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Sample records for multicomponent monooxygenase pseudomonas

  1. Substrate Trafficking And Dioxygen Activation in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, L.J.; Lippard, S.J.

    2009-06-03

    Non-heme carboxylate-bridged diiron centers in the hydroxylase components of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases process four substrates during catalysis: electrons, protons, dioxygen, and hydrocarbons. Understanding how protein-protein interactions mediate the transport of these substrates to the diiron center to achieve the selective oxidation of the hydrocarbon is a significant challenge. In this Account, we summarize our current knowledge of these processes with a focus on the methane monooxygenase system. We also describe recent results for the toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase and phenol hydroxylase systems from Pseudomonas sporium OX1. The observation in these latter systems of a diiron(III) oxygenated intermediate having different Moessbauer parameters from analogous species in other carboxylate-bridged diiron proteins is discussed. The results indicate that the ability of the protein framework to tune the reactivity of the diiron center at structurally similar active sites is substantially more complex than previously recognized.

  2. Analysis of the gene cluster encoding toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, G.; Martino, M.; Galli, E.; Barbieri, P.

    1998-10-01

    The toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase cloned from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 displays a very broad range of substrates and a very peculiar regioselectivity, because it is able to hydroxylate more than one position on the aromatic ring of several hydrocarbons and phenols. The nucleotide sequence of the gene cluster coding for this enzymatic system has been determined. The sequence analysis revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to other genes clustered in operons coding for multicomponent monooxygenases found in benzene- and toluene-degradative pathways cloned from Pseudomonas strains. Significant similarities were also found with multicomponent monooxygenase systems for phenol, methane, alkene, and dimethyl sulfide cloned from different bacterial strains. The knockout of each ORF and complementation with the wild-type allele indicated that all six ORFs are essential for the full activity of the toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase in Escherichia coli. This analysis also shows that despite its activity on both hydrocarbons and phenols, toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase belongs to a toluene multicomponent monooxygenase subfamily rather than to the monooxygenases active on phenols.

  3. Nucleotide sequence analysis of genes encoding a toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase from pseudomonas sp. strain JS150

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Olsen, R.H.

    1995-09-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 metabolizes benzene and alkyl- and chloro-substituted benzenes by using dioxygenase-initiated pathways coupled with multiple downstream metabolic pathways to accommodate catechol metabolism. By cloning genes encoding benzene-degradative enzymes, strain JS150 was also found to carry genes for a toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase. The gene cluster encoding a 2-monooxygenase and its cognate regulator was cloned from a plasmid carried by strain JS150. Oxygen ({sup 18}O{sub 2}) incorporation experiments using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains carrying the cloned genes confirmed toluene hydroxylation was catalyzed through an authentic monooxygenase reaction to yield ortho-cresol. Encoding the toluene-2-monooxygenase and regulatory gene product was localized in two regions of the cloned fragment. The nucleotide sequence of the toluene/benzene-2-monooxygenase locus was determined, revealing six open reading frames that were then designated tbmA, tbmB, tbmC, tbmD, tbmE, and tbmF. The deduced amino acid sequences for these genes showed the presence of motifs similar to well-conserved functional domains of multicomponent oxygenases. This analysis allowed the tentative identification of two terminal oxygenase subunits (TbmB and TbmD) and an electron transport protein (TbmF) for the monooxygenase enzyme. All the tbm polypeptides shared significant homology with protein components from other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. Overall, the tbm gene products shared greater similarity with polypeptides from the phenol hydroxylases of Pseudomo-KR1 and Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) picketti PKO1. The relationship found between the phenol hydroxlases and a toluene-2-monooxygenase, characterized in this study for the first time at the nucleotide sequence level, suggested DNA probes used for surveys of environmental populations should be carefully selected to reflect DNA sequences corresponding to the metabolic pathway of interest. 58 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Coupling Oxygen Consumption with Hydrocarbon Oxidation in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixue; Liang, Alexandria D; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-09-15

    A fundamental goal in catalysis is the coupling of multiple reactions to yield a desired product. Enzymes have evolved elegant approaches to address this grand challenge. A salient example is the biological conversion of methane to methanol catalyzed by soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. sMMO is a dynamic protein complex of three components: a hydroxylase, a reductase, and a regulatory protein. The active site, a carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron center, is buried inside the 251 kDa hydroxylase component. The enzyme processes four substrates: O2, protons, electrons, and methane. To couple O2 activation to methane oxidation, timely control of substrate access to the active site is critical. Recent studies of sMMO, as well as its homologues in the BMM superfamily, have begun to unravel the mechanism. The emerging and unifying picture reveals that each substrate gains access to the active site along a specific pathway through the hydroxylase. Electrons and protons are delivered via a three-amino-acid pore located adjacent to the diiron center; O2 migrates via a series of hydrophobic cavities; and hydrocarbon substrates reach the active site through a channel or linked set of cavities. The gating of these pathways mediates entry of each substrate to the diiron active site in a timed sequence and is coordinated by dynamic interactions with the other component proteins. The result is coupling of dioxygen consumption with hydrocarbon oxidation, avoiding unproductive oxidation of the reductant rather than the desired hydrocarbon. To initiate catalysis, the reductase delivers two electrons to the diiron(III) center by binding over the pore of the hydroxylase. The regulatory component then displaces the reductase, docking onto the same surface of the hydroxylase. Formation of the hydroxylase-regulatory component complex (i) induces conformational changes of pore residues that may bring protons to the

  5. Molecular Determinants of the Regioselectivity of Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain OX1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Notomista, Eugenio; Cafaro, Valeria; Bozza, Giuseppe; Di Donato, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) are a heterogeneous family of di-iron monooxygenases which share the very interesting ability to hydroxylate aliphatic and/or aromatic hydrocarbons. Each BMM possesses defined substrate specificity and regioselectivity which match the metabolic requirements of the strain from which it has been isolated. Pseudomonas sp. strain OX1, a strain able to metabolize o-, m-, and p-cresols, produces the BMM toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO), which converts toluene to a mixture of o-, m-, and p-cresol isomers. In order to investigate the molecular determinants of ToMO regioselectivity, we prepared and characterized 15 single-mutant and 3 double-mutant forms of the ToMO active site pocket. Using the Monte Carlo approach, we prepared models of ToMO-substrate and ToMO-reaction intermediate complexes which allowed us to provide a molecular explanation for the regioselectivities of wild-type and mutant ToMO enzymes. Furthermore, using binding energy values calculated by energy analyses of the complexes and a simple mathematical model of the hydroxylation reaction, we were able to predict quantitatively the regioselectivities of the majority of the variant proteins with good accuracy. The results show not only that the fine-tuning of ToMO regioselectivity can be achieved through a careful alteration of the shape of the active site but also that the effects of the mutations on regioselectivity can be quantitatively predicted a priori. PMID:19074607

  6. Molecular determinants of the regioselectivity of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain OX1.

    PubMed

    Notomista, Eugenio; Cafaro, Valeria; Bozza, Giuseppe; Di Donato, Alberto

    2009-02-01

    Bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) are a heterogeneous family of di-iron monooxygenases which share the very interesting ability to hydroxylate aliphatic and/or aromatic hydrocarbons. Each BMM possesses defined substrate specificity and regioselectivity which match the metabolic requirements of the strain from which it has been isolated. Pseudomonas sp. strain OX1, a strain able to metabolize o-, m-, and p-cresols, produces the BMM toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO), which converts toluene to a mixture of o-, m-, and p-cresol isomers. In order to investigate the molecular determinants of ToMO regioselectivity, we prepared and characterized 15 single-mutant and 3 double-mutant forms of the ToMO active site pocket. Using the Monte Carlo approach, we prepared models of ToMO-substrate and ToMO-reaction intermediate complexes which allowed us to provide a molecular explanation for the regioselectivities of wild-type and mutant ToMO enzymes. Furthermore, using binding energy values calculated by energy analyses of the complexes and a simple mathematical model of the hydroxylation reaction, we were able to predict quantitatively the regioselectivities of the majority of the variant proteins with good accuracy. The results show not only that the fine-tuning of ToMO regioselectivity can be achieved through a careful alteration of the shape of the active site but also that the effects of the mutations on regioselectivity can be quantitatively predicted a priori. PMID:19074607

  7. Cloning and characterization of a Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 gene cluster encoding toluene-4-monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Kwangmu Yen; Karl, M.R.; Blatt, L.M.; Simon, M.J.; Winter, R.B.; Fausset, P.R.; Lu, H.S.; Harcourt, A.A.; Chen, K.K. )

    1991-09-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 metabolizes toluene as a carbon source by a previously unknown pathway. The initial step of the pathway is hydroxylation of toluene to form p-cresol by a multicomponent toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) system. The authors have cloned and characterized a gene cluster from KR 1 that determines the T4MO activity. To clone the T4MO genes, KR1 DNA libraries were constructed in Escherichia coli HB 101 by using a broad-host-range vector and transferred to a KR1 mutant able to grow on p-cresol but no on toluene. An insert consisting of two SacI fragments of identical size was shown to complement the mutant for growth on toluene. One of the SacI fragments, when cloned into the E. coli vector pUC19, was found to direct the synthesis of indigo dye. The indigo-forming property was correlated with the presence of T4MO activity. The T4MO genes were mapped to a 3.6-kb region, and the direction of transcription was determined. DNA sequencing and N-terminal amino acid determination identified a five-gene cluster, tmoABCDE, within this region. Expression of this cluster carrying a single mutation in each gene demonstrated that each of the five genes is essential for T4MO activity. Other evidence presented indicated that none of the tmo genes was involved in the regulation of the tmo gene cluster, in the control of substrate transport of the T4MO system, or in major processing of the products of the tmo genes. It was tentatively concluded that the tmoABCDE genes encode structural polypeptides of the T4MO enzyme system. One of the tmo genes was tentatively identified as a ferredoxin gene.

  8. Enhancing Indigo Production by Over-Expression of the Styrene Monooxygenase in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Yin, Sheng; Chen, Min; Sun, Baoguo; Hao, Shuai; Wang, Chengtao

    2016-08-01

    As an important traditional blue dye, indigo has been used in food and textile industry for centuries, which can be produced via the styrene oxygenation pathway in Pseudomonas putida. Hence, the styrene monooxygenase gene styAB and oxide isomerase gene styC are over-expressed in P. putida to investigate their roles in indigo biosynthesis. RT-qPCR analysis indicated that transcriptions of styA and styB were increased by 2500- and 750-folds in the styAB over-expressed strain B4-01, compared with the wild-type strain B4, consequently significantly enhancing the indole monooxygenase activity. Transcription of styC was also increased by 100-folds in the styC over-expressed strain B4-02. Besides, styAB over-expression slightly up-regulated the transcription of styC in B4-01, while styC over-expression hardly exerted an effect on the transcriptional levels of styA and styB and indole monooxygenase activity in B4-02. Furthermore, shaking flask experiments showed that indigo production in B4-01 reached 52.13 mg L(-1) after 24 h, which was sevenfold higher than that in B4. But no obvious increase in indigo yield was observed in B4-02. Over-expression of styAB significantly enhanced the indigo production, revealing that the monooxygenase STYAB rather than oxide isomerase STYC probably acted as the key rate-limiting enzyme in the indigo biosynthesis pathway in P. putida. This work provided a new strategy for enhancing indigo production in Pseudomonas. PMID:27154464

  9. A New Biocatalyst for Production of Optically Pure Aryl Epoxides by Styrene Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, Patrizia; Colmegna, Andrea; Galli, Enrica; Sello, Guido; Pelizzoni, Francesca; Bestetti, Giuseppina

    1999-01-01

    We developed a biocatalyst by cloning the styrene monooxygenase genes (styA and styB) from Pseudomonas fluorescens ST responsible for the oxidation of styrene to its corresponding epoxide. Recombinant Escherichia coli was able to oxidize different aryl vinyl and aryl ethenyl compounds to their corresponding optically pure epoxides. The results of bioconversions indicate the broad substrate preference of styrene monooxygenase and its potential for the production of several fine chemicals. PMID:10347083

  10. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  11. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily. PMID:26527149

  12. Rhizoremediation of Trichloroethylene by a Recombinant, Root-Colonizing Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain Expressing Toluene ortho-Monooxygenase Constitutively

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Dennis C.; Maynard, Jennifer A.; Wood, Thomas K.

    1998-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was removed from soils by using a wheat rhizosphere established by coating seeds with a recombinant, TCE-degrading Pseudomonas fluorescens strain that expresses the tomA+ (toluene o-monooxygenase) genes from Burkholderia cepacia PR123(TOM23C). A transposon integration vector was used to insert tomA+ into the chromosome of P. fluorescens 2-79, producing a stable strain that expressed constitutively the monooxygenase at a level of 1.1 nmol/min · mg of protein (initial TCE concentration, 10 μM, assuming that all of the TCE was in the liquid) for more than 280 cell generations (36 days). We also constructed a salicylate-inducible P. fluorescens strain that degraded TCE at an initial rate of 2.6 nmol/min · mg of protein in the presence of 10 μM TCE [cf. B. cepacia G4 PR123(TOM23C), which degraded TCE at an initial rate of 2.5 nmol/min · mg of protein]. A constitutive strain, P. fluorescens 2-79TOM, grew (maximum specific growth rate, 0.78 h−1) and colonized wheat (3 × 106 CFU/cm of root) as well as wild-type P. fluorescens 2-79 (maximum specific growth rate, 0.77 h−1; level of colonization, 4 × 106 CFU/cm of root). Rhizoremediation of TCE was demonstrated by using microcosms containing the constitutive monooxygenase-expressing microorganism, soil, and wheat. These closed microcosms degraded an average of 63% of the initial TCE in 4 days (20.6 nmol of TCE/day · plant), compared to the 9% of the initial TCE removed by negative controls consisting of microcosms containing wild-type P. fluorescens 2-79-inoculated wheat, uninoculated wheat, or sterile soil. PMID:9435067

  13. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and chloroform by toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Wood, T.K.; Barbieri, P.

    1998-08-01

    Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1, which oxidizes toluene and o-xylene, was examined for its ability to degrade the environmental pollutants trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), cis-1,2-DCE, trans-1,2-DCE, chloroform, dichloromethane, phenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol, and 2,3,4,5,6-pentachlorophenol. Escherichia coli JM109 that expressed ToMO from genes on plasmid pBZ1260 under control of the lac promoter degraded TCE, 1,1-DCE, and chloroform at initial rates of 3.1, 3.6, and 1.6 nmol, respectively. Stoichiometric amounts of chloride release were seen, indicating mineralization. Thus, the substrate range of ToMO is extended to include aliphatic chlorinated compounds.

  14. Biochemical characterization of a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent monooxygenase, ornithine hydroxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggests a novel reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Lamb, Audrey L

    2007-10-23

    Pyoverdin is the hydroxamate siderophore produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa under the iron-limiting conditions of the human host. This siderophore includes derivatives of ornithine in the peptide backbone that serve as iron chelators. PvdA is the ornithine hydroxylase, which performs the first enzymatic step in preparation of these derivatives. PvdA requires both flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) for activity; it was found to be a soluble monomer most active at pH 8.0. The enzyme demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics in an NADPH oxidation assay, but a hydroxylation assay indicated substrate inhibition at high ornithine concentration. PvdA is highly specific for both substrate and coenzyme, and lysine was shown to be a nonsubstrate effector and mixed inhibitor of the enzyme with respect to ornithine. Chloride is a mixed inhibitor of PvdA with respect to ornithine but a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH, and a bulky mercurial compound (p-chloromercuribenzoate) is a mixed inhibitor with respect to ornithine. Steady-state experiments indicate that PvdA/FAD forms a ternary complex with NADPH and ornithine for catalysis. PvdA in the absence of ornithine shows slow substrate-independent flavin reduction by NADPH. Biochemical comparison of PvdA to p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH, from Pseudomonas fluorescens) and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs, from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and hog liver microsomes) leads to the hypothesis that PvdA catalysis proceeds by a novel reaction mechanism. PMID:17900176

  15. Initial Reaction(s) in Biotransformation of CL-20 Is Catalyzed by Salicylate 1-Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain ATCC 29352

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Bharat; Halasz, Annamaria; Spain, Jim C.; Hawari, Jalal

    2004-01-01

    CL-20 (2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazaisowurtzitane) (C6H6N12O12), a future-generation high-energy explosive, is biodegradable by Pseudomonas sp. strain FA1 and Agrobacterium sp. strain JS71; however, the nature of the enzyme(s) involved in the process was not understood. In the present study, salicylate 1-monooxygenase, a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-containing purified enzyme from Pseudomonas sp. strain ATCC 29352, biotransformed CL-20 at rates of 0.256 ± 0.011 and 0.043 ± 0.003 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The disappearance of CL-20 was accompanied by the release of nitrite ions. Using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in the negative electrospray ionization mode, we detected a metabolite with a deprotonated mass ion [M − H]− at 345 Da, corresponding to an empirical formula of C6H6N10O8, produced as a result of two sequential N denitration steps on the CL- 20 molecule. We also detected two isomeric metabolites with [M − H]− at 381 Da corresponding to an empirical formula of C6H10N10O10. The latter was a hydrated product of the metabolite C6H6N10O8 with addition of two H2O molecules, as confirmed by tests using 18O-labeled water. The product stoichiometry showed that each reacted CL-20 molecule produced about 1.7 nitrite ions, 3.2 molecules of nitrous oxide, 1.5 molecules of formic acid, and 0.6 ammonium ion. Diphenyliodonium-mediated inhibition of salicylate 1-monooxygenase and a comparative study between native, deflavo, and reconstituted enzyme(s) showed that FAD site of the enzyme was involved in the biotransformation of CL-20 catalyzed by salicylate 1-monooxygenase. The data suggested that salicylate 1-monooxygenase catalyzed two oxygen-sensitive single-electron transfer steps necessary to release two nitrite ions from CL-20 and that this was followed by the secondary decomposition of this energetic chemical. PMID:15240281

  16. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of FAD-dependent monooxygenase PhzS, a phenazine-modifying enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gohain, Neelakshi; Thomashow, Linda S.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2006-10-01

    PhzS, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes a reaction involved in the biosynthesis of the virulence factor pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa, was cloned, overexpressed and crystallized. Data collection from native and seleno-l-methionine-labelled crystals is reported. The blue chloroform-soluble bacterial metabolite pyocyanin (1-hydroxy-5-methyl-phenazine) contributes to the survival and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals. Little is known about the two enzymes, designated PhzM and PhzS, that function in the synthesis of pyocyanin from phenazine-1-carboxylic acid. In this study, the FAD-dependent monooxygenase PhzS was purified and crystallized from lithium sulfate/ammonium sulfate/sodium citrate pH 5.5. Native crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 144.2, b = 96.2, c = 71.7 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 110.5°. They contain two monomers of PhzS in the asymmetric unit and diffract to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Seleno-l-methionine-labelled PhzS also crystallizes in space group C2, but the unit-cell parameters change to a = 70.6, b = 76.2, c = 80.2 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 110.5° and the diffraction limit is 2.7 Å.

  17. Identification and Characterization of Catabolic para-Nitrophenol 4-Monooxygenase and para-Benzoquinone Reductase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain WBC-3▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-Jie; Liu, Hong; Xiao, Yi; Zhang, Xian-En; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain WBC-3 utilizes para-nitrophenol (PNP) as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. In order to identify the genes involved in this utilization, we cloned and sequenced a 12.7-kb fragment containing a conserved region of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase genes. Of the products of the 13 open reading frames deduced from this fragment, PnpA shares 24% identity to the large component of a 3-hydroxyphenylacetate hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida U and PnpB is 58% identical to an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase from Escherichia coli. Both PnpA and PnpB were purified to homogeneity as His-tagged proteins, and they were considered to be a monomer and a dimer, respectively, as determined by gel filtration. PnpA is a flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent single-component PNP 4-monooxygenase that converts PNP to para-benzoquinone in the presence of NADPH. PnpB is a flavin mononucleotide-and NADPH-dependent p-benzoquinone reductase that catalyzes the reduction of p-benzoquinone to hydroquinone. PnpB could enhance PnpA activity, and genetic analyses indicated that both pnpA and pnpB play essential roles in PNP mineralization in strain WBC-3. Furthermore, the pnpCDEF gene cluster next to pnpAB shares significant similarities with and has the same organization as a gene cluster responsible for hydroquinone degradation (hapCDEF) in Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB (M. J. Moonen, N. M. Kamerbeek, A. H. Westphal, S. A. Boeren, D. B. Janssen, M. W. Fraaije, and W. J. van Berkel, J. Bacteriol. 190:5190-5198, 2008), suggesting that the genes involved in PNP degradation are physically linked. PMID:19218392

  18. Mechanism of the 6-hydroxy-3-succinoyl-pyridine 3-monooxygenase flavoprotein from Pseudomonas putida S16.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Hausinger, Robert P; Tang, Hong-Zhi; Xu, Ping

    2014-10-17

    6-Hydroxy-3-succinoyl-pyridine (HSP) 3-monooxygenase (HspB), a flavoprotein essential to the pyrrolidine pathway of nicotine degradation, catalyzes pyridine-ring β-hydroxylation, resulting in carbon-carbon cleavage and production of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Here, we generated His6-tagged HspB in Escherichia coli, characterized the properties of the recombinant enzyme, and investigated its mechanism of catalysis. In contrast to conclusions reported previously, the second product of the HspB reaction was shown to be succinate, with isotope labeling experiments providing direct evidence that the newly introduced oxygen atom of succinate is derived from H2O. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that HspB is the most closely related to two p-nitrophenol 4-monooxygenases, and the experimental results exhibit that p-nitrophenol is a substrate of HspB. The reduction of HspB (with maxima at 375 and 460 nm, and a shoulder at 485 nm) by NADH was followed by stopped-flow spectroscopy, and the rate constant for reduction was shown to be stimulated by HSP. Reduced HspB reacts with oxygen to form a C(4a)-(hydro)peroxyflavin intermediate with an absorbance maximum at ∼400 nm within the first few milliseconds before converting to the oxidized flavoenzyme species. The formed C(4a)-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate reacts with HSP to form an intermediate that hydrolyzes to the products 2,5-dihydroxypyridine and succinate. The investigation on the catalytic mechanism of a flavoprotein pyridine-ring β-position hydroxylase provides useful information for the biosynthesis of pyridine derivatives. PMID:25172510

  19. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE. PMID:25432418

  20. OXIDATION OF BIPHENYL BY A MULTICOMPONENT ENZYME SYSTEM FROM PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. This organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of bipheny...

  1. OXIDATION OF BIPHENYL BY A MULTICOMPONENT ENZYME SYSTEM FROM PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. his organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. iphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of biphenyl ...

  2. A Flexible Glutamine Regulates the Catalytic Activity of Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase capable of oxidizing aromatic substrates. The carboxylate-rich diiron active site is located in the hydroxylase component of ToMO (ToMOH), buried 12 Å from the surface of the protein. A small, hydrophilic pore is the shortest pathway between the diiron active site and the protein exterior. In this study of ToMOH from Pseudomonas sp. OX1, the functions of two residues lining this pore, N202 and Q228, were investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. Steady-state characterization of WT and the three mutant enzymes demonstrates that residues N202 and Q228 are critical for turnover. Kinetic isotope effects and pH profiles reveal that these residues govern the kinetics of water egress and prevent quenching of activated oxygen intermediates formed at the diiron active site. We propose that this activity arises from movement of these residues, opening and closing the pore during catalysis, as seen in previous X-ray crystallographic studies. In addition, N202 and Q228 are important for the interactions of the reductase and regulatory components to ToMOH, suggesting that they bind competitively to the hydroxylase. The role of the pore in the hydroxylase components of other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases within the superfamily is discussed in light of these conclusions. PMID:24873259

  3. The Combined Structural and Kinetic Characterization of a Bacterial Nitronate Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Establishes NMO Class I and II*

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Francesca; Agniswamy, Johnson; Yuan, Hongling; Vercammen, Ken; Pelicaen, Rudy; Cornelis, Pierre; Spain, Jim C.; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Nitronate monooxygenase (NMO) oxidizes the mitochondrial toxin propionate 3-nitronate (P3N) to malonate semialdehyde. The enzyme has been previously characterized biochemically in fungi, but no structural information is available. Based on amino acid similarity 4,985 genes are annotated in the GenBankTM as NMO. Of these, 4,424 (i.e. 89%) are bacterial genes, including several Pseudomonads that have been shown to use P3N as growth substrate. Here, we have cloned and expressed the gene pa4202 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, purified the resulting protein, and characterized it. The enzyme is active on P3N and other alkyl nitronates, but cannot oxidize nitroalkanes. P3N is the best substrate at pH 7.5 and atmospheric oxygen with kcatapp/Kmapp of 12 × 106 m−1 s−1, kcatapp of 1300 s−1, and Kmapp of 110 μm. Anerobic reduction of the enzyme with P3N yields a flavosemiquinone, which is formed within 7.5 ms, consistent with this species being a catalytic intermediate. Absorption spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and x-ray crystallography demonstrate a tightly, non-covalently bound FMN in the active site of the enzyme. Thus, PA4202 is the first NMO identified and characterized in bacteria. The x-ray crystal structure of the enzyme was solved at 1.44 Å, showing a TIM barrel-fold. Four motifs in common with the biochemically characterized NMO from Cyberlindnera saturnus are identified in the structure of bacterial NMO, defining Class I NMO, which includes bacterial, fungal, and two animal NMOs. Notably, the only other NMO from Neurospora crassa for which biochemical evidence is available lacks the four motifs, defining Class II NMO. PMID:25002579

  4. Cloning, Baeyer-Villiger biooxidations, and structures of the camphor pathway 2-oxo-Δ(3)-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-coenzyme A monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453.

    PubMed

    Leisch, Hannes; Shi, Rong; Grosse, Stephan; Morley, Krista; Bergeron, Hélène; Cygler, Miroslaw; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C K

    2012-04-01

    A dimeric Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) catalyzing the lactonization of 2-oxo-Δ(3)-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA), a key intermediate in the metabolism of camphor by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453, had been initially characterized in 1983 by Ougham and coworkers (H. J. Ougham, D. G. Taylor, and P. W. Trudgill, J. Bacteriol. 153:140-152, 1983). Here we cloned and overexpressed the 2-oxo-Δ(3)-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-CoA monooxygenase (OTEMO) in Escherichia coli and determined its three-dimensional structure with bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) at a 1.95-Å resolution as well as with bound FAD and NADP(+) at a 2.0-Å resolution. OTEMO represents the first homodimeric type 1 BVMO structure bound to FAD/NADP(+). A comparison of several crystal forms of OTEMO bound to FAD and NADP(+) revealed a conformational plasticity of several loop regions, some of which have been implicated in contributing to the substrate specificity profile of structurally related BVMOs. Substrate specificity studies confirmed that the 2-oxo-Δ(3)-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid coenzyme A ester is preferred over the free acid. However, the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) favors 2-n-hexyl cyclopentanone (4.3 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) as a substrate, although its affinity (K(m) = 32 μM) was lower than that of the CoA-activated substrate (K(m) = 18 μM). In whole-cell biotransformation experiments, OTEMO showed a unique enantiocomplementarity to the action of the prototypical cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) and appeared to be particularly useful for the oxidation of 4-substituted cyclohexanones. Overall, this work extends our understanding of the molecular structure and mechanistic complexity of the type 1 family of BVMOs and expands the catalytic repertoire of one of its original members. PMID:22267661

  5. Cloning, Baeyer-Villiger Biooxidations, and Structures of the Camphor Pathway 2-Oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-Trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-Coenzyme A Monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453

    PubMed Central

    Leisch, Hannes; Shi, Rong; Grosse, Stephan; Morley, Krista; Bergeron, Hélène; Cygler, Miroslaw; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    A dimeric Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) catalyzing the lactonization of 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA), a key intermediate in the metabolism of camphor by Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453, had been initially characterized in 1983 by Ougham and coworkers (H. J. Ougham, D. G. Taylor, and P. W. Trudgill, J. Bacteriol. 153:140–152, 1983). Here we cloned and overexpressed the 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-CoA monooxygenase (OTEMO) in Escherichia coli and determined its three-dimensional structure with bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) at a 1.95-Å resolution as well as with bound FAD and NADP+ at a 2.0-Å resolution. OTEMO represents the first homodimeric type 1 BVMO structure bound to FAD/NADP+. A comparison of several crystal forms of OTEMO bound to FAD and NADP+ revealed a conformational plasticity of several loop regions, some of which have been implicated in contributing to the substrate specificity profile of structurally related BVMOs. Substrate specificity studies confirmed that the 2-oxo-Δ3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid coenzyme A ester is preferred over the free acid. However, the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) favors 2-n-hexyl cyclopentanone (4.3 × 105 M−1 s−1) as a substrate, although its affinity (Km = 32 μM) was lower than that of the CoA-activated substrate (Km = 18 μM). In whole-cell biotransformation experiments, OTEMO showed a unique enantiocomplementarity to the action of the prototypical cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) and appeared to be particularly useful for the oxidation of 4-substituted cyclohexanones. Overall, this work extends our understanding of the molecular structure and mechanistic complexity of the type 1 family of BVMOs and expands the catalytic repertoire of one of its original members. PMID:22267661

  6. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of FAD-dependent monooxygenase PhzS, a phenazine-modifying enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The blue chloroform-soluble bacterial metabolite pyocyanin (1-hydroxy-5-methyl-phenazine) contributes to the survival and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals. Little is known about the two enzymes, designated PhzM and PhzS, tha...

