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1

[Multi-disciplinary team work in health services development].  

PubMed

Multidisciplinary teamwork or collaboration is a new approach designed to guide thinking and practise within healthcare systems. As a concept multidisciplinary collaboration or teamwork is not clear. Researchers have developed many definition about multidisciplinary collaboration having characteristics like objectivity, methodicalness, regularity, common goals, population's/patient's perspective and individually shared responsibility. In decision making every expert has a responsibility to give his/her skills and acknowledge for the goals of the working community and patients. A great deal of research and development work is currently ongoing in hospitals and health centers on multidisciplinary topic. This approach has been useful in district responsibility and also in primary nursing. The leadership in primary nursing system has the responsibility to create an environment conductive for collaborative relationships. In multiprofessional relationships nurses can find their professional roles and evaluate their skills and knowledge base and assess their needs for continued education. PMID:8260690

Merjola-Partanen, T

1993-01-01

2

Overcoming obstacles to establish a multidisciplinary team approach to hepatobiliary diseases: a working model in a Caribbean setting  

PubMed Central

Introduction By providing a structured forum to exchange information and ideas, multidisciplinary team meetings improve working relationships, expedite investigations, promote evidence-based treatment, and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. Methods This discursive paper reports the introduction of a multidisciplinary team approach to manage hepatobiliary diseases in Jamaica, focusing on the challenges encountered and the methods used to overcome these obstacles. Conclusion Despite multiple challenges in resource-limited environments, a multidisciplinary team approach can be incorporated into clinical practice in developing nations. Policy makers should make it a priority to support clinical, operational, and governance aspects of the multidisciplinary teams. PMID:24920917

Cawich, Shamir O; Johnson, Peter B; Shah, Sundeep; Roberts, Patrick; Arthurs, Milton; Murphy, Trevor; Bonadie, Kimon O; Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Abu Hilal, Mohammed; Pearce, Neil W

2014-01-01

3

Multidisciplinary team, working with elderly persons living in the community: a systematic literature review.  

PubMed

As the number of elderly persons with complex health needs is increasing, teams for their care have been recommended as a means of meeting these needs, particularly in the case of elderly persons with multi-diseases. Occupational therapists, in their role as team members, exert significant influence in guiding team recommendations. However, it has been emphasized that there is a lack of sound research to show the impact of teamwork from the perspective of elderly persons. The aim of this paper was to explore literature concerning multidisciplinary teams that work with elderly persons living in the community. The research method was a systematic literature review and a total of 37 articles was analysed. The result describes team organisation, team intervention and outcome, and factors that influence teamwork. Working in a team is multifaceted and complex. It is important to enhance awareness about factors that influence teamwork. The team process itself is also of great importance. Clinical implications for developing effective and efficient teamwork are also presented and discussed. PMID:19466676

Johansson, Gudrun; Eklund, Kajsa; Gosman-Hedström, Gunilla

2010-01-01

4

Educating Students for Participation as Members of Multidisciplinary Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

From turbo jets to nanotechnology bandages to treat burn victims, products and projects worked on by engineers in industry today are created by multidisciplinary teams. Today's engineer must be well grounded in engineering design, problem solving, decision making, and be able to function cooperatively as a member of a multidisciplinary team. This paper discusses programs at Kansas State University and

E. Marie Steichen; James Steichen; Larry E. Erickson

5

Multidisciplinary team working in an adult male prison establishment in the UK.  

PubMed

The first two articles in this series exploring the oral and dental health of male prisoners in the UK demonstrated how the general and oral health of prisoners is compromised compared to those of a similar age who are not prisoners. In caring for the oral health needs of this group the high demand for emergency dental services often precludes the delivery of preventive and routine care. Comprehensive oral care for this population requires a level of training to gain the skills and knowledge to manage prisoners' complex medical, dental and social needs and the heightened dental anxiety that prisoners exhibit. The type of training that might be required for prison dentistry will be discussed in the final article. This article will describe a number of cases selected to demonstrate the complex problems presented by male prisoners in Her Majesty's Prison (HMP), Brixton. This article will also discuss the establishment of a primary care inter-professional relationship network (IRN) developed within a prison setting involving a dentist and other healthcare professionals. After informal discussions between the dentist and other prison healthcare professionals, it became apparent that vulnerable patients were not accessing dental services. These patients also cancel/fail to attend their dental appointments more frequently. In order to improve access and provision of dental care for this group of prisoners, an IRN was developed between the dentist, diabetic nurse, forensic psychology team, communicable disease lead, general medical practitioner (GMP), prison officers and healthcare manager within HMP Brixton. The nature of the IRN is presented along with reviews with relevant patient cases. The IRN allowed information sharing between professionals and an open care culture. The network was valued by prisoners. Prison populations show higher rates of general and oral disease, therefore an IRN can help to identify vulnerable groups and allow healthcare providers to give appropriate, targeted and focused care in a timely fashion. PMID:25104690

Heidari, E; Dickinson, C; Newton, T

2014-08-01

6

Multi-Disciplinary Team Project With Software  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Multi-disciplinary team projects are an important element in the ABET accreditation of engineering programs. The basic manufacturing processes course in the Industrial Engineering (IE) Program at West Virginia University is one of only two IE courses which are required by other engineering majors. A software program was developed to assist students in the evaluation of costs when selecting different materials and shapes to meet specific load and deflection requirements. The program has been used for four semesters to develop an appreciation of the effect of material selection and design upon the total cost of a multi-constrained project. Students have indicated several problems which resulted in model changes and the development of an instruction manual. The project has been modified so that several reports are required before the final project. This paper discusses the student responses and the effect of the use of multiple reports.

Creese, Robert

7

Evaluating Multidisciplinary Child Abuse and Neglect Teams: A Research Agenda  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of child welfare research literature reveals that although multidisciplinary teams are increasingly used to investigate and intervene in child abuse and neglect cases, the field does not know enough about their structural variations, implementation processes, or effectiveness. Moreover, although articles advocating multidisciplinary teams

Lalayants, Marina; Epstein, Irwin

2005-01-01

8

Teaching ideas for generating critical and constructive insights into well-functioning multidisciplinary mental health teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – It is now common place for mental health services to operate using multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) where several health professionals simultaneously maintain their disciplinary distinctiveness and assume complementary professional roles. This requires awareness of other team members' disciplines and good team-work skills. Yet in Australia, the preparation of health professionals continues to occur primarily in single-discipline programs, where interaction

Margaret McAllister; Shirley Morrissey; Donna McAuliffe; Graham Davidson; Harry McConnell; Prasuna Reddy

2011-01-01

9

Crisis resource management: evaluating outcomes of a multidisciplinary team.  

PubMed

Crisis resource management (CRM) is a team-training program that teaches nontechnical skills such as: collaboration, communication, task management, teamwork, and leadership. The purpose of this study was to evaluate improvement in the nontechnical skills of a multidisciplinary team of pediatric residents, anesthesiology residents and pediatric nurses following participation in the CRM educational program. Self-efficacy theory guided the teaching method used in the CRM program. The Collaboration and Satisfaction about Care Decisions instrument and the Anesthetists' Nontechnical Skills System served as outcome measures. Seven multidisciplinary groups were studied with a total of 40 subjects. A significant increase was found in posttest scores for perceived collaboration and satisfaction with care and in numerical ratings of observed team skills following the CRM program. The results suggest multidisciplinary team participation in the CRM program increased perceived team collaboration, satisfaction with care, and observed teamwork skills. PMID:19088613

Jankouskas, Tara; Bush, Mary Chasko; Murray, Bosseau; Rudy, Sally; Henry, Jody; Dyer, Anne Marie; Liu, Wenlei; Sinz, Elizabeth

2007-01-01

10

Charting Multidisciplinary Team External Dynamics Using a Systems Thinking Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using the formalism provided by the Systems Thinking approach, the dynamics present when operating multidisciplinary teams are examined in the context of the NASA Langley Research and Technology Group, an R&D organization organized along functional lines. The paper focuses on external dynamics and examines how an organization creates and nurtures the teams and how it disseminates and retains the lessons and expertise created by the multidisciplinary activities. Key variables are selected and the causal relationships between the variables are identified. Five "stories" are told, each of which touches on a different aspect of the dynamics. The Systems Thinking Approach provides recommendations as to interventions that will facilitate the introduction of multidisciplinary teams and that therefore will increase the likelihood of performing successful multidisciplinary developments. These interventions can be carried out either by individual researchers, line management or program management.

Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Waszak, Martin R.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

1998-01-01

11

Making Science Teams Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science teachers, likely have more experience with students working together than teachers in any other subject area due to teaming students for hands-on activities. While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, getting teams to actually work-meaning getting students to share equally in the academic…

Miller, Roxanne Greitz

2004-01-01

12

The Interplay of Conflict and Analogy in Multidisciplinary Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creative teamwork in multidisciplinary teams is a topic of interest to cognitive psychologists on the one hand, and to both social and organizational psychologists on the other. However, the interconnections between cognitive and social layers have been rarely explored. Drawing on mental models and dissonance theories, the current study takes a…

Paletz, Susannah B. F.; Schunn, Christian D.; Kim, Kevin H.

2013-01-01

13

Reflections on Knowledge Brokering within a Multidisciplinary Research Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Knowledge brokering (KB) may be one approach of helping researchers and decision makers effectively communicate their needs and abilities, and move toward increased use of evidence in health care. A multidisciplinary research team in Nova Scotia, Canada, has created a dedicated KB position with the goal of improving access to quality colorectal…

Urquhart, Robin; Porter, Geoffrey A.; Grunfeld, Eva

2011-01-01

14

Teams work (panel session)  

Microsoft Academic Search

“I didn't think I'd like group work, but I ended up in a good team and it was a great experience. But I feel if you end up in a bad team it can really get you down and will affect your mark.” This student response (University of Exeter, U.K.) is typical and telling. At least some of the time

Sally Fincher; James Caristi

2000-01-01

15

Predictors of Team Work Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability to work in teams is an attribute highly valued by employers of information technology (IT) graduates. For IT students to effectively engage in team work tasks, the process of working in teams should be satisfying for the students. This work explored whether university students who were involved in compulsory team work were satisfied…

Hamlyn-Harris, James H.; Hurst, Barbara J.; von Baggo, Karola; Bayley, Anthony J.

2006-01-01

16

Effective multidisciplinary working: the key to high-quality care.  

PubMed

This article explores multidisciplinary team working, inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary and effective collaborative practice in order to provide high-quality patient care. It discusses different views on collaboration, some of the issues around cross-discipline and multi-agency working and concerns around promoting 'high-quality' care. It also discusses the importance of evidence-based practice in multidisciplinary teams. Issues around good-quality care, clinical governance and the audit cycle in MDTs are addressed. The article highlights the importance of the 6Cs (care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment) in MDTs if quality care is to be achieved. The article also explores advantages and limitations of multidisciplinary team working, trans-disciplinary working and inter-professional working in developing and delivering high-quality patient-centred care. Further research is needed on how clinical audits can help to improve how MDTs function in order improve the quality of service provided to clients. PMID:25072333

Ndoro, Samuel

17

Heterogeneity and Work Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper attempts to extend and contribute to the domestic diversity literature by presenting a comprehensive model that takes into consideration the Indian work set up. It proposes to examine the effects of the composition of information systems development teams in Indian firms. Besides the conventional demographics which were studied…

Dyaram, Lata; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

2008-01-01

18

Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review  

PubMed Central

Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

Epstein, Nancy E.

2014-01-01

19

The multidisciplinary in-hospital wound care team: two models.  

PubMed

The cost of community- and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers is particularly high in terms of both patient morbidity and economics. Multidisciplinary wound care teams were developed independently at two different hospitals to deal with the needs of patients with pressure ulcers and to control costs. Although the goals of the teams at both institutions were similar, the strategies for achieving the goals were different because they were adapted to the needs of the particular institution. As a result, care and prevention of pressure ulcers have improved at both hospitals. PMID:9729938

Granick, M S; Ladin, D A

1998-01-01

20

What is a virtual multidisciplinary team (vMDT)?  

