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Sample records for multichannel auditory brain

  1. Multichannel Spatial Auditory Display for Speed Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand R.; Erbe, Tom

    1994-01-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA/Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by the use of simplifiedhead-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four-letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 degree azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximum intelligibility improvement of about 6-7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 or 90 degree azimuth positions.

  2. Multichannel spatial auditory display for speech communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, D. R.; Erbe, T.; Wenzel, E. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA/Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by the use of simplified head-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four-letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 degrees azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximum intelligibility improvement of about 6-7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 or 90 degrees azimuth positions.

  3. Functional development in the infant brain for auditory pitch processing.

    PubMed

    Homae, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Hama; Nakano, Tamami; Taga, Gentaro

    2012-03-01

    Understanding how the developing brain processes auditory information is a critical step toward the clarification of infants' perception of speech and music. We have reported that the infant brain perceives pitch information in speech sounds. Here, we used multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy to examine whether the infant brain is sensitive to information of pitch changes in auditory sequences. Three types of auditory sequences with distinct temporal structures of pitch changes were presented to 3- and 6-month-old infants: a long condition of 12 successive tones constructing a chromatic scale (600 ms), a short condition of four successive tones constructing a chromatic scale (200 ms), and a random condition of random tone sequences (50 ms per tone). The difference among the conditions was only in the sequential order of the tones, which causes pitch changes between the successive tones. We found that the bilateral temporal regions of both ages of infants showed significant activation under the three conditions. The stimulus-dependent activation was observed in the right temporoparietal region of the both infant groups; the 3- and 6-month-old infants showed the most prominent activation under the random and short conditions, respectively. Our findings indicate that the infant brain, which shows functional differentiation and lateralization in auditory-related areas, is capable of responding to more than single tones of pitch information. These results suggest that the right temporoparietal region of the infants increases sensitivity to auditory sequences, which have temporal structures similar to those of syllables in speech sounds, in the course of development. PMID:21488136

  4. Consequences of Broad Auditory Filters for Identification of Multichannel-Compressed Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Pamela; Wright, Richard; Bor, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In view of previous findings (Bor, Souza, & Wright, 2008) that some listeners are more susceptible to spectral changes from multichannel compression (MCC) than others, this study addressed the extent to which differences in effects of MCC were related to differences in auditory filter width. Method: Listeners were recruited in 3 groups:…

  5. Improving auditory steady-state response detection using independent component analysis on multichannel EEG data.

    PubMed

    Van Dun, Bram; Wouters, Jan; Moonen, Marc

    2007-07-01

    Over the last decade, the detection of auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) has been developed for reliable hearing threshold estimation at audiometric frequencies. Unfortunately, the duration of ASSR measurement can be long, which is unpractical for wide scale clinical application. In this paper, we propose independent component analysis (ICA) as a tool to improve the ASSR detection in recorded single-channel as well as multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) data. We conclude that ICA is able to reduce measurement duration significantly. For a multichannel implementation, near-optimal performance is obtained with five-channel recordings. PMID:17605353

  6. A Brain System for Auditory Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Sabine; Gander, Phillip E.; Barascud, Nicolas; Halpern, Andrea R.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    The brain basis for auditory working memory, the process of actively maintaining sounds in memory over short periods of time, is controversial. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in human participants, we demonstrate that the maintenance of single tones in memory is associated with activation in auditory cortex. In addition, sustained activation was observed in hippocampus and inferior frontal gyrus. Multivoxel pattern analysis showed that patterns of activity in auditory cortex and left inferior frontal gyrus distinguished the tone that was maintained in memory. Functional connectivity during maintenance was demonstrated between auditory cortex and both the hippocampus and inferior frontal cortex. The data support a system for auditory working memory based on the maintenance of sound-specific representations in auditory cortex by projections from higher-order areas, including the hippocampus and frontal cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this work, we demonstrate a system for maintaining sound in working memory based on activity in auditory cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex, and functional connectivity among them. Specifically, our work makes three advances from the previous work. First, we robustly demonstrate hippocampal involvement in all phases of auditory working memory (encoding, maintenance, and retrieval): the role of hippocampus in working memory is controversial. Second, using a pattern classification technique, we show that activity in the auditory cortex and inferior frontal gyrus is specific to the maintained tones in working memory. Third, we show long-range connectivity of auditory cortex to hippocampus and frontal cortex, which may be responsible for keeping such representations active during working memory maintenance. PMID:27098693

  7. Auditory pattern perception in 'split brain' patients.

    PubMed

    Musiek, F E; Pinheiro, M L; Wilson, D H

    1980-10-01

    Three "split brain" subjects with normal peripheral hearing were tested on identifying monaurally presented auditory intensity and frequency patterns. One subject was tested before commissurotomy, ten days later, and one year after surgery. Results indicated that sectioning the corpus callosum dramatically affects the ability to verbally report both intensity and frequency patterns. However, the ability of the subjects to correctly "hum" frequency patterns was not impaired. Thus, it appears for a correct verbal report of an auditory pattern, interhemispheric transfer of acoustic information is required, while "humming" the pattern does not. Further application of this finding implicates auditory pattern tasks as as a potentially valuable test for detecting problems of higher auditory processing, particularly those affecting interhemispheric interaction. PMID:7417089

  8. Multi-channel spatial auditory display for speech communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begault, Durand; Erbe, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A spatial auditory display for multiple speech communications was developed at NASA-Ames Research Center. Input is spatialized by use of simplified head-related transfer functions, adapted for FIR filtering on Motorola 56001 digital signal processors. Hardware and firmware design implementations are overviewed for the initial prototype developed for NASA-Kennedy Space Center. An adaptive staircase method was used to determine intelligibility levels of four letter call signs used by launch personnel at NASA, against diotic speech babble. Spatial positions at 30 deg azimuth increments were evaluated. The results from eight subjects showed a maximal intelligibility improvement of about 6 to 7 dB when the signal was spatialized to 60 deg or 90 deg azimuth positions.

  9. Rapid acquisition of auditory subcortical steady state responses using multichannel recordings✩

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Hari M.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Auditory subcortical steady state responses (SSSRs), also known as frequency following responses (FFRs), provide a non-invasive measure of phase-locked neural responses to acoustic and cochlear-induced periodicities. SSSRs have been used both clinically and in basic neurophysiological investigation of auditory function. SSSR data acquisition typically involves thousands of presentations of each stimulus type, sometimes in two polarities, with acquisition times often exceeding an hour per subject. Here, we present a novel approach to reduce the data acquisition times significantly. Methods Because the sources of the SSSR are deep compared to the primary noise sources, namely background spontaneous cortical activity, the SSSR varies more smoothly over the scalp than the noise. We exploit this property and extract SSSRs efficiently, using multichannel recordings and an eigendecomposition of the complex cross-channel spectral density matrix. Results Our proposed method yields SNR improvement exceeding a factor of 3 compared to traditional single-channel methods. Conclusions It is possible to reduce data acquisition times for SSSRs significantly with our approach. Significance The proposed method allows SSSRs to be recorded for several stimulus conditions within a single session and also makes it possible to acquire both SSSRs and cortical EEG responses without increasing the session length. PMID:24525091

  10. Exploring functional connectivity networks with multichannel brain array coils.

    PubMed

    Anteraper, Sheeba Arnold; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Keil, Boris; Shannon, Steven; Gabrieli, John D; Triantafyllou, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The use of multichannel array head coils in functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), higher sensitivity, and parallel imaging capabilities. However, their benefits remain to be systematically explored in the context of resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI). In this study, we compare signal detectability within and between commercially available multichannel brain coils, a 32-Channel (32Ch), and a 12-Channel (12Ch) at 3T, in a high-resolution regime to accurately map resting-state networks. We investigate whether the 32Ch coil can extract and map fcMRI more efficiently and robustly than the 12Ch coil using seed-based and graph-theory-based analyses. Our findings demonstrate that although the 12Ch coil can be used to reveal resting-state connectivity maps, the 32Ch coil provides increased detailed functional connectivity maps (using seed-based analysis) as well as increased global and local efficiency, and cost (using graph-theory-based analysis), in a number of widely reported resting-state networks. The exploration of subcortical networks, which are scarcely reported due to limitations in spatial-resolution and coil sensitivity, also proved beneficial with the 32Ch coil. Further, comparisons regarding the data acquisition time required to successfully map these networks indicated that scan time can be significantly reduced by 50% when a coil with increased number of channels (i.e., 32Ch) is used. Switching to multichannel arrays in resting-state fcMRI could, therefore, provide both detailed functional connectivity maps and acquisition time reductions, which could further benefit imaging special subject populations, such as patients or pediatrics who have less tolerance in lengthy imaging sessions. PMID:23510203

  11. Multichannel Brain-Signal-Amplifying and Digitizing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevins, Alan

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus has been developed for use in acquiring multichannel electroencephalographic (EEG) data from a human subject. EEG apparatuses with many channels in use heretofore have been too heavy and bulky to be worn, and have been limited in dynamic range to no more than 18 bits. The present apparatus is small and light enough to be worn by the subject. It is capable of amplifying EEG signals and digitizing them to 22 bits in as many as 150 channels. The apparatus is controlled by software and is plugged into the USB port of a personal computer. This apparatus makes it possible, for the first time, to obtain high-resolution functional EEG images of a thinking brain in a real-life, ambulatory setting outside a research laboratory or hospital.

  12. The SRI24 Multi-Channel Brain Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M.; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2009-01-01

    We present a new standard atlas of the human brain based on magnetic resonance images. The atlas was generated using unbiased population registration from high-resolution images obtained by multichannel-coil acquisition at 3T in a group of 24 normal subjects. The final atlas comprises three anatomical channels (T1-weighted, early and late spin echo), three diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, diffusion-weighted image), and three tissue probability maps (CSF, gray matter, white matter). The atlas is dynamic in that it is implicitly represented by nonrigid transformations between the 24 subject images, as well as distortion-correction alignments between the image channels in each subject. The atlas can, therefore, be generated at essentially arbitrary image resolutions and orientations (e.g., AC/PC aligned), without compounding interpolation artifacts. We demonstrate in this paper two different applications of the atlas: (a) region definition by label propagation in a fiber tracking study is enabled by the increased sharpness of our atlas compared with other available atlases, and (b) spatial normalization is enabled by its average shape property. In summary, our atlas has unique features and will be made available to the scientific community as a resource and reference system for future imaging-based studies of the human brain. PMID:19183706

  13. The SRI24 multichannel brain atlas: construction and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M.; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2008-03-01

    We present a new standard atlas of the human brain based on magnetic resonance images. The atlas was generated using unbiased population registration from high-resolution images obtained by multichannel-coil acquisition at 3T in a group of 24 normal subjects. The final atlas comprises three anatomical channels (T I-weighted, early and late spin echo), three diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, diffusion-weighted image), and three tissue probability maps (CSF, gray matter, white matter). The atlas is dynamic in that it is implicitly represented by nonrigid transformations between the 24 subject images, as well as distortion-correction alignments between the image channels in each subject. The atlas can, therefore, be generated at essentially arbitrary image resolutions and orientations (e.g., AC/PC aligned), without compounding interpolation artifacts. We demonstrate in this paper two different applications of the atlas: (a) region definition by label propagation in a fiber tracking study is enabled by the increased sharpness of our atlas compared with other available atlases, and (b) spatial normalization is enabled by its average shape property. In summary, our atlas has unique features and will be made available to the scientific community as a resource and reference system for future imaging-based studies of the human brain.

  14. The utility of multichannel local field potentials for brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Eun Jung; Andersen, Richard A.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Local field potentials (LFPs) that carry information about the subject's motor intention have the potential to serve as a complement or alternative to spike signals for brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). The goal of this study is to assess the utility of LFPs for BMIs by characterizing the largely unknown information coding properties of multichannel LFPs. Approach. Two monkeys were implanted, each with a 16-channel electrode array, in the parietal reach region where both LFPs and spikes are known to encode the subject's intended reach target. We examined how multichannel LFPs recorded during a reach task jointly carry reach target information, and compared the LFP performance to simultaneously recorded multichannel spikes. Main Results. LFPs yielded a higher number of channels that were informative about reach targets than spikes. Single channel LFPs provided more accurate target information than single channel spikes. However, LFPs showed significantly larger signal and noise correlations across channels than spikes. Reach target decoders performed worse when using multichannel LFPs than multichannel spikes. The underperformance of multichannel LFPs was mostly due to their larger noise correlation because noise de-correlated multichannel LFPs produced a decoding accuracy comparable to multichannel spikes. Despite the high noise correlation, decoders using LFPs in addition to spikes outperformed decoders using only spikes. Significance. These results demonstrate that multichannel LFPs could effectively complement spikes for BMI applications by yielding more informative channels. The utility of multichannel LFPs may be further augmented if their high noise correlation can be taken into account by decoders.

  15. [Analysis of auditory information in the brain of the cetacean].

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Ia

    2006-01-01

    The cetacean brain specifics involve an exceptional development of the auditory neural centres. The place of projection sensory areas including the auditory that in the cetacean brain cortex is essentially different from that in other mammals. The EP characteristics indicated presence of several functional divisions in the auditory cortex. Physiological studies of the cetacean auditory centres were mainly performed using the EP technique. Of several types of the EPs, the short-latency auditory EP was most thoroughly studied. In cetacean, it is characterised by exceptionally high temporal resolution with the integration time about 0.3 ms which corresponds to the cut-off frequency 1700 Hz. This much exceeds the temporal resolution of the hearing in terranstrial mammals. The frequency selectivity of hearing in cetacean was measured using a number of variants of the masking technique. The hearing frequency selectivity acuity in cetacean exceeds that of most terraneous mammals (excepting the bats). This acute frequency selectivity provides the differentiation among the finest spectral patterns of auditory signals. PMID:16613059

  16. [Auditory hallucinations in lesions of the brain stem].

    PubMed

    Cambier, J; Decroix, J P; Masson, C

    1987-01-01

    Since the publication by Jean Lhermitte in 1922 of his paper on hallucinosis, the peduncular type has been described as a purely visual phenomenon. However, limited brain stem lesions can give rise to analogous manifestations in the auditory field. Five cases of auditory hallucinosis are reviewed, the first four resulting from a lesion of tegmentum of pons responsible for contralateral hemi-anesthesia and homolateral facial palsy with paralysis of laterality. Central type hypoacusis and a severe disorder of localization of sounds revealed a lesion of trapezoid body. The fifth case resulted from a peduncular lesion in region supplied by superior cerebellar artery, the auditory deficit being related to a lesion of inferior corpus quadrigeminum. In one patient, the auditory hallucinosis was followed by a period of visual hallucinations and oneiric delusions. Both auditory and visual hallucinosis can be related to hypnagogic hallucinations. Dream mechanisms (the geniculo-occipital spikes system) escape from normal inhibitory control exerted by the raphe nuclei. Auditory deafferentation could predispose to auditory hallucinosis. PMID:3629075

  17. The Human Brain Maintains Contradictory and Redundant Auditory Sensory Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Pieszek, Marika; Widmann, Andreas; Gruber, Thomas; Schröger, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Computational and experimental research has revealed that auditory sensory predictions are derived from regularities of the current environment by using internal generative models. However, so far, what has not been addressed is how the auditory system handles situations giving rise to redundant or even contradictory predictions derived from different sources of information. To this end, we measured error signals in the event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in response to violations of auditory predictions. Sounds could be predicted on the basis of overall probability, i.e., one sound was presented frequently and another sound rarely. Furthermore, each sound was predicted by an informative visual cue. Participants’ task was to use the cue and to discriminate the two sounds as fast as possible. Violations of the probability based prediction (i.e., a rare sound) as well as violations of the visual-auditory prediction (i.e., an incongruent sound) elicited error signals in the ERPs (Mismatch Negativity [MMN] and Incongruency Response [IR]). Particular error signals were observed even in case the overall probability and the visual symbol predicted different sounds. That is, the auditory system concurrently maintains and tests contradictory predictions. Moreover, if the same sound was predicted, we observed an additive error signal (scalp potential and primary current density) equaling the sum of the specific error signals. Thus, the auditory system maintains and tolerates functionally independently represented redundant and contradictory predictions. We argue that the auditory system exploits all currently active regularities in order to optimally prepare for future events. PMID:23308266

  18. Shaping the aging brain: role of auditory input patterns in the emergence of auditory cortical impairments

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Brishna; Holman, Constance; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Age-related impairments in the primary auditory cortex (A1) include poor tuning selectivity, neural desynchronization, and degraded responses to low-probability sounds. These changes have been largely attributed to reduced inhibition in the aged brain, and are thought to contribute to substantial hearing impairment in both humans and animals. Since many of these changes can be partially reversed with auditory training, it has been speculated that they might not be purely degenerative, but might rather represent negative plastic adjustments to noisy or distorted auditory signals reaching the brain. To test this hypothesis, we examined the impact of exposing young adult rats to 8 weeks of low-grade broadband noise on several aspects of A1 function and structure. We then characterized the same A1 elements in aging rats for comparison. We found that the impact of noise exposure on A1 tuning selectivity, temporal processing of auditory signal and responses to oddball tones was almost indistinguishable from the effect of natural aging. Moreover, noise exposure resulted in a reduction in the population of parvalbumin inhibitory interneurons and cortical myelin as previously documented in the aged group. Most of these changes reversed after returning the rats to a quiet environment. These results support the hypothesis that age-related changes in A1 have a strong activity-dependent component and indicate that the presence or absence of clear auditory input patterns might be a key factor in sustaining adult A1 function. PMID:24062649

  19. Neural mechanisms of auditory categorization: from across brain areas to within local microcircuits

    PubMed Central

    Tsunada, Joji; Cohen, Yale E.

    2014-01-01

    Categorization enables listeners to efficiently encode and respond to auditory stimuli. Behavioral evidence for auditory categorization has been well documented across a broad range of human and non-human animal species. Moreover, neural correlates of auditory categorization have been documented in a variety of different brain regions in the ventral auditory pathway, which is thought to underlie auditory-object processing and auditory perception. Here, we review and discuss how neural representations of auditory categories are transformed across different scales of neural organization in the ventral auditory pathway: from across different brain areas to within local microcircuits. We propose different neural transformations across different scales of neural organization in auditory categorization. Along the ascending auditory system in the ventral pathway, there is a progression in the encoding of categories from simple acoustic categories to categories for abstract information. On the other hand, in local microcircuits, different classes of neurons differentially compute categorical information. PMID:24987324

  20. Analysis of auditory information in the brains of cetaceans.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Ya

    2007-03-01

    A characteristic feature of the brains of toothed cetaceans is the exclusive development of the auditory neural centers. The location of the projection sensory zones, including the auditory zones, in the cetacean cortex is significantly different from that in other mammals. The characteristics of evoked potentials demonstrate the existence of several functional subdivisions in the auditory cortex. Physiological studies of the auditory neural centers of cetaceans have been performed predominantly using the evoked potentials method. Of the several types of evoked potentials available for non-invasive recording, the most detailed studies have been performed using short-latency auditory evoked potentials (SLAEP). SLAEP in cetaceans are characterized by exclusively high time resolution, with integration times of about 0.3 msec, which on the frequency scale corresponds to a cut-off frequency of 1700 Hz. This is more than an order of magnitude greater than the time resolution of hearing in terrestrial mammals. The frequency selectivity of hearing in cetaceans has been measured using several versions of the masking method. The acuity of frequency selectivity in cetaceans is several times greater than that in most terrestrial mammals (except bats). The acute frequency selectivity allows the discrimination of very fine spectral patterns of sound signals. PMID:17294105

  1. Brain Metabolism during Hallucination-Like Auditory Stimulation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Horga, Guillermo; Fernández-Egea, Emilio; Mané, Anna; Font, Mireia; Schatz, Kelly C.; Falcon, Carles; Lomeña, Francisco; Bernardo, Miguel; Parellada, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in schizophrenia are typically characterized by rich emotional content. Despite the prominent role of emotion in regulating normal perception, the neural interface between emotion-processing regions such as the amygdala and auditory regions involved in perception remains relatively unexplored in AVH. Here, we studied brain metabolism using FDG-PET in 9 remitted patients with schizophrenia that previously reported severe AVH during an acute psychotic episode and 8 matched healthy controls. Participants were scanned twice: (1) at rest and (2) during the perception of aversive auditory stimuli mimicking the content of AVH. Compared to controls, remitted patients showed an exaggerated response to the AVH-like stimuli in limbic and paralimbic regions, including the left amygdala. Furthermore, patients displayed abnormally strong connections between the amygdala and auditory regions of the cortex and thalamus, along with abnormally weak connections between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. These results suggest that abnormal modulation of the auditory cortex by limbic-thalamic structures might be involved in the pathophysiology of AVH and may potentially account for the emotional features that characterize hallucinatory percepts in schizophrenia. PMID:24416328

  2. Amplitude-modulated stimuli reveal auditory-visual interactions in brain activity and brain connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Mark; Rees, Adrian; Vuong, Quoc C.

    2015-01-01

    The temporal congruence between auditory and visual signals coming from the same source can be a powerful means by which the brain integrates information from different senses. To investigate how the brain uses temporal information to integrate auditory and visual information from continuous yet unfamiliar stimuli, we used amplitude-modulated tones and size-modulated shapes with which we could manipulate the temporal congruence between the sensory signals. These signals were independently modulated at a slow or a fast rate. Participants were presented with auditory-only, visual-only, or auditory-visual (AV) trials in the fMRI scanner. On AV trials, the auditory and visual signal could have the same (AV congruent) or different modulation rates (AV incongruent). Using psychophysiological interaction analyses, we found that auditory regions showed increased functional connectivity predominantly with frontal regions for AV incongruent relative to AV congruent stimuli. We further found that superior temporal regions, shown previously to integrate auditory and visual signals, showed increased connectivity with frontal and parietal regions for the same contrast. Our findings provide evidence that both activity in a network of brain regions and their connectivity are important for AV integration, and help to bridge the gap between transient and familiar AV stimuli used in previous studies. PMID:26483710

  3. Concurrent brain responses to separate auditory and visual targets.

    PubMed

    Finoia, Paola; Mitchell, Daniel J; Hauk, Olaf; Beste, Christian; Pizzella, Vittorio; Duncan, John

    2015-08-01

    In the attentional blink, a target event (T1) strongly interferes with perception of a second target (T2) presented within a few hundred milliseconds. Concurrently, the brain's electromagnetic response to the second target is suppressed, especially a late negative-positive EEG complex including the traditional P3 wave. An influential theory proposes that conscious perception requires access to a distributed, frontoparietal global workspace, explaining the attentional blink by strong mutual inhibition between concurrent workspace representations. Often, however, the attentional blink is reduced or eliminated for targets in different sensory modalities, suggesting a limit to such global inhibition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we confirm that visual and auditory targets produce similar, distributed patterns of frontoparietal activity. In an attentional blink EEG/MEG design, however, an auditory T1 and visual T2 are identified without mutual interference, with largely preserved electromagnetic responses to T2. The results suggest parallel brain responses to target events in different sensory modalities. PMID:26084914

  4. Concurrent brain responses to separate auditory and visual targets

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Daniel J.; Hauk, Olaf; Beste, Christian; Pizzella, Vittorio; Duncan, John

    2015-01-01

    In the attentional blink, a target event (T1) strongly interferes with perception of a second target (T2) presented within a few hundred milliseconds. Concurrently, the brain's electromagnetic response to the second target is suppressed, especially a late negative-positive EEG complex including the traditional P3 wave. An influential theory proposes that conscious perception requires access to a distributed, frontoparietal global workspace, explaining the attentional blink by strong mutual inhibition between concurrent workspace representations. Often, however, the attentional blink is reduced or eliminated for targets in different sensory modalities, suggesting a limit to such global inhibition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we confirm that visual and auditory targets produce similar, distributed patterns of frontoparietal activity. In an attentional blink EEG/MEG design, however, an auditory T1 and visual T2 are identified without mutual interference, with largely preserved electromagnetic responses to T2. The results suggest parallel brain responses to target events in different sensory modalities. PMID:26084914

  5. Infant Auditory Processing and Event-related Brain Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Musacchia, Gabriella; Ortiz-Mantilla, Silvia; Realpe-Bonilla, Teresa; Roesler, Cynthia P.; Benasich, April A.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid auditory processing and acoustic change detection abilities play a critical role in allowing human infants to efficiently process the fine spectral and temporal changes that are characteristic of human language. These abilities lay the foundation for effective language acquisition; allowing infants to hone in on the sounds of their native language. Invasive procedures in animals and scalp-recorded potentials from human adults suggest that simultaneous, rhythmic activity (oscillations) between and within brain regions are fundamental to sensory development; determining the resolution with which incoming stimuli are parsed. At this time, little is known about oscillatory dynamics in human infant development. However, animal neurophysiology and adult EEG data provide the basis for a strong hypothesis that rapid auditory processing in infants is mediated by oscillatory synchrony in discrete frequency bands. In order to investigate this, 128-channel, high-density EEG responses of 4-month old infants to frequency change in tone pairs, presented in two rate conditions (Rapid: 70 msec ISI and Control: 300 msec ISI) were examined. To determine the frequency band and magnitude of activity, auditory evoked response averages were first co-registered with age-appropriate brain templates. Next, the principal components of the response were identified and localized using a two-dipole model of brain activity. Single-trial analysis of oscillatory power showed a robust index of frequency change processing in bursts of Theta band (3 - 8 Hz) activity in both right and left auditory cortices, with left activation more prominent in the Rapid condition. These methods have produced data that are not only some of the first reported evoked oscillations analyses in infants, but are also, importantly, the product of a well-established method of recording and analyzing clean, meticulously collected, infant EEG and ERPs. In this article, we describe our method for infant EEG net

  6. Evoked potential correlates of selective attention with multi-channel auditory inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Ten subjects were presented with random, rapid sequences of four auditory tones which were separated in pitch and apparent spatial position. The N1 component of the auditory vertex evoked potential (EP) measured relative to a baseline was observed to increase with attention. It was concluded that the N1 enhancement reflects a finely tuned selective attention to one stimulus channel among several concurrent, competing channels. This EP enhancement probably increases with increased information load on the subject.

  7. An auditory brain-computer interface using virtual sound field.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haiyang; Ouyang, Minhui; Zhang, Dan; Hong, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) exploring the auditory communication channel might be preferable for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients with poor sight or with the visual system being occupied for other uses. Spatial attention was proven to be able to modulate the event-related potentials (ERPs); yet up to now, there is no auditory BCI based on virtual sound field. In this study, auditory spatial attention was introduced by using stimuli in a virtual sound field. Subjects attended selectively to the virtual location of the target sound and discriminated its relevant properties. The concurrently recorded ERP components and the users' performance were compared with those of the paradigm where all sounds were presented in the frontal direction. The early ERP components (100-250 ms) and the simulated online accuracies indicated that spatial attention indeed added effective discriminative information for BCI classification. The proposed auditory paradigm using virtual sound field may lead to a high-performance and portable BCI system. PMID:22255354

  8. Brain Region-Specific Activity Patterns after Recent or Remote Memory Retrieval of Auditory Conditioned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Jhang, Jinho; Kim, Hyung-Su; Lee, Sujin; Han, Jin-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Memory is thought to be sparsely encoded throughout multiple brain regions forming unique memory trace. Although evidence has established that the amygdala is a key brain site for memory storage and retrieval of auditory conditioned fear memory, it remains elusive whether the auditory brain regions may be involved in fear memory storage or…

  9. Development of auditory-specific brain rhythm in infants.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Takako; Mourad, Nasser; Trainor, Laurel J

    2011-02-01

    Human infants rapidly develop their auditory perceptual abilities and acquire culture-specific knowledge in speech and music in the second 6 months of life. In the adult brain, neural rhythm around 10 Hz in the temporal lobes is thought to reflect sound analysis and subsequent cognitive processes such as memory and attention. To study when and how such rhythm emerges in infancy, we examined electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings in infants 4 and 12 months of age during sound stimulation and silence. In the 4-month-olds, the amplitudes of narrowly tuned 4-Hz brain rhythm, recorded from bilateral temporal electrodes, were modulated by sound stimuli. In the 12-month-olds, the sound-induced modulation occurred at faster 6-Hz rhythm at temporofrontal locations. The brain rhythms in the older infants consisted of more complex components, as even evident in individual data. These findings suggest that auditory-specific rhythmic neural activity, which is already established before 6 months of age, involves more speed-efficient long-range neural networks by the age of 12 months when long-term memory for native phoneme representation and for musical rhythmic features is formed. We suggest that maturation of distinct rhythmic components occurs in parallel, and that sensory-specific functions bound to particular thalamo-cortical networks are transferred to newly developed higher-order networks step by step until adult hierarchical neural oscillatory mechanisms are achieved across the whole brain. PMID:21226773

  10. Brain Mapping of Language and Auditory Perception in High-Functioning Autistic Adults: A PET Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, R-A.; Behen, M. E.; Rothermel, R. D.; Chugani, D. C.; Muzik, O.; Mangner, T. J.; Chugani, H. T.

    1999-01-01

    A study used positron emission tomography (PET) to study patterns of brain activation during auditory processing in five high-functioning adults with autism. Results found that participants showed reversed hemispheric dominance during the verbal auditory stimulation and reduced activation of the auditory cortex and cerebellum. (CR)

  11. Tactual and auditory vigilance in split-brain man.

    PubMed Central

    Dimond, S J

    1979-01-01

    Two studies are reported of tactual and auditory vigilance performance in patients with a split-brain or partial commissurotomy to examine the attentional behaviour of the right and left hemisphere, and to identify defects in attention which may be related to the division of the cerebral commissures. The performance of the right hemisphere on all tasks of sustained attention so far studied was substantially better than that of the left. Considerable depletion of concentration was observed for the total split-brain group but not in patients with partial commissurotomy. One of the more unusual phenomena of the split-brain condition is that gaps of attention, often lasting many seconds, occur predominantly on the left hemisphere. The switch to a different type of signal on the same hemisphere does not stop them but the switching of signals from one hemisphere to another does. The defect is interpreted as a failure of attention peculiar to the individual hemisphere under test. PMID:762586

  12. An integrated system for dynamic control of auditory perspective in a multichannel sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corey, Jason Andrew

    An integrated system providing dynamic control of sound source azimuth, distance and proximity to a room boundary within a simulated acoustic space is proposed for use in multichannel music and film sound production. The system has been investigated, implemented, and psychoacoustically tested within the ITU-R BS.775 recommended five-channel (3/2) loudspeaker layout. The work brings together physical and perceptual models of room simulation to allow dynamic placement of virtual sound sources at any location of a simulated space within the horizontal plane. The control system incorporates a number of modules including simulated room modes, "fuzzy" sources, and tracking early reflections, whose parameters are dynamically changed according to sound source location within the simulated space. The control functions of the basic elements, derived from theories of perception of a source in a real room, have been carefully tuned to provide efficient, effective, and intuitive control of a sound source's perceived location. Seven formal listening tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithm design choices. The tests evaluated: (1) loudness calibration of multichannel sound images; (2) the effectiveness of distance control; (3) the resolution of distance control provided by the system; (4) the effectiveness of the proposed system when compared to a commercially available multichannel room simulation system in terms of control of source distance and proximity to a room boundary; (5) the role of tracking early reflection patterns on the perception of sound source distance; (6) the role of tracking early reflection patterns on the perception of lateral phantom images. The listening tests confirm the effectiveness of the system for control of perceived sound source distance, proximity to room boundaries, and azimuth, through fine, dynamic adjustment of parameters according to source location. All of the parameters are grouped and controlled together to

  13. The auditory and non-auditory brain areas involved in tinnitus. An emergent property of multiple parallel overlapping subnetworks.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of an external sound source. It is characterized by sensory components such as the perceived loudness, the lateralization, the tinnitus type (pure tone, noise-like) and associated emotional components, such as distress and mood changes. Source localization of quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) data demonstrate the involvement of auditory brain areas as well as several non-auditory brain areas such as the anterior cingulate cortex (dorsal and subgenual), auditory cortex (primary and secondary), dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, insula, supplementary motor area, orbitofrontal cortex (including the inferior frontal gyrus), parahippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex and the precuneus, in different aspects of tinnitus. Explaining these non-auditory brain areas as constituents of separable subnetworks, each reflecting a specific aspect of the tinnitus percept increases the explanatory power of the non-auditory brain areas involvement in tinnitus. Thus, the unified percept of tinnitus can be considered an emergent property of multiple parallel dynamically changing and partially overlapping subnetworks, each with a specific spontaneous oscillatory pattern and functional connectivity signature. PMID:22586375

  14. Brain network interactions in auditory, visual and linguistic processing.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Barry; Braun, Allen R

    2004-05-01

    In the paper, we discuss the importance of network interactions between brain regions in mediating performance of sensorimotor and cognitive tasks, including those associated with language processing. Functional neuroimaging, especially PET and fMRI, provide data that are obtained essentially simultaneously from much of the brain, and thus are ideal for enabling one to assess interregional functional interactions. Two ways to use these types of data to assess network interactions are presented. First, using PET, we demonstrate that anterior and posterior perisylvian language areas have stronger functional connectivity during spontaneous narrative production than during other less linguistically demanding production tasks. Second, we show how one can use large-scale neural network modeling to relate neural activity to the hemodynamically-based data generated by fMRI and PET. We review two versions of a model of object processing - one for visual and one for auditory objects. The regions comprising the models include primary and secondary sensory cortex, association cortex in the temporal lobe, and prefrontal cortex. Each model incorporates specific assumptions about how neurons in each of these areas function, and how neurons in the different areas are interconnected with each other. Each model is able to perform a delayed match-to-sample task for simple objects (simple shapes for the visual model; tonal contours for the auditory model). We find that the simulated electrical activities in each region are similar to those observed in nonhuman primates performing analogous tasks, and the absolute values of the simulated integrated synaptic activity in each brain region match human fMRI/PET data. Thus, this type of modeling provides a way to understand the neural bases for the sensorimotor and cognitive tasks of interest. PMID:15068921

  15. Atypical Bilateral Brain Synchronization in the Early Stage of Human Voice Auditory Processing in Young Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Toshiharu; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Chiaki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hirosawa, Tetsu; Furutani, Naoki; Higashida, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Takashi; Mutou, Kouhei; Asada, Minoru; Minabe, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been postulated to involve impaired neuronal cooperation in large-scale neural networks, including cortico-cortical interhemispheric circuitry. In the context of ASD, alterations in both peripheral and central auditory processes have also attracted a great deal of interest because these changes appear to represent pathophysiological processes; therefore, many prior studies have focused on atypical auditory responses in ASD. The auditory evoked field (AEF), recorded by magnetoencephalography, and the synchronization of these processes between right and left hemispheres was recently suggested to reflect various cognitive abilities in children. However, to date, no previous study has focused on AEF synchronization in ASD subjects. To assess global coordination across spatially distributed brain regions, the analysis of Omega complexity from multichannel neurophysiological data was proposed. Using Omega complexity analysis, we investigated the global coordination of AEFs in 3-8-year-old typically developing (TD) children (n = 50) and children with ASD (n = 50) in 50-ms time-windows. Children with ASD displayed significantly higher Omega complexities compared with TD children in the time-window of 0-50 ms, suggesting lower whole brain synchronization in the early stage of the P1m component. When we analyzed the left and right hemispheres separately, no significant differences in any time-windows were observed. These results suggest lower right-left hemispheric synchronization in children with ASD compared with TD children. Our study provides new evidence of aberrant neural synchronization in young children with ASD by investigating auditory evoked neural responses to the human voice. PMID:27074011