  7. Camphor pathway redux: functional recombinant expression of 2,5- and 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenases of Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453 with their cognate flavin reductase catalyzing Baeyer-Villiger reactions.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Hiroaki; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Leisch, Hannes; Morley, Krista; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C K

    2013-05-01

    Whereas the biochemical properties of the monooxygenase components that catalyze the oxidation of 2,5-diketocamphane and 3,6-diketocamphane (2,5-DKCMO and 3,6-DKCMO, respectively) in the initial catabolic steps of (+) and (-) isomeric forms of camphor (CAM) metabolism in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 17453 are relatively well characterized, the actual identity of the flavin reductase (Fred) component that provides the reduced flavin to the oxygenases has hitherto been ill defined. In this study, a 37-kDa Fred was purified from a camphor-induced culture of P. putida ATCC 17453 and this facilitated cloning and characterization of the requisite protein. The active Fred is a homodimer with a subunit molecular weight of 18,000 that uses NADH as an electron donor (Km = 32 μM), and it catalyzes the reduction of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) (Km = 3.6 μM; kcat = 283 s(-1)) in preference to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) (Km = 19 μM; kcat = 128 s(-1)). Sequence determination of ∼40 kb of the CAM degradation plasmid revealed the locations of two isofunctional 2,5-DKCMO genes (camE25-1 for 2,5-DKCMO-1 and camE25-2 for 2,5-DKCMO-2) as well as that of a 3,6-DKCMO-encoding gene (camE36). In addition, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the CAM plasmid was established to be linear and ∼533 kb in length. To enable functional assessment of the two-component monooxygenase system in Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, recombinant plasmids expressing Fred in tandem with the respective 2,5-DKCMO- and 3,6-DKCMO-encoding genes in Escherichia coli were constructed. Comparative substrate profiling of the isofunctional 2,5-DCKMOs did not yield obvious differences in Baeyer-Villiger biooxidations, but they are distinct from 3,6-DKCMO in the stereoselective oxygenations with various mono- and bicyclic ketone substrates. PMID:23524667

  8. Membrane-association determinants of the omega-amino acid monooxygenase PvdA, a pyoverdine biosynthetic enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Imperi, Francesco; Putignani, Lorenza; Tiburzi, Federica; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Cipollone, Rita; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2008-09-01

    The L-ornithine N(delta)-oxygenase PvdA catalyses the N(delta)-hydroxylation of L-ornithine in many Pseudomonas spp., and thus provides an essential enzymic function in the biogenesis of the pyoverdine siderophore. Here, we report a detailed analysis of the membrane topology of the PvdA enzyme from the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Membrane topogenic determinants of PvdA were identified by computational analysis, and verified in Escherichia coli by constructing a series of translational fusions between PvdA and the PhoA (alkaline phosphatase) reporter enzyme. The inferred topological model resembled a eukaryotic reverse signal-anchor (type III) protein, with a single N-terminal domain anchored to the inner membrane, and the bulk of the protein spanning the cytosol. According to this model, the predicted transmembrane region should overlap the putative FAD-binding site. Cell fractionation and proteinase K accessibility experiments in P. aeruginosa confirmed the membrane-bound nature of PvdA, but excluded the transmembrane topology of its N-terminal hydrophobic region. Mutational analysis of PvdA, and complementation assays in a P. aeruginosa DeltapvdA mutant, demonstrated the dual (structural and functional) role of the PvdA N-terminal domain. PMID:18757814

  9. The role of substrate binding pocket residues phenylalanine 176 and phenylalanine 196 on Pseudomonas sp. OX1 toluene o-xylene monooxygenase activity and regiospecificity.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, Burcu; Yanık-Yıldırım, K Cansu; Wood, Thomas K; Vardar-Schara, Gönül

    2014-08-01

    Saturation mutagenesis was used to generate eleven substitutions of toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) at alpha subunit (TouA) positions F176 and F196 among which nine were novel: F176H, F176N, F176S, F176T, F196A, F196L, F196T, F196Y, F196H, F196I, and F196V. By testing the substrates phenol, toluene, and naphthalene, these positions were found to influence ToMO oxidation activity and regiospecificity. Specifically, TouA variant F176H was identified that had 4.7-, 4.3-, and 1.8-fold faster hydroxylation activity towards phenol, toluene, and naphthalene, respectively, compared to native ToMO. The F176H variant also produced the novel product hydroquinone (61%) from phenol, made twofold more 2-naphthol from naphthalene (34% vs. 16% by the wild-type ToMO), and had the regiospecificity of toluene changed from 51% to 73% p-cresol. The TouA F176N variant had the most para-hydroxylation capability, forming p-cresol (92%) from toluene and hydroquinone (82%) from phenol as the major product, whereas native ToMO formed 30% o-cresol, 19% m-cresol, and 51% of p-cresol from toluene and 100% catechol from phenol. For naphthalene oxidation, TouA variant F176S exhibited the largest shift in the product distribution by producing threefold more 2-naphthol. Among the other F196 variants, F196L produced catechol from phenol two times faster than the wild-type enzyme. The TouA F196I variant produced twofold less o-cresol and 19% more p-cresol from toluene, and the TouA F196A variant produced 62% more 2-naphthol from naphthalene compared to wild-type ToMO. Both of these positions have never been studied through the saturation mutagenesis and some of the best substitutions uncovered here have never been predicted and characterized for aromatics hydroxylation. PMID:24519264

  10. The Hybrid Histidine Kinase LadS Forms a Multicomponent Signal Transduction System with the GacS/GacA Two-Component System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Redelberger, David; Fadel, Firas; Filloux, Alain; Sivaneson, Melissa; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Bordi, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental changes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is able to switch from a planktonic (free swimming) to a sessile (biofilm) lifestyle. The two-component system (TCS) GacS/GacA activates the production of two small non-coding RNAs, RsmY and RsmZ, but four histidine kinases (HKs), RetS, GacS, LadS and PA1611, are instrumental in this process. RetS hybrid HK blocks GacS unorthodox HK autophosphorylation through the formation of a heterodimer. PA1611 hybrid HK, which is structurally related to GacS, interacts with RetS in P. aeruginosa in a very similar manner to GacS. LadS hybrid HK phenotypically antagonizes the function of RetS by a mechanism that has never been investigated. The four sensors are found in most Pseudomonas species but their characteristics and mode of signaling may differ from one species to another. Here, we demonstrated in P. aeruginosa that LadS controls both rsmY and rsmZ gene expression and that this regulation occurs through the GacS/GacA TCS. We additionally evidenced that in contrast to RetS, LadS signals through GacS/GacA without forming heterodimers, either with GacS or with RetS. Instead, we demonstrated that LadS is involved in a genuine phosphorelay, which requires both transmitter and receiver LadS domains. LadS signaling ultimately requires the alternative histidine-phosphotransfer domain of GacS, which is here used as an Hpt relay by the hybrid kinase. LadS HK thus forms, with the GacS/GacA TCS, a multicomponent signal transduction system with an original phosphorelay cascade, i.e. H1LadS→D1LadS→H2GacS→D2GacA. This highlights an original strategy in which a unique output, i.e. the modulation of sRNA levels, is controlled by a complex multi-sensing network to fine-tune an adapted biofilm and virulence response. PMID:27176226

  11. Functional redundancy in phenol and toluene degradation in Pseudomonas stutzeri strains isolated from the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Heinaru, Eeva; Naanuri, Eve; Grünbach, Maarja; Jõesaar, Merike; Heinaru, Ain

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we describe functional redundancy of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (toluene monooxygenase (TMO) and toluene/xylene monooxygenase (XylAM) of TOL pathway) and cooperative genetic regulation at the expression of the respective catabolic operons by touR and xylR encoded regulatory circuits in five phenol- and toluene-degrading Pseudomonas stutzeri strains. In these strains both toluene degradation pathways (TMO and Xyl) are active and induced by toluene and phenol. The whole genome sequence of the representative strain 2A20 revealed the presence of complete TMO- and Xyl-upper pathway operons together with two sets of lower catechol meta pathway operons, as well as phenol-degrading operon in a single 292,430bp contig. The much lower GC content and analysis of the predicted ORFs refer to the plasmid origin of the approximately 130kb region of this contig, containing the xyl, phe and tou genes. The deduced amino acid sequences of the TMO, XylA and the large subunit of phenol monooxygenase (LmPH) show 98-100% identity with the respective gene products of the strain Pseudomonas sp. OX1. In both strains 2A20 and OX1 the meta-cleavage pathways for catechol degradation are coded by two redundant operons (phe and xyl). We show that in the strain 2A20 TouR and XylR are activated by different effector molecules, phenol and toluene, respectively, and they both control transcription of the xyl upper, tou (TMO) and phe catabolic operons. Although the growth parameters of redundant strains did not show advantage at toluene biodegradation, the functional redundancy could provide better flexibility to the bacteria in environmental conditions. PMID:27185632

  12. Cloning and characterization of Pseudomonas sp. strain DNT genes for 2,4-dinitrotoluene degradation.

    PubMed

    Suen, W C; Spain, J C

    1993-03-01

    The degradation of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) by Pseudomonas sp. strain DNT is initiated by a dioxygenase attack to yield 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC) and nitrite. Subsequent oxidation of MNC by a monooxygenase results in the removal of the second molecule of nitrite, and further enzymatic reactions lead to ring fission. Initial studies on the molecular basis of DNT degradation in this strain revealed the presence of three plasmids. Mitomycin-derived mutants deficient in either DNT dioxygenase only or DNT dioxygenase and MNC monooxygenase were isolated. Plasmid profiles of mutant strains suggested that the mutations resulted from deletions in the largest plasmid. Total plasmid DNA partially digested by EcoRI was cloned into a broad-host-range cosmid vector, pCP13. Recombinant clones containing genes encoding DNT dioxygenase, MNC monooxygenase, and 2,4,5-trihydroxytoluene oxygenase were characterized by identification of reaction products and the ability to complement mutants. Subcloning analysis suggests that the DNT dioxygenase is a multicomponent enzyme system and that the genes for the DNT pathway are organized in at least three different operons. PMID:8449889

  13. The Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase Enzymatic Activity for the Biosynthesis of Aromatic Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Notomista, Eugenio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Cristo, Carlo; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Monocyclic phenols and catechols are important antioxidant compounds for the food and pharmaceutic industries; their production through biotransformation of low-added value starting compounds is of major biotechnological interest. The toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) that is able to hydroxylate a wide array of aromatic compounds and has already proven to be a versatile biochemical tool to produce mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives of aromatic compounds. The molecular determinants of its regioselectivity and substrate specificity have been thoroughly investigated, and a computational strategy has been developed which allows designing mutants able to hydroxylate non-natural substrates of this enzyme to obtain high-added value compounds of commercial interest. In this work, we have investigated the use of recombinant ToMO, expressed in cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109, for the biotransformation of non-natural substrates of this enzyme such as 2-phenoxyethanol, phthalan and 2-indanol to produce six hydroxylated derivatives. The hydroxylated products obtained were identified, isolated and their antioxidant potential was assessed both in vitro, using the DPPH assay, and on the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Incubation of H9c2 cells with the hydroxylated compounds obtained from ToMO-catalyzed biotransformation induced a differential protective effect towards a mild oxidative stress induced by the presence of sodium arsenite. The results obtained confirm once again the versatility of the ToMO system for oxyfunctionalization reactions of biotechnological importance. Moreover, the hydroxylated derivatives obtained possess an interesting antioxidant potential that encourages the use of the enzyme for further functionalization reactions and their possible use as scaffolds to design novel bioactive molecules. PMID:25915063

  14. Toluene Monooxygenase-Catalyzed Epoxidation of Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Kevin; Fox, Brian G.; Steffan, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Several toluene monooxygenase-producing organisms were tested for their ability to oxidize linear alkenes and chloroalkenes three to eight carbons long. Each of the wild-type organisms degraded all of the alkenes that were tested. Epoxides were produced during the oxidation of butene, butadiene, and pentene but not hexene or octadiene. A strain of Escherichia coli expressing the cloned toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 was able to oxidize butene, butadiene, pentene, and hexene but not octadiene, producing epoxides from all of the substrates that were oxidized. A T4MO-deficient variant of P. mendocina KR1 oxidized alkenes that were five to eight carbons long, but no epoxides were detected, suggesting the presence of multiple alkene-degrading enzymes in this organism. The alkene oxidation rates varied widely (ranging from 0.01 to 0.33 μmol of substrate/min/mg of cell protein) and were specific for each organism-substrate pair. The enantiomeric purity of the epoxide products also varied widely, ranging from 54 to >90% of a single epoxide enantiomer. In the absence of more preferred substrates, such as toluene or alkenes, the epoxides underwent further toluene monooxygenase-catalyzed transformations, forming products that were not identified. PMID:10788354

  15. Some properties of a soluble methane mono-oxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus strain Bath.

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1976-01-01

    Soluble extracts of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), obtained by centrifugation of crude extracts at 160000g for 1h, catalyse the NAD(P)H- and O2-dependent disappearance of bromomethane, and also the formation of methanol from methane. Soluble methane mono-oxygenase is not inhibited by chelating agents or by most electron-transport inhibitors, and is a multicomponent enzyme. PMID:962879

  16. Electron transfer control in soluble methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixue; Iacob, Roxana E; Luoh, Rebecca P; Engen, John R; Lippard, Stephen J

    2014-07-01

    The hydroxylation or epoxidation of hydrocarbons by bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) requires the interplay of three or four protein components. How component protein interactions control catalysis, however, is not well understood. In particular, the binding sites of the reductase components on the surface of their cognate hydroxylases and the role(s) that the regulatory proteins play during intermolecular electron transfer leading to the hydroxylase reduction have been enigmatic. Here we determine the reductase binding site on the hydroxylase of a BMM enzyme, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). We present evidence that the ferredoxin domain of the reductase binds to the canyon region of the hydroxylase, previously determined to be the regulatory protein binding site as well. The latter thus inhibits reductase binding to the hydroxylase and, consequently, intermolecular electron transfer from the reductase to the hydroxylase diiron active site. The binding competition between the regulatory protein and the reductase may serve as a control mechanism for regulating electron transfer, and other BMM enzymes are likely to adopt the same mechanism. PMID:24937475

  17. NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCING AND TRANSCRIPTIONAL MAPPING OF THE GENES ENCODING BIPHENYL DIOXYGENASE, A MULTICOMPONENT POLYCHLORINATED-BIPHENYL-DEGRADING ENZYME IN PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA region encoding biphenyl dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the biphenyl-polychlorinated biphenyl degradation pathway of Pseudomonas species strain LB400, was sequenced. ix open reading frames were identified, four of which are, homologous to the components of toluene dioxy...

  18. Hydroxylation of methane through component interactions in soluble methane monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydroxylation through methane monooxygenases (MMOs) is a key aspect due to their control of the carbon cycle in the ecology system and recent applications of methane gas in the field of bioenergy and bioremediation. Methanotropic bacteria perform a specific microbial conversion from methane, one of the most stable carbon compounds, to methanol through elaborate mechanisms. MMOs express particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in most strains and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) under copper-limited conditions. The mechanisms of MMO have been widely studied from sMMO belonging to the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. This enzyme has diiron active sites where different types of hydrocarbons are oxidized through orchestrated hydroxylase, regulatory and reductase components for precise control of hydrocarbons, oxygen, protons, and electrons. Recent advances in biophysical studies, including structural and enzymatic achievements for sMMO, have explained component interactions, substrate pathways, and intermediates of sMMO. In this account, oxidation of methane in sMMO is discussed with recent progress that is critical for understanding the microbial applications of C-H activation in one-carbon substrates. PMID:27033202

  19. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  20. Structural biology of heme monooxygenases

    SciTech Connect

    Poulos, Thomas L. . E-mail: poulos@uci.edu

    2005-12-09

    Over the past few years the number of crystal structures available for heme monooxygenases has substantially increased. Those most closely related to one another are cytochrome P450, nitric oxide synthase, and heme oxygenase. The present mini-review provides a summary of some recently published work on how crystallography and solution studies have provided new insights on function and especially the oxygen activation process. It now appears that in all three monooxygenases highly ordered solvent in the active site serves as direct proton donors to the iron-linked dioxygen; a requirement for splitting the O-O bond. This is in sharp contrast to the related peroxidase family of enzymes where strategically positioned amino acid side chains serve the function of shuttling protons. The P450cam-oxy-complex as well as various mutants in a complex with either oxygen or carbon monoxide have enabled a fairly detailed picture to be developed on the role of specific amino acids and conformational changes in both electron transfer and oxygen activation.

  1. Squalene monooxygenase - a target for hypercholesterolemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Belter, Agnieszka; Skupinska, Miroslawa; Giel-Pietraszuk, Malgorzata; Grabarkiewicz, Tomasz; Rychlewski, Leszek; Barciszewski, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Squalene monooxygenase catalyzes the epoxidation of C-C double bond of squalene to yield 2,3-oxidosqualene, the key step of sterol biosynthesis pathways in eukaryotes. Sterols are essential compounds of these organisms and squalene epoxidation is an important regulatory point in their synthesis. Squalene monooxygenase downregulation in vertebrates and fungi decreases synthesis of cholesterol and ergosterol, respectively, which makes squalene monooxygenase a potent and attractive target of hypercholesterolemia and antifungal therapies. Currently some fungal squalene monooxygenase inhibitors (terbinafine, naftifine, butenafine) are in clinical use, whereas mammalian enzymes' inhibitors are still under investigation. Research on new squalene monooxygenase inhibitors is important due to the prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and the lack of both sufficient and safe remedies. In this paper we (i) review data on activity and the structure of squalene monooxygenase, (ii) present its inhibitors, (iii) compare current strategies of lowering cholesterol level in blood with some of the most promising strategies, (iv) underline advantages of squalene monooxygenase as a target for hypercholesterolemia therapy, and (v) discuss safety concerns about hypercholesterolemia therapy based on inhibition of cellular cholesterol biosynthesis and potential usage of squalene monooxygenase inhibitors in clinical practice. After many years of use of statins there is some clinical evidence for their adverse effects and only partial effectiveness. Currently they are drugs of choice but are used with many restrictions, especially in case of children, elderly patients and women of childbearing potential. Certainly, for the next few years, statins will continue to be a suitable tool for cost-effective cardiovascular prevention; however research on new hypolipidemic drugs is highly desirable. We suggest that squalene monooxygenase inhibitors could become the hypocholesterolemic agents of the

  2. ASSAY FOR DETECTION AD ENUMERATION OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MICROORGANISMS WHICH IS BASED ON THE ACTIVITY OF A DEREGULATED 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETATE MONOOXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An assay system was developed for the enumeration of genetically engineered microorganisms expressing a deregulated 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (TFD) monooxygenase, which coverts phenoxyacetate (PAA) to phenol. n PAA-amended cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1C (pRO103) and Ps...

  3. Cellulose degradation by polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Beeson, William T; Vu, Van V; Span, Elise A; Phillips, Christopher M; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs), also known as lytic PMOs (LPMOs), enhance the depolymerization of recalcitrant polysaccharides by hydrolytic enzymes and are found in the majority of cellulolytic fungi and actinomycete bacteria. For more than a decade, PMOs were incorrectly annotated as family 61 glycoside hydrolases (GH61s) or family 33 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM33s). PMOs have an unusual surface-exposed active site with a tightly bound Cu(II) ion that catalyzes the regioselective hydroxylation of crystalline cellulose, leading to glycosidic bond cleavage. The genomes of some cellulolytic fungi contain more than 20 genes encoding cellulose-active PMOs, suggesting a diversity of biological activities. PMOs show great promise in reducing the cost of conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars; however, many questions remain about their reaction mechanism and biological function. This review addresses, in depth, the structural and mechanistic aspects of oxidative depolymerization of cellulose by PMOs and considers their biological function and phylogenetic diversity. PMID:25784051

  4. Electron-transfer reactions and functionalization of cytochrome P450cam monooxygenase system in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Hirofumi; Michizoe, Junji; Maruyama, Tatsuo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-06-22

    Enzyme-based electron-transfer reactions involved in the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system were investigated in nanostructural reverse micelles. A bacterial flavoprotein, putidaredoxin reductase (PdR), was activated and shown to be capable of catalyzing the electron transport from NADH to electron-carrier proteins such as cytochrome b5 (tCyt-b5) and putidaredoxin (Pdx) in reverse micelles. Ferric tCyt-b5 in reverse micelles was effectively converted to its ferrous form by the exogenous addition of separately prepared reverse micellar solution harboring PdR and NADH. The fact that direct interactions of macromolecular proteins should be possible in the reverse micellar system encouraged us to functionalize a multicomponent monooxygenase system composed of the bacterial cytochrome P450cam (P450cam), putidaredoxin (Pdx), and PdR in reverse micelles. The successful camphor hydroxylation reaction catalyzed by P450cam was significantly dependent on the coexistence of Pdx, PdR, and NADH but not H2O2, suggesting that the oxygen-transfer reactions proceeded via a "monooxygenation" mechanism. This is the first report of a multicomponent cytochrome P450 system exhibiting enzymatic activity in organic media. PMID:15986701

  5. Component Interactions and Electron Transfer in Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The multicomponent protein toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) activates molecular oxygen to oxidize aromatic hydrocarbons. Prior to dioxygen activation, two electrons are injected into each of two diiron(III) units of the hydroxylase, a process that involves three redox active proteins: the ToMO hydroxylase (ToMOH), Rieske protein (ToMOC), and an NADH oxidoreductase (ToMOF). In addition to these three proteins, a small regulatory protein is essential for catalysis (ToMOD). Through steady state and pre-steady state kinetics studies, we show that ToMOD attenuates electron transfer from ToMOC to ToMOH in a concentration-dependent manner. At substoichiometric concentrations, ToMOD increases the rate of turnover, which we interpret to be a consequence of opening a pathway for oxygen transport to the catalytic diiron center in ToMOH. Excess ToMOD inhibits steady state catalysis in a manner that depends on ToMOC concentration. Through rapid kinetic assays, we demonstrate that ToMOD attenuates formation of the ToMOC–ToMOH complex. These data, coupled with protein docking studies, support a competitive model in which ToMOD and ToMOC compete for the same binding site on the hydroxylase. These results are discussed in the context of other studies of additional proteins in the superfamily of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:25402597

  6. NMR structure of the flavin domain from soluble methane monooxygenase reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Chatwood, Lisa L; Müller, Jens; Gross, John D; Wagner, Gerhard; Lippard, Stephen J

    2004-09-28

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyzes the hydroxylation of methane by dioxygen to methanol, the first step in carbon assimilation by methanotrophs. This multicomponent system transfers electrons from NADH through a reductase component to the non-heme diiron center in the hydroxylase where O(2) is activated. The reductase component comprises three distinct domains, a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin domain along with FAD- and NADH-binding domains. We report the solution structure of the reduced 27.6 kDa FAD- and NADH-binding domains (MMOR-FAD) of the reductase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). The FAD-binding domain consists of a six-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel and one alpha-helix, with the first 10 N-terminal residues unstructured. In the interface between the two domains, the FAD cofactor is tightly bound in an unprecedented extended conformation. The NADH-binding domain consists of a five-stranded parallel beta-sheet with four alpha-helices packing closely around this sheet. MMOR-FAD is structurally homologous to other FAD-containing oxidoreductases, and we expect similar structures for the FAD/NADH-binding domains of reductases that occur in other multicomponent monooxygenases. PMID:15379538

  7. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  8. Comparison of Bacillus monooxygenase genes for unique fatty acid production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews Bacillus genes encoding monooxygenase enzymes producing unique fatty acid metabolites. Specifically, it examines standard monooxygenase electron transfer schemes and related domain structures of these fused domain enzymes on route to understanding the observed oxygenase activiti...

  9. Starch-degrading polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vu, Van V; Marletta, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Polysaccharide degradation by hydrolytic enzymes glycoside hydrolases (GHs) is well known. More recently, polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs, also known as lytic PMOs or LPMOs) were found to oxidatively degrade various polysaccharides via a copper-dependent hydroxylation. PMOs were previously thought to be either GHs or carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), and have been re-classified in carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZY) database as auxiliary activity (AA) families. These enzymes include cellulose-active fungal PMOs (AA9, formerly GH61), chitin- and cellulose-active bacterial PMOs (AA10, formerly CBM33), and chitin-active fungal PMOs (AA11). These PMOs significantly boost the activity of GHs under industrially relevant conditions, and thus have great potential in the biomass-based biofuel industry. PMOs that act on starch are the latest PMOs discovered (AA13), which has expanded our perspectives in PMOs studies and starch degradation. Starch-active PMOs have many common structural features and biochemical properties of the PMO superfamily, yet differ from other PMO families in several important aspects. These differences likely correlate, at least in part, to the differences in primary and higher order structures of starch and cellulose, and chitin. In this review we will discuss the discovery, structural features, biochemical and biophysical properties, and possible biological functions of starch-active PMOs, as well as their potential application in the biofuel, food, and other starch-based industries. Important questions regarding various aspects of starch-active PMOs and possible economical driving force for their future studies will also be highlighted. PMID:27170366

  10. Multicomponent mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.; Krishna, R.

    1993-01-01

    This is an important book on multicomponent mass transfer, meant for readers already acquainted with the theory of mass transfer and the fundamentals of transport phenomena. Part 1, entitled Molecular Diffusion, contains the following chapters: Preliminary Concepts; The Maxwell-Stefan Relations; Fick's Law; Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients; Solution of multicomponent Diffusion Problems: The Linearized Theory; and Solution of Multicomponent Diffusion Problems: Effective Diffusivity Methods. Part 2, entitled Interphase Transfer, contains the following chapters: Mass-Transfer Coefficients; Film Theory; Unsteady-State Mass-Transfer Models; Mass Transfer in Turbulent Flow; and Simultaneous Mass and Energy Transfer. Part 3, entitled Design, contains the following chapters: Multicomponent Distillation: Mass-Transfer Models; Multicomponent Distillation: Efficiency Models; Multicomponent Distillation: A Nonequilibrium Stage Model; and Condensation of Vapor Mixtures. Appendices are provided on matrix algebra, equation-solving and estimation of a thermodynamic derivative matrix. A computer diskette is provided with the book; the examples in Chapters 1--13 are solvable using this diskette and the commercial package Mathcad which the user must obtain. A separate software package, Chemsep, is needed for some of the exercises in Chapter 14.

  11. Two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, N; Yeager, C M; Arp, D J

    2001-11-01

    Alkane monooxygenases in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8 were examined at the physiological and genetic levels. Strain CF8 can utilize alkanes ranging in chain length from C(2) to C(16). Butane degradation by butane-grown cells was strongly inhibited by allylthiourea, a copper-selective chelator, while hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells showed detectable butane degradation activity in the presence of allylthiourea. Growth on butane and hexane was strongly inhibited by 1-hexyne, while 1-hexyne did not affect growth on octane or decane. A specific 30-kDa acetylene-binding polypeptide was observed for butane-, hexane-, octane-, and decane-grown cells but was absent from cells grown with octane or decane in the presence of 1-hexyne. These results suggest the presence of two monooxygenases in strain CF8. Degenerate primers designed for PCR amplification of genes related to the binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase from Pseudomonas oleovorans were used to clone a related gene from strain CF8. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that this gene encoding a binuclear-iron-containing alkane hydroxylase was expressed in cells grown on alkanes above C(6). These results indicate the presence of two distinct monooxygenases for alkane oxidation in Nocardioides sp. strain CF8. PMID:11679317

  12. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs): An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs) are enzymes belonging to the “Class B” of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga) and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi) for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other “Class B” monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases –FMOs – and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases – NMOs) was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all “Class B” monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes. PMID:26161776

  13. Efficient multicomponent fuel algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, D. J.; O'Rourke, P. J.; Amsden, A. A.

    2003-03-01

    We derive equations for multicomponent fuel evaporation in airborne fuel droplets and wall films, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Temporal and spatial variations in liquid droplet composition and temperature are not modelled but solved for by discretizing the interior of the droplet in an implicit and computationally efficient way. We find that an interior discretization is necessary to correctly compute the evolution of the droplet composition. The details of the one-dimensional numerical algorithm are described. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets and compared to experimental data.