PubMed Central

Background: Multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTs), also known as tumour boards or multidisciplinary case conferences, are an integral component of contemporary cancer care. There are logistical problems with setting up and maintaining participation in these meetings. An ill-defined concept, the virtual MDT (vMDT), has arisen in response to these difficulties. We have, in order to provide clarity and to generate discussion, attempted to define the concept of the vMDT, outline its advantages and disadvantages, and consider some of the practical aspects involved in setting up a virtual MDT. Methods: This is an unstructured review of published evidence and personal experience relating to virtual teams in general, and to MDTs in particular. Results: We have devised a simple taxonomy for MDTs, discussed some of the practicalities involved in setting up a vMDT, and described some of the potential advantages and disadvantages associated with vMDTs. Conclusion: The vMDT may be useful for discussions concerning rare or unusual tumours, or for helping guide the assessment and management of patients with uncommon complications related to treatment. However, the vMDT is a niche concept and is currently unlikely to replace the more traditional face-to-face MDT in the management of common tumours at specific sites. PMID:23756866

Munro, A J; Swartzman, S

2013-01-01

21

Making Science Teams Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards , getting teams to share equally in the academic assignments and interact in a positive and productive manner often eludes even the best of teachers. These strategies for creating effective student teams include planning, student pre-assessment, communication with students and parents, motivational strategies, and arrangement of the classroom and activities.

Roxanne Greitz Miller

2004-09-01

22

Improving recovery time following heart transplantation: the role of the multidisciplinary health care team  

PubMed Central

Background The care of cardiac transplant patients is complex requiring a finely orchestrated endeavor to save a patient’s life. Given the chronic and complex nature of these patients, multiple disciplines are involved in their care. Recognizing difficulties with communication among team members and striving for improved efficiencies in our pretransplant listing process and in our inpatient care, our team was prompted to change the existing approach to patient care related to heart transplantation. Methods Daily multidisciplinary rounds were instituted and the format of the weekly Multidisciplinary Review Committee (MDRC) meetings was modified with the list of attendees broadened to include a larger interdisciplinary team. Additionally, the approach to patient care was analyzed for process improvement. Results The quality improvements are improved communication and throughput, quantified in an 85% decrease in time to complete transplant evaluation, a 37% decrease in median length of stay posttransplantation, and a 33% reduction in the 30 day readmission rate. In addition, pre- and posttransplant caregivers now participate in MDRC in person or via an electronic meeting platform to support the continuum of care. Quality metrics were chosen and tracked via a transparent electronic platform allowing all involved to assess progress toward agreed upon goals. These were achieved in an 18 month time period following the recruitment of new leadership and invested team members working together as a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of cardiac transplant care. Discussion: Implementation of daily multidisciplinary rounds and expansion of the attendees for the MDRC meetings improved care related to heart transplantation. PMID:24009423

Roussel, Maureen G; Gorham, Noreen; Wilson, Lynn; Mangi, Abeel A

2013-01-01

23

"Bioengineering trains you to speak the many different technical languages needed to work in multidisciplinary teams that tackle the medical challenges of a rapidly  

E-print Network

"Bioengineering trains you to speak the many different technical languages needed to work the Future of Medicine. UW Bioengineering faculty and students bridge the traditional disciplines of medicine, scientists, engineers, and physicians come together in Bioengineering to develop innovative and cost

Anderson, Richard

24

Perceived Importance of Contributions Made by Professionals Participating on Multidisciplinary Evaluation Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ratings of the importance of each team member's contributions by team participants (N-235) during multidisciplinary team assessments of handicapped children showed that professions most often participating on such teams were also those rated most important. Professions' importance rating also varied as a function of the child's suspected…

Frankenberger, William; Harper, Jerry

1988-01-01

25

Medical Team Training: Using Simulation as a Teaching Strategy for Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is an innovative approach currently being used to inspire group work, specifically a medical team training model, referred to as The Simulation Model, which includes as its major components: (1) Prior Training in Group Work of Medical Team Members; (2) Simulation in Teams or Groups; (3) Multidisciplinary Teamwork; (4) Team Leader…

Moyer, Michael R.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas

2011-01-01

26

Medical Team Training: Using Simulation as a Teaching Strategy for Group Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Described is an innovative approach currently being used to inspire group work, specifically a medical team training model, referred to as The Simulation Model, which includes as its major components: (1) Prior Training in Group Work of Medical Team Members; (2) Simulation in Teams or Groups; (3) Multidisciplinary Teamwork; (4) Team Leader Selection; and (5) a Facilitated Group Debriefing Process.

Michael R. Moyer; Rhonda Douglas Brown

2011-01-01

27

Teams make it work: how team work engagement mediates between social resources and performance in teams.  

PubMed

In this study we analyze the mediating role of team work engagement between team social resources (i.e., supportive team climate, coordination, teamwork), and team performance (i.e., in-role and extra-role performance) as predicted by the Job Demands-Resources Model. Aggregated data of 533 employees nested within 62 teams and 13 organizations were used, whereas team performance was assessed by supervisor ratings. Structural equation modeling revealed that, as expected, team work engagement plays a mediating role between social resources perceived at the team level and team performance as assessed by the supervisor. PMID:22269372

Torrente, Pedro; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

2012-02-01

28

Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries  

PubMed Central

This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists. PMID:24001762

Silbermann, M.; Pitsillides, B.; Al-Alfi, N.; Omran, S.; Al-Jabri, K.; Elshamy, K.; Ghrayeb, I.; Livneh, J.; Daher, M.; Charalambous, H.; Jafferri, A.; Fink, R.; El-Shamy, M.

2013-01-01

29

Measuring ward-based multidisciplinary healthcare team functioning: a validation study of the Team Functioning Assessment Tool (TFAT).  

PubMed

The team functioning assessment tool (TFAT) has been shown to be a reliable behavioral marker tool for assessing nontechnical skills that are critical to the success of ward-based healthcare teams. This paper aims to refine and shorten the length of the TFAT to improve usability, and establish its reliability and construct validity. Psychometric testing based on 110 multidisciplinary healthcare teams demonstrated that the TFAT is a reliable and valid tool for measuring team members' nontechnical skills in regards to Clinical Planning, Executive Tasks, and Team Functioning. Providing support for concurrent validity, high TFAT ratings were predicted by low levels of organizational constraints and high levels of group potency. There was also partial support for the negative relationships between time pressure, leadership ambiguity, and TFAT ratings. The paper provides a discussion on the applicability of the tool for assessing multidisciplinary healthcare team functioning in the context of improving team effectiveness and patient safety for ward-based hospital teams. PMID:23551303

Sutton, Gigi; Liao, Jenny; Jimmieson, Nerina L; Restubog, Simon L D

2013-01-01

30

Pharmacist contributions as members of the multidisciplinary ICU team.  

PubMed

Critical care pharmacy services in the ICU have expanded from traditional dispensing responsibilities to being recognized as an essential component of multidisciplinary care for critically ill patients. Augmented by technology and resource utilization, this shift in roles has allowed pharmacists to provide valuable services in the form of assisting physicians and clinicians with pharmacotherapy decision-making, reducing medication errors, and improving medication safety systems to optimize patient outcomes. Documented improvements in the management of infections, anticoagulation therapy, sedation, and analgesia for patients receiving mechanical ventilation and in emergency response help to justify the need for clinical pharmacy services for critically ill patients. Contributions to quality improvement initiatives, scholarly and research activities, and the education and training of interdisciplinary personnel are also valued services offered by clinical pharmacists. Partnering with physician and nursing champions can garner support from hospital administrators for the addition of clinical pharmacy critical care services. The addition of a pharmacist to an interprofessional critical care team should be encouraged as health-care systems focus on improving the quality and efficiency of care delivered to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24189862

Preslaski, Candice R; Lat, Ishaq; MacLaren, Robert; Poston, Jason

2013-11-01

31

Teaching Engineering Students Team Work  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

Levi, Daniel

1998-01-01

32

[Multiprofessional team working in palliative medicine].  

PubMed

Now, more than ever, palliative medicine has been gaining recognition for its essential role in cancer treatment. Since its beginning, it has emphasized the importance of collaboration among multidisciplinary professionals, valuing a comprehensive and holistic philosophy, addressing a wide range of hopes and suffering that patients and families experience. There are three models (approaches) for the medical teams: multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary. Palliative care teams often choose the interdisciplinary team model, and the teams in the palliative care units may often choose the transdisciplinary team model. Recently, accumulating research has shown the clinical benefits of the interdisciplinary/transdisciplinary approach in palliative care settings. Clarifying appropriate functions and ideal features of physicians in the health care team, and enforcing the suitable team approach will contribute to improve the quality of whole medical practice beyond the framework of "palliative medicine". PMID:23848012

Osaka, Iwao

2013-04-01

33

A qualitative analysis of communication between members of a hospital-based multidisciplinary lung cancer team.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to explore how patient information is communicated between health professionals within a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team and to identify mechanisms to improve these communications. A qualitative method was employed using semi-structured in-depth interviews with a representative sample (n = 22) of members of a multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team including medical, nursing and allied health professionals. Analysis was undertaken using a thematic grounded theory approach to derive key themes to describe communication patterns within the team and how communication could be improved. Two themes with sub-themes were identified: (1) characteristics of communication between team members including the impact of role on direction of communications, and doctors' dominance in communications; and (2) channels of communication including, preference for face-to-face and the suboptimal roles of the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting and the hospital medical record as mediums for communication. Traditional influences of role delineation and the dominance of doctors were found to impact on communication within the multidisciplinary hospital-based lung cancer team. Existing guidelines on implementation of multidisciplinary cancer care fail to address barriers to effective team communication. The paper-based medical record does not support team communications and alternative electronic solutions need to be used. PMID:22966875

Rowlands, S; Callen, J

2013-01-01

34

The CTSA as an Exemplar Framework for Developing Multidisciplinary Translational Teams  

PubMed Central

Translational science requires that scientists from multiple disciplines work together to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. Although a literature exists on the design and management of multidisciplinary teams, little has been written on multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs). MTTs are distinct hybrid entities, with goals taken from both industry and academic models. We identified 30 design factors in 10 domains from a literature survey relevant to our MTT model: specific goals, structures, and processes. These dimensions were adapted to our own institutional environment in the selection and management of 11 MTTs that exploited resources of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA). Case illustrations of two specific MTTs illustrate some of the challenges encountered and opportunities realized in terms of education and scientific advances. Network depiction of disciplinarity indicated that CTSA KRs and CTSA leadership contributed to discipline diversity especially in small (or nascent) MTTs. A separate depiction of MTT-KR utilization indicated that data analysis, translational technologies, and novel methods were heavily utilized by MTTs, whereas other KRs contributed significant effort to infrastructure development. We conclude that the CTSA can provide a rich infrastructural framework and scientific environment for the development of successful MTTs. PMID:23399092

Calhoun, William J.; Wooten, Kevin; Bhavnani, Suresh; Anderson, Karl E.; Freeman, Jean; Brasier, Allan R.

2013-01-01

35

The informational roles and psychological health of members of 10 oncology multidisciplinary teams in the UK  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report here the different roles undertaken by the members of 10 multidisciplinary cancer teams in conveying information to patients during their care. Team members completed an Informational Roles Questionnaire measuring an individual's perception of their major role and that of their colleagues in giving information to patients. They also completed two standard psychological health measures, the General Health Questionnaire

S Catt; L Fallowfield; V Jenkins; C Langridge; A Cox

2005-01-01

36

The importance of multidisciplinary team management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer  

PubMed Central

Historically, a simple approach to the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) was applicable to nearly all patients. Recently, a more complex treatment algorithm has emerged, driven by both pathologic and molecular phenotype. This increasing complexity underscores the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach to the diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care of patients with nsclc. A team approach to management is important at all points: from diagnosis, through treatment, to end-of-life care. It also needs to be patient-centred and must involve the patient in decision-making concerning treatment. Multidisciplinary case conferencing is becoming an integral part of care. Early integration of palliative care into the team approach appears to contribute significantly to quality of life and potentially extends overall survival for these patients. Supportive approaches, including psychosocial and nutrition support, should be routinely incorporated into the team approach. Challenges to the implementation of multidisciplinary care require institutional commitment and support. PMID:22787414

Ellis, P.M.

2012-01-01

37

Self-managed work teams: what works?  

