells, while no protein-free culture cells secreted predominantly growth-stimulating activity into their cultured media. These results suggest that autonomy in tumor cell proliferation may result from the acquisition of the ability to escape from negative control in multicellular organisms, as shown in monads, rather than an acquisition of further response to growth-stimulating control. PMID:21584570

  18. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Halle, Bo; Rosager, Ann Mari; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark; Kruse, Torben A.; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Aims Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking invasion and tumor stemness into account. Methods Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS) cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. Results We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice cultures both by confocal time-lapse microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This invasion closely resembled the invasion in vivo. The Ki-67 proliferation indexes in spheroids implanted into brain slices were lower than in free-floating spheroids. The expression of stem cell markers varied between free-floating spheroids, spheroids implanted into brain slices and tumors in vivo. Conclusion The established invasion model kept in stem cell medium closely mimics tumor cell invasion into the brain in vivo preserving also to some extent the expression of stem cell markers. The model is feasible and robust and we suggest the model as an in vivo-like model with a great potential in glioma studies and drug discovery. PMID:27454178

  19. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  20. Bacterial Stigmergy: An Organising Principle of Multicellular Collective Behaviours of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gloag, Erin S.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2015-01-01

    The self-organisation of collective behaviours often manifests as dramatic patterns of emergent large-scale order. This is true for relatively “simple” entities such as microbial communities and robot “swarms,” through to more complex self-organised systems such as those displayed by social insects, migrating herds, and many human activities. The principle of stigmergy describes those self-organised phenomena that emerge as a consequence of indirect communication between individuals of the group through the generation of persistent cues in the environment. Interestingly, despite numerous examples of multicellular behaviours of bacteria, the principle of stigmergy has yet to become an accepted theoretical framework that describes how bacterial collectives self-organise. Here we review some examples of multicellular bacterial behaviours in the context of stigmergy with the aim of bringing this powerful and elegant self-organisation principle to the attention of the microbial research community. PMID:25653882

  1. Imaging multicellular specimens with real-time optimized tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qinyi; Martin, Benjamin L.; Matus, David Q.; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the progress made in selective plane illumination microscopy, high-resolution 3D live imaging of multicellular specimens remains challenging. Tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy (TLS-SPIM) with real-time light-sheet optimization was developed to respond to the challenge. It improves the 3D imaging ability of SPIM in resolving complex structures and optimizes SPIM live imaging performance by using a real-time adjustable tiling light sheet and creating a flexible compromise between spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the 3D live imaging ability of TLS-SPIM by imaging cellular and subcellular behaviours in live C. elegans and zebrafish embryos, and show how TLS-SPIM can facilitate cell biology research in multicellular specimens by studying left-right symmetry breaking behaviour of C. elegans embryos. PMID:27004937

  2. The Dynamic Regulatory Genome of Capsaspora and the Origin of Animal Multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ballaré, Cecilia; Parra-Acero, Helena; Chiva, Cristina; Tena, Juan J; Sabidó, Eduard; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Di Croce, Luciano; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2016-05-19

    The unicellular ancestor of animals had a complex repertoire of genes linked to multicellular processes. This suggests that changes in the regulatory genome, rather than in gene innovation, were key to the origin of animals. Here, we carry out multiple functional genomic assays in Capsaspora owczarzaki, the unicellular relative of animals with the largest known gene repertoire for transcriptional regulation. We show that changing chromatin states, differential lincRNA expression, and dynamic cis-regulatory sites are associated with life cycle transitions in Capsaspora. Moreover, we demonstrate conservation of animal developmental transcription-factor networks and extensive network interconnection in this premetazoan organism. In contrast, however, Capsaspora lacks animal promoter types, and its regulatory sites are small, proximal, and lack signatures of animal enhancers. Overall, our results indicate that the emergence of animal multicellularity was linked to a major shift in genome cis-regulatory complexity, most notably the appearance of distal enhancer regulation. PMID:27114036

  3. Evolution of oxygen utilization in multicellular organisms and implications for cell signalling in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stamati, Katerina; Mudera, Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is one of the critically defining elements resulting in the existence of eukaryotic life on this planet. The rise and fall of this element can be tracked through time and corresponds with the evolution of diverse life forms, development of efficient energy production (oxidative phosphorylation) in single cell organisms, the evolution of multicellular organisms and the regulation of complex cell phenotypes. By understanding these events, we can plot the effect of oxygen on evolution and its direct influence on different forms of life today, from the whole organism to specific cells within multicellular organisms. In the emerging field of tissue engineering, understanding the role of different levels of oxygen for normal cell function as well as control of complex signalling cascades is paramount to effectively build 3D tissues in vitro and their subsequent survival when implanted. PMID:22292107

  4. Game theoretic treatments for the differentiation of functional roles in the transition to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Tudge, S J; Watson, R A; Brede, M

    2016-04-21

    Multicellular organisms are characterised by role specialisation, brought about by the epigenetic differentiation of their constituent parts. Conventional game theoretic studies of cooperation do not account for this division of labour, nor do they allow for the possibility of the plastic expression of phenotype. We address these issues by extending the notion of cooperative dilemmas to account for such interaction in which heterogeneous roles are advantageous and present an extended dynamical model of selection that allows for the possibility of conditional expression of phenotype. We use these models to investigate systematically when selection will favour an adaptive diversification of roles. We argue that such extensions to models and concepts are necessary to understand the origins of multicellularity and development. PMID:26869214

  5. Noise-plasticity correlations of gene expression in the multicellular organism Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Koudai; Nagano, Atsushi J; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-12-21

    Gene expression levels exhibit stochastic variations among genetically identical organisms under the same environmental conditions (called gene expression "noise" or phenotype "fluctuation"). In yeast and Escherichia coli, positive correlations have been found between such gene expression noise and "plasticity" with environmental variations. To determine the universality of such correlations in both unicellular and multicellular organisms, we focused on the relationships between gene expression "noise" and "plasticity" in Arabidopsis thaliana, a multicellular model organism. In recent studies on yeast and E. coli, only some gene groups with specific properties of promoter architecture, average expression levels, and functions exhibited strong noise-plasticity correlations. However, we found strong noise-plasticity correlations for most gene groups in Arabidopsis; additionally, promoter architecture, functional essentiality of genes, and circadian rhythm appeared to have only a weak influence on the correlation strength. The differences in the characteristics of noise-plasticity correlations may result from three-dimensional chromosomal structures and/or circadian rhythm. PMID:26431771

  6. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Langan, Laura M; Dodd, Nicholas J F; Owen, Stewart F; Purcell, Wendy M; Jackson, Simon K; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2016-01-01

    Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D) organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells) using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL) is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen) report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid) and absolute size (118±32 μm) allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface) for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid) cultures in biomedical and toxicological

  7. Spheroid formation and enhanced cardiomyogenic potential of adipose-derived stem cells grown on chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing-Hsien; Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Yu-Chun; Wang, Min-Hsiung; Chen, David C; Lee, Bo-Hua; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells may differentiate into cardiomyocytes and participate in local tissue repair after heart injury. In the current study, rat adipose-derived adult stem cells (ASCs) grown on chitosan membranes were observed to form cell spheroids after 3 days. The cell seeding density and surface modification of chitosan with Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide had an influence on the sizes of ASC