  14. Microbial Flavoprotein Monooxygenases as Mimics of Mammalian Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases for the Enantioselective Preparation of Drug Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gul, Turan; Krzek, Marzena; Permentier, Hjalmar P; Fraaije, Marco W; Bischoff, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases, which are difficult to obtain and study, play a major role in detoxifying various xenobiotics. To provide alternative biocatalytic tools to generate flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMO)-derived drug metabolites, a collection of microbial flavoprotein monooxygenases, sequence-related to human FMOs, was tested for their ability to oxidize a set of xenobiotic compounds. For all tested xenobiotics [nicotine, lidocaine, 3-(methylthio)aniline, albendazole, and fenbendazole], one or more monooxygenases were identified capable of converting the target compound. Chiral liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analyses of the conversions of 3-(methylthio)aniline, albendazole, and fenbendazole revealed that the respective sulfoxides are formed in good to excellent enantiomeric excess (e.e.) by several of the tested monooxygenases. Intriguingly, depending on the chosen microbial monooxygenase, either the (R)- or (S)-sulfoxide was formed. For example, when using a monooxygenase from Rhodococcus jostii the (S)-sulfoxide of albendazole (ricobendazole) was obtained with a 95% e.e. whereas a fungal monooxygenase yielded the respective (R)-sulfoxide in 57% e.e. For nicotine and lidocaine, monooxygenases could be identified that convert the amines into their respective N-oxides. This study shows that recombinantly expressed microbial monooxygenases represent a valuable toolbox of mammalian FMO mimics that can be exploited for the production of FMO-associated xenobiotic metabolites. PMID:26984198

  15. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  16. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced. PMID:26647577

  17. Identification of a putative alternate sigma factor and characterization of a multicomponent regulatory cascade controlling the expression of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae Pss61 hrp and hrmA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Y; Heu, S; Yi, J; Lu, Y; Hutcheson, S W

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae hrp and hrmA genes controlling pathogenicity and elicitation of the hypersensitive response and the avr genes controlling host range have been shown previously to be regulated by carbon, nitrogen, pH, osmolarity, and hypothetical plant factors. In P. syringae pv. syringae Pss61, inactivation of hrp complementation groups II and XIII reduced expression of a plasmid-borne hrmA'-lacZ fusion. The hrp regions II and XIII were cloned on separate plasmids and shown to enhance the activity of the hrmA promoter in Escherichia coli MC4100 transformants at least 100-fold. The nucleotide sequence of region XIII revealed two open reading frames (hrpR and hrpS) whose deduced products share homology with P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 HrpS and are both related to the NtrC family of two-component signal transduction systems. HrpR and HrpS differ from most members of the protein family by lacking an amino-terminal domain which modulates the regulatory activity. A single open reading frame, hrpL, whose product shares homology with AlgU, a putative alternate sigma factor of P. aeruginosa, as well as with the related alternate sigma factors was identified within region II. Key domains are partially conserved. Inactivation of hrpS in Pss61 repressed expression of a plasmid-borne hrpL'-lacZ fusion carried by pYXPL1R, and transformation of MC4100(pYXPL1R) with a plasmid carrying hrpRS increased hrpL promoter activity at least 200-fold. Neither hrpS nor hrpR, when cloned on separate plasmids, activated the hrpL promoter activity individually. The expression of hrpL when directed by a lac promoter was sufficient to express a set of plasmid-borne hrmA'-, hrpJ'-, and hrpZ'-lacZ fusions independently of other hrp genes. The results indicate that hrpRS and hrpL are part of a regulatory cascade in which HrpR and HrpS activate expression of hrpL and HrpL, a putative sigma factor, induces expression of HrpL-responsive genes. Images PMID:8106313

  18. Monooxygenase activity of type 3 copper proteins.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2007-07-01

    The molecular mechanism of the monooxygenase (phenolase) activity of type 3 copper proteins has been examined in detail both in the model systems and in the enzymatic systems. The reaction of a side-on peroxo dicopper(II) model compound ( A) and neutral phenols proceeds via a proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) mechanism to generate phenoxyl radical species, which collapse each other to give the corresponding C-C coupling dimer products. In this reaction, a bis(mu-oxo)dicopper(III) complex ( B) generated by O-O bond homolysis of A is suggested to be a real active species. On the other hand, the reaction of lithium phenolates (deprotonated form of phenols) with the same side-on peroxo dicopper(II) complex proceeds via an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism to give the oxygenated products (catechols). The mechanistic difference between these two systems has been discussed on the basis of the Marcus theory of electron transfer and Hammett analysis. Mechanistic details of the monooxygenase activity of tyrosinase have also been examined using a simplified enzymatic reaction system to demonstrate that the enzymatic reaction mechanism is virtually the same as that of the model reaction, that is, an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism. In addition, the monooxygenase activity of the oxygen carrier protein hemocyanin has been explored for the first time by employing urea as an additive in the reaction system. In this case as well, the ortho-hydroxylation of phenols to catechols has been demonstrated to involve the same ionic mechanism. PMID:17461541

  19. The reduced flavin-dependent monooxygenase SfnG converts dimethylsulfone to methanesulfinate.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Denyce K

    2016-08-15

    The biochemical pathway through which sulfur may be assimilated from dimethylsulfide (DMS) is proposed to proceed via oxidation of DMS to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and subsequent conversion of DMSO to dimethylsulfone (DMSO2). Analogous chemical oxidation processes involving biogenic DMS in the atmosphere result in the deposition of DMSO2 into the terrestrial environment. Elucidating the enzymatic pathways that involve DMSO2 contribute to our understanding of the global sulfur cycle. Dimethylsulfone monooxygenase SfnG and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase MsuE from the genome of the aerobic soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 were produced in Escherichia coli, purified, and biochemically characterized. The enzyme MsuE functions as a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dependent FMN reductase with apparent steady state kinetic parameters of Km = 69 μM and kcat/Km = 9 min(-1) μM (-1) using NADH as the variable substrate, and Km = 8 μM and kcat/Km = 105 min(-1) μM (-1) using FMN as the variable substrate. The enzyme SfnG functions as a flavoprotein monooxygenase and converts DMSO2 to methanesulfinate in the presence of FMN, NADH, and MsuE, as evidenced by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results suggest that methanesulfinate is a biochemical intermediate in sulfur assimilation. PMID:27392454

  20. CRYSTALLIZATION IN MULTICOMPONENT GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; HRMA PR

    2009-10-08

    In glass processing situations involving glass crystallization, various crystalline forms nucleate, grow, and dissolve, typically in a nonuniform temperature field of molten glass subjected to convection. Nuclear waste glasses are remarkable examples of multicomponent vitrified mixtures involving partial crystallization. In the glass melter, crystals form and dissolve during batch-to-glass conversion, melter processing, and product cooling. Crystals often agglomerate and sink, and they may settle at the melter bottom. Within the body of cooling glass, multiple phases crystallize in a non-uniform time-dependent temperature field. Self-organizing periodic distribution (the Liesegnang effect) is common. Various crystallization phenomena that occur in glass making are reviewed.

  1. Magnetization of multicomponent ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Szalai, I; Dietrich, S

    2011-08-17

    The solution of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) integral equation for isotropic multicomponent dipolar hard sphere fluids without external fields is used to construct a density functional theory (DFT), which includes external fields, in order to obtain an analytical expression for the external field dependence of the magnetization of ferrofluidic mixtures. This DFT is based on a second-order Taylor series expansion of the free energy density functional of the anisotropic system around the corresponding isotropic MSA reference system. The ensuing results for the magnetic properties are in quantitative agreement with our canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation data presented here. PMID:21795777

  2. Electrohydrodynamics Of Multicomponent Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gera, Prerna; Salac, David

    2015-11-01

    The addition of cholesterol into a lipid membrane induces the formation of distinct domains. These domains try to minimize the overall energy of the system by coalescence and migration. The application of electric fields will induce flow of these membrane domains and influence the rate at which they coarsen. In this work the electrohydrodynamics of multicomponent vesicles is numerically modelled. The method uses a Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model of the lipid domains restricted to a deforming three-dimensional vesicle and will be briefly discussed. Sample results will be presented and compared to experimental observations. This work supported by NSF Grant #1253739.

  3. Structural basis of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marta; Levy, Colin; Heyes, Derren J; Lafite, Pierre; Outeiro, Tiago F; Giorgini, Flaviano; Leys, David; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2013-04-18

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), an enzyme in the eukaryotic tryptophan catabolic pathway (that is, kynurenine pathway), leads to amelioration of Huntington's-disease-relevant phenotypes in yeast, fruitfly and mouse models, as well as in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. KMO is a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase and is located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it converts l-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. Perturbations in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites have been linked to the pathogenesis of a spectrum of brain disorders, as well as cancer and several peripheral inflammatory conditions. Despite the importance of KMO as a target for neurodegenerative disease, the molecular basis of KMO inhibition by available lead compounds has remained unknown. Here we report the first crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae KMO, in the free form and in complex with the tight-binding inhibitor UPF 648. UPF 648 binds close to the FAD cofactor and perturbs the local active-site structure, preventing productive binding of the substrate l-kynurenine. Functional assays and targeted mutagenesis reveal that the active-site architecture and UPF 648 binding are essentially identical in human KMO, validating the yeast KMO-UPF 648 structure as a template for structure-based drug design. This will inform the search for new KMO inhibitors that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in targeted therapies against neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:23575632

  4. Expression and characterization of styrene monooxygenases of Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10 for synthesizing enantiopure (S)-epoxides.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroshi; Imae, Ryouta; Komio, Tomoko; Itoh, Nobuya

    2012-10-01

    Styrene monooxygenase (StyA, SMOA)- and flavin oxidoreductase (StyB, SMOB)-coding genes of styrene-assimilating bacteria Rhodococcus sp. ST-5 and ST-10 were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Determined amino acid sequences of StyAs and StyBs of ST-5 and ST-10 showed more similarity with those of Pseudomonas than with self-sufficient styrene monooxygenase (StyA2B) of Rhodococcus. Recombinant enzymes were purified from E. coli cells as functional proteins, and their properties were characterized in detail. StyBs (flavin oxidoreductase) of strains ST-5 and ST-10 have similar enzymatic properties to those of Pseudomonas, but StyB of strain ST-10 exhibited higher temperature stability than that of strain ST-5. StyAs of strains ST-5 and ST-10 catalyzed the epoxidation of vinyl side-chain of styrene and its derivatives and produced (S)-epoxides from styrene derivatives and showed high stereoselectivity. Both StyAs showed higher specific activity on halogenated styrene derivatives than on styrene itself. Additionally, the enzymes could catalyze the epoxidation of short-chain 1-alkenes to the corresponding (S)-epoxides. Aromatic compounds including styrene, 3-chlorostyrene, styrene oxide, and benzene exhibited marked inhibition of SMO reaction, although linear 1-alkene showed no inhibition of SMO activity at any concentration. PMID:22258641

  5. Soluble expression and purification of the oxidoreductase component of toluene 4-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Lucas J; Elsen, Nathaniel L; Pierce, Brad S; Fox, Brian G

    2008-01-01

    Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases, an enzyme family that utilizes a soluble diiron hydroxylase to oxidize a variety of hydrocarbons as the initial step in their metabolism. The hydroxylases obtain reducing equivalents from NAD(P)H via an electron transfer chain that is initiated by an oxidoreductase containing an N-terminal ferredoxin domain and C-terminal flavin- and NAD-binding domains. T4moF, the NADH oxidoreductase of T4MO, was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) from the pUC-derived expression vector pRS205. This vector contains a lac promoter instead of a T7 promoter. A three step purification from the soluble cell lysate yielded approximately 1 mg of T4moF per gram of wet cell paste with greater than 90% purity. The purified protein contained 1 mol of FAD and 2 mol of Fe per mol of T4moF; quantitative EPR spectroscopy showed approximately 1 mol of the S=1/2 signal from the reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster per mol of T4moF. Steady state kinetic analysis of p-cresol formation activity treating T4moF as the variable substrate while all other proteins and substrates were held constant gave apparent K(M-) and apparent k(cat)-values of 0.15 microM and 3.0 s(-1), respectively. This expression system and purification allows for the recovery of the soluble oxidoreductase in yields that facilitate further biochemical and structural characterizations. PMID:17964805

  6. Trichloroethylene degradation using recombinant bacteria expressing the soluble methane monooxygenase from methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, D.; Kim, C.; Wood, T.K.

    1995-12-01

    Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from M. trichosporium OB3b has the ability to degrade many halogenated aliphatic compounds that are found in contaminated soil and groundwater. For efficient trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation in a foreign host, efforts are being made to improve inconsistent and low sMMO activity of the recombinant strain constructed previously (Pseudomonas putida F1/pSMMO20). Additional smmo-containing recombinant strains have been constructed including various Pseudomonas, Agrobacterium, and Rhizobium strains. Recombinant facultative methylotrophs containing the smmo locus were also constructed through electroporation and tri-parental mating using a new plasmid pSMMO50. TCE degradation by these recombinant strains was examined. The effect of metal ions on in vitro sMMO activity was also discerned to optimize the expression medium. Among the metal ions examined, Cu(I), Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) inhibited sMMO purified from trichosporium OB3b, and the effect of the metal ions on each of the components of sMMO will also be discussed. In addition, the post-segregational killing locus (hok/sok) from E. coli plasmid R1 was inserted downstream of the smmo locus to stabilize the recombinant plasmid in these host cells, and chemostat cultures were used to optimize expression of active sMMO by varying the growth rate.

  7. Substrate radical intermediates in soluble methane monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Aimin; Jin Yi; Zhang Jingyan; Brazeau, Brian J.; Lipscomb, John D. . E-mail: lipsc001@umn.edu

    2005-12-09

    EPR spin-trapping experiments were carried out using the three-component soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO). Spin-traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), {alpha}-4-pyridyl-1-oxide N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN), and nitrosobenzene (NOB) were used to investigate the possible formation of substrate radical intermediates during catalysis. In contrast to a previous report, the NADH-coupled oxidations of various substrates did not produce any trapped radical species when DMPO or POBN was present. However, radicals were detected by these traps when only the MMO reductase component and NADH were present. DMPO and POBN were found to be weak inhibitors of the MMO reaction. In contrast, NOB is a strong inhibitor for the MMO-catalyzed nitrobenzene oxidation reaction. When NOB was used as a spin-trap in the complete MMO system with or without substrate, EPR signals from an NOB radical were detected. We propose that a molecule of NOB acts simultaneously as a substrate and a spin-trap for MMO, yielding the long-lived radical and supporting a stepwise mechanism for MMO.

  8. EVALUATING MULTICOMPONENT COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION IN FIXED BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An equilibrium column model (ECM) was developed to evaluate multicomponent competition in fixed-bed adsorption columns. The model ignores mass transfer resistances and uses ideal adsorbed solution theory to predict the competitive effects in multicomponent mixtures. The bed capac...

  9. Structure and Ligand Binding Properties of the Epoxidase Component of Styrene Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Kantz, Auric; Beaton, Michelle; Gassner, George T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-23

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase that transforms styrene to styrene oxide in the first step of the styrene catabolic and detoxification pathway of Pseudomonas putida S12. The crystal structure of the N-terminally histidine-tagged epoxidase component of this system, NSMOA, determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, indicates the enzyme exists as a homodimer in which each monomer forms two distinct domains. The overall architecture is most similar to that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH), although there are some significant differences in secondary structure. Structural comparisons suggest that a large cavity open to the surface forms the FAD binding site. At the base of this pocket is another cavity that likely represents the styrene binding site. Flavin binding and redox equilibria are tightly coupled such that reduced FAD binds apo NSMOA {approx}8000 times more tightly than the oxidized coenzyme. Equilibrium fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry data using benzene as a substrate analogue indicate that the oxidized flavin and substrate analogue binding equilibria of NSMOA are linked such that the binding affinity of each is increased by 60-fold when the enzyme is saturated with the other. A much weaker {approx}2-fold positive cooperative interaction is observed for the linked binding equilibria of benzene and reduced FAD. The low affinity of the substrate analogue for the reduced FAD complex of NSMOA is consistent with a preferred reaction order in which flavin reduction and reaction with oxygen precede the binding of styrene, identifying the apoenzyme structure as the key catalytic resting state of NSMOA poised to bind reduced FAD and initiate the oxygen reaction.

  10. Identification of a Novel Self-Sufficient Styrene Monooxygenase from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Dirk; Eulberg, Dirk; Lakner, Silvia; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.; Schlömann, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Sequence analysis of a 9-kb genomic fragment of the actinobacterium Rhodococcus opacus 1CP led to identification of an open reading frame encoding a novel fusion protein, StyA2B, with a putative function in styrene metabolism via styrene oxide and phenylacetic acid. Gene cluster analysis indicated that the highly related fusion proteins of Nocardia farcinica IFM10152 and Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 are involved in a similar physiological process. Whereas 413 amino acids of the N terminus of StyA2B are highly similar to those of the oxygenases of two-component styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) from pseudomonads, the residual 160 amino acids of the C terminus show significant homology to the flavin reductases of these systems. Cloning and functional expression of His10-StyA2B revealed for the first time that the fusion protein does in fact catalyze two separate reactions. Strictly NADH-dependent reduction of flavins and highly enantioselective oxygenation of styrene to (S)-styrene oxide were shown. Inhibition studies and photometric analysis of recombinant StyA2B indicated the absence of tightly bound heme and flavin cofactors in this self-sufficient monooxygenase. StyA2B oxygenates a spectrum of aromatic compounds similar to those of two-component SMOs. However, the specific activities of the flavin-reducing and styrene-oxidizing functions of StyA2B are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those of StyA/StyB from Pseudomonas sp. strain VLB120. PMID:19482928

  11. Purification and properties of the NADH reductase component of alkene monooxygenase from Mycobacterium strain E3.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, F J; van Berkel, W J; Hartmans, S; de Bont, J A

    1992-01-01

    Alkene monooxygenase, a multicomponent enzyme system which catalyzes the epoxidation of short-chain alkenes, is induced in Mycobacterium strain E3 when it is grown on ethene. We purified the NADH reductase component of this enzyme system to homogeneity. Recovery of the enzyme was 19%, with a purification factor of 920-fold. The enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of 56 kDa as determined by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It is yellow-red with absorption maxima at 384, 410, and 460 nm. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) was identified as a prosthetic group at a FAD-protein ratio of 1:1. Tween 80 prevented irreversible dissociation of FAD from the enzyme during chromatographic purification steps. Colorimetric analysis revealed 2 mol each of iron and acid-labile sulfide, indicating the presence of a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The presence of this cluster was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (g values at 2.011, 1.921, and 1.876). Anaerobic reduction of the reductase by NADH resulted in formation of a flavin semiquinone. Images PMID:1315734

  12. Electron transfer reactions in the alkene mono-oxygenase complex from Nocardia corallina B-276.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, S C; Cammack, R; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    Nocardia corallina B-276 possesses a multi-component enzyme, alkene mono-oxygenase (AMO), that catalyses the stereoselective epoxygenation of alkenes. The reductase component of this system has been shown by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy to contain two prosthetic groups, an FAD centre and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The role of these centres in the epoxygenation reaction was determined by midpoint potential measurements and electron transfer kinetics. The order of potentials of the prosthetic groups of the reductase were FAD/FAD.=-216 mV, [2Fe-2S]/[2Fe-2S].=-160 mV and FAD./FAD.=-134 mV. Combined, these data implied that the reductase component supplied the energy required for the epoxygenation reaction and allowed a prediction of the mechanism of electron transfer within the AMO complex. The FAD moiety was reduced by bound NADH in a two-electron reaction. The electrons were then transported to the [2Fe-2S] centre one at a time, which in turn reduced the di-iron centre of the epoxygenase. Reduction of the di-iron centre is required for oxygen binding and substrate oxidation. PMID:10085230

  13. Controlled oxidation of aliphatic CH bonds in metallo-monooxygenases: mechanistic insights derived from studies on deuterated and fluorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Sheng; Luo, Wen-I; Yang, Chung-Ling; Tu, Yi-Jung; Chang, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Chih-Hsiang; Chang, Chi-Yao; Chan, Sunney I; Yu, Steve S-F

    2014-05-01

    The control over the regio- and/or stereo-selective aliphatic CH oxidation by metalloenzymes is of great interest to scientists. Typically, these enzymes invoke host-guest chemistry to sequester the substrates within the protein pockets, exploiting sizes, shapes and specific interactions such as hydrogen-bonding, electrostatic forces and/or van der Waals interactions to control the substrate specificity, regio-specificity and stereo-selectivity. Over the years, we have developed a series of deuterated and fluorinated variants of these hydrocarbon substrates as probes to gain insights into the controlled CH oxidations of hydrocarbons facilitated by these enzymes. In this review, we illustrate the application of these designed probes in the study of three monooxygenases: (i) the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), which oxidizes straight-chain C1-C5 alkanes and alkenes to form their corresponding 2-alcohols and epoxides, respectively; (ii) the recombinant alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) from Pseudomonas putida GPo1, which oxidizes the primary CH bonds of C5-C12 linear alkanes; and (iii) the recombinant cytochrome P450 from Bacillus megaterium, which oxidizes C12-C20 fatty acids at the ω-1, ω-2 or ω-3 CH positions. PMID:24629413

  14. Enzymatic production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine using l-lysine monooxygenase and 5-aminovaleramide amidohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan; Zhang, Haiwei; Lv, Min; Hu, Mandong; Li, Zhong; Gao, Chao; Xu, Ping; Ma, Cuiqing

    2014-01-01

    5-Aminovalerate is a potential C5 platform chemical for synthesis of valerolactam, 5-hydroxyvalerate, glutarate, and 1,5-pentanediol. It is a metabolite of l-lysine catabolism through the aminovalerate pathway in Pseudomonas putida. l-Lysine monooxygenase (DavB) and 5-aminovaleramide amidohydrolase (DavA) play key roles in the biotransformation of l-lysine into 5-aminovalerate. Here, DavB and DavA of P. putida KT2440 were expressed, purified, and coupled for the production of 5-aminovalerate from l-lysine. Under optimal conditions, 20.8 g/L 5-aminovalerate was produced from 30 g/L l-lysine in 12 h. Because l-lysine is an industrial fermentation product, the two-enzyme coupled system presents a promising alternative for the production of 5-aminovalerate. PMID:25012259

  15. Characterization of a tryptophan 2-monooxygenase gene from Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici involved in auxin biosynthesis and rust pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chuntao; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R; Hulbert, Scot H

    2014-03-01

    The plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is best known as a regulator of plant growth and development but its production can also affect plant-microbe interactions. Microorganisms, including numerous plant-associated bacteria and several fungi, are also capable of producing IAA. The stem rust fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici induced wheat plants to accumulate auxin in infected leaf tissue. A gene (Pgt-IaaM) encoding a putative tryptophan 2-monooxygenase, which makes the auxin precursor indole-3-acetamide (IAM), was identified in the P. graminis f. sp. tritici genome and found to be expressed in haustoria cells in infected plant tissue. Transient silencing of the gene in infected wheat plants indicated that it was required for full pathogenicity. Expression of Pgt-IaaM in Arabidopsis caused a typical auxin expression phenotype and promoted susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. PMID:24350783

  16. Saturation mutagenesis of Bradyrhizobium sp. BTAi1 toluene 4-monooxygenase at alpha-subunit residues proline 101, proline 103, and histidine 214 for regiospecific oxidation of aromatics.

    PubMed

    Yanık-Yıldırım, K Cansu; Vardar-Schara, Gönül

    2014-11-01

    A novel toluene monooxygenase (TMO) six-gene cluster from Bradyrhizobium sp. BTAi1 having an overall 35, 36, and 38 % protein similarity with toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) of Pseudomonas sp. OX1, toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1, and toluene-para-monooxygenase (TpMO) of Ralstonia pickettii PKO1, respectively, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli TG1, and its potential activity was investigated for aromatic hydroxylation and trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation. The natural substrate toluene was hydroxylated to p-cresol, indicating that the new toluene monooxygenase (T4MO·BTAi1) acts as a para hydroxylating enzyme, similar to T4MO and TpMO. Some shifts in regiospecific hydroxylations were observed compared to the other wild-type TMOs. For example, wild-type T4MO·BTAi1 formed catechol (88 %) and hydroquinone (12 %) from phenol, whereas all the other wild-type TMOs were reported to form only catechol. Furthermore, it was discovered that TG1 cells expressing wild-type T4MO·BTAi1 mineralized TCE at a rate of 0.67 ± 0.10 nmol Cl(-)/h/mg protein. Saturation and site directed mutagenesis were used to generate eight variants of T4MO·BTAi1 at alpha-subunit positions P101, P103, and H214: P101T/P103A, P101S, P101N/P103T, P101V, P103T, P101V/P103T, H214G, and H214G/D278N; by testing the substrates phenol, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, positions P101 and P103 were found to influence the regiospecific oxidation of aromatics. For example, compared to wild type, variant P103T produced four fold more m-nitrophenol from nitrobenzene as well as produced mainly resorcinol (60 %) from phenol whereas wild-type T4MO·BTAi1 did not. Similarly, variants P101T/P103A and P101S synthesized more 2-naphthol and 2.3-fold and 1.6-fold less 1-naphthol from naphthalene, respectively. PMID:25016343

  17. Pseudomonas 2007 Meeting Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas is an important genus of bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the third most common nosocomial pathogen in our society, associated with chronic and eventually fatal lung disease in cystic fibrosis patients, while Pseudomonas syringae species are prominent plant pathogens. The fluorescen...

  18. Regulation of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the compound 1,4-bis(2-(3,4-dichloropyridyloxy)) benzene (TCPOBOP) has been identified as a highly potent phenobabital-like agonist in mice. This finding has led to the suggestion that a receptor-mediated process may govern the induction of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases by phenobarbital and phenobarbital-like agonists. This dissertation examines: (1) the effects of structural alterations of the TCPOBOP molecule on enzyme induction activity, (2) the induction response to phenobarbital and TCPOBOP among inbred mouse strains, (3) the spectrum of monooxygenase activities induced by phenobarbital and TCPOBOP compared to 3-methylcholanthrene, isosafrole and pregnenolone 16..cap alpha..-carbonitrile (PCN) and (4) the binding of (/sup 3/H) TCPOBOP in hepatic cytosol. Changes in the structure of the pyridyloxy or benzene rings markedly affect enzyme induction activity and provide additional indirect evidence for a receptor-mediated response. An evaluation of monooxygenase induction by TCPOBOP for 27 inbred mouse strains and by phenobarbital for 15 inbred mouse strains failed to identify a strain which was completely nonresponsive to these compounds, although several strains exhibited decreased responsiveness for select monooxygenase reactions. TCPOBOP, PCN and phenobarbital were all found to significantly increase the rate of hydroxylation of testosterone at the 2..cap alpha..-, 6..beta..- and 15..beta..- positions but only TCPOBOP and phenobarbital dramatically increased the rate of pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation. The results demonstrates that TCPOBOP most closely resembles phenobarbital in its mode of monooxygenase induction in mice. Sucrose density gradient analysis of (/sup 3/H) TCPOBOP-hepatic cytosol incubations failed to identify specific, saturable binding of (/sup 3/H) TCPOBOP to cytosolic marcomolecular elements.

  19. Multi-Component Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2008-11-01

    We explore multi-component dark matter models where the dark sector consists of multiple stable states with different mass scales, and dark forces coupling these states further enrich the dynamics. The multi-component nature of the dark matter naturally arises in supersymmetric models, where both R parity and an additional symmetry, such as a Z{sub 2}, is preserved. We focus on a particular model where the heavier component of dark matter carries lepton number and annihilates mostly to leptons. The heavier component, which is essentially a sterile neutrino, naturally explains the PAMELA, ATIC and synchrotron signals, without an excess in antiprotons which typically mars other models of weak scale dark matter. The lighter component, which may have a mass from a GeV to a TeV, may explain the DAMA signal, and may be visible in low threshold runs of CDMS and XENON, which search for light dark matter.

  20. Reconstitution of {beta}-carotene hydroxylase activity of thermostable CYP175A1 monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Momoi, Kyoko; Hofmann, Ute; Schmid, Rolf D.; Urlacher, Vlada B. . E-mail: itbvkha@po.uni-stuttgart.de

    2006-01-06

    CYP175A1 is a thermostable P450 Monooxygenase from Thermus thermophilus HB27, demonstrating in vivo activity towards {beta}-carotene. Activity of CYP175A1 was reconstituted in vitro using artificial electron transport proteins. First results were obtained in the mixture with a crude Escherichia coli cell extract at 37 {sup o}C. In this system, {beta}-carotene was hydroxylated to {beta}-cryptoxanthin. The result indicated the presence of electron transport enzymes among the E. coli proteins, which are suitable for CYP175A1. However, upon in vitro reconstitution of CYP175A1 activity with purified recombinant flavodoxin and flavodoxin reductase from E. coli, only very low {beta}-cryptoxanthin production was observed. Remarkably, with another artificial electron transport system, putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase from Pseudomonas putida, purified CYP175A1 enzyme hydroxylated {beta}-carotene at 3- and also 3'-positions, resulting in {beta}-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the turnover rate of the enzyme reached 0.23 nmol {beta}-cryptoxanthin produced per nmol P450 per min.