PubMed

Case studies have shown that under the right circumstances, employees within self-managed work teams (SMWTs) produce more at work than employees organized in a more hierarchical, traditional structure because they perform not only technical skills, but management skills as well. The purpose of this article is to clarify the specific factors most important to an SMWT's success. The information shared here comes from three sources. The primary source is a research project funded by a 3-year grant (1994-1997) from the National Science Foundation. The primary factors found to affect the success of SMWTs formed five groups. Work process factors include those that are needed when actually performing the work, such as the appropriate resources, talent, procedures, and effort. Interpersonal process factors include communication and both positive and negative conflict. Environmental factors include those within the SMWT'S organization, such as management support and the reward system, as well as factors outside the organization, such as suppliers and the market. Team design factors and team member characteristics were found to be equally important to the high performance of the SMWT. PMID:10178700

Yeatts, D E; Schulz, E

1998-01-01

38

BSc Physiotherapy `Do you want to work in a profession as part of the healthcare team that makes a difference to peoples  

E-print Network

BSc Physiotherapy `Do you want to work in a profession as part of the healthcare team that makes insight into working within a multi-disciplinary healthcare team oAn exciting choice of modules to choose multidisciplinary team working skills which are valuable for professional practice. You also have an exciting choice

Miall, Chris

39

Cauda equina syndrome: the importance of complete multidisciplinary team management  

PubMed Central

A 44-year-old lady with a history of lumbar back pain presented to the emergency department complaining of severe back pain radiating to her buttocks. Positive examination findings were a loss of sensation in the perianal area and 348?ml of retained urine. An urgent MRI showed compression of the cauda equina by a herniated disc. The patient was operated upon that evening, having a lumbar 5/sacral 1 decompression and sequestrectomy. During follow-up, the patient was reviewed by a consultant spinal surgeon, a urologist and our cauda equina nurse at every appointment, as per the cauda equina pathway specifically designed and implemented by our spinal unit. This report shows the complex nature of cauda equina syndrome and broad functional deficit patients can suffer from. It shows the benefits of prompt diagnosis and surgery, together with intensive, multidisciplinary follow-up and treatment, all of which are possible by a specially created, cauda equina protocol. PMID:23505270

Shivji, Faiz; Tsegaye, Magnum

2013-01-01

40

Addressing sophisticated cyber threats demands a multidisciplinary team with a unique mindset. Sandia provides  

E-print Network

situational awareness to cyberspace. Use our in-house microelectronics foundry to design and prototype trustedAddressing sophisticated cyber threats demands a multidisciplinary team with a unique mindset citing its clear skies, trails, and strong economy. CA: Uniquely situated at the edge of the world

41

Undergraduate Students' Self-Efficacy and Cognitive Behaviors for Learning in Multidisciplinary Project Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate individual students' learning from the perspectives of self-efficacy and cognitive learning expressions in multidisciplinary project teams. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected to address the major research questions, which are aimed at understanding individual students'…

Chen, Xiaojun

2012-01-01

42

A CEFAS Multidisciplinary Project Team The Rame Head Disposal Site Environmental impacts resulting from disposal of  

E-print Network

modelling 63 5.1.6. Sediment budget for the disposal site. 64 5.2. Is Disposal Having an Impact on DivingA CEFAS Multidisciplinary Project Team ­ The Rame Head Disposal Site 1 Environmental impacts Recreational diving 19 Fishing and shellfishery activities 20 Sewage outfalls and overflows 20 2.2.6. Public

43

Psychopathological aspects of kidney transplantation: Efficacy of a multidisciplinary team.  

PubMed

Renal transplantation is a well established treatment for end-stage renal disease, allowing most patients to return to a satisfactory quality of life. Studies have identified many problems that may affect adaptation to the transplanted condition and post-operative compliance. The psychological implications of transplantation have important consequences even on strictly physical aspects. Organ transplantation is very challenging for the patient and acts as an intense stressor stimulus to which the patient reacts with neurotransmitter and endocrine-metabolic changes. Transplantation can result in a psychosomatic crisis that requires the patient to mobilize all bio-psycho-social resources during the process of adaptation to the new foreign organ which may result in an alteration in self-representation and identity, with possible psychopathologic repercussions. These reactions are feasible in mental disorders, e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder, and psychosomatic disorders. In organ transplantation, the fruitful collaboration between professionals with diverse scientific expertise, calls for both a guarantee for mental health and greater effectiveness in challenging treatments for a viable association between patients, family members and doctors. Integrated and multidisciplinary care should include uniform criteria and procedures for standard assessments, for patient autonomy, adherence to therapy, new coping strategies and the adoption of more appropriate lifestyles. PMID:25540735

De Pasquale, Concetta; Veroux, Massimiliano; Indelicato, Luisa; Sinagra, Nunzia; Giaquinta, Alessia; Fornaro, Michele; Veroux, Pierfrancesco; Pistorio, Maria L

2014-12-24

44

Consequences of participating in multidisciplinary medical team meetings for surgical, nonsurgical, and supporting specialties.  

PubMed

This study examines the consequences for medical specialists of participating in multidisciplinary medical team meetings in terms of perceived clinical autonomy, domain distinctiveness, and professional accountability. These consequences may influence their willingness to cooperate and the quality of teamwork. The authors hypothesized that multidisciplinary medical team meetings would be more of a threat to the professional identity of surgical specialists than to the professional identity of nonsurgical and supporting specialists. A survey among 1,827 Dutch medical specialists supported the authors' hypotheses. However, a few specific specialties had response patterns that deviated from our expectations. The results are related to specialty choice, to the training of medical specialties, and to having a role in leading team meetings. PMID:19815682

Molleman, Eric; Broekhuis, Manda; Stoffels, Renee; Jaspers, Frans

2010-04-01

45

Multidisciplinary design problem solving on product development teams  

E-print Network

This investigation, conducted under the auspices of the Lean Aerospace Initiative (LAI), studied how engineers from different specialties interpret and communicate about technical design problems while working on product ...

Bernstein, Joshua I. (Joshua Ian), 1974-

2001-01-01

46

Social Work and The Mental Health Team  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The contributions of social work to the interdisciplinary team are described, along with opportunities for, and barriers to, effective teamwork.Conclusions: Social work is concerned with the social context and consequences of mental illness on the individual, family and community. Social work serves to connect the treatment team to the broader issues of family welfare, housing, income security, and community

Robert Bland; Noel Renouf

2001-01-01

47

The Benefits of Multidisciplinary Learning in Clinical Practice for Law, Finance, and Social Work Students: An Australian Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In July 2010, the faculties of Law, Business and Economics, and Medicine at Monash University, Australia commenced placing law, finance, and social work students in a multidisciplinary clinic at a community legal service operated by the University. Students from the three disciplines began seeing legal service clients at the same time as a team.…

Hyams, Ross; Brown, Grace; Foster, Richard

2013-01-01

48

Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work  

PubMed Central

Background Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes. Method This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary team work, and the perceptions of over 253 staff from 11 community rehabilitation and intermediate care teams in the UK. These data sources were merged using qualitative content analysis to arrive at a framework that identifies characteristics and proposes ten competencies that support effective interdisciplinary team work. Results Ten characteristics underpinning effective interdisciplinary team work were identified: positive leadership and management attributes; communication strategies and structures; personal rewards, training and development; appropriate resources and procedures; appropriate skill mix; supportive team climate; individual characteristics that support interdisciplinary team work; clarity of vision; quality and outcomes of care; and respecting and understanding roles. Conclusions We propose competency statements that an effective interdisciplinary team functioning at a high level should demonstrate. PMID:23663329

2013-01-01

49

Tracheostomy patients on the ward: multiple benefits from a multidisciplinary team?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients requiring tracheostomies tend to have a longer length of stay due to their underlying disease. After a thorough literature\\u000a search, Garrubba and colleagues found only three studies assessing the impact of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) on tracheostomy\\u000a patients on the ward. One consistent observation was the decreased time to decannulation after institution of MDT care when\\u000a compared with historical controls.

Mihae Yu

2010-01-01

50

The Role of the Multidisciplinary Team in Recruiting to Cancer Clinical Trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

This paper explores factors influencing patient recruitment to breast cancer clinical trials from the perspective of multidisciplinary research teams. Based on the results of the study, the authors recommend numerous strategies to improve recruitment, including having a recruitment plan, having flexibility in recruitment strategies, recording information on women eligible for and approached to join clinical trials, using financial incentives for recruiters and participants, educating patients and clinicians about clinical trials, and allowing women to make their own treatment decisions.

51

Using peer observers to assess the quality of cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a qualitative proof of concept study  

PubMed Central

Background Multidisciplinary team (MDT) working is well established as the foundation for providing cancer services in the UK and elsewhere. A core activity is the weekly meeting (or case conference/tumor boards) where the treatment recommendations for individual patients are agreed. Evidence suggests that the quality of team working varies across cancer teams, and this may impact negatively on the decision-making process, and ultimately patient care. Feedback on performance by expert observers may improve performance, but can be resource-intensive to implement. This proof of concept study sought to: develop a structured observational assessment tool for use by peers (managers or clinicians from the local workforce) and explore its usability; assess the feasibility of the principle of observational assessment by peers; and explore the views of MDT members and observers about the utility of feedback from observational assessment. Methods For tool development, the content was informed by national clinical consensus recommendations for best practice in cancer MDTs and developed in collaboration with an expert steering group. It consisted of ten subdomains of team working observable in MDT meetings that were rated on a 10-point scale (very poor to very good). For observational assessment, a total of 19 peer observers used the tool (assessing performance in 20 cancer teams from four hospitals). For evaluation, telephone interviews with 64 team members and all peer observers were analyzed thematically. Results The tool was easy to use and areas for refinement were identified. Peer observers were identified and most indicated that undertaking observation was feasible. MDT members generally reported that observational assessment and feedback was useful, with the potential to facilitate improvements in team working. Conclusion This study suggests that observation and feedback by peers may provide a feasible and acceptable approach to enhance MDT performance. Further tool refinement and validation is required. PMID:25143743

Harris, Jenny; Green, James SA; Sevdalis, Nick; Taylor, Cath

2014-01-01

52

(Working Team meeting of IEA-CADDET)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler serving as Delegate from the United States, Center for the Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy, (CADDET) National Team, participated in the activities of the annual International Energy Agency, CADDET Working Team meeting. Highlights of this meeting included progress/status presentations by 12 to 13 CADDET National Teams, development of future CADDET work plans including a prioritization of activities, and discussions of long range expectations for CADDET. Follow-up discussions were held with CADDET staff members which focused on US CADDET National Team contributions to the CADDET newsletter, brochures and register of demonstrated energy technologies.

Broders, M.A.

1990-10-25

53

Part 1: Participatory Ergonomics Approach to Waste Container Handling Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Team  

SciTech Connect

This multidisciplinary team approach to waste container handling, developed within the Grassroots Ergonomics process, presents participatory ergonomic interpretations of quantitative and qualitative aspects of this process resulting in a peer developed training. The lower back, shoulders, and wrists were identified as frequently injured areas, so these working postures were a primary focus for the creation of the workers' training. Handling procedures were analyzed by the team to identify common cycles involving one 5 gallon (60 pounds), two 5 gallons (60 and 54 pounds), 30 gallon (216 pounds), and 55 gallon (482 pounds) containers: lowering from transporting to/from transport vehicles, loading/unloading on transport vehicles, and loading onto pallet. Eleven experienced waste container handlers participated in this field analysis. Ergonomic exposure assessment tools measuring these field activities included posture analysis, posture targeting, Lumbar Motion Monitor{trademark} (LMM), and surface electromyography (sEMG) for the erector spinae, infraspinatus, and upper trapezius muscles. Posture analysis indicates that waste container handlers maintained non-neutral lower back postures (flexion, lateral bending, and rotation) for a mean of 51.7% of the time across all activities. The right wrist was in non-neutral postures (radial, ulnar, extension, and flexion) a mean of 30.5% of the time and the left wrist 31.4%. Non-neutral shoulder postures (elevation) were the least common, occurring 17.6% and 14.0% of the time in the right and left shoulders respectively. For training applications, each cycle had its own synchronized posture analysis and posture target diagram. Visual interpretations relating to the peak force modifications of the posture target diagrams proved to be invaluable for the workers' understanding of LMM and sEMG results (refer to Part II). Results were reviewed by the team's field technicians and their interpretations were developed into ergonomic training that address the issues originally raised. This training includes intervention methods, ergonomic tools used, dam acquired, and effects of waste container handling techniques on lower back, shoulder, and wrists and methods to help proactively reduce injuries associated with this profession.

Zalk, D.M.; Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Biggs, T.W.; Perry, C.M.; Tageson, R.; Barsnick, L.