  16. Atypical Bilateral Brain Synchronization in the Early Stage of Human Voice Auditory Processing in Young Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Toshiharu; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Chiaki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hirosawa, Tetsu; Furutani, Naoki; Higashida, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Takashi; Mutou, Kouhei; Asada, Minoru; Minabe, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been postulated to involve impaired neuronal cooperation in large-scale neural networks, including cortico-cortical interhemispheric circuitry. In the context of ASD, alterations in both peripheral and central auditory processes have also attracted a great deal of interest because these changes appear to represent pathophysiological processes; therefore, many prior studies have focused on atypical auditory responses in ASD. The auditory evoked field (AEF), recorded by magnetoencephalography, and the synchronization of these processes between right and left hemispheres was recently suggested to reflect various cognitive abilities in children. However, to date, no previous study has focused on AEF synchronization in ASD subjects. To assess global coordination across spatially distributed brain regions, the analysis of Omega complexity from multichannel neurophysiological data was proposed. Using Omega complexity analysis, we investigated the global coordination of AEFs in 3–8-year-old typically developing (TD) children (n = 50) and children with ASD (n = 50) in 50-ms time-windows. Children with ASD displayed significantly higher Omega complexities compared with TD children in the time-window of 0–50 ms, suggesting lower whole brain synchronization in the early stage of the P1m component. When we analyzed the left and right hemispheres separately, no significant differences in any time-windows were observed. These results suggest lower right-left hemispheric synchronization in children with ASD compared with TD children. Our study provides new evidence of aberrant neural synchronization in young children with ASD by investigating auditory evoked neural responses to the human voice. PMID:27074011

  17. Behavioral and electrophysiological auditory processing measures in traumatic brain injury after acoustically controlled auditory training: a long-term study

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Carolina Calsolari; de Andrade, Adriana Neves; Marangoni-Castan, Andréa Tortosa; Gil, Daniela; Suriano, Italo Capraro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate the long-term efficacy of acoustically controlled auditory training in adults after tarumatic brain injury. Methods A total of six audioogically normal individuals aged between 20 and 37 years were studied. They suffered severe traumatic brain injury with diffuse axional lesion and underwent an acoustically controlled auditory training program approximately one year before. The results obtained in the behavioral and electrophysiological evaluation of auditory processing immediately after acoustically controlled auditory training were compared to reassessment findings, one year later. Results Quantitative analysis of auditory brainsteim response showed increased absolute latency of all waves and interpeak intervals, bilaterraly, when comparing both evaluations. Moreover, increased amplitude of all waves, and the wave V amplitude was statistically significant for the right ear, and wave III for the left ear. As to P3, decreased latency and increased amplitude were found for both ears in reassessment. The previous and current behavioral assessment showed similar results, except for the staggered spondaic words in the left ear and the amount of errors on the dichotic consonant-vowel test. Conclusion The acoustically controlled auditory training was effective in the long run, since better latency and amplitude results were observed in the electrophysiological evaluation, in addition to stability of behavioral measures after one-year training. PMID:26676270

  18. Bigger Brains or Bigger Nuclei? Regulating the Size of Auditory Structures in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Kubke, M. Fabiana; Massoglia, Dino P.; Carr, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in the size of the neuronal structures that mediate specific behaviors are believed to be related to enhanced computational performance. It is not clear, however, what developmental and evolutionary mechanisms mediate these changes, nor whether an increase in the size of a given neuronal population is a general mechanism to achieve enhanced computational ability. We addressed the issue of size by analyzing the variation in the relative number of cells of auditory structures in auditory specialists and generalists. We show that bird species with different auditory specializations exhibit variation in the relative size of their hindbrain auditory nuclei. In the barn owl, an auditory specialist, the hind-brain auditory nuclei involved in the computation of sound location show hyperplasia. This hyperplasia was also found in songbirds, but not in non-auditory specialists. The hyperplasia of auditory nuclei was also not seen in birds with large body weight suggesting that the total number of cells is selected for in auditory specialists. In barn owls, differences observed in the relative size of the auditory nuclei might be attributed to modifications in neurogenesis and cell death. Thus, hyperplasia of circuits used for auditory computation accompanies auditory specialization in different orders of birds. PMID:14726625

  19. Evoked potential correlates of selective attention with multi-channel auditory inputs.

    PubMed

    Schwent, V L; Hillyard, S A

    1975-02-01

    Ten subjects were presented with a random sequence of 50 msec tone pips at a rapid rate (averaging one tone every 225 msec). The tones came from four different sound sources or sensory "channels" each having a different pitch (2000,4000,1000, and 500 c/sec respectively) and perceived spatial position (spaced equidistant across the head). Within each sensory "channel" a random 10% of the tones were of a slightly higher pitch (designated as "targets"). The subject attended to one channel at a time for 7.5 min and counted the targets in that channel. The auditory evoked vertex potential elicited by a channel of stimuli when attended was compared with the mean vertex potential elicited by those same stimuli when the other three channels were being attended. The N1 component (latency 80130 msec) measured re a baseline revealed an increase with attention (82% in the baselineN1 measure, P less than 10-). It was concluded that: (1) this N1 enhancement could not be attributed to peripheral mechanisms acting on sensory transmission; (2) this N1 enhancement reflects a "finely tuned" selective attention to one channel of stimuli among several concurrent and competing channels; and (3) a probable relationship exists between the information load on the subject and the magnitude of this EP enhancement with selective attention. PMID:45943

  20. Quantitative map of multiple auditory cortical regions with a stereotaxic fine-scale atlas of the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Tsukano, Hiroaki; Horie, Masao; Hishida, Ryuichi; Takahashi, Kuniyuki; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2016-01-01

    Optical imaging studies have recently revealed the presence of multiple auditory cortical regions in the mouse brain. We have previously demonstrated, using flavoprotein fluorescence imaging, at least six regions in the mouse auditory cortex, including the anterior auditory field (AAF), primary auditory cortex (AI), the secondary auditory field (AII), dorsoanterior field (DA), dorsomedial field (DM), and dorsoposterior field (DP). While multiple regions in the visual cortex and somatosensory cortex have been annotated and consolidated in recent brain atlases, the multiple auditory cortical regions have not yet been presented from a coronal view. In the current study, we obtained regional coordinates of the six auditory cortical regions of the C57BL/6 mouse brain and illustrated these regions on template coronal brain slices. These results should reinforce the existing mouse brain atlases and support future studies in the auditory cortex. PMID:26924462

  1. The importance of individual frequencies of endogenous brain oscillations for auditory cognition - A short review.

    PubMed

    Baltus, Alina; Herrmann, Christoph Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Oscillatory EEG activity in the human brain with frequencies in the gamma range (approx. 30-80Hz) is known to be relevant for a large number of cognitive processes. Interestingly, each subject reveals an individual frequency of the auditory gamma-band response (GBR) that coincides with the peak in the auditory steady state response (ASSR). A common resonance frequency of auditory cortex seems to underlie both the individual frequency of the GBR and the peak of the ASSR. This review sheds light on the functional role of oscillatory gamma activity for auditory processing. For successful processing, the auditory system has to track changes in auditory input over time and store information about past events in memory which allows the construction of auditory objects. Recent findings support the idea of gamma oscillations being involved in the partitioning of auditory input into discrete samples to facilitate higher order processing. We review experiments that seem to suggest that inter-individual differences in the resonance frequency are behaviorally relevant for gap detection and speech processing. A possible application of these resonance frequencies for brain computer interfaces is illustrated with regard to optimized individual presentation rates for auditory input to correspond with endogenous oscillatory activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. PMID:26453287

  2. [Verbal auditory agnosia: SPECT study of the brain].

    PubMed

    Carmona, C; Casado, I; Fernández-Rojas, J; Garín, J; Rayo, J I

    1995-01-01

    Verbal auditory agnosia are rare in clinical practice. Clinically, it characterized by impairment of comprehension and repetition of speech but reading, writing, and spontaneous speech are preserved. So it is distinguished from generalized auditory agnosia by the preserved ability to recognize non verbal sounds. We present the clinical picture of a forty-years-old, right handed woman who developed verbal auditory agnosic after an bilateral temporal ischemic infarcts due to atrial fibrillation by dilated cardiomyopathie. Neurophysiological studies by pure tone threshold audiometry: brainstem auditory evoked potentials and cortical auditory evoked potentials showed sparing of peripheral hearing and intact auditory pathway in brainstem but impaired cortical responses. Cranial CT-SCAN revealed two large hypodenses area involving both cortico-subcortical temporal lobes. Cerebral SPECT using 99mTc-HMPAO as radiotracer showed hypoperfusion just posterior in both frontal lobes nect to Roland's fissure and at level of bitemporal lobes just anterior to Sylvian's fissure. PMID:8556589

  3. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  4. An auditory brain-computer interface evoked by natural speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Gordo, M. A.; Fernandez, E.; Romero, S.; Pelayo, F.; Prieto, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are mainly intended for people unable to perform any muscular movement, such as patients in a complete locked-in state. The majority of BCIs interact visually with the user, either in the form of stimulation or biofeedback. However, visual BCIs challenge their ultimate use because they require the subjects to gaze, explore and shift eye-gaze using their muscles, thus excluding patients in a complete locked-in state or under the condition of the unresponsive wakefulness syndrome. In this study, we present a novel fully auditory EEG-BCI based on a dichotic listening paradigm using human voice for stimulation. This interface has been evaluated with healthy volunteers, achieving an average information transmission rate of 1.5 bits min-1 in full-length trials and 2.7 bits min-1 using the optimal length of trials, recorded with only one channel and without formal training. This novel technique opens the door to a more natural communication with users unable to use visual BCIs, with promising results in terms of performance, usability, training and cognitive effort.

  5. Effectiveness of direct and non-direct auditory stimulation on coma arousal after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohyun; Davis, Alice E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of direct and non-direct auditory stimulation on arousal in coma patients with severe traumatic brain injury and to compare the effects of direct vs. non-direct auditory stimulation. A crossover intervention study design was used. Nine participants who were comatose after a severe traumatic brain injury underwent direct and non-direct auditory stimulation. Direct auditory stimulation requires a higher level of interpersonal interaction between the patient and stimuli such as voices of family members, orientation by a nurse or family member and familiar music. In contrast, non-direct auditory stimuli were characterized as more general, less familiar, less interactive, indirect and not lively such as general music and TV sounds. Participants received both direct and non-direct auditory stimulation in randomized order for 15 minutes. Recovery of consciousness was measured with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and Sensory Stimulation Assessment Measure (SSAM). The Friedman test with post hoc analysis by Wilcoxon's signed-rank test comparisons was used for data analysis. Patients who received both direct and non-direct auditory stimulation exhibited significantly increased GCS (p = 0.008) and SSAM scores (p = 0.008) over baseline. The improvement in SSAM scores after direct auditory stimulation was significantly greater than that after non-direct auditory stimulation (p = 0.021), but there was no statistically significant difference in GCS scores (p = 0.139). Auditory stimulation, in particular direct auditory stimulation, might be useful for improving the recovery of consciousness and increasing the arousal of comatose patients. The SSAM is more useful for detecting subtle changes from stimulation intervention than the GCS. PMID:27241789

  6. Scale-Free Brain Quartet: Artistic Filtering of Multi-Channel Brainwave Music

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Li, Chaoyi; Yao, Dezhong

    2013-01-01

    To listen to the brain activities as a piece of music, we proposed the scale-free brainwave music (SFBM) technology, which translated scalp EEGs into music notes according to the power law of both EEG and music. In the present study, the methodology was extended for deriving a quartet from multi-channel EEGs with artistic beat and tonality filtering. EEG data from multiple electrodes were first translated into MIDI sequences by SFBM, respectively. Then, these sequences were processed by a beat filter which adjusted the duration of notes in terms of the characteristic frequency. And the sequences were further filtered from atonal to tonal according to a key defined by the analysis of the original music pieces. Resting EEGs with eyes closed and open of 40 subjects were utilized for music generation. The results revealed that the scale-free exponents of the music before and after filtering were different: the filtered music showed larger variety between the eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO) conditions, and the pitch scale exponents of the filtered music were closer to 1 and thus it was more approximate to the classical music. Furthermore, the tempo of the filtered music with eyes closed was significantly slower than that with eyes open. With the original materials obtained from multi-channel EEGs, and a little creative filtering following the composition process of a potential artist, the resulted brainwave quartet opened a new window to look into the brain in an audible musical way. In fact, as the artistic beat and tonal filters were derived from the brainwaves, the filtered music maintained the essential properties of the brain activities in a more musical style. It might harmonically distinguish the different states of the brain activities, and therefore it provided a method to analyze EEGs from a relaxed audio perspective. PMID:23717527

  7. Maximum-likelihood estimation of channel-dependent trial-to-trial variability of auditory evoked brain responses in MEG

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We propose a mathematical model for multichannel assessment of the trial-to-trial variability of auditory evoked brain responses in magnetoencephalography (MEG). Methods Following the work of de Munck et al., our approach is based on the maximum likelihood estimation and involves an approximation of the spatio-temporal covariance of the contaminating background noise by means of the Kronecker product of its spatial and temporal covariance matrices. Extending the work of de Munck et al., where the trial-to-trial variability of the responses was considered identical to all channels, we evaluate it for each individual channel. Results Simulations with two equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) with different trial-to-trial variability, one seeded in each of the auditory cortices, were used to study the applicability of the proposed methodology on the sensor level and revealed spatial selectivity of the trial-to-trial estimates. In addition, we simulated a scenario with neighboring ECDs, to show limitations of the method. We also present an illustrative example of the application of this methodology to real MEG data taken from an auditory experimental paradigm, where we found hemispheric lateralization of the habituation effect to multiple stimulus presentation. Conclusions The proposed algorithm is capable of reconstructing lateralization effects of the trial-to-trial variability of evoked responses, i.e. when an ECD of only one hemisphere habituates, whereas the activity of the other hemisphere is not subject to habituation. Hence, it may be a useful tool in paradigms that assume lateralization effects, like, e.g., those involving language processing. PMID:24939398

  8. Are Auditory Hallucinations Related to the Brain's Resting State Activity? A 'Neurophenomenal Resting State Hypothesis'

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    While several hypotheses about the neural mechanisms underlying auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) have been suggested, the exact role of the recently highlighted intrinsic resting state activity of the brain remains unclear. Based on recent findings, we therefore developed what we call the 'resting state hypotheses' of AVH. Our hypothesis suggest that AVH may be traced back to abnormally elevated resting state activity in auditory cortex itself, abnormal modulation of the auditory cortex by anterior cortical midline regions as part of the default-mode network, and neural confusion between auditory cortical resting state changes and stimulus-induced activity. We discuss evidence in favour of our 'resting state hypothesis' and show its correspondence with phenomenal, i.e., subjective-experiential features as explored in phenomenological accounts. Therefore I speak of a 'neurophenomenal resting state hypothesis' of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia. PMID:25598821

  9. The Relationship between Phonological and Auditory Processing and Brain Organization in Beginning Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Kenneth R.; Landi, Nicole; Preston, Jonathan L.; Mencl, W. Einar; Austin, Alison C.; Sibley, Daragh; Fulbright, Robert K.; Seidenberg, Mark S.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Constable, R. Todd; Molfese, Peter; Frost, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We employed brain-behavior analyses to explore the relationship between performance on tasks measuring phonological awareness, pseudoword decoding, and rapid auditory processing (all predictors of reading (dis)ability) and brain organization for print and speech in beginning readers. For print-related activation, we observed a shared set of…

  10. Comparison of temporal properties of auditory single units in response to cochlear infrared laser stimulation recorded with multi-channel and single tungsten electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaodong; Xia, Nan; Young, Hunter; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-02-01

    Auditory prostheses may benefit from Infrared Neural Stimulation (INS) because optical stimulation allows for spatially selective activation of neuron populations. Selective activation of neurons in the cochlear spiral ganglion can be determined in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) because the tonotopic organization of frequencies in the cochlea is maintained throughout the auditory pathway. The activation profile of INS is well represented in the ICC by multichannel electrodes (MCEs). To characterize single unit properties in response to INS, however, single tungsten electrodes (STEs) should be used because of its better signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, we compared the temporal properties of ICC single units recorded with MCEs and STEs in order to characterize the response properties of single auditory neurons in response to INS in guinea pigs. The length along the cochlea stimulated with infrared radiation corresponded to a frequency range of about 0.6 octaves, similar to that recorded with STEs. The temporal properties of single units recorded with MCEs showed higher maximum rates, shorter latencies, and higher firing efficiencies compared to those recorded with STEs. When the preset amplitude threshold for triggering MCE recordings was raised to twice over the noise level, the temporal properties of the single units became similar to those obtained with STEs. Undistinguishable neural activities from multiple sources in MCE recordings could be responsible for the response property difference between MCEs and STEs. Thus, caution should be taken in single unit recordings with MCEs.

  11. A multi-channel telemetry system for brain microstimulation in freely roaming animals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaohua; Talwar, Sanjiv K; Hawley, Emerson S; Li, Lei; Chapin, John K

    2004-02-15

    A system is described that enables an experimenter to remotely deliver electrical pulse train stimuli to multiple different locations in the brains of freely moving rats. The system consists of two separate components: a transmitter base station that is controlled by a PC operator, and a receiver-microprocessor integrated pack worn on the back of the animals and which connects to suitably implanted brain locations. The backpack is small and light so that small animal subjects can easily carry it. Under remote command from the PC the backpack can be configured to provide biphasic pulse trains of arbitrarily specified parameters. A feature of the system is that it generates precise brain-stimulation behavioral effects using the direct constant-voltage TTL output of the backpack microprocessor. The system performs with high fidelity even in complex environments over a distance of about 300 m. Rat self-stimulation tests showed that this system produced the same behavioral responses as a conventional constant-current stimulator. This system enables a variety of multi-channel brain stimulation experiments in freely moving animals. We have employed it to develop a new animal behavior model ("virtual" conditioning) for the neurophysiological study of spatial learning, in which a rat can be accurately guided to navigate various terrains. PMID:14757345

  12. Multichannel biomagnetic system for study of electrical activity in the brain and heart.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S; Hoenig, E; Reichenberger, H; Abraham-Fuchs, K; Moshage, W; Oppelt, A; Stefan, H; Weikl, A; Wirth, A

    1990-09-01

    The authors designed a multichannel system for noninvasive measurement of the extremely weak magnetic fields generated by the brain and the heart. It uses a flat array of 37 superconducting magnetic field-sensing coils connected to sophisticated superconducting quantum interference devices. To prevent interference from external electromagnetic fields, the system is operated inside a shielded room. Complete sets of coherent data, even from spontaneous events, can be recorded. System performance was evaluated with phantom measurements and evoked-response studies. A spatial resolution of a few millimeters and a temporal resolution of a millisecond were obtained. First results in patients with partial epilepsy and investigations of the cardiac conductive pathway indicate that biomagnetism is now ready for a systematic clinical evaluation. Interpretation of measurements was facilitated by highlighting biomagnetically localized electrical activity in three-dimensional digital magnetic resonance images. PMID:2389043

  13. Auditory motion in the sighted and blind: Early visual deprivation triggers a large-scale imbalance between auditory and "visual" brain regions.

    PubMed

    Dormal, Giulia; Rezk, Mohamed; Yakobov, Esther; Lepore, Franco; Collignon, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    How early blindness reorganizes the brain circuitry that supports auditory motion processing remains controversial. We used fMRI to characterize brain responses to in-depth, laterally moving, and static sounds in early blind and sighted individuals. Whole-brain univariate analyses revealed that the right posterior middle temporal gyrus and superior occipital gyrus selectively responded to both in-depth and laterally moving sounds only in the blind. These regions overlapped with regions selective for visual motion (hMT+/V5 and V3A) that were independently localized in the sighted. In the early blind, the right planum temporale showed enhanced functional connectivity with right occipito-temporal regions during auditory motion processing and a concomitant reduced functional connectivity with parietal and frontal regions. Whole-brain searchlight multivariate analyses demonstrated higher auditory motion decoding in the right posterior middle temporal gyrus in the blind compared to the sighted, while decoding accuracy was enhanced in the auditory cortex bilaterally in the sighted compared to the blind. Analyses targeting individually defined visual area hMT+/V5 however indicated that auditory motion information could be reliably decoded within this area even in the sighted group. Taken together, the present findings demonstrate that early visual deprivation triggers a large-scale imbalance between auditory and "visual" brain regions that typically support the processing of motion information. PMID:27107468

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Berns, Gregory S.; Cook, Peter F.; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L.; Marino, Lori

    2015-01-01

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of ‘associative′ regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging of dolphin brains reveals direct auditory pathway to temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Berns, Gregory S; Cook, Peter F; Foxley, Sean; Jbabdi, Saad; Miller, Karla L; Marino, Lori

    2015-07-22

    The brains of odontocetes (toothed whales) look grossly different from their terrestrial relatives. Because of their adaptation to the aquatic environment and their reliance on echolocation, the odontocetes' auditory system is both unique and crucial to their survival. Yet, scant data exist about the functional organization of the cetacean auditory system. A predominant hypothesis is that the primary auditory cortex lies in the suprasylvian gyrus along the vertex of the hemispheres, with this position induced by expansion of 'associative' regions in lateral and caudal directions. However, the precise location of the auditory cortex and its connections are still unknown. Here, we used a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) sequence in archival post-mortem brains of a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) and a pantropical dolphin (Stenella attenuata) to map their sensory and motor systems. Using thalamic parcellation based on traditionally defined regions for the primary visual (V1) and auditory cortex (A1), we found distinct regions of the thalamus connected to V1 and A1. But in addition to suprasylvian-A1, we report here, for the first time, the auditory cortex also exists in the temporal lobe, in a region near cetacean-A2 and possibly analogous to the primary auditory cortex in related terrestrial mammals (Artiodactyla). Using probabilistic tract tracing, we found a direct pathway from the inferior colliculus to the medial geniculate nucleus to the temporal lobe near the sylvian fissure. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of post-mortem DTI in archival specimens to answer basic questions in comparative neurobiology in a way that has not previously been possible and shows a link between the cetacean auditory system and those of terrestrial mammals. Given that fresh cetacean specimens are relatively rare, the ability to measure connectivity in archival specimens opens up a plethora of possibilities for investigating neuroanatomy in cetaceans and other species

  16. Brain region-specific activity patterns after recent or remote memory retrieval of auditory conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Jhang, Jinho; Kim, Hyung-Su; Lee, Sujin; Han, Jin-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Memory is thought to be sparsely encoded throughout multiple brain regions forming unique memory trace. Although evidence has established that the amygdala is a key brain site for memory storage and retrieval of auditory conditioned fear memory, it remains elusive whether the auditory brain regions may be involved in fear memory storage or retrieval. To investigate this possibility, we systematically imaged the brain activity patterns in the lateral amygdala, MGm/PIN, and AuV/TeA using activity-dependent induction of immediate early gene zif268 after recent and remote memory retrieval of auditory conditioned fear. Consistent with the critical role of the amygdala in fear memory, the zif268 activity in the lateral amygdala was significantly increased after both recent and remote memory retrieval. Interesting, however, the density of zif268 (+) neurons in both MGm/PIN and AuV/TeA, particularly in layers IV and VI, was increased only after remote but not recent fear memory retrieval compared to control groups. Further analysis of zif268 signals in AuV/TeA revealed that conditioned tone induced stronger zif268 induction compared to familiar tone in each individual zif268 (+) neuron after recent memory retrieval. Taken together, our results support that the lateral amygdala is a key brain site for permanent fear memory storage and suggest that MGm/PIN and AuV/TeA might play a role for remote memory storage or retrieval of auditory conditioned fear, or, alternatively, that these auditory brain regions might have a different way of processing for familiar or conditioned tone information at recent and remote time phases. PMID:22993170

  17. The SRI24 Multi-Channel Brain Atlas: Construction and Applications.

    PubMed

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2008-01-01

    We present a new standard atlas of the human brain based on magnetic resonance images. The atlas was generated using unbiased population registration from high-resolution images obtained by multichannel-coil acquisition at 3T in a group of 24 normal subjects. The final atlas comprises three anatomical channels (T(1)-weighted, early and late spin echo), three diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, diffusion-weighted image), and three tissue probability maps (CSF, gray matter, white matter). The atlas is dynamic in that it is implicitly represented by nonrigid transformations between the 24 subject images, as well as distortion-correction alignments between the image channels in each subject. The atlas can, therefore, be generated at essentially arbitrary image resolutions and orientations (e.g., AC/PC aligned), without compounding interpolation artifacts. We demonstrate in this paper two different applications of the atlas: (a) region definition by label propagation in a fiber tracking study is enabled by the increased sharpness of our atlas compared with other available atlases, and (b) spatial normalization is enabled by its average shape property. In summary, our atlas has unique features and will be made available to the scientific community as a resource and reference system for future imaging-based studies of the human brain. PMID:19183706

  18. Non-local Atlas-guided Multi-channel Forest Learning for Human Brain Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guangkai; Gao, Yaozong; Wu, Guorong; Wu, Ligang; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    Labeling MR brain images into anatomically meaningful regions is important in many quantitative brain researches. In many existing label fusion methods, appearance information is widely used. Meanwhile, recent progress in computer vision suggests that the context feature is very useful in identifying an object from a complex scene. In light of this, we propose a novel learning-based label fusion method by using both low-level appearance features (computed from the target image) and high-level context features (computed from warped atlases or tentative labeling maps of the target image). In particular, we employ a multi-channel random forest to learn the nonlinear relationship between these hybrid features and the target labels (i.e., corresponding to certain anatomical structures). Moreover, to accommodate the high inter-subject variations, we further extend our learning-based label fusion to a multi-atlas scenario, i.e., we train a random forest for each atlas and then obtain the final labeling result according to the consensus of all atlases. We have comprehensively evaluated our method on both LONI-LBPA40 and IXI datasets, and achieved the highest labeling accuracy, compared to the state-of-the-art methods in the literature. PMID:26942235

  19. Multi-channel linear descriptors for event-related EEG collected in brain computer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xiao-mei; Zheng, Chong-xun; Xu, Jin; Bin, Guang-yu; Wang, Hong-wu

    2006-03-01

    By three multi-channel linear descriptors, i.e. spatial complexity (Ω), field power (Σ) and frequency of field changes (Φ), event-related EEG data within 8-30 Hz were investigated during imagination of left or right hand movement. Studies on the event-related EEG data indicate that a two-channel version of Ω, Σ and Φ could reflect the antagonistic ERD/ERS patterns over contralateral and ipsilateral areas and also characterize different phases of the changing brain states in the event-related paradigm. Based on the selective two-channel linear descriptors, the left and right hand motor imagery tasks are classified to obtain satisfactory results, which testify the validity of the three linear descriptors Ω, Σ and Φ for characterizing event-related EEG. The preliminary results show that Ω, Σ together with Φ have good separability for left and right hand motor imagery tasks, which could be considered for classification of two classes of EEG patterns in the application of brain computer interfaces.

  20. [New method for the clinical study of the auditory pathway in the brainstem and cerebral primary and secondary auditory cortex using averaged auditory brain mapping for 15 seconds after sound stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ried Undurraga, E; Ried Goycoolea, E; Cristian Martínez, T

    1999-01-01

    A practical new method for the clinical examination of the auditory pathway from the ear to the brain is presented. Averaging of 4000 stimuli produces a graphic image of evoked potentials in the brainstem and both cerebral hemispheres. We report the results of examination with this new method in 60 normal ears of 30 healthy young people to determine the normal pattern of cerebral processing of evoked auditory signals 5 to 15 milliseconds after stimulating the ear. It is concluded that the examination is useful for studying auditory signal processing in the brain. It also demonstrated that the primary and secondary auditory cortexes are not the destination of the auditory pathway, but relay stations. PMID:10491469

  1. Turning down the noise: the benefit of musical training on the aging auditory brain.

    PubMed

    Alain, Claude; Zendel, Benjamin Rich; Hutka, Stefanie; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2014-02-01

    Age-related decline in hearing abilities is a ubiquitous part of aging, and commonly impacts speech understanding, especially when there are competing sound sources. While such age effects are partially due to changes within the cochlea, difficulties typically exist beyond measurable hearing loss, suggesting that central brain processes, as opposed to simple peripheral mechanisms (e.g., hearing sensitivity), play a critical role in governing hearing abilities late into life. Current training regimens aimed to improve central auditory processing abilities have experienced limited success in promoting listening benefits. Interestingly, recent studies suggest that in young adults, musical training positively modifies neural mechanisms, providing robust, long-lasting improvements to hearing abilities as well as to non-auditory tasks that engage cognitive control. These results offer the encouraging possibility that musical training might be used to counteract age-related changes in auditory cognition commonly observed in older adults. Here, we reviewed studies that have examined the effects of age and musical experience on auditory cognition with an emphasis on auditory scene analysis. We infer that musical training may offer potential benefits to complex listening and might be utilized as a means to delay or even attenuate declines in auditory perception and cognition that often emerge later in life. PMID:23831039

  2. A blueprint for vocal learning: auditory predispositions from brains to genomes.

    PubMed

    Wheatcroft, David; Qvarnström, Anna

    2015-08-01

    Memorizing and producing complex strings of sound are requirements for spoken human language. We share these behaviours with likely more than 4000 species of songbirds, making birds our primary model for studying the cognitive basis of vocal learning and, more generally, an important model for how memories are encoded in the brain. In songbirds, as in humans, the sounds that a juvenile learns later in life depend on auditory memories formed early in development. Experiments on a wide variety of songbird species suggest that the formation and lability of these auditory memories, in turn, depend on auditory predispositions that stimulate learning when a juvenile hears relevant, species-typical sounds. We review evidence that variation in key features of these auditory predispositions are determined by variation in genes underlying the development of the auditory system. We argue that increased investigation of the neuronal basis of auditory predispositions expressed early in life in combination with modern comparative genomic approaches may provide insights into the evolution of vocal learning. PMID:26246333

  3. A blueprint for vocal learning: auditory predispositions from brains to genomes

    PubMed Central

    Wheatcroft, David; Qvarnström, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Memorizing and producing complex strings of sound are requirements for spoken human language. We share these behaviours with likely more than 4000 species of songbirds, making birds our primary model for studying the cognitive basis of vocal learning and, more generally, an important model for how memories are encoded in the brain. In songbirds, as in humans, the sounds that a juvenile learns later in life depend on auditory memories formed early in development. Experiments on a wide variety of songbird species suggest that the formation and lability of these auditory memories, in turn, depend on auditory predispositions that stimulate learning when a juvenile hears relevant, species-typical sounds. We review evidence that variation in key features of these auditory predispositions are determined by variation in genes underlying the development of the auditory system. We argue that increased investigation of the neuronal basis of auditory predispositions expressed early in life in combination with modern comparative genomic approaches may provide insights into the evolution of vocal learning. PMID:26246333

  4. Auditory-musical processing in autism spectrum disorders: a review of behavioral and brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, Tia; Foster, Nicholas E V; Tryfon, Ana; Hyde, Krista L

    2012-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental condition characterized by atypical social and communication skills, repetitive behaviors, and atypical visual and auditory perception. Studies in vision have reported enhanced detailed ("local") processing but diminished holistic ("global") processing of visual features in ASD. Individuals with ASD also show enhanced processing of simple visual stimuli but diminished processing of complex visual stimuli. Relative to the visual domain, auditory global-local distinctions, and the effects of stimulus complexity on auditory processing in ASD, are less clear. However, one remarkable finding is that many individuals with ASD have enhanced musical abilities, such as superior pitch processing. This review provides a critical evaluation of behavioral and brain imaging studies of auditory processing with respect to current theories in ASD. We have focused on auditory-musical processing in terms of global versus local processing and simple versus complex sound processing. This review contributes to a better understanding of auditory processing differences in ASD. A deeper comprehension of sensory perception in ASD is key to better defining ASD phenotypes and, in turn, may lead to better interventions. PMID:22524375

  5. BabySQUID: A mobile, high-resolution multichannel magnetoencephalography system for neonatal brain assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoshio; Pratt, Kevin; Atwood, Christopher; Mascarenas, Anthony; Reineman, Richard; Nurminen, Jussi; Paulson, Douglas

    2006-02-01

    We developed a prototype of a mobile, high-resolution, multichannel magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, called babySQUID, for assessing brain functions in newborns and infants. Unlike electroencephalography, MEG signals are not distorted by the scalp or the fontanels and sutures in the skull. Thus, brain activity can be measured and localized with MEG as if the sensors were above an exposed brain. The babySQUID is housed in a moveable cart small enough to be transported from one room to another. To assess brain functions, one places the baby on the bed of the cart and the head on its headrest with MEG sensors just below. The sensor array consists of 76 first-order axial gradiometers, each with a pickup coil diameter of 6mm and a baseline of 30mm, in a high-density array with a spacing of 12-14mm center-to-center. The pickup coils are 6±1mm below the outer surface of the headrest. The short gap provides unprecedented sensitivity since the scalp and skull are thin (as little as 3-4mm altogether) in babies. In an electromagnetically unshielded room in a hospital, the field sensitivity at 1kHz was ˜17fT/√Hz. The noise was reduced from ˜400to200fT/√Hz at 1Hz using a reference cancellation technique and further to ˜40fT/√Hz using a gradient common mode rejection technique. Although the residual environmental magnetic noise interfered with the operation of the babySQUID, the instrument functioned sufficiently well to detect spontaneous brain signals from babies with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of as much as 7.6:1. In a magnetically shielded room, the field sensitivity was 17fT/√Hz at 20Hz and 30fT/√Hz at 1Hz without implementation of reference or gradient cancellation. The sensitivity was sufficiently high to detect spontaneous brain activity from a 7month old baby with a SNR as much as 40:1 and evoked somatosensory responses with a 50Hz bandwidth after as little as four averages. We expect that both the noise and the sensor gap can be reduced further by

  6. Multichannel brain recordings in behaving Drosophila reveal oscillatory activity and local coherence in response to sensory stimulation and circuit activation

    PubMed Central

    Paulk, Angelique C.; Zhou, Yanqiong; Stratton, Peter; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Neural networks in vertebrates exhibit endogenous oscillations that have been associated with functions ranging from sensory processing to locomotion. It remains unclear whether oscillations may play a similar role in the insect brain. We describe a novel “whole brain” readout for Drosophila melanogaster using a simple multichannel recording preparation to study electrical activity across the brain of flies exposed to different sensory stimuli. We recorded local field potential (LFP) activity from >2,000 registered recording sites across the fly brain in >200 wild-type and transgenic animals to uncover specific LFP frequency bands that correlate with: 1) brain region; 2) sensory modality (olfactory, visual, or mechanosensory); and 3) activity in specific neural circuits. We found endogenous and stimulus-specific oscillations throughout the fly brain. Central (higher-order) brain regions exhibited sensory modality-specific increases in power within narrow frequency bands. Conversely, in sensory brain regions such as the optic or antennal lobes, LFP coherence, rather than power, best defined sensory responses across modalities. By transiently activating specific circuits via expression of TrpA1, we found that several circuits in the fly brain modulate LFP power and coherence across brain regions and frequency domains. However, activation of a neuromodulatory octopaminergic circuit specifically increased neuronal coherence in the optic lobes during visual stimulation while decreasing coherence in central brain regions. Our multichannel recording and brain registration approach provides an effective way to track activity simultaneously across the fly brain in vivo, allowing investigation of functional roles for oscillations in processing sensory stimuli and modulating behavior. PMID:23864378

  7. Auditory evoked responses in musicians during passive vowel listening are modulated by functional connectivity between bilateral auditory-related brain regions.