  1. Purification and characterization of chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100.

    PubMed Central

    Xun, L

    1996-01-01

    Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) cepacia AC1100 mineralizes the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4,5-T), and the first intermediate of 2,4,5-T degradation is 2,4,5-trichlorophenol. Chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase activity responsible for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol degradation was detected in the cell extract. The enzyme consisted of two components separated during purification, and both were purified to more than 95% homogeneity. The reconstituted enzyme catalyzed the hydroxylation of several tested chlorophenols with the coconsumption of NADH and oxygen. In addition to chlorophenols, the enzyme also hydroxylated some chloro-p-hydroquinones with the coconsumption of NADH and oxygen. Apparently, the single enzyme was responsible for converting 2,4,5-trichlorophenol to 2,5-dichloro-p-hydroquinone and then to 5-chlorohydroxyquinol (5-chloro-1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene). Component A had a molecular weight of 22,000 and contained flavin adenine dinucleotide. Component A alone catalyzed NADH-dependent cytochrome c reduction, indicating that it had reductase activity. Component B had a molecular weight of 58,000, and no catalytic activity has yet been shown by itself. PMID:8626333

  2. Multicomponent reactions in nucleoside chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Buchowicz, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review covers sixty original publications dealing with the application of multicomponent reactions (MCRs) in the synthesis of novel nucleoside analogs. The reported approaches were employed for modifications of the parent nucleoside core or for de novo construction of a nucleoside scaffold from non-nucleoside substrates. The cited references are grouped according to the usually recognized types of the MCRs. Biochemical properties of the novel nucleoside analogs are also presented (if provided by the authors). PMID:25161730

  3. A Sustainable Multicomponent Pyrimidine Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Deibl, Nicklas; Ament, Kevin; Kempe, Rhett

    2015-10-14

    Since alcohols are accessible from indigestible biomass (lignocellulose), the development of novel preferentially catalytic reactions in which alcohols are converted into important classes of fine chemicals is a central topic of sustainable synthesis. Multicomponent reactions are especially attractive in organic chemistry as they allow the synthesis of large libraries of diversely functionalized products in a short time when run in a combinatorial fashion. Herein, we report a novel, regioselective, iridium-catalyzed multicomponent synthesis of pyrimidines from amidines and up to three (different) alcohols. This reaction proceeds via a sequence of condensation and dehydrogenation steps which give rise to selective C-C and C-N bond formations. While the condensation steps deoxygenate the alcohol components, the dehydrogenations lead to aromatization. Two equiv of hydrogen and water are liberated in the course of the reactions. PN5P-Ir-pincer complexes, recently developed in our laboratory, catalyze this sustainable multicomponent process most efficiently. A total of 38 different pyrimidines were synthesized in isolated yields of up to 93%. Strong points of the new protocol are its regioselectivity and thus the immediate access to pyrimidines that are highly and unsymmetrically decorated with alkyl or aryl substituents. The combination of this novel protocol with established methods for converting alcohols to nitriles now allows to selectively assemble pyrimidines from four alcohol building blocks and 2 equiv of ammonia. PMID:26414993

  4. Investigations into the Biosynthesis, Regulation, and Self-Resistance of Toxoflavin in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Philmus, Benjamin; Shaffer, Brenda T; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Yan, Qing; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Begley, Tadhg P; Loper, Joyce E

    2015-08-17

    Pseudomonas spp. are prolific producers of natural products from many structural classes. Here we show that the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 is capable of producing trace levels of the triazine natural product toxoflavin (1) under microaerobic conditions. We evaluated toxoflavin production by derivatives of Pf-5 with deletions in specific biosynthesis genes, which led us to propose a revised biosynthetic pathway for toxoflavin that shares the first two steps with riboflavin biosynthesis. We also report that toxM, which is not present in the well-characterized cluster of Burkholderia glumae, encodes a monooxygenase that degrades toxoflavin. The toxoflavin degradation product of ToxM is identical to that of TflA, the toxoflavin lyase from Paenibacillus polymyxa. Toxoflavin production by P. protegens causes inhibition of several plant-pathogenic bacteria, and introduction of toxM into the toxoflavin-sensitive strain Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 results in resistance to toxoflavin. PMID:26077901

  5. Novel cyclohexane monooxygenase from Acidovorax sp. CHX100.

    PubMed

    Salamanca, Diego; Karande, Rohan; Schmid, Andreas; Dobslaw, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Acidovorax sp. CHX100 has a remarkable ability for growth on short cycloalkanes (C5-C8) as a sole source of carbon and energy under aerobic conditions via an uncharacterized mechanism. Transposon mutagenesis of Acidovorax sp. CHX100 revealed a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP450chx) which catalyzed the transformation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanol. Primer walking methods categorized CYP450chx as cytochrome P450 class I taking into account its operon structure: monooxygenase, FAD oxidoreductase, and ferredoxin. CYP450chx was successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli JM109. The activity of CYP450chx was demonstrated by means of the indole co-oxidation. Biotransformation capability of CYP450chx was confirmed through the catalysis of cycloalkanes (C5-C8) to their respective cyclic alcohols. PMID:25935342

  6. Methane monooxygenase: functionalizing methane at iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Sazinsky, Matthew H; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) catalyze the conversion of methane to methanol as the first committed step in the assimilation of this hydrocarbon into biomass and energy by methanotrophs, thus playing a significant role in the biogeochemistry of this potent greenhouse gas. Two distinct enzymes, a copper-dependent membrane protein, particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), and an iron-dependent cytosolic protein, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), carry out this transformation using large protein scaffolds that help to facilitate the timely transport of hydrocarbon, O₂, proton, and electron substrates to buried dimetallic active sites. For both enzymes, reaction of the reduced metal centers with O₂leads to intermediates that activate the relatively inert C-H bonds of hydrocarbons to yield oxidized products. Among synthetic and biological catalysts, MMOs are unique because they are the only ones known to hydroxylate methane at ambient temperatures. As a need for new industrial catalysts and green chemical transformations increases, understanding how the different MMO metal centers efficiently accomplish this challenging chemistry has become the focus of intense study. This chapter examines current understanding of the sMMO and pMMO protein structures, their methods for substrate channeling, and mechanisms for the dimetallic activation of O₂and C-H bonds. PMID:25707469

  7. Monophenol monooxygenase and lincomysin biosynthesis in Streptomyces lincolnensis.

    PubMed

    Michalik, J; Emilianowicz-Czerska, W; Switalski, L; Raczyńska-Bojanowska, K

    1975-11-01

    Monophenol monooxygenase (monophenol, dihydroxyphenylalanine:oxygen oxidoreductase EC 1.14.18.1) was studied in melanin-positive and melanin-negative mutants of Streptomyces lincolnensis NCIB 9413, varying in the lincomycin synthesizing ability. The activities of laccase and tyrosine phenol lyase (EC 4.1.99.2) are absent in this organism. The monophenol monooxygenase catalyzes hydroxylation of monophenols (K(m) and V(max) for l-tyrosine, 2 x 10(-4) M and 8.0 nmol of O(2)/min per ml, respectively) at a slower rate than it dehydrogenates diphenols to o-quinones (K(m) and V(max) for l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, 7 x 10(-5) M and 51.7 nmol of O(2)/min per ml, respectively. It is inhibited by KCN, beta-mercaptoethanol, ethylenediaminetetraacetate, dipyridyl, thiourea, p-aminobenzoic acids and by some tryptophan metabolites. Changes in the activity of monophenol monooxygenase caused by mutation or by inhibitors are reflected in the synthesis of the antibiotic. Its participation in the biogenesis of the propylhygric moiety of lincomycin is discussed. PMID:813570

  8. A Multicomponent Latent Trait Model for Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embretson, Susan E.; Yang, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a noncompensatory latent trait model, the multicomponent latent trait model for diagnosis (MLTM-D), for cognitive diagnosis. In MLTM-D, a hierarchical relationship between components and attributes is specified to be applicable to permit diagnosis at two levels. MLTM-D is a generalization of the multicomponent latent trait…

  9. Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a submission to the list of microorganisms with standing in nomenclature maintained by the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. We wish to have Pseudomonas kuykendallii sp. nov. added to the list as a valid species belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Three str...

  10. Recombineering Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we report the identification of functions that promote genomic recombination of linear DNA introduced into Pseudomonas cells by electroporation. The genes encoding these functions were identified in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a based on similarity to the lambda Red Exo/Beta and RecE...

  11. Pseudomonas screening assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  12. Active site models for the Cu(A) site of peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase and dopamine β-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Kunishita, Atsushi; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Okubo, Yuri; Tano, Tetsuro; Sugimoto, Hideki; Ohkubo, Kei; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Cramer, Christopher J; Itoh, Shinobu

    2012-09-01

    A mononuclear copper(II) superoxo species has been invoked as the key reactive intermediate in aliphatic substrate hydroxylation by copper monooxygenases such as peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), and tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM). We have recently developed a mononuclear copper(II) end-on superoxo complex using a N-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]-1,5-diazacyclooctane tridentate ligand, the structure of which is similar to the four-coordinate distorted tetrahedral geometry of the copper-dioxygen adduct found in the oxy-form of PHM (Prigge, S. T.; Eipper, B. A.; Mains, R. E.; Amzel, L. M. Science2004, 304, 864-867). In this study, structures and physicochemical properties as well as reactivity of the copper(I) and copper(II) complexes supported by a series of tridentate ligands having the same N-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]-1,5-diazacyclooctane framework have been examined in detail to shed light on the chemistry dictated in the active sites of mononuclear copper monooxygenases. The ligand exhibits unique feature to stabilize the copper(I) complexes in a T-shape geometry and the copper(II) complexes in a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Low temperature oxygenation of the copper(I) complexes generated the mononuclear copper(II) end-on superoxo complexes, the structure and spin state of which have been further characterized by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Detailed kinetic analysis on the O(2)-adduct formation reaction gave the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters providing mechanistic insights into the association and dissociation processes of O(2) to the copper complexes. The copper(II) end-on superoxo complex thus generated gradually decomposed to induce aliphatic ligand hydroxylation. Kinetic and DFT studies on the decomposition reaction have suggested that C-H bond abstraction occurs unimolecularly from the superoxo complex with subsequent rebound of the copper hydroperoxo species to generate the oxygenated

  13. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2008-11-12

    The enthalpy diffusion flux in the multicomponent energy equation is a well known yet frequently neglected term. It accounts for energy changes, associated with compositional changes, resulting from species diffusion. Enthalpy diffusion is important in flows where significant mixing occurs between species of dissimilar molecular weight. The term plays a critical role in preventing local violations of the entropy condition. In simulations of nonpremixed combustion, omission of the enthalpy flux can lead to anomalous temperature gradients, which may cause mixing regions to exceed ignition conditions. The term can also play a role in generating acoustic noise in turbulent mixing layers. Euler solvers that rely on numerical diffusion to mix fluids cannot accurately predict the temperature in mixed regions. On the other hand, Navier-Stokes solvers that incorporate enthalpy diffusion can provide much more accurate results.

  14. Multi-component assembly casting

    SciTech Connect

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  15. Phenylacetylene reversibly inhibits the phenol hydroxylase of Pseudomonas sp. CF600 at high concentrations but is oxidized at lower concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kagle, Jeanne; Hay, Anthony G

    2006-09-01

    Alkynes are mechanism-based inhibitors of several bacterial monooxygenases, including the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) of Methylococcus capsulatus and the toluene o-monooxygenase (TOM) of Burkholderia cepacia G4. In this paper, we investigated the inhibition of the phenol hydroxylase of Pseudomonas sp. CF600 by the alkyne phenylacetylene. Growth of CF600 on phenol and phenol hydroxylase activity were inhibited by phenylacetylene concentrations greater than 1.0 mM. Unlike other alkynes, which irreversibly inhibit a number of monooxygenases, inhibition of phenol hydroxylase by phenylacetylene was reversible, as demonstrated by the ability of washed cells to regain phenol hydroxylase activity. Additionally, phenylacetylene was metabolized by phenol-grown cells, yielding a yellow meta-ring fission product which absorbed light maximally at 412 nm. Phenol-grown CF600 transformed phenylacetylene to hydroxyphenylacetylene and 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-octa-2,4-dien-7-ynoic acid as detected by gas chromatography--mass spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively, while neither a derivative of CF600 with a non-functional phenol hydroxylase nor wild-type CF600 grown on acetate transformed phenylacetylene. These results demonstrate that the phenol hydroxylase of CF600 has broader substrate specificity than previously reported. They also suggest that phenylacetylene acts as a competitive inhibitor rather than as a mechanism-based inhibitor of this phenol hydroxylase. PMID:16485115

  16. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations. PMID:25761383

  17. Analysis, cloning, and high-level expression of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate monooxygenase gene tfdA of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134.

    PubMed Central

    Streber, W R; Timmis, K N; Zenk, M H

    1987-01-01

    Plasmid pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 contains all genes for the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Five of these genes, tfdB, tfdC, tfdD, tfdE, and tfdF, have recently been localized and cloned (R. H. Don, A. J. Weightman, H.-J. Knackmuss, and K. N. Timmis, J. Bacteriol. 161:85-90, 1985). Gene tfdA, which codes for the 2,4-D monooxygenase, has now been found by mutagenesis with transposon Tn5. A 3-kilobase fragment of pJP4 cloned in a broad-host-range vector could complement the 2,4-D-negative phenotype of two mutants which lacked 2,4-D monooxygenase activity. The cloned tfdA gene was also transferred to A. eutrophus JMP222, which is a cured derivative of JMP134. The recombinant strain could utilize phenoxyacetic acid as a sole source of carbon and energy. Pseudomonas sp. strain B13, containing the cloned tfdA, was able to degrade phenoxyacetic acid and 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid. Gene tfdA was subcloned and analyzed by deletions. Expression of 2,4-D monooxygenase in Escherichia coli containing a 1.4-kilobase subfragment was demonstrated by radioisotopic enzyme assay, and a protein of 32,000-dalton molecular mass was detected by labeling experiments. A 2-kilobase subfragment containing tfdA has been sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 861 bases which was identified as the coding region of tfdA by insertion mutagenesis. Images PMID:3036764

  18. The molecular basis of polysaccharide cleavage by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Kristian E H; Simmons, Thomas J; Dupree, Paul; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Ciano, Luisa; Johnston, Esther M; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Marmuse, Laurence; Fort, Sébastien; Cottaz, Sylvain; Driguez, Hugues; Henrissat, Bernard; Lenfant, Nicolas; Tuna, Floriana; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Davies, Gideon J; Lo Leggio, Leila; Walton, Paul H

    2016-04-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-containing enzymes that oxidatively break down recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin. Since their discovery, LPMOs have become integral factors in the industrial utilization of biomass, especially in the sustainable generation of cellulosic bioethanol. We report here a structural determination of an LPMO-oligosaccharide complex, yielding detailed insights into the mechanism of action of these enzymes. Using a combination of structure and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we reveal the means by which LPMOs interact with saccharide substrates. We further uncover electronic and structural features of the enzyme active site, showing how LPMOs orchestrate the reaction of oxygen with polysaccharide chains. PMID:26928935

  19. Mechanistic Studies on the Hydroxylation of Methane by Methane Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Baik, Mu-Hyun; Newcomb, Martin; Friesner, Richard A.; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2003-05-17

    Methanotrophs are bacteria that live on methane as their only source of carbon.1 The first step in their utilization of this simplest of all hydrocarbons is its selective conversion to methanol. Subsequent biochemical pathways transform methanol to formaldehyde, which in turn is processed into biomass. Further oxidation of formaldehyde to carbon dioxide provides energy that is stored for later use as NADH.2 The conversion of methane to methanol is catalyzed at the active site of a metalloenzyme known as methane monooxygenase, or MMO.3-9

  20. On the catalytic mechanisms of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J

    2016-04-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered copper-containing oxygenases. LPMOs oxidise recalcitrant polysaccharides such as chitin and cellulose, thereby making these substrates more tractable to canonical chitinase or cellulase action. As such, LPMOs are attracting much attention not only for their capacity to greatly increase the efficiency of production of cellulosic-based biofuels, but also for the new questions they pose about the mechanisms of biological oxidation of recalcitrant substrates. This review draws together the current thinking on the catalytic mechanisms of LPMOs and other copper catalysed oxygenations and provides a blueprint for further investigation into the mechanisms of action of these intriguing enzymes. PMID:27094791

  1. The framework of polysaccharide monooxygenase structure and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Span, Elise A; Marletta, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Polysaccharide monooxygenases, or PMOs (also known as lytic PMOs or LPMOs), are a group of enzymes discovered in recent years to catalyze the oxidative degradation of carbohydrate polymers. The PMO catalytic domain has a β-sandwich fold that bears a strong resemblance to both immunoglobulin (Ig) and fibronectin type III (FnIII) domains. PMOs are secreted by fungi and bacteria, and there is recent evidence for their roles in pathogenesis, in addition to biomass processing. This review addresses the biological origins and functions of emerging PMO families, as well as describes the aspects of PMO structure that support the chemistry of copper-catalyzed, oxidative polysaccharide degradation. PMID:26615470

  2. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification. PMID:24316190

  3. The metal centres of particulate methane mono-oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2008-12-01

    pMMO (particulate methane mono-oxygenase) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that catalyses the oxidation of methane to methanol. The pMMO metal active site has not been identified, precluding detailed investigation of the reaction mechanism. Models for the metal centres proposed by various research groups have evolved as crystallographic and spectroscopic data have become available. The present review traces the evolution of these active-site models before and after the 2005 Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) pMMO crystal structure determination. PMID:19021511

  4. Multicomponent fuel vaporization at high pressures.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D. J.; O'Rourke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    We extend our multicomponent fuel model to high pressures using a Peng-Robinson equation of state, and implement the model into KIVA-3V. Phase equilibrium is achieved by equating liquid and vapor fugacities. The latent heat of vaporization and fuel enthalpies are also corrected for at high pressures. Numerical simulations of multicomponent evaporation are performed for single droplets for a diesel fuel surrogate at different pressures.

  5. Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Thomas K.; Telschow, Kenneth

    2011-01-25

    Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

  6. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  7. Role of flavin-containing monooxygenase in drug development.

    PubMed

    Cashman, John R

    2008-12-01

    This review summarizes some recent observations and information related to the role of the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) in preclinical drug development. Flavin-containing monooxygenase is a complimentary enzyme system to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family of enzymes and oxygenates several soft, highly polarizable nucleophilic heteroatom-containing chemicals and drugs. The products of FMO-mediated metabolism are generally benign and highly polar, readily excreted materials. There may be some advantages in designing drugs that are metabolized in part by FMO and not exclusively by CYP. In this review, I describe the practical aspects for the participation of FMO in drug and chemical metabolism including: i) the study of FMO using in vitro preparations; ii) some observations about metabolism of drugs and chemicals by FMO in vivo; and iii) the consequences of studying FMO-related metabolism in various small animal models. Some of the preclinical research and development areas related to FMO are not fully mature areas and there are certain gaps in our knowledge. However, I include discussion of these areas to stimulate further work and invite further discussion. PMID:19040327

  8. The methane monooxygenase intrinsic activity of kinds of methanotrophs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingxin; Xin, Jiaying; Chen, Linlin; Xia, Chungu

    2009-06-01

    Methanotrophs have promising applications in the epoxidation of some alkenes and some chlorinated hydrocarbons and in the production of a biopolymer, poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate; PHB). In contrast with methane monooxygenase (MMO) activity and ability of PHB synthesis of four kinds of methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, M. trichosporium IMV3011, Methylococcus capsulatus HD6T, Methylomonas sp. GYJ3, and the mixture of the four kinds of strains, M. trichosporium OB3b is the highest of the four in the activity of propene epoxidation (10.72 nmol/min mg dry weight of cell [dwc]), the activity of naphthalene oxidation (22.7 mmol/mg dwc), and ability in synthesis of PHB(11% PHB content in per gram dry weight of cell in 84 h). It could be feasible to improve the MMO activity by mixing four kinds of methanotrophs. The MMO activity dramatically decreased when the cellular PHB accumulated in the second stage. The reason for this may be the dilution of the MMO system in the cells with increasing PHB contents. It has been found that the PHB contents at the level of 1-5% are beneficial to the cells for maintenance of MMO epoxidation activity when enough PHB have been accumulated. Moreover, it was also found that high particulate methane monooxygenase activity may contribute to the synthesis of PHB in the cell, which could be used to improve the yield of PHB in methanotrophs. PMID:19052919

  9. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  14. Dynamics in Multicomponent Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagao, Michihiro

    2010-03-01

    Double-network hydrogels (DN-gel) prepared from the combination of a moderately cross-linked anionic polyelectrolyte (poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid), PAMPS) and an un-cross-linked linear polymer (polyacrylamide, PAAm) solution show strong mechanical properties far superior to that of their individual constituents [1]. To determine the origin of the superior properties of DN-gels, we investigated the structure and the chain dynamics of model PAMPS/PAAm solution blends using small-angle neutron scattering and neutron spin-echo measurements [2]. Akcasu's dynamic scattering theory for a multicomponent system [3] is modified to include polyelectrolytes, and the resulting equation describes well the neutron spin-echo results over the entire wavevector range covered in our experiments. Parameters such as effective solvent viscosity were deduced from the measured data using the modified Akcasu equation. Both the relaxation time at large length scales (10-100 nm) and the segmental diffusion coefficient at short length scales (0.1-1 nm) or the effective solvent viscosity show good accordance with the macroscopic rheological behavior of the solution blends. [4pt] [1] J.P. Gong et al., Adv. Mater. 15, 1155 (2003). [0pt] [2] S. Lee et al., Macromolecules 42, 1293 (2009). [0pt] [2] A.Z. Akcasu, in Dynamic Liht Scattering, The Method and Some Applications; W. Brown Ed. (Oxford University Press, London 1992).

  15. Diclofenac Sodium Loaded Multicomponent Implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, Lila; Viitanen, Petrus; Ashammakhi, Nureddin

    2008-02-01

    Earlier we have reported on developing DS releasing bioabsorbable rods for inhibition of osteolysis [l]. Due to their unsatisfactory drug release profiles we assessed the use of sintering technique of enhancement of drug release in the current study. Melt extruded PLGA 80/20 rods were compounded 8 wt-% DS. Some rods were self reinforced (SR) and some of them were sterilized to get three different components with different drug release profiles. Different rods were sintered together with heat and pressure. Three different specimen groups with different construction were studied. Thermal properties were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Changes of IV were performed with capillary analysis and drug release measurements with UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Mechanical strength were measured two weeks, when disintegration occurred. Release rate consisted of 1) sharp jump start peak, 2) second smoother peak, and 3) third smooth peak. Released DS concentrations reached local therapeutic levels and maintained at that stage for 24-36 days. All DS was released during 50-70 days. The drug release from multicomponent implant was more stable and commenced earlier than from initial rods. Such properties were favored ones. Initial shear strength was 82 MPa and it decreased to 15 MPa. The mechanical bonding was sufficient although the components disintegrated relatively fast. By sintering different PLGA/DS components with different release rates it is possible to construct a truly controlled release implant for bone fixation with anti-inflammatory properties.

  16. Crystallization of classical multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zach; Cumming, Andrew

    2010-03-15

    We develop a method for calculating the equilibrium properties of the liquid-solid phase transition in a classical, ideal, multicomponent plasma. Our method is a semianalytic calculation that relies on extending the accurate fitting formulas available for the one-, two-, and three-component plasmas to the case of a plasma with an arbitrary number of components. We compare our results to those of C. J. Horowitz et al. [Phys. Rev. E 75, 066101 (2007)], who used a molecular-dynamics simulation to study the chemical properties of a 17-species mixture relevant to the ocean-crust boundary of an accreting neutron star at the point where half the mixture has solidified. Given the same initial composition as Horowitz et al., we are able to reproduce to good accuracy both the liquid and solid compositions at the half-freezing point; we find abundances for most species within 10% of the simulation values. Our method allows the phase diagram of complex mixtures to be explored more thoroughly than possible with numerical simulations. We briefly discuss the implications for the nature of the liquid-solid boundary in accreting neutron stars.

  17. Multicomponent Therapeutics of Berberine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Yang, Meihua; Dong, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2013-01-01

    Although berberine alkaloids (BAs) are reported to be with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antiviral activities, the interactions among BAs have not been elucidated. In the present study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was chosen as a model organism, and modified broth microdilution was applied for the determination of the fluorescence absorption values to calculate the anti-MRSA activity of BAs. We have initiated four steps to seek the optimal combination of BAs that are (1) determining the anti-MRSA activity of single BA, (2) investigating the two-component combination to clarify the interactions among BAs by checkerboard assay, (3) investigating the multicomponent combination to determine the optimal ratio by quadratic rotation-orthogonal combination design, and (4) in vivo and in vitro validation of the optimal combination. The results showed that the interactions among BAs are related to their concentrations. The synergetic combinations included “berberine and epiberberine,” “jatrorrhizine and palmatine” and “jatrorrhizine and coptisine”; the antagonistic combinations included “coptisine and epiberberine”. The optimal combination was berberine : coptisine : jatrorrhizine : palmatine : epiberberine = 0.702 : 0.863 : 1 : 0.491 : 0.526, and the potency of the optimal combination on cyclophosphamide-immunocompromised mouse model was better than the natural combinations of herbs containing BAs. PMID:23634170

  18. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Folliculitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Hot Tub Rash ( Pseudomonas Folliculitis) Information for adults A ... the skin and small pus-filled lesions. Overview Hot tub rash ( Pseudomonas folliculitis) is an infection of ...

  19. Purification and properties of the methane mono-oxygenase enzyme system from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed Central

    Tonge, G M; Harrison, D E; Higgins, I J

    1977-01-01

    1. A three-component enzyme system that catalyses the oxidation of methane to methanol has been highly purified from Methylosinus trichosporium. 2. The components are (i) a soluble CO-binding cytochrome c, (ii) a copper-containing protein and (iii) a small protein; the mol. wts. are 13 000, 47 000 and 9400 respectively. The cytochrome component cannot be replaced by similar cytochrome purified from Pseudomonas extorquens or by horse heart cytochrome c. 3. The stoicheiometry suggests a mono-oxygenase mechanism and the specific activity with methane as substrate is 6 micronmol/min per mg of protein. 4. Other substrates rapidly oxidized are ethane, n-propane, n-butane and CO. Dimethyl ether is not a substrate. 5. The purified enzyme system utilizes ascorbate or, in the presence of partially purified M. trichosporium methanol dehydrogenase, methanol as electron donor but not NADH or NADPH. 6. Activity is highly sensitive to low concentrations of a variety of chelating agents, cyanide, 2-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol. 7. Activity is highly pH-dependent (optimum 6.9-7.0) and no component of the enzyme is stable to freezing. 8. The soluble CO-binding cytochrome c shows oxidase acitivity and the relationship between this and the oxygenase activity is discussed. Images Fig. 3. PMID:15544

  20. In silico analysis for prediction of degradative capacity of Pseudomonas putida SF1.

    PubMed

    Tikariha, Hitesh; Pal, Rajesh Ramavadh; Qureshi, Asifa; Kapley, Atya; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-10-15

    The study employs draft genome sequence data to explore p-nitrophenol (PNP) degradation activity of Pseudomonas putida strain SF-1 at a genomic scale. Annotation analysis proposes that the strain SF1 not only possesses the gene cluster for PNP utilization but also for the utilization of benzoate, catechol, hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate, and homogentisate. Further, the analysis was carried out to understand more details of PNP 4-monooxygenase and its regulator. A comparative analysis of PNP 4-monooxygenase from SF1 was carried out for prediction of its tertiary structure; and also its binding affinity with PNP, FAD, NADH and NADPH using FlexX docking. The tertiary structure of regulator was also predicted along with its conserved DNA binding residues. Regulator binding site (RBS) and promoter region were mapped for the PNP degradation gene cluster. Based on genome sequence analysis, the study unveiled the genomic attributes for a versatile catabolic potential of Pseudomonas putida strain SF-1 for different aromatic compounds. PMID:27317892

  1. Conscientiousness increases efficiency of multicomponent behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Many everyday situations require the flexible interruption and changing of different actions to achieve a goal. Several strategies can be applied to do so, but those requiring high levels of cognitive control seem to confer an efficiency (speed) advantage in situations requiring multi-component behavior. However, it is elusive in how far personality traits affect performance in such situations. Given that top-down control is an important aspect of personality and furthermore correlates with conscientiousness, N = 163 participants completed the NEO-FFI and performed an experimental (stop-change) paradigm assessing multicomponent behavior. Applying mathematical constraints to the behavioral data, we estimated the processing strategy of each individual. The results show that multicomponent behavior is selectively affected by conscientiousness which explained approximately 19% of the measured inter-individual behavioral variance. Conscientiousness should hence be seen as a major personality dimension modulating multicomponent behavior. Highly conscientious people showed a more effective, step-by-step processing strategy of different actions necessary to achieve a goal. In situations with simultaneous requirements, this strategy equipped them with an efficiency (speed) advantage towards individuals with lower conscientiousness. In sum, the results show that strategies and the efficiency with which people cope with situations requiring multicomponent behavior are strongly influenced by their personality. PMID:26503352

  2. Multicomponent liquid ion exchange with chabazite zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.M.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Byers, C.W.

    1993-10-01

    In spite of the increasing commercial use of zeolites for binary and multicomponent sorption, the understanding of the basic mass-transfer processes associated with multicomponent zeolite ion-exchange systems is quite limited. This study was undertaken to evaluate Na-Ca-Mg-Cs-Sr ion exchange from an aqueous solution using a chabazite zeolite. Mass-transfer coefficients and equilibrium equations were determined from experimental batch-reactor data for single and multicomponent systems. The Langmuir isotherm was used to represent the equilibrium relationship for binary systems, and a modified Dubinin-Polyani model was used for the multicomponent systems. The experimental data indicate that diffusion through the microporous zeolite crystals is the primary diffusional resistance. Macropore diffusion also significantly contributes to the mass-transfer resistance. Various mass-transfer models were compared to the experimental data to determine mass-transfer coefficients. Effective diffusivities were obtained which accurately predicted experimental data using a variety of models. Only the model which accounts for micropore and macropore diffusion occurring in series accurately predicted multicomponent data using single-component diffusivities. Liquid and surface diffusion both contribute to macropore diffusion. Surface and micropore diffusivities were determined to be concentration dependent.

  3. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  4. Determinants of regioselective hydroxylation in the fungal polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vu, Van V; Beeson, William T; Phillips, Christopher M; Cate, Jamie H D; Marletta, Michael A

    2014-01-15

    The ubiquitous fungal polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) (also known as GH61 proteins, LPMOs, and AA9 proteins) are structurally related but have significant variation in sequence. A heterologous expression method in Neurospora crassa was developed as a step toward connecting regioselectivity of the chemistry to PMO phylogeny. Activity assays, as well as sequence and phylogenetic analyses, showed that the majority of fungal PMOs fall into three major groups with distinctive active site surface features. PMO1s and PMO2s hydroxylate glycosidic positions C1 and C4, respectively. PMO3s hydroxylate both C1 and C4. A subgroup of PMO3s (PMO3*) hydroxylate C1. Mutagenesis studies showed that an extra subdomain of about 12 amino acids contribute to C4 oxidation in the PMO3 family. PMID:24350607

  5. Quantum Chemical Studies of Methane Monooxygenase: Comparison with P450

    SciTech Connect

    Guallar, Victor; Gherman, Benjamin F.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2002-04-01

    The catalytic pathways of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and cytochrome P450CAM, iron-containing enzymes, are described and compared. Recent extensive density functional ab initio electronic structure calculations have revealed many similarities in a number of the key catalytic steps, as well as some important differences. A particularly interesting and significant contrast is the role played by the protein in each system. For sMMO, the protein stabilizes various species in the catalytic cycle through a series of carboxylate shifts. This process is adequately described by a relatively compact model of the active site (similar to100 atoms), providing a reasonable description of the energetics of hydrogen atom abstraction. For P450CAM, in contrast, the inclusion of the full protein is necessary for an accurate description of the hydrogen atom abstraction.