2000-02-07

54

Are multidisciplinary teams in secondary care cost-effective? A systematic review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the cost effectiveness of management of patients within the context of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting in cancer and non-cancer teams in secondary care. Design Systematic review. Data sources EMBASE, MEDLINE, NHS EED, CINAHL, EconLit, Cochrane Library, and NHS HMIC. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort, case–control, before and after and cross-sectional study designs including an economic evaluation of management decisions made in any disease in secondary care within the context of an MDT meeting. Data extraction Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC-list). MDTs were defined by evidence of two characteristics: decision making requiring a minimum of two disciplines; and regular meetings to discuss diagnosis, treatment and/or patient management, occurring at a physical location or by teleconferencing. Studies that reported on the costs of administering, preparing for, and attending MDT meetings and/or the subsequent direct medical costs of care, non-medical costs, or indirect costs, and any health outcomes that were relevant to the disease being investigated were included and classified as cancer or non-cancer MDTs. Results Fifteen studies (11 RCTs in non-cancer care, 2 cohort studies in cancer and non-cancer care, and 2 before and after studies in cancer and non cancer care) were identified, all with a high risk of bias. Twelve papers reported the frequency of meetings which varied from daily to three monthly and all reported the number of disciplines included (mean 5, range 2 to 9). The results from all studies showed mixed effects; a high degree of heterogeneity prevented a meta-analysis of findings; and none of the studies reported how the potential savings of MDT working may offset the costs of administering, preparing for, and attending MDT meetings. Conclusions Current evidence is insufficient to determine whether MDT working is cost-effective or not in secondary care. Further studies aimed at understanding the key aspects of MDT working that lead to cost-effective cancer and non-cancer care are required. PMID:23557141

2013-01-01

55

[Health education: team work at school].  

PubMed

In this field, team work is invaluable, as the relevant frame for both content and method to be permanently readjusted to various levels imposed by the specific objectives. The better the members of this team are integrated into the educational system, as straff members of a service, the deeper the impact of the programme. PMID:595905

Ducommun, S; Hazeghi, P

1977-11-01

56

Impact of a specialized multidisciplinary tracheostomy team on tracheostomy care in critically ill patients  

PubMed Central

Background A multidisciplinary tracheostomy team was created in 2005 to follow critically ill patients who had undergone a tracheostomy until their discharge from hospital. Composed of a surgeon, surgical resident, respiratory therapist, speech-language pathologist and clinical nurse specialist, this team has been meeting twice a week for rounds involving patients who transitioned from the intensive care unit (ICU) to the medical and surgical wards. Our objective was to assess the impact of this multidisciplinary team on downsizing and decannulation times, on the incidence of speaking valve placement and on the incidence of tracheostomy-related complications on the ward. Methods This study was conducted at a tertiary care, level-1 trauma centre and teaching hospital and involved all patients who had received a tracheostomy during admission to the ICU from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2004 (preservice group), and from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2006 (postservice group). We compared the outcomes of patients who required tracheostomies in a 12-month period after the team was created with those of patients from a similar time frame before the establishment of the team. Results There were 32 patients in the preservice group and 54 patients in the post-service group. Under the new tracheostomy service, there was a decrease in incidence of tube blockage (5.5% v. 25.0%, p = 0.016) and calls for respiratory distress (16.7% v. 37.5%, p = 0.039) on the wards. A significantly larger proportion of patients also received speaking valves (67.4% v. 19.4%, p < 0.001) after creation of the team. Furthermore, there appeared to be a decreased time to first tube downsizing (26.0 to 9.4 d) and decreased time to decannulation (50.4 to 28.4 d), although this did not reach statistical significance owing to our small sample size. Conclusion Standardized care provided by a specialized multidisciplinary tracheostomy team was associated with fewer tracheostomy-related complications and an increase in the use of a speaking valve. PMID:21443833

de Mestral, Charles; Iqbal, Sameena; Fong, Nancy; LeBlanc, Joanne; Fata, Paola; Razek, Tarek; Khwaja, Kosar

2011-01-01

57

Game playbooks: tools to guide multidisciplinary teams in developing videogame-based behavior change interventions.  

PubMed

As mobile technologies and videogaming platforms are becoming increasingly prevalent in the realm of health and healthcare, so are the opportunities to use these resources to conduct behavioral interventions. The creation and empirical testing of game style interventions, however, is challenged by the requisite collaboration of multidisciplinary teams, including researchers and game developers who have different cultures, terminologies, and standards of evidence. Thus, traditional intervention development tools such as logic models and intervention manuals may need to be augmented by creating what we have termed "Game Playbooks" which are intervention guidebooks that are created by, understood by, and acceptable to all members of the multidisciplinary game development team. The purpose of this paper is to describe the importance and content of a Game Playbook created to aide in the development of a videogame intervention designed specifically for health behavior change in young teens as well as the process for creating such a tool. We draw on the experience of our research and game design team to describe the critical components of the Game Playbook and the necessity of creating such a tool. PMID:24653781

Duncan, Lindsay R; Hieftje, Kimberly D; Culyba, Sabrina; Fiellin, Lynn E

2014-03-01

58

Working effectively in a virtual team  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasingly, teachers are asked to work as members of a virtual team. This may be because they work away from the main campus or are involved in a project across organisations. Technology makes it possible to work together virtually and virtual projects are often related to use of technology in teaching and learning. This paper describes how the authors have

Terry Neal; Clare Atkins

59

Alcohol brief interventions practice following training for multidisciplinary health and social care teams: A qualitative interview study  

PubMed Central

Introduction and Aims Few studies of the implementation of alcohol brief interventions (ABI) have been conducted in community settings such as mental health, social work and criminal justice teams. This qualitative interview study sought to explore the impact of training on ABI delivery by staff from a variety of such teams. Design and Methods Fifteen semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out with trained practitioners and with managers to explore the use of, perceived need for and approaches to ABI delivery and recording with clients, and compatibility of ABIs with current practice. Interviews were analysed thematically using an inductive approach. Results Very few practitioners reported delivery of any ABIs following training primarily because they felt ABIs to be inappropriate for their clients. According to practitioners, this was either because they drank too much or too little to benefit. Practitioners reported a range of current activities relating to alcohol, and some felt that their knowledge and confidence were improved following training. One practitioner reported ABI delivery and was considered a training success, while expectations of ABIs did not fit with current practice including assessment procedures for the remainder. Discussion and Conclusions Identified barriers to ABI delivery included issues relating to individual practitioners, their teams, current practice and the ABI model. They are likely to be best addressed by strategic team- and setting-specific approaches to implementation, of which training is only one part. [Fitzgerald N, Molloy H, MacDonald F, McCambridge J. Alcohol brief interventions practice following training for multidisciplinary health and social care teams: A qualitative interview study. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;34:185–93] PMID:25196713

Fitzgerald, Niamh; Molloy, Heather; MacDonald, Fiona; McCambridge, Jim

2015-01-01

60

Distributed expertise: qualitative study of a British network of multidisciplinary teams supporting parents of children with chronic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Background Long-term childhood conditions are often managed by hospital-based multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) of professionals with discipline specific expertise of a condition, in partnership with parents. However, little evidence exists on professional–parent interactions in this context. An exploration of professionals' accounts of the way they individually and collectively teach parents to manage their child's clinical care at home is, therefore, important for meeting parents' needs, informing policy and educating novice professionals. Using chronic kidney disease as an exemplar this paper reports on one aspect of a study of interactions between professionals and parents in a network of 12 children's kidney units in Britain. Methods We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a convenience sample of 112 professionals (clinical-psychologists, dietitians, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, play-workers, therapists and social workers), exploring accounts of their parent-educative activity. We analysed data using framework and the concept of distributed expertise. Results Four themes emerged that related to the way expertise was distributed within and across teams: (i) recognizing each other's' expertise, (ii) sharing expertise within the MDT, (iii) language interpretation, and (iv) acting as brokers. Two different professional identifications were also seen to co-exist within MDTs, with participants using the term ‘we’ both as the intra-professional ‘we’ (relating to the professional identity) when describing expertise within a disciplinary group (for example: ‘As dietitians we aim to give tailored advice to optimize children's growth’), and the inter-professional ‘we’ (a ‘team-identification’), when discussing expertise within the team (for example: ‘We work as a team and make sure we're all happy with every aspect of their training before they go home’). Conclusions This study highlights the dual identifications implicit in ‘being professional’ in this context (to the team and to one's profession) as well as the unique role that each member of a team contributes to children's care. Our methodology and results have the potential to be transferred to teams managing other conditions. PMID:24827413

Swallow, V; Smith, T; Webb, N J A; Wirz, L; Qizalbash, L; Brennan, E; Birch, A; Sinha, M D; Krischock, L; van der Voort, J; King, D; Lambert, H; Milford, D V; Crowther, L; Saleem, M; Lunn, A; Williams, J

2015-01-01

61

A multidisciplinary team approach to hydroxyurea-associated chronic wound with squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

Hydroxyurea (HU) has been shown to induce a variety of cutaneous adverse reactions, including severe leg ulcers. This report shows a successful treatment of a HU-induced chronic wound associated with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). A 62-year-old patient affected with polycythemia vera and treated with HU for 10 years, presented with a non healing ulcer on a left heel. The patient gave a history of suffering from the wound for over 2 years. Biopsy showed evidence of invasive SCC. The patient underwent Mohs surgery and a greater saphenous vein ablation for polycythemia vera-associated vascular complications. The wound consistently decreased in size following successive debridements and coverage with human skin equivalent. The wound healed completely after a 6-month period. A multidisciplinary team approach to the treatment proved to be effective resulting in healing of this multifactorial chronic ulcer. PMID:22099725

Stone, Tamar; Berger, Alexandra; Blumberg, Sheila; O'Neill, Daniel; Ross, Frank; McMeeking, Alexander; Chen, Weiliam; Pastar, Irena

2012-06-01

62

High Involvement Work Teams [in HRD].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These five papers are from a symposium on high involvement work teams that was facilitated by Catherine M. Sleezer at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. "An Empirical Study of Employee Involvement in Designing and Managing Reward Systems" (William M. Kahnweiler) reports on a study of 300 organizations that found the…

1995

63

A Multidisciplinary Health Care Team's Efforts to Improve Educational Attainment in Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia and Cerebral Infarcts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary objective of this study was to improve the educational success of children with sickle-cell disease (SCD) and cerebral infarcts. A prospective intervention trial was conducted; a multidisciplinary team was created to maximize educational resources for children with SCD and cerebral infarcts. Students were evaluated systematically…

King, Allison; Herron, Sonya; McKinstry, Robert; Bacak, Stephen; Armstrong, Melissa; White, Desiree; DeBaun, Michael

2006-01-01

64

Hospital-Based Multidisciplinary Teams Can Prevent Unnecessary Child Abuse Reports and Out-of-Home Placements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To determine how often and for what reasons a hospital-based multidisciplinary child abuse team concluded that a report of alleged or suspected child abuse was unnecessary in young children with fractures. Methods: A retrospective review was completed of all children less than 12 months of age who, because of fractures, were referred to…

Wallace, Gregory H.; Makoroff, Kathi L.; Malott, Heidi A.; Shapiro, Robert A.

2007-01-01

65

Team work in research and development organizations: The characteristics of successful teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Team work has become a central issue for many corporations, and self-managing teams are often viewed as the goal of team work development programs. The increased pressure on professionals to perform their tasks with fewer employees, at faster speeds, and with more quality and customer responsiveness creates the need for team work. This is especially apparent in research and development

Daniel Levi; Charles Slem

1995-01-01

66

Psychiatric Approaches for Disorders of Sex Development: Experience of a Multidisciplinary Team  

PubMed Central

Objective: Disorders of sex development (DSD) are a group of congenital medical conditions that affect life as a whole. In this study, we aimed to reflect the experience of a multidisciplinary team in the clinical/psychiatric follow-up of a group of children and adolescents with DSD. Methods: The study group consisted of 51 patients diagnosed with DSD. The Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, Draw a Person Test and Children’s Apperception Test, and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGIS) were used for psychiatric evaluations. Results: The mean age of the patients was 7.8 years (median: 7.8; min: 1.0; max: 18.0). Genetic evaluation showed 46,XX configuration in 15 patients (29.4%) and 46,XY in 35 (68.6%). One patient (2.0%) was diagnosed to have a sex chromosome disorder. Forty patients (78.4%) had no problems with their given gender identity and gender role. Thirty-four (66.7%) patients had normal intellectual capacity. Twenty-eight (54.9%) patients did not have any psychiatric problem. Depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and adjustment disorders were the common diagnoses. The mean score of symptom severity on CGIS-severity-baseline was 6.15±0.68 and after one year, it was 1.46±0.51 (Z=-3.236 p=0.001). The mean score of CGI–Improvement was 1.23±0.44. Conclusion: It is important to identify and treat the psychiatric disorders encountered in patients with DSD. A psychiatrist needs to be included in the professional team following these patients. Examination and observation results need to be shared by holding periodic team meetings to establish a wholesome point of view for every unique child. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379031

Özbaran, Burcu; Özen, Samim; Gök?en, Damla; Korkmaz, Özlem; Onay, Hüseyin; Özk?nay, Ferda; Ço?ulu, Özgür; Erermi?, Serpil; Köse, Sezen; Avano?lu, Ali; Ulman, ?brahim; Darcan, ?ükran

2013-01-01

67

Multidisciplinary Team Contributions Within a Dedicated Outpatient Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic: A Prospective Descriptive Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient palliative RT clinic. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients referred for RT for painful bone metastases were screened for symptoms and needs relevant to their medications, nutritional intake, activities of daily living, and psychosocial and spiritual concerns from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Consultations by appropriate team members and resulting recommendations were collected prospectively. Patients who received RT were contacted by telephone 4 weeks later to assess symptom outcomes. Results: A total of 106 clinic visits by 82 individual patients occurred. As determined by screening form responses, the clinical Pharmacist, Occupational Therapist, Registered Dietician and Social Worker were consulted to provide assessments and recommendations within the time constraints presented by 1-day palliative RT delivery. In addition to pain relief, significant improvements in tiredness, depression, anxiety, drowsiness and overall well-being were reported at 4 weeks. Conclusions: Systematic screening of this population revealed previously unmet needs, addressed in the form of custom verbal and written recommendations. Multidisciplinary assessment is associated with a high number of recommendations and decreased symptom distress. Our findings lend strong support to the routine assessment by multiple supportive care professionals for patients with advanced cancer being considered for palliative RT.