    PubMed

    Kühnis, Jürg; Elmer, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-12-01

    Currently, there is striking evidence showing that professional musical training can substantially alter the response properties of auditory-related cortical fields. Such plastic changes have previously been shown not only to abet the processing of musical sounds, but likewise spectral and temporal aspects of speech. Therefore, here we used the EEG technique and measured a sample of musicians and nonmusicians while the participants were passively exposed to artificial vowels in the context of an oddball paradigm. Thereby, we evaluated whether increased intracerebral functional connectivity between bilateral auditory-related brain regions may promote sensory specialization in musicians, as reflected by altered cortical N1 and P2 responses. This assumption builds on the reasoning that sensory specialization is dependent, at least in part, on the amount of synchronization between the two auditory-related cortices. Results clearly revealed that auditory-evoked N1 responses were shaped by musical expertise. In addition, in line with our reasoning musicians showed an overall increased intracerebral functional connectivity (as indexed by lagged phase synchronization) in theta, alpha, and beta bands. Finally, within-group correlative analyses indicated a relationship between intracerebral beta band connectivity and cortical N1 responses, however only within the musicians' group. Taken together, we provide first electrophysiological evidence for a relationship between musical expertise, auditory-evoked brain responses, and intracerebral functional connectivity among auditory-related brain regions. PMID:24893742

  8. Auditory information processing during human sleep as revealed by event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Atienza, M; Cantero, J L; Escera, C

    2001-11-01

    The main goal of this review is to elucidate up to what extent pre-attentive auditory information processing is affected during human sleep. Evidence from event-related brain potential (ERP) studies indicates that auditory information processing is selectively affected, even at early phases, across the different stages of sleep-wakefulness continuum. According to these studies, 3 main conclusions are drawn: (1) the sleeping brain is able to automatically detect stimulus occurrence and trigger an orienting response towards that stimulus if its degree of novelty is large; (2) auditory stimuli are represented in the auditory system and maintained for a period of time in sensory memory, making the automatic-change detection during sleep possible; and (3) there are specific brain mechanisms (sleep-specific ERP components associated with the presence of vertex waves and K-complexes) by which information processing can be improved during non-rapid eye movement sleep. However, the remarkably affected amplitude and latency of the waking-ERPs during the different stages of sleep suggests deficits in the building and maintenance of a neural representation of the stimulus as well as in the process by which neural events lead to an orienting response toward such a stimulus. The deactivation of areas in the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex during sleep contributing to the generation of these ERP components is hypothesized to be one of the main causes for the attenuated amplitude of these ERPs during human sleep. PMID:11682341

  9. Nonlocal atlas-guided multi-channel forest learning for human brain labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guangkai; Gao, Yaozong; Wu, Guorong; Wu, Ligang; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It is important for many quantitative brain studies to label meaningful anatomical regions in MR brain images. However, due to high complexity of brain structures and ambiguous boundaries between different anatomical regions, the anatomical labeling of MR brain images is still quite a challenging task. In many existing label fusion methods, appearance information is widely used. However, since local anatomy in the human brain is often complex, the appearance information alone is limited in characterizing each image point, especially for identifying the same anatomical structure across different subjects. Recent progress in computer vision suggests that the context features can be very useful in identifying an object from a complex scene. In light of this, the authors propose a novel learning-based label fusion method by using both low-level appearance features (computed from the target image) and high-level context features (computed from warped atlases or tentative labeling maps of the target image). Methods: In particular, the authors employ a multi-channel random forest to learn the nonlinear relationship between these hybrid features and target labels (i.e., corresponding to certain anatomical structures). Specifically, at each of the iterations, the random forest will output tentative labeling maps of the target image, from which the authors compute spatial label context features and then use in combination with original appearance features of the target image to refine the labeling. Moreover, to accommodate the high inter-subject variations, the authors further extend their learning-based label fusion to a multi-atlas scenario, i.e., they train a random forest for each atlas and then obtain the final labeling result according to the consensus of results from all atlases. Results: The authors have comprehensively evaluated their method on both public LONI_LBPA40 and IXI datasets. To quantitatively evaluate the labeling accuracy, the authors use the

  10. Brain activity during auditory and visual phonological, spatial and simple discrimination tasks.

    PubMed

    Salo, Emma; Rinne, Teemu; Salonen, Oili; Alho, Kimmo

    2013-02-16

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure human brain activity during tasks demanding selective attention to auditory or visual stimuli delivered in concurrent streams. Auditory stimuli were syllables spoken by different voices and occurring in central or peripheral space. Visual stimuli were centrally or more peripherally presented letters in darker or lighter fonts. The participants performed a phonological, spatial or "simple" (speaker-gender or font-shade) discrimination task in either modality. Within each modality, we expected a clear distinction between brain activations related to nonspatial and spatial processing, as reported in previous studies. However, within each modality, different tasks activated largely overlapping areas in modality-specific (auditory and visual) cortices, as well as in the parietal and frontal brain regions. These overlaps may be due to effects of attention common for all three tasks within each modality or interaction of processing task-relevant features and varying task-irrelevant features in the attended-modality stimuli. Nevertheless, brain activations caused by auditory and visual phonological tasks overlapped in the left mid-lateral prefrontal cortex, while those caused by the auditory and visual spatial tasks overlapped in the inferior parietal cortex. These overlapping activations reveal areas of multimodal phonological and spatial processing. There was also some evidence for intermodal attention-related interaction. Most importantly, activity in the superior temporal sulcus elicited by unattended speech sounds was attenuated during the visual phonological task in comparison with the other visual tasks. This effect might be related to suppression of processing irrelevant speech presumably distracting the phonological task involving the letters. PMID:23261663

  11. Coding space-time stimulus dynamics in auditory brain maps

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunyan; Gutfreund, Yoram; Peña, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Sensory maps are often distorted representations of the environment, where ethologically-important ranges are magnified. The implication of a biased representation extends beyond increased acuity for having more neurons dedicated to a certain range. Because neurons are functionally interconnected, non-uniform representations influence the processing of high-order features that rely on comparison across areas of the map. Among these features are time-dependent changes of the auditory scene generated by moving objects. How sensory representation affects high order processing can be approached in the map of auditory space of the owl's midbrain, where locations in the front are over-represented. In this map, neurons are selective not only to location but also to location over time. The tuning to space over time leads to direction selectivity, which is also topographically organized. Across the population, neurons tuned to peripheral space are more selective to sounds moving into the front. The distribution of direction selectivity can be explained by spatial and temporal integration on the non-uniform map of space. Thus, the representation of space can induce biased computation of a second-order stimulus feature. This phenomenon is likely observed in other sensory maps and may be relevant for behavior. PMID:24782781

  12. Brain Network Interactions in Auditory, Visual and Linguistic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Barry; Braun, Allen R.

    2004-01-01

    In the paper, we discuss the importance of network interactions between brain regions in mediating performance of sensorimotor and cognitive tasks, including those associated with language processing. Functional neuroimaging, especially PET and fMRI, provide data that are obtained essentially simultaneously from much of the brain, and thus are…

  13. The relationship between phonological and auditory processing and brain organization in beginning readers

    PubMed Central

    PUGH, Kenneth R.; LANDI, Nicole; PRESTON, Jonathan L.; MENCL, W. Einar; AUSTIN, Alison C.; SIBLEY, Daragh; FULBRIGHT, Robert K.; SEIDENBERG, Mark S.; GRIGORENKO, Elena L.; CONSTABLE, R. Todd; MOLFESE, Peter; FROST, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We employed brain-behavior analyses to explore the relationship between performance on tasks measuring phonological awareness, pseudoword decoding, and rapid auditory processing (all predictors of reading (dis)ability) and brain organization for print and speech in beginning readers. For print-related activation, we observed a shared set of skill-correlated regions, including left hemisphere temporoparietal and occipitotemporal sites, as well as inferior frontal, visual, visual attention, and subcortical components. For speech-related activation, shared variance among reading skill measures was most prominently correlated with activation in left hemisphere inferior frontal gyrus and precuneus. Implications for brain-based models of literacy acquisition are discussed. PMID:22572517

  14. Neurogenesis in the brain auditory pathway of a marsupial, the northern native cat (Dasyurus hallucatus)

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkin, L.; Nelson, J.; Farrington, M.; Swann, S. )

    1991-07-08

    Neurogenesis in the auditory pathway of the marsupial Dasyurus hallucatus was studied. Intraperitoneal injections of tritiated thymidine (20-40 microCi) were made into pouch-young varying from 1 to 56 days pouch-life. Animals were killed as adults and brain sections were prepared for autoradiography and counterstained with a Nissl stain. Neurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus were generated prior to 3 days pouch-life, in the superior olive at 5-7 days, and in the dorsal cochlear nucleus over a prolonged period. Inferior collicular neurogenesis lagged behind that in the medial geniculate, the latter taking place between days 3 and 9 and the former between days 7 and 22. Neurogenesis began in the auditory cortex on day 9 and was completed by about day 42. Thus neurogenesis was complete in the medullary auditory nuclei before that in the midbrain commenced, and in the medial geniculate before that in the auditory cortex commenced. The time course of neurogenesis in the auditory pathway of the native cat was very similar to that in another marsupial, the brushtail possum. For both, neurogenesis occurred earlier than in eutherian mammals of a similar size but was more protracted.

  15. Development and modulation of intrinsic membrane properties control the temporal precision of auditory brain stem neurons.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Delwen L; Gleiss, Sarah A; Berger, Christina; Kümpfbeck, Franziska S; Ammer, Julian J; Felmy, Felix

    2015-01-15

    Passive and active membrane properties determine the voltage responses of neurons. Within the auditory brain stem, refinements in these intrinsic properties during late postnatal development usually generate short integration times and precise action-potential generation. This developmentally acquired temporal precision is crucial for auditory signal processing. How the interactions of these intrinsic properties develop in concert to enable auditory neurons to transfer information with high temporal precision has not yet been elucidated in detail. Here, we show how the developmental interaction of intrinsic membrane parameters generates high firing precision. We performed in vitro recordings from neurons of postnatal days 9-28 in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of Mongolian gerbils, an auditory brain stem structure that converts excitatory to inhibitory information with high temporal precision. During this developmental period, the input resistance and capacitance decrease, and action potentials acquire faster kinetics and enhanced precision. Depending on the stimulation time course, the input resistance and capacitance contribute differentially to action-potential thresholds. The decrease in input resistance, however, is sufficient to explain the enhanced action-potential precision. Alterations in passive membrane properties also interact with a developmental change in potassium currents to generate the emergence of the mature firing pattern, characteristic of coincidence-detector neurons. Cholinergic receptor-mediated depolarizations further modulate this intrinsic excitability profile by eliciting changes in the threshold and firing pattern, irrespective of the developmental stage. Thus our findings reveal how intrinsic membrane properties interact developmentally to promote temporally precise information processing. PMID:25355963

  16. Localized Brain Activation Related to the Strength of Auditory Learning in a Parrot

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Masanori; Matsuda, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Hiro-Aki; Satoh, Ryohei; Watanabe, Aiko; Zandbergen, Matthijs A.; Manabe, Kazuchika; Kawashima, Takashi; Bolhuis, Johan J.

    2012-01-01

    Parrots and songbirds learn their vocalizations from a conspecific tutor, much like human infants acquire spoken language. Parrots can learn human words and it has been suggested that they can use them to communicate with humans. The caudomedial pallium in the parrot brain is homologous with that of songbirds, and analogous to the human auditory association cortex, involved in speech processing. Here we investigated neuronal activation, measured as expression of the protein product of the immediate early gene ZENK, in relation to auditory learning in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus), a parrot. Budgerigar males successfully learned to discriminate two Japanese words spoken by another male conspecific. Re-exposure to the two discriminanda led to increased neuronal activation in the caudomedial pallium, but not in the hippocampus, compared to untrained birds that were exposed to the same words, or were not exposed to words. Neuronal activation in the caudomedial pallium of the experimental birds was correlated significantly and positively with the percentage of correct responses in the discrimination task. These results suggest that in a parrot, the caudomedial pallium is involved in auditory learning. Thus, in parrots, songbirds and humans, analogous brain regions may contain the neural substrate for auditory learning and memory. PMID:22701714

  17. Inconsistencies in the correlation between loss of brain stem auditory evoked response waves and postoperative deafness.

    PubMed

    Mustain, W D; al-Mefty, O; Anand, V K

    1992-07-01

    This case underscores the difficulty of predicting postoperative hearing status from brain stem auditory evoked response (BAER) monitoring when wave I is preserved and all later waves are lost. During an operation involving the base of the skull, sudden and irreversible loss of all BAER waves beyond wave I occurred unilaterally. Wave I was preserved, with reduced amplitude and minimal latency shift. There was no permanent postoperative hearing sensitivity loss or speech discrimination loss. PMID:1494930

  18. Brain stem auditory evoked responses in human infants and adults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecox, K.; Galambos, R.

    1974-01-01

    Brain stem evoked potentials were recorded by conventional scalp electrodes in infants (3 weeks to 3 years of age) and adults. The latency of one of the major response components (wave V) is shown to be a function both of click intensity and the age of the subject; this latency at a given signal strength shortens postnatally to reach the adult value (about 6 msec) by 12 to 18 months of age. The demonstrated reliability and limited variability of these brain stem electrophysiological responses provide the basis for an optimistic estimate of their usefulness as an objective method for assessing hearing in infants and adults.

  19. Endogenous Delta/Theta Sound-Brain Phase Entrainment Accelerates the Buildup of Auditory Streaming.

    PubMed

    Riecke, Lars; Sack, Alexander T; Schroeder, Charles E

    2015-12-21

    In many natural listening situations, meaningful sounds (e.g., speech) fluctuate in slow rhythms among other sounds. When a slow rhythmic auditory stream is selectively attended, endogenous delta (1‒4 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex may shift their timing so that higher-excitability neuronal phases become aligned with salient events in that stream [1, 2]. As a consequence of this stream-brain phase entrainment [3], these events are processed and perceived more readily than temporally non-overlapping events [4-11], essentially enhancing the neural segregation between the attended stream and temporally noncoherent streams [12]. Stream-brain phase entrainment is robust to acoustic interference [13-20] provided that target stream-evoked rhythmic activity can be segregated from noncoherent activity evoked by other sounds [21], a process that usually builds up over time [22-27]. However, it has remained unclear whether stream-brain phase entrainment functionally contributes to this buildup of rhythmic streams or whether it is merely an epiphenomenon of it. Here, we addressed this issue directly by experimentally manipulating endogenous stream-brain phase entrainment in human auditory cortex with non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (TACS) [28-30]. We assessed the consequences of these manipulations on the perceptual buildup of the target stream (the time required to recognize its presence in a noisy background), using behavioral measures in 20 healthy listeners performing a naturalistic listening task. Experimentally induced cyclic 4-Hz variations in stream-brain phase entrainment reliably caused a cyclic 4-Hz pattern in perceptual buildup time. Our findings demonstrate that strong endogenous delta/theta stream-brain phase entrainment accelerates the perceptual emergence of task-relevant rhythmic streams in noisy environments. PMID:26628008

  20. The SRI24 Multi-Channel Atlas of Normal Adult Human Brain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M.; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the SRI24 atlas, a new standard reference system of normal human brain anatomy, that was created using template-free population registration of high-resolution magnetic resonance images acquired at 3T in a group of 24 normal control subjects. The atlas comprises anatomical channels (T1, T2, and proton density weighted), diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, longitudinal diffusivity, mean diffusion-weighted image), tissue channels (CSF probability, gray matter probability, white matter probability, tissue labels), and two cortical parcellation maps. The SRI24 atlas enables multi-channel atlas-to-subject image registration. It is uniquely versatile in that it is equally suited for the two fundamentally different atlas applications: label propagation and spatial normalization. Label propagation, herein demonstrated using DTI fiber tracking, is enabled by the increased sharpness of the SRI24 atlas compared with other available atlases. Spatial normalization, herein demonstrated using data from a young-old group comparison study, is enabled by its unbiased average population shape property. For both propagation and normalization, we also report the results of quantitative comparisons with seven other published atlases: Colin27, MNI152, ICBM452 (warp5 and air12), and LPBA40 (SPM5, FLIRT, AIR). Our results suggest that the SRI24 atlas, although based on 3T MR data, allows equally accurate spatial normalization of data acquired at 1.5T as the comparison atlases, all of which are based on 1.5T data. Furthermore, the SRI24 atlas is as suitable for label propagation as the comparison atlases and detailed enough to allow delineation of anatomical structures for this purpose directly in the atlas. PMID:20017133

  1. The SRI24 multichannel atlas of normal adult human brain structure.

    PubMed

    Rohlfing, Torsten; Zahr, Natalie M; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2010-05-01

    This article describes the SRI24 atlas, a new standard reference system of normal human brain anatomy, that was created using template-free population registration of high-resolution magnetic resonance images acquired at 3T in a group of 24 normal control subjects. The atlas comprises anatomical channels (T1, T2, and proton density weighted), diffusion-related channels (fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, longitudinal diffusivity, mean diffusion-weighted image), tissue channels (CSF probability, gray matter probability, white matter probability, tissue labels), and two cortical parcellation maps. The SRI24 atlas enables multichannel atlas-to-subject image registration. It is uniquely versatile in that it is equally suited for the two fundamentally different atlas applications: label propagation and spatial normalization. Label propagation, herein demonstrated using diffusion tensor image fiber tracking, is enabled by the increased sharpness of the SRI24 atlas compared with other available atlases. Spatial normalization, herein demonstrated using data from a young-old group comparison study, is enabled by its unbiased average population shape property. For both propagation and normalization, we also report the results of quantitative comparisons with seven other published atlases: Colin27, MNI152, ICBM452 (warp5 and air12), and LPBA40 (SPM5, FLIRT, AIR). Our results suggest that the SRI24 atlas, although based on 3T MR data, allows equally accurate spatial normalization of data acquired at 1.5T as the comparison atlases, all of which are based on 1.5T data. Furthermore, the SRI24 atlas is as suitable for label propagation as the comparison atlases and detailed enough to allow delineation of anatomical structures for this purpose directly in the atlas. PMID:20017133

  2. Can an auditory illusion trick the brain into turning down tinnitus?

    PubMed

    Fletcher, M D; Wiggins, I M

    2014-07-01

    Tinnitus, the phantom perception of sound with no external source, affects an estimated 10-15% of the adult population. Current treatments for this oftentimes distressing condition are of limited effectiveness. The "central gain" model proposes that tinnitus arises from an increase in the responsiveness, or gain, of neurons in central auditory pathways, triggered by damage to the auditory periphery. It has been suggested that tinnitus might be treated by compensating for the peripheral damage, thereby restoring normal levels of input to the central pathways, and hence reducing central gain. Unfortunately, when tinnitus originates with permanent damage to the auditory periphery, it may be impossible to compensate for this damage directly. However, we hypothesize that tinnitus may be treated by tricking the brain into believing that it temporarily receives normal levels of input at frequencies where peripheral damage has occurred. We identify an auditory illusion that seems capable, in principle, of achieving this objective. If effective, this approach would offer a safe, accessible, and non-invasive treatment for tinnitus. PMID:24767808

  3. Can You Hear Me Now? Musical Training Shapes Functional Brain Networks for Selective Auditory Attention and Hearing Speech in Noise

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Dana L.; Kraus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Even in the quietest of rooms, our senses are perpetually inundated by a barrage of sounds, requiring the auditory system to adapt to a variety of listening conditions in order to extract signals of interest (e.g., one speaker's voice amidst others). Brain networks that promote selective attention are thought to sharpen the neural encoding of a target signal, suppressing competing sounds and enhancing perceptual performance. Here, we ask: does musical training benefit cortical mechanisms that underlie selective attention to speech? To answer this question, we assessed the impact of selective auditory attention on cortical auditory-evoked response variability in musicians and non-musicians. Outcomes indicate strengthened brain networks for selective auditory attention in musicians in that musicians but not non-musicians demonstrate decreased prefrontal response variability with auditory attention. Results are interpreted in the context of previous work documenting perceptual and subcortical advantages in musicians for the hearing and neural encoding of speech in background noise. Musicians’ neural proficiency for selectively engaging and sustaining auditory attention to language indicates a potential benefit of music for auditory training. Given the importance of auditory attention for the development and maintenance of language-related skills, musical training may aid in the prevention, habilitation, and remediation of individuals with a wide range of attention-based language, listening and learning impairments. PMID:21716636

  4. The WIN-speller: a new intuitive auditory brain-computer interface spelling application

    PubMed Central

    Kleih, Sonja C.; Herweg, Andreas; Kaufmann, Tobias; Staiger-Sälzer, Pit; Gerstner, Natascha; Kübler, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the usability of a new auditory Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) application for communication. We introduce a word based, intuitive auditory spelling paradigm the WIN-speller. In the WIN-speller letters are grouped by words, such as the word KLANG representing the letters A, G, K, L, and N. Thereby, the decoding step between perceiving a code and translating it to the stimuli it represents becomes superfluous. We tested 11 healthy volunteers and four end-users with motor impairment in the copy spelling mode. Spelling was successful with an average accuracy of 84% in the healthy sample. Three of the end-users communicated with average accuracies of 80% or higher while one user was not able to communicate reliably. Even though further evaluation is required, the WIN-speller represents a potential alternative for BCI based communication in end-users. PMID:26500476

  5. The Wellcome Prize Lecture. A map of auditory space in the mammalian brain: neural computation and development.

    PubMed

    King, A J

    1993-09-01

    The experiments described in this review have demonstrated that the SC contains a two-dimensional map of auditory space, which is synthesized within the brain using a combination of monaural and binaural localization cues. There is also an adaptive fusion of auditory and visual space in this midbrain nucleus, providing for a common access to the motor pathways that control orientation behaviour. This necessitates a highly plastic relationship between the visual and auditory systems, both during postnatal development and in adult life. Because of the independent mobility of difference sense organs, gating mechanisms are incorporated into the auditory representation to provide up-to-date information about the spatial orientation of the eyes and ears. The SC therefore provides a valuable model system for studying a number of important issues in brain function, including the neural coding of sound location, the co-ordination of spatial information between different sensory systems, and the integration of sensory signals with motor outputs. PMID:8240794

  6. Psychophysical and neural correlates of noised-induced tinnitus in animals: Intra- and inter-auditory and non-auditory brain structure studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinsheng; Luo, Hao; Pace, Edward; Li, Liang; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Tinnitus, a ringing in the ear or head without an external sound source, is a prevalent health problem. It is often associated with a number of limbic-associated disorders such as anxiety, sleep disturbance, and emotional distress. Thus, to investigate tinnitus, it is important to consider both auditory and non-auditory brain structures. This paper summarizes the psychophysical, immunocytochemical and electrophysiological evidence found in rats or hamsters with behavioral evidence of tinnitus. Behaviorally, we tested for tinnitus using a conditioned suppression/avoidance paradigm, gap detection acoustic reflex behavioral paradigm, and our newly developed conditioned licking suppression paradigm. Our new tinnitus behavioral paradigm requires relatively short baseline training, examines frequency specification of tinnitus perception, and achieves sensitive tinnitus testing at an individual level. To test for tinnitus-related anxiety and cognitive impairment, we used the elevated plus maze and Morris water maze. Our results showed that not all animals with tinnitus demonstrate anxiety and cognitive impairment. Immunocytochemically, we found that animals with tinnitus manifested increased Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in both auditory and non-auditory structures. The manner in which FLI appeared suggests that lower brainstem structures may be involved in acute tinnitus whereas the midbrain and cortex are involved in more chronic tinnitus. Meanwhile, animals with tinnitus also manifested increased FLI in non-auditory brain structures that are involved in autonomic reactions, stress, arousal and attention. Electrophysiologically, we found that rats with tinnitus developed increased spontaneous firing in the auditory cortex (AC) and amygdala (AMG), as well as intra- and inter-AC and AMG neurosynchrony, which demonstrate that tinnitus may be actively produced and maintained by the interactions between the AC and AMG. PMID:26299842

  7. Responses to Vocalizations and Auditory Controls in the Human Newborn Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cristia, Alejandrina; Minagawa, Yasuyo; Dupoux, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    In the adult brain, speech can recruit a brain network that is overlapping with, but not identical to, that involved in perceiving non-linguistic vocalizations. Using the same stimuli that had been presented to human 4-month-olds and adults, as well as adult macaques, we sought to shed light on the cortical networks engaged when human newborns process diverse vocalization types. Near infrared spectroscopy was used to register the response of 40 newborns' perisylvian regions when stimulated with speech, human and macaque emotional vocalizations, as well as auditory controls where the formant structure was destroyed but the long-term spectrum was retained. Left fronto-temporal and parietal regions were significantly activated in the comparison of stimulation versus rest, with unclear selectivity in cortical activation. These results for the newborn brain are qualitatively and quantitatively compared with previous work on newborns, older human infants, adult humans, and adult macaques reported in previous work. PMID:25517997

  8. Synchrony of auditory brain responses predicts behavioral ability to keep still in children with autism spectrum disorder: Auditory-evoked response in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yuko; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Chiaki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Remijn, Gerard B; Oi, Manabu; Munesue, Toshio; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    The auditory-evoked P1m, recorded by magnetoencephalography, reflects a central auditory processing ability in human children. One recent study revealed that asynchrony of P1m between the right and left hemispheres reflected a central auditory processing disorder (i.e., attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD) in children. However, to date, the relationship between auditory P1m right-left hemispheric synchronization and the comorbidity of hyperactivity in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is unknown. In this study, based on a previous report of an asynchrony of P1m in children with ADHD, to clarify whether the P1m right-left hemispheric synchronization is related to the symptom of hyperactivity in children with ASD, we investigated the relationship between voice-evoked P1m right-left hemispheric synchronization and hyperactivity in children with ASD. In addition to synchronization, we investigated the right-left hemispheric lateralization. Our findings failed to demonstrate significant differences in these values between ASD children with and without the symptom of hyperactivity, which was evaluated using the Autism Diagnostic Observational Schedule, Generic (ADOS-G) subscale. However, there was a significant correlation between the degrees of hemispheric synchronization and the ability to keep still during 12-minute MEG recording periods. Our results also suggested that asynchrony in the bilateral brain auditory processing system is associated with ADHD-like symptoms in children with ASD. PMID:27551667

  9. Connectivity in the human brain dissociates entropy and complexity of auditory inputs.

    PubMed

    Nastase, Samuel A; Iacovella, Vittorio; Davis, Ben; Hasson, Uri

    2015-03-01

    Complex systems are described according to two central dimensions: (a) the randomness of their output, quantified via entropy; and (b) their complexity, which reflects the organization of a system's generators. Whereas some approaches hold that complexity can be reduced to uncertainty or entropy, an axiom of complexity science is that signals with very high or very low entropy are generated by relatively non-complex systems, while complex systems typically generate outputs with entropy peaking between these two extremes. In understanding their environment, individuals would benefit from coding for both input entropy and complexity; entropy indexes uncertainty and can inform probabilistic coding strategies, whereas complexity reflects a concise and abstract representation of the underlying environmental configuration, which can serve independent purposes, e.g., as a template for generalization and rapid comparisons between environments. Using functional neuroimaging, we demonstrate that, in response to passively processed auditory inputs, functional integration patterns in the human brain track both the entropy and complexity of the auditory signal. Connectivity between several brain regions scaled monotonically with input entropy, suggesting sensitivity to uncertainty, whereas connectivity between other regions tracked entropy in a convex manner consistent with sensitivity to input complexity. These findings suggest that the human brain simultaneously tracks the uncertainty of sensory data and effectively models their environmental generators. PMID:25536493

  10. Connectivity in the human brain dissociates entropy and complexity of auditory inputs☆

    PubMed Central

    Nastase, Samuel A.; Iacovella, Vittorio; Davis, Ben; Hasson, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Complex systems are described according to two central dimensions: (a) the randomness of their output, quantified via entropy; and (b) their complexity, which reflects the organization of a system's generators. Whereas some approaches hold that complexity can be reduced to uncertainty or entropy, an axiom of complexity science is that signals with very high or very low entropy are generated by relatively non-complex systems, while complex systems typically generate outputs with entropy peaking between these two extremes. In understanding their environment, individuals would benefit from coding for both input entropy and complexity; entropy indexes uncertainty and can inform probabilistic coding strategies, whereas complexity reflects a concise and abstract representation of the underlying environmental configuration, which can serve independent purposes, e.g., as a template for generalization and rapid comparisons between environments. Using functional neuroimaging, we demonstrate that, in response to passively processed auditory inputs, functional integration patterns in the human brain track both the entropy and complexity of the auditory signal. Connectivity between several brain regions scaled monotonically with input entropy, suggesting sensitivity to uncertainty, whereas connectivity between other regions tracked entropy in a convex manner consistent with sensitivity to input complexity. These findings suggest that the human brain simultaneously tracks the uncertainty of sensory data and effectively models their environmental generators. PMID:25536493

  11. Effects of Visual and Auditory Background on Reading Achievement Test Performance of Brain-Injured and Non Brain-Injured Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.

    Forty-two brain injured boys and 42 non brain injured boys (aged 11-6 to 12-6) were tested to determine the effects of increasing amounts of visual and auditory distraction on reading performance. The Stanford Achievement Reading Comprehension Test was administered with three degrees of distraction. The visual distraction consisted of either very…

  12. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI brain signatures of auditory cue utilization

    PubMed Central

    Scharinger, Mathias; Herrmann, Björn; Nierhaus, Till; Obleser, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Optimal utilization of acoustic cues during auditory categorization is a vital skill, particularly when informative cues become occluded or degraded. Consequently, the acoustic environment requires flexible choosing and switching amongst available cues. The present study targets the brain functions underlying such changes in cue utilization. Participants performed a categorization task with immediate feedback on acoustic stimuli from two categories that varied in duration and spectral properties, while we simultaneously recorded Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) responses in fMRI and electroencephalograms (EEGs). In the first half of the experiment, categories could be best discriminated by spectral properties. Halfway through the experiment, spectral degradation rendered the stimulus duration the more informative cue. Behaviorally, degradation decreased the likelihood of utilizing spectral cues. Spectrally degrading the acoustic signal led to increased alpha power compared to nondegraded stimuli. The EEG-informed fMRI analyses revealed that alpha power correlated with BOLD changes in inferior parietal cortex and right posterior superior temporal gyrus (including planum temporale). In both areas, spectral degradation led to a weaker coupling of BOLD response to behavioral utilization of the spectral cue. These data provide converging evidence from behavioral modeling, electrophysiology, and hemodynamics that (a) increased alpha power mediates the inhibition of uninformative (here spectral) stimulus features, and that (b) the parietal attention network supports optimal cue utilization in auditory categorization. The results highlight the complex cortical processing of auditory categorization under realistic listening challenges. PMID:24926232

  13. An Auditory-Tactile Visual Saccade-Independent P300 Brain-Computer Interface.

    PubMed

    Yin, Erwei; Zeyl, Timothy; Saab, Rami; Hu, Dewen; Zhou, Zongtan; Chau, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Most P300 event-related potential (ERP)-based brain-computer interface (BCI) studies focus on gaze shift-dependent BCIs, which cannot be used by people who have lost voluntary eye movement. However, the performance of visual saccade-independent P300 BCIs is generally poor. To improve saccade-independent BCI performance, we propose a bimodal P300 BCI approach that simultaneously employs auditory and tactile stimuli. The proposed P300 BCI is a vision-independent system because no visual interaction is required of the user. Specifically, we designed a direction-congruent bimodal paradigm by randomly and simultaneously presenting auditory and tactile stimuli from the same direction. Furthermore, the channels and number of trials were tailored to each user to improve online performance. With 12 participants, the average online information transfer rate (ITR) of the bimodal approach improved by 45.43% and 51.05% over that attained, respectively, with the auditory and tactile approaches individually. Importantly, the average online ITR of the bimodal approach, including the break time between selections, reached 10.77 bits/min. These findings suggest that the proposed bimodal system holds promise as a practical visual saccade-independent P300 BCI. PMID:26678249

  14. Specialization of the auditory processing in harbor porpoise, characterized by brain-stem potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, Nikolay G.

    2002-05-01

    Brain-stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) were recorded from the head surface of the three awaked harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena). Silver disk placed on the skin surface above the vertex bone was used as an active electrode. The experiments were performed at the Karadag biological station (the Crimea peninsula). Clicks and tone bursts were used as stimuli. The temporal and frequency selectivity of the auditory system was estimated using the methods of simultaneous and forward masking. An evident minimum of the BAEPs thresholds was observed in the range of 125-135 kHz, where the main spectral component of species-specific echolocation signal is located. In this frequency range the tonal forward masking demonstrated a strong frequency selectivity. Off-response to such tone bursts was a typical observation. An evident BAEP could be recorded up to the frequencies 190-200 kHz, however, outside the acoustical fovea the frequency selectivity was rather poor. Temporal resolution was estimated by measuring BAER recovery functions for double clicks, double tone bursts, and double noise bursts. The half-time of BAERs recovery was in the range of 0.1-0.2 ms. The data indicate that the porpoise auditory system is strongly adapted to detect ultrasonic closely spaced sounds like species-specific locating signals and echoes.