  6. [Association of kynurenine-3-monooxygenase gene with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Golimbet, V E; Lezheiko, T V; Alfimova, M V; Abramova, L I; Kondrat'ev, N V

    2014-06-01

    Neurotoxic products produced during tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway could be involved in schizophrenia pathogenesis. It has been shown that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO) is indirectly involved in these products' formation. KMO polymorphic loci rs2275163 (C/T) and rs1053230 (A/G) were examined in 187 schizophrenia patients and 229 healthy subjects. A genetic combination of allele T and genotype GG was observed more often in a patient group compared with healthy controls (p = 0.003, OR 2.0 (95% CI 1.2-2.9). In the latter group, this combination was associated with schizophrenia endophenotype (p = 0.04), which manifested in a higher expression of schizotypal personality traits assessed using the MMPI test. PMID:25715464

  7. Kynurenine-3-monooxygenase: a review of structure, mechanism, and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason R; Jamie, Joanne F; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-02-01

    Kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme of the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway (KP), which is the major catabolic route of tryptophan. Kyn represents a branch point of the KP, being converted into the neurotoxin 3-hydroxykynurenine via KMO, neuroprotectant kynurenic acid, and anthranilic acid. As a result of this branch point, KMO is an attractive drug target for several neurodegenerative and/or neuroinflammatory diseases, especially Huntington's (HD), Alzheimer's (AD), and Parkinson's (PD) diseases. Although a neurological target, administration of KMO inhibitors in the periphery has demonstrated promising pharmacological results. In light of a recent crystal structure release and reports of preclinical candidates, here we provide a concise yet comprehensive update on the current state of research into the enzymology of KMO and related drug discovery efforts, highlighting areas where further work is required. PMID:26589832

  8. Acinetobacter cyclohexanone monooxygenase: gene cloning and sequence determination.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y C; Peoples, O P; Walsh, C T

    1988-01-01

    The gene coding for cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter sp. strain NCIB 9871 was isolated by immunological screening methods. We located and determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene. The structural gene is 1,626 nucleotides long and codes for a polypeptide of 542 amino acids; 389 nucleotides 5' and 108 nucleotides 3' of the coding region are also reported. The complete amino acid sequence of the enzyme was derived by translation of the nucleotide sequence. From a comparison of the amino acid sequence with consensus sequences of nucleotide-binding folds, we identified a potential flavin-binding site at the NH2 terminus of the enzyme (residues 6 to 18) and a potential nicotinamide-binding site extending from residue 176 to residue 208 of the protein. An overproduction system for the gene to facilitate genetic manipulations was also constructed by using the tac promoter vector pKK223-3 in Escherichia coli. Images PMID:3338974

  9. Polymicrobial Ventriculitis Involving Pseudomonas fulva

    PubMed Central

    Rebolledo, Paulina A.; Vu, Catphuong Cathy L.; Carlson, Renee Donahue; Kraft, Colleen S.; Anderson, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Infections due to Pseudomonas fulva remain a rare but emerging concern. A case of ventriculitis due to Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas fulva following placement of an external ventricular drain is described. Similar to other reports, the organism was initially misidentified as Pseudomonas putida. The infection was successfully treated with levofloxacin. PMID:24648556

  10. Evolving P450pyr Monooxygenase for Regio- and Stereoselective Hydroxylations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    P450pyr monooxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. HXN-200 catalysed the regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation at a non-activated carbon atom, a useful but challenging reaction in classic chemistry, with unique substrate specificity for a number of alicyclic compounds. New P450pyr mutants were developed by directed evolution with improved catalytic performance, thus significantly extending the application of the P450pyr monooxygenase family in biohydroxylation to prepare useful and valuable chiral alcohols. Directed evolution of P450pyr created new enzymes with improved S-enantioselectivity or R-enantioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl pyrrolidine, enhanced regioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl pyrrolidinone, and increased enantioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl piperidinone, respectively. Directed evolution of P450pyr generated also mutants with fully altered regioselectivity (from terminal to subterminal) and newly created excellent S-enantioselectivity for the biohydroxylation of n-octane and propylbenzene, respectively, providing new opportunities for the regio- and enantioselective alkane functionalization. New P450pyr mutants were engineered as the first catalyst for highly selective terminal hydroxylation of n-butanol to 1,4-butanediol. Several novel, accurate, sensitive, simple, and HTS assays based on colorimetric or MS detection for measuring the enantio- and/or regioselectivity of hydroxylation were developed and proven to be practical in directed evolution. The P450pyr X-ray structure was obtained and used to guide the evolution. In silico modelling and substrate docking provided some insight into the influence of several important amino acid mutations of the engineered P450pyr mutants on the altered or enhanced regio- and enantioselectivity as well as new substrate acceptance. The obtained information and knowledge is useful for further engineering of P450pyr for other hydroxylations and oxidations. PMID:26507217

  11. Monooxygenase Substrates Mimic Flavin to Catalyze Cofactorless Oxygenations.

    PubMed

    Machovina, Melodie M; Usselman, Robert J; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2016-08-19

    Members of the antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenase family catalyze O2-dependent oxidations and oxygenations in the absence of any metallo- or organic cofactor. How these enzymes surmount the kinetic barrier to reactions between singlet substrates and triplet O2 is unclear, but the reactions have been proposed to occur via a flavin-like mechanism, where the substrate acts in lieu of a flavin cofactor. To test this model, we monitored the uncatalyzed and enzymatic reactions of dithranol, a substrate for the nogalamycin monooxygenase (NMO) from Streptomyces nogalater As with flavin, dithranol oxidation was faster at a higher pH, although the reaction did not appear to be base-catalyzed. Rather, conserved asparagines contributed to suppression of the substrate pKa The same residues were critical for enzymatic catalysis that, consistent with the flavoenzyme model, occurred via an O2-dependent slow step. Evidence for a superoxide/substrate radical pair intermediate came from detection of enzyme-bound superoxide during turnover. Small molecule and enzymatic superoxide traps suppressed formation of the oxygenation product under uncatalyzed conditions, whereas only the small molecule trap had an effect in the presence of NMO. This suggested that NMO both accelerated the formation and directed the recombination of a superoxide/dithranyl radical pair. These catalytic strategies are in some ways flavin-like and stand in contrast to the mechanisms of urate oxidase and (1H)-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, both cofactor-independent enzymes that surmount the barriers to direct substrate/O2 reactivity via markedly different means. PMID:27307041

  12. Effects of bromocriptine on hepatic cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system.

    PubMed

    Moochhala, S M; Lee, E J; Hu, G T; Koh, O S; Becket, G

    1989-02-01

    We have evaluated the in vitro effects of bromocriptine (Br), on the hepatic cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system of rats pretreated with saline phenobarbitone (PB) and beta-naphthoflavone (BNF). Br inhibited ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (EROD) activity in liver microsomes of rats pretreated with saline and PB but not in BNF pretreated animals. Maximum inhibition of EROD activity by Br in the microsomes of saline and PB pretreated rats were 50%-60% of the control. In contrast, a dual effect was observed on aminopyrine N-demethylase activity (APD) by Br in microsomes of saline, PB and BNF pretreated rats. At a low concentration (25 microM), Br inhibited the activity of APD to a similar extent in all pretreatment groups; however, with higher concentrations of Br (50 microM to 300 microM), enhancement of APD activity was observed. Br (300 microM) increased the APD activity to 2-3 times the control level in microsomes of rats pretreated with saline, PB or BNF. Spectral studies revealed a Type II binding of Br to cytochrome P-450 from microsomes of saline and PB pretreated rats. A reverse type I binding was observed for BNF induced microsomes. In addition, Br also enhanced NADPH cytochrome c (P-450) reductase activity to a similar extent in all pretreatment groups. These results suggest that the inhibition of EROD activity may be due to direct binding by Br to certain isozymes of cytochrome P-450 and that the enhancing effect of Br on APD activity may be in part due to the activation of the NADPH cytochrome c reductase component of the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system. PMID:2499727

  13. Pseudomonas psychrotolerans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Elke; Kämpfer, Peter; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2004-09-01

    Three yellow-pigmented, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterial strains, C36T, C37 and C39, were isolated in the Medical Clinic for Small Animals and Ungulates at the University for Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain C36T was shown to belong to the genus Pseudomonas; Pseudomonas oleovorans DSM 1045T was the nearest relative (99.5 % sequence similarity). Other Pseudomonas species shared <97 % sequence similarity with strain C36T. The presence of Q-9 as the major ubiquinone, the predominance of putrescine and spermidine in its polyamine patterns and its fatty acid profile [i.e. the predominance of C(16 : 0), summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or 2-OH C(15 : 0) iso), C(18 : 1)omega7c and the presence of 3-OH C(10 : 0), 3-OH C(12 : 0) and 2-OH C(12 : 0)] were in agreement with identification of this strain as a member of the genus Pseudomonas. Physiological and biochemical characteristics and the results of genomic fingerprinting clearly differentiated strain C36T from its phylogenetic relative P. oleovorans DSM 1045T. Results from DNA-DNA hybridization showed that strain C36T represents a species that is distinct from P. oleovorans DSM 1045T. These data demonstrate that strain C36T represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas psychrotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is C36T (= LMG 21977T = DSM 15758T). Additionally, physiological, biochemical, chemotaxonomic and genomic fingerprints indicate that P. oleovorans ATCC 29347 may not be a member of the species P. oleovorans sensu stricto. PMID:15388721

  14. Multicomponent Transport in Polyatomic Reactive Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Giovangigli, Vincent

    2011-05-20

    We investigate multicomponent reactive flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases. We discuss in particular the conservation equations, the transport fluxes and the transport coefficients in weak and strong magnetic fields. The mathematical properties of the resulting hyperbolic-parabolic systems of partial differential equations modeling multicomponent flows are deduced from the underlying kinetic framework. The structure and solution of the transport linear systems associated with the evaluation of transport coefficients are also addressed. In particular, the convergence of iterative techniques is deduced from the properties of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The impact of multicomponent transport is also discussed, notably the importance of Soret effects in various flows and the impact of volume viscosity.

  15. Multicomponent Transport in Polyatomic Reactive Gas Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovangigli, Vincent

    2011-05-01

    We investigate multicomponent reactive flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases. We discuss in particular the conservation equations, the transport fluxes and the transport coefficients in weak and strong magnetic fields. The mathematical properties of the resulting hyperbolic-parabolic systems of partial differential equations modeling multicomponent flows are deduced from the underlying kinetic framework. The structure and solution of the transport linear systems associated with the evaluation of transport coefficients are also addressed. In particular, the convergence of iterative techniques is deduced from the properties of the linearized Boltzmann collision operator. The impact of multicomponent transport is also discussed, notably the importance of Soret effects in various flows and the impact of volume viscosity.

  16. Aminoazoles as Key Reagents in Multicomponent Heterocyclizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chebanov, Valentin A.; Gura, Katerina A.; Desenko, Sergey M.

    Because of the significant role in biological processes in living cells and the diverse types of physiological activities, heterocyclic compounds are in focus of intense investigations by academic and applied-oriented chemists. Considerably, a scientific renaissance of heterocycles during the last decades is closely related to the development of multicomponent approaches to their synthesis. Multicomponent methodology fundamentally different from two-component or sequential processes together with other innovative synthetic methods like microwave- and ultrasonic-assisted reactions offer some new possibilities in constructing heterocyclic systems with high level of molecular diversity and complexity. An overview of known multicomponent heterocyclizations using aminoazoles as a key reagent and their rich synthetic potential for obtaining five-, six-, and seven-membered heterocycles is presented. A special attention is paid to the tuning of chemo- and regio- and positional selectivity of some reactions as well as to the application of nonclassical activation methods based on microwave and ultrasonic irradiation.

  17. Cavity residue leucine 95 and channel residues glutamine 204, aspartic acid 211, and phenylalanine 269 of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase influence catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Cansu; Sönmez, Burcu; Vardar, Nurcan; Yanık-Yıldırım, K Cansu; Vardar-Schara, Gönül

    2016-09-01

    Structural analysis of toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) hydroxylase revealed the presence of three hydrophobic cavities, a channel, and a pore leading from the protein surface to the active site. Here, saturation mutagenesis was used to investigate the catalytic roles of alpha-subunit (TouA) second cavity residue L95 and TouA channel residues Q204, D211, and F269. By testing the substrates toluene, phenol, nitrobenzene, and/or naphthalene, these positions were found to influence the catalytic activity of ToMO. Several regiospecific variants were identified from TouA positions Q204, F269, and L95. For example, TouA variant Q204H had the regiospecificity of nitrobenzene changed significantly from 30 to 61 % p-nitrophenol. Interestingly, a combination of mutations at Q204H and A106V altered the regiospecificity of nitrobenzene back to 27 % p-nitrophenol. TouA variants F269Y, F269P, Q204E, and L95D improved the meta-hydroxylating capability of nitrobenzene by producing 87, 85, 82, and 77 % m-nitrophenol, respectively. For naphthalene oxidation, TouA variants F269V, Q204A, Q204S/S222N, and F269T had the regiospecificity changed from 16 to 9, 10, 23, and 25 % 2-naphthol, respectively. Here, two additional TouA residues, S222 and A106, were also identified that may have important roles in catalysis. Most of the isolated variants from D211 remained active, whereas having a hydrophobic residue at this position appeared to diminish the catalytic activity toward naphthalene. The mutational effects on the ToMO regiospecificity described here suggest that it is possible to further fine tune and engineer the reactivity of multicomponent diiron monooxygenases toward different substrates at positions that are relatively distant from the active site. PMID:27311562

  18. Deposition of thin films of multicomponent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Composite films of multicomponent materials, such as oxides and nitrides, e.g., lead zirconate titanate, are deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, employing a rotating substrate holder, which rotates relative to a plurality of targets, one target for each metal element of the multicomponent material. The sputtering is carried out in a reactive atmosphere. The substrates on which the layers are deposited are at ambient temperature. Following deposition of the composite film, the film is heated to a temperature sufficient to initiate a solid state reaction and form the final product, which is substantially single phase and substantially homogeneous.

  19. Multi-Component Reactions in Heterocyclic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas J. J.; Orru, Romano V. A.; Chebanov, Valentin A.; Sakhno, Yana I.; Saraev, Vyacheslav E.; Muravyova, Elena A.; Andrushchenko, Anastasia Yu.; Desenko, Sergey M.; Akhmetova, V. R.; Khabibullina, G. R.; Rakhimova, E. B.; Vagapov, R. A.; Khairullina, R. R.; Niatshina, Z. T.; Murzakova, N. N.; Maslivets, Andrey N.; Voskressensky, Leonid G.; Danagulyan, Gevorg G.; Murtchyan, Armen D.; Tumanyan, Araksya K.; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; de Moliner, Fabio; Guanti, Giuseppe; Petricci, Elena; Riva, Renata; Taddei, Maurizio; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza; Mashkouri, Sara; Sharifi, Ali; Przhevalski, Nikolai M.; Rozhkova, Elena N.; Tokmakov, Gennadii P.; Magedov, Igor V.; Armisheva, M. N.; Rassudihina, N. A.; Vahrin, M. I.; Gein, V. L.; Shaabani, Ahmad; Rezayan, Ali Hossein; Sarvary, Afshin; Heidary, Marjan; Ng, Seik Weng; Beliaev, Nikolai A.; Mokrushin, Vladimir S.; Paramonov, Igor V.; Ilyin, Alexey; Garkushenko, Anna K.; Dushek, Maria A.; Sagitullina, Galina P.; Sagitullin, Reva S.; Kysil, Volodymyr; Khvat, Alexander; Tsirulnikov, Sergey; Tkachenko, Sergey; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre; Gein, Vladimir L.; Panova, Olga S.; Ilyn, Alexey P.; Kravchenko, Dmitri V.; Potapov, Victor V.; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V.; Vichegjanina, V. N.; Levandovskaya, E. B.; Gein, V. L.; Vahrin, M. I.; Vladimirov, I. N.; Zorina, A. A.; Nosova, N. V.; Gein, V. L.; Fedorova, O. V.; Vahrin, M. I.

    Multi-component and domino reactions are efficient and effective methods in the sustainable and diversity-oriented synthesis of heterocycles. In particular, transition metal-catalyzed multi-component sequences have recently gained considerable interest. Based upon the Sonogashira entry to alkynones, alkenones, and intermediate allenes, we have opened new avenues to the one-pot synthesis of numerous classes of heterocyclic frameworks in an MCR fashion. This methodological approach has now found various applications in one-pot syntheses of functional chromophores, pharmaceutically active compounds, and marine alkaloids and derivatives.

  20. Degradation of 4-chloro-3-nitrophenol via a novel intermediate, 4-chlororesorcinol by Pseudomonas sp. JHN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2014-03-01

    A 4-chloro-3-nitrophenol (4C3NP)-mineralizing bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. JHN was isolated from a waste water sample collected from a chemically-contaminated area, India by an enrichment method. Pseudomonas sp. JHN utilized 4C3NP as a sole carbon and energy source and degraded it with the release of stoichiometric amounts of chloride and nitrite ions. Gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected 4-chlororesorcinol as a major metabolite of the 4C3NP degradation pathway. Inhibition studies using 2,2'-dipyridyl showed that 4-chlororesorcinol is a terminal aromatic compound in the degradation pathway of 4C3NP. The activity for 4C3NP-monooxygenase was detected in the crude extracts of the 4C3NP-induced JHN cells that confirmed the formation of 4-chlororesorcinol from 4C3NP. The capillary assay showed that Pseudomonas sp. JHN exhibited chemotaxis toward 4C3NP. The bioremediation capability of Pseudomonas sp. JHN was monitored to carry out the microcosm experiments using sterile and non-sterile soils spiked with 4C3NP. Strain JHN degraded 4C3NP in sterile and non-sterile soil with same degradation rates. This is the first report of (i) bacterial degradation and bioremediation of 4C3NP, (ii) formation of 4-chlororesorcinol in the degradation pathway of 4C3NP, (iii) bacterial chemotaxis toward 4C3NP.

  1. Trichloroethylene oxidation by purified toluene 2-monooxygenase: products, kinetics, and turnover-dependent inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L M; Wackett, L P

    1997-01-01

    Trichloroethylene is oxidized by several types of nonspecific bacterial oxygenases. Toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia G4 is implicated in trichloroethylene oxidation and is uniquely suggested to be resistant to turnover-dependent inactivation in vivo. In this work, the oxidation of trichloroethylene was studied with purified toluene 2-monooxygenase. All three purified toluene 2-monooxygenase protein components and NADH were required to reconstitute full trichloroethylene oxidation activity in vitro. The apparent Km and Vmax were 12 microM and 37 nmol per min per mg of hydroxylase component, respectively. Ten percent of the full activity was obtained when the small-molecular-weight enzyme component was omitted. The stable oxidation products, accounting for 84% of the trichloroethylene oxidized, were carbon monoxide, formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and covalently modified oxygenase proteins that constituted 12% of the reacted [14C]trichloroethylene. The stable oxidation products may all derive from the unstable intermediate trichloroethylene epoxide that was trapped by reaction with 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine. Chloral hydrate and dichloroacetic acid were not detected. This finding differs from that with soluble methane monooxygenase and cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase, which produce chloral hydrate. Trichloroethylene-dependent inactivation of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity was observed. All of the protein components were covalently modified during the oxidation of trichloroethylene. The addition of cysteine to reaction mixtures partially protected the enzyme system against inactivation, most notably protecting the NADH-oxidoreductase component. This suggested the participation of diffusible intermediates in the inactivation of the oxidoreductase. PMID:8981984

  2. Structure and Mechanism of Styrene Monooxygenase Reductase: New Insight into the FAD–Transfer Reaction†

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    The two–component flavoprotein styrene monooxygenase (SMO) from Pseudomonas putida S12 catalyzes the NADH– and FAD–dependent epoxidation of styrene to styrene oxide. In this study we investigate the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer from the reductase (SMOB) to epoxidase (NSMOA) component and report our findings in light of the 2.2–Å crystal structure of SMOB. Upon rapidly mixing with NADH, SMOB forms an NADH→FADox charge–transfer intermediate and catalyzes a hydride–transfer reaction from NADH to FAD, with a rate constant of 49.1 ± 1.4 s−1, in a step that is coupled to the rapid dissociation of NAD+. Electrochemical and equilibrium–binding studies indicate that NSMOA binds FADhq ~13–times more tightly than SMOB, which supports a vectoral transfer of FADhq from the reductase to the epoxidase. After binding to NSMOA, FADhq rapidly reacts with molecular oxygen to form a stable C(4a)–hydroperoxide intermediate. The half–life of apoSMOB generated in the FAD–transfer reaction is increased ~21–fold, supporting the model of a protein–protein interaction between apoSMOB and NSMOA with the peroxide intermediate. The mechanisms of FAD–dissociation and transport from SMOB to NSMOA were probed by monitoring the competitive reduction of cytochrome c in the presence and absence of pyridine nucleotides. Based on these studies, we propose a model in which reduced FAD binds to SMOB in equilibrium between an unreactive, sequestered state (S–state) and more reactive, transfer state (T–state). Dissociation of NAD+ after the hydride transfer–reaction transiently populates the T–state, promoting the transfer of FADhq to NSMOA. The binding of pyridine nucleotides to SMOB–FADhq shifts the FADhq–binding equilibrium from the T–state to the S–state. Additionally, the 2.2–Å crystal structure of SMOB–FADox reported in this work is discussed in light of the pyridine nucleotide–gated flavin–transfer and electron

  3. Recent developments in asymmetric multicomponent reactions.

    PubMed

    de Graaff, Corien; Ruijter, Eelco; Orru, Romano V A

    2012-05-21

    Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) receive increasing attention because they address both diversity and complexity in organic synthesis. Thus, in principle diverse sets of relatively complex structures can be generated from simple starting materials in a single reaction step. The ever increasing need for optically pure compounds for pharmaceutical and agricultural applications as well as for catalysis promotes the development of asymmetric multicomponent reactions. In recent years, asymmetric multicomponent reactions have been applied to the total synthesis of various enantiopure natural products and commercial drugs, reducing the number of required reaction steps significantly. Although many developments in diastereoselective MCRs have been reported, the field of catalytic enantioselective MCRs has just started to blossom. This critical review describes developments in both diastereoselective and catalytic enantioselective multicomponent reactions since 2004. Significantly broadened scopes, new techniques, more environmentally benign methods and entirely novel MCRs reflect the increasingly inventive paths that synthetic chemist follow in this field. Until recently, enantioselective transition metal-catalyzed MCRs represented the majority of catalytic enantioselective MCRs. However, metal contamination is highly undesirable for drug synthesis. The emergence of organocatalysis greatly influences the quest for new asymmetric MCRs. PMID:22546840

  4. Inhibition of ammonia monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea by carbon disulfide.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M R; Kim, C Y; Arp, D J

    1990-01-01

    Carbon disulfide has long been recognized as a potent inhibitor of nitrification, and it is the likely active component in several nitrification inhibitors suitable for field use. The effects of this compound on Nitrosomonas europaea have been investigated, and the site of action has been determined. Low concentrations of CS2 (less than 400 microM) produced a time-dependent inhibition of ammonia-dependent O2 uptake but did not inhibit hydrazine-oxidizing activity. CS2 also produced distinct changes in difference spectra of whole cells. These results suggest that ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) is the site of action of CS2. Unlike the case for thiourea and acetylene, saturating concentrations of CS2 did not fully inhibit AMO, and the inhibition resulted in a low but significant rate of ammonia-dependent O2 uptake. The effects of CS2 were not competitive with respect to ammonia concentration, and the inhibition by CS2 did not require the turnover of AMO to take effect. The ability of CS2-treated cells to incorporate [14C]acetylene into the 28-kilodalton polypeptide of AMO was used to demonstrate that the effects of CS2 are compatible with a mode of action which involves a reduction of the rate of turnover of AMO without effects on the catalytic mechanism. It is proposed that CS2 may act on AMO by reversibly reacting with a suitable nucleophilic amino acid in close proximity to the active site copper. Images PMID:2118501

  5. Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase: An Influential Mediator of Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, Jennifer M.; O’Connor, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence demonstrates that kynurenine metabolism may play an important pathogenic role in the development of multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. The kynurenine pathway consists of two functionally distinct branches that generate both neuroactive and oxidatively reactive metabolites. In the brain, the rate-limiting enzyme for one of these branches, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), is predominantly expressed in microglia and has emerged as a pivotal point of metabolic regulation. KMO substrate and expression levels are upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and altered by functional genetic mutations. Increased KMO metabolism results in the formation of metabolites that activate glutamate receptors and elevate oxidative stress, while recent evidence has revealed neurodevelopmental consequences of reduced KMO activity. Together, the evidence suggests that KMO is positioned at a critical metabolic junction to influence the development or trajectory of a myriad of neurological diseases. Understanding the mechanism(s) by which alterations in KMO activity are able to impair neuronal function, and viability will enhance our knowledge of related disease pathology and provide insight into novel therapeutic opportunities. This review will discuss the influence of KMO on brain kynurenine metabolism and the current understanding of molecular mechanisms by which altered KMO activity may contribute to neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:26347662

  6. Structural basis for pregnenolone biosynthesis by the mitochondrial monooxygenase system

    SciTech Connect

    Strushkevich, Natallia; MacKenzie, Farrell; Cherkesova, Tatyana; Grabovec, Irina; Usanov, Sergey; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-06

    In humans, the precursor to all steroid hormones, pregnenolone, is synthesized from cholesterol by an enzyme complex comprising adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), adrenodoxin (Adx), and a cytochrome P450 (P450scc or CYP11A1). This complex not only plays a key role in steroidogenesis, but also has long been a model to study electron transfer, multistep catalysis, and C-C bond cleavage performed by monooxygenases. Detailed mechanistic understanding of these processes has been hindered by a lack of structural information. Here we present the crystal structure of the complex of human Adx and CYP11A1 - the first of a complex between a eukaryotic CYP and its redox partner. The structures with substrate and a series of reaction intermediates allow us to define the mechanism underlying sequential hydroxylations of the cholesterol and suggest the mechanism of C-C bond cleavage. In the complex the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Adx is positioned 17.4 {angstrom} away from the heme iron of CYP11A1. This structure suggests that after an initial protein-protein association driven by electrostatic forces, the complex adopts an optimized geometry between the redox centers. Conservation of the interaction interface suggests that this mechanism is common for all mitochondrial P450s.

  7. Diversity and evolution of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Sello, Mopeli Marshal; Jafta, Norventia; Nelson, David R; Chen, Wanping; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Parvez, Mohammad; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Monyaki, Richie; Raselemane, Seiso Caiphus; Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Mthakathi, Ntsane Trevor; Sitheni Mashele, Samson; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins whose role as drug targets against pathogens, as well as in valuable chemical production and bioremediation, has been explored. In this study we performed comprehensive comparative analysis of P450s in 13 newly explored oomycete pathogens. Three hundred and fifty-six P450s were found in oomycetes. These P450s were grouped into 15 P450 families and 84 P450 subfamilies. Among these, nine P450 families and 31 P450 subfamilies were newly found in oomycetes. Research revealed that oomycetes belonging to different orders contain distinct P450 families and subfamilies in their genomes. Evolutionary analysis and sequence homology data revealed P450 family blooms in oomycetes. Tandem arrangement of a large number of P450s belonging to the same family indicated that P450 family blooming is possibly due to its members’ duplications. A unique combination of amino acid patterns was observed at EXXR and CXG motifs for the P450 families CYP5014, CYP5015 and CYP5017. A novel P450 fusion protein (CYP5619 family) with an N-terminal P450 domain fused to a heme peroxidase/dioxygenase domain was discovered in Saprolegnia declina. Oomycete P450 patterns suggested host influence in shaping their P450 content. This manuscript serves as reference for future P450 annotations in newly explored oomycetes. PMID:26129850

  8. Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase: An Influential Mediator of Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Jennifer M; O'Connor, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence demonstrates that kynurenine metabolism may play an important pathogenic role in the development of multiple neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. The kynurenine pathway consists of two functionally distinct branches that generate both neuroactive and oxidatively reactive metabolites. In the brain, the rate-limiting enzyme for one of these branches, kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), is predominantly expressed in microglia and has emerged as a pivotal point of metabolic regulation. KMO substrate and expression levels are upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and altered by functional genetic mutations. Increased KMO metabolism results in the formation of metabolites that activate glutamate receptors and elevate oxidative stress, while recent evidence has revealed neurodevelopmental consequences of reduced KMO activity. Together, the evidence suggests that KMO is positioned at a critical metabolic junction to influence the development or trajectory of a myriad of neurological diseases. Understanding the mechanism(s) by which alterations in KMO activity are able to impair neuronal function, and viability will enhance our knowledge of related disease pathology and provide insight into novel therapeutic opportunities. This review will discuss the influence of KMO on brain kynurenine metabolism and the current understanding of molecular mechanisms by which altered KMO activity may contribute to neurodevelopment, neurodegenerative, and neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:26347662

  9. Effects of Zinc on Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Activity and Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  10. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  11. Effects of zinc on particulate methane monooxygenase activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2014-08-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  12. Mechanism of Action of a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy,S.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Elimination of nonnutritional and insoluble compounds is a critical task for any living organism. Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) attach an oxygen atom to the insoluble nucleophilic compounds to increase solubility and thereby increase excretion. Here we analyze the functional mechanism of FMO from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the crystal structures of the wild type and protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes. The structure of the wild-type FMO revealed that the prosthetic group FAD is an integral part of the protein. FMO needs NADPH as a cofactor in addition to the prosthetic group for its catalytic activity. Structures of the protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes provide insights into mechanism of action. We propose that FMOs exist in the cell as a complex with a reduced form of the prosthetic group and NADPH cofactor, readying them to act on substrates. The 4{alpha}-hydroperoxyflavin form of the prosthetic group represents a transient intermediate of the monooxygenation process. The oxygenated and reduced forms of the prosthetic group help stabilize interactions with cofactor and substrate alternately to permit continuous enzyme turnover.