Pituskin, Edith, E-mail: pituskin@ualberta.c [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Dutka, Jennifer; Gagnon, Lori; Driga, Amy; Tachynski, Patty; Borschneck, Jo-Ann [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Department of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

2010-10-01

68

Mind Builders: Multidisciplinary Challenges for Cooperative Team-Building and Competition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than twenty years, the Richmond, Virginia Public Schools' program for gifted students has conducted an interscholastic competition similar to the nationally known competition, Destination Imagination. In the featured contest of this yearly event, teams of five students present solutions to engineering problems that they have worked on for…

Fleisher, Paul; Ziegler, Donald

2006-01-01

69

Performer: An Instrument for Multidisciplinary Courseware Teams to Share Knowledge and Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the traditional problems in courseware development that is recognized as hard to solve, is the communication and co-operation between various disciplines in project teams that are working on a courseware product [Alber (1996) "Multimedia: a management perspective." California: Wadsworth; Boyle (1997) "Design for multimedia learning." UK:…

van Aalst, Jan-Willem; van der Mast, Charles

2003-01-01

70

"It's hard to tell": The challenges of scoring patients on standardised outcome measures by multidisciplinary teams: a case study of neurorehabilitation  

PubMed Central

Background Interest is increasing in the application of standardised outcome measures in clinical practice. Measures designed for use in research may not be sufficiently precise to be used in monitoring individual patients. However, little is known about how clinicians and in particular, multidisciplinary teams, score patients using these measures. This paper explores the challenges faced by multidisciplinary teams in allocating scores on standardised outcome measures in clinical practice. Methods Qualitative case study of an inpatient neurorehabilitation team who routinely collected standardised outcome measures on their patients. Data were collected using non participant observation, fieldnotes and tape recordings of 16 multidisciplinary team meetings during which the measures were recited and scored. Eleven clinicians from a range of different professions were also interviewed. Data were analysed used grounded theory techniques. Results We identified a number of instances where scoring the patient was 'problematic'. In 'problematic' scoring, the scores were uncertain and subject to revision and adjustment. They sometimes required negotiation to agree on a shared understanding of concepts to be measured and the guidelines for scoring. Several factors gave rise to this problematic scoring. Team members' knowledge about patients' problems changed over time so that initial scores had to be revised or dismissed, creating an impression of deterioration when none had occurred. Patients had complex problems which could not easily be distinguished from each other and patients themselves varied in their ability to perform tasks over time and across different settings. Team members from different professions worked with patients in different ways and had different perspectives on patients' problems. This was particularly an issue in the scoring of concepts such as anxiety, depression, orientation, social integration and cognitive problems. Conclusion From a psychometric perspective these problems would raise questions about the validity, reliability and responsiveness of the scores. However, from a clinical perspective, such characteristics are an inherent part of clinical judgement and reasoning. It is important to highlight the challenges faced by multidisciplinary teams in scoring patients on standardised outcome measures but it would be unwarranted to conclude that such challenges imply that these measures should not be used in clinical practice for decision making about individual patients. However, our findings do raise some concerns about the use of such measures for performance management. PMID:18945357

Greenhalgh, J; Long, AF; Flynn, R; Tyson, S

2008-01-01

71

Multidisciplinary Teams for Engineering in Food Safety Applications - Bridges between Engineering and Biology  

Microsoft Academic Search

A team of undergraduate students from mechanical engineering and poultry science was assembled and worked cooperatively on a food safety project. The particular problem addressed was the development of a non-chemical-based clean-in-place system for cleaning the piping used to transport giblets in a poultry processing plant. The design and testing of the system required engineers to work with poultry plant

Jeffrey W. Fergus; Omar A. Oyarzabal; Robert S. Miller; William F. Gale

2008-01-01

72

Multidisciplinary case teams: an approach to the future management of advanced colorectal cancer.  

PubMed Central

The effective management of advanced colorectal cancer has traditionally been viewed in terms of treatment outcome measures such as efficacy (survival, objective response and palliation) and safety. Although these outcomes are of paramount importance and are essential for the evaluation of the effectiveness and tolerability of treatment, they do not take account of the global effect of therapy on patients, society and healthcare systems. Furthermore, they may not reveal important differences between treatments of equivalent anti-tumour efficacy that might influence the overall effectiveness in terms of acceptability of therapy. To achieve this, a broader, patient-centred evaluation of advanced cancer treatment is required that acknowledges the views, experience and perspectives of all involved in the treatment process. To this end, the International Working Group in Colorectal Cancer, a multidisciplinary group that encompasses expertise from a range of relevant fields and disciplines, has advocated a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer that is likely to deliver the best possible overall care. PMID:9579848

Minsky, B. D.

1998-01-01

73

Palliative Radiotherapy with or without Additional Care by a Multidisciplinary Palliative Care Team: A Retrospective Comparison  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To analyze pattern of care and survival after palliative radiotherapy (RT) in patients managed exclusively by regular oncology staff or a multidisciplinary palliative care team (MPCT) in addition. Methods. Retrospective analysis of 522 RT courses. Comparison of Two Groups: MPCT versus none. Results. We analyzed 140 RT courses (27%) with MPCT care and 382 without it. The following statistically significant differences were observed: 33% of female patients had MPCT care versus only 23% of male patients and 37% of patients <65 years had MPCT care versus only 22% of older patients. MPCT patients were more likely to have poor performance status and liver metastases. In the MPCT group steroid and opioid use was significantly more common. Dose-fractionation regimens were similar. Median survival was significantly shorter in the MPCT group, 3.9 versus 6.9 months. In multivariate analysis, MPCT care was not associated with survival. Adjusted for confounders, MPCT care reduced the likelihood of incomplete RT by 33%, P > 0.05. Conclusions. Patterns of referral and care differed, for example, regarding age and medication use. It seems possible that MPCT care reduces likelihood of incomplete RT. Therefore, the impact of MPCT care on symptom control should be investigated and objective referral criteria should be developed. PMID:25006507

Dalhaug, Astrid; Pawinski, Adam; Aandahl, Gro; Haukland, Ellinor; Engljähringer, Kirsten

2014-01-01

74

Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit  

PubMed Central

Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. Practitioner Summary: This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams PMID:24837514

Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

2014-01-01

75

Experiences of Multidisciplinary Development Team Members During User-Centered Design of Telecare Products and Services: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background User-centered design (UCD) methodologies can help take the needs and requirements of potential end-users into account during the development of innovative telecare products and services. Understanding how members of multidisciplinary development teams experience the UCD process might help to gain insight into factors that members with different backgrounds consider critical during the development of telecare products and services. Objective The primary objective of this study was to explore how members of multidisciplinary development teams experienced the UCD process of telecare products and services. The secondary objective was to identify differences and similarities in the barriers and facilitators they experienced. Methods Twenty-five members of multidisciplinary development teams of four Research and Development (R&D) projects participated in this study. The R&D projects aimed to develop telecare products and services that can support self-management in elderly people or patients with chronic conditions. Seven participants were representatives of end-users (elderly persons or patients with chronic conditions), three were professional end-users (geriatrician and nurses), five were engineers, four were managers (of R&D companies or engineering teams), and six were researchers. All participants were interviewed by a researcher who was not part of their own development team. The following topics were discussed during the interviews: (1) aim of the project, (2) role of the participant, (3) experiences during the development process, (4) points of improvement, and (5) what the project meant to the participant. Results Experiences of participants related to the following themes: (1) creating a development team, (2) expectations regarding responsibilities and roles, (3) translating user requirements into technical requirements, (4) technical challenges, (5) evaluation of developed products and services, and (6) valorization. Multidisciplinary team members from different backgrounds often reported similar experienced barriers (eg, different members of the development team speak a “different language”) and facilitators (eg, team members should voice expectations at the start of the project to prevent miscommunication at a later stage). However, some experienced barriers and facilitators were reported only by certain groups of participants. For example, only managers reported the experience that having different ideas about what a good business case is within one development team was a barrier, whereas only end-users emphasized the facilitating role of project management in end-user participation and the importance of continuous feedback from researchers on input of end-users. Conclusions Many similarities seem to exist between the experienced barriers and facilitators of members of multidisciplinary development teams during UCD of telecare products and services. However, differences in experiences between team members from various backgrounds exist as well. Insights into these similarities and differences can improve understanding between team members from different backgrounds, which can optimize collaboration during the development of telecare products and services. PMID:24840245

2014-01-01

76

Program design by a multidisciplinary team. [for structural finite element analysis on STAR-100 computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of software engineering aids in the design of a structural finite-element analysis computer program for the STAR-100 computer is described. Nested functional diagrams to aid in communication among design team members were used, and a standardized specification format to describe modules designed by various members was adopted. This is a report of current work in which use of the functional diagrams provided continuity and helped resolve some of the problems arising in this long-running part-time project.

Voigt, S.

1975-01-01

77

The Impact of Transformational Leadership on Individual and Team Performance: Evidence from Knowledge Work Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study explored the effect of transformational leadership of knowledge work team leaders on team members' individual performance, which included both in-role behavior and organizational citizenship behavior(OCB), and team performance. Survey data was collected from a sample of 54 knowledge work teams in high-tech organizations in four cities of China. The results of hierarchical regression showed that relationship-oriented transformational

Wu Xin; Wu Zhiming

2007-01-01

78

Selected Research on Work Team Diversity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains seven exploratory research papers from a conference on diversity and workplace teams. The authors examine diversity in terms of a variety of attributes, including race and sex. The book is divided into three sections. The first contains three papers that deal with the management of diverse teams. The following papers are…

Ruderman, Marian N., Ed.; And Others

79

Training Students to Work Effectively in Partially Distributed Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology teams are often partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT consists of two or more subteams that are separated geographically. This article describes research focused on the use of PDTs to engage students in "real world" IT team learning about the subject matter while also teaching them the skills they will need to work in…

Ocker, Rosalie; Rosson, Mary Beth; Kracaw, Dana; Hiltz, S. Roxanne

2009-01-01

80

A Method to Improve Learning Analysing Communication in Team Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years learning how to work in teams has become a common subject in higher education. Communication between student team members can be monitored using a bulletin board system, and hence, analyse individual and group role development. The composition and distribution of roles in a team are relevant characteristics that will considerably…

Bermejo, Miren; Sanchez, Ana; Gutierrez, Julian; Perez, Tomas A.