  15. Auditory brain development in premature infants: the importance of early experience.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Erin; Wintermark, Pia; Lahav, Amir

    2012-04-01

    Preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often close their eyes in response to bright lights, but they cannot close their ears in response to loud sounds. The sudden transition from the womb to the overly noisy world of the NICU increases the vulnerability of these high-risk newborns. There is a growing concern that the excess noise typically experienced by NICU infants disrupts their growth and development, putting them at risk for hearing, language, and cognitive disabilities. Preterm neonates are especially sensitive to noise because their auditory system is at a critical period of neurodevelopment, and they are no longer shielded by maternal tissue. This paper discusses the developmental milestones of the auditory system and suggests ways to enhance the quality control and type of sounds delivered to NICU infants. We argue that positive auditory experience is essential for early brain maturation and may be a contributing factor for healthy neurodevelopment. Further research is needed to optimize the hospital environment for preterm newborns and to increase their potential to develop into healthy children. PMID:22524335

  16. Brain responses to altered auditory feedback during musical keyboard production: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Pfordresher, Peter Q; Mantell, James T; Brown, Steven; Zivadinov, Robert; Cox, Jennifer L

    2014-03-27

    Alterations of auditory feedback during piano performance can be profoundly disruptive. Furthermore, different alterations can yield different types of disruptive effects. Whereas alterations of feedback synchrony disrupt performed timing, alterations of feedback pitch contents can disrupt accuracy. The current research tested whether these behavioral dissociations correlate with differences in brain activity. Twenty pianists performed simple piano keyboard melodies while being scanned in a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. In different conditions they experienced normal auditory feedback, altered auditory feedback (asynchronous delays or altered pitches), or control conditions that excluded movement or sound. Behavioral results replicated past findings. Neuroimaging data suggested that asynchronous delays led to increased activity in Broca's area and its right homologue, whereas disruptive alterations of pitch elevated activations in the cerebellum, area Spt, inferior parietal lobule, and the anterior cingulate cortex. Both disruptive conditions increased activations in the supplementary motor area. These results provide the first evidence of neural responses associated with perception/action mismatch during keyboard production. PMID:24513403

  17. Auditory vocabulary of the right hemisphere following brain bisection or hemidecortication.

    PubMed

    Zaidel, E

    1976-09-01

    Unilateral scores of two commissurotomy and three (one left and two right) hemispherectomy patients were obtained on standardized auditory language comprehension tests which use pointing responses to a pictorial array. Unilateral performance by the commissurotomy patients was achieved by restricting the pictorial array to one visual half field, using a novel contact lens system which permits ocular scanning of the lateralized stimulus and self-monitoring of task performance. Using the Peabody and Ammons Picture Vocabulary Tests, the auditory vocabulary in the disconnected or isolated right hemispheres was found to be equivalent to that of normal subjects of ages 8:1 to 16:3 with a mean of 11:7 (eleven years and 7 months old). At the same time, standardized aphasia tests showed that the picture vocabulary in the right hemispheres is similar to that of a heterogeneous population of aphasics, even though the right hemispheres did not behave quite like any classical aphasic diagnostic group. No significant differences were found between right hemisphere comprehension of object vs. action names. Results indicated that vocabulary as a function of word frequency followed the same pattern in the right and left hemisphere although the right hemisphere was consistently lower. This parallel between the two hemispheres was conjectured to reflect some similar or even shared lexical structures in the two hemispheres. Together with other data on the performance of the right hemisphere on the Token Test (Zaidel, 1976), the results suggest a complex model of the development of language laterality in the brain, in which some, but not all, auditory language functions continue to develop in the right hemisphere past what is generally regarded as the critical period for language acquistion. In general, auditory language comprehension is better characterized as that of an "average aphasic" than that of a child of a specific age. PMID:1000988

  18. Age-related Changes in Auditory Nerve – Inner Hair Cell Connections, Hair Cell Numbers, Auditory Brain Stem Response and Gap Detection in UM-HET4 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, RA; Dolan, DF; Halsey, K; Kanicki, A; Deng, N; Martin, C; Eberle, J; Kohrman, DC; Miller, RA; Schacht, J

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the timing of appearance of three components of age-related hearing loss that determine the pattern and severity of presbycusis: the functional and structural pathologies of sensory cells and neurons and changes in Gap Detection, the latter as an indicator of auditory temporal processing. Using UM-HET4 mice, genetically heterogeneous mice derived from four inbred strains, we studied the integrity of inner and outer hair cells by position along the cochlear spiral, inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections, spiral ganglion neurons, and determined auditory thresholds, as well as pre-pulse and gap inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Comparisons were made between mice of 5-7, 22-24 and 27-29 months of age. There was individual variability among mice in the onset and extent of age-related auditory pathology. At 22-24 months of age a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was restricted to the apical third of the cochlea and threshold shifts in auditory brain stem response were minimal. There was also a large and significant loss of inner hair cell – auditory nerve connections and a significant reduction in Gap Detection. The expression of Ntf3 in the cochlea was significantly reduced. At 27-29 months of age there was no further change in the mean number of synaptic connections per inner hair cell or in gap detection, but a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was found across all cochlear turns as well as significantly increased ABR threshold shifts at 4, 12, 24 and 48 kHz. A statistical analysis of correlations on an individual animal basis revealed that neither the hair cell loss nor the ABR threshold shifts correlated with loss of gap detection or with the loss of connections, consistent with independent pathological mechanisms. PMID:25665752

  19. Age-related changes in auditory nerve-inner hair cell connections, hair cell numbers, auditory brain stem response and gap detection in UM-HET4 mice.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, R A; Dolan, D F; Halsey, K; Kanicki, A; Deng, N; Martin, C; Eberle, J; Kohrman, D C; Miller, R A; Schacht, J

    2015-04-30

    This study compared the timing of appearance of three components of age-related hearing loss that determine the pattern and severity of presbycusis: the functional and structural pathologies of sensory cells and neurons and changes in gap detection (GD), the latter as an indicator of auditory temporal processing. Using UM-HET4 mice, genetically heterogeneous mice derived from four inbred strains, we studied the integrity of inner and outer hair cells by position along the cochlear spiral, inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections, spiral ganglion neurons (SGN), and determined auditory thresholds, as well as pre-pulse and gap inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (ASR). Comparisons were made between mice of 5-7, 22-24 and 27-29 months of age. There was individual variability among mice in the onset and extent of age-related auditory pathology. At 22-24 months of age a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was restricted to the apical third of the cochlea and threshold shifts in the auditory brain stem response were minimal. There was also a large and significant loss of inner hair cell-auditory nerve connections and a significant reduction in GD. The expression of Ntf3 in the cochlea was significantly reduced. At 27-29 months of age there was no further change in the mean number of synaptic connections per inner hair cell or in GD, but a moderate to large loss of outer hair cells was found across all cochlear turns as well as significantly increased ABR threshold shifts at 4, 12, 24 and 48 kHz. A statistical analysis of correlations on an individual animal basis revealed that neither the hair cell loss nor the ABR threshold shifts correlated with loss of GD or with the loss of connections, consistent with independent pathological mechanisms. PMID:25665752

  20. Case study: auditory brain responses in a minimally verbal child with autism and cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Shu H.; McArthur, Genevieve; Badcock, Nicholas A.; Brock, Jon

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 30% of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) remain minimally verbal into late childhood, but research on cognition and brain function in ASD focuses almost exclusively on those with good or only moderately impaired language. Here we present a case study investigating auditory processing of GM, a nonverbal child with ASD and cerebral palsy. At the age of 8 years, GM was tested using magnetoencephalography (MEG) whilst passively listening to speech sounds and complex tones. Where typically developing children and verbal autistic children all demonstrated similar brain responses to speech and nonspeech sounds, GM produced much stronger responses to nonspeech than speech, particularly in the 65–165 ms (M50/M100) time window post-stimulus onset. GM was retested aged 10 years using electroencephalography (EEG) whilst passively listening to pure tone stimuli. Consistent with her MEG response to complex tones, GM showed an unusually early and strong response to pure tones in her EEG responses. The consistency of the MEG and EEG data in this single case study demonstrate both the potential and the feasibility of these methods in the study of minimally verbal children with ASD. Further research is required to determine whether GM's atypical auditory responses are characteristic of other minimally verbal children with ASD or of other individuals with cerebral palsy. PMID:26150768

  1. Electrical Brain Responses to an Auditory Illusion and the Impact of Musical Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Christos I.; Pereda, Ernesto; Lindsen, Job P.; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    The presentation of two sinusoidal tones, one to each ear, with a slight frequency mismatch yields an auditory illusion of a beating frequency equal to the frequency difference between the two tones; this is known as binaural beat (BB). The effect of brief BB stimulation on scalp EEG is not conclusively demonstrated. Further, no studies have examined the impact of musical training associated with BB stimulation, yet musicians' brains are often associated with enhanced auditory processing. In this study, we analysed EEG brain responses from two groups, musicians and non-musicians, when stimulated by short presentation (1 min) of binaural beats with beat frequency varying from 1 Hz to 48 Hz. We focused our analysis on alpha and gamma band EEG signals, and they were analysed in terms of spectral power, and functional connectivity as measured by two phase synchrony based measures, phase locking value and phase lag index. Finally, these measures were used to characterize the degree of centrality, segregation and integration of the functional brain network. We found that beat frequencies belonging to alpha band produced the most significant steady-state responses across groups. Further, processing of low frequency (delta, theta, alpha) binaural beats had significant impact on cortical network patterns in the alpha band oscillations. Altogether these results provide a neurophysiological account of cortical responses to BB stimulation at varying frequencies, and demonstrate a modulation of cortico-cortical connectivity in musicians' brains, and further suggest a kind of neuronal entrainment of a linear and nonlinear relationship to the beating frequencies. PMID:26065708

  2. A comprehensive approach to the segmentation of multichannel three-dimensional MR brain images in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sushmita; Narayana, Ponnada A

    2013-01-01

    Accurate classification and quantification of brain tissues is important for monitoring disease progression, measurement of atrophy, and correlating magnetic resonance (MR) measures with clinical disability. Classification of MR brain images in the presence of lesions, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), is particularly challenging. Images obtained with lower resolution often suffer from partial volume averaging leading to false classifications. While partial volume averaging can be reduced by acquiring volumetric images at high resolution, image segmentation and quantification can be technically challenging. In this study, we integrated the brain anatomical knowledge with non-parametric and parametric statistical classifiers for automatically classifying tissues and lesions on high resolution multichannel three-dimensional images acquired on 60 MS brains. The results of automatic lesion segmentation were reviewed by the expert. The agreement between results obtained by the automated analysis and the expert was excellent as assessed by the quantitative metrics, low absolute volume difference percent (36.18 ± 34.90), low average symmetric surface distance (1.64 mm ± 1.30 mm), high true positive rate (84.75 ± 12.69), and low false positive rate (34.10 ± 16.00). The segmented results were also in close agreement with the corrected results as assessed by Bland-Altman and regression analyses. Finally, our lesion segmentation was validated using the MS lesion segmentation grand challenge dataset (MICCAI 2008). PMID:24179773

  3. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Gregory D.; Karns, Christina M.; Dow, Mark W.; Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants were limited by inter-subject variability of Heschl's gyrus. In addition to reorganized auditory cortex (cross-modal plasticity), a second gap in our understanding is the contribution of altered modality-specific cortices (visual intramodal plasticity in this case), as well as supramodal and multisensory cortices, especially when target detection is required across contrasts. Here we address these gaps by comparing fMRI signal change for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual stimulation (11–15° vs. 2–7°) in congenitally deaf and hearing participants in a blocked experimental design with two analytical approaches: a Heschl's gyrus region of interest analysis and a whole brain analysis. Our results using individually-defined primary auditory cortex (Heschl's gyrus) indicate that fMRI signal change for more peripheral stimuli was greater than perifoveal in deaf but not in hearing participants. Whole-brain analyses revealed differences between deaf and hearing participants for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual processing in extrastriate visual cortex including primary auditory cortex, MT+/V5, superior-temporal auditory, and multisensory and/or supramodal regions, such as posterior parietal cortex (PPC), frontal eye fields, anterior cingulate, and supplementary eye fields. Overall, these data demonstrate the contribution of neuroplasticity in multiple systems including primary auditory cortex, supramodal, and multisensory regions, to altered visual processing in congenitally deaf

  4. Design of the multi-channel electroencephalography-based brain-computer interface with novel dry sensors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shang-Lin; Liao, Lun-De; Liou, Chang-Hong; Chen, Shi-An; Ko, Li-Wei; Chen, Bo-Wei; Wang, Po-Sheng; Chen, Sheng-Fu; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2012-01-01

    The traditional brain-computer interface (BCI) system measures the electroencephalography (EEG) signals by the wet sensors with the conductive gel and skin preparation processes. To overcome the limitations of traditional BCI system with conventional wet sensors, a wireless and wearable multi-channel EEG-based BCI system is proposed in this study, including the wireless EEG data acquisition device, dry spring-loaded sensors, a size-adjustable soft cap. The dry spring-loaded sensors are made of metal conductors, which can measure the EEG signals without skin preparation and conductive gel. In addition, the proposed system provides a size-adjustable soft cap that can be used to fit user's head properly. Indeed, the results are shown that the proposed system can properly and effectively measure the EEG signals with the developed cap and sensors, even under movement. In words, the developed wireless and wearable BCI system is able to be used in cognitive neuroscience applications. PMID:23366259

  5. Research of brain activation regions of "yes" and "no" responses by auditory stimulations in human EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Min; Liu, GuoZhong

    2011-11-01

    People with neuromuscular disorders are difficult to communicate with the outside world. It is very important to the clinician and the patient's family that how to distinguish vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) for a disorders of consciousness (DOC) patient. If a patient is diagnosed with VS, this means that the hope of recovery is greatly reduced, thus leading to the family to abandon the treatment. Brain-computer interface (BCI) is aiming to help those people by analyzing patients' electroencephalogram (EEG). This paper focus on analyzing the corresponding activated regions of the brain when a subject responses "yes" or "no" to an auditory stimuli question. When the brain concentrates, the phase of the related area will become orderly from desultorily. So in this paper we analyzed EEG from the angle of phase. Seven healthy subjects volunteered to participate in the experiment. A total of 84 groups of repeatability stimulation test were done. Firstly, the frequency is fragmented by using wavelet method. Secondly, the phase of EEG is extracted by Hilbert. At last, we obtained approximate entropy and information entropy of each frequency band of EEG. The results show that brain areas are activated of the central area when people say "yes", and the areas are activated of the central area and temporal when people say "no". This conclusion is corresponding to magnetic resonance imaging technology. This study provides the theory basis and the algorithm design basis for designing BCI equipment for people with neuromuscular disorders.

  6. Brain hyper-reactivity to auditory novel targets in children with high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Gomot, Marie; Belmonte, Matthew K; Bullmore, Edward T; Bernard, Frédéric A; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2008-09-01

    Although communication and social difficulties in autism have received a great deal of research attention, the other key diagnostic feature, extreme repetitive behaviour and unusual narrow interests, has been addressed less often. Also known as 'resistance to change' this may be related to atypical processing of infrequent, novel stimuli. This can be tested at sensory and neural levels. Our aims were to (i) examine auditory novelty detection and its neural basis in children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) and (ii) test for brain activation patterns that correlate quantitatively with number of autistic traits as a test of the dimensional nature of ASC. The present study employed event-related fMRI during a novel auditory detection paradigm. Participants were twelve 10- to 15-year-old children with ASC and a group of 12 age-, IQ- and sex-matched typical controls. The ASC group responded faster to novel target stimuli. Group differences in brain activity mainly involved the right prefrontal-premotor and the left inferior parietal regions, which were more activated in the ASC group than in controls. In both groups, activation of prefrontal regions during target detection was positively correlated with Autism Spectrum Quotient scores measuring the number of autistic traits. These findings suggest that target detection in autism is associated not only with superior behavioural performance (shorter reaction time) but also with activation of a more widespread network of brain regions. This pattern also shows quantitative variation with number of autistic traits, in a continuum that extends to the normal population. This finding may shed light on the neurophysiological process underlying narrow interests and what clinically is called 'need for sameness'. PMID:18669482

  7. Auditory agnosia.

    PubMed

    Slevc, L Robert; Shell, Alison R

    2015-01-01

    Auditory agnosia refers to impairments in sound perception and identification despite intact hearing, cognitive functioning, and language abilities (reading, writing, and speaking). Auditory agnosia can be general, affecting all types of sound perception, or can be (relatively) specific to a particular domain. Verbal auditory agnosia (also known as (pure) word deafness) refers to deficits specific to speech processing, environmental sound agnosia refers to difficulties confined to non-speech environmental sounds, and amusia refers to deficits confined to music. These deficits can be apperceptive, affecting basic perceptual processes, or associative, affecting the relation of a perceived auditory object to its meaning. This chapter discusses what is known about the behavioral symptoms and lesion correlates of these different types of auditory agnosia (focusing especially on verbal auditory agnosia), evidence for the role of a rapid temporal processing deficit in some aspects of auditory agnosia, and the few attempts to treat the perceptual deficits associated with auditory agnosia. A clear picture of auditory agnosia has been slow to emerge, hampered by the considerable heterogeneity in behavioral deficits, associated brain damage, and variable assessments across cases. Despite this lack of clarity, these striking deficits in complex sound processing continue to inform our understanding of auditory perception and cognition. PMID:25726291

  8. Audio representations of multi-channel EEG: a new tool for diagnosis of brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vialatte, François B; Dauwels, Justin; Musha, Toshimitsu; Cichocki, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to develop audio representations of electroencephalographic (EEG) multichannel signals, useful for medical practitioners and neuroscientists. The fundamental question explored in this paper is whether clinically valuable information contained in the EEG, not available from the conventional graphical EEG representation, might become apparent through audio representations. Methods and Materials: Music scores are generated from sparse time-frequency maps of EEG signals. Specifically, EEG signals of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and (healthy) control subjects are considered. Statistical differences in the audio representations of MCI patients and control subjects are assessed through mathematical complexity indexes as well as a perception test; in the latter, participants try to distinguish between audio sequences from MCI patients and control subjects. Results: Several characteristics of the audio sequences, including sample entropy, number of notes, and synchrony, are significantly different in MCI patients and control subjects (Mann-Whitney p < 0.01). Moreover, the participants of the perception test were able to accurately classify the audio sequences (89% correctly classified). Conclusions: The proposed audio representation of multi-channel EEG signals helps to understand the complex structure of EEG. Promising results were obtained on a clinical EEG data set. PMID:23383399

  9. High-Resolution Mapping of Myeloarchitecture In Vivo: Localization of Auditory Areas in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Federico; Moerel, Michelle; Xu, Junqian; van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Ugurbil, Kamil; Goebel, Rainer; Yacoub, Essa; Formisano, Elia

    2015-10-01

    The precise delineation of auditory areas in vivo remains problematic. Histological analysis of postmortem tissue indicates that the relation of areal borders to macroanatomical landmarks is variable across subjects. Furthermore, functional parcellation schemes based on measures of, for example, frequency preference (tonotopy) remain controversial. Here, we propose a 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging method that enables the anatomical delineation of auditory cortical areas in vivo and in individual brains, through the high-resolution visualization (0.6 × 0.6 × 0.6 mm(3)) of intracortical anatomical contrast related to myelin. The approach combines the acquisition and analysis of images with multiple MR contrasts (T1, T2*, and proton density). Compared with previous methods, the proposed solution is feasible at high fields and time efficient, which allows collecting myelin-related and functional images within the same measurement session. Our results show that a data-driven analysis of cortical depth-dependent profiles of anatomical contrast allows identifying a most densely myelinated cortical region on the medial Heschl's gyrus. Analyses of functional responses show that this region includes neuronal populations with typical primary functional properties (single tonotopic gradient and narrow frequency tuning), thus indicating that it may correspond to the human homolog of monkey A1. PMID:24994817

  10. Auditory Hallucinations and the Brain's Resting-State Networks: Findings and Methodological Observations.

    PubMed

    Alderson-Day, Ben; Diederen, Kelly; Fernyhough, Charles; Ford, Judith M; Horga, Guillermo; Margulies, Daniel S; McCarthy-Jones, Simon; Northoff, Georg; Shine, James M; Turner, Jessica; van de Ven, Vincent; van Lutterveld, Remko; Waters, Flavie; Jardri, Renaud

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the potential for alterations to the brain's resting-state networks (RSNs) to explain various kinds of psychopathology. RSNs provide an intriguing new explanatory framework for hallucinations, which can occur in different modalities and population groups, but which remain poorly understood. This collaboration from the International Consortium on Hallucination Research (ICHR) reports on the evidence linking resting-state alterations to auditory hallucinations (AH) and provides a critical appraisal of the methodological approaches used in this area. In the report, we describe findings from resting connectivity fMRI in AH (in schizophrenia and nonclinical individuals) and compare them with findings from neurophysiological research, structural MRI, and research on visual hallucinations (VH). In AH, various studies show resting connectivity differences in left-hemisphere auditory and language regions, as well as atypical interaction of the default mode network and RSNs linked to cognitive control and salience. As the latter are also evident in studies of VH, this points to a domain-general mechanism for hallucinations alongside modality-specific changes to RSNs in different sensory regions. However, we also observed high methodological heterogeneity in the current literature, affecting the ability to make clear comparisons between studies. To address this, we provide some methodological recommendations and options for future research on the resting state and hallucinations. PMID:27280452

  11. Brain-Generated Estradiol Drives Long-Term Optimization of Auditory Coding to Enhance the Discrimination of Communication Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tremere, Liisa A.; Pinaud, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Auditory processing and hearing-related pathologies are heavily influenced by steroid hormones in a variety of vertebrate species including humans. The hormone estradiol has been recently shown to directly modulate the gain of central auditory neurons, in real-time, by controlling the strength of inhibitory transmission via a non-genomic mechanism. The functional relevance of this modulation, however, remains unknown. Here we show that estradiol generated in the songbird homologue of the mammalian auditory association cortex, rapidly enhances the effectiveness of the neural coding of complex, learned acoustic signals in awake zebra finches. Specifically, estradiol increases mutual information rates, coding efficiency and the neural discrimination of songs. These effects are mediated by estradiol’s modulation of both rate and temporal coding of auditory signals. Interference with the local action or production of estradiol in the auditory forebrain of freely-behaving animals disrupts behavioral responses to songs, but not to other behaviorally-relevant communication signals. Our findings directly show that estradiol is a key regulator of auditory function in the adult vertebrate brain. PMID:21368039

  12. A brain-computer interface controlled auditory event-related potential (p300) spelling system for locked-in patients.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Andrea; Furdea, Adrian; Halder, Sebastian; Hammer, Eva Maria; Nijboer, Femke; Kotchoubey, Boris

    2009-03-01

    Using brain-computer interfaces (BCI) humans can select letters or other targets on a computer screen without any muscular involvement. An intensively investigated kind of BCI is based on the recording of visual event-related brain potentials (ERP). However, some severely paralyzed patients who need a BCI for communication have impaired vision or lack control of gaze movement, thus making a BCI depending on visual input no longer feasible. In an effort to render the ERP-BCI usable for this group of patients, the ERP-BCI was adapted to auditory stimulation. Letters of the alphabet were assigned to cells in a 5 x 5 matrix. Rows of the matrix were coded with numbers 1 to 5, and columns with numbers 6 to 10, and the numbers were presented auditorily. To select a letter, users had to first select the row and then the column containing the desired letter. Four severely paralyzed patients in the end-stage of a neurodegenerative disease were examined. All patients performed above chance level. Spelling accuracy was significantly lower with the auditory system as compared with a similar visual system. Patients reported difficulties in concentrating on the task when presented with the auditory system. In future studies, the auditory ERP-BCI should be adjusted by taking into consideration specific features of severely paralyzed patients, such as reduced attention span. This adjustment in combination with more intensive training will show whether an auditory ERP-BCI can become an option for visually impaired patients. PMID:19351359

  13. Persistent frontal P300 brain potential suggests abnormal processing of auditory information in distractible children.

    PubMed

    Kilpeläinen, R; Luoma, L; Herrgård, E; Yppärilä, H; Partanen, J; Karhu, J

    1999-11-01

    The P300 event-related potential (ERP) was studied at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end of an auditory stimulus discrimination task in 70 normal 9-year-old children. Easily distractible children showed frontally a short-latency P300 response to target stimuli throughout the task, whereas in the non-distractible children the corresponding response was distinctly smaller and also showed a tendency to decrease in size towards the end of the task. The short-latency frontal P300 response reflects activation of the brain's orienting networks, and it normally decreases in size when stimuli lose their 'novelty value' with stimulus repetition. Persistent frontal P300 suggest that distractible children continued to show enhanced orienting to stimuli that should have already been well encoded and/or categorized. PMID:10599853

  14. Frequency tuning of the dolphin's hearing as revealed by auditory brain-stem response with notch-noise masking.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin, A Y; Klishin, V O

    1997-12-01

    Notch-noise masking was used to measure frequency tuning in a dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in a simultaneous-masking paradigm in conjunction with auditory brain-stem evoked potential recording. Measurements were made at probe frequencies of 64, 76, 90, and 108 kHz. The data were analyzed by fitting the rounded-exponent model of the auditory filters to the experimental data. The fitting parameter values corresponded to the filter tuning as follows: QER (center frequency divided by equivalent rectangular bandwidths) of 35 to 36.5 and Q10 dB of 18 to 19 at all tested frequencies. PMID:9407671

  15. Proteome rearrangements after auditory learning: high-resolution profiling of synapse-enriched protein fractions from mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kähne, Thilo; Richter, Sandra; Kolodziej, Angela; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Pielot, Rainer; Engler, Alexander; Ohl, Frank W; Dieterich, Daniela C; Seidenbecher, Constanze; Tischmeyer, Wolfgang; Naumann, Michael; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2016-07-01

    Learning and memory processes are accompanied by rearrangements of synaptic protein networks. While various studies have demonstrated the regulation of individual synaptic proteins during these processes, much less is known about the complex regulation of synaptic proteomes. Recently, we reported that auditory discrimination learning in mice is associated with a relative down-regulation of proteins involved in the structural organization of synapses in various brain regions. Aiming at the identification of biological processes and signaling pathways involved in auditory memory formation, here, a label-free quantification approach was utilized to identify regulated synaptic junctional proteins and phosphoproteins in the auditory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of mice 24 h after the learning experiment. Twenty proteins, including postsynaptic scaffolds, actin-remodeling proteins, and RNA-binding proteins, were regulated in at least three brain regions pointing to common, cross-regional mechanisms. Most of the detected synaptic proteome changes were, however, restricted to individual brain regions. For example, several members of the Septin family of cytoskeletal proteins were up-regulated only in the hippocampus, while Septin-9 was down-regulated in the hippocampus, the frontal cortex, and the striatum. Meta analyses utilizing several databases were employed to identify underlying cellular functions and biological pathways. Data are available via ProteomeExchange with identifier PXD003089. How does the protein composition of synapses change in different brain areas upon auditory learning? We unravel discrete proteome changes in mouse auditory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum functionally implicated in the learning process. We identify not only common but also area-specific biological pathways and cellular processes modulated 24 h after training, indicating individual contributions of the regions to memory processing. PMID

  16. Evaluation of Auditory Brain Stems Evoked Response in Newborns With Pathologic Hyperbilirubinemia in Mashhad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Okhravi, Tooba; Tarvij Eslami, Saeedeh; Hushyar Ahmadi, Ali; Nassirian, Hossain; Najibpour, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal jaundice is a common cause of sensorneural hearing loss in children. Objectives: We aimed to detect the neurotoxic effects of pathologic hyperbilirubinemia on brain stem and auditory tract by auditory brain stem evoked response (ABR) which could predict early effects of hyperbilirubinemia. Patients and Methods: This case-control study was performed on newborns with pathologic hyperbilirubinemia. The inclusion criteria were healthy term and near term (35 - 37 weeks) newborns with pathologic hyperbilirubinemia with serum bilirubin values of ≥ 7 mg/dL, ≥ 10 mg/dL and ≥14 mg/dL at the first, second and third-day of life, respectively, and with bilirubin concentration ≥ 18 mg/dL at over 72 hours of life. The exclusion criteria included family history and diseases causing sensorineural hearing loss, use of auto-toxic medications within the preceding five days, convulsion, congenital craniofacial anomalies, birth trauma, preterm newborns < 35 weeks old, birth weight < 1500 g, asphyxia, and mechanical ventilations for five days or more. A total of 48 newborns with hyperbilirubinemia met the enrolment criteria as the case group and 49 healthy newborns as the control group, who were hospitalized in a university educational hospital (22 Bahaman), in a north-eastern city of Iran, Mashhad. ABR was performed on both groups. The evaluated variable factors were latency time, inter peak intervals time, and loss of waves. Results: The mean latencies of waves I, III and V of ABR were significantly higher in the pathologic hyperbilirubinemia group compared with the controls (P < 0.001). In addition, the mean interpeak intervals (IPI) of waves I-III, I-V and III-V of ABR were significantly higher in the pathologic hyperbilirubinemia group compared with the controls (P < 0.001). For example, the mean latencies time of wave I was significantly higher in right ear of the case group than in controls (2.16 ± 0.26 vs. 1.77 ± 0.15 milliseconds, respectively) (P

  17. Brain activity during divided and selective attention to auditory and visual sentence comprehension tasks

    PubMed Central

    Moisala, Mona; Salmela, Viljami; Salo, Emma; Carlson, Synnöve; Vuontela, Virve; Salonen, Oili; Alho, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we measured brain activity of human participants while they performed a sentence congruence judgment task in either the visual or auditory modality separately, or in both modalities simultaneously. Significant performance decrements were observed when attention was divided between the two modalities compared with when one modality was selectively attended. Compared with selective attention (i.e., single tasking), divided attention (i.e., dual-tasking) did not recruit additional cortical regions, but resulted in increased activity in medial and lateral frontal regions which were also activated by the component tasks when performed separately. Areas involved in semantic language processing were revealed predominantly in the left lateral prefrontal cortex by contrasting incongruent with congruent sentences. These areas also showed significant activity increases during divided attention in relation to selective attention. In the sensory cortices, no crossmodal inhibition was observed during divided attention when compared with selective attention to one modality. Our results suggest that the observed performance decrements during dual-tasking are due to interference of the two tasks because they utilize the same part of the cortex. Moreover, semantic dual-tasking did not appear to recruit additional brain areas in comparison with single tasking, and no crossmodal inhibition was observed during intermodal divided attention. PMID:25745395

  18. Hemispheric asymmetry of primary auditory cortex and Heschl’s gyrus in schizophrenia and nonpsychiatric brains

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, John F.; Hackett, Troy A.; Preuss, Todd M.; Bleiwas, Cynthia; Figarsky, Khadija; Mann, J. John; Rosoklija, Gorazd; Javitt, Daniel C.; Dwork, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Heschl’s gyrus (HG) is reported to have a normal left>right hemispheric volume asymmetry, and reduced asymmetry in schizophrenia. Primary auditory cortex (A1) occupies the caudal-medial surface of HG, but it is unclear if A1 has normal asymmetry, or whether its asymmetry is altered in schizophrenia. To address these issues, we compared bilateral gray matter volumes of HG and A1, and neuron density and number in A1, in autopsy brains from male subjects with or without schizophrenia. Comparison of diagnostic groups did not reveal altered gray matter volumes, neuron density, neuron number or hemispheric asymmetries in schizophrenia. With respect to hemispheric differences, HG displayed a clear left>right asymmetry of gray matter volume. Area A1 occupied nearly half of HG, but had less consistent volume asymmetry, that was clearly present only in a subgroup of archival brains from elderly subjects. Neuron counts, in layers IIIb-c and V-VI, showed that the A1 volume asymmetry reflected differences in neuron number, and was not caused simply by changes in neuron density. Our findings confirm previous reports of striking hemispheric asymmetry of HG, and additionally show evidence that A1 has a corresponding asymmetry, although less consistent than that of HG. PMID:24148910

  19. Physiological modulators of Kv3.1 channels adjust firing patterns of auditory brain stem neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Maile R; El-Hassar, Lynda; Zhang, Yalan; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Large, Charles H; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2016-07-01

    Many rapidly firing neurons, including those in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) in the auditory brain stem, express "high threshold" voltage-gated Kv3.1 potassium channels that activate only at positive potentials and are required for stimuli to generate rapid trains of actions potentials. We now describe the actions of two imidazolidinedione derivatives, AUT1 and AUT2, which modulate Kv3.1 channels. Using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing rat Kv3.1 channels, we found that lower concentrations of these compounds shift the voltage of activation of Kv3.1 currents toward negative potentials, increasing currents evoked by depolarization from typical neuronal resting potentials. Single-channel recordings also showed that AUT1 shifted the open probability of Kv3.1 to more negative potentials. Higher concentrations of AUT2 also shifted inactivation to negative potentials. The effects of lower and higher concentrations could be mimicked in numerical simulations by increasing rates of activation and inactivation respectively, with no change in intrinsic voltage dependence. In brain slice recordings of mouse MNTB neurons, both AUT1 and AUT2 modulated firing rate at high rates of stimulation, a result predicted by numerical simulations. Our results suggest that pharmaceutical modulation of Kv3.1 currents represents a novel avenue for manipulation of neuronal excitability and has the potential for therapeutic benefit in the treatment of hearing disorders. PMID:27052580

  20. Noninvasive brain stimulation for the treatment of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia: methods, effects and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Kubera, Katharina M.; Barth, Anja; Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A.; Wolf, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on noninvasive brain stimulation techniques as an augmentation method for the treatment of persistent auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in patients with schizophrenia. Paradigmatically, we place emphasis on transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We specifically discuss rationales of stimulation and consider methodological questions together with issues of phenotypic diversity in individuals with drug-refractory and persistent AVH. Eventually, we provide a brief outlook for future investigations and treatment directions. Taken together, current evidence suggests TMS as a promising method in the treatment of AVH. Low-frequency stimulation of the superior temporal cortex (STC) may reduce symptom severity and frequency. Yet clinical effects are of relatively short duration and effect sizes appear to decrease over time along with publication of larger trials. Apart from considering other innovative stimulation techniques, such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), and optimizing stimulation protocols, treatment of AVH using noninvasive brain stimulation will essentially rely on accurate identification of potential responders and non-responders for these treatment modalities. In this regard, future studies will need to consider distinct phenotypic presentations of AVH in patients with schizophrenia, together with the putative functional neurocircuitry underlying these phenotypes. PMID:26528145

  1. Spect-studies of the brain with stimulation of the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Schadel, A

    1988-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical N-isopropyl-p-J-Amphetamin (IMP) permits a new approach in the study of cerebral perfusion and function. We advanced the hypothesis for an increased IMP-uptake on auditory cortex during stimulation by white noise. Auditory stimulation activates the auditory cortex. This is marked by an increased IMP-uptake. IMP-uptake by the auditory region on the left side during stimulation on the right ear is another evidence of the crossing of central auditory pathways to the contralateral side. PMID:3265798

  2. An online brain-computer interface based on shifting attention to concurrent streams of auditory stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, N. J.; Schölkopf, B.

    2012-04-01

    We report on the development and online testing of an electroencephalogram-based brain-computer interface (BCI) that aims to be usable by completely paralysed users—for whom visual or motor-system-based BCIs may not be suitable, and among whom reports of successful BCI use have so far been very rare. The current approach exploits covert shifts of attention to auditory stimuli in a dichotic-listening stimulus design. To compare the efficacy of event-related potentials (ERPs) and steady-state auditory evoked potentials (SSAEPs), the stimuli were designed such that they elicited both ERPs and SSAEPs simultaneously. Trial-by-trial feedback was provided online, based on subjects' modulation of N1 and P3 ERP components measured during single 5 s stimulation intervals. All 13 healthy subjects were able to use the BCI, with performance in a binary left/right choice task ranging from 75% to 96% correct across subjects (mean 85%). BCI classification was based on the contrast between stimuli in the attended stream and stimuli in the unattended stream, making use of every stimulus, rather than contrasting frequent standard and rare ‘oddball’ stimuli. SSAEPs were assessed offline: for all subjects, spectral components at the two exactly known modulation frequencies allowed discrimination of pre-stimulus from stimulus intervals, and of left-only stimuli from right-only stimuli when one side of the dichotic stimulus pair was muted. However, attention modulation of SSAEPs was not sufficient for single-trial BCI communication, even when the subject's attention was clearly focused well enough to allow classification of the same trials via ERPs. ERPs clearly provided a superior basis for BCI. The ERP results are a promising step towards the development of a simple-to-use, reliable yes/no communication system for users in the most severely paralysed states, as well as potential attention-monitoring and -training applications outside the context of assistive technology.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates auditory function in the hearing cochlea.

    PubMed

    Sly, David J; Hampson, Amy J; Minter, Ricki L; Heffer, Leon F; Li, Jack; Millard, Rodney E; Winata, Leon; Niasari, Allen; O'Leary, Stephen J

    2012-02-01

    Neurotrophins prevent spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) degeneration in animal models of ototoxin-induced deafness and may be used in the future to improve the hearing of cochlear implant patients. It is increasingly common for patients with residual hearing to undergo cochlear implantation. However, the effect of neurotrophin treatment on acoustic hearing is not known. In this study, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was applied to the round window membrane of adult guinea pigs for 4 weeks using a cannula attached to a mini-osmotic pump. SGN survival was first assessed in ototoxically deafened guinea pigs to establish that the delivery method was effective. Increased survival of SGNs was observed in the basal and middle cochlear turns of deafened guinea pigs treated with BDNF, confirming that delivery to the cochlea was successful. The effects of BDNF treatment in animals with normal hearing were then assessed using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), pure tone, and click-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). DPOAE assessment indicated a mild deficit of 5 dB SPL in treated and control groups at 1 and 4 weeks after cannula placement. In contrast, ABR evaluation showed that BDNF lowered thresholds at specific frequencies (8 and 16 kHz) after 1 and 4 weeks posttreatment when compared to the control cohort receiving Ringer's solution. Longer treatment for 4 weeks not only widened the range of frequencies ameliorated from 2 to 32 kHz but also lowered the threshold by at least 28 dB SPL at frequencies ≥16 kHz. BDNF treatment for 4 weeks also increased the amplitude of the ABR response when compared to either the control cohort or prior to treatment. We show that BDNF applied to the round window reduces auditory thresholds and could potentially be used clinically to protect residual hearing following cochlear implantation. PMID:22086147

  4. Delta, theta, beta, and gamma brain oscillations index levels of auditory sentence processing.

    PubMed

    Mai, Guangting; Minett, James W; Wang, William S-Y

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of studies indicate that multiple ranges of brain oscillations, especially the delta (δ, <4Hz), theta (θ, 4-8Hz), beta (β, 13-30Hz), and gamma (γ, 30-50Hz) bands, are engaged in speech and language processing. It is not clear, however, how these oscillations relate to functional processing at different linguistic hierarchical levels. Using scalp electroencephalography (EEG), the current study tested the hypothesis that phonological and the higher-level linguistic (semantic/syntactic) organizations during auditory sentence processing are indexed by distinct EEG signatures derived from the δ, θ, β, and γ oscillations. We analyzed specific EEG signatures while subjects listened to Mandarin speech stimuli in three different conditions in order to dissociate phonological and semantic/syntactic processing: (1) sentences comprising valid disyllabic words assembled in a valid syntactic structure (real-word condition); (2) utterances with morphologically valid syllables, but not constituting valid disyllabic words (pseudo-word condition); and (3) backward versions of the real-word and pseudo-word conditions. We tested four signatures: band power, EEG-acoustic entrainment (EAE), cross-frequency coupling (CFC), and inter-electrode renormalized partial directed coherence (rPDC). The results show significant effects of band power and EAE of δ and θ oscillations for phonological, rather than semantic/syntactic processing, indicating the importance of tracking δ- and θ-rate phonetic patterns during phonological analysis. We also found significant β-related effects, suggesting tracking of EEG to the acoustic stimulus (high-β EAE), memory processing (θ-low-β CFC), and auditory-motor interactions (20-Hz rPDC) during phonological analysis. For semantic/syntactic processing, we obtained a significant effect of γ power, suggesting lexical memory retrieval or processing grammatical word categories. Based on these findings, we confirm that scalp EEG

  5. Noise trauma induced plastic changes in brain regions outside the classical auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, G-D; Sheppard, A; Salvi, R

    2016-02-19

    The effects of intense noise exposure on the classical auditory pathway have been extensively investigated; however, little is known about the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on non-classical auditory areas in the brain such as the lateral amygdala (LA) and striatum (Str). To address this issue, we compared the noise-induced changes in spontaneous and tone-evoked responses from multiunit clusters (MUC) in the LA and Str with those seen in auditory cortex (AC) in rats. High-frequency octave band noise (10-20 kHz) and narrow band noise (16-20 kHz) induced permanent threshold shifts at high-frequencies within and above the noise band but not at low frequencies. While the noise trauma significantly elevated spontaneous discharge rate (SR) in the AC, SRs in the LA and Str were only slightly increased across all frequencies. The high-frequency noise trauma affected tone-evoked firing rates in frequency and time-dependent manner and the changes appeared to be related to the severity of noise trauma. In the LA, tone-evoked firing rates were reduced at the high-frequencies (trauma area) whereas firing rates were enhanced at the low-frequencies or at the edge-frequency dependent on severity of hearing loss at the high frequencies. The firing rate temporal profile changed from a broad plateau to one sharp, delayed peak. In the AC, tone-evoked firing rates were depressed at high frequencies and enhanced at the low frequencies while the firing rate temporal profiles became substantially broader. In contrast, firing rates in the Str were generally decreased and firing rate temporal profiles become more phasic and less prolonged. The altered firing rate and pattern at low frequencies induced by high-frequency hearing loss could have perceptual consequences. The tone-evoked hyperactivity in low-frequency MUC could manifest as hyperacusis whereas the discharge pattern changes could affect temporal resolution and integration. PMID:26701290

  6. Quantitative complexity analysis in multi-channel intracranial EEG recordings form epilepsy brains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Chia; Pardalos, Panos M.; Chaovalitwongse, W. Art; Shiau, Deng-Shan; Ghacibeh, Georges; Suharitdamrong, Wichai; Sackellares, J. Chris

    2008-01-01

    Epilepsy is a brain disorder characterized clinically by temporary but recurrent disturbances of brain function that may or may not be associated with destruction or loss of consciousness and abnormal behavior. Human brain is composed of more than 10 to the power 10 neurons, each of which receives electrical impulses known as action potentials from others neurons via synapses and sends electrical impulses via a sing output line to a similar (the axon) number of neurons. When neuronal networks are active, they produced a change in voltage potential, which can be captured by an electroencephalogram (EEG). The EEG recordings represent the time series that match up to neurological activity as a function of time. By analyzing the EEG recordings, we sought to evaluate the degree of underlining dynamical complexity prior to progression of seizure onset. Through the utilization of the dynamical measurements, it is possible to classify the state of the brain according to the underlying dynamical properties of EEG recordings. The results from two patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the degree of complexity start converging to lower value prior to the epileptic seizures was observed from epileptic regions as well as non-epileptic regions. The dynamical measurements appear to reflect the changes of EEG’s dynamical structure. We suggest that the nonlinear dynamical analysis can provide a useful information for detecting relative changes in brain dynamics, which cannot be detected by conventional linear analysis. PMID:19079790

  7. An online multi-channel SSVEP-based brain-computer interface using a canonical correlation analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Guangyu; Gao, Xiaorong; Yan, Zheng; Hong, Bo; Gao, Shangkai

    2009-08-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in using steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) in brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. However, several aspects of current SSVEP-based BCI systems need improvement, specifically in relation to speed, user variation and ease of use. With these improvements in mind, this paper presents an online multi-channel SSVEP-based BCI system using a canonical correlation analysis (CCA) method for extraction of frequency information associated with the SSVEP. The key parameters, channel location, window length and the number of harmonics, are investigated using offline data, and the result used to guide the design of the online system. An SSVEP-based BCI system with six targets, which use nine channel locations in the occipital and parietal lobes, a window length of 2 s and the first harmonic, is used for online testing on 12 subjects. The results show that the proposed BCI system has a high performance, achieving an average accuracy of 95.3% and an information transfer rate of 58 ± 9.6 bit min-1. The positive characteristics of the proposed system are that channel selection and parameter optimization are not required, the possible use of harmonic frequencies, low user variation and easy setup.