  13. Assay, Purification, and Partial Characterization of Choline Monooxygenase from Spinach.

    PubMed Central

    Burnet, M.; Lafontaine, P. J.; Hanson, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The osmoprotectant glycine betaine is synthesized via the path-way choline -> betaine aldehyde -> glycine betaine. In spinach (Spinacia oleracea), the first step is catalyzed by choline monooxygenase (CMO), and the second is catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase. Because betaine aldehyde is unstable and not easily detected, we developed a coupled radiometric assay for CMO. [14C]Choline is used as substrate; NAD+ and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase prepared from Escherichia coli are added to oxidize [14C]betaine aldehyde to [14C]glycine betaine, which is isolated by ion exchange. The assay was used in the purification of CMO from leaves of salinized spinach. The 10-step procedure included polyethylene glycol precipitation, polyethyleneimine precipitation, hydrophobic interaction, anion exchange on choline-Sepharose, dimethyldiethanolamine-Sepharose, and Mono Q, hydroxyapatite, gel filtration, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Following gel filtration, overall purification was about 600-fold and recovery of activity was 0.5%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 45 kD. Taken with the value of 98 kD estimated for native CMO (R. Brouquisse, P. Weigel, D. Rhodes, C.F. Yocum, A.D. Hanson [1989] Plant Physiol 90: 322-329), this indicates that CMO is a homodimer. CMO preparations were red-brown, showed absorption maxima at 329 and 459 nm, and lost color upon dithionite addition, suggesting that CMO is an iron-sulfur protein. PMID:12228495

  14. Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition in blood ameliorates neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zwilling, Daniel; Huang, Shao-Yi; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V.; Notarangelo, Francesca M.; Guidetti, Paolo; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Lee, Jason; Truong, Jennifer; Andrews-Zwilling, Yaisa; Hsieh, Eric W.; Louie, Jamie Y.; Wu, Tiffany; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Patrick, Christina; Adame, Anthony; Giorgini, Flaviano; Moussaoui, Saliha; Laue, Grit; Rassoulpour, Arash; Flik, Gunnar; Huang, Yadong; Muchowski, Joseph M.; Masliah, Eliezer; Schwarcz, Robert; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Metabolites in the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation are thought to play an important role in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Metabolites that cause glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and free radical formation are elevated in the blood and vulnerable brain regions in these diseases, while levels of the neuroprotective metabolite kynurenic acid are often decreased. Here we describe the synthesis and characterization of JM6, a novel small-molecule pro-drug inhibitor of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). JM6 raises kynurenic acid and reduces extracellular glutamate in the brain after chronic oral administration by inhibiting KMO in blood. In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, JM6 prevented spatial memory deficits, anxiety-related behavior, and synaptic loss. JM6 also extended life span, prevented synaptic loss, and decreased microglial activation in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. These findings support a critical link between blood cells and neurodegeneration that is mediated by KMO and the kynurenine pathway. PMID:21640374

  15. Activation of enzymatic chitin degradation by a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Hamre, Anne Grethe; Eide, Kristine B; Wold, Hanne H; Sørlie, Morten

    2015-04-30

    For decades, the enzymatic conversion of recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin was thought to solely rely on the synergistic action of hydrolytic enzymes, but recent work has shown that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are important contributors to this process. Here, we have examined the initial rate enhancement an LPMO (CBP21) has on the hydrolytic enzymes (ChiA, ChiB, and ChiC) of the chitinolytic machinery of Serratia marcescens through determinations of apparent k(cat) (k(cat)(app)) values on a β-chitin substrate. k(cat)(app) values were determined to be 1.7±0.1 s(-1) and 1.7±0.1 s(-1) for the exo-active ChiA and ChiB, respectively and 1.2±0.1 s(-1) for the endo-active ChiC. The addition of CBP21 boosted the k(cat)(app) values of ChiA and ChiB giving values of 11.1±1.5 s(-1) and 13.9±1.4 s(-1), while there was no effect on ChiC (0.9±0.1 s(-1)). PMID:25812992

  16. Multicomponent dynamical nucleation theory and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, Shawn M; Schenter, Gregory K; Garrett, Bruce C

    2004-05-15

    Vapor to liquid multicomponent nucleation is a dynamical process governed by a delicate interplay between condensation and evaporation. Since the population of the vapor phase is dominated by monomers at reasonable supersaturations, the formation of clusters is governed by monomer association and dissociation reactions. Although there is no intrinsic barrier in the interaction potential along the minimum energy path for the association process, the formation of a cluster is impeded by a free energy barrier. Dynamical nucleation theory provides a framework in which equilibrium evaporation rate constants can be calculated and the corresponding condensation rate constants determined from detailed balance. The nucleation rate can then be obtained by solving the kinetic equations. The rate constants governing the multistep kinetics of multicomponent nucleation including sensitivity analysis and the potential influence of contaminants will be presented and discussed. PMID:15267849

  17. Regulation of bacterial methane oxidation: transcription of the soluble methane mono-oxygenase operon of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is repressed by copper ions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A K; Gerdes, K; Degn, H; Murrell, J C

    1996-05-01

    Methane is oxidized to methanol by the enzyme methane mono-oxygenase (MMO) in methanotrophic bacteria. In previous work, this multicomponent enzyme system has been extensively characterized at the biochemical and molecular level. Copper ions have been shown to irreversibly inhibit MMO activity in vivo and in vitro, but the effect of copper ions on transcription of the genes encoding the soluble (cytoplasmic) MMO (sMMO) has not previously been investigated. To examine more closely the regulation of bacterial methane oxidation and to determine the role of copper in this process, we have investigated transcriptional regulation of the sMMO gene cluster in the methanotrophic bacterium Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Using Northern blot analysis and primer extension experiments, it was shown that the six ORFs of the sMMO gene cluster are organized as an operon and the transcripts produced upon expression of this operon have been identified. The synthesis of these transcripts was under control of a single copper-regulated promoter, which is as yet not precisely defined. PMID:8704968

  18. Diffusion Of Mass In Evaporating Multicomponent Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report summarizes study of diffusion of mass and related phenomena occurring in evaporation of dense and dilute clusters of drops of multicomponent liquids intended to represent fuels as oil, kerosene, and gasoline. Cluster represented by simplified mathematical model, including global conservation equations for entire cluster and conditions on boundary between cluster and ambient gas. Differential equations of model integrated numerically. One of series of reports by same authors discussing evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels.

  19. Multiphase, Multicomponent Compressibility in Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Macias-Chapa, L.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1987-01-20

    Coefficients of compressibilities below the bubble point were computer with a thermodynamic model for single and multicomponent systems. Results showed coefficients of compressibility below the bubble point larger than the gas coefficient of compressibility at the same conditions. Two-phase compressibilities computed in the conventional way are underestimated and may lead to errors in reserve estimation and well test analysis. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Novel Reagents for Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanguang; Basso, Andrea; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Krasavin, Mikhail; Bushkova, Ekaterina; Parchinsky, Vladislav; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Riva, Renata; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Rozentsveig, Gulnur N.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Serykh, Valeriy J.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Cao, Song; Shen, Li; Liu, Nianjin; Wu, Jingjing; Li, Lina; Qian, Xuhong; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Hongbo; Feng, Jinwu; Wang, Yanguang; Lu, Ping; Heravi, Majid M.; Sadjadi, Samaheh; Kazemizadeh, Ali Reza; Ramazani, Ali; Kudyakova, Yulia S.; Goryaeva, Marina V.; Burgart, Yanina V.; Saloutin, Victor I.; Mossetti, Riccardo; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Mayorova, Olga A.; Shklyaev, Yuriy V.; Zhdanko, Alexander G.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Plekhanova, Irina V.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.

    Ketenimines are a class of versatile and highly reactive intermediates that can participate in a variety of organic reactions, such as nucleophilic additions, radical additions, [2 + 2] and [2 + 4] cycloadditions, and sigmatropic rearrangements. In this presentation, we report on a series of multi-component reactions that involve a ketenimine intermediate. These reactions could furnish diverse heterocyclic compounds, including functionalized iminocoumarin, iminodihydroqunolines, iminothiochromens, pyrrolines, isoquinolines, pyridines, β-lactams, imino-1,2-dihydrocoumarins, and benzimidazoles.

  1. Silver and gold-catalyzed multicomponent reactions

    PubMed Central

    Abbiati, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Silver and gold salts and complexes mainly act as soft and carbophilic Lewis acids even if their use as σ-activators has been rarely reported. Recently, transformations involving Au(I)/Au(III)-redox catalytic systems have been reported in the literature. In this review we highlight all these aspects of silver and gold-mediated processes and their application in multicomponent reactions. PMID:24605168

  2. Predicting phase behavior in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, William M; Frenkel, Daan

    2013-07-14

    Mixtures with a large number of components can undergo phase transitions of a hybrid character, with both condensation and demixing contributions. We describe a robust Monte Carlo simulation method for calculating phase coexistence in multicomponent mixtures. We use this approach to study the phase behavior of lattice models of multicomponent mixtures with strongly varying pair interactions. Such a system can be thought of as a simplified model of the cytosol, with both specific and nonspecific interactions. We show that mapping a multicomponent mixture onto an approximately equivalent one-component system yields both upper and lower bounds on the maximum solute volume fraction of a stable, homogeneous phase. By following the minimum excess-free-energy path from the dilute phase free-energy minimum, we predict the difference in composition between the condensed and dilute phases at the boundary of the homogeneous phase. We find that this "direction" of phase separation rarely aligns with the dominant direction of density fluctuations in the dilute phase. We also show that demixing transitions tend to lower the maximum solute volume fraction at which the homogeneous phase is stable. By considering statistical ensembles of mixtures with random interactions, we show that the demixing contribution to phase separation is self-averaging and dependent only on the mean and variance of the distribution of interactions. PMID:23862930

  3. Multicomponent gas sorption Joule-Thomson refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Petrick, S. Walter (Inventor); Bard, Steven (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cryogenic Joule-Thomson refrigeration capable of pumping multicomponent gases with a single stage sorption compressor system. Alternative methods of pumping a multicomponent gas with a single stage compressor are disclosed. In a first embodiment, the sorbent geometry is such that a void is defined near the output of the sorption compressor. When the sorbent is cooled, the sorbent primarily adsorbs the higher boiling point gas such that the lower boiling point gas passes through the sorbent to occupy the void. When the sorbent is heated, the higher boiling point gas is desorbed at high temperature and pressure and thereafter propels the lower boiling point gas out of the sorption compressor. A mixing chamber is provided to remix the constituent gases prior to expansion of the gas through a Joule-Thomson valve. Other methods of pumping a multicomponent gas are disclosed. For example, where the sorbent is porous and the low boiling point gas does not adsorb very well, the pores of the sorbent will act as a void space for the lower boiling point gas. Alternatively, a mixed sorbent may be used where a first sorbent component physically adsorbs the high boiling point gas and where the second sorbent component chemically absorbs the low boiling point gas.

  4. Optimization of trichloroethylene degradation using soluble methane monooxygenase of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b expressed in recombinant bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Jahng, D.; Kim, C.S.; Wood, T.K.; Hanson, R.S.

    1996-08-05

    By complementing cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas putida F1/pSMMO20 with purified soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) components of Methylosinus trichospoirium OB3b, the low cloned-gene sMMO activity in the recombinant strain was found to be due to incomplete activity of the hydroxylase component. To address this incomplete activity, additional sMMO-expressing strains were formed by transferring mmo-containing pSMMO20 and pSMMO50 into various bacterial species including pseudomonads and {alpha}-2 subdivision strains such as methanotrophs, methylotrophs, Agrobacterium tumefaciens A114, and Rhizobium meliloti 102F34 (11 new strains screened); sMMO activity was detected in the last two strains. To increase plasmid segregational stability, the hok/sok locus originally from Escherichia coli plasmid R1 was inserted downstream of the mmo locus of pSMMO20 (resulting in pSMMO40) and found to enhance plasmid stability in P. putida F1 and R. meliloti 102F34 (first report of hok/sok in Rhizobium). To further increase sMMO activity, a modified Whittenbury minimal medium was selected from various minimal and complex media based on trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation and growth rates and was improved by removing the sMMO-inhibiting metal ions [Cu(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II)] and chloramphenicol from the medium and by supplementing with an iron source (3.6 {micro}M of ferrous ammonium sulfate). Using chemostat-grown P. putida F1/pSMMO40, it was found that sMMO activity was higher for cells grown at higher dilution rates. These optimization efforts resulted in a twofold increase in the extent of TCE degradation and more consistent sMMO activity.

  5. THE BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FERRET CAROTENE-9', 10'-MONOOXYGENASE CATALYZING CLEAVAGE OF CAROTENOIDS IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that beta -carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (CMO1) catalyzes the cleavage of beta -carotene at the central carbon 15, 15’-double bond, but cleaves lycopene with much lower activity. However, expressing the mouse carotene-9’,10’-monooxygenase (CMO2) in beta-carotene/lycopene...

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of the Grape Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Gene CYP736B Expression in Response to Xylella fastidiosa Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are a group of versatile redox proteins that mediate the biosynthesis of lignins, terpenes, alkaloids, and a variety of other secondary compounds which act as plant defense agents. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to...

  7. Selective Usage of Transcription Initiation and Polyadenylation Sites in Grape Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Gene CYP736B Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are versatile redox proteins that mediate biosynthesis of lignins, terpenes, alkaloids, and a variety of other secondary compounds as plant defense agents against a range of pathogens and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in the...

  8. Terpene hydroxylation with microbial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Janocha, Simon; Schmitz, Daniela; Bernhardt, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids comprise a highly diverse group of natural products. In addition to their basic carbon skeleton, they differ from one another in their functional groups. Functional groups attached to the carbon skeleton are the basis of the terpenoids' diverse properties. Further modifications of terpene olefins include the introduction of acyl-, aryl-, or sugar moieties and usually start with oxidations catalyzed by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s, CYPs). P450s are ubiquitously distributed throughout nature, involved in essential biological pathways such as terpenoid biosynthesis as well as the tailoring of terpenoids and other natural products. Their ability to introduce oxygen into nonactivated C-H bonds is unique and makes P450s very attractive for applications in biotechnology. Especially in the field of terpene oxidation, biotransformation methods emerge as an attractive alternative to classical chemical synthesis. For this reason, microbial P450s depict a highly interesting target for protein engineering approaches in order to increase selectivity and activity, respectively. Microbial P450s have been described to convert industrial and pharmaceutically interesting terpenoids such as ionones, limone, valencene, resin acids, and triterpenes (including steroids) as well as vitamin D3. Highly selective and active mutants have been evolved by applying classical site-directed mutagenesis as well as directed evolution of proteins. As P450s usually depend on electron transfer proteins, mutagenesis has also been applied to improve the interactions between P450s and their respective redox partners. This chapter provides an overview of terpenoid hydroxylation reactions catalyzed by bacterial P450s and highlights the achievements made by protein engineering to establish productive hydroxylation processes. PMID:25682070

  9. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-01-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  10. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-02-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  11. A family of starch-active polysaccharide monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Van V.; Beeson, William T.; Span, Elise A.; Farquhar, Erik R.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered fungal and bacterial polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) are capable of oxidatively cleaving chitin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses that contain β(1→4) linkages between glucose or substituted glucose units. They are also known collectively as lytic PMOs, or LPMOs, and individually as AA9 (formerly GH61), AA10 (formerly CBM33), and AA11 enzymes. PMOs share several conserved features, including a monocopper center coordinated by a bidentate N-terminal histidine residue and another histidine ligand. A bioinformatic analysis using these conserved features suggested several potential new PMO families in the fungus Neurospora crassa that are likely to be active on novel substrates. Herein, we report on NCU08746 that contains a C-terminal starch-binding domain and an N-terminal domain of previously unknown function. Biochemical studies showed that NCU08746 requires copper, oxygen, and a source of electrons to oxidize the C1 position of glycosidic bonds in starch substrates, but not in cellulose or chitin. Starch contains α(1→4) and α(1→6) linkages and exhibits higher order structures compared with chitin and cellulose. Cellobiose dehydrogenase, the biological redox partner of cellulose-active PMOs, can serve as the electron donor for NCU08746. NCU08746 contains one copper atom per protein molecule, which is likely coordinated by two histidine ligands as shown by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and sequence analysis. Results indicate that NCU08746 and homologs are starch-active PMOs, supporting the existence of a PMO superfamily with a much broader range of substrates. Starch-active PMOs provide an expanded perspective on studies of starch metabolism and may have potential in the food and starch-based biofuel industries. PMID:25201969

  12. A family of starch-active polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vu, Van V; Beeson, William T; Span, Elise A; Farquhar, Erik R; Marletta, Michael A

    2014-09-23

    The recently discovered fungal and bacterial polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs) are capable of oxidatively cleaving chitin, cellulose, and hemicelluloses that contain β(1→4) linkages between glucose or substituted glucose units. They are also known collectively as lytic PMOs, or LPMOs, and individually as AA9 (formerly GH61), AA10 (formerly CBM33), and AA11 enzymes. PMOs share several conserved features, including a monocopper center coordinated by a bidentate N-terminal histidine residue and another histidine ligand. A bioinformatic analysis using these conserved features suggested several potential new PMO families in the fungus Neurospora crassa that are likely to be active on novel substrates. Herein, we report on NCU08746 that contains a C-terminal starch-binding domain and an N-terminal domain of previously unknown function. Biochemical studies showed that NCU08746 requires copper, oxygen, and a source of electrons to oxidize the C1 position of glycosidic bonds in starch substrates, but not in cellulose or chitin. Starch contains α(1→4) and α(1→6) linkages and exhibits higher order structures compared with chitin and cellulose. Cellobiose dehydrogenase, the biological redox partner of cellulose-active PMOs, can serve as the electron donor for NCU08746. NCU08746 contains one copper atom per protein molecule, which is likely coordinated by two histidine ligands as shown by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and sequence analysis. Results indicate that NCU08746 and homologs are starch-active PMOs, supporting the existence of a PMO superfamily with a much broader range of substrates. Starch-active PMOs provide an expanded perspective on studies of starch metabolism and may have potential in the food and starch-based biofuel industries. PMID:25201969

  13. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. PMID:26862199

  14. Metabolic pathway involved in 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline degradation by Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 and cloning of the novel flavin-dependent monooxygenase system meaBA.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-12-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02' in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase. PMID:26386060

  15. Metabolic Pathway Involved in 2-Methyl-6-Ethylaniline Degradation by Sphingobium sp. Strain MEA3-1 and Cloning of the Novel Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase System meaBA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02′ in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase. PMID:26386060

  16. A study of the hepatic microsomal monooxygenase of sea birds and its relationship to organochlorine pollutants.

    PubMed

    Knight, G C; Walker, C H

    1982-01-01

    1. The levels of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase in sea birds were determined using organochlorine substrates. Levels of cytochrome P450 and organochlorine residues were also measured. 2. The razorbill (Alca torda) and puffin (Fratercula arctica) showed highly variable activities which were resolved into multiple peaks on frequency diagrams. 3. The most active individuals amongst razorbills were early season females with large ovaries. 4. The properties of monooxygenase from individuals of low and high activity were compared. 5. The results are discussed in relation to PCB pollution. PMID:6128175

  17. Toluene 2-Monooxygenase-Dependent Growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4/PR1 on Diethyl Ether

    PubMed Central

    Hur, H.; Newman, L. M.; Wackett, L. P.; Sadowsky, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Aerobic bacterial growth on aromatic hydrocarbons typically requires oxygenase enzymes, which are known to fortuitously oxidize nongrowth substrates. In this study, we found that oxidation of diethyl ether by toluene 2-monooxygenase supported more rapid growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4/PR1 than did the aromatic substrates n-propylbenzene and o-xylene. The wild-type Burkholderia cepacia G4 failed to grow on diethyl ether. Purified toluene 2-monooxygenase protein components oxidized diethyl ether stoichiometrically to ethanol and acetaldehyde. Butyl methyl ether, diethyl sulfide, and 2-chloroethyl ethyl ether were oxidized by B. cepacia G4/PR1. PMID:16535583

  18. Intermediate P* from Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Contains a Diferrous Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rahul; Meier, Katlyn K.; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D.

    2013-01-01

    During a single turnover of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, several discrete intermediates are formed. The diiron cluster of MMOH is first reduced to the FeIIFeII state (Hred). O2 binds rapidly at a site away from the cluster to form the FeIIFeII intermediate O, which converts to an FeIIIFeIII-peroxo intermediate P and finally to the FeIVFeIV intermediate Q. Q binds and reacts with methane to yield methanol and water. The rate constants for these steps are increased by a regulatory protein, MMOB. Previously reported transient kinetic studies have suggested that an intermediate P* forms between O and P in which the g = 16 EPR signal characteristic of the reduced diiron cluster of Hred and O is lost. This was interpreted as signaling oxidation of the cluster, but low accumulation of P* prevented further characterization. In this study, three methods to directly detect and trap P* are applied together to allow its spectroscopic and kinetic characterization. First, the MMOB mutant His33Ala is used to specifically slow the decay of P* without affecting its formation rate, leading to its nearly quantitative accumulation. Second, spectra-kinetic data collection is used to provide a sensitive measure of the formation and decay rate constants of intermediates as well as their optical spectra. Finally, the substrate furan is included to react with Q and quench its strong chromophore. The optical spectrum of P* closely mimics those of Hred and O, but it is distinctly different from that of P. The reaction cycle rate constants allowed prediction of the times for maximal accumulation of the intermediates. Mössbauer spectra of rapid freeze quench samples at these times show that the intermediates are formed at almost exactly the predicted levels. The Mössbauer spectra show that the diiron cluster of P*, quite unexpectedly, is in the FeIIFeII state. Thus, the loss of the g = 16 EPR results from a change of

  19. Regulation of Hydroxylation and Nitroreduction Pathways during Metabolism of the Neonicotinoid Insecticide Imidacloprid by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tian-Qi; Mao, Shi-Yun; Sun, Shi-Lei; Yang, Wen-Long; Ge, Feng; Dai, Yi-Jun

    2016-06-22

    Imidacloprid (IMI) is mainly metabolized via nitroreduction and hydroxylation pathways, which produce different metabolites that are toxic to mammals and insects. However, regulation of IMI metabolic flux between nitroreduction and hydroxylation pathways is still unclear. In this study, Pseudomonas putida was found to metabolize IMI to 5-hydroxy and nitroso IMI and was therefore used for investigating the regulation of IMI metabolic flux. The cell growth time, cosubstrate, dissolved oxygen concentration, and pH showed significant effect on IMI degradation and nitroso and 5-hydroxy IMI formation. Gene cloning and overexpression in Escherichia coli proved that P. putida KT2440 aldehyde oxidase mediated IMI nitroreduction to nitroso IMI, while cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP) failed to improve IMI hydroxylation. Moreover, E. coli cells without CYP could hydroxylate IMI, demonstrating the role of a non-CYP enzyme in IMI hydroxylation. Thus, the present study helps to further understand the environmental fate of IMI and its underlying mechanism. PMID:27230024

  20. Simulation of paraequilibrium growth in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.; Olson, G. B.

    2001-03-01

    A methodology to simulate paraequilibrium (PE) growth in multicomponent systems using the DIC-TRA (Diffusion-Controlled Transformation) software is presented. For any given multicomponent system containing substitutional and interstitial elements, the basic approach is to define a hypothetical element Z, whose thermodynamic and mobility parameters are expressed in terms of the weighted average (with respect to site fraction) of the thermodynamic parameters and mobilities of the substitutional alloying elements. This procedure facilitates the calculation of PE phase diagrams and the PE growth simulations directly in the Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software, respectively. The results of two distinct case studies in multicomponent alloys are presented. In the first example, we simulate the isothermal growth of PE cementite in an Fe-C-Co-Cr-Mo-Ni secondary hardening steel during tempering. This is of practical importance in modeling the carbide precipitation kinetics during secondary hardening. In the second example, we have presented the results of PE ferrite growth during continuous cooling from an intercritical temperature in an Fe-Al-C-Mn-Si low-alloy steel. This is of importance to the design of triple-phase steels containing an austenite that has optimum stability, to facilitate stress-induced transformation under dynamic loading. The results of both simulations are in good accord with experimental results. The model calculations do not consider any resistive or dissipative forces, such as the interfacial energy, strain energy, or solute drag, and, as a result, the interface velocities represent an upper limit under the available chemical driving force.

  1. Hybrid Multicomponent Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinqiao; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2009-01-01

    Artificial ECMs that not only closely mimic the hybrid nature of the natural ECM but also provide tunable material properties and enhanced biological functions are attractive candidates for tissue engineering applications. This review summarizes recent advances in developing multicomponent hybrid hydrogels by integrating modular and heterogeneous building blocks into well-defined, multifunctional hydrogel composites. The individual building blocks can be chemically, morphologically, and functionally diverse, and the hybridization can occur at molecular level or microscopic scale. The modular nature of the designs, combined with the potential synergistic effects of the hybrid systems, has resulted in novel hydrogel matrices with robust structure and defined functions. PMID:19107720

  2. Regularized Grad equations for multicomponent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Thierry E.; Martins, Gérald; Torrilhon, Manuel

    2011-05-01

    The moment method of Grad is used to derive macroscopic conservation equations for multicomponent plasmas for small and moderate Knudsen numbers, accounting for the electromagnetic field influence and thermal nonequilibrium. In the low Knudsen number limit, the equations derived are fully consistent with those obtained by means of the Chapman-Enskog method. In particular, we have retieved the Kolesnikov effect coupling electrons and heavy particles in the case of the Boltzmann moment systems. Finally, a regularization procedure is proposed to achieve continuous shock structures at all Mach numbers.

  3. Corrections to scaling in multicomponent polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Vicari, Ettore

    2006-05-01

    We calculate the correction-to-scaling exponent omegaT that characterizes the approach to the scaling limit in multicomponent polymer solutions. A direct Monte Carlo determination of omegaT in a system of interacting self-avoiding walks gives omegaT=0.415+/-0.020. A field-theory analysis based on five- and six-loop perturbative series leads to omegaT=0.41+/-0.04. We also verify the renormalization-group predictions for the scaling behavior close to the ideal-mixing point. PMID:16802958

  4. General Model for Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Marschall, Jochen; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A previous paper (AIAA 94-2042) presented equations and numerical procedures for modeling the thermochemical ablation and pyrolysis of thermal protection materials which contain multiple surface species. This work describes modifications and enhancements to the Multicomponent Ablation Thermochemistry (MAT) theory and code for application to the general case which includes surface area constraints, rate limited surface reactions, and non-thermochemical mass loss (failure). Detailed results and comparisons with data are presented for the Shuttle Orbiter reinforced carbon-carbon oxidation protection system which contains a mixture of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), silica (SiO2), silicon carbide (SiC), and carbon (C).

  5. Multicomponent glass fiber optic integrated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Szarniak, Przemyslaw; Franczyk, Marcin; Stepien, Ryszard; Buczynski, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    A range of integrated fiber optic structures - lightguides, image guides, multicapillary arrays, microstructured (photonic) fibers - manufactured in the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) is described. All these structures are made of multicomponent glasses (a part of them melted in ITME). They can be manufactured in similar multistep process that involves drawing glass or lightguide rods and tubes preparing glass performs, stacking a bundle with rods and (or) tubes, drawing multifiber or multicapillary performs. Structure formation, technological process, characterization and applications of different integrated structures are presented.

  6. Statistical Model of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth; LeClercq, Patrick; Bellan, Josette

    2007-01-01

    An improved statistical model has been developed to describe the chemical composition of an evaporating multicomponent- liquid drop and of the mixture of gases surrounding the drop. The model is intended for use in computational simulations of the evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels, which are typically mixtures of as many as hundreds of different hydrocarbon compounds. The present statistical model is an approximation designed to afford results that are accurate enough to contribute to understanding of the simulated physical and chemical phenomena, without imposing an unduly large computational burden.

  7. [Meningoencephalitis caused by Pseudomonas cepacia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Monrás, Miriam Fina; Batlle Almodóvar, María del Carmen; González, Cernero; Tamargo Martínez, Isis; Meneses, Félix Dickinson

    2006-01-01

    A case of meningoencephalitis of bacterial etiology caused by Pseudomonas cepacia was described. The strain was received at the Reference Laboratory of Bacterial Acute Respiratory Infections of "Pedro Kouri" Institute of Tropical Medicine, where its microbiological identification was confirmed. This isolation was a finding in an adult immunocompetent patient. The evolution was favourable with no sequelae for his future life. Pseudomona cepacia has been associated with respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Patients with Pseudomonas cepacia may be asymptomatic or present fatal acute and fulminant infection. PMID:23427437

  8. Flavoprotein monooxygenases for oxidative biocatalysis: recombinant expression in microbial hosts and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ceccoli, Romina D.; Bianchi, Dario A.; Rial, Daniela V.

    2014-01-01

    External flavoprotein monooxygenases comprise a group of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyze the insertion of one atom of molecular oxygen into an organic substrate and the second atom is reduced to water. These enzymes are involved in a great number of metabolic pathways both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Flavoprotein monooxygenases have attracted the attention of researchers for several decades and the advent of recombinant DNA technology caused a great progress in the field. These enzymes are subjected to detailed biochemical and structural characterization and some of them are also regarded as appealing oxidative biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and valuable intermediates toward active pharmaceutical ingredients due to their high chemo-, stereo-, and regioselectivity. Here, we review the most representative reactions catalyzed both in vivo and in vitro by prototype flavoprotein monooxygenases, highlighting the strategies employed to produce them recombinantly, to enhance the yield of soluble proteins, and to improve cofactor regeneration in order to obtain versatile biocatalysts. Although we describe the most outstanding features of flavoprotein monooxygenases, we mainly focus on enzymes that were cloned, expressed and used for biocatalysis during the last years. PMID:24567729

  9. Cloning, expression and characterization of a eukaryotic cycloalkanone monooxygenase from Cylindrocarpon radicicola ATCC 11011.