2011-01-01

81

Cross-functional Teams and Informal Social Networks: A Case Study of Project Development and Performance in a Multidisciplinary Science and Technology National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study focuses on a single cross-functional project team in a multidisciplinary science and technology national laboratory in the United States, with particular emphasis on the contribution of team- member networks to project success. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with members of the subject team and with project stakeholders to identify how this factor, namely network-embeddedness, along with other organizational

Mario A. Rivera; Max M. Valdez

82

Multidisciplinary Team Contributions Within a Dedicated Outpatient Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic: A Prospective Descriptive Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient

Edith Pituskin; Alysa Fairchild; Jennifer Dutka; Lori Gagnon; Amy Driga; Patty Tachynski; Jo-Ann Borschneck; Sunita Ghosh

2010-01-01

83

To adopt is to adapt: the process of implementing the ICF with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team in England  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The success of the International Classifcation of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) depends on its uptake in clinical practice. This project aimed to explore ways the ICF could be used with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team and identify key learning from the implementation process. Method: Using an action research approach, iterative cycles of observe, plan, act and evaluate were used within three phases: exploratory; innovatory and refective. Thematic analysis was undertaken, using a model of immersion and crystallisation, on data collected via interview and focus groups, e-mail communications, minutes from relevant meetings, feld notes and a refective diary. Results: Two overall themes were determined from the data analysis which enabled implementation. There is a need to: (1) adopt the ICF in ways that meet local service needs; and (2) adapt the ICF language and format. Conclusions: The empirical fndings demonstrate how to make the ICF classifcation a clinical reality. First, we need to adopt the ICF as a vehicle to implement local service priorities e.g. to structure a multidisciplinary team report, thus enabling ownership of the implementation process. Second, we need to adapt the ICF terminology and format to make it acceptable for use by clinicians. PMID:22372376

Tempest, Stephanie; Harries, Priscilla; Kilbride, Cherry; De Souza, Lorraine

2012-01-01

84

Improving teamwork, confidence, and collaboration among members of a pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit multidisciplinary team using simulation-based team training.  

PubMed

Findings show that simulation-based team training (SBTT) is effective at increasing teamwork skills. Postpediatric cardiac surgery cardiac arrest (PPCS-CA) is a high-risk clinical situation with high morbidity and mortality. Whereas adult guidelines managing cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery are available, little exists for pediatric cardiac surgery. The authors developed a post-PPCS-CA algorithm and used SBTT to improve identification and management of PPCS-CA in the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. Their goal was to determine whether participation aids in improving teamwork, confidence, and communication during these events. The authors developed a simulation-based training course using common postcardiac surgical emergency scenarios with specific learning objectives. Simulated scenarios are followed by structured debriefings. Participants were evaluated based on critical performance criteria, key elements in the PPCS-CA algorithm, and Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (Team STEPPS) principles. Surveys performed before, immediately after, and 3 months after participation evaluated perception of skill, knowledge, and confidence. The study had 37 participants (23 nurses, 5 cardiology/critical care trainees, 5 respiratory therapists, and 4 noncategorized subjects). Confidence and skill in the roles of team leader, advanced airway management, and cardioversion/defibrillation were increased significantly (p < 0.05) immediately after training and 3 months later. A significant increase (p < 0.05) also was observed in the use of Team STEPPS concepts immediately after training and 3 months later. This study showed SBTT to be effective in improving communication and increasing confidence among members of a multidisciplinary team during crisis scenarios. Thus, SBTT provides an excellent tool for teaching and implementing new processes. PMID:22972517

Figueroa, Mayte I; Sepanski, Robert; Goldberg, Steven P; Shah, Samir

2013-03-01

85

Determinants of treatment plan implementation in multidisciplinary team meetings for patients with chronic diseases: a mixed-methods study  

PubMed Central

Objective Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are assumed to produce better decisions and are extensively used to manage chronic disease in the National Health Service (NHS). However, evidence for their effectiveness is mixed. Our objective was to investigate determinants of MDT effectiveness by examining factors influencing the implementation of MDT treatment plans. This is a proxy measure of effectiveness, because it lies on the pathway to improvements in health, and reflects team decision making which has taken account of clinical and non-clinical information. Additionally, this measure can be compared across MDTs for different conditions. Methods We undertook a prospective mixed-methods study of 12 MDTs in London and North Thames. Data were collected by observation of 370 MDT meetings, interviews with 53 MDT members, and from 2654 patient medical records. We examined the influence of patient-related factors (disease, age, sex, deprivation, whether their preferences and other clinical/health behaviours were mentioned) and MDT features (as measured using the ‘Team Climate Inventory’ and skill mix) on the implementation of MDT treatment plans. Results The adjusted odds (or likelihood) of implementation was reduced by 25% for each additional professional group represented at the MDT meeting. Implementation was more likely in MDTs with clear goals and processes and a good ‘Team Climate’ (adjusted OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.15 to 3.31 for a unit increase in Team Climate Inventory (TCI) score). Implementation varied by disease category, with the lowest adjusted odds of implementation in mental health teams. Implementation was also lower for patients living in more deprived areas (adjusted odds of implementation for patients in the most compared with least deprived areas was 0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.91). Conclusions Greater multidisciplinarity is not necessarily associated with more effective decision making. Explicit goals and procedures are also crucial. Decision implementation should be routinely monitored to ensure the equitable provision of care. PMID:24915539

Raine, Rosalind; Xanthopoulou, Penny; Wallace, Isla; Nic a’ Bháird, Caoimhe; Lanceley, Anne; Clarke, Alex; Livingston, Gill; Prentice, Archie; Ardron, Dave; Harris, Miriam; King, Michael; Michie, Susan; Blazeby, Jane M; Austin-Parsons, Natalie; Gibbs, Simon; Barber, Julie

2014-01-01

86

Structured Learning Teams: Reimagining Student Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Even in a standards-based curriculum, teachers can apply constructivist practices such as structured learning teams. In this environment, students become invested in the learning aims, triggering the desire in students to awaken, get information, interpret, remix, share, and design scenarios.

Lendvay, Gregory C.

2014-01-01

87

The Management Team: Making It Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the REASONS (Responsive, Evaluative Accountability System Operating Newark Schools) program, based on team-oriented management by objectives principles. Reviews REASONS' system for annually defining and refining district missions and system development, unit development, personal growth, and operational objectives, which serve as the…

Bainbridge, William L.; Evans, George C.

1982-01-01

88

The Management Team: Making It Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1980 the Newark (Ohio) City School District established a team management system called REASONS--an acronym for Responsive, Evaluative Accountability System Operating Newark Schools. The goals of the REASONS program comprise systematic planning and accomplishment of objectives, increased productivity, open two-way communication, and peer…

Bainbridge, William L.; Evans, George C.

89

Working Together: The Special Needs Team.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A team approach will ensure that special needs, or at-risk, students receive appropriate evaluation services, guidance and counseling, instructional materials, remedial assistance, and placement and followup services. Cooperation among vocational education, special education, and vocational rehabilitation is essential in providing services for…

Feichtner, Sheila; Sarkees, Michelle

1987-01-01

90

A MULTIDISCIPLINARY PRACTICE MODEL FOR INDEPENDENT PRACTITIONERS WHO WORK WITH OLDER ADULTS IN THE COMMUNITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a framework for the integration of community services for older adults. A model for multidisciplinary practice is introduced to teach students and professionals how independent practitioners can integrate their community practices. Practitioners from disciplines such as medicine, nursing, social work, psychiatry, psychology, finance, law, and religion can develop collaborative community practices to more effectively serve older adults.

Terry Tirrito; Ilene Nathanson; Nieli Langer

1996-01-01

91

Teacher Teams: Exploring Job Characteristics and Work-Related Outcomes of Work Group Enhancement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores how teacher teams influence middle-school teachers' work characteristics and other work-related variables. Participating teachers whose jobs had a work-group emphasis (interdisciplinary teaming) reported significantly higher skill variety, knowledge of students, satisfaction, professional commitment, motivation, and team helpfulness and…

Pounder, Diana G.

1999-01-01

92

Pressure ulcer multidisciplinary teams via telemedicine: a pragmatic cluster randomized stepped wedge trial in long term care  

PubMed Central

Background The study was conducted to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of enhanced multi-disciplinary teams (EMDTs) vs. ‘usual care’ for the treatment of pressure ulcers in long term care (LTC) facilities in Ontario, Canada Methods We conducted a multi-method study: a pragmatic cluster randomized stepped-wedge trial, ethnographic observation and in-depth interviews, and an economic evaluation. Long term care facilities (clusters) were randomly allocated to start dates of the intervention. An advance practice nurse (APN) with expertise in skin and wound care visited intervention facilities to educate staff on pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, supported by an off-site hospital based expert multi-disciplinary wound care team via email, telephone, or video link as needed. The primary outcome was rate of reduction in pressure ulcer surface area (cm2/day) measured on before and after standard photographs by an assessor blinded to facility allocation. Secondary outcomes were time to healing, probability of healing, pressure ulcer incidence, pressure ulcer prevalence, wound pain, hospitalization, emergency department visits, utility, and cost. Results 12 of 15 eligible LTC facilities were randomly selected to participate and randomized to start date of the intervention following the stepped wedge design. 137 residents with a total of 259 pressure ulcers (stage 2 or greater) were recruited over the 17 month study period. No statistically significant differences were found between control and intervention periods on any of the primary or secondary outcomes. The economic evaluation demonstrated a mean reduction in direct care costs of $650 per resident compared to ‘usual care’. The qualitative study suggested that onsite support by APN wound specialists was welcomed, and is responsible for reduced costs through discontinuation of expensive non evidence based treatments. Insufficient allocation of nursing home staff time to wound care may explain the lack of impact on healing. Conclusion Enhanced multi-disciplinary wound care teams were cost effective, with most benefit through cost reduction initiated by APNs, but did not improve the treatment of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. Policy makers should consider the potential yield of strengthening evidence based primary care within LTC facilities, through outreach by APNs. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01232764 PMID:24559218

2014-01-01

93

The Effect of a Nurse-Led Multidisciplinary Team on Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Rates  

PubMed Central

Background. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a worrisome, yet potentially preventable threat in critically ill patients. Evidence-based clinical practices targeting the prevention of VAP have proven effective, but the most optimal methods to ensure consistent implementation and compliance remain unknown. Methods. A retrospective study of the trend in VAP rates in a community-hospital's open medical intensive care unit (MICU) after the enactment of a nurse-led VAP prevention team. The period of the study was between April 1, 2009, and September 30, 2012. The team rounded on mechanically ventilated patients every Tuesday and Thursday. They ensured adherence to the evidence-based VAP prevention. A separate and independent infection control team monitored VAP rates. Results. Across the study period, mean VAP rate was 3.20/1000 ventilator days ±5.71 SD. Throughout the study time frame, there was an average monthly reduction in VAP rate of 0.27/1000 ventilator days, P < 0.001 (CI: ?0.40–?0.13). Conclusion. A nurse-led interdisciplinary team dedicated to VAP prevention rounding twice a week to ensure adherence with a VAP prevention bundle lowered VAP rates in a community-hospital open MICU. The team had interdepartmental and administrative support and addressed any deficiencies in the VAP prevention bundle components actively. PMID:25061525

Dosher, W. Bradley; Loomis, Elena C.; Richardson, Sherry L.; Crowell, Jennifer A.; Waltman, Richard D.; Miller, Lisa D.; Nazim, Muhammad; Khasawneh, Faisal A.

2014-01-01

94

The multidisciplinary health care team in the management of stenosis in Crohn’s disease  

PubMed Central

Background Stricture formation is a common complication of Crohn’s disease (CD), occurring in approximately one-third of all patients with this condition. Our aim was to summarize the available epidemiology data on strictures in patients with CD, to outline the principal evidence on diagnostic imaging, and to provide an overview of the current knowledge on treatment strategies, including surgical and endoscopic options. Overall, the unifying theme of this narrative review is the multidisciplinary approach in the clinical management of patients with stricturing CD. Methods A Medline search was performed, using “Inflammatory Bowel Disease”, “stricture”, “Crohn’s Disease”, “Ulcerative Colitis”, “endoscopic balloon dilatation” and “strictureplasty” as keywords. A selection of clinical cohort studies and systematic reviews were reviewed. Results Strictures in CD are described as either inflammatory or fibrotic. They can occur de novo, at sites of bowel anastomosis or in the ileal pouch. CD-related strictures generally show a poor response to medical therapies, and surgical bowel resection or surgical strictureplasty are often required. Over the last three decades, the potential role of endoscopic balloon dilatation has grown in importance, and nowadays this technique is a valid option, complementary to surgery. Conclusion Patients with stricturing CD require complex clinical management, which benefits from a multidisciplinary approach: gastroenterologists, pediatricians, radiologists, surgeons, specialist nurses, and dieticians are among the health care providers involved in supporting these patients throughout diagnosis, prevention of complications, and treatment. PMID:25878504

Gasparetto, Marco; Angriman, Imerio; Guariso, Graziella

2015-01-01

95

Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

2010-01-01

96

Multidisciplinary teams, and parents, negotiating common ground in shared-care of children with long-term conditions: A mixed methods study  