  8. Design, simulation and experimental validation of a novel flexible neural probe for deep brain stimulation and multichannel recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Chin-Teng; Hsu, Jui-Hsiang; He, Xin; Chen, You-Yin; Chang, Jyh-Yeong; Chen, Hui-Fen; Tsang, Siny; Shih, Yen-Yu I.

    2012-06-01

    An implantable micromachined neural probe with multichannel electrode arrays for both neural signal recording and electrical stimulation was designed, simulated and experimentally validated for deep brain stimulation (DBS) applications. The developed probe has a rough three-dimensional microstructure on the electrode surface to maximize the electrode-tissue contact area. The flexible, polyimide-based microelectrode arrays were each composed of a long shaft (14.9 mm in length) and 16 electrodes (5 µm thick and with a diameter of 16 µm). The ability of these arrays to record and stimulate specific areas in a rat brain was evaluated. Moreover, we have developed a finite element model (FEM) applied to an electric field to evaluate the volume of tissue activated (VTA) by DBS as a function of the stimulation parameters. The signal-to-noise ratio ranged from 4.4 to 5 over a 50 day recording period, indicating that the laboratory-designed neural probe is reliable and may be used successfully for long-term recordings. The somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) obtained by thalamic stimulations and in vivo electrode-electrolyte interface impedance measurements was stable for 50 days and demonstrated that the neural probe is feasible for long-term stimulation. A strongly linear (positive correlation) relationship was observed among the simulated VTA, the absolute value of the SSEP during the 200 ms post-stimulus period (ΣSSEP) and c-Fos expression, indicating that the simulated VTA has perfect sensitivity to predict the evoked responses (c-Fos expression). This laboratory-designed neural probe and its FEM simulation represent a simple, functionally effective technique for studying DBS and neural recordings in animal models.

  9. Hyperpolarization-independent maturation and refinement of GABA/glycinergic connections in the auditory brain stem.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanmi; Bach, Eva; Noh, Jihyun; Delpire, Eric; Kandler, Karl

    2016-03-01

    During development GABA and glycine synapses are initially excitatory before they gradually become inhibitory. This transition is due to a developmental increase in the activity of neuronal potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2), which shifts the chloride equilibrium potential (ECl) to values more negative than the resting membrane potential. While the role of early GABA and glycine depolarizations in neuronal development has become increasingly clear, the role of the transition to hyperpolarization in synapse maturation and circuit refinement has remained an open question. Here we investigated this question by examining the maturation and developmental refinement of GABA/glycinergic and glutamatergic synapses in the lateral superior olive (LSO), a binaural auditory brain stem nucleus, in KCC2-knockdown mice, in which GABA and glycine remain depolarizing. We found that many key events in the development of synaptic inputs to the LSO, such as changes in neurotransmitter phenotype, strengthening and elimination of GABA/glycinergic connection, and maturation of glutamatergic synapses, occur undisturbed in KCC2-knockdown mice compared with wild-type mice. These results indicate that maturation of inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the LSO is independent of the GABA and glycine depolarization-to-hyperpolarization transition. PMID:26655825

  10. Estimation of Temporary Change of Brain Activities in Auditory Oddball Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Tadanori; Koyanagi, Yusuke; Tanno, Yukinori; Shimada, Takamasa; Akatsuka, Takao; Saito, Yoichi

    In this research, we estimated temporary change of brain activities in auditory oddball paradigm by moving an analysis time window. An advantage of this method is that it can acquire rough changes of activated areas even with data having low time resolution. Eight normal subjects participated in the study, which consisted of a random series of 30 target and 70 nontarget stimuli. We investigated the activated area in three kinds of analysis time sections, from stimulus onset to 5 seconds after the stimulus (time section A), from 2 to 7 seconds after (B) and from 4 to 9 seconds after (C). In time section A, representative activated areas were regions including superior temporal gyrus centered around inferior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus corresponding to Broadmann area 6 (BA 6), right fusiform gyrus corresponding to BA 20, bilaterally medial frontal gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus were activated. In B, we could see the activations in bilatelally cerebellum, inferior frontal gyrus, and region including left motor area. In C, bilatelally postcentral gyrus, left cingulate gyrus , right cerebellum and right insula were activated. Most activations were consistent with previous studies.

  11. Non-invasive Brain Stimulation and Auditory Verbal Hallucinations: New Techniques and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Peter; Alderson-Day, Ben; Ellison, Amanda; Jardri, Renaud; Fernyhough, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are the experience of hearing a voice in the absence of any speaker. Results from recent attempts to treat AVHs with neurostimulation (rTMS or tDCS) to the left temporoparietal junction have not been conclusive, but suggest that it may be a promising treatment option for some individuals. Some evidence suggests that the therapeutic effect of neurostimulation on AVHs may result from modulation of cortical areas involved in the ability to monitor the source of self-generated information. Here, we provide a brief overview of cognitive models and neurostimulation paradigms associated with treatment of AVHs, and discuss techniques that could be explored in the future to improve the efficacy of treatment, including alternating current and random noise stimulation. Technical issues surrounding the use of neurostimulation as a treatment option are discussed (including methods to localize the targeted cortical area, and the state-dependent effects of brain stimulation), as are issues surrounding the acceptability of neurostimulation for adolescent populations and individuals who experience qualitatively different types of AVH. PMID:26834541

  12. Brain electrical activity evoked by mental formation of auditory expectations and images.

    PubMed

    Janata, P

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for the brain's derivation of explicit expectancies in an ongoing sensory context has been well established by studies of the P300 and processing negativity (PN) components of the event-related potential (ERP). "Emitted potentials" generated in the absence of sensory input by unexpected stimulus omissions also exhibit a P300 component and provide another perspective on patterns of brain activity related to the processing of expectancies. The studies described herein extend earlier emitted potential findings in several aspects. First, high-density (128-channel) EEG recordings are used for topographical mapping of emitted potentials. Second, the primary focus is on emitted potential components preceding the P300, i.e. those components that are more likely to resemble ERP components associated with sensory processing. Third, the dependence of emitted potentials on attention is assessed. Fourth, subjects' knowledge of the structure of an auditory stimulus sequence is modulated so that emitted potentials can be compared between conditions that are identical in physical aspects but differ in terms of subjects' expectations regarding the sequence structure. Finally, a novel task is used to elicit emitted potentials, in which subjects explicitly imagine the continuations of simple melodies. In this task, subjects mentally complete melodic fragments in the appropriate tempo, even though they know with absolute certainty that no sensory stimulus will occur. Emitted potentials were elicited only when subjects actively formed expectations or images. The topographies of the initial portion of the emitted potentials were significantly correlated with the N100 topography elicited by corresponding acoustic stimuli, but uncorrelated with the topographies of corresponding silence control periods. PMID:11302397

  13. Klinefelter syndrome has increased brain responses to auditory stimuli and motor output, but not to visual stimuli or Stroop adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Skakkebæk, Anne; Bojesen, Anders; Fedder, Jens; Laurberg, Peter; Østergaard, John R.; Hertz, Jens Michael; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) (KS) is a genetic syndrome characterized by the presence of an extra X chromosome and low level of testosterone, resulting in a number of neurocognitive abnormalities, yet little is known about brain function. This study investigated the fMRI-BOLD response from KS relative to a group of Controls to basic motor, perceptual, executive and adaptation tasks. Participants (N: KS = 49; Controls = 49) responded to whether the words “GREEN” or “RED” were displayed in green or red (incongruent versus congruent colors). One of the colors was presented three times as often as the other, making it possible to study both congruency and adaptation effects independently. Auditory stimuli saying “GREEN” or “RED” had the same distribution, making it possible to study effects of perceptual modality as well as Frequency effects across modalities. We found that KS had an increased response to motor output in primary motor cortex and an increased response to auditory stimuli in auditory cortices, but no difference in primary visual cortices. KS displayed a diminished response to written visual stimuli in secondary visual regions near the Visual Word Form Area, consistent with the widespread dyslexia in the group. No neural differences were found in inhibitory control (Stroop) or in adaptation to differences in stimulus frequencies. Across groups we found a strong positive correlation between age and BOLD response in the brain's motor network with no difference between groups. No effects of testosterone level or brain volume were found. In sum, the present findings suggest that auditory and motor systems in KS are selectively affected, perhaps as a compensatory strategy, and that this is not a systemic effect as it is not seen in the visual system. PMID:26958463

  14. Klinefelter syndrome has increased brain responses to auditory stimuli and motor output, but not to visual stimuli or Stroop adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Skakkebæk, Anne; Bojesen, Anders; Fedder, Jens; Laurberg, Peter; Østergaard, John R; Hertz, Jens Michael; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) (KS) is a genetic syndrome characterized by the presence of an extra X chromosome and low level of testosterone, resulting in a number of neurocognitive abnormalities, yet little is known about brain function. This study investigated the fMRI-BOLD response from KS relative to a group of Controls to basic motor, perceptual, executive and adaptation tasks. Participants (N: KS = 49; Controls = 49) responded to whether the words "GREEN" or "RED" were displayed in green or red (incongruent versus congruent colors). One of the colors was presented three times as often as the other, making it possible to study both congruency and adaptation effects independently. Auditory stimuli saying "GREEN" or "RED" had the same distribution, making it possible to study effects of perceptual modality as well as Frequency effects across modalities. We found that KS had an increased response to motor output in primary motor cortex and an increased response to auditory stimuli in auditory cortices, but no difference in primary visual cortices. KS displayed a diminished response to written visual stimuli in secondary visual regions near the Visual Word Form Area, consistent with the widespread dyslexia in the group. No neural differences were found in inhibitory control (Stroop) or in adaptation to differences in stimulus frequencies. Across groups we found a strong positive correlation between age and BOLD response in the brain's motor network with no difference between groups. No effects of testosterone level or brain volume were found. In sum, the present findings suggest that auditory and motor systems in KS are selectively affected, perhaps as a compensatory strategy, and that this is not a systemic effect as it is not seen in the visual system. PMID:26958463

  15. Mother’s voice and heartbeat sounds elicit auditory plasticity in the human brain before full gestation

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Alexandra R.; Heller, Howard T.; Benson, Carol B.; Lahav, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Brain development is largely shaped by early sensory experience. However, it is currently unknown whether, how early, and to what extent the newborn’s brain is shaped by exposure to maternal sounds when the brain is most sensitive to early life programming. The present study examined this question in 40 infants born extremely prematurely (between 25- and 32-wk gestation) in the first month of life. Newborns were randomized to receive auditory enrichment in the form of audio recordings of maternal sounds (including their mother’s voice and heartbeat) or routine exposure to hospital environmental noise. The groups were otherwise medically and demographically comparable. Cranial ultrasonography measurements were obtained at 30 ± 3 d of life. Results show that newborns exposed to maternal sounds had a significantly larger auditory cortex (AC) bilaterally compared with control newborns receiving standard care. The magnitude of the right and left AC thickness was significantly correlated with gestational age but not with the duration of sound exposure. Measurements of head circumference and the widths of the frontal horn (FH) and the corpus callosum (CC) were not significantly different between the two groups. This study provides evidence for experience-dependent plasticity in the primary AC before the brain has reached full-term maturation. Our results demonstrate that despite the immaturity of the auditory pathways, the AC is more adaptive to maternal sounds than environmental noise. Further studies are needed to better understand the neural processes underlying this early brain plasticity and its functional implications for future hearing and language development. PMID:25713382

  16. Brain-computer interfaces using capacitive measurement of visual or auditory steady-state responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyun Jae; Kim, Hyun Seok; Heo, Jeong; Lim, Yong Gyu; Park, Kwang Suk

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies have been intensely studied to provide alternative communication tools entirely independent of neuromuscular activities. Current BCI technologies use electroencephalogram (EEG) acquisition methods that require unpleasant gel injections, impractical preparations and clean-up procedures. The next generation of BCI technologies requires practical, user-friendly, nonintrusive EEG platforms in order to facilitate the application of laboratory work in real-world settings. Approach. A capacitive electrode that does not require an electrolytic gel or direct electrode-scalp contact is a potential alternative to the conventional wet electrode in future BCI systems. We have proposed a new capacitive EEG electrode that contains a conductive polymer-sensing surface, which enhances electrode performance. This paper presents results from five subjects who exhibited visual or auditory steady-state responses according to BCI using these new capacitive electrodes. The steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) spelling system and the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) binary decision system were employed. Main results. Offline tests demonstrated BCI performance high enough to be used in a BCI system (accuracy: 95.2%, ITR: 19.91 bpm for SSVEP BCI (6 s), accuracy: 82.6%, ITR: 1.48 bpm for ASSR BCI (14 s)) with the analysis time being slightly longer than that when wet electrodes were employed with the same BCI system (accuracy: 91.2%, ITR: 25.79 bpm for SSVEP BCI (4 s), accuracy: 81.3%, ITR: 1.57 bpm for ASSR BCI (12 s)). Subjects performed online BCI under the SSVEP paradigm in copy spelling mode and under the ASSR paradigm in selective attention mode with a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 17.78 ± 2.08 and 0.7 ± 0.24 bpm, respectively. Significance. The results of these experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using our capacitive EEG electrode in BCI systems. This capacitive electrode may become a flexible and

  17. Are you listening? Brain activation associated with sustained nonspatial auditory attention in the presence and absence of stimulation.

    PubMed

    Seydell-Greenwald, Anna; Greenberg, Adam S; Rauschecker, Josef P

    2014-05-01

    Neuroimaging studies investigating the voluntary (top-down) control of attention largely agree that this process recruits several frontal and parietal brain regions. Since most studies used attention tasks requiring several higher-order cognitive functions (e.g. working memory, semantic processing, temporal integration, spatial orienting) as well as different attentional mechanisms (attention shifting, distractor filtering), it is unclear what exactly the observed frontoparietal activations reflect. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigated, within the same participants, signal changes in (1) a "Simple Attention" task in which participants attended to a single melody, (2) a "Selective Attention" task in which they simultaneously ignored another melody, and (3) a "Beep Monitoring" task in which participants listened in silence for a faint beep. Compared to resting conditions with identical stimulation, all tasks produced robust activation increases in auditory cortex, cross-modal inhibition in visual and somatosensory cortex, and decreases in the default mode network, indicating that participants were indeed focusing their attention on the auditory domain. However, signal increases in frontal and parietal brain areas were only observed for tasks 1 and 2, but completely absent for task 3. These results lead to the following conclusions: under most conditions, frontoparietal activations are crucial for attention since they subserve higher-order cognitive functions inherently related to attention. However, under circumstances that minimize other demands, nonspatial auditory attention in the absence of stimulation can be maintained without concurrent frontal or parietal activations. PMID:23913818

  18. Repetition suppression and repetition enhancement underlie auditory memory-trace formation in the human brain: an MEG study.

    PubMed

    Recasens, Marc; Leung, Sumie; Grimm, Sabine; Nowak, Rafal; Escera, Carles

    2015-03-01

    The formation of echoic memory traces has traditionally been inferred from the enhanced responses to its deviations. The mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditory event-related potential (ERP) elicited between 100 and 250ms after sound deviation is an indirect index of regularity encoding that reflects a memory-based comparison process. Recently, repetition positivity (RP) has been described as a candidate ERP correlate of direct memory trace formation. RP consists of repetition suppression and enhancement effects occurring in different auditory components between 50 and 250ms after sound onset. However, the neuronal generators engaged in the encoding of repeated stimulus features have received little interest. This study intends to investigate the neuronal sources underlying the formation and strengthening of new memory traces by employing a roving-standard paradigm, where trains of different frequencies and different lengths are presented randomly. Source generators of repetition enhanced (RE) and suppressed (RS) activity were modeled using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy subjects. Our results show that, in line with RP findings, N1m (~95-150ms) activity is suppressed with stimulus repetition. In addition, we observed the emergence of a sustained field (~230-270ms) that showed RE. Source analysis revealed neuronal generators of RS and RE located in both auditory and non-auditory areas, like the medial parietal cortex and frontal areas. The different timing and location of neural generators involved in RS and RE points to the existence of functionally separated mechanisms devoted to acoustic memory-trace formation in different auditory processing stages of the human brain. PMID:25528656

  19. On the temporal window of auditory-brain system in connection with subjective responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouri, Kiminori

    2003-08-01

    The human auditory-brain system processes information extracted from autocorrelation function (ACF) of the source signal and interaural cross correlation function (IACF) of binaural sound signals which are associated with the left and right cerebral hemispheres, respectively. The purpose of this dissertation is to determine the desirable temporal window (2T: integration interval) for ACF and IACF mechanisms. For the ACF mechanism, the visual change of Φ(0), i.e., the power of ACF, was associated with the change of loudness, and it is shown that the recommended temporal window is given as about 30(τe)min [s]. The value of (τe)min is the minimum value of effective duration of the running ACF of the source signal. It is worth noticing from the experiment of EEG that the most preferred delay time of the first reflection sound is determined by the piece indicating (τe)min in the source signal. For the IACF mechanism, the temporal window is determined as below: The measured range of τIACC corresponding to subjective angle for the moving image sound depends on the temporal window. Here, the moving image was simulated by the use of two loudspeakers located at +/-20° in the horizontal plane, reproducing amplitude modulated band-limited noise alternatively. It is found that the temporal window has a wide range of values from 0.03 to 1 [s] for the modulation frequency below 0.2 Hz. Thesis advisor: Yoichi Ando Copies of this thesis written in English can be obtained from Kiminori Mouri, 5-3-3-1110 Harayama-dai, Sakai city, Osaka 590-0132, Japan. E-mail address: km529756@aol.com

  20. From Complex B1 Mapping to Local SAR Estimation for Human Brain MR Imaging Using Multi-channel Transceiver Coil at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortel, Pierre-François; Liu, Jiaen

    2014-01-01

    Elevated Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) associated with increased main magnetic field strength remains as a major safety concern in ultra-high-field (UHF) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications. The calculation of local SAR requires the knowledge of the electric field induced by radiofrequency (RF) excitation, and the local electrical properties of tissues. Since electric field distribution cannot be directly mapped in conventional MR measurements, SAR estimation is usually performed using numerical model-based electromagnetic simulations which, however, are highly time consuming and cannot account for the specific anatomy and tissue properties of the subject undergoing a scan. In the present study, starting from the measurable RF magnetic fields (B1) in MRI, we conducted a series of mathematical deduction to estimate the local, voxel-wise and subject-specific SAR for each single coil element using a multi-channel transceiver array coil. We first evaluated the feasibility of this approach in numerical simulations including two different human head models. We further conducted experimental study in a physical phantom and in two human subjects at 7T using a multi-channel transceiver head coil. Accuracy of the results is discussed in the context of predicting local SAR in the human brain at UHF MRI using multi-channel RF transmission. PMID:23508259

  1. Plasticity in the neural coding of auditory space in the mammalian brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Andrew J.; Parsons, Carl H.; Moore, David R.

    2000-10-01

    Sound localization relies on the neural processing of monaural and binaural spatial cues that arise from the way sounds interact with the head and external ears. Neurophysiological studies of animals raised with abnormal sensory inputs show that the map of auditory space in the superior colliculus is shaped during development by both auditory and visual experience. An example of this plasticity is provided by monaural occlusion during infancy, which leads to compensatory changes in auditory spatial tuning that tend to preserve the alignment between the neural representations of visual and auditory space. Adaptive changes also take place in sound localization behavior, as demonstrated by the fact that ferrets raised and tested with one ear plugged learn to localize as accurately as control animals. In both cases, these adjustments may involve greater use of monaural spectral cues provided by the other ear. Although plasticity in the auditory space map seems to be restricted to development, adult ferrets show some recovery of sound localization behavior after long-term monaural occlusion. The capacity for behavioral adaptation is, however, task dependent, because auditory spatial acuity and binaural unmasking (a measure of the spatial contribution to the "cocktail party effect") are permanently impaired by chronically plugging one ear, both in infancy but especially in adulthood. Experience-induced plasticity allows the neural circuitry underlying sound localization to be customized to individual characteristics, such as the size and shape of the head and ears, and to compensate for natural conductive hearing losses, including those associated with middle ear disease in infancy.

  2. Management of auditory hallucinations as a sequela of traumatic brain injury: a case report and a relevant literature review.

    PubMed

    Dobry, Yuriy; Novakovic, Vladan; Barkin, Robert L; Sundaram, Vikram K

    2014-01-01

    A patient with progressively worsening auditory hallucinations and 30-year history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) was reported. To formulate a comprehensive diagnostic and treatment approach to patients with auditory sensory disturbances and other neuropsychiatric sequela of a TBI, an electronic search of the major behavioral science databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Medline) and a textbook review were conducted to retrieve studies detailing the clinical characteristics, biological mechanisms, and therapeutic approaches to post-TBI psychosis. Additional references were incorporated from the bibliographies of the retrieved articles. Although infrequent, auditory hallucinations is a debilitating complication of TBI that can manifest itself 4-5 years after the occurrence of TBI. Because the age range of TBI survivors is 15-24 years, and the chance of developing post-TBI psychosis is reported to be up to 20%, this chronic neuropsychiatric complication and the available treatment options warrant close scrutiny from the clinical and the biomedical research community. Our case report and literature review demonstrates a clear need for a large, well-designed randomized trials to compare properties and efficacies of different, available, and promising pharmacotherapy agents for the treatment of post-TBI psychosis. PMID:24263164

  3. Brain systems for encoding and retrieval of auditory-verbal memory. An in vivo study in humans.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, P C; Frith, C D; Grasby, P M; Shallice, T; Frackowiak, R S; Dolan, R J

    1995-04-01

    Long-term auditory-verbal memory comprises, at a neuropsychological level, a number of distinct cognitive processes. In the present study we determined the brain systems engaged during encoding (experiment 1) and retrieval (experiment 2) of episodic auditory-verbal material. In the separate experiments, PET measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), an index of neural activity, were performed in normal volunteers during either the encoding or the retrieval of paired word associates. In experiment 1, a dual task interference paradigm was used to isolate areas involved in episodic encoding from those which would be concurrently activated by other cognitive processes associated with the presentation of paired associates, notably priming. In experiment 2, we used the cued retrieval of paired associates from episodic or from semantic memory in order to isolate the neural correlates of episodic memories. Encoding of episodic memory was associated with activation of the left prefrontal cortex and the retrosplenial area of the cingulate cortex, while retrieval from episodic memory was associated with activation of the precuneus bilaterally and of the right prefrontal cortex. These results are compatible with the patterns of activation reported in a previous PET memory experiment in which encoding and retrieval were studied concurrently. They also indicate that separate brain systems are engaged during the encoding and retrieval phases of episodic auditory-verbal memory. Retrieval from episodic memory engages a different, but overlapping, system to that engaged by retrieval from semantic memory, a finding that lends functional anatomical support to this neuropsychological distinction. PMID:7735882

  4. The Application of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to Functional Auditory Consequences of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Werff, Kathy R Vander

    2016-08-01

    This article reviews the auditory consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Because of growing awareness of mTBI as a public health concern and the diverse and heterogeneous nature of the individual consequences, it is important to provide audiologists and other health care providers with a better understanding of potential implications in the assessment of levels of function and disability for individual interdisciplinary remediation planning. In consideration of body structures and function, the mechanisms of injury that may result in peripheral or central auditory dysfunction in mTBI are reviewed, along with a broader scope of effects of injury to the brain. The activity limitations and participation restrictions that may affect assessment and management in the context of an individual's personal factors and their environment are considered. Finally, a review of management strategies for mTBI from an audiological perspective as part of a multidisciplinary team is included. PMID:27489400

  5. Altered Small-World Brain Networks in Temporal Lobe in Patients with Schizophrenia Performing an Auditory Oddball Task

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qingbao; Sui, Jing; Rachakonda, Srinivas; He, Hao; Pearlson, Godfrey; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2011-01-01

    The functional architecture of the human brain has been extensively described in terms of complex networks characterized by efficient small-world features. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found altered small-world topological properties of brain functional networks in patients with schizophrenia (SZ) during the resting state. However, little is known about the small-world properties of brain networks in the context of a task. In this study, we investigated the topological properties of human brain functional networks derived from fMRI during an auditory oddball (AOD) task. Data were obtained from 20 healthy controls and 20 SZ; A left and a right task-related network which consisted of the top activated voxels in temporal lobe of each hemisphere were analyzed separately. All voxels were detected by group independent component analysis. Connectivity of the left and right task-related networks were estimated by partial correlation analysis and thresholded to construct a set of undirected graphs. The small-worldness values were decreased in both hemispheres in SZ. In addition, SZ showed longer shortest path length and lower global efficiency only in the left task-related networks. These results suggested small-world attributes are altered during the AOD task-related networks in SZ which provided further evidences for brain dysfunction of connectivity in SZ. PMID:21369355

  6. Intracranial Recording and Source Localization of Auditory Brain Responses Elicited at the 50 ms Latency in Three Children Aged from 3 to 16 Years

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Eishi; Gumenyuk, Valentina; Juhász, Csaba; Wagner, Michael; Rothermel, Robert D.; Chugani, Harry T.

    2013-01-01

    Maturational studies of the auditory-evoked brain response at the 50 ms latency provide an insight into why this response is aberrant in a number of psychiatric disorders that have developmental origin. Here, using intracranial recordings we found that neuronal activity of the primary contributors to this response can be localised at the lateral part of Heschl’s gyrus already at the age of 3.5 years. This study provides results to support the notion that deviations in cognitive function(s) attributed to the auditory P50 in adults might involve abnormalities in neuronal activity of the frontal lobe or in the interaction between the frontal and temporal lobes. Validation and localisation of progenitors of the adults’ P50 in young children is a much-needed step in the understanding of the biological significance of different subcomponents that comprise the auditory P50 in the adult brain. In combination with other approaches investigating neuronal mechanisms of auditory P50, the present results contribute to the greater understanding of what and why neuronal activity underlying this response is aberrant in a number of brain dysfunctions. Moreover, the present source localisation results of auditory response at the 50 ms latency might be useful in paediatric neurosurgery practice. PMID:19701702

  7. Characteristics of Auditory Agnosia in a Child with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattiangadi, Nina; Pillion, Joseph P.; Slomine, Beth; Christensen, James; Trovato, Melissa K.; Speedie, Lynn J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a case that is unusual in many respects from other documented incidences of auditory agnosia, including the mechanism of injury, age of the individual, and location of neurological insult. The clinical presentation is one of disturbance in the perception of spoken language, music, pitch, emotional prosody, and temporal auditory…

  8. Brain Correlates of Early Auditory Processing Are Attenuated by Expectations for Time and Pitch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Kathrin

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated how auditory processing is modulated by expectations for time and pitch by analyzing reaction times and event-related potentials (ERPs). In two experiments, tone sequences were presented to the participants, who had to discriminate whether the last tone of the sequence contained a short gap or was continuous…

  9. UNRECOGNIZED ERRORS DUE TO ANALOG FILTERING OF THE BRAIN-STEM AUDITORY EVOKED RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) is used as a tool both in clinical evaluation and in toxicological research, where the subject is most often the laboratory rat. As in other species, interpretation of the rat BAER waveform is based on the latencies and amplitudes of ...

  10. Reduced resting-state brain activity in the default mode network in children with (central) auditory processing disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been a growing interest in Central Auditory Processing Disorder (C)APD. However, the neural correlates of (C)APD are poorly understood. Previous neuroimaging experiments have shown changes in the intrinsic activity of the brain in various cognitive deficits and brain disorders. The present study investigated the spontaneous brain activity in (C)APD subjects with resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI). Methods Thirteen children diagnosed with (C)APD and fifteen age and gender-matched controls participated in a rs-fMRI study during which they were asked to relax keeping their eyes open. Two different techniques of the rs-fMRI data analysis were used: Regional Homogeneity (ReHo) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), which approach is rare. Results Both methods of data analysis showed comparable results in the pattern of DMN activity within groups. Additionally, ReHo analysis revealed increased co-activation of the superior frontal gyrus, the posterior cingulate cortex/the precuneus in controls, compared to the (C)APD group. ICA yielded inconsistent results across groups. Conclusions Our ReHo results suggest that (C)APD children seem to present reduced regional homogeneity in brain regions considered a part of the default mode network (DMN). These findings might contribute to a better understanding of neural mechanisms of (C)APD. PMID:25261349

  11. Far-field brainstem responses evoked by vestibular and auditory stimuli exhibit increases in interpeak latency as brain temperature is decreased

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, L. F.; Horowitz, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of decreasing of brain temperature on the brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) in rats was investigated. Voltage pulses, applied to a piezoelectric crystal attached to the skull, were used to evoke stimuli in the auditory system by means of bone-conducted vibrations. The responses were recorded at 37 C and 34 C brain temperatures. The peaks of the BAER recorded at 34 C were delayed in comparison with the peaks from the 37 C wave, and the later peaks were more delayed than the earlier peaks. These results indicate that an increase in the interpeak latency occurs as the brain temperature is decreased. Preliminary experiments, in which responses to brief angular acceleration were used to measure the brainstem vestibular evoked response (BVER), have also indicated increases in the interpeak latency in response to the lowering of brain temperature.

  12. Evaluating auditory stream segregation of SAM tone sequences by subjective and objective psychoacoustical tasks, and brain activity

    PubMed Central

    Dolležal, Lena-Vanessa; Brechmann, André; Klump, Georg M.; Deike, Susann

    2014-01-01

    Auditory stream segregation refers to a segregated percept of signal streams with different acoustic features. Different approaches have been pursued in studies of stream segregation. In psychoacoustics, stream segregation has mostly been investigated with a subjective task asking the subjects to report their percept. Few studies have applied an objective task in which stream segregation is evaluated indirectly by determining thresholds for a percept that depends on whether auditory streams are segregated or not. Furthermore, both perceptual measures and physiological measures of brain activity have been employed but only little is known about their relation. How the results from different tasks and measures are related is evaluated in the present study using examples relying on the ABA- stimulation paradigm that apply the same stimuli. We presented A and B signals that were sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) tones providing purely temporal, spectral or both types of cues to evaluate perceptual stream segregation and its physiological correlate. Which types of cues are most prominent was determined by the choice of carrier and modulation frequencies (fmod) of the signals. In the subjective task subjects reported their percept and in the objective task we measured their sensitivity for detecting time-shifts of B signals in an ABA- sequence. As a further measure of processes underlying stream segregation we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). SAM tone parameters were chosen to evoke an integrated (1-stream), a segregated (2-stream), or an ambiguous percept by adjusting the fmod difference between A and B tones (Δfmod). The results of both psychoacoustical tasks are significantly correlated. BOLD responses in fMRI depend on Δfmod between A and B SAM tones. The effect of Δfmod, however, differs between auditory cortex and frontal regions suggesting differences in representation related to the degree of perceptual ambiguity of the sequences

  13. A Trade-Off between Somatosensory and Auditory Related Brain Activity during Object Naming But Not Reading

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Thomas M.H.; Prejawa, Susan; Parker Jones, ‘Ōiwi; Vitkovitch, Melanie; Price, Cathy J.

    2015-01-01

    The parietal operculum, particularly the cytoarchitectonic area OP1 of the secondary somatosensory area (SII), is involved in somatosensory feedback. Using fMRI with 58 human subjects, we investigated task-dependent differences in SII/OP1 activity during three familiar speech production tasks: object naming, reading and repeatedly saying “1-2-3.” Bilateral SII/OP1 was significantly suppressed (relative to rest) during object naming, to a lesser extent when repeatedly saying “1-2-3” and not at all during reading. These results cannot be explained by task difficulty but the contrasting difference between naming and reading illustrates how the demands on somatosensory activity change with task, even when motor output (i.e., production of object names) is matched. To investigate what determined SII/OP1 deactivation during object naming, we searched the whole brain for areas where activity increased as that in SII/OP1 decreased. This across subject covariance analysis revealed a region in the right superior temporal sulcus (STS) that lies within the auditory cortex, and is activated by auditory feedback during speech production. The tradeoff between activity in SII/OP1 and STS was not observed during reading, which showed significantly more activation than naming in both SII/OP1 and STS bilaterally. These findings suggest that, although object naming is more error prone than reading, subjects can afford to rely more or less on somatosensory or auditory feedback during naming. In contrast, fast and efficient error-free reading places more consistent demands on both types of feedback, perhaps because of the potential for increased competition between lexical and sublexical codes at the articulatory level. PMID:25788691

  14. A case of ataxic diplegia, mental retardation, congenital nystagmus and abnormal auditory brain stem responses showing only waves I and II.