    PubMed

    Leipold, Friedemann; Wardenga, Rainer; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we have cloned and characterized a cycloalkanone monooxygenase (CAMO) from the ascomycete Cylindrocarpon radicicola ATCC 11011 (identical to Cylindrocarpon destructans DSM 837). The primary structure of this Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BMVO) revealed 531 residues with around 45% sequence identity to known cyclohexanone monooxygenases. The enzyme was functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli and investigated with respect to substrate spectrum and kinetic parameters. Substrate specificity studies revealed that a large variety of cycloaliphatic and bicycloaliphatic ketones are converted by this CAMO. A high catalytic efficiency against cyclobutanone was observed and seems to be a particular property of this BVMO. The thus produced butyrolactone derivatives are valuable building blocks for the synthesis of a variety of natural products and bioactive compounds. Furthermore, the enzyme revealed activity against open-chain ketones such as cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl and cyclohexyl methyl ketone which have not been reported to be accepted by typical cyclohexanone monooxygenases. These results suggest that the BVMO from C. radicicola indeed might be rather unique and since no BVMOs originating from eukaryotic organisms have been produced recombinantly so far, this study provides the first example for such an enzyme. PMID:22075635

  10. Expression of Individual Copies of Methylococcus capsulatus Bath Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Stolyar, Sergei; Franke, Marion; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2001-01-01

    The expression of the two gene clusters encoding the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was assessed by analysis of transcripts and by use of chromosomal gene fusions. The results suggest that the two clusters are functionally redundant but that relative expression alters depending on the copper levels available for growth. PMID:11160118

  11. Expression of individual copies of Methylococcus capsulatus bath particulate methane monooxygenase genes.

    PubMed

    Stolyar, S; Franke, M; Lidstrom, M E

    2001-03-01

    The expression of the two gene clusters encoding the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was assessed by analysis of transcripts and by use of chromosomal gene fusions. The results suggest that the two clusters are functionally redundant but that relative expression alters depending on the copper levels available for growth. PMID:11160118

  12. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, DA; Bertolani, SJ; Siegel, JB

    2015-01-01

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  13. A fluorescence polarization binding assay to identify inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jun; Kizjakina, Karina; Robinson, Reeder; Tolani, Karishma; Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    N-Hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are essential for pathogenesis in fungi and bacteria. NMOs catalyze the hydroxylation of sine and ornithine in the biosynthesis of hydroxamate-containing siderophores. Inhibition of kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), which catalyzes the conversion of kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, alleviates neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's and Alzheimer's diseases and brain infections caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. These enzymes are examples of flavin-dependent monooxygenases, which are validated drug targets. Here, we describe the development and optimization of a fluorescence polarization assay to identify potential inhibitors of flavin-dependent monooxygenases. Fluorescently labeled ADP molecules were synthesized and tested. An ADP-TAMRA chromophore bound to KMO with a K(d) value of 0.60 ± 0.05 μM and to the NMOs from Aspergillus fumigatus and Mycobacterium smegmatis with K(d) values of 2.1 ± 0.2 and 4.0 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. The assay was tested in competitive binding experiments with substrates and products of KMO and an NMO. Furthermore, we show that this assay can be used to identify inhibitors of NMOs. A Z' factor of 0.77 was calculated, and we show that the assay exhibits good tolerance to temperature, incubation time, and dimethyl sulfoxide concentration. PMID:22410281

  14. Identification of a microsomal retinoic acid synthase as a microsomal cytochrome P-450-linked monooxygenase system.

    PubMed

    Tomita, S; Tsujita, M; Matsuo, Y; Yubisui, T; Ichikawa, Y

    1993-12-01

    1. To characterize an enzyme which metabolizes retinal in liver microsomes, several properties of the enzymatic reaction from retinal to retinoic acid were investigated using rabbit liver microsomes. 2. The maximum pH of the reaction in the liver microsomes was 7.6. 3. The Km and Vmax values for all-trans, 9-cis and 13-cis-retinals were determined. 4. The reaction proceeded in the presence of NADPH and molecular oxygen. 5. The incorporation of one atom of molecular oxygen into retinal was confirmed by using oxygen-18, showing that the reaction comprised monooxygenation, not dehydrogenation. 6. The monooxygenase activity was inhibited by carbon monoxide, phenylisocyanide and anti-NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase IgG, but not by anti-cytochrome b5 IgG. 7. The enzymatic activity inhibited by carbon monoxide was photoreversibly restored by light of a wavelength of around 450 nm. 8. The retinal-induced spectra of liver microsomes with three isomeric retinals were type I spectra. 9. The microsomal monooxygenase activity induced by phenobarbital or ethanol were more effective than that by 3-methylcholanthrene, clotrimazole or beta-naphthoflavone. 10. These results showed that the monooxygenase reaction from retinal to retinoic acid in liver microsomes is catalyzed by a cytochrome P-450-linked monooxygenase system. PMID:8138015

  15. Identification of Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Diaphornia citri, an economically important psyllid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty P450’s in the CYP monooxygenases were identified in the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The psyllid is responsible for the transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causative agent of huanglongbing ( HLB), also known as citrus greening dise...

  16. Biology of Pseudomonas stutzeri

    PubMed Central

    Lalucat, Jorge; Bennasar, Antoni; Bosch, Rafael; García-Valdés, Elena; Palleroni, Norberto J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri is a nonfluorescent denitrifying bacterium widely distributed in the environment, and it has also been isolated as an opportunistic pathogen from humans. Over the past 15 years, much progress has been made in elucidating the taxonomy of this diverse taxonomical group, demonstrating the clonality of its populations. The species has received much attention because of its particular metabolic properties: it has been proposed as a model organism for denitrification studies; many strains have natural transformation properties, making it relevant for study of the transfer of genes in the environment; several strains are able to fix dinitrogen; and others participate in the degradation of pollutants or interact with toxic metals. This review considers the history of the discovery, nomenclatural changes, and early studies, together with the relevant biological and ecological properties, of P. stutzeri. PMID:16760312

  17. Cloning and characterization of the genes encoding nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase of Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600.

    PubMed Central

    Knobel, H R; Egli, T; van der Meer, J R

    1996-01-01

    A 6.2-kb DNA fragment containing the genes for the nitrilotriacetate (NTA) monooxygenase of Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600 was cloned and characterized by DNA sequencing and expression studies. The nucleotide sequence contained three major open reading frames (ORFs). Two of the ORFs, which were oriented divergently with an intergenic region of 307 bp, could be assigned to the NTA monooxygenase components A and B. The predicted N-terminal amino acid sequences of these ORFs were identical with those determined for the purified components. We therefore named these genes ntaA (for component A of NTA monooxygenase) and ntaB (for component B). The ntaA and ntaB genes could be expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and the gene products were visualized after Western blotting (immunoblotting) and incubation with polyclonal antibodies against component A or B. By mixing overproduced NtaB from E. coli and purified component A from C. heintzii ATCC 29600, reconstitution of a functional NTA monooxygenase complex was possible. The deduced gene product of ntaA showed only significant homology to SoxA (involved in dibenzothiophene degradation) and to SnaA (involved in pristamycin synthesis); that of ntaB shared weak homologies in one domain with other NADH:flavine mononucleotide oxidoreductases. These homologies provide no conclusive answer as to the possible evolutionary origin of the NTA monooxygenase. The deduced gene product of the third ORF (ORF1) had homology in the N-terminal region with the GntR class of bacterial regulator proteins and therefore may encode a regulator protein, possibly involved in regulation of ntaA and ntaB expression. PMID:8892809

  18. Steady-state kinetics and spectroscopic characterization of enzyme-tRNA interactions for the non-heme diiron tRNA-monooxygenase, MiaE.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Bishnu P; Corder, Andra L; Zhang, Siai; Foss, Frank W; Pierce, Brad S

    2015-01-20

    MiaE [2-methylthio-N(6)-isopentenyl-adenosine(37)-tRNA monooxygenase] isolated from Salmonella typhimurium is a unique non-heme diiron enzyme that catalyzes the O2-dependent post-transcriptional allylic hydroxylation of a hypermodified nucleotide (ms(2)i(6)A37) at position 37 of selected tRNA molecules to produce 2-methylthio-N(6)-(4-hydroxyisopentenyl)-adenosine(37). In this work, isopentenylated tRNA substrates for MiaE were produced from small RNA oligomers corresponding to the anticodon stem loop (ACSL) region of tRNA(Trp) using recombinant MiaA and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate. Steady-state rates for MiaE-catalyzed substrate hydroxylation were determined using recombinant ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin reductase (FdR) to provide a catalytic electron transport chain (ETC) using NADPH as the sole electron source. As with previously reported peroxide-shunt assays, steady-state product formation retains nearly stoichiometric (>98%) E stereoselectivity. MiaE-catalyzed i(6)A-ACSL(Trp) hydroxylation follows Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetics with kcat, KM, and V/K determined to be 0.10 ± 0.01 s(-1), 9.1 ± 1.5 μM, and ∼11000 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. While vastly slower, MiaE-catalyzed hydroxylation of free i(6)A nucleoside could also be observed using the (Fd/FdR)-ETC assay. By comparison to the V/K determined for i(6)A-ACSL substrates, an ∼6000-fold increase in enzymatic efficiency is imparted by ACSL(Trp)-MiaE interactions. The impact of substrate tRNA-MiaE interactions on protein secondary structure and active site electronic configuration was investigated using circular dichroism, dual-mode X-band electron paramagnetic resonance, and Mössbauer spectroscopies. These studies demonstrate that binding of tRNA to MiaE induces a protein conformational change that influences the electronic structure of the diiron site analogous to what has been observed for various bacterial multicomponent diiron monooxygenases upon titration with their corresponding effector

  19. Lattice Boltzmann algorithm for continuum multicomponent flow.

    PubMed

    Halliday, I; Hollis, A P; Care, C M

    2007-08-01

    We present a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation for continuum fluid mechanics, paying particular attention to the component segregation part of the underlying algorithm. In the principal result of this paper, the dynamics of a component index, or phase field, is obtained for a segregation method after U. D'Ortona [Phys. Rev. E 51, 3718 (1995)], due to Latva-Kokko and Rothman [Phys. Rev. E 71 056702 (2005)]. The said dynamics accord with a simulation designed to address multicomponent flow in the continuum approximation and underwrite improved simulation performance in two main ways: (i) by reducing the interfacial microcurrent activity considerably and (ii) by facilitating simulational access to regimes of flow with a low capillary number and drop Reynolds number [I. Halliday, R. Law, C. M. Care, and A. Hollis, Phys. Rev. E 73, 056708 (2006)]. The component segregation method studied, used in conjunction with Lishchuk's method [S. V. Lishchuk, C. M. Care, and I. Halliday, Phys. Rev. E 67, 036701 (2003)], produces an interface, which is distributed in terms of its component index; however, the hydrodynamic boundary conditions which emerge are shown to support the notion of a sharp, unstructured, continuum interface. PMID:17930175

  20. Theory of margination in confined multicomponent suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriquez Rivera, Rafael; Sinha, Kushal; Graham, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In blood flow, leukocytes and platelets tend to segregate near the vessel walls; this is known as margination. Margination of leukocytes and platelets is important in physiological processes, medical diagnostics and drug delivery. A mechanistic theory is developed to describe flow-induced segregation in confined multicomponent suspensions of deformable particles such as blood. The theory captures the essential features of margination by describing it in terms of two key competing processes in these systems at low Reynolds number: wall-induced migration and hydrodynamic pair collisions. The theory also includes the effect of physical properties of the deformable particles and molecular diffusion. Several regimes of segregation are identified, depending on the value of a ``margination parameter'' M. Moreover, there is a critical value of M below which a sharp ``drainage transition'' occurs: one component is completely depleted from the bulk flow to the vicinity of the walls. Direct hydrodynamic simulations also display this transition in suspensions where the components differ in size or flexibility. The developed mechanistic theory leads to substantial insight into the origins of margination and will help in guiding development of new technologies involving multicomponent suspensions. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1436082.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... becoming more difficult to treat because of increasing antibiotic resistance. Selecting the right antibiotic usually requires that a ... to help educate people about Pseudomonas infections, and antibiotic resistance, and to encourage prevention activities and healthy behaviors ...

  2. Structures of the Apo and FAD-bound forms of 2-hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA) locate activity hotspots identified by using directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Chantel N; Mielke, Tamara; Farrugia, Joseph E; Frank, Annika; Man, Henry; Hart, Sam; Turkenburg, Johan P; Grogan, Gideon

    2015-04-13

    The FAD-dependent monooxygenase HbpA from Pseudomonas azelaica HBP1 catalyses the hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2HBP) to 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl (23DHBP). HbpA has been used extensively as a model for studying flavoprotein hydroxylases under process conditions, and has also been subjected to directed-evolution experiments that altered its catalytic properties. The structure of HbpA has been determined in its apo and FAD-complex forms to resolutions of 2.76 and 2.03 Å, respectively. Comparisons of the HbpA structure with those of homologues, in conjunction with a model of the reaction product in the active site, reveal His48 as the most likely acid/base residue to be involved in the hydroxylation mechanism. Mutation of His48 to Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. The structures of HbpA also provide evidence that mutants achieved by directed evolution that altered activity are comparatively remote from the substrate-binding site. PMID:25737306

  3. Continuous cyclohexane oxidation to cyclohexanol using a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from Acidovorax sp. CHX100 in recombinant P. taiwanensis VLB120 biofilms.

    PubMed

    Karande, Rohan; Debor, Linde; Salamanca, Diego; Bogdahn, Fabian; Engesser, Karl-Heinrich; Buehler, Katja; Schmid, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The applications of biocatalysts in chemical industries are characterized by activity, selectivity, and stability. One key strategy to achieve high biocatalytic activity is the identification of novel enzymes with kinetics optimized for organic synthesis by Nature. The isolation of novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes from Acidovorax sp. CHX100 and their functional expression in recombinant Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120 enabled efficient oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanol. Although initial resting cell activities of 20 U gCDW (-1) were achieved, the rapid decrease in catalytic activity due to the toxicity of cyclohexane prevented synthetic applications. Cyclohexane toxicity was reduced and cellular activities stabilized over the reaction time by delivering the toxic substrate through the vapor phase and by balancing the aqueous phase mass transfer with the cellular conversion rate. The potential of this novel CYP enzyme was exploited by transferring the shake flask reaction to an aqueous-air segmented flow biofilm membrane reactor for maximizing productivity. Cyclohexane was continuously delivered via the silicone membrane. This ensured lower reactant toxicity and continuous product formation at an average volumetric productivity of 0.4 g L tube (-1) h(-1) for several days. This highlights the potential of combining a powerful catalyst with a beneficial reactor design to overcome critical issues of cyclohexane oxidation to cyclohexanol. It opens new opportunities for biocatalytic transformations of compounds which are toxic, volatile, and have low solubility in water. PMID:26153144

  4. Structures of the Apo and FAD-Bound Forms of 2-Hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA) Locate Activity Hotspots Identified by Using Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Chantel N; Mielke, Tamara; Farrugia, Joseph E; Frank, Annika; Man, Henry; Hart, Sam; Turkenburg, Johan P; Grogan, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    The FAD-dependent monooxygenase HbpA from Pseudomonas azelaica HBP1 catalyses the hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2HBP) to 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl (23DHBP). HbpA has been used extensively as a model for studying flavoprotein hydroxylases under process conditions, and has also been subjected to directed-evolution experiments that altered its catalytic properties. The structure of HbpA has been determined in its apo and FAD-complex forms to resolutions of 2.76 and 2.03 Å, respectively. Comparisons of the HbpA structure with those of homologues, in conjunction with a model of the reaction product in the active site, reveal His48 as the most likely acid/base residue to be involved in the hydroxylation mechanism. Mutation of His48 to Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. The structures of HbpA also provide evidence that mutants achieved by directed evolution that altered activity are comparatively remote from the substrate-binding site. PMID:25737306

  5. Cloning of Toluene 4-Monooxygenase Genes and Application of Two-Phase System to the Production of the Anticancer Agent, Indirubin.

    PubMed

    Wongsaroj, Lampet; Sallabhan, Ratiboot; Dubbs, James M; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Loprasert, Suvit

    2015-08-01

    Indirubin is a strong inhibitor of several eukaryotic cell signaling pathways and shows promise as a treatment for myelocytic leukemia and Alzheimer's disease. The tmoABCDEF operon, encoding the components of a novel toluene 4-monooxygenase from the paint factory soil isolate, Pseudomonas sp. M4, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. E. coli::pKSR12 expressing the tmo genes was used to develop a two-phase [dioctyl phthalate (DOP)/aqueous medium] culture system that was optimized to obtain maximal yields of indirubin from the starting substrate, indole. DOP was used as the organic phase to solubilize and sequester the toxic indole substrate, making possible the use of high indole concentrations that would otherwise interfere with growth in aqueous media. A 50 % (v/v) DOP two-phase system using tryptophan medium containing 3 mM cysteine, 5 mM indole, and 1 mM isatin yielded 102.4 mg/L of indirubin with no conversion of indole to the less valuable alternate product, indigo. PMID:25779640

  6. Chloroform Cometabolism by Butane-Grown CF8, Pseudomonas butanovora, and Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 and Methane-Grown Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    PubMed Central

    Hamamura, N.; Page, C.; Long, T.; Semprini, L.; Arp, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Chloroform (CF) degradation by a butane-grown enrichment culture, CF8, was compared to that by butane-grown Pseudomonas butanovora and Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 and to that by a known CF degrader, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. All three butane-grown bacteria were able to degrade CF at rates comparable to that of M. trichosporium. CF degradation by all four bacteria required O(inf2). Butane inhibited CF degradation by the butane-grown bacteria, suggesting that butane monooxygenase is responsible for CF degradation. P. butanovora required exogenous reductant to degrade CF, while CF8 and M. vaccae utilized endogenous reductants. Prolonged incubation with CF resulted in decreased CF degradation. CF8 and P. butanovora were more sensitive to CF than either M. trichosporium or M. vaccae. CF degradation by all three butane-grown bacteria was inactivated by acetylene, which is a mechanism-based inhibitor for several monooxygenases. Butane protected all three butane-grown bacteria from inactivation by acetylene, which indicates that the same monooxygenase is responsible for both CF and butane oxidation. CF8 and P. butanovora were able to degrade other chlorinated hydrocarbons, including trichloroethylene, 1,2-cis-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. In addition, CF8 degraded 1,1,2-trichloroethane. The results indicate the potential of butane-grown bacteria for chlorinated hydrocarbon transformation. PMID:16535693

  7. Gauge transformation and symmetries of the commutative multicomponent BKP hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanzhong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we defined a new multi-component B type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (BKP) hierarchy that takes values in a commutative subalgebra of {gl}(N,{{C}}). After this, we give the gauge transformation of this commutative multicomponent BKP (CMBKP) hierarchy. Meanwhile, we construct a new constrained CMBKP hierarchy that contains some new integrable systems, including coupled KdV equations under a certain reduction. After this, the quantum torus symmetry and quantum torus constraint on the tau function of the commutative multi-component BKP hierarchy will be constructed.

  8. Critical dynamics in multicomponent lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Haataja, Mikko

    2009-08-01

    The formation and dynamics of spatially extended compositional domains in multicomponent lipid membranes both in vivo and in vitro lie at the heart of many important biological and biophysical phenomena. While the thermodynamic basis for domain formation has been explored extensively in the past, the roles of membrane and exterior fluid hydrodynamics on domain formation kinetics have received less attention. A case in point is the impact of hydrodynamics on the dynamics of compositional heterogeneities in lipid membranes in the vicinity of a critical point. In this Rapid Communication it is argued that the asymptotic dynamic behavior of a lipid membrane system in the vicinity of a critical point is strongly influenced by hydrodynamic interactions. More specifically, a mode-coupling argument is developed which predicts a scaling behavior of lipid transport coefficients near the critical point for both symmetric and asymmetric bilayers immersed in a bulk fluid. PMID:19792068

  9. Multicomponent diffusion—A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, R. Byron; Klingenberg, Daniel J.

    2013-12-01

    After a brief summary of previous work on multicomponent diffusion theory, we review how the thermodynamics of irreversible processes leads us to an expression for the generalized driving force for diffusion. We then give the generalized Fick's law expression containing the diffusivities D; then we show how this may be turned "wrong-side out" using Merk's method to give the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations containing the diffusivities Ð12≡x1x2/C12. Finally, we show how the latter are related to the diffusivities D12 that are usually reported in the literature. All results are applicable to gases or liquids. This review is restricted to presenting the basic theory in a consistent notation, and not to the applications of the theory.

  10. Multicomponent processing of channel waves for anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Macbeth, C.; Liu, E.; Horne, S.

    1994-12-31

    Combining information derived from mode polarization and dispersion may help to limit inherent non-uniquenesses when interpreting channel wave data in anisotropic waveguides. However, estimates of these attributes require careful processing and cannot be fully understood by direct inspection of the time-series. A multicomponent analysis method is developed to separate these frequency-dependent attributes when data containing no more than a few overlapping modes is excited by several source directions. The method, a complex similarity transformation,may be viewed as the channel wave equivalent of real rotation algorithms currently employed for use with body waves. The analysis is illustrated by application to field data from an in-seam seismic survey in the U.K. displaying a dominant second generalized mode (Love-type motion). A favorable comparison is made between the observed and synthetic eigenmode dispersion, and the polarization ellipticity, sense of rotation and orientation.

  11. Design of Multi-Component Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jieping; Kaïm, Laurent El; Tron, Gian Cesare; Lavilla, Rodolfo; Banfi, Luca; Basso, Andrea; Cerulli, Valentina; Guanti, Giuseppe; Lecinska, Paulina; Riva, Renata; Arévalo, M. J.; Kielland, N.; Masdeu, C.; Miguel, M.; Isambert, N.; Lavilla, R.; Medvedeva, Alevtina S.; Novokshonov, Vladimir V.; Novokshonova, Irina A.; Demina, Maria M.; Kon'kova, Tatyana V.; Shklyaev, Yurii V.; Rozhkova, Yulia S.; Vshivkova, Tatiana S.; Stryapunina, Olga G.; Glushkov, Vladimir A.; Kharitonova, Anastasia V.; Fisyuk, Alexander S.; Mukanov, Aleksey Y.; Poendaev, Nicolay V.; Gulevich, Anton V.; Nenajdenko, Valentine G.; Ivantsova, Maria N.; Tokareva, Maria I.; Mironov, Maxim A.; Mokrushin, Vladimir S.; Pirali, Tracey; Tron, Gian Cesare; Zhu, Jieping; Rozentsveig, Igor B.; Popov, Aleksandr V.; Levkovskaya, Galina G.; Chernyshev, Kirill A.; Krivdin, Leonid B.; Tomilov, Yury V.; Platonov, Dmitry N.; Rulev, Alexander Y.; Ushakov, Igor A.; Vorobyeva, Alexandra; Ilyin, Alexey; Kysil, Volodimir; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre

    Multi-component reactions (MCRs) have now been well established as a powerful synthetic tool for creating molecular complexity and diversity and are undoubtedly well suited for the drug discovery program. Another potential that has probably received less attention among synthetic chemists is the opportunity offered by MCRs for the development of new fundamentally important transformations (reactions). Indeed, although an MCR is composed of a series of known bimolecular reactions, the overall transformation could be novel. Consequently, it provides chemists the opportunities to uncover transformations that were otherwise difficult to realize. In this talk, we will present our recent work in this field, including: (1) the oxidative homologation of aldehydes to amides, (2) the oxidative coupling of aldehydes and isocyanides to α-ketoamides, (3) oxidative isocyanide-based MCRs, and (4) the enantioselective Passerini reaction.

  12. Determination of Stability from Multicomponent Pesticide Mixes.

    PubMed

    Dorweiler, Kelly J; Gurav, Jagdish N; Walbridge, James S; Ghatge, Vishwas S; Savant, Rahul H

    2016-08-10

    A study was conducted to evaluate the stability of 528 pesticides, metabolites, and contaminants prepared in large multicomponent mixes to enhance laboratory efficiency by allowing maximum use of the useful shelf life of the mixtures. Accelerated aging at 50 °C simulated 6 month, 1 year, and 2 year storage periods at -20 °C. Initial mixture composition was based on the instrument of analysis. After preliminary stability data had been obtained, mixtures were reformulated and re-evaluated. In all, 344 compounds showed satisfactory stability across all treatment groups, 100 compounds showed statistically significant changes between the control and the 6 month simulated storage period (27 with losses >20%), and the remainder showed borderline stability or were tested in one protocol. Stability behavior for organophosphates agreed with the proposed reaction mechanism responsible for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. A small number of compounds increased in response over time, suggesting the occurrence of degradation of precursor pesticides into these respective compounds. PMID:26937779

  13. Chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, R C; Montie, T C

    1979-01-01

    Chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa RM46 has been studied, and conditions required for chemotaxis have been defined, by using the Adler capillary assay technique. Several amino acids, organic acids, and glucose were shown to be attractants of varying effectiveness for this organism. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was absolutely required for chemotaxis, and magnesium was also necessary for a maximum response. Serine taxis was greatest when the chemotaxis medium contained 1.5 X 10(-5) M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 0.005 M magnesium chloride. It was not necessary to include methionine in the chemotaxis medium. The strength of the chemotactic responses to glucose and to citrate was dependent on prior growth of the bacteria on glucose and citrate, respectively. Accumulation in response to serine was inhibited by the addition of succinate, citrate, malate, glucose, pyruvate, or methionine to the chemotaxis medium. Inhibition by succinate was not dependent on the concentration of attractant in the capillary. However, the degree to which glucose and citrate inhibited serine taxis was dependent on the carbon source utilized for growth. Further investigation of this inhibition may provide information about the mechanisms of chemotaxis in P. aeruginosa. PMID:104961

  14. Characterization and Optimization Multiscale and Multicomponent Nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    Materials with new combinations of properties are increasingly needed to meet the requirements of energy, transportation, and medical applications. The use of multi-component systems, with potentially complementary properties, represent a unique path to improve materials properties for a variety of applications. Among the most interesting applications of these materials is in the development of contrast agents in biological imaging and dynamic sensing applications. Although a variety of techniques to characterize these materials exist, noninvasive characterization methods, such as optical-based techniques, are ideal for studying these materials in their native states and for monitoring dynamic changes. The proposition becomes even more attractive when at least one of the components carries an optical signature.The use of optoacoustic (OA) is an emerging technology based on studying optically absorbing nano and microstructures in the sample by recording transit pressure waves generated from laser-induced thermal expansion. More recently OA has been developed as a vibrant technology for medical applications and some growing applications is for material characterization in research and industrial applications. Specifically, OA can assist in the characterization and optimization of composite materials containing nanoparticles when paired with other characterization techniques. The present work illustrates an overview of select hybrid nanomaterials, including their unique optoacoustic signatures utilizing an all optical OA technique. The results of this work show that optical based techniques such as OA, provide a noninvasive, nondestructive means to study multi-material, multi-scale, multi-functional materials are important in the development of novel multi-component nanomaterial schemes and elucidating the structure-function relationship in these materials.

  15. Simulations of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    A paper presents additional information on the subject matter of Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops (NPO-30505), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 55. To recapitulate: A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The model is used to perform direct numerical simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behaviors of sprays of liquid petroleum fuels in furnaces, industrial combustors, and engines. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and drops, respectively, and incorporates a concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described by use of a distribution function. In this investigation, the distribution function depends solely on the species molar weight. The present paper reiterates the description of the model and discusses further in-depth analysis of the previous results as well as results of additional numerical simulations assessing the effect of the mass loading. The paper reiterates the conclusions reported in the cited previous article, and states some new conclusions. Some new conclusions are: 1. The slower evaporation and the evaporation/ condensation process for multicomponent-fuel drops resulted in a reduced drop-size polydispersity compared to their single-component counterpart. 2. The inhomogeneity in the spatial distribution of the species in the layer increases with the initial mass loading. 3. As evaporation becomes faster, the assumed invariant form of the molecular- weight distribution during evaporation becomes inaccurate.

  16. Diversity of soluble methane monooxygenase-containing methanotrophs isolated from polluted environments.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ian R; Miguez, Carlos B; Rogge, Gerlinde; Bourque, Denis; Wendlandt, Karin D; Groleau, Denis; Murrell, J Colin

    2006-02-01

    Methanotrophs were enriched and isolated from polluted environments in Canada and Germany. Enrichments in low copper media were designed to specifically encourage growth of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) containing organisms. The 10 isolates were characterized physiologically and genetically with one type I and nine type II methanotrophs being identified. Three key genes: 16S rRNA; pmoA and mmoX, encoding for the particulate and soluble methane monooxygenases respectively, were cloned from the isolates and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences identified strains, which were closely related to Methylococcus capsulatus, Methylocystis sp., Methylosinus sporium and Methylosinus trichosporium. Diversity of sMMO-containing methanotrophs detected in this and previous studies was rather narrow, both genetically and physiologically, suggesting possible constraints on genetic diversity of sMMO due to essential conservation of enzyme function. PMID:16448499

  17. Modelling of micro- and macrosegregation for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, K.; Mortensen, D.; M'Hamdi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Realistic predictions of macrosegregation formation during casting of aluminium alloys requires an accurate modeling of solute microsegregation accounting for multicomponent phase diagrams and secondary phase formation. In the present work, the stand alone Alstruc model, a microsegregation model for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys, is coupled with the continuum model ALSIM which calculates the macroscopic transport of mass, enthalpy, momentum, and solutes as well as stresses and deformation during solidification of aluminium. Alstruc deals with multicomponent alloys accounting for temperature dependent partition coefficients, liquidus slopes and the precipitation of secondary phases. The challenge associated with computation of microsegregation for multicomponent alloys is solved in Alstruc by approximating the phase diagram data by simple, analytical expressions which allows for a CPU-time efficient coupling with the macroscopic transport model. In the present work, the coupled model has been applied in a study of macrosegregation including thermal and solutal convection, solidification shrinkage and surface exudation on an industrial DC-cast billet.

  18. A METHOD FOR COMPARING MULTICOMPONENT, MULTIMEDIA POLLUTION ABATEMENT PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a comparison of the cost-effectiveness of four multicomponent, multimedia pollution abatement options: coal cleaning, limestone, limestone plus adipic acid, and coal cleaning plus limestone plus adipic acid. The comparison makes cost-effectiveness evaluations ...

  19. MPH: A library for distributed multi-component environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Chris H.Q.; He, Yun

    2001-06-01

    Many current large and complex HPC applications are based on semi-independent program components developed by different groups or for different purposes. On distributed memory parallel supercomputers, how to perform component-name registration and initialize communications between independent components are among the first critical steps in establishing a distributed multi-component environment. Here we describe MPH, a multi-component handshaking library that resolves these tasks in a convenient and consistent way. MPH uses MPI for high performance and supports many PVM functionality. It supports two major parallel integration mechanism: multi-component multi-executable (MCME) and multi-component single-executable (MCME). It is a simple, easy-to-use module for developing practical codes, or as basis for larger software tools/frameworks.