PubMed Central

Background Limited negotiation around care decisions is believed to undermine collaborative working between parents of children with long-term conditions and professionals, but there is little evidence of how they actually negotiate their respective roles. Using chronic kidney disease as an exemplar this paper reports on a multi-method study of social interaction between multidisciplinary teams and parents as they shared clinical care. Methods Phases 1 and 2: a telephone survey mapping multidisciplinary teams’ parent-educative activities, and qualitative interviews with 112 professionals (Clinical-psychologists, Dietitians, Doctors, Nurses, Play-specialists, Pharmacists, Therapists and Social-workers) exploring their accounts of parent-teaching in the 12 British children’s kidney units. Phase 3: six ethnographic case studies in two units involving observations of professional/parent interactions during shared-care, and individual interviews. We used an analytical framework based on concepts drawn from Communities of Practice and Activity Theory. Results Professionals spoke of the challenge of explaining to each other how they are aware of parents’ understanding of clinical knowledge, and described three patterns of parent-educative activity that were common across MDTs: Engaging parents in shared practice; Knowledge exchange and role negotiation, and Promoting common ground. Over time, professionals had developed a shared repertoire of tools to support their negotiations with parents that helped them accomplish common ground during the practice of shared-care. We observed mutual engagement between professionals and parents where a common understanding of the joint enterprise of clinical caring was negotiated. Conclusions For professionals, making implicit knowledge explicit is important as it can provide them with a language through which to articulate more clearly to each other what is the basis of their intuition-based hunches about parents’ support needs, and may help them to negotiate with parents and accelerate parents’ learning about shared caring. Our methodology and results are potentially transferrable to shared management of other conditions. PMID:23835151

2013-01-01

97

Humanitarian cardiac care in Arequipa, Peru: experiences of a multidisciplinary Canadian cardiovascular team  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence of cardiovascular disease and its associated mortality continue to increase in developing countries despite unparalleled improvements in cardiovascular medicine over the last century. Cardiovascular care in developing nations is often constrained by limited resources, poor access, lack of specialty training and inadequate financial support. Medical volunteerism by experienced health care teams can provide mentorship, medical expertise and health policy advice to local teams and improve cardiovascular patient outcomes. Methods We report our experience from annual successive humanitarian medical missions to Arequipa, Peru, and describe the challenges faced when performing cardiovascular interventions with limited resources. Results Over a 2-year period, we performed a total of 15 cardiac repairs in patients with rheumatic, congenital and ischemic heart disease. We assessed and managed 150 patients in an outpatient clinic, including 7 patients at 1-year postoperative follow-up. Conclusion Despite multiple challenges, we were able to help the local team deliver advanced cardiovascular care to many patients with few alternatives and achieve good early and 1-year outcomes. Interdisciplinary education at all levels of cardiac care, including preoperative assessment, intraoperative surgical and anesthetic details, and postoperative critical care management, were major goals for our medical missions. PMID:22630071

Adams, Corey; Kiefer, Philipp; Ryan, Kenneth; Smith, David; McCabe, Greg; Allen, Peter; Sridhar, Kumar; Torres, Pedro; Chu, Michael W.A.

2012-01-01

98

Chronic back pain and work disability: Vocational outcomes following multidisciplinary rehabilitation.  

PubMed

Studies indicate that work disabled chronic back pain patients out of work for longer than three months have a reduced probability of returning to work. The escalating personal and economic costs (indemnity and health care) associated with such long term disability have facilitated efforts at multiple levels to prevent and more effectively manage work disability. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MDR) targeted at return to work represents one such approach. The approach is based upon a multidimensional conceptualization of work disability and integrates medical, physical, psychological, educational and vocational interventions to increase physical function, reduce pain, increase stress coping skills and facilitate return to work. Seven outpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation outcome studies for chronic back pain were identified that met the following selection criteria: 1) diagnosis of back pain, low back pain, spinal disorder (specific and nonspecific diagnosis), 2) chronic back pain of either longer than three months since injury or longer than three months absence from work, 3) use of an outpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation approach that included some combination of medical management, physical conditioning, pain and stress management, vocational counseling/placement and education regarding back safety and health, and 4) work reentry was the primary focus of outcome. These were reviewed to determine the effectiveness of MDR in terms of return to work outcome. Analyses revealed that an average of 71 percent of work disabled chronic back pain patients who completed a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program were working or involved in vocational rehabilitation efforts at 12 month follow-up in contrast to an average of 44 percent in corresponding comparison groups. While these studies suggest the clinical utility of a multidisciplinary approach as compared to usual care in facilitating return to work for chronic back pain patients, the literature was characterized by several methodological limitations including the absence of randomization in the majority of studies, use of insurance company denials as control groups, heterogenous samples in terms of duration of work disability, job availability at discharge, extent of impairment and disability, age and duration of pain disorder, lack of specification as to exact treatment delivered in the control or usual care groups and varying definitions of return to work outcome. Research on predictors of return to work outcome following MDR were identified and included variables in five categories: demographics, medical history, physical findings, pain and psychological characteristics. The literature provides support for the use of integrated approaches that target the medical, physical, ergonomic and psychosocial factors that can exacerbate and/or maintain work disability. Future research should address current methodological limitations in the literature and focus on: 1) identifying critical treatment components of such approaches, 2) developing innovative screening methods to identify high risk cases to facilitate earlier more targeted efforts to assist such individuals, and 3) consider variations in the staging of various combinations of interventions in an effort to develop more cost-effective variations in the multidisciplinary approach. PMID:24234509

Feuerstein, M; Menz, L; Zastowny, T; Barron, B A

1994-12-01

99

Team Teaching in Social Work: Sharing Power with Bachelor of Social Work Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Team teaching in social work education usually involves sequential lectures delivered by different instructors--relay or tag-team teaching. Truly collaborative or collegial team teaching involves a committed group of diverse instructors interacting together as equals in the classroom. Having more than one teacher in the classroom confounds…

Zapf, Michael Kim; Jerome, Les; Williams, Margaret

2011-01-01

100

Bowel endometriosis: Colorectal surgeon’s perspective in a multidisciplinary surgical team  

PubMed Central

Endometriosis is a gynecological condition that presents as endometrial-like tissue outside the uterus and induces a chronic inflammatory reaction. Up to 15% of women in their reproductive period are affected by this condition. Deep endometriosis is defined as endometriosis located more than 5 mm beneath the peritoneal surface. This type of endometriosis is mostly found on the uterosacral ligaments, inside the rectovaginal septum or vagina, in the rectosigmoid area, ovarian fossa, pelvic peritoneum, ureters, and bladder, causing a distortion of the pelvic anatomy. The frequency of bowel endometriosis is unknown, but in cases of bowel infiltration, about 90% are localized on the sigmoid colon or the rectum. Colorectal involvement results in alterations of bowel habits such as constipation, diarrhea, tenesmus, dyschezia, and, rarely, rectal bleeding. Differential diagnosis must be made in case of irritable bowel syndrome, solitary rectal ulcer syndrome, and a rectal tumor. A precise diagnosis about the presence, location, and extent of endometriosis is necessary to plan surgical treatment. Multidisciplinary laparoscopic treatment has become the standard of care. Depending on the size of the lesion and site of involvement, full-thickness disc excision or bowel resection needs to be performed by an experienced colorectal surgeon. Long-term outcomes, following bowel resection for severe endometriosis, regarding pain and recurrence rate are good with a pregnancy rate of 50%. PMID:25400445

Wolthuis, Albert M; Meuleman, Christel; Tomassetti, Carla; D’Hooghe, Thomas; de Buck van Overstraeten, Anthony; D’Hoore, André

2014-01-01

101

(International Energy Agency Heat Pump Center Working Team meeting)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler, serving as Delegate from the United States Heat Pump Center National Team, participated in the activities of the second International Energy Agency Heat Pump Center (IEA-HPC) Working Team meeting. This included a 20 minute presentation by the traveler about the Development and Activities of the IEA Heat Pump Center US National Team.'' Highlights of this meeting included development of 1991 IEA-HPC work plans including a prioritization of activities, introduction of the newly appointed IEA-HPC Advisory Board, and discussion of a new IEA Clearinghouse Network initiative. Pre-meeting discussions were held with IEA-HPC staff members which focused on US Heat Pump Center National Team contributions to the IEA-HPC Newsletter and participation in other IEA-HPC sponsored activities.

Broders, M.A.

1990-11-20

102

Analysis of time taken to discuss new patients with head and neck cancer in multidisciplinary team meetings.  

PubMed

Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings have an important role in the management of head and neck cancer. Increasing incidence of the disease and a drive towards centralised meetings on large numbers of patients mean that effective discussions are pertinent. We aimed to evaluate new cases within a single high volume head and neck cancer MDT and to explore the relation between the time taken to discuss each case, the number of discussants, and type of case. A total of 105 patients with a new diagnosis of head and neck malignancy or complex benign tumour were discussed at 10 head and neck cancer MDT meetings. A single observer timed each discussion using a stopwatch, and recorded the number of discussants and the diagnosis and characteristics of each patient. Timings ranged from 15 to 480 s (8 min) with a mean of 119 s (2 min), and the duration of discussion correlated closely with the number of discussants (rs=0.63, p<0.001). The longest discussions concerned patients with advanced T stage (p=0.006) and advanced N stage (p=0.009) disease, the elderly (p=0.02) and male patients (p=0.05). Tumour site and histological findings were not significant factors in the duration of discussion. Most discussions on patients with early stage tumours were short (T1: 58% less than 60s, mean 90) and fewer people contributed. Many patients, particularly those with early stage disease, require little discussion, and their treatment might reasonably be planned according to an agreed protocol, which would leave more time and resources for those that require greater multidisciplinary input. Further studies may highlight extended discussions on patients with head and neck cancer, which may prompt a review of protocols and current evidence. PMID:24280116

Mullan, B J; Brown, J S; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N; Shaw, R J

2014-02-01

103

76 FR 10403 - Hewlett Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working On-Site...Technology Business Development Team, the Engineering Application Support Team, and the Engineering Workstation Refresh Team. On...

2011-02-24

104

Symptomatic lumbar osteochondroma treated via a multidisciplinary military surgical team: case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

The authors describe the case of a giant osteochondroma emanating from the L5 vertebral body and extending into the retroperitoneum of a 40-year-old man, causing low back pain. Osteochondromas are benign bony tumors that typically occur within the appendicular skeleton, although in the sporadic form, up to 4% occur in the spine. A review of the English language literature has returned 44 cases of lumbar osteochondroma, including the present example. The lesions were sporadic in 81% of cases. Mean age of presentation overall is 39.5 years, with a mean age of 18.4 years (range 8-34 years) for hereditary cases and 45.7 years (range 11-81 years) for solitary lesions. Of the instances where gender was reported, 64% were male. The most common level of origin was L4 (38%). The most common anatomic site of origin was the inferior articular process (one-third). Of those lesions treated operatively, 46% underwent simple decompression, with 22% requiring decompression and fusion. This particular lesion was resected via a transperitoneal approach performed by a multidisciplinary team of neurosurgeons, vascular surgeons, and urologists. The bony tumor measured 6.1 × 7.8 × 7.7 cm. Removal of the lesion resulted in a significant improvement of the patient's symptoms. PMID:25562870

Rymarczuk, George N; Dirks, Michael S; Whittaker, David R; Neal, Chris J

2015-01-01

105

Primary care team working in Ireland: a qualitative exploration of team members' experiences in a new primary care service.  

PubMed

Team working is an integral aspect of primary care, but barriers to effective team working can limit the effectiveness of a primary care team (PCT). The establishment of new PCTs in Ireland provides an excellent opportunity to explore team working in action. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of team members working in a PCT. Team members (n = 19) from two PCTs were interviewed from May to June 2010 using a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using NVivo (version 8). Thematic analysis was used to explore the data. We identified five main themes that described the experiences of the team members. The themes were support for primary care, managing change, communication, evolution of roles and benefits of team working. Team members were generally supportive of primary care and had experienced benefits to their practice and to the care of their patients from participation in the team. Regular team meetings enabled communication and discussion of complex cases. Despite the significant scope for role conflict due to the varied employment arrangements of the team members, neither role nor interpersonal conflict was evident in the teams studied. In addition, despite the unusual team structure in Irish PCTs - where there is no formally appointed team leader or manager - general issues around team working and its benefits and challenges were very similar to those found in other international studies. This suggests, in contrast to some studies, that some aspects of the leadership role may not be as important in successful PCT functioning as previously thought. Nonetheless, team leadership was identified as an important issue in the further development of the teams. PMID:25429985

Kennedy, Norelee; Armstrong, Claire; Woodward, Oonagh; Cullen, Walter

2014-11-28

106

Team work project 1A The bird flu  

E-print Network

Team work project 1A The bird flu By Huy Quang Nguyen Kari Johanne Kihle Attramadal Brattøra................................................................................................................. 3 2. What is the bird flu? And which virus cause bird flu? What is the situation now?.... 3 3. How protect yourself if you have been in contact with potentially infection birds

Bech, Claus

107

Implementing Self-Directed Work Teams at a College Newspaper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The problem: Motivating and retaining staff had become an ongoing problem at the student newspaper. Student staffers would quit abruptly when overwhelmed or dissatisfied, leaving the newspaper with critical positions vacant. This affected the performance of the newspaper. Method: The newspaper was organized into self directed work teams (SDWTs).…

de Pillis, Emmeline; Parsons, Blake

2013-01-01

108

Making Workers Visible: Unmasking Learning in a Work Team.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A case study of a work team in a company using quality management strategies found that training to improve customer service actually served to shape workers' attitudes and control their behavior. The focus of this organizational learning was instrumental and served the interests of the organization, not the workers. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

Howell, Sharon L.; Carter, Vicki K.; Schied, Fred M.