    PubMed

    Aiba, K; Yokochi, K; Ishikawa, T

    1986-01-01

    A three-year-old boy who had ataxic diplegia, mental retardation, horizontal pendular nystagmus with head nodding and abnormal auditory brain stem responses showing only waves I and II was presented. His clinical features coincided with recent reports in the Japanese literature of cases of a new syndrome that is congenital in origin and seen only in boys. PMID:3826555

  15. Suppression and facilitation of auditory neurons through coordinated acoustic and midbrain stimulation: investigating a deep brain stimulator for tinnitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offutt, Sarah J.; Ryan, Kellie J.; Konop, Alexander E.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. The inferior colliculus (IC) is the primary processing center of auditory information in the midbrain and is one site of tinnitus-related activity. One potential option for suppressing the tinnitus percept is through deep brain stimulation via the auditory midbrain implant (AMI), which is designed for hearing restoration and is already being implanted in deaf patients who also have tinnitus. However, to assess the feasibility of AMI stimulation for tinnitus treatment we first need to characterize the functional connectivity within the IC. Previous studies have suggested modulatory projections from the dorsal cortex of the IC (ICD) to the central nucleus of the IC (ICC), though the functional properties of these projections need to be determined. Approach. In this study, we investigated the effects of electrical stimulation of the ICD on acoustic-driven activity within the ICC in ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs. Main Results. We observed ICD stimulation induces both suppressive and facilitatory changes across ICC that can occur immediately during stimulation and remain after stimulation. Additionally, ICD stimulation paired with broadband noise stimulation at a specific delay can induce greater suppressive than facilitatory effects, especially when stimulating in more rostral and medial ICD locations. Significance. These findings demonstrate that ICD stimulation can induce specific types of plastic changes in ICC activity, which may be relevant for treating tinnitus. By using the AMI with electrode sites positioned with the ICD and the ICC, the modulatory effects of ICD stimulation can be tested directly in tinnitus patients.

  16. Processing of species-specific auditory patterns in the cricket brain by ascending, local, and descending neurons during standing and walking

    PubMed Central

    Zorović, M.

    2011-01-01

    The recognition of the male calling song is essential for phonotaxis in female crickets. We investigated the responses toward different models of song patterns by ascending, local, and descending neurons in the brain of standing and walking crickets. We describe results for two ascending, three local, and two descending interneurons. Characteristic dendritic and axonal arborizations of the local and descending neurons indicate a flow of auditory information from the ascending interneurons toward the lateral accessory lobes and point toward the relevance of this brain region for cricket phonotaxis. Two aspects of auditory processing were studied: the tuning of interneuron activity to pulse repetition rate and the precision of pattern copying. Whereas ascending neurons exhibited weak, low-pass properties, local neurons showed both low- and band-pass properties, and descending neurons represented clear band-pass filters. Accurate copying of single pulses was found at all three levels of the auditory pathway. Animals were walking on a trackball, which allowed an assessment of the effect that walking has on auditory processing. During walking, all neurons were additionally activated, and in most neurons, the spike rate was correlated to walking velocity. The number of spikes elicited by a chirp increased with walking only in ascending neurons, whereas the peak instantaneous spike rate of the auditory responses increased on all levels of the processing pathway. Extra spiking activity resulted in a somewhat degraded copying of the pulse pattern in most neurons. PMID:21346206

  17. Processing of species-specific auditory patterns in the cricket brain by ascending, local, and descending neurons during standing and walking.

    PubMed

    Zorović, M; Hedwig, B

    2011-05-01

    The recognition of the male calling song is essential for phonotaxis in female crickets. We investigated the responses toward different models of song patterns by ascending, local, and descending neurons in the brain of standing and walking crickets. We describe results for two ascending, three local, and two descending interneurons. Characteristic dendritic and axonal arborizations of the local and descending neurons indicate a flow of auditory information from the ascending interneurons toward the lateral accessory lobes and point toward the relevance of this brain region for cricket phonotaxis. Two aspects of auditory processing were studied: the tuning of interneuron activity to pulse repetition rate and the precision of pattern copying. Whereas ascending neurons exhibited weak, low-pass properties, local neurons showed both low- and band-pass properties, and descending neurons represented clear band-pass filters. Accurate copying of single pulses was found at all three levels of the auditory pathway. Animals were walking on a trackball, which allowed an assessment of the effect that walking has on auditory processing. During walking, all neurons were additionally activated, and in most neurons, the spike rate was correlated to walking velocity. The number of spikes elicited by a chirp increased with walking only in ascending neurons, whereas the peak instantaneous spike rate of the auditory responses increased on all levels of the processing pathway. Extra spiking activity resulted in a somewhat degraded copying of the pulse pattern in most neurons. PMID:21346206

  18. Brain activity underlying auditory perceptual learning during short period training: simultaneous fMRI and EEG recording

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an accumulating body of evidence indicating that neuronal functional specificity to basic sensory stimulation is mutable and subject to experience. Although fMRI experiments have investigated changes in brain activity after relative to before perceptual learning, brain activity during perceptual learning has not been explored. This work investigated brain activity related to auditory frequency discrimination learning using a variational Bayesian approach for source localization, during simultaneous EEG and fMRI recording. We investigated whether the practice effects are determined solely by activity in stimulus-driven mechanisms or whether high-level attentional mechanisms, which are linked to the perceptual task, control the learning process. Results The results of fMRI analyses revealed significant attention and learning related activity in left and right superior temporal gyrus STG as well as the left inferior frontal gyrus IFG. Current source localization of simultaneously recorded EEG data was estimated using a variational Bayesian method. Analysis of current localized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus revealed gamma band activity correlated with behavioral performance. Conclusions Rapid improvement in task performance is accompanied by plastic changes in the sensory cortex as well as superior areas gated by selective attention. Together the fMRI and EEG results suggest that gamma band activity in the right STG and left IFG plays an important role during perceptual learning. PMID:23316957

  19. Potassium conductance dynamics confer robust spike-time precision in a neuromorphic model of the auditory brain stem

    PubMed Central

    Boahen, Kwabena

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental question in neuroscience is how neurons perform precise operations despite inherent variability. This question also applies to neuromorphic engineering, where low-power microchips emulate the brain using large populations of diverse silicon neurons. Biological neurons in the auditory pathway display precise spike timing, critical for sound localization and interpretation of complex waveforms such as speech, even though they are a heterogeneous population. Silicon neurons are also heterogeneous, due to a key design constraint in neuromorphic engineering: smaller transistors offer lower power consumption and more neurons per unit area of silicon, but also more variability between transistors and thus between silicon neurons. Utilizing this variability in a neuromorphic model of the auditory brain stem with 1,080 silicon neurons, we found that a low-voltage-activated potassium conductance (gKL) enables precise spike timing via two mechanisms: statically reducing the resting membrane time constant and dynamically suppressing late synaptic inputs. The relative contribution of these two mechanisms is unknown because blocking gKL in vitro eliminates dynamic adaptation but also lengthens the membrane time constant. We replaced gKL with a static leak in silico to recover the short membrane time constant and found that silicon neurons could mimic the spike-time precision of their biological counterparts, but only over a narrow range of stimulus intensities and biophysical parameters. The dynamics of gKL were required for precise spike timing robust to stimulus variation across a heterogeneous population of silicon neurons, thus explaining how neural and neuromorphic systems may perform precise operations despite inherent variability. PMID:23554436

  20. Long-range correlation properties in timing of skilled piano performance: the influence of auditory feedback and deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Herrojo Ruiz, María; Hong, Sang Bin; Hennig, Holger; Altenmüller, Eckart; Kühn, Andrea A.

    2014-01-01

    Unintentional timing deviations during musical performance can be conceived of as timing errors. However, recent research on humanizing computer-generated music has demonstrated that timing fluctuations that exhibit long-range temporal correlations (LRTC) are preferred by human listeners. This preference can be accounted for by the ubiquitous presence of LRTC in human tapping and rhythmic performances. Interestingly, the manifestation of LRTC in tapping behavior seems to be driven in a subject-specific manner by the LRTC properties of resting-state background cortical oscillatory activity. In this framework, the current study aimed to investigate whether propagation of timing deviations during the skilled, memorized piano performance (without metronome) of 17 professional pianists exhibits LRTC and whether the structure of the correlations is influenced by the presence or absence of auditory feedback. As an additional goal, we set out to investigate the influence of altering the dynamics along the cortico-basal-ganglia-thalamo-cortical network via deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the LRTC properties of musical performance. Specifically, we investigated temporal deviations during the skilled piano performance of a non-professional pianist who was treated with subthalamic-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) due to severe Parkinson's disease, with predominant tremor affecting his right upper extremity. In the tremor-affected right hand, the timing fluctuations of the performance exhibited random correlations with DBS OFF. By contrast, DBS restored long-range dependency in the temporal fluctuations, corresponding with the general motor improvement on DBS. Overall, the present investigations demonstrate the presence of LRTC in skilled piano performances, indicating that unintentional temporal deviations are correlated over a wide range of time scales. This phenomenon is stable after removal of the auditory feedback, but is altered by STN-DBS, which suggests that cortico

  1. Long-range correlation properties in timing of skilled piano performance: the influence of auditory feedback and deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Herrojo Ruiz, María; Hong, Sang Bin; Hennig, Holger; Altenmüller, Eckart; Kühn, Andrea A

    2014-01-01

    Unintentional timing deviations during musical performance can be conceived of as timing errors. However, recent research on humanizing computer-generated music has demonstrated that timing fluctuations that exhibit long-range temporal correlations (LRTC) are preferred by human listeners. This preference can be accounted for by the ubiquitous presence of LRTC in human tapping and rhythmic performances. Interestingly, the manifestation of LRTC in tapping behavior seems to be driven in a subject-specific manner by the LRTC properties of resting-state background cortical oscillatory activity. In this framework, the current study aimed to investigate whether propagation of timing deviations during the skilled, memorized piano performance (without metronome) of 17 professional pianists exhibits LRTC and whether the structure of the correlations is influenced by the presence or absence of auditory feedback. As an additional goal, we set out to investigate the influence of altering the dynamics along the cortico-basal-ganglia-thalamo-cortical network via deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the LRTC properties of musical performance. Specifically, we investigated temporal deviations during the skilled piano performance of a non-professional pianist who was treated with subthalamic-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) due to severe Parkinson's disease, with predominant tremor affecting his right upper extremity. In the tremor-affected right hand, the timing fluctuations of the performance exhibited random correlations with DBS OFF. By contrast, DBS restored long-range dependency in the temporal fluctuations, corresponding with the general motor improvement on DBS. Overall, the present investigations demonstrate the presence of LRTC in skilled piano performances, indicating that unintentional temporal deviations are correlated over a wide range of time scales. This phenomenon is stable after removal of the auditory feedback, but is altered by STN-DBS, which suggests that cortico

  2. “Where Do Auditory Hallucinations Come From?”—A Brain Morphometry Study of Schizophrenia Patients With Inner or Outer Space Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Plaze, Marion; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Penttilä, Jani; Januel, Dominique; de Beaurepaire, Renaud; Bellivier, Franck; Andoh, Jamila; Galinowski, André; Gallarda, Thierry; Artiges, Eric; Olié, Jean-Pierre; Mangin, Jean-François; Martinot, Jean-Luc

    2011-01-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations are a cardinal symptom of schizophrenia. Bleuler and Kraepelin distinguished 2 main classes of hallucinations: hallucinations heard outside the head (outer space, or external, hallucinations) and hallucinations heard inside the head (inner space, or internal, hallucinations). This distinction has been confirmed by recent phenomenological studies that identified 3 independent dimensions in auditory hallucinations: language complexity, self-other misattribution, and spatial location. Brain imaging studies in schizophrenia patients with auditory hallucinations have already investigated language complexity and self-other misattribution, but the neural substrate of hallucination spatial location remains unknown. Magnetic resonance images of 45 right-handed patients with schizophrenia and persistent auditory hallucinations and 20 healthy right-handed subjects were acquired. Two homogeneous subgroups of patients were defined based on the hallucination spatial location: patients with only outer space hallucinations (N = 12) and patients with only inner space hallucinations (N = 15). Between-group differences were then assessed using 2 complementary brain morphometry approaches: voxel-based morphometry and sulcus-based morphometry. Convergent anatomical differences were detected between the patient subgroups in the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ). In comparison to healthy subjects, opposite deviations in white matter volumes and sulcus displacements were found in patients with inner space hallucination and patients with outer space hallucination. The current results indicate that spatial location of auditory hallucinations is associated with the rTPJ anatomy, a key region of the “where” auditory pathway. The detected tilt in the sulcal junction suggests deviations during early brain maturation, when the superior temporal sulcus and its anterior terminal branch appear and merge. PMID:19666833

  3. MULTICHANNEL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, G.G.

    1959-11-10

    A multichannel pulse analyzer having several window amplifiers, each amplifier serving one group of channels, with a single fast pulse-lengthener and a single novel interrogation circuit serving all channels is described. A pulse followed too closely timewise by another pulse is disregarded by the interrogation circuit to prevent errors due to pulse pileup. The window amplifiers are connected to the pulse lengthener output, rather than the linear amplifier output, so need not have the fast response characteristic formerly required.

  4. Alterations in brain-stem auditory evoked potentials among drug addicts

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sonia; Sharma, Rajeev; Mittal, Shilekh; Thapar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the absolute latencies, the interpeak latencies, and amplitudes of different waveforms of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) in different drug abusers and controls, and to identify early neurological damage in persons who abuse different drugs so that proper counseling and timely intervention can be undertaken. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, BAEP’s were assessed by a data acquisition and analysis system in 58 male drug abusers in the age group of 15-45 years as well as in 30 age matched healthy controls. The absolute peak latencies and the interpeak latencies of BAEP were analyzed by applying one way ANOVA and student t-test. The study was carried out at the GGS Medical College, Faridkot, Punjab, India between July 2012 and May 2013. Results: The difference in the absolute peak latencies and interpeak latencies of BAEP in the 2 groups was found to be statistically significant in both the ears (p<0.05). However, the difference in the amplitude ratio in both the ears was found to be statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Chronic intoxication by different drugs has been extensively associated with prolonged absolute peak latencies and interpeak latencies of BAEP in drug abusers reflecting an adverse effect of drug dependence on neural transmission in central auditory nerve pathways. PMID:26166594

  5. [Topography of the Event-Related Brain Responses during Discrimination of Auditory Motion in Humans].

    PubMed

    Shestopalova, L B; Petropavlovskaia, E A; Vaitulevich, S Ph; Nikitin, N I

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the hemispheric asymmetry of auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) and mismatch negativity (MMN) during passive discrimination of the moving sound stimuli presented according to the oddball paradigm. The sound movement to the left/right from the head midline was produced by linear changes of the interaural time delay (ITD). It was found that the right-hemispheric N1 and P2 responses were more prominent than the left-hemispheric ones, especially in the fronto-lateral region. On the contrary, N250 and MMN responses demonstrated contralateral dominance in the fronto-lateral and fronto-medial regions. Direction of sound motion had no significant effect on the ERP or MMN topography. The right-hemispheric asymmetry of N1 increased with sound velocity. Maximal asymmetry of P2 was obtained with short stimulus trajectories. The contralateral bias of N250 and MMN increased with the spatial difference between standard and deviant stimuli. The results showed different type of hemispheric asymmetry for the early and late ERP components which could reflect the activity of distinct neural populations involved in the sensory and cognitive processing of the auditory input. PMID:26860001

  6. Hearing status in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia by auditory brain stem evoked response and transient evoked otoacoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Atighechi, Saeid; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Rozita; Karimi, Ghasem; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Eslami, Zia; Baradarnfar, Amin

    2011-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia at neonatal period is one of the major deteriorating factors of the auditory system. If left untreated, it may cause certain cerebral damage. This study aims to evaluate the impact of hyperbilirubinemia on the hearing of neonate. This study was conducted on 35 newborn babies with jaundice (bilirubin more than 20 mg/dL). Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) tests were performed, after treatment and one year after. ABR test results indicated that 26 children (74.3%) had normal hearing but 9 (25.7%) suffered from an impairment. As for TEOAE test, 30 children (85.7%) passed whereas the remaining (14.3%) seemed to be failures. The comparative results of the two tests pointed to autonomic neuropathy /autonomic dysreflexia symptoms in 5 babies. Due to the high incidence of autonomic neuropathy/autonomic dysreflexia among hyperbilirubinemic babies, screening in this regard seems reasonable. Our result emphasizes the necessity of more experiments on the afflicted areas. PMID:21598220

  7. Instrument specific brain activation in sensorimotor and auditory representation in musicians.

    PubMed

    Gebel, B; Braun, Ch; Kaza, E; Altenmüller, E; Lotze, M

    2013-07-01

    Musicians show a remarkable ability to interconnect motor patterns and sensory processing in the somatosensory and auditory domains. Many of these processes are specific for the instrument used. We were interested in the cerebral and cerebellar representations of these instrument-specific changes and therefore applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in two groups of instrumentalists with different instrumental training for comparable periods (approximately 15 years). The first group (trumpet players) uses tight finger and lip interaction; the second (pianists as control group) uses only the extremities for performance. fMRI tasks were balanced for instructions (piano and trumpet notes), sensory feedback (keypad and trumpet), and hand-lip interaction on the trumpet. During fMRI, both groups switched between different devices (trumpet or keypad) and performance was combined with or without auditory feedback. Playing the trumpet without any tone emission or using the mouthpiece showed an instrument training-specific activation increase in trumpet players. This was evident for the posterior-superior cerebellar hemisphere, the dominant primary sensorimotor cortex, and the left Heschl's gyrus. Additionally, trumpet players showed increased activity in the bilateral Heschl's gyrus during actual trumpet playing, although they showed significantly decreased loudness while playing with the mouthpiece in the scanner compared to pianists. PMID:23454048

  8. Auditory imagery: empirical findings.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L

    2010-03-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d) auditory imagery's relationship to perception and memory (detection, encoding, recall, mnemonic properties, phonological loop), and (e) individual differences in auditory imagery (in vividness, musical ability and experience, synesthesia, musical hallucinosis, schizophrenia, amusia) are considered. It is concluded that auditory imagery (a) preserves many structural and temporal properties of auditory stimuli, (b) can facilitate auditory discrimination but interfere with auditory detection, (c) involves many of the same brain areas as auditory perception, (d) is often but not necessarily influenced by subvocalization, (e) involves semantically interpreted information and expectancies, (f) involves depictive components and descriptive components, (g) can function as a mnemonic but is distinct from rehearsal, and (h) is related to musical ability and experience (although the mechanisms of that relationship are not clear). PMID:20192565

  9. The influence of cochlear spectral processing on the timing and amplitude of the speech-evoked auditory brain stem response

    PubMed Central

    Nuttall, Helen E.; Moore, David R.; Barry, Johanna G.; Krumbholz, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    The speech-evoked auditory brain stem response (speech ABR) is widely considered to provide an index of the quality of neural temporal encoding in the central auditory pathway. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which the speech ABR is shaped by spectral processing in the cochlea. High-pass noise masking was used to record speech ABRs from delimited octave-wide frequency bands between 0.5 and 8 kHz in normal-hearing young adults. The latency of the frequency-delimited responses decreased from the lowest to the highest frequency band by up to 3.6 ms. The observed frequency-latency function was compatible with model predictions based on wave V of the click ABR. The frequency-delimited speech ABR amplitude was largest in the 2- to 4-kHz frequency band and decreased toward both higher and lower frequency bands despite the predominance of low-frequency energy in the speech stimulus. We argue that the frequency dependence of speech ABR latency and amplitude results from the decrease in cochlear filter width with decreasing frequency. The results suggest that the amplitude and latency of the speech ABR may reflect interindividual differences in cochlear, as well as central, processing. The high-pass noise-masking technique provides a useful tool for differentiating between peripheral and central effects on the speech ABR. It can be used for further elucidating the neural basis of the perceptual speech deficits that have been associated with individual differences in speech ABR characteristics. PMID:25787954

  10. Brain dynamics that correlate with effects of learning on auditory distance perception

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Matthew G.; Mercado, Eduardo; Church, Barbara A.; Gramann, Klaus; Makeig, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Accuracy in auditory distance perception can improve with practice and varies for sounds differing in familiarity. Here, listeners were trained to judge the distances of English, Bengali, and backwards speech sources pre-recorded at near (2-m) and far (30-m) distances. Listeners' accuracy was tested before and after training. Improvements from pre-test to post-test were greater for forward speech, demonstrating a learning advantage for forward speech sounds. Independent component (IC) processes identified in electroencephalographic (EEG) data collected during pre- and post-testing revealed three clusters of ICs across subjects with stimulus-locked spectral perturbations related to learning and accuracy. One cluster exhibited a transient stimulus-locked increase in 4–8 Hz power (theta event-related synchronization; ERS) that was smaller after training and largest for backwards speech. For a left temporal cluster, 8–12 Hz decreases in power (alpha event-related desynchronization; ERD) were greatest for English speech and less prominent after training. In contrast, a cluster of IC processes centered at or near anterior portions of the medial frontal cortex showed learning-related enhancement of sustained increases in 10–16 Hz power (upper-alpha/low-beta ERS). The degree of this enhancement was positively correlated with the degree of behavioral improvements. Results suggest that neural dynamics in non-auditory cortical areas support distance judgments. Further, frontal cortical networks associated with attentional and/or working memory processes appear to play a role in perceptual learning for source distance. PMID:25538550

  11. Detection of brain magnetic fields with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hui; Hoffman, Dan; Baranga, Andrei; Romalis, Michael

    2006-05-01

    We report detection of magnetic fields generated by evoked brain activity with an atomic magnetometer. The measurements are performed with a high-density potassium magnetometer operating in a spin-exchange relaxation free regime. Compared to SQUID magnetometers which so far have been the only detectors capable of measuring the magnetic fields from the brain, atomic magnetometers have the advantages of higher sensitivity and spatial resolution, simple multi-channel recording, and no need for cryogenics. Using a multi-channel photodetector array we recorded magnetic fields from the brain correlated with an audio tone administered with a non-magnetic earphone. The spatial map of the magnetic field gives information about the location of the brain region responding to the auditory stimulation. Our results demonstrate the atomic magnetometer as an alternative and low cost technique for brain imaging applications, without using cryogenic apparatus.

  12. Auditory evoked potentials to spectro-temporal modulation of complex tones in normal subjects and patients with severe brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jones, S J; Vaz Pato, M; Sprague, L; Stokes, M; Munday, R; Haque, N

    2000-05-01

    In order to assess higher auditory processing capabilities, long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) were recorded to synthesized musical instrument tones in 22 post-comatose patients with severe brain injury causing variably attenuated behavioural responsiveness. On the basis of normative studies, three different types of spectro-temporal modulation were employed. When a continuous 'clarinet' tone changes pitch once every few seconds, N1/P2 potentials are evoked at latencies of approximately 90 and 180 ms, respectively. Their distribution in the fronto-central region is consistent with generators in the supratemporal cortex of both hemispheres. When the pitch is modulated at a much faster rate ( approximately 16 changes/s), responses to each change are virtually abolished but potentials with similar distribution are still elicited by changing the timbre (e.g. 'clarinet' to 'oboe') every few seconds. These responses appear to represent the cortical processes concerned with spectral pattern analysis and the grouping of frequency components to form sound 'objects'. Following a period of 16/s oscillation between two pitches, a more anteriorly distributed negativity is evoked on resumption of a steady pitch. Various lines of evidence suggest that this is probably equivalent to the 'mismatch negativity' (MMN), reflecting a pre-perceptual, memory-based process for detection of change in spectro-temporal sound patterns. This method requires no off-line subtraction of AEPs evoked by the onset of a tone, and the MMN is produced rapidly and robustly with considerably larger amplitude (usually >5 microV) than that to discontinuous pure tones. In the brain-injured patients, the presence of AEPs to two or more complex tone stimuli (in the combined assessment of two authors who were 'blind' to the clinical and behavioural data) was significantly associated with the demonstrable possession of discriminative hearing (the ability to respond differentially to verbal commands

  13. Multichannel fiber-based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the rat brain exposed to a laser-induced shock wave: comparison between ipsi- and contralateral hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaki, Mai; Kawauchi, Satoko; Okuda, Wataru; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Takemura, Toshiya; Sato, Shunichi; Nishidate, Izumi

    2015-03-01

    Due to considerable increase in the terrorism using explosive devices, blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) receives much attention worldwide. However, little is known about the pathology and mechanism of bTBI. In our previous study, we found that cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) occurred in the hemisphere exposed to a laser- induced shock wave (LISW), which was followed by long-lasting hypoxemia-oligemia. However, there is no information on the events occurred in the contralateral hemisphere. In this study, we performed multichannel fiber-based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the rat brain exposed to an LISW and compared the results for the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. A pair of optical fibers was put on the both exposed right and left parietal bone; white light was delivered to the brain through source fibers and diffuse reflectance signals were collected with detection fibers for both hemispheres. An LISW was applied to the left (ipsilateral) hemisphere. By analyzing reflectance signals, we evaluated occurrence of CSD, blood volume and oxygen saturation for both hemispheres. In the ipsilateral hemispheres, we observed the occurrence of CSD and long-lasting hypoxemia-oligemia in all rats examined (n=8), as observed in our previous study. In the contralateral hemisphere, on the other hand, no occurrence of CSD was observed, but we observed oligemia in 7 of 8 rats and hypoxemia in 1 of 8 rats, suggesting a mechanism to cause hypoxemia or oligemia or both that is (are) not directly associated with CSD in the contralateral hemisphere.

  14. Comparisons of MRI images, and auditory-related and vocal-related protein expressions in the brain of echolocation bats and rodents.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chun-Jen; Hsu, Chih-Hsiang; Lin, Ching-Lung; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Jen, Philip Hung-Sun

    2016-08-17

    Although echolocating bats and other mammals share the basic design of laryngeal apparatus for sound production and auditory system for sound reception, they have a specialized laryngeal mechanism for ultrasonic sound emissions as well as a highly developed auditory system for processing species-specific sounds. Because the sounds used by bats for echolocation and rodents for communication are quite different, there must be differences in the central nervous system devoted to producing and processing species-specific sounds between them. The present study examines the difference in the relative size of several brain structures and expression of auditory-related and vocal-related proteins in the central nervous system of echolocation bats and rodents. Here, we report that bats using constant frequency-frequency-modulated sounds (CF-FM bats) and FM bats for echolocation have a larger volume of midbrain nuclei (inferior and superior colliculi) and cerebellum relative to the size of the brain than rodents (mice and rats). However, the former have a smaller volume of the cerebrum and olfactory bulb, but greater expression of otoferlin and forkhead box protein P2 than the latter. Although the size of both midbrain colliculi is comparable in both CF-FM and FM bats, CF-FM bats have a larger cerebrum and greater expression of otoferlin and forkhead box protein P2 than FM bats. These differences in brain structure and protein expression are discussed in relation to their biologically relevant sounds and foraging behavior. PMID:27337384

  15. Brain activity is related to individual differences in the number of items stored in auditory short-term memory for pitch: evidence from magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Grimault, Stephan; Nolden, Sophie; Lefebvre, Christine; Vachon, François; Hyde, Krista; Peretz, Isabelle; Zatorre, Robert; Robitaille, Nicolas; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine brain activity related to the maintenance of non-verbal pitch information in auditory short-term memory (ASTM). We focused on brain activity that increased with the number of items effectively held in memory by the participants during the retention interval of an auditory memory task. We used very simple acoustic materials (i.e., pure tones that varied in pitch) that minimized activation from non-ASTM related systems. MEG revealed neural activity in frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices that increased with a greater number of items effectively held in memory by the participants during the maintenance of pitch representations in ASTM. The present results reinforce the functional role of frontal and temporal cortices in the retention of pitch information in ASTM. This is the first MEG study to provide both fine spatial localization and temporal resolution on the neural mechanisms of non-verbal ASTM for pitch in relation to individual differences in the capacity of ASTM. This research contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms mediating the representation and maintenance of basic non-verbal auditory features in the human brain. PMID:24642285

  16. Age-Related Changes in Transient and Oscillatory Brain Responses to Auditory Stimulation during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Catherine; Picton, Terence W.; Paus, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Maturational changes in the capacity to process quickly the temporal envelope of sound have been linked to language abilities in typically developing individuals. As part of a longitudinal study of brain maturation and cognitive development during adolescence, we employed dense-array EEG and spatiotemporal source analysis to characterize…

  17. The combined monitoring of brain stem auditory evoked potentials and intracranial pressure in coma. A study of 57 patients.

    PubMed Central

    García-Larrea, L; Artru, F; Bertrand, O; Pernier, J; Mauguière, F

    1992-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) was carried out in 57 comatose patients for periods ranging from 5 hours to 13 days. In 53 cases intracranial pressure (ICP) was also simultaneously monitored. The study of relative changes of evoked potentials over time proved more relevant to prognosis than the mere consideration of "statistical normality" of waveforms; thus progressive degradation of the BAEPs was associated with a bad outcome even if the responses remained within normal limits. Contrary to previous reports, a normal BAEP obtained during the second week of coma did not necessarily indicate a good vital outcome; it could, however, do so in cases with a low probability of secondary insults. The simultaneous study of BAEPs and ICP showed that apparently significant (greater than 40 mm Hg) acute rises in ICP were not always followed by BAEP changes. The stability of BAEP's despite "significant" ICP rises was associated in our patients with a high probability of survival, while prolongation of central latency of BAEPs in response to ICP modifications was almost invariably followed by brain death. Continuous monitoring of brainstem responses provided a useful physiological counterpart to physical parameters such as ICP. Serial recording of cortical EPs should be added to BAEP monitoring to permit the early detection of rostrocaudal deterioration. Images PMID:1402970

  18. Neuronal coupling by endogenous electric fields: cable theory and applications to coincidence detector neurons in the auditory brain stem.

    PubMed

    Goldwyn, Joshua H; Rinzel, John

    2016-04-01

    The ongoing activity of neurons generates a spatially and time-varying field of extracellular voltage (Ve). ThisVefield reflects population-level neural activity, but does it modulate neural dynamics and the function of neural circuits? We provide a cable theory framework to study how a bundle of model neurons generatesVeand how thisVefeeds back and influences membrane potential (Vm). We find that these "ephaptic interactions" are small but not negligible. The model neural population can generateVewith millivolt-scale amplitude, and thisVeperturbs theVmof "nearby" cables and effectively increases their electrotonic length. After using passive cable theory to systematically study ephaptic coupling, we explore a test case: the medial superior olive (MSO) in the auditory brain stem. The MSO is a possible locus of ephaptic interactions: sounds evoke large (millivolt scale)Vein vivo in this nucleus. TheVeresponse is thought to be generated by MSO neurons that perform a known neuronal computation with submillisecond temporal precision (coincidence detection to encode sound source location). Using a biophysically based model of MSO neurons, we find millivolt-scale ephaptic interactions consistent with the passive cable theory results. These subtle membrane potential perturbations induce changes in spike initiation threshold, spike time synchrony, and time difference sensitivity. These results suggest that ephaptic coupling may influence MSO function. PMID:26823512

  19. Diagnostic System Based on the Human AUDITORY-BRAIN Model for Measuring Environmental NOISE—AN Application to Railway Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAKAI, H.; HOTEHAMA, T.; ANDO, Y.; PRODI, N.; POMPOLI, R.

    2002-02-01

    Measurements of railway noise were conducted by use of a diagnostic system of regional environmental noise. The system is based on the model of the human auditory-brain system. The model consists of the interplay of autocorrelators and an interaural crosscorrelator acting on the pressure signals arriving at the ear entrances, and takes into account the specialization of left and right human cerebral hemispheres. Different kinds of railway noise were measured through binaural microphones of a dummy head. To characterize the railway noise, physical factors, extracted from the autocorrelation functions (ACF) and interaural crosscorrelation function (IACF) of binaural signals, were used. The factors extracted from ACF were (1) energy represented at the origin of the delay, Φ (0), (2) effective duration of the envelope of the normalized ACF, τe, (3) the delay time of the first peak, τ1, and (4) its amplitude,ø1 . The factors extracted from IACF were (5) IACC, (6) interaural delay time at which the IACC is defined, τIACC, and (7) width of the IACF at the τIACC,WIACC . The factor Φ (0) can be represented as a geometrical mean of energies at both ears as listening level, LL.