  20. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  1. Induction of cytochrome P450 1A1 and monooxygenase activity in Tilapia by sediment extract

    SciTech Connect

    Ueng, Y.F.; Ueng, T.H.; Liu, T.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent monooxygenases of fishes are inducible by a variety of environmental pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Induction of fish monoxygenases may serve as a biological monitor for PAH- and PCB-types of environmental chemicals. Many studies have demonstrated environmental induction of fish monooxygenases using various experimental approaches. However, relatively few studies have been conducted using fish treated with contaminated river sediment extracts. Damsui River is the largest river in the north of Taiwan. The lower section of the river in the Taipei Metropolitan area is heavily polluted by industrial and municipal wastes. Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) is one of the few species of fish that occur in the polluted river. Previous field studies showed that the levels of P450 1A1, benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities in tilapia collected at Fu-Ho Bridge, a polluted section of Damsui River, were higher than respective levels in fish collected from an unpolluted section. These results suggested that tilapia caught at the polluted site were exposed to substances similar in action to PAHs and PCBs, because these chemical pollutants are potent inducers of P450 1A1. PAHs and PCBs are persistent compounds that can accumulate in sediment. Tilapia are occasionally associated with the bottom and could ingest chemically contaminated sediment. In the present study, we determined the induction properties of monooxygenases using tilapia treated with extract of sediment collected from a polluted section of Damsui River. The present study demonstrates that Damsui River sediment extract has the ability to induce hepatic P450 1A1 and dependent monooxygenase activities in tilapia. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Factors limiting aliphatic chlorocarbon degradation by Nitrosomonas europaea: Cometabolic inactivation of ammonia monooxygenase and substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, M.E.; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The soil nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea is capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated hydrocarbons. TCE cometabolism by N. europaea resulted in an irreversible loss of TCE biodegradative capacity, ammonia-oxidizing activity, and ammonia-dependent O{sub 2} uptake by the cells. Inactivation was not observed in the presence of allylthiourea, a specific inhibitor of enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, or under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the TCE-mediated inactivation required ammonia monooxygenase activity. When N. europaea cells were incubated with ({sup 14}C)TCE under conditions which allowed turnover of ammonia monooxygenase, a number of cellular proteins were covalently labeled with {sup 14}C. Treatment of cells with allylthiourea or acetylene prior to incubation with ({sup 14}C)TCE prevented incorporation of {sup 14}C into proteins. The ammonia-oxidizing activity of cells inactivated in the presence of TCE could be recovered through a process requiring de novo protein synthesis. In addition to TCE, a series of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, and other ethylenes were screened as substrates for ammonia monooxygenase and for their ability to inactivate the ammonia-oxidizing system of N. europaea. The chlorocarbons would be divided into three classes depending on their biodegradability and inactivating potential: (1) compounds which were not biodegradable by N. europaea and which had no toxic effect on the cells (2) compounds which were cooxidized by N. europaea and had little or no toxic effect on the cells; and (3) compounds which were cooxidized and produced a turnover-dependent inactivation of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea.

  3. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePlus

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  4. Multicomponent reactions: A simple and efficient route to heterocyclic phosphonates.

    PubMed

    Haji, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) are one of the most important processes for the preparation of highly functionalized organic compounds in modern synthetic chemistry. As shown in this review, they play an important role in organophosphorus chemistry where phosphorus reagents are used as substrates for the synthesis of a wide range of phosphorylated heterocycles. In this article, an overview about multicomponent reactions used for the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds bearing a phosphonate group on the ring is given. PMID:27559377

  5. Modulated decay in the multi-component Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Seishi; Kohri, Kazunori; Matsuda, Tomohiro E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp

    2013-08-01

    The early Universe after inflation may have oscillations, kinations (nonoscillatory evolution of a field), topological defects, relativistic and non-relativistic particles at the same time. The Universe whose energy density is a sum of those components can be called the multi-component Universe. The components, which may have distinguishable density scalings, may decay modulated. In this paper we study generation of the curvature perturbations caused by the modulated decay in the multi-component Universe.

  6. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers in presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  7. Multicomponent reactions: A simple and efficient route to heterocyclic phosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) are one of the most important processes for the preparation of highly functionalized organic compounds in modern synthetic chemistry. As shown in this review, they play an important role in organophosphorus chemistry where phosphorus reagents are used as substrates for the synthesis of a wide range of phosphorylated heterocycles. In this article, an overview about multicomponent reactions used for the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds bearing a phosphonate group on the ring is given. PMID:27559377

  8. Catalytic residues and a predicted structure of tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Watschinger, Katrin; Fuchs, Julian E.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Keller, Markus A.; Golderer, Georg; Hermetter, Albin; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Hulo, Nicolas; Werner, Ernst R.

    2012-01-01

    Alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase (EC 1.14.16.5) forms a third, distinct, class among tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes in addition to aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. Its protein sequence contains the fatty acid hydroxylase motif, a signature indicative of a di-iron centre, which contains eight conserved histidine residues. Membrane enzymes containing this motif, including alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase, are especially labile and so far have not been purified to homogeneity in active form. To obtain a first insight into structure–function relationships of this enzyme, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 26 selected amino acid residues and expressed wild-type and mutant proteins containing a C-terminal Myc tag together with fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in Chinese-hamster ovary cells. Among all of the acidic residues within the eight-histidine motif, only mutation of Glu137 to alanine led to an 18-fold increase in the Michaelis–Menten constant for tetrahydrobiopterin, suggesting a role in tetrahydrobiopterin interaction. A ninth additional histidine residue essential for activity was also identified. Nine membrane domains were predicted by four programs: ESKW, TMHMM, MEMSAT and Phobius. Prediction of a part of the structure using the Rosetta membrane ab initio method led to a plausible suggestion for a structure of the catalytic site of alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase. PMID:22220568

  9. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  10. Kinetic evidence for an anion binding pocket in the active site of nitronate monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Francis, Kevin; Gadda, Giovanni

    2009-10-01

    A series of monovalent, inorganic anions and aliphatic aldehydes were tested as inhibitors for Hansenula mrakii and Neurospora crassa nitronate monooxygenase, formerly known as 2-nitropropane dioxygenase, to investigate the structural features that contribute to the binding of the anionic nitronate substrates to the enzymes. A linear correlation between the volumes of the inorganic anions and their effectiveness as competitive inhibitors of the enzymes was observed in a plot of pK(is)versus the ionic volume of the anion with slopes of 0.041+/-0.001 mM/A(3) and 0.027+/-0.001 mM/A(3) for the H. mrakii and N. crassa enzymes, respectively. Aliphatic aldehydes were weak competitive inhibitors of the enzymes, with inhibition constants that are independent of their alkyl chain lengths. The reductive half reactions of H. mrakii nitronate monooxygenase with primary nitronates containing two to four carbon atoms all showed apparent K(d) values of approximately 5 mM. These results are consistent with the presence of an anion binding pocket in the active site of nitronate monooxygenase that interacts with the nitro group of the substrate, and suggest a minimal contribution of the hydrocarbon chain of the nitronates to the binding of the ligands to the enzyme. PMID:19683782

  11. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of the Corynebacterium glutamicum nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase component A

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Lee, Sujin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee

    2006-11-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum NTA monooxygenase component A protein, which plays the central role in NTA biodegradation, was crystallized. The initial X-ray crystallographic characterization is reported. Safety and environmental concerns have recently dictated the proper disposal of nitrilotriacetate (NTA). Biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase, which is composed of two proteins: component A and component B. The NTA monooxygenase component A protein from Corynebacterium glutamicum was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.04, b = 98.51, c = 171.61 Å, β = 101.94°. The asymmetric unit consists of four molecules, corresponding to a packing density of 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. Structure refinement is in progress.

  12. Catalytic residues and a predicted structure of tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Fuchs, Julian E; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Keller, Markus A; Golderer, Georg; Hermetter, Albin; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Hulo, Nicolas; Werner, Ernst R

    2012-04-01

    Alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase (EC 1.14.16.5) forms a third, distinct, class among tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes in addition to aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. Its protein sequence contains the fatty acid hydroxylase motif, a signature indicative of a di-iron centre, which contains eight conserved histidine residues. Membrane enzymes containing this motif, including alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase, are especially labile and so far have not been purified to homogeneity in active form. To obtain a first insight into structure-function relationships of this enzyme, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 26 selected amino acid residues and expressed wild-type and mutant proteins containing a C-terminal Myc tag together with fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase in Chinese-hamster ovary cells. Among all of the acidic residues within the eight-histidine motif, only mutation of Glu137 to alanine led to an 18-fold increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for tetrahydrobiopterin, suggesting a role in tetrahydrobiopterin interaction. A ninth additional histidine residue essential for activity was also identified. Nine membrane domains were predicted by four programs: ESKW, TMHMM, MEMSAT and Phobius. Prediction of a part of the structure using the Rosetta membrane ab initio method led to a plausible suggestion for a structure of the catalytic site of alkylglycerol mono-oxygenase. PMID:22220568

  13. Glucosinolate Biosynthesis (Further Characterization of the Aldoxime-Forming Microsomal Monooxygenases in Oilseed Rape Leaves).

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, R. N.; Hick, A. J.; Dawson, G. W.; Wallsgrove, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The initial steps in glucosinolate biosynthesis are thought to proceed from amino acids, via N-hydroxy amino acids, to aldoximes. We showed previously that microsomes from green leaves of oilseed rape (Brassica napus cv Bienvenu) contain two distinct monooxygenases that catalyze the conversion of homophenylalanine and dihomomethionine to their respective aldoximes. Further characterization of these enzymes has now demonstrated that the latter enzyme catalyzes the NADPH-dependent oxidative decarboxylation of two higher homologs of methionine, in addition to dihomomethionine. No activity was found for either enzyme with L-methionine, DL-homomethionine, L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, or L-tryptophan. Both of these rape monooxygenase activities are dependent on O2, not requiring any other O2 species or radical. The presence of an unoxidized sulfur atom and its relative position in the side chain of the aliphatic substrates are important for binding to the active site of the methionine-homolog enzyme. Neither enzyme has any characteristics of a cytochrome P450-type enzyme, and antiserum raised against cytochrome P450 reductase did not significantly inhibit monooxygenase activity. PMID:12228596

  14. Crystal structure of a phenol-coupling P450 monooxygenase involved in teicoplanin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G.; Schuler, Mary A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2012-02-08

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin has proven efficacy against gram-positive pathogens. Teicoplanin is distinguished from the vancomycin-type glycopeptide antibiotics, by the presence of an additional cross-link between the aromatic amino acids 1 and 3 that is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase Orf6* (CYP165D3). As a goal towards understanding the mechanism of this phenol-coupling reaction, we have characterized recombinant Orf6* and determined its crystal structure to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution. Although the structure of Orf6* reveals the core fold common to other P450 monooxygenases, there are subtle differences in the disposition of secondary structure elements near the active site cavity necessary to accommodate its complex heptapeptide substrate. Specifically, the orientation of the F and G helices in Orf6* results in a more closed active site than found in the vancomycin oxidative enzymes OxyB and OxyC. In addition, Met226 in the I helix replaces the more typical Gly/Ala residue that is positioned above the heme porphyrin ring, where it forms a hydrogen bond with a heme iron-bound water molecule. Sequence comparisons with other phenol-coupling P450 monooxygenases suggest that Met226 plays a role in determining the substrate regiospecificity of Orf6*. These features provide further insights into the mechanism of the cross-linking mechanisms that occur during glycopeptide antibiotics biosynthesis.

  15. Inducible Monooxygenase Activities and 3-Methylcholanthrene-Initiated Tumorigenesis in Mouse Recombinant Inbred Sublines

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Steven A.; Taylor, Benjamin A.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Nebert, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    The induction of a certain group of hepatic monooxygenase activities by polycyclic aromatic compounds is regulated by the same locus or gene cluster controlling the formation of cytochrome P1–450 (P–448) in mice. Certain inbred strains of mice are "responsive" (Ahb) to such induction, whereas others are "nonresponsive" (Ahd). A pair of closely related sublines that differ with respect to the Ah locus (for aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness) were used to identify or confirm the pleiotropic effects of this gene. The lines were derived by sibling-mating without selection from (C57L/J x AKR/J)F 2 mice; the two sublines were separated at the F12 generation. Ten microsomal monooxygenase activities and one cytosol enzyme activity known to be associated with the Ah locus were similarly associated with cytochrome P1–450 formation in these recombinant inbred sublines as well. Nine additional hepatic monooxygenase activities studied were found not to be associated with the Ah locus; certain of these activities were increased slightly, following treatment of nonresponsive as well as responsive mice with polycyclic aromatic compounds. The Ahb-containing subline was highly susceptible to 3-methylcholanthrene-induced subcutaneous sarcomas, whereas the Ah-d-containing subline was relatively resistant. These results emphasize the potential importance of this particular enzyme for the study of coordinated regulation in mammals. PMID:955403

  16. Quantitative surface spectroscopic analysis of multicomponent polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Hengzhong

    Angle-dependent electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) has been successfully used to examine the surface compositional gradient of a multicomponent polymer. However, photoelectron intensities detected at each take-off angle of ESCA measurements are convoluted signals. The convoluted nature of the signal distorts depth profiles for samples having compositional gradients. To recover the true concentration profiles for the samples, a deconvolution program has been described in Chapter 2. The compositional profiles of two classes of important multicomponent polymers, i.e., poly(dimethysiloxane urethane) (PU-DMS) segmented copolymers and fluorinated poly(amide urethane) block copolymers, are achieved using this program. The effects of the polymer molecular structure and the processing variation on its surface compositional profile have been studied. Besides surface composition, it is desirable to know whether the distribution of segment or block lengths at the surface is different than in the bulk, because this aspect of surface structure may lead to properties different than that predicted simply by knowledge of the surface composition and the bulk structure. In Chapter 3, we pioneered the direct determination of the distribution of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) segment lengths at the surface of PU-DMS using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (SUMS). Exciting preliminary results are provided: for the thick film of PU-DMS with nominal MW of PDMS = 1000, the distribution of the PDMS segment lengths at the surface is nearly identical to that in the bulk, whereas in the case of the thick films of PU-DMS with nominal MW of PDMS = 2400, only those PDMS segments with MW of ca. 1000 preferentially segregated at the surface. As a potential minimal fouling coating or biocompatible cardio-vascular materials, PU-DMS copolymers eventually come into contact with water once in use. Could such an environmental change (from air to aqueous) induce any undesirable

  17. Expression of L-ornithine Ndelta-oxygenase (PvdA) in fluorescent Pseudomonas species: an immunochemical and in silico study.

    PubMed

    Putignani, Lorenza; Ambrosi, Cecilia; Ascenzi, Paolo; Visca, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Omega-amino acid monooxygenases (EC 1.14.13.-), catalysing the formation of hydroxamate precursors of microbial siderophores (e.g., pyoverdine), have so far eluded structural and biochemical characterisation. Here, the expression of recombinant L-ornithine-Ndelta-oxygenase (PvdA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is reported. A library of eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against PvdA has been generated. Two MAb families recognising the N- and C-terminal regions of PvdA were identified. The MAbs made it possible to demonstrate that 45-48 kDa PvdA homologues are expressed in response to iron limitation by different species and strains of fluorescent pseudomonads. Despite the different degrees in sequence similarity between P. aeruginosa PvdA and putative homologues from Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas syringae, Burkholderia cepacia, and Ralstonia solanacearum, in silico domain scanning predicts an impressive conservation of putative cofactor and substrate binding domains. The MAb library was also used to monitor PvdA expression during the transition of P. aeruginosa from iron-sufficient to iron-deficient growth. PMID:14684153

  18. Principles of Transport in Multicomponent Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Franklin, Raoul N.; Demidov, Vladimir I.

    The main principles of transport in multicomponent plasmas are described. Because the bulk plasma is charged positively to keep electrons together with positive ions, negative ions are confined by electrostatic fields inside the plasma and they flow from the plasma periphery toward the center. It is shown that the flow velocity of negative ions is a nonlinear function of the negative ion density. Increasing the negative ion density makes the electron density profile flatter and leads to a decrease of the electric field. Such a nonlinear dependence of the negative ion flow velocity on their density results in the formation of steep gradients of negative ion density, or negative ion fronts. Addition of negative ions makes the plasma afterglow a complex process as well. Typically, two stages of afterglow appear. In the first stage, the negative ions are trapped inside the plasma and only electrons and positive ions can reach the walls. However, at a later time, electrons quickly leave the plasma, and the second stage of afterglow begins, in which electrons are totally absent and an ion-ion plasma forms. During this stage, only the negative and positive ions contribute to the wall fluxes. The complex structure of the radio frequency sheath in strongly electronegative gases is also reviewed. Similar phenomena are observed in dusty plasmas. A possible relevance to ball lightning is discussed.

  19. An evaporation model of multicomponent solution drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Silvana; Liñán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2010-11-01

    Solutions of polymers are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as tablets coatings. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or appearance. The coating is performed by spraying and drying the tablets at moderate temperatures. The wetting of the coating solution on the pill's surface depends on the droplet Webber and Re numbers, angle of impact and on the rheological properties of the droplet. We present a model for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions droplets in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the solvent. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface the fluid in the drop increases in concentration, until reaching its saturation point. After saturation, precipitation occurs uniformly within the drop. As the surface regresses, a compacting front formed by the precipitate at its maximum packing density advances into the drop, while the solute continues precipitating uniformly. This porous shell grows fast due to the double effect of surface regression and precipitation. The evaporation rate is determined by the rates at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and at which liquid vapor diffuses away from it. When the drop is fully compacted, the evaporation is drastically reduced.

  20. Ti Multicomponent Alloy Bulks by Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kuibao; Wen, Guanjun; Dai, Hongchuan; Teng, Yuancheng; Li, Yuxiang

    2014-10-01

    In this study, CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti multicomponent alloy bulks were prepared by powder metallurgy of mechanical alloying and sintering. A simple body-centered cubic (bcc) solid solution was prepared after 40 h ball milling of the raw CrCuFeMnMo0.5Ti metallic powder. Particles of the alloyed powder are in microsized structures, which are actually a soft agglomeration of lamellar grains with thicknesses less than 1 μm. Meanwhile, the lamellar granules are consisted of nanosized grains under rigid cold welding. The 80-h ball-milled powder was consolidated by cold pressing and subsequent sintering at 800°C. The observed main phase in the consolidated sample after milling for 80 h is still a bcc solid solution. The solidified sample of 80-h ball-milled powder exhibits a Vickers hardness of 468 HV, which is much higher than 171 HV of the counterpart prepared from the raw metallic powder.

  1. Mineral Selection for Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Plamer, C. D.; Ohly, S. R.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, G.; McLing, T.; Mattson, E.

    2015-04-01

    Multicomponent geothermometry requires knowledge of the mineral phases in the reservoir with which the geothermal fluids may be equilibrated. These minerals phases are most often alteration products rather than primary minerals. We have reviewed the literature on geothermal systems representing most major geologic environments typically associated with geothermal activity and identified potential alteration products in various environments. We have included this information in RTEst, a code we have developed to estimate reservoir conditions (temperature, CO2 fugacity) from the geochemistry of near-surface geothermal waters. The information has been included in RTEst through the addition of filters that decrease the potential numbermore » of minerals from all possibilities based on the basis species to those that are more relevant to the particular conditions in which the user is interested. The three groups of filters include host rock type (tholeiitic, calc-alkaline, silicic, siliciclastic, carbonate), water type (acidic, neutral), and the temperature range over which the alteration minerals were formed (low, medium, high). The user-chosen mineral assemblage is checked to make sure that it does not violate the Gibbs phase rule. The user can select one of three mineral saturation weighting schemes that decrease the chance the optimization from being skewed by reaction stoichiometry or analytical uncertainty.« less

  2. Mineral Selection for Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Plamer, C. D.; Ohly, S. R.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, G.; McLing, T.; Mattson, E.

    2015-04-01

    Multicomponent geothermometry requires knowledge of the mineral phases in the reservoir with which the geothermal fluids may be equilibrated. These minerals phases are most often alteration products rather than primary minerals. We have reviewed the literature on geothermal systems representing most major geologic environments typically associated with geothermal activity and identified potential alteration products in various environments. We have included this information in RTEst, a code we have developed to estimate reservoir conditions (temperature, CO2 fugacity) from the geochemistry of near-surface geothermal waters. The information has been included in RTEst through the addition of filters that decrease the potential number of minerals from all possibilities based on the basis species to those that are more relevant to the particular conditions in which the user is interested. The three groups of filters include host rock type (tholeiitic, calc-alkaline, silicic, siliciclastic, carbonate), water type (acidic, neutral), and the temperature range over which the alteration minerals were formed (low, medium, high). The user-chosen mineral assemblage is checked to make sure that it does not violate the Gibbs phase rule. The user can select one of three mineral saturation weighting schemes that decrease the chance the optimization from being skewed by reaction stoichiometry or analytical uncertainty.

  3. Multicomponent assessment and treatment of cigarette pica.

    PubMed Central

    Goh, H L; Iwata, B A; Kahng, S W

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a multicomponent assessment and treatment for 4 individuals who engaged in cigarette pica. During Phase 1, three stimulus preference assessments were conducted to identify (a) the reinforcing component of the cigarette, (b) potential alternative reinforcers that may be used during treatment, and (c) whether the alternative reinforcer would compete effectively with cigarettes. Results were successful in identifying the reinforcing component of the cigarette and suggested the feasibility of using alternative reinforcers during treatment to eliminate cigarette pica. During Phase 2, the effects of two treatment procedures were evaluated. Noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) with the alternative edible reinforcer reduced the pica of 2 of the participants, but effects were not maintained when the initial dense schedule of NCR was thinned. Subsequently, differential reinforcement of alternative behavior with the alternative edible reinforcer was effective in reducing pica for 3 participants. An evaluation of nine treatment procedures failed to identify an effective intervention for the remaining participant; consequently, preventive measures were designed to minimize occurrences of cigarette pica. PMID:10513026

  4. Single Pass Multi-component Harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Reed Hoskinson; J. Richard Hess

    2004-08-01

    Abstract. In order to meet the U. S. government’s goal of supplementing the energy available from petroleum by increasing the production of energy from renewable resources, increased production of bioenergy has become one of the new goals of the United States government and our society. U.S. Executive Orders and new Federal Legislation have mandated changes in government procedures and caused reorganizations within the government to support these goals. The Biomass Research and Development Initiative is a multi-agency effort to coordinate and accelerate all U.S. Federal biobased products and bioenergy research and development. The Initiative is managed by the National Biomass Coordination Office, which is staffed by both the DOE and the USDA. One of the most readily available sources of biomass from which to produce bioenergy is an agricultural crop residue, of which straw from small grains is the most feasible residue with which to start. For the straw residue to be used its collection must be energy efficient and its removal must not impact the sustainability of the growing environment. In addition, its collection must be economically advantageous to the producer. To do all that, a single pass multi-component harvester system is most desirable. Results from our first prototype suggest that current combines probably do adequate threshing and that a separate chassis can be developed that does additional separation and that is economically feasible.

  5. Efficient hydroxylation of 1,8-cineole with monoterpenoid-resistant recombinant Pseudomonas putida GS1.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia; Schewe, Hendrik; Buchhaupt, Markus; Holtmann, Dirk; Schrader, Jens

    2016-07-01

    In this work, monoterpenoid hydroxylation with Pseudomonas putida GS1 and KT2440 were investigated as host strains, and the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP176A1 (P450cin) and its native redox partner cindoxin (CinC) from Citrobacter braakii were introduced in P. putida to catalyze the stereoselective hydroxylation of 1,8-cineole to (1R)-6β-hydroxy-1,8-cineole. Growth experiments in the presence of 1,8-cineole confirmed pseudomonads' superior resilience compared to E. coli. Whole-cell P. putida harboring P450cin with and without CinC were capable of hydroxylating 1,8-cineole, whereas coexpression of CinC has been shown to accelerate this bioconversion. Under the same conditions, P. putida GS1 produced more than twice the amount of heterologous P450cin and bioconversion product than P. putida KT2440. A concentration of 1.1 ± 0.1 g/L (1R)-6β-hydroxy-1,8-cineole was obtained within 55 h in shake flasks and 13.3 ± 1.9 g/L in 89 h in a bioreactor, the latter of which corresponds to a yield YP/S of 79 %. To the authors' knowledge, this is the highest product titer for a P450 based whole-cell monoterpene oxyfunctionalization reported so far. These results show that solvent-tolerant P. putida GS1 can be used as a highly efficient recombinant whole-cell biocatalyst for a P450 monooxygenase-based valorization of monoterpenoids. PMID:27263007

  6. MPH: A Library for Distributed Multi-Component Environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-01

    A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflops compyters is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. We develop MPH, a multi-component handshaking library that allows component models recognize and talk to each other in a convenient and consisten way, thus to run multi-component ulti-executable applications effectively on distributed memory architectures. MPH provides the following capabilities: component name registration, resource allocation, inter-component communication, inquiry on themore » multi-component environment, standard in/out redirect. It supports the following four integration mechanisms: Multi-Component Single-Executable (MCSE); Single-Component Multi-Executable (SCME); Multi-Component Multi-Executable (MCME); Multi-instance Multi-Executable (MIME). MPH currently works on IBM SP, SGI Origin, Compaq AlphaSC, Cray T3E, and PC clusters. It is being adopted in NCAR's CCSM and Colorado State University's icosahedra grid coupled model. A joint communicator between any two components could be created. MPI communication between local processors and remote processors are invoked through component names and the local id. More functions are available to inquire the global-id, local-id, number of executales, etc.« less

  7. Amine-phenyl multi-component gradient stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Dewoolkar, Veeren C; Kannan, Balamurali; Ashraf, Kayesh M; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2015-09-01

    Continuous multi-component gradients in amine and phenyl groups were fabricated using controlled rate infusion (CRI). Solutions prepared from either 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTEOS) or phenyltrimethoxysilane (PTMOS) were infused, in a sequential fashion, at a controlled rate into an empty graduated cylinder housing a vertically aligned thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate. The hydrolyzed precursors reacted with an abundance of silanol (SiOH) groups on the TLC plates, covalently attaching the functionalized silane to its surface. The extent of modification by phenyl and amine was determined by the kinetics of each reaction and the exposure time at each point along the TLC plate. The local concentrations of phenyl and amine were measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The profile of the multi-component gradients strongly depended on the order of infusion, the direction of the gradient and the presence of available surface silanol groups. A slightly higher amount of phenyl can be deposited on the TLC plate by first modifying its surface with amine groups as they serve as a catalyst, enhancing condensation. Separation of water- and fat-soluble vitamins and the control of retention factors were demonstrated on the multi-component gradient TLC plates. Uniformly modified and single-component TLC plates gave different separations compared to the multi-component gradient plates. The retention factors of the individual vitamins depended on the order of surface modification, the spotting end, and whether the multi-component gradients align or oppose each other. PMID:26255112

  8. [New Virulent Bacteriophages Active against Multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains].

    PubMed

    Balarjishvili, N Sh; Kvachadze, L I; Kutateladze, M I; Meskhi, T Sh; Pataridze, T K; Berishvili, T A; Tevdoradze, E Sh

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity of 512 newly isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical strains to six classes of anti-microbial preparations has been studied. Antibiotic-resistant strains were selected and genotyped. Three new virulent bacteriophages of the families Myoviridae and Podoviridae were isolated against these strains. The parameters of the intracellular phage development cycle were established, and the influence of inactivating factors (temperature, pH, and UV exposure) on phage viability was studied. The molecular weight of the phage genome was determined. Phage DNA restriction analysis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of envelope protein SDS were carried out. The plating efficacy of phages on 28 genetically distant antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa strains was studied. It was established that 26 of them were lysed by phages with a high efficacy. The range of antibacterial action of the studied phages and their mixtures on 427 multi-drug-resistant clinical isolates was assessed. It is shown that including these phages in one multicomponent preparation enhanced their lytic activity. PMID:26859962

  9. Cyclic Peptidomimetics and Pseudopeptides from Multicomponent Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessjohann, Ludger A.; Rhoden, Cristiano R. B.; Rivera, Daniel G.; Vercillo, Otilie Eichler

    Multicomponent reactions (MCRs) that provide in the final product amides are suitable to produce peptides and peptide-like moieties. The Passerini and Staudinger reactions provide one amide bond, and the Ugi-four-component reaction generates two amides from three or even four (or more) components, respectively. The Ugi-reaction thus is most important to produce peptides and peptoids while the Passerini reaction is useful to generate depsipeptoid moieties. In order to produce cyclic peptides and pseudopeptides, the linear peptidic MCR products have to be cyclized, usually with the help of bifunctional or activatable building blocks. Orthogonal but cyclizable secondary functionalities that need no protection in isonitrile MCRs commonly include alkenes (for ring closing metathesis), azide/alkyne (for Huisgen click reactions) or dienes and enoates (Diels-Alder) etc. If MCR-reactive groups are to be used also for the cyclisation, monoprotected bifunctional building blocks are used and deprotected after the MCR, e.g. for Ugi reactions as Ugi-Deprotection-Cyclisation (UDC). Alternatively one of the former building blocks or functional groups generated by the MCR can be activated. Most commonly these are activated amides (from so-called convertible isonitriles) which can be used e.g. for Ugi-Activation-Cyclisation (UAC) protocols, or most recently for a simultaneous use of both strategies Ugi-Deprotection/Activation-Cyclisation (UDAC). These methods mostly lead to small, medicinally relevant peptide turn mimics. In an opposing strategy, the MCR is rather used as ring-closing reaction, thereby introducing a (di-)peptide moiety. Most recently these processes have been combined to use MCRs for both, linear precursor synthesis and cyclisation. These multiple MCR approaches allow the most efficient and versatile one pot synthesis of macrocyclic pseudopeptides known to date.

  10. Engineering of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase-based Escherichia coli biocatalyst for large scale biotransformation of ricinoleic acid into (Z)-11-(heptanoyloxy)undec-9-enoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Hwan-Hee; Jeon, Eun-Yeong; Song, Young-Ha; Shin, Chul-Soo; Park, Jin-Byung

    2016-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are able to catalyze regiospecific Baeyer-Villiger oxygenation of a variety of cyclic and linear ketones to generate the corresponding lactones and esters, respectively. However, the enzymes are usually difficult to express in a functional form in microbial cells and are rather unstable under process conditions hindering their large-scale applications. Thereby, we investigated engineering of the BVMO from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and the gene expression system to improve its activity and stability for large-scale biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (1) into the ester (i.e., (Z)-11-(heptanoyloxy)undec-9-enoic acid) (3), which can be hydrolyzed into 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (5) (i.e., a precursor of polyamide-11) and n-heptanoic acid (4). The polyionic tag-based fusion engineering of the BVMO and the use of a synthetic promoter for constitutive enzyme expression allowed the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the BVMO and the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus to produce the ester (3) to 85 mM (26.6 g/L) within 5 h. The 5 L scale biotransformation process was then successfully scaled up to a 70 L bioreactor; 3 was produced to over 70 mM (21.9 g/L) in the culture medium 6 h after biotransformation. This study demonstrated that the BVMO-based whole-cell reactions can be applied for large-scale biotransformations. PMID:27311560