2001-01-01

109

Enhancing Social Work Education through Team-Based Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Group learning strategies are used extensively in social work education, despite the challenges and negative outcomes regularly experienced by students and faculty. Building on principles of cooperative learning, team-based learning offers a more structured approach that maximizes the benefits of cooperative learning while also offering…

Gillespie, Judy

2012-01-01

110

Decision-making from multidisciplinary team meetings to the bedside: Factors influencing the recruitment of breast cancer patients into clinical trials | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

Multidisciplinary team meetings in comprehensive cancer centers identify potentially eligible patients and discuss clinical trial participation. However, a French study using retrospective chart review and physician surveys found that less than half (39%) of the identified patients were invited to participate by their physicians. Of those invited, 74% joined a trial. Physicians were most likely to offer diagnostic or prognostic trials and retired patients and executives were the most likely to enroll.

111

The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between self-directed work teams and traditional work groups using four work ethic subscales: dependable, considerate, ambitious, and cooperative (Dawson, [1999]; Petty, [1991]). Differences in measured work ethic scores were also compared across six demographic variables: age,…

Petty, Gregory C.; Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won; Fontan, Johnny

2008-01-01

112

The Open Science Grid - Support for Multi-Disciplinary Team Science - the Adolescent Years  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As it enters adolescence the Open Science Grid (OSG) is bringing a maturing fabric of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) services that supports an expanding HEP community to an increasingly diverse spectrum of domain scientists. Working closely with researchers on campuses throughout the US and in collaboration with national cyberinfrastructure initiatives, we transform their computing environment through new concepts, advanced tools and deep experience. We discuss examples of these including: the pilot-job overlay concepts and technologies now in use throughout OSG and delivering 1.4 Million CPU hours/day; the role of campus infrastructures- built out from concepts of sharing across multiple local faculty clusters (made good use of already by many of the HEP Tier-2 sites in the US); the work towards the use of clouds and access to high throughput parallel (multi-core and GPU) compute resources; and the progress we are making towards meeting the data management and access needs of non-HEP communities with general tools derived from the experience of the parochial tools in HEP (integration of Globus Online, prototyping with IRODS, investigations into Wide Area Lustre). We will also review our activities and experiences as HTC Service Provider to the recently awarded NSF XD XSEDE project, the evolution of the US NSF TeraGrid project, and how we are extending the reach of HTC through this activity to the increasingly broad national cyberinfrastructure. We believe that a coordinated view of the HPC and HTC resources in the US will further expand their impact on scientific discovery.

Bauerdick, Lothar; Ernst, Michael; Fraser, Dan; Livny, Miron; Pordes, Ruth; Sehgal, Chander; Würthwein, Frank; Open Science Grid

2012-12-01

113

The tough work of turning around a team.  

PubMed

Bill Parcells, one of the NFL's winningest coaches, offers business leaders three rules for reversing the fortunes of a losing team. He contends that the keys to motivating people are much the same whether they're playing on a football field or working in an office. The first rule is to make it clear from day one that you're in charge. Parcells has found that holding frank one-on-one conversations with every member of the organization is essential to success. Leaders can do everything right with their teams and still fail if they aren't able to reach each member as an individual. Rule two is that confrontation is healthy. Parcells relishes confrontation because it provides an opportunity to get things straight with people. Confrontation does not mean putting someone down. When criticizing members of the team, he puts it in a positive context. Once he sets that context, he's not afraid to be blunt about players' failings. Parcells's third rule is to identify small goals and hit them. He believes that success breeds success. Once a team gets in the habit of losing, confidence dips and success seems unreachable. To break the habit of losing, Parcells focuses on achieving goals within immediate reach. In the end, Parcells is convinced that if you get people on your team who share the same goals and the same passion, and if you push them to achieve at the highest level, you're going to come out on top. PMID:11184972

Parcells, B

2000-01-01

114

Critical Education for Work: Multidisciplinary Approaches. Social and Policy Issues in Education: The David C. Anchin Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book expands the meaning of today's education for work by offering five multidisciplinary approaches--school-to-work transitions, gender equity, labor education, economic democracy, and vocational education--revealing the complexities of personal, social, and cultural transformation. "Critical Education for Work" (Richard D. Lakes) is an…

Lakes, Richard D., Ed.

115

RoboCup: Multi-disciplinary Senior Design Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cross-college team of educators has developed a collaborative, multi-disciplinary senior design course at Ohio University. This course offers an attractive opportunity for students from a variety of disciplines to work together in a learning community to accomplish a challenging task. It provides a novel multi-disciplinary learning environment…

Elder, Kevin Lee

116

Are self-directed work teams successful and effective tools for today`s organization?  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to (1) show the effectiveness and success of self-directed work teams within the organization, (2) emphasize the importance of team building in the success of the team, and (3) assist organizations in building self-directed work teams. The researcher used a direct survey and studied the following team building techniques: (1) Is the team`s mission clearly defined to each team member? (2) Are the goals clearly defined and achievable by all team members? (3) Will empowerment (decision-making power) be given equally to all team members? (4) Will open and honest communication be allowed among team members? (5) Will each team member be respected and valued for his/her position on the team? (6) Are self-directed work teams effectively rewarded for accomplishments? (7) Have team members received adequate training to effectively complete their job tasks? Upon completion of the literature review and statistical data, and after analyzing the seven areas of team building techniques, it was determined three of the four teams were successful and effective. The only area of concern to the organization is that the participants felt they did not have true ownership of their teams; that is, team members were not given full empowerment. According to this study and the review of literature, full empowerment must be given to achieve successful and effective teams. If true empowerment is not given, the team will suffer in other areas of team building, and the organization will lose a valuable tool.

Arnwine, A.D.

1995-03-01

117

Affective Mechanisms Linking Dysfunctional Behavior to Performance in Work Teams: A Moderated Mediation Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examines the association between dysfunctional team behavior and team performance. Data included measures of teams' dysfunctional behavior and negative affective tone as well as supervisors' ratings of teams' (nonverbal) negative emotional expressivity and performance. Utilizing a field sample of 61 work teams, the authors tested the proposed relationships with robust data analytic techniques. Results were consistent with

Michael S. Cole; Frank Walter; Heike Bruch

2008-01-01

118

Building a healthy work environment: a nursing resource team perspective.  

PubMed

Leadership and staff from the London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) Nursing Resource Team (NRT), including members of their Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Council, attended the first Southern Ontario Nursing Resource Team Conference (SONRTC), held March 2012 in Toronto. The SONRTC highlighted healthy work environments (HWEs), noting vast differences among the province's various organizations. Conversely, CQI Council members anecdotally acknowledged similar inconsistencies in HWEs across the various inpatient departments at LHSC. In fact, the mobility of the NRT role allows these nurses to make an unbiased observation about the culture, behaviours and practices of specific units as well as cross-reference departments regarding HWEs. Studies have documented that HWEs have a direct impact on the quality of patient care. Furthermore, the literature supports a relationship between HWEs and nurse job satisfaction. Based on this heightened awareness, the NRT CQI Council aimed to investigate HWEs at LHSC. The American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments was adapted in developing a survey for measuring HWEs based on the perceptions of NRT staff. Each of the departments was evaluated in terms of the following indicators: skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision-making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition and authentic leadership (AACN 2005). Ultimately, the Building a Healthy Work Environment: A Nursing Resource Team Perspective survey was employed with NRT nurses at LHSC, and data was collected for use by leadership and staff for creating HWE strategies aimed at improving the quality of patient care. PMID:24860954

Vaughan, Leslie; Slinger, Trisha

2013-01-01

119

APPLYING LEARNING FROM SELF?DIRECTED WORK TEAMS IN BUSINESS TO CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY GERIATRIC TEAMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Business settings, which increasingly promote the value of teamwork and self?directed work teams (SDWTs), offer a popular model for team development training. SDWTs are formal, permanent organizational structures or units empowered to manage themselves and the work they do. SDWTs in business settings have many of the same features as, face similar issues and problems to, and have worked out

Theresa J. K. Drinka

1996-01-01

120

Individual autonomy in work teams: The role of team autonomy, self-efficacy, and social support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Task autonomy is long recognized as a means to improve functioning of individuals and teams. Taking a multilevel approach, we unravelled the constructs of team and individual autonomy and studied the interplay between team autonomy, self-efficacy, and social support in determining individual autonomy of team members. Hierarchical regression results of a survey among 733 members of 76 health care teams

H. van Mierlo; C. G. Rutte; J. K. Vermunt; M. A. J. Kompier; J. A. M. C. Doorewaard

2006-01-01

121

Team Physicians in College Athletics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:There has been little documentation of what constitutes the clinical work of intercollegiate team physicians. Team physicians could be recruited based on the needs of athletes.Hypothesis:A multidisciplinary team of physicians is necessary to treat college athletes. Most physician evaluations are for musculoskeletal injuries treated nonoperatively.Study Design:Descriptive epidemiology study.Methods:For a 2-year period, a database was created that recorded information on team

Mark E. Steiner; D. Bradford Quigley; Frank Wang; Christopher R. Balint; Arthur L. Boland

2005-01-01

122

(Mis) Perceptions and Interactions of Sleep Specialists and Generalists: Obstacles to Referrals to Sleep Specialists and the Multidisciplinary Team Management of Sleep Disorders  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: This study assessed generalists' perceptions and challenges in providing care to sleep disorders patients and the role of sleep specialists in improving gaps in care. Methods: A mixed-method approach included qualitative (semi-structured interviews, discussion groups) and quantitative (online surveys) data collection techniques regarding care of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and shift work disorder (SWD). Results: Participants: OSA: generalists n = 165, specialists (internists, neurologists, psychiatrists, pulmonologists) n = 12; SWD: generalists n = 216, specialists n = 108. Generalists reported challenges in assessing sleep disorders and diagnosing patients with sleep complaints. Generalists lacked confidence (selected ? 3 on a 5-pt Likert scale) in managing polypharmacy and drug interactions (OSA: 54.2%; SWD: 62.6%), addiction (OSA: 61.8%), and continuous positive airway pressure (OSA: 66.5%). Generalists in both studies reported deficits in knowledge of monitoring sleep disorders (OSA: 57.7%; SWD: 78.7%), rather relying on patients' subjective reports; 23% of SWD generalists did not identify SWD as a medical condition. Challenges to generalist-specialist collaboration were reported, with 66% of generalists and 68% of specialists in the SWD study reporting lack of coordination as a barrier. Generalists reported lack of consistency in sleep medicine and a perceived lack of value in consulting with sleep specialists. Conclusions: Knowledge and attitudinal challenges were found in primary care of patients with sleep disorders. Sleep specialists need to clarify and educate practitioners regarding primary care's approach. Citation: Hayes SM; Murray S; Castriotta RJ; Landrigan CP; Malhotra A. (Mis) perceptions and interactions of sleep specialists and generalists: obstacles to referrals to sleep specialists and the multidisciplinary team management of sleep disorders. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(6):633-642. PMID:23243396

Hayes, Sean M.; Murray, Suzanne; Castriotta, Richard J.; Landrigan, Christopher P.; Malhotra, Atul

2012-01-01

123

Multidisciplinary lymphedema treatment program.  

PubMed

Lymphedema is an underrecognized and undertreated condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in an individualized program that will address the special needs of each patient. In an ideal setting of an outpatient management program the team should be composed of a vascular surgeon, a dermatologist, a physiotherapist, a dietician, a psychologist, a social worker, and an office employee, working together in the assessment and management of all aspects of lymphedema. All treatment strategies and actions taken