  20. Asymmetries of the human social brain in the visual, auditory and chemical modalities

    PubMed Central

    Brancucci, Alfredo; Lucci, Giuliana; Mazzatenta, Andrea; Tommasi, Luca

    2008-01-01

    Structural and functional asymmetries are present in many regions of the human brain responsible for motor control, sensory and cognitive functions and communication. Here, we focus on hemispheric asymmetries underlying the domain of social perception, broadly conceived as the analysis of information about other individuals based on acoustic, visual and chemical signals. By means of these cues the brain establishes the border between ‘self’ and ‘other’, and interprets the surrounding social world in terms of the physical and behavioural characteristics of conspecifics essential for impression formation and for creating bonds and relationships. We show that, considered from the standpoint of single- and multi-modal sensory analysis, the neural substrates of the perception of voices, faces, gestures, smells and pheromones, as evidenced by modern neuroimaging techniques, are characterized by a general pattern of right-hemispheric functional asymmetry that might benefit from other aspects of hemispheric lateralization rather than constituting a true specialization for social information. PMID:19064350

  1. Auditory Verbal Hallucinations and Brain Dysconnectivity in the Perisylvian Language Network: A Multimodal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson-Yeo, William; Allen, Paul; Catani, Marco; Williams, Steven; Barsaglini, Alessio; Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Lana M.; McGuire, Philip; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of schizophrenia have indicated that the development of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) is associated with altered structural and functional connectivity within the perisylvian language network. However, these studies focussed mainly on either structural or functional alterations in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Therefore, they were unable to examine the relationship between the 2 types of measures and could not establish whether the observed alterations would be expressed in the early stage of the illness. We used diffusion tensor imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine white matter integrity and functional connectivity within the left perisylvian language network of 46 individuals with an at risk mental state for psychosis or a first episode of the illness, including 28 who had developed AVH group and 18 who had not (nonauditory verbal hallucination [nAVH] group), and 22 healthy controls. Inferences were made at P < .05 (corrected). The nAVH group relative to healthy controls showed a reduction of both white matter integrity and functional connectivity as well as a disruption of the normal structure−function relationship along the fronto-temporal pathway. For all measures, the AVH group showed intermediate values between healthy controls and the nAVH group. These findings seem to suggest that, in the early stage of the disorder, a significant impairment of fronto-temporal connectivity is evident in patients who do not experience AVHs. This is consistent with the hypothesis that, whilst mild disruption of connectivity might still enable the emergence of AVHs, more severe alterations may prevent the occurrence of the hallucinatory experience. PMID:24361862

  2. Mammalian CNS barosensitivity: studied by brain-stem auditory-evoked potential in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruiyong; Xiao, Weibing; Li, Jun; He, Jia; Chen, Haiting

    2012-01-01

    High pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS) is an instinctive response of mammalian high-class nervous functions to increased hydrostatic pressure. Electrophysiological activity of mammalian central nervous system (CNS), including brainstem auditory-evoked potential (BAEP), has characteristic changes under pressure. Here we recorded BAEP of 63 mice exposed to 0-4.0 MPa. The results showed that interpeak latencies between wave I and wave IV (IPL1-4) and their changes under pressures (deltaIPL1-4) responded to increasing pressure in a biphase pattern, shortened under pressure from 0 to 0.7MPa, then prolonged later. There were significantly negative correlations between base IPL1-4s and deltaIPL1-4s (p < 0.01). Individual IPL1-4s were supposed to respond to increasing pressure in a relative steady pattern in accordance with its base IPL1-4s. Those with shorter-base IPL1-4 presented direct increases in IPL1-4. However, those with longer-base IPL1-4 had a decreased IPL1-4 under small to moderate pressure then rebounded later. Our results suggested that mammalian CNS functions were susceptible to small to moderate pressure, as well as a higher pressure than 1.0MPa. Mice, as a statistical mass, had an "optimum" pressure about 0.7MPa, rather than atmospheric pressure, referred as shortest IPL1-4s. An individual's response to high pressure might be relied on his base biological condition. Our results highlighted a new approach to investigate a practical strategy to medical selecting barotolerant candidates for deep divers. Diversity of individual susceptibility to hydrostatic pressure was under discussed. Underlying mechanisms of the "optimum" pressure for CNS function and its significance to neurophysiology remain open to further exploration. PMID:22400446

  3. Auditory brain-stem evoked potentials in cat after kainic acid induced neuronal loss. II. Cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zaaroor, M; Starr, A

    1991-01-01

    Auditory brain-stem potentials (ABRs) were studied in cats for up to 6 weeks after kainic acid had been injected unilaterally into the cochlear nucleus (CN) producing extensive neuronal destruction. The ABR components were labeled by the polarity at the vertex (P, for positive) and their order of appearance (the arabic numerals 1, 2, etc.). Component P1 can be further subdivided into 2 subcomponents, P1a and P1b. The assumed correspondence between the ABR components in cat and man is indicated by providing human Roman numeral designations in parentheses following the feline notation, e.g., P2 (III). To stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection, the ABR changes consisted of a loss of components P2 (III) and P3 (IV), and an attenuation and prolongation of latency of components P4 (V) and P5 (VI). The sustained potential shift from which the components arose was not affected. Wave P1a (I) was also slightly but significantly attenuated compatible with changes of excitability of nerve VIII in the cochlea secondary to cochlear nucleus destruction. Unexpectedly, to stimulation of the ear contralateral to the injection side, waves P2 (III), P3 (IV), and P4 (V) were also attenuated and delayed in latency but to a lesser degree than to stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection. Changes in binaural interaction of the ABR following cochlear nucleus lesions were similar to those produced in normal animals by introducing a temporal delay of the input to one ear. The results of the present set of studies using kainic acid to induce neuronal loss in auditory pathway when combined with prior lesion and recording experiments suggest that each of the components of the ABR requires the integrity of an anatomically diffuse system comprising a set of neurons, their axons, and the neurons on which they terminate. Disruption of any portion of the system will alter the amplitude and/or the latency of that component. PMID:1716569

  4. Eye movement preparation causes spatially-specific modulation of auditory processing: New evidence from event-related brain potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gherri, Elena; Driver, Jon; Eimer, Martin

    2009-01-01

    To investigate whether saccade preparation can modulate processing of auditory stimuli in a spatially-specific fashion, ERPs were recorded for a Saccade task, in which the direction of a prepared saccade was cued, prior to an imperative auditory stimulus indicating whether to execute or withhold that saccade. For comparison, we also ran a conventional Covert Attention task, where the same cue now indicated the direction for a covert endogenous attentional shift prior to an auditory target-nontarget discrimination. Lateralised components previously observed during cued shifts of attention (ADAN, LDAP) did not differ significantly across tasks, indicating commonalities between auditory spatial attention and oculomotor control. Moreover, in both tasks, spatially-specific modulation of auditory processing was subsequently found, with enhanced negativity for lateral auditory nontarget stimuli at cued versus uncued locations. This modulation started earlier and was more pronounced for the Covert Attention task, but was also reliably present in the Saccade task, demonstrating that the effects of covert saccade preparation on auditory processing can be similar to effects of endogenous covert attentional orienting, albeit smaller. These findings provide new evidence for similarities but also some differences between oculomotor preparation and shifts of endogenous spatial attention. They also show that saccade preparation can affect not just vision, but also sensory processing of auditory events. PMID:18614157

  5. Brain functional connectivity during the experience of thought blocks in schizophrenic patients with persistent auditory verbal hallucinations: an EEG study.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, Elias; Koutsoukos, Elias; Maillis, Antonis; Papadimitriou, George N; Stefanis, Costas

    2014-03-01

    Thought blocks (TBs) are characterized by regular interruptions in the stream of thought. Outward signs are abrupt and repeated interruptions in the flow of conversation or actions while subjective experience is that of a total and uncontrollable emptying of the mind. In the very limited bibliography regarding TB, the phenomenon is thought to be conceptualized as a disturbance of consciousness that can be attributed to stoppages of continuous information processing due to an increase in the volume of information to be processed. In an attempt to investigate potential expression of the phenomenon on the functional properties of electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, an EEG study was contacted in schizophrenic patients with persisting auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) who additionally exhibited TBs. In this case, we hypothesized that the persistent and dense AVHs could serve the role of an increased information flow that the brain is unable to process, a condition that is perceived by the person as TB. Phase synchronization analyses performed on EEG segments during the experience of TBs showed that synchrony values exhibited a long-range common mode of coupling (grouped behavior) among the left temporal area and the remaining central and frontal brain areas. These common synchrony-fluctuation schemes were observed for 0.5 to 2s and were detected in a 4-s window following the estimated initiation of the phenomenon. The observation was frequency specific and detected in the broad alpha band region (6-12Hz). The introduction of synchrony entropy (SE) analysis applied on the cumulative synchrony distribution showed that TB states were characterized by an explicit preference of the system to be functioned at low values of synchrony, while the synchrony values are broadly distributed during the recovery state. Our results indicate that during TB states, the phase locking of several brain areas were converged uniformly in a narrow band of low synchrony values and in a

  6. The role of auditory transient and deviance processing in distraction of task performance: a combined behavioral and event-related brain potential study.

    PubMed

    Berti, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Distraction of goal-oriented performance by a sudden change in the auditory environment is an everyday life experience. Different types of changes can be distracting, including a sudden onset of a transient sound and a slight deviation of otherwise regular auditory background stimulation. With regard to deviance detection, it is assumed that slight changes in a continuous sequence of auditory stimuli are detected by a predictive coding mechanisms and it has been demonstrated that this mechanism is capable of distracting ongoing task performance. In contrast, it is open whether transient detection-which does not rely on predictive coding mechanisms-can trigger behavioral distraction, too. In the present study, the effect of rare auditory changes on visual task performance is tested in an auditory-visual cross-modal distraction paradigm. The rare changes are either embedded within a continuous standard stimulation (triggering deviance detection) or are presented within an otherwise silent situation (triggering transient detection). In the event-related brain potentials, deviants elicited the mismatch negativity (MMN) while transients elicited an enhanced N1 component, mirroring pre-attentive change detection in both conditions but on the basis of different neuro-cognitive processes. These sensory components are followed by attention related ERP components including the P3a and the reorienting negativity (RON). This demonstrates that both types of changes trigger switches of attention. Finally, distraction of task performance is observable, too, but the impact of deviants is higher compared to transients. These findings suggest different routes of distraction allowing for the automatic processing of a wide range of potentially relevant changes in the environment as a pre-requisite for adaptive behavior. PMID:23874278

  7. Evidence of a visual-to-auditory cross-modal sensory gating phenomenon as reflected by the human P50 event-related brain potential modulation.

    PubMed

    Lebib, Riadh; Papo, David; de Bode, Stella; Baudonnière, Pierre Marie

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the existence of a cross-modal sensory gating reflected by the modulation of an early electrophysiological index, the P50 component. We analyzed event-related brain potentials elicited by audiovisual speech stimuli manipulated along two dimensions: congruency and discriminability. The results showed that the P50 was attenuated when visual and auditory speech information were redundant (i.e. congruent), in comparison with this same event-related potential component elicited with discrepant audiovisual dubbing. When hard to discriminate, however, bimodal incongruent speech stimuli elicited a similar pattern of P50 attenuation. We concluded to the existence of a visual-to-auditory cross-modal sensory gating phenomenon. These results corroborate previous findings revealing a very early audiovisual interaction during speech perception. Finally, we postulated that the sensory gating system included a cross-modal dimension. PMID:12697279

  8. Conventional and cross-correlation brain-stem auditory evoked responses in the white leghorn chick: rate manipulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkard, R.; Jones, S.; Jones, T.

    1994-01-01

    Rate-dependent changes in the chick brain-stem auditory evoked response (BAER) using conventional averaging and a cross-correlation technique were investigated. Five 15- to 19-day-old white leghorn chicks were anesthetized with Chloropent. In each chick, the left ear was acoustically stimulated. Electrical pulses of 0.1-ms duration were shaped, attenuated, and passed through a current driver to an Etymotic ER-2 which was sealed in the ear canal. Electrical activity from stainless-steel electrodes was amplified, filtered (300-3000 Hz) and digitized at 20 kHz. Click levels included 70 and 90 dB peSPL. In each animal, conventional BAERs were obtained at rates ranging from 5 to 90 Hz. BAERs were also obtained using a cross-correlation technique involving pseudorandom pulse sequences called maximum length sequences (MLSs). The minimum time between pulses, called the minimum pulse interval (MPI), ranged from 0.5 to 6 ms. Two BAERs were obtained for each condition. Dependent variables included the latency and amplitude of the cochlear microphonic (CM), wave 2 and wave 3. BAERs were observed in all chicks, for all level by rate combinations for both conventional and MLS BAERs. There was no effect of click level or rate on the latency of the CM. The latency of waves 2 and 3 increased with decreasing click level and increasing rate. CM amplitude decreased with decreasing click level, but was not influenced by click rate for the 70 dB peSPL condition. For the 90 dB peSPL click, CM amplitude was uninfluenced by click rate for conventional averaging. For MLS BAERs, CM amplitude was similar to conventional averaging for longer MPIs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  9. An fMRI Study of Auditory Orienting and Inhibition of Return in Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Yeo, Ronald A.; Pena, Amanda; Ling, Josef M.; Klimaj, Stefan; Campbell, Richard; Doezema, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Studies in adult mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) have shown that two key measures of attention, spatial reorienting and inhibition of return (IOR), are impaired during the first few weeks of injury. However, it is currently unknown whether similar deficits exist following pediatric mTBI. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the effects of semi-acute mTBI (<3 weeks post-injury) on auditory orienting in 14 pediatric mTBI patients (age 13.50±1.83 years; education: 6.86±1.88 years), and 14 healthy controls (age 13.29±2.09 years; education: 7.21±2.08 years), matched for age and years of education. The results indicated that patients with mTBI showed subtle (i.e., moderate effect sizes) but non-significant deficits on formal neuropsychological testing and during IOR. In contrast, functional imaging results indicated that patients with mTBI demonstrated significantly decreased activation within the bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus, thalamus, basal ganglia, midbrain nuclei, and cerebellum. The spatial topography of hypoactivation was very similar to our previous study in adults, suggesting that subcortical structures may be particularly affected by the initial biomechanical forces in mTBI. Current results also suggest that fMRI may be a more sensitive tool for identifying semi-acute effects of mTBI than the procedures currently used in clinical practice, such as neuropsychological testing and structural scans. fMRI findings could potentially serve as a biomarker for measuring the subtle injury caused by mTBI, and documenting the course of recovery. PMID:22533632

  10. Differences in brain circuitry for appetitive and reactive aggression as revealed by realistic auditory scripts

    PubMed Central

    Moran, James K.; Weierstall, Roland; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is thought to divide into two motivational elements: The first being a self-defensively motivated aggression against threat and a second, hedonically motivated “appetitive” aggression. Appetitive aggression is the less understood of the two, often only researched within abnormal psychology. Our approach is to understand it as a universal and adaptive response, and examine the functional neural activity of ordinary men (N = 50) presented with an imaginative listening task involving a murderer describing a kill. We manipulated motivational context in a between-subjects design to evoke appetitive or reactive aggression, against a neutral control, measuring activity with Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Results show differences in left frontal regions in delta (2–5 Hz) and alpha band (8–12 Hz) for aggressive conditions and right parietal delta activity differentiating appetitive and reactive aggression. These results validate the distinction of reward-driven appetitive aggression from reactive aggression in ordinary populations at the level of functional neural brain circuitry. PMID:25538590

  11. Auditory brain-stem evoked potentials in cat after kainic acid induced neuronal loss. I. Superior olivary complex.

    PubMed

    Zaaroor, M; Starr, A

    1991-01-01

    Auditory brain-stem potentials (ABRs) were studied in cats for up to 45 days after kainic acid had been injected unilaterally or bilaterally into the superior olivary complex (SOC) to produce neuronal destruction while sparing fibers of passage and the terminals of axons of extrinsic origin connecting to SOC neurons. The components of the ABR in cat were labeled by their polarity at the vertex (P, for positive) and their order of appearance (the arabic numerals 1, 2, etc.). Component P1 can be further subdivided into 2 subcomponents labeled P1a and P1b. The correspondences we have assumed between the ABR components in cat and man are indicated by providing a Roman numeral designation for the human component in parentheses following the feline notation, e.g., P4 (V). With bilateral SOC destruction, there was a significant and marked attenuation of waves P2 (III), P3 (IV), P4 (V), P5 (VI), and the sustained potential shift (SPS) amounting to as much as 80% of preoperative values. Following unilateral SOC destruction the attenuation of many of these same ABR components, in response to stimulation of either ear, was up to 50%. No component of the ABR was totally abolished even when the SOC was lesioned 100% bilaterally. In unilaterally lesioned cats with extensive neuronal loss (greater than 75%) the latencies of the components beginning at P3 (IV) were delayed to stimulation of the ear ipsilateral to the injection site but not to stimulation of the ear contralateral to the injection. Binaural interaction components of the ABR were affected in proportion to the attenuation of the ABR. These results are compatible with multiple brain regions contributing to the generation of the components of the ABR beginning with P2 (III) and that components P3 (IV), P4 (V), and P5 (VI) and the sustained potential shift depend particularly on the integrity of the neurons of the SOC bilaterally. The neurons of the lateral subdivision (LSO) and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body

  12. Central auditory disorders: toward a neuropsychology of auditory objects

    PubMed Central

    Goll, Johanna C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Analysis of the auditory environment, source identification and vocal communication all require efficient brain mechanisms for disambiguating, representing and understanding complex natural sounds as ‘auditory objects’. Failure of these mechanisms leads to a diverse spectrum of clinical deficits. Here we review current evidence concerning the phenomenology, mechanisms and brain substrates of auditory agnosias and related disorders of auditory object processing. Recent findings Analysis of lesions causing auditory object deficits has revealed certain broad anatomical correlations: deficient parsing of the auditory scene is associated with lesions involving the parieto-temporal junction, while selective disorders of sound recognition occur with more anterior temporal lobe or extra-temporal damage. Distributed neural networks have been increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of such disorders as developmental dyslexia, congenital amusia and tinnitus. Auditory category deficits may arise from defective interaction of spectrotemporal encoding and executive and mnestic processes. Dedicated brain mechanisms are likely to process specialised sound objects such as voices and melodies. Summary Emerging empirical evidence suggests a clinically relevant, hierarchical and fractionated neuropsychological model of auditory object processing that provides a framework for understanding auditory agnosias and makes specific predictions to direct future work. PMID:20975559

  13. Bilinguals at the "cocktail party": dissociable neural activity in auditory-linguistic brain regions reveals neurobiological basis for nonnative listeners' speech-in-noise recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Dexter, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    We examined a consistent deficit observed in bilinguals: poorer speech-in-noise (SIN) comprehension for their nonnative language. We recorded neuroelectric mismatch potentials in mono- and bi-lingual listeners in response to contrastive speech sounds in noise. Behaviorally, late bilinguals required ∼10dB more favorable signal-to-noise ratios to match monolinguals' SIN abilities. Source analysis of cortical activity demonstrated monotonic increase in response latency with noise in superior temporal gyrus (STG) for both groups, suggesting parallel degradation of speech representations in auditory cortex. Contrastively, we found differential speech encoding between groups within inferior frontal gyrus (IFG)-adjacent to Broca's area-where noise delays observed in nonnative listeners were offset in monolinguals. Notably, brain-behavior correspondences double dissociated between language groups: STG activation predicted bilinguals' SIN, whereas IFG activation predicted monolinguals' performance. We infer higher-order brain areas act compensatorily to enhance impoverished sensory representations but only when degraded speech recruits linguistic brain mechanisms downstream from initial auditory-sensory inputs. PMID:25747886

  14. Loss of auditory sensitivity from inner hair cell synaptopathy can be centrally compensated in the young but not old brain.

    PubMed

    Möhrle, Dorit; Ni, Kun; Varakina, Ksenya; Bing, Dan; Lee, Sze Chim; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Knipper, Marlies; Rüttiger, Lukas

    2016-08-01

    A dramatic shift in societal demographics will lead to rapid growth in the number of older people with hearing deficits. Poorer performance in suprathreshold speech understanding and temporal processing with age has been previously linked with progressing inner hair cell (IHC) synaptopathy that precedes age-dependent elevation of auditory thresholds. We compared central sound responsiveness after acoustic trauma in young, middle-aged, and older rats. We demonstrate that IHC synaptopathy progresses from middle age onward and hearing threshold becomes elevated from old age onward. Interestingly, middle-aged animals could centrally compensate for the loss of auditory fiber activity through an increase in late auditory brainstem responses (late auditory brainstem response wave) linked to shortening of central response latencies. In contrast, old animals failed to restore central responsiveness, which correlated with reduced temporal resolution in responding to amplitude changes. These findings may suggest that cochlear IHC synaptopathy with age does not necessarily induce temporal auditory coding deficits, as long as the capacity to generate neuronal gain maintains normal sound-induced central amplitudes. PMID:27318145

  15. A Longitudinal Evaluation of the Speech Perception Capabilities of Children Using Multichannel Tactile Vocoders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilers, Rebecca E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Thirty children with profound hearing impairments were followed over a three-year period with a semiannual battery of speech perception tests. Testing utilized multichannel tactile vocoders in variations of tactile and/or auditory/visual conditions. Performance in the tactile plus auditory condition generally exceeded that in other conditions,…

  16. fMRI reveals lateralized pattern of brain activity modulated by the metrics of stimuli during auditory rhyme processing.

    PubMed

    Hurschler, Martina A; Liem, Franziskus; Oechslin, Mathias; Stämpfli, Philipp; Meyer, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Our fMRI study investigates auditory rhyme processing in spoken language to further elucidate the topic of functional lateralization of language processing. During scanning, 14 subjects listened to four different types of versed word strings and subsequently performed either a rhyme or a meter detection task. Our results show lateralization to auditory-related temporal regions in the right hemisphere irrespective of task. As for the left hemisphere we report responses in the supramarginal gyrus as well as in the opercular part of the inferior frontal gyrus modulated by the presence of regular meter and rhyme. The interaction of rhyme and meter was associated with increased involvement of the superior temporal sulcus and the putamen of the right hemisphere. Overall, these findings support the notion of right-hemispheric specialization for suprasegmental analyses during processing of spoken sentences and provide neuroimaging evidence for the influence of metrics on auditory rhyme processing. PMID:26025759

  17. Volumetric comparison of auditory brain nuclei in ear-tufted Araucanas with those in other chicken breeds.

    PubMed

    Frahm, H D; Rehkämper, G

    1998-01-01

    Domestic chickens of the breed Araucana have ear-tufts, which affect the structure of the ear canal. Volumes of auditory brainstem nuclei were measured in three chicken breeds in order to evaluate whether the characteristics described for ear-tufted individuals of the Araucana chicken breed (alterations in the outer and middle ear anatomy) are associated with changes in the size of the relevant auditory nuclei. Allometric comparison reveals no size reductions of the angular, laminar and superior olivary nuclei in Araucanas, compared to Japanese Bantams and Brown Leghorns, but a slight increase in the size of the magnocellular nucleus. PMID:9672109

  18. The Role of Animacy in the Real Time Comprehension of Mandarin Chinese: Evidence from Auditory Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipp, Markus; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina; Bisang, Walter; Schlesewsky, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Two auditory ERP studies examined the role of animacy in sentence comprehension in Mandarin Chinese by comparing active and passive sentences in simple verb-final (Experiment 1) and relative clause constructions (Experiment 2). In addition to the voice manipulation (which modulated the assignment of actor and undergoer roles to the arguments),…

  19. Information processing becomes slower and predominantly serial in aging: Characterization of response-related brain potentials in an auditory-visual distraction-attention task.

    PubMed

    Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aging and attentional capture provoked by novel auditory stimuli on behavior (reaction time [RT], hits) and on response-related brain potentials (preRFP, CRN, postRFP, parietalRP) to target visual stimuli. Twenty-two young, 27 middle-aged, and 24 old adults performed an auditory-visual distraction-attention task. The RTs and latencies of preRFP, postRFP and parietalRT were longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants, reflecting the well-established age-related slowing of processing and performance. The inter-peak latencies (P3b-preRFP, preRFP-parietalRP, parietalRP-postRFP) were also longer in old and middle-aged than in young participants, further indicating an age-related tendency to increased predominance of serial (rather than parallel) processing of information, and that preRFP, CRN, postRFP, and parietalRP represent different cognitive processes from those indexed by the stimulus-related P3b. Finally, a distraction effect in performance (all three groups) and in postRFP latency (only middle-aged group) was also observed. PMID:26589359

  20. Design and evaluation of area-efficient and wide-range impedance analysis circuit for multichannel high-quality brain signal recording system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwagami, Takuma; Tani, Takaharu; Ito, Keita; Nishino, Satoru; Harashima, Takuya; Kino, Hisashi; Kiyoyama, Koji; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2016-04-01

    To enable chronic and stable neural recording, we have been developing an implantable multichannel neural recording system with impedance analysis functions. One of the important things for high-quality neural signal recording is to maintain well interfaces between recording electrodes and tissues. We have proposed an impedance analysis circuit with a very small circuit area, which is implemented in a multichannel neural recording and stimulating system. In this paper, we focused on the design of an impedance analysis circuit configuration and the evaluation of a minimal voltage measurement unit. The proposed circuit has a very small circuit area of 0.23 mm2 designed with 0.18 µm CMOS technology and can measure interface impedances between recording electrodes and tissues in ultrawide ranges from 100 Ω to 10 MΩ. In addition, we also successfully acquired interface impedances using the proposed circuit in agarose gel experiments.

  1. The Drosophila Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoff-Falk, Grace; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Development of a functional auditory system in Drosophila requires specification and differentiation of the chordotonal sensilla of Johnston’s organ (JO) in the antenna, correct axonal targeting to the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) in the brain, and synaptic connections to neurons in the downstream circuit. Chordotonal development in JO is functionally complicated by structural, molecular and functional diversity that is not yet fully understood, and construction of the auditory neural circuitry is only beginning to unfold. Here we describe our current understanding of developmental and molecular mechanisms that generate the exquisite functions of the Drosophila auditory system, emphasizing recent progress and highlighting important new questions arising from research on this remarkable sensory system. PMID:24719289

  2. Site of auditory plasticity in the brain stem (VLVp) of the owl revealed by early monaural occlusion.

    PubMed

    Mogdans, J; Knudsen, E I

    1994-12-01

    1. The optic tectum of the barn owl contains a physiological map of interaural level difference (ILD) that underlies, in part, its map of auditory space. Monaural occlusion shifts the range of ILDs experienced by an animal and alters the correspondence of ILDs with source locations. Chronic monaural occlusion during development induces an adaptive shift in the tectal ILD map that compensates for the effects of the earplug. The data presented in this study indicate that one site of plasticity underlying this adaptive adjustment is in the posterior division of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VLVp), the first site of ILD comparison in the auditory pathway. 2. Single and multiple unit sites were recorded in the optic tecta and VLVps of ketamine-anesthetized owls. The owls were raised from 4 wk of age with one ear occluded with an earplug. Auditory testing, using digitally synthesized dichotic stimuli, was carried out 8-16 wk later with the earplug removed. The adaptive adjustment in ILD coding in each bird was quantified as the shift from normal ILD tuning measured in the optic tectum. Evidence of adaptive adjustment in the VLVp was based on statistical differences between the VLVp's ipsilateral and contralateral to the occluded ear in the sensitivity of units to excitatory-ear and inhibitory-ear stimulation. 3. The balance of excitatory to inhibitory influences on VLVp units was shifted in the adaptive direction in six out of eight owls. In three of these owls, adaptive differences in inhibition, but not in excitation, were found. For this group of owls, the patterns of response properties across the two VLVps can only be accounted for by plasticity in the VLVp. For the other three owls, the possibility that the difference between the two VLVps resulted from damage to one of the VLVps could not be eliminated, and for one of these, plasticity at a more peripheral site (in the cochlea or cochlear nucleus) could also explain the data. In the remaining two

  3. Sex, acceleration, brain imaging, and rhesus monkeys: Converging evidence for an evolutionary bias for looming auditory motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhoff, John G.

    2003-04-01

    Increasing acoustic intensity is a primary cue to looming auditory motion. Perceptual overestimation of increasing intensity could provide an evolutionary selective advantage by specifying that an approaching sound source is closer than actual, thus affording advanced warning and more time than expected to prepare for the arrival of the source. Here, multiple lines of converging evidence for this evolutionary hypothesis are presented. First, it is shown that intensity change specifying accelerating source approach changes in loudness more than equivalent intensity change specifying decelerating source approach. Second, consistent with evolutionary hunter-gatherer theories of sex-specific spatial abilities, it is shown that females have a significantly larger bias for rising intensity than males. Third, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with approaching and receding auditory motion, it is shown that approaching sources preferentially activate a specific neural network responsible for attention allocation, motor planning, and translating perception into action. Finally, it is shown that rhesus monkeys also exhibit a rising intensity bias by orienting longer to looming tones than to receding tones. Together these results illustrate an adaptive perceptual bias that has evolved because it provides a selective advantage in processing looming acoustic sources. [Work supported by NSF and CDC.

  4. Touch activates human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Martin; Caetano, Gina; Hlushchuk, Yevhen; Jousmäki, Veikko; Hari, Riitta

    2006-05-01

    Vibrotactile stimuli can facilitate hearing, both in hearing-impaired and in normally hearing people. Accordingly, the sounds of hands exploring a surface contribute to the explorer's haptic percepts. As a possible brain basis of such phenomena, functional brain imaging has identified activations specific to audiotactile interaction in secondary somatosensory cortex, auditory belt area, and posterior parietal cortex, depending on the quality and relative salience of the stimuli. We studied 13 subjects with non-invasive functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to search for auditory brain areas that would be activated by touch. Vibration bursts of 200 Hz were delivered to the subjects' fingers and palm and tactile pressure pulses to their fingertips. Noise bursts served to identify auditory cortex. Vibrotactile-auditory co-activation, addressed with minimal smoothing to obtain a conservative estimate, was found in an 85-mm3 region in the posterior auditory belt area. This co-activation could be related to facilitated hearing at the behavioral level, reflecting the analysis of sound-like temporal patterns in vibration. However, even tactile pulses (without any vibration) activated parts of the posterior auditory belt area, which therefore might subserve processing of audiotactile events that arise during dynamic contact between hands and environment. PMID:16488157

  5. Effect Of Electromagnetic Waves Emitted From Mobile Phone On Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potential In Adult Males.

    PubMed

    Singh, K

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone (MP) is commonly used communication tool. Electromagnetic waves (EMWs) emitted from MP may have potential health hazards. So, it was planned to study the effect of electromagnetic waves (EMWs) emitted from the mobile phone on brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) in male subjects in the age group of 20-40 years. BAEPs were recorded using standard method of 10-20 system of electrode placement and sound click stimuli of specified intensity, duration and frequency.Right ear was exposed to EMW emitted from MP for about 10 min. On comparison of before and after exposure to MP in right ear (found to be dominating ear), there was significant increase in latency of II, III (p < 0.05) and V (p < 0.001) wave, amplitude of I-Ia wave (p < 0.05) and decrease in IPL of III-V wave (P < 0.05) after exposure to MP. But no significant change was found in waves of BAEP in left ear before vs after MP. On comparison of right (having exposure routinely as found to be dominating ear) and left ears (not exposed to MP), before exposure to MP, IPL of IIl-V wave and amplitude of V-Va is more (< 0.001) in right ear compared to more latency of III and IV wave (< 0.001) in left ear. After exposure to MP, the amplitude of V-Va was (p < 0.05) more in right ear compared to left ear. In conclusion, EMWs emitted from MP affects the auditory potential. PMID:27530007

  6. Implicit learning of predictable sound sequences modulates human brain responses at different levels of the auditory hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Lecaignard, Françoise; Bertrand, Olivier; Gimenez, Gérard; Mattout, Jérémie; Caclin, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Deviant stimuli, violating regularities in a sensory environment, elicit the mismatch negativity (MMN), largely described in the Event-Related Potential literature. While it is widely accepted that the MMN reflects more than basic change detection, a comprehensive description of mental processes modulating this response is still lacking. Within the framework of predictive coding, deviance processing is part of an inference process where prediction errors (the mismatch between incoming sensations and predictions established through experience) are minimized. In this view, the MMN is a measure of prediction error, which yields specific expectations regarding its modulations by various experimental factors. In particular, it predicts that the MMN should decrease as the occurrence of a deviance becomes more predictable. We conducted a passive oddball EEG study and manipulated the predictability of sound sequences by means of different temporal structures. Importantly, our design allows comparing mismatch responses elicited by predictable and unpredictable violations of a simple repetition rule and therefore departs from previous studies that investigate violations of different time-scale regularities. We observed a decrease of the MMN with predictability and interestingly, a similar effect at earlier latencies, within 70 ms after deviance onset. Following these pre-attentive responses, a reduced P3a was measured in the case of predictable deviants. We conclude that early and late deviance responses reflect prediction errors, triggering belief updating within the auditory hierarchy. Beside, in this passive study, such perceptual inference appears to be modulated by higher-level implicit learning of sequence statistical structures. Our findings argue for a hierarchical model of auditory processing where predictive coding enables implicit extraction of environmental regularities. PMID:26441602

  7. Implicit learning of predictable sound sequences modulates human brain responses at different levels of the auditory hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Lecaignard, Françoise; Bertrand, Olivier; Gimenez, Gérard; Mattout, Jérémie; Caclin, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Deviant stimuli, violating regularities in a sensory environment, elicit the mismatch negativity (MMN), largely described in the Event-Related Potential literature. While it is widely accepted that the MMN reflects more than basic change detection, a comprehensive description of mental processes modulating this response is still lacking. Within the framework of predictive coding, deviance processing is part of an inference process where prediction errors (the mismatch between incoming sensations and predictions established through experience) are minimized. In this view, the MMN is a measure of prediction error, which yields specific expectations regarding its modulations by various experimental factors. In particular, it predicts that the MMN should decrease as the occurrence of a deviance becomes more predictable. We conducted a passive oddball EEG study and manipulated the predictability of sound sequences by means of different temporal structures. Importantly, our design allows comparing mismatch responses elicited by predictable and unpredictable violations of a simple repetition rule and therefore departs from previous studies that investigate violations of different time-scale regularities. We observed a decrease of the MMN with predictability and interestingly, a similar effect at earlier latencies, within 70 ms after deviance onset. Following these pre-attentive responses, a reduced P3a was measured in the case of predictable deviants. We conclude that early and late deviance responses reflect prediction errors, triggering belief updating within the auditory hierarchy. Beside, in this passive study, such perceptual inference appears to be modulated by higher-level implicit learning of sequence statistical structures. Our findings argue for a hierarchical model of auditory processing where predictive coding enables implicit extraction of environmental regularities. PMID:26441602

  8. Preferred EEG brain states at stimulus onset in a fixed interstimulus interval equiprobable auditory Go/NoGo task: a definitive study.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert J; De Blasio, Frances M; De Pascalis, Vilfredo; Karamacoska, Diana

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the occurrence of preferred EEG phase states at stimulus onset in an equiprobable auditory Go/NoGo task with a fixed interstimulus interval, and their effects on the resultant event-related potentials (ERPs). We used a sliding short-time FFT decomposition of the EEG at Cz for each trial to assess prestimulus EEG activity in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. We determined the phase of each 2 Hz narrow-band contributing to these four broad bands at 125 ms before each stimulus onset, and for the first time, avoided contamination from poststimulus EEG activity. This phase value was extrapolated 125 ms to obtain the phase at stimulus onset, combined into the broad-band phase, and used to sort trials into four phase groups for each of the four broad bands. For each band, ERPs were derived for each phase from the raw EEG activity at 19 sites. Data sets from each band were separately decomposed using temporal Principal Components Analyses with unrestricted VARIMAX rotation to extract N1-1, PN, P2, P3, SW and LP components. Each component was analysed as a function of EEG phase at stimulus onset in the context of a simple conceptualisation of orthogonal phase effects (cortical negativity vs. positivity, negative driving vs. positive driving, waxing vs. waning). The predicted non-random occurrence of phase-defined brain states was confirmed. The preferred states of negativity, negative driving, and waxing were each associated with more efficient stimulus processing, as reflected in amplitude differences of the components. The present results confirm the existence of preferred brain states and their impact on the efficiency of brain dynamics in perceptual and cognitive processing. PMID:25043955

  9. Cross-Modal Recruitment of Primary Visual Cortex by Auditory Stimuli in the Nonhuman Primate Brain: A Molecular Mapping Study

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Priscilla; Javadi Khomami, Pasha; Gharat, Amol; Zangenehpour, Shahin

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to only one component of audiovisual events can lead to cross-modal cortical activation. However, it is not certain whether such crossmodal recruitment can occur in the absence of explicit conditioning, semantic factors, or long-term associations. A recent study demonstrated that crossmodal cortical recruitment can occur even after a brief exposure to bimodal stimuli without semantic association. In addition, the authors showed that the primary visual cortex is under such crossmodal influence. In the present study, we used molecular activity mapping of the immediate early gene zif268. We found that animals, which had previously been exposed to a combination of auditory and visual stimuli, showed increased number of active neurons in the primary visual cortex when presented with sounds alone. As previously implied, this crossmodal activation appears to be the result of implicit associations of the two stimuli, likely driven by their spatiotemporal characteristics; it was observed after a relatively short period of exposure (~45 min) and lasted for a relatively long period after the initial exposure (~1 day). These results suggest that the previously reported findings may be directly rooted in the increased activity of the neurons occupying the primary visual cortex. PMID:22792489

  10. Noise-gated encoding of slow inputs by auditory brain stem neurons with a low-threshold K+ current.

    PubMed

    Gai, Yan; Doiron, Brent; Kotak, Vibhakar; Rinzel, John

    2009-12-01

    Phasic neurons, which do not fire repetitively to steady depolarization, are found at various stages of the auditory system. Phasic neurons are commonly described as band-pass filters because they do not respond to low-frequency inputs even when the amplitude is large. However, we show that phasic neurons can encode low-frequency inputs when noise is present. With a low-threshold potassium current (I(KLT)), a phasic neuron model responds to rising and falling phases of a subthreshold low-frequency signal with white noise. When the white noise was low-pass filtered, the phasic model also responded to the signal's trough but still not to the peak. In contrast, a tonic neuron model fired mostly to the signal's peak. To test the model predictions, whole cell slice recordings were obtained in the medial (MSO) and lateral (LSO) superior olivary neurons in gerbil from postnatal day 10 (P10) to 22. The phasic MSO neurons with strong I(KLT), mostly from gerbils aged P17 or older, showed firing patterns consistent with the preceding predictions. Moreover, injecting a virtual I(KLT) into weak-phasic MSO and tonic LSO neurons with putative weak or no I(KLT) (from gerbils younger than P17) shifted the neural response from the signal's peak to the rising phase. These findings advance our knowledge about how noise gates the signal pathway and how phasic neurons encode slow envelopes of sounds with high-frequency carriers. PMID:19812289

  11. Maps of the Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Alyssa A; Barton, Brian

    2016-07-01

    One of the fundamental properties of the mammalian brain is that sensory regions of cortex are formed of multiple, functionally specialized cortical field maps (CFMs). Each CFM comprises two orthogonal topographical representations, reflecting two essential aspects of sensory space. In auditory cortex, auditory field maps (AFMs) are defined by the combination of tonotopic gradients, representing the spectral aspects of sound (i.e., tones), with orthogonal periodotopic gradients, representing the temporal aspects of sound (i.e., period or temporal envelope). Converging evidence from cytoarchitectural and neuroimaging measurements underlies the definition of 11 AFMs across core and belt regions of human auditory cortex, with likely homology to those of macaque. On a macrostructural level, AFMs are grouped into cloverleaf clusters, an organizational structure also seen in visual cortex. Future research can now use these AFMs to investigate specific stages of auditory processing, key for understanding behaviors such as speech perception and multimodal sensory integration. PMID:27145914

  12. Auditory spatial processing in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Golden, Hannah L; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Yong, Keir X X; Downey, Laura E; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    The location and motion of sounds in space are important cues for encoding the auditory world. Spatial processing is a core component of auditory scene analysis, a cognitively demanding function that is vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease. Here we designed a novel neuropsychological battery based on a virtual space paradigm to assess auditory spatial processing in patient cohorts with clinically typical Alzheimer's disease (n = 20) and its major variant syndrome, posterior cortical atrophy (n = 12) in relation to healthy older controls (n = 26). We assessed three dimensions of auditory spatial function: externalized versus non-externalized sound discrimination, moving versus stationary sound discrimination and stationary auditory spatial position discrimination, together with non-spatial auditory and visual spatial control tasks. Neuroanatomical correlates of auditory spatial processing were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Relative to healthy older controls, both patient groups exhibited impairments in detection of auditory motion, and stationary sound position discrimination. The posterior cortical atrophy group showed greater impairment for auditory motion processing and the processing of a non-spatial control complex auditory property (timbre) than the typical Alzheimer's disease group. Voxel-based morphometry in the patient cohort revealed grey matter correlates of auditory motion detection and spatial position discrimination in right inferior parietal cortex and precuneus, respectively. These findings delineate auditory spatial processing deficits in typical and posterior Alzheimer's disease phenotypes that are related to posterior cortical regions involved in both syndromic variants and modulated by the syndromic profile of brain degeneration. Auditory spatial deficits contribute to impaired spatial awareness in Alzheimer's disease and may constitute a novel perceptual model for probing brain network disintegration across the Alzheimer's disease

  13. Decreases in energy and increases in phase locking of event-related oscillations to auditory stimuli occur during adolescence in human and rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Cindy L; Wills, Derek N; Desikan, Anita; Phillips, Evelyn; Havstad, James

    2014-01-01

    Synchrony of phase (phase locking) of event-related oscillations (EROs) within and between different brain areas has been suggested to reflect communication exchange between neural networks and as such may be a sensitive and translational measure of changes in brain remodeling that occur during adolescence. This study sought to investigate developmental changes in EROs using a similar auditory event-related potential (ERP) paradigm in both rats and humans. Energy and phase variability of EROs collected from 38 young adult men (aged 18-25 years), 33 periadolescent boys (aged 10-14 years), 15 male periadolescent rats [at postnatal day (PD) 36] and 19 male adult rats (at PD103) were investigated. Three channels of ERP data (frontal cortex, central cortex and parietal cortex) were collected from the humans using an 'oddball plus noise' paradigm that was presented under passive (no behavioral response required) conditions in the periadolescents and under active conditions (where each subject was instructed to depress a counter each time he detected an infrequent target tone) in adults and adolescents. ERPs were recorded in rats using only the passive paradigm. In order to compare the tasks used in rats to those used in humans, we first studied whether three ERO measures [energy, phase locking index (PLI) within an electrode site and phase difference locking index (PDLI) between different electrode sites] differentiated the 'active' from 'passive' ERP tasks. Secondly, we explored our main question of whether the three ERO measures differentiated adults from periadolescents in a similar manner in both humans and rats. No significant changes were found in measures of ERO energy between the active and passive tasks in the periadolescent human participants. There was a smaller but significant increase in PLI but not PDLI as a function of active task requirements. Developmental differences were found in energy, PLI and PDLI values between the periadolescents and adults in

  14. Brain Dynamics of Aging: Multiscale Variability of EEG Signals at Rest and during an Auditory Oddball Task1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Perdikis, Dionysios; Müller, Viktor; Blanc, Jean-Luc; Huys, Raoul; Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present work focused on the study of fluctuations of cortical activity across time scales in young and older healthy adults. The main objective was to offer a comprehensive characterization of the changes of brain (cortical) signal variability during aging, and to make the link with known underlying structural, neurophysiological, and functional modifications, as well as aging theories. We analyzed electroencephalogram (EEG) data of young and elderly adults, which were collected at resting state and during an auditory oddball task. We used a wide battery of metrics that typically are separately applied in the literature, and we compared them with more specific ones that address their limits. Our procedure aimed to overcome some of the methodological limitations of earlier studies and verify whether previous findings can be reproduced and extended to different experimental conditions. In both rest and task conditions, our results mainly revealed that EEG signals presented systematic age-related changes that were time-scale-dependent with regard to the structure of fluctuations (complexity) but not with regard to their magnitude. Namely, compared with young adults, the cortical fluctuations of the elderly were more complex at shorter time scales, but less complex at longer scales, although always showing a lower variance. Additionally, the elderly showed signs of spatial, as well as between, experimental conditions dedifferentiation. By integrating these so far isolated findings across time scales, metrics, and conditions, the present study offers an overview of age-related changes in the fluctuation electrocortical activity while making the link with underlying brain dynamics. PMID:26464983

  15. Brain Dynamics of Aging: Multiscale Variability of EEG Signals at Rest and during an Auditory Oddball Task(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Perdikis, Dionysios; Müller, Viktor; Blanc, Jean-Luc; Huys, Raoul; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2015-01-01

    The present work focused on the study of fluctuations of cortical activity across time scales in young and older healthy adults. The main objective was to offer a comprehensive characterization of the changes of brain (cortical) signal variability during aging, and to make the link with known underlying structural, neurophysiological, and functional modifications, as well as aging theories. We analyzed electroencephalogram (EEG) data of young and elderly adults, which were collected at resting state and during an auditory oddball task. We used a wide battery of metrics that typically are separately applied in the literature, and we compared them with more specific ones that address their limits. Our procedure aimed to overcome some of the methodological limitations of earlier studies and verify whether previous findings can be reproduced and extended to different experimental conditions. In both rest and task conditions, our results mainly revealed that EEG signals presented systematic age-related changes that were time-scale-dependent with regard to the structure of fluctuations (complexity) but not with regard to their magnitude. Namely, compared with young adults, the cortical fluctuations of the elderly were more complex at shorter time scales, but less complex at longer scales, although always showing a lower variance. Additionally, the elderly showed signs of spatial, as well as between, experimental conditions dedifferentiation. By integrating these so far isolated findings across time scales, metrics, and conditions, the present study offers an overview of age-related changes in the fluctuation electrocortical activity while making the link with underlying brain dynamics. PMID:26464983

  16. Auditory pathways: are 'what' and 'where' appropriate?

    PubMed

    Hall, Deborah A

    2003-05-13

    New evidence confirms that the auditory system encompasses temporal, parietal and frontal brain regions, some of which partly overlap with the visual system. But common assumptions about the functional homologies between sensory systems may be misleading. PMID:12747854

  17. [Brain stem auditory and visual evoked potentials in children and adolescents with Guillain-Barré syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zgorzalewicz, Małgorzata; Zielińska, Mariola; Kilarski, Dariusz

    2004-01-01

    amplitudes were found. These parameters were statistically significant in comparison to the control group. VEP results suggest the involvement of visual pathway in examined children and adolescents. EP can be used as a complementary method for the evaluation of clinically silent lesion in the auditory and optical tracts in GBS. PMID:15045865

  18. Auditory synesthesias.

    PubMed

    Afra, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    Synesthesia is experienced when sensory stimulation of one sensory modality (the inducer) elicits an involuntary or automatic sensation in another sensory modality or different aspect of the same sensory modality (the concurrent). Auditory synesthesias (AS) occur when auditory stimuli trigger a variety of concurrents, or when non-auditory sensory stimulations trigger auditory synesthetic perception. The AS are divided into three types: developmental, acquired, and induced. Developmental AS are not a neurologic disorder but a different way of experiencing one's environment. They are involuntary and highly consistent experiences throughout one's life. Acquired AS have been reported in association with neurologic diseases that cause deafferentation of anterior optic pathways, with pathologic lesions affecting the central nervous system (CNS) outside of the optic pathways, as well as non-lesional cases associated with migraine, and epilepsy. It also has been reported with mood disorders as well as a single idiopathic case. Induced AS has been reported in experimental and postsurgical blindfolding, as well as intake of hallucinogenics or psychedelics. In this chapter the three different types of synesthesia, their characteristics, and phenomologic differences, as well as their possible neural mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25726281

  19. Auditory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ades, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    The physical correlations of hearing, i.e. the acoustic stimuli, are reported. The auditory system, consisting of external ear, middle ear, inner ear, organ of Corti, basilar membrane, hair cells, inner hair cells, outer hair cells, innervation of hair cells, and transducer mechanisms, is discussed. Both conductive and sensorineural hearing losses are also examined.

  20. Harmonic Training and the Formation of Pitch Representation in a Neural Network Model of the Auditory Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Nasir; Higgins, Irina; Walker, Kerry M. M.; Stringer, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    Attempting to explain the perceptual qualities of pitch has proven to be, and remains, a difficult problem. The wide range of sounds which elicit pitch and a lack of agreement across neurophysiological studies on how pitch is encoded by the brain have made this attempt more difficult. In describing the potential neural mechanisms by which pitch may be processed, a number of neural networks have been proposed and implemented. However, no unsupervised neural networks with biologically accurate cochlear inputs have yet been demonstrated. This paper proposes a simple system in which pitch representing neurons are produced in a biologically plausible setting. Purely unsupervised regimes of neural network learning are implemented and these prove to be sufficient in identifying the pitch of sounds with a variety of spectral profiles, including sounds with missing fundamental frequencies and iterated rippled noises. PMID:27047368

  1. Harmonic Training and the Formation of Pitch Representation in a Neural Network Model of the Auditory Brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nasir; Higgins, Irina; Walker, Kerry M M; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Attempting to explain the perceptual qualities of pitch has proven to be, and remains, a difficult problem. The wide range of sounds which elicit pitch and a lack of agreement across neurophysiological studies on how pitch is encoded by the brain have made this attempt more difficult. In describing the potential neural mechanisms by which pitch may be processed, a number of neural networks have been proposed and implemented. However, no unsupervised neural networks with biologically accurate cochlear inputs have yet been demonstrated. This paper proposes a simple system in which pitch representing neurons are produced in a biologically plausible setting. Purely unsupervised regimes of neural network learning are implemented and these prove to be sufficient in identifying the pitch of sounds with a variety of spectral profiles, including sounds with missing fundamental frequencies and iterated rippled noises. PMID:27047368

  2. Auditory short-term memory in the primate auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brian H; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2016-06-01

    Sounds are fleeting, and assembling the sequence of inputs at the ear into a coherent percept requires auditory memory across various time scales. Auditory short-term memory comprises at least two components: an active ׳working memory' bolstered by rehearsal, and a sensory trace that may be passively retained. Working memory relies on representations recalled from long-term memory, and their rehearsal may require phonological mechanisms unique to humans. The sensory component, passive short-term memory (pSTM), is tractable to study in nonhuman primates, whose brain architecture and behavioral repertoire are comparable to our own. This review discusses recent advances in the behavioral and neurophysiological study of auditory memory with a focus on single-unit recordings from macaque monkeys performing delayed-match-to-sample (DMS) tasks. Monkeys appear to employ pSTM to solve these tasks, as evidenced by the impact of interfering stimuli on memory performance. In several regards, pSTM in monkeys resembles pitch memory in humans, and may engage similar neural mechanisms. Neural correlates of DMS performance have been observed throughout the auditory and prefrontal cortex, defining a network of areas supporting auditory STM with parallels to that supporting visual STM. These correlates include persistent neural firing, or a suppression of firing, during the delay period of the memory task, as well as suppression or (less commonly) enhancement of sensory responses when a sound is repeated as a ׳match' stimulus. Auditory STM is supported by a distributed temporo-frontal network in which sensitivity to stimulus history is an intrinsic feature of auditory processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. PMID:26541581

  3. Impaired auditory selective attention ameliorated by cognitive training with graded exposure to noise in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dundon, Neil M; Dockree, Suvi P; Buckley, Vanessa; Merriman, Niamh; Carton, Mary; Clarke, Sarah; Roche, Richard A P; Lalor, Edmund C; Robertson, Ian H; Dockree, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Patients who suffer traumatic brain injury frequently report difficulty concentrating on tasks and completing routine activities in noisy and distracting environments. Such impairments can have long-term negative psychosocial consequences. A cognitive control function that may underlie this impairment is the capacity to select a goal-relevant signal for further processing while safeguarding it from irrelevant noise. A paradigmatic investigation of this problem was undertaken using a dichotic listening task (study 1) in which comprehension of a stream of speech to one ear was measured in the context of increasing interference from a second stream of irrelevant speech to the other ear. Controls showed an initial decline in performance in the presence of competing speech but thereafter showed adaptation to increasing audibility of irrelevant speech, even at the highest levels of noise. By contrast, patients showed linear decline in performance with increasing noise. Subsequently attempts were made to ameliorate this deficit (study 2) using a cognitive training procedure based on attention process training (APT) that included graded exposure to irrelevant noise over the course of training. Patients were assigned to adaptive and non-adaptive training schedules or to a no-training control group. Results showed that both types of training drove improvements in the dichotic listening and in naturalistic tasks of performance in noise. Improvements were also seen on measures of selective attention in the visual domain suggesting transfer of training. We also observed augmentation of event-related potentials (ERPs) linked to target processing (P3b) but no change in ERPs evoked by distractor stimuli (P3a) suggesting that training heightened tuning of target signals, as opposed to gating irrelevant noise. No changes in any of the above measures were observed in a no-training control group. Together these findings present an ecologically valid approach to measure selective

  4. List mode multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, S. John; Mauger, G. Joseph; Riot, Vincent J.; Knapp, David A.

    2007-08-07

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  5. Electrophysiological study of auditory development.

    PubMed

    Lippé, S; Martinez-Montes, E; Arcand, C; Lassonde, M

    2009-12-15

    Cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) testing, a non-invasive technique, is widely employed to study auditory brain development. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of the auditory electrophysiological signal without addressing specific abilities such as speech or music discrimination. We were interested in the temporal and spectral domains of conventional auditory evoked potentials. We analyzed cerebral responses to auditory stimulation (broadband noises) in 40 infants and children (1 month to 5 years 6 months) and 10 adults using high-density electrophysiological recording. We hypothesized that the adult auditory response has precursors that can be identified in infant and child responses. Results confirm that complex adult CAEP responses and spectral activity patterns appear after 5 years, showing decreased involvement of lower frequencies and increased involvement of higher frequencies. In addition, time-locked response to stimulus and event-related spectral pertubation across frequencies revealed alpha and beta band contributions to the CAEP of infants and toddlers before mutation to the beta and gamma band activity of the adult response. A detailed analysis of electrophysiological responses to a perceptual stimulation revealed general development patterns and developmental precursors of the adult response. PMID:19665050

  6. Source analysis of magnetic field responses from the human auditory cortex elicited by short speech sounds.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, S; Okita, Y; Hirata, Y

    1995-01-01

    We made a detailed source analysis of the magnetic field responses that were elicited in the human brain by different monosyllabic speech sounds, including vowel, plosive, fricative, and nasal speech. Recordings of the magnetic field responses from a lateral area of the left hemisphere of human subjects were made using a multichannel SQUID magnetometer, having 37 field-sensing coils. A single source of the equivalent current dipole of the field was estimated from the spatial distribution of the evoked responses. The estimated sources of an N1m wave occurring at about 100 ms after the stimulus onset of different monosyllables were located close to each other within a 10-mm-sided cube in the three-dimensional space of the brain. Those sources registered on the magnetic resonance images indicated a restricted area in the auditory cortex, including Heschl's gyri in the superior temporal plane. In the spatiotemporal domain the sources exhibited apparent movements, among which anterior shift with latency increase on the anteroposterior axis and inferior shift on the inferosuperior axis were common in the responses to all monosyllables. However, selective movements that depended on the type of consonants were observed on the mediolateral axis; the sources of plosive and fricative responses shifted laterally with latency increase, but the source of the vowel response shifted medially. These spatiotemporal movements of the sources are discussed in terms of dynamic excitation of the cortical neurons in multiple areas of the human auditory cortex. PMID:7621933

  7. Long-term recovery from hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical abnormalities induced by noise exposure during brain development. Evaluation of auditory pathway integrity.

    PubMed

    Uran, S L; Gómez-Casati, M E; Guelman, L R

    2014-10-01

    Sound is an important part of man's contact with the environment and has served as critical means for survival throughout his evolution. As a result of exposure to noise, physiological functions such as those involving structures of the auditory and non-auditory systems might be damaged. We have previously reported that noise-exposed developing rats elicited hippocampal-related histological, biochemical and behavioral changes. However, no data about the time lapse of these changes were reported. Moreover, measurements of auditory pathway function were not performed in exposed animals. Therefore, with the present work, we aim to test the onset and the persistence of the different extra-auditory abnormalities observed in noise-exposed rats and to evaluate auditory pathway integrity. Male Wistar rats of 15 days were exposed to moderate noise levels (95-97 dB SPL, 2 h a day) during one day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or during 15 days (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal biochemical determinations as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) behavioral assessments were performed. In addition, histological and functional evaluations of the auditory pathway were carried out in exposed animals. Our results show that hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical changes (impairments in habituation, recognition and associative memories as well as distortion of anxiety-related behavior, decreases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and increases in antioxidant enzymes activities) induced by noise exposure were almost completely restored by PND 90. In addition, auditory evaluation shows that increased cochlear thresholds observed in exposed rats were re-established at PND 90, although with a remarkable supra-threshold amplitude reduction. These data suggest that noise-induced hippocampal and auditory-related alterations are mostly transient and that the effects of noise on the hippocampus might be, at least in part, mediated by the damage on the auditory pathway

  8. Intrinsic firing properties in the avian auditory brain stem allow both integration and encoding of temporally modulated noisy inputs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kreeger, Lauren J; Arshed, Arslaan; MacLeod, Katrina M

    2012-11-01

    The intrinsic properties of tonically firing neurons in the cochlear nucleus contribute to representing average sound intensity by favoring synaptic integration across auditory nerve inputs, reducing phase locking to fine temporal acoustic structure and enhancing envelope locking. To determine whether tonically firing neurons of the avian cochlear nucleus angularis (NA) resemble ideal integrators, we investigated their firing responses to noisy current injections during whole cell patch-clamp recordings in brain slices. One subclass of neurons (36% of tonically firing neurons, mainly subtype tonic III) showed no significant changes in firing rate with noise fluctuations, acting like pure integrators. In contrast, many tonically firing neurons (>60%, mainly subtype tonic I or II) showed a robust sensitivity to noisy current fluctuations, increasing their firing rates with increased fluctuation amplitudes. For noise-sensitive tonic neurons, the firing rate vs. average current curves with noise had larger maximal firing rates, lower gains, and wider dynamic ranges compared with FI curves for current steps without noise. All NA neurons showed fluctuation-driven patterning of spikes with a high degree of temporal reliability and millisecond spike time precision. Single-spiking neurons in NA also responded to noisy currents with higher firing rates and reliable spike trains, although less precisely than nucleus magnocellularis neurons. Thus some NA neurons function as integrators by encoding average input levels over wide dynamic ranges regardless of current fluctuations, others detect the degree of coherence in the inputs, and most encode the temporal patterns contained in their inputs with a high degree of precision. PMID:22914650

  9. Multichannel Compressive Sensing MRI Using Noiselet Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kamlesh; Egan, Gary; Zhang, Jingxin

    2015-01-01

    The incoherence between measurement and sparsifying transform matrices and the restricted isometry property (RIP) of measurement matrix are two of the key factors in determining the performance of compressive sensing (CS). In CS-MRI, the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix is used as the measurement matrix and the wavelet transform is usually used as sparsifying transform matrix. However, the incoherence between the randomly under-sampled Fourier matrix and the wavelet matrix is not optimal, which can deteriorate the performance of CS-MRI. Using the mathematical result that noiselets are maximally incoherent with wavelets, this paper introduces the noiselet unitary bases as the measurement matrix to improve the incoherence and RIP in CS-MRI. Based on an empirical RIP analysis that compares the multichannel noiselet and multichannel Fourier measurement matrices in CS-MRI, we propose a multichannel compressive sensing (MCS) framework to take the advantage of multichannel data acquisition used in MRI scanners. Simulations are presented in the MCS framework to compare the performance of noiselet encoding reconstructions and Fourier encoding reconstructions at different acceleration factors. The comparisons indicate that multichannel noiselet measurement matrix has better RIP than that of its Fourier counterpart, and that noiselet encoded MCS-MRI outperforms Fourier encoded MCS-MRI in preserving image resolution and can achieve higher acceleration factors. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noiselet encoding scheme, a pulse sequences with tailored spatially selective RF excitation pulses was designed and implemented on a 3T scanner to acquire the data in the noiselet domain from a phantom and a human brain. The results indicate that noislet encoding preserves image resolution better than Fouirer encoding. PMID:25965548

  10. Time-resolved multi-channel optical system for assessment of brain oxygenation and perfusion by monitoring of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milej, D.; Gerega, A.; Kacprzak, M.; Sawosz, P.; Weigl, W.; Maniewski, R.; Liebert, A.

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy is an optical technique which can be applied in tissue oxygenation assessment. In the last decade this method is extensively tested as a potential clinical tool for noninvasive human brain function monitoring and imaging. In the present paper we show construction of an instrument which allows for: (i) estimation of changes in brain tissue oxygenation using two-wavelength spectroscopy approach and (ii) brain perfusion assessment with the use of single-wavelength reflectometry or fluorescence measurements combined with ICG-bolus tracking. A signal processing algorithm based on statistical moments of measured distributions of times of flight of photons is implemented. This data analysis method allows for separation of signals originating from extra- and intracerebral tissue compartments. In this paper we present compact and easily reconfigurable system which can be applied in different types of time-resolved experiments: two-wavelength measurements at 687 and 832 nm, single wavelength reflectance measurements at 760 nm (which is at maximum of ICG absorption spectrum) or fluorescence measurements with excitation at 760 nm. Details of the instrument construction and results of its technical tests are shown. Furthermore, results of in-vivo measurements obtained for various modes of operation of the system are presented.

  11. A subfemtotesla multichannel atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, I. K.; Kornack, T. W.; Allred, J. C.; Romalis, M. V.

    2003-04-01

    The magnetic field is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous physical observables, carrying information about all electromagnetic phenomena. For the past 30 years, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4K have been unchallenged as ultrahigh-sensitivity magnetic field detectors, with a sensitivity reaching down to 1fTHz-1/2 (1fT = 10-15T). They have enabled, for example, mapping of the magnetic fields produced by the brain, and localization of the underlying electrical activity (magnetoencephalography). Atomic magnetometers, based on detection of Larmor spin precession of optically pumped atoms, have approached similar levels of sensitivity using large measurement volumes, but have much lower sensitivity in the more compact designs required for magnetic imaging applications. Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution combined with non-cryogenic operation of atomic magnetometers would enable new applications, including the possibility of mapping non-invasively the cortical modules in the brain. Here we describe a new spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) atomic magnetometer, and demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity of 0.54fTHz-1/2 with a measurement volume of only 0.3cm3. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device are below 0.01fTHz-1/2. We also demonstrate simple multichannel operation of the magnetometer, and localization of magnetic field sources with a resolution of 2mm.

  12. A subfemtotesla multichannel atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Kominis, I K; Kornack, T W; Allred, J C; Romalis, M V

    2003-04-10

    The magnetic field is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous physical observables, carrying information about all electromagnetic phenomena. For the past 30 years, superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) operating at 4 K have been unchallenged as ultrahigh-sensitivity magnetic field detectors, with a sensitivity reaching down to 1 fT Hz(-1/2) (1 fT = 10(-15) T). They have enabled, for example, mapping of the magnetic fields produced by the brain, and localization of the underlying electrical activity (magnetoencephalography). Atomic magnetometers, based on detection of Larmor spin precession of optically pumped atoms, have approached similar levels of sensitivity using large measurement volumes, but have much lower sensitivity in the more compact designs required for magnetic imaging applications. Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution combined with non-cryogenic operation of atomic magnetometers would enable new applications, including the possibility of mapping non-invasively the cortical modules in the brain. Here we describe a new spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) atomic magnetometer, and demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity of 0.54 fT Hz(-1/2) with a measurement volume of only 0.3 cm3. Theoretical analysis shows that fundamental sensitivity limits of this device are below 0.01 fT Hz(-1/2). We also demonstrate simple multichannel operation of the magnetometer, and localization of magnetic field sources with a resolution of 2 mm. PMID:12686995

  13. Multichannel Human Body Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przystup, Piotr; Bujnowski, Adam; Wtorek, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Human Body Communication is an attractive alternative for traditional wireless communication (Bluetooth, ZigBee) in case of Body Sensor Networks. Low power, high data rates and data security makes it ideal solution for medical applications. In this paper, signal attenuation for different frequencies, using FR4 electrodes, has been investigated. Performance of single and multichannel transmission with frequency modulation of analog signal has been tested. Experiment results show that HBC is a feasible solution for transmitting data between BSN nodes.

  14. Miniature multichannel biotelemeter system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carraway, J. B.; Sumida, J. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A miniature multichannel biotelemeter system is described. The system includes a transmitter where signals from different sources are sampled to produce a wavetrain of pulses. The transmitter also separates signals by sync pulses. The pulses amplitude modulate a radio frequency carrier which is received at a receiver unit. There the sync pulses are detected by a demultiplexer which routes the pulses from each different source to a separate output channel where the pulses are used to reconstruct the signals from the particular source.

  15. Causal contribution of primate auditory cortex to auditory perceptual decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Tsunada, Joji; Liu, Andrew S.K.; Gold, Joshua I.; Cohen, Yale E.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory perceptual decisions are thought to be mediated by the ventral auditory pathway. However, the specific and causal contributions of different brain regions in this pathway, including the middle-lateral (ML) and anterolateral (AL) belt regions of the auditory cortex, to auditory decisions have not been fully identified. To identify these contributions, we recorded from and microstimulated ML and AL sites while monkeys decided whether an auditory stimulus contained more low-frequency or high-frequency tone bursts. Both ML and AL neural activity was modulated by the frequency content of the stimulus. However, only the responses of the most stimulus-sensitive AL neurons were systematically modulated by the monkeys’ choices. Consistent with this observation, microstimulation of AL—but not ML—systematically biased the monkeys’ behavior toward the choice associated with the preferred frequency of the stimulated site. Together, these findings suggest that AL directly and causally contributes sensory evidence used to form this auditory decision. PMID:26656644

  16. Atypical brain lateralisation in the auditory cortex and language performance in 3- to 7-year-old children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: a child-customised magnetoencephalography (MEG) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    chronological age was a significant predictor of shorter P50m latency in the right hemisphere. Conclusions Using a child-customised MEG device, we studied the P50m component that was evoked through binaural human voice stimuli in young ASD and TD children to examine differences in auditory cortex function that are associated with language development. Our results suggest that there is atypical brain function in the auditory cortex in young children with ASD, regardless of language development. PMID:24103585

  17. The brain-stem auditory-evoked response in the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus) to clicks and frequency-modulated sweeps.

    PubMed

    Burkard, R; Moss, C F

    1994-08-01

    Three experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of stimulus level on the brain-stem auditory-evoked response (BAER) in the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), a species that uses frequency-modulated (FM) sonar sounds for echolocation. In experiment 1, the effects of click level on the BAER were investigated. Clicks were presented at levels of 30 to 90 dB pSPL in 10-dB steps. Each animal responded reliably to clicks at levels of 50 dB pSPL and above, showing a BAER containing four peaks in the first 3-4 ms from click onset (waves i-iv). With increasing click level, BAER peak amplitude increased and peak latency decreased. A decrease in the i-iv interval also occurred with increasing click level. In experiment 2, stimuli were 1-ms linear FM sweeps, decreasing in frequency from 100 to 20 kHz. Stimulus levels ranged from 20 to 90 dB pSPL. BAERs to FM sweeps were observed in all animals for levels of 40 dB pSPL and above. These responses were similar to the click-evoked BAER in waveform morphology, with the notable exception of an additional peak observed at the higher levels of FM sweeps. This peak (wave ia) occurred prior to the first wave seen at lower levels (wave ib). As the level of the FM sweep increased, there was a decrease in peak latency and an increase in peak amplitude. Similarity in the magnitude and behavior of the i-iv and ib-iv intervals suggests that wave ib to FM sweeps is the homolog of the wave i response to click stimuli. Experiment 3 tested the hypothesis that wave ia represented activity emanating from more basal cochlear regions than wave ib. FM sweeps (100-20 kHz) were presented at 90 dB pSPL, and broadband noise was raised in level until the BAER was eliminated. This "masked threshold" occurred at 85 dB SPL of noise. At masked threshold, the broadband noise was steeply high-pass filtered at five cutoff frequencies ranging from 20 to 80 kHz. Generally, wave ia was eliminated for masker cutoff frequencies of 56.6 kHz and below, while wave

  18. Auditory Efferent System Modulates Mosquito Hearing.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Marta; Seifert, Marvin; Spalthoff, Christian; Warren, Ben; Weiss, Lukas; Giraldo, Diego; Winkler, Margret; Pauls, Stephanie; Göpfert, Martin C

    2016-08-01

    The performance of vertebrate ears is controlled by auditory efferents that originate in the brain and innervate the ear, synapsing onto hair cell somata and auditory afferent fibers [1-3]. Efferent activity can provide protection from noise and facilitate the detection and discrimination of sound by modulating mechanical amplification by hair cells and transmitter release as well as auditory afferent action potential firing [1-3]. Insect auditory organs are thought to lack efferent control [4-7], but when we inspected mosquito ears, we obtained evidence for its existence. Antibodies against synaptic proteins recognized rows of bouton-like puncta running along the dendrites and axons of mosquito auditory sensory neurons. Electron microscopy identified synaptic and non-synaptic sites of vesicle release, and some of the innervating fibers co-labeled with somata in the CNS. Octopamine, GABA, and serotonin were identified as efferent neurotransmitters or neuromodulators that affect auditory frequency tuning, mechanical amplification, and sound-evoked potentials. Mosquito brains thus modulate mosquito ears, extending the use of auditory efferent systems from vertebrates to invertebrates and adding new levels of complexity to mosquito sound detection and communication. PMID:27476597

  19. Primary auditory cortical responses to electrical stimulation of the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Atencio, Craig A; Shih, Jonathan Y; Schreiner, Christoph E; Cheung, Steven W

    2014-03-01

    Cochlear implant electrical stimulation of the auditory system to rehabilitate deafness has been remarkably successful. Its deployment requires both an intact auditory nerve and a suitably patent cochlear lumen. When disease renders prerequisite conditions impassable, such as in neurofibromatosis type II and cochlear obliterans, alternative treatment targets are considered. Electrical stimulation of the cochlear nucleus and midbrain in humans has delivered encouraging clinical outcomes, buttressing the promise of central auditory prostheses to mitigate deafness in those who are not candidates for cochlear implantation. In this study we explored another possible implant target: the auditory thalamus. In anesthetized cats, we first presented pure tones to determine frequency preferences of thalamic and cortical sites. We then electrically stimulated tonotopically organized thalamic sites while recording from primary auditory cortical sites using a multichannel recording probe. Cathode-leading biphasic thalamic stimulation thresholds that evoked cortical responses were much lower than published accounts of cochlear and midbrain stimulation. Cortical activation dynamic ranges were similar to those reported for cochlear stimulation, but they were narrower than those found through midbrain stimulation. Our results imply that thalamic stimulation can activate auditory cortex at low electrical current levels and suggest an auditory thalamic implant may be a viable central auditory prosthesis. PMID:24335216

  20. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  1. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  2. Separating heart and brain: on the reduction of physiological noise from multichannel functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauernfeind, G.; Wriessnegger, S. C.; Daly, I.; Müller-Putz, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging technique for the in vivo assessment of functional activity of the cerebral cortex as well as in the field of brain-computer interface (BCI) research. A common challenge for the utilization of fNIRS in these areas is a stable and reliable investigation of the spatio-temporal hemodynamic patterns. However, the recorded patterns may be influenced and superimposed by signals generated from physiological processes, resulting in an inaccurate estimation of the cortical activity. Up to now only a few studies have investigated these influences, and still less has been attempted to remove/reduce these influences. The present study aims to gain insights into the reduction of physiological rhythms in hemodynamic signals (oxygenated hemoglobin (oxy-Hb), deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxy-Hb)). Approach. We introduce the use of three different signal processing approaches (spatial filtering, a common average reference (CAR) method; independent component analysis (ICA); and transfer function (TF) models) to reduce the influence of respiratory and blood pressure (BP) rhythms on the hemodynamic responses. Main results. All approaches produce large reductions in BP and respiration influences on the oxy-Hb signals and, therefore, improve the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In contrast, for deoxy-Hb signals CAR and ICA did not improve the CNR. However, for the TF approach, a CNR-improvement in deoxy-Hb can also be found. Significance. The present study investigates the application of different signal processing approaches to reduce the influences of physiological rhythms on the hemodynamic responses. In addition to the identification of the best signal processing method, we also show the importance of noise reduction in fNIRS data.

  3. Multichannel analog temperature sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribble, R.

    1985-08-01

    A multichannel system that protects the numerous and costly water-cooled magnet coils on the translation section of the FRX-C/T magnetic fusion experiment is described. The system comprises a thermistor for each coil, a constant current circuit for each thermistor, and a multichannel analog-to-digital converter interfaced to the computer.

  4. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network. PMID:27425612

  5. Speech recognition for 40 patients receiving multichannel cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Dowell, R C; Mecklenburg, D J; Clark, G M

    1986-10-01

    We collected data on 40 patients who received the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implant. Results were reviewed to determine if the coding strategy is effective in transmitting the intended speech features and to assess patient benefit in terms of communication skills. All patients demonstrated significant improvement over preoperative results with a hearing aid for both lipreading enhancement and speech recognition without lipreading. Of the patients, 50% demonstrated ability to understand connected discourse with auditory input only. For the 23 patients who were tested 12 months postoperatively, there was substantial improvement in open-set speech recognition. PMID:3755975

  6. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  7. Multichannel birefringent filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouxiang, A.; Huefeng, H.

    1985-01-01

    A birefringent filter with a large field of view and no additional polarization is discussed. It plays an important role in observing the solar monochromatic image and the solar vector magnetic field. It has only one channel. For simultaneous multichannel observations, the solar spectrograph is better than the birefringent filter. A suggestion was proposed to try to obtain a multichannel birefringent filter which will be used in a new telescope at the Huairou reservoir station of Beijing Observatory. By means of N polarizing beam splitters, (N+1) channels can be divided. In principle, any number of limitless channels can be obtained, thereby subdividing the whole solar spectrum. But since the space in a telescope is limited, the channels to be used are also limited. For the new telescope, 5 and 9 channels are being considered, and the spectral range is from lambda 3800A to lambda 7000A. Many lines are included in this range, for example, H, K, H beta, lambda lambda 5324A, 5250A, 6302A, H alpha, etc., and some of the lines are suited to measure solar velocity fields. According to the character of these lines, the half width of each channel is determined. Moreover, in some channels the solid polarizing Michelson interferometer is considered for measuring velocity field with a lm/s accuracy. The advantages of the filter and problems to be solved are listed.

  8. On-Line Statistical Segmentation of a Non-Speech Auditory Stream in Neonates as Demonstrated by Event-Related Brain Potentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudo, Noriko; Nonaka, Yulri; Mizuno, Noriko; Mizuno, Katsumi; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    The ability to statistically segment a continuous auditory stream is one of the most important preparations for initiating language learning. Such ability is available to human infants at 8 months of age, as shown by a behavioral measurement. However, behavioral study alone cannot determine how early this ability is available. A recent study using…

  9. Estrogenic modulation of auditory processing: a vertebrate comparison

    PubMed Central

    Caras, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    Sex-steroid hormones are well-known regulators of vocal motor behavior in several organisms. A large body of evidence now indicates that these same hormones modulate processing at multiple levels of the ascending auditory pathway. The goal of this review is to provide a comparative analysis of the role of estrogens in vertebrate auditory function. Four major conclusions can be drawn from the literature: First, estrogens may influence the development of the mammalian auditory system. Second, estrogenic signaling protects the mammalian auditory system from noise- and age-related damage. Third, estrogens optimize auditory processing during periods of reproductive readiness in multiple vertebrate lineages. Finally, brain-derived estrogens can act locally to enhance auditory response properties in at least one avian species. This comparative examination may lead to a better appreciation of the role of estrogens in the processing of natural vocalizations and may provide useful insights toward alleviating auditory dysfunctions emanating from hormonal imbalances. PMID:23911849

  10. Electrophysiological measurement of human auditory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Contingent negative variations in the presence and amplitudes of brain potentials evoked by sound are considered. Evidence is produced that the evoked brain stem response to auditory stimuli is clearly related to brain events associated with cognitive processing of acoustic signals since their properties depend upon where the listener directs his attention, whether the signal is an expected event or a surprise, and when sound that is listened-for is heard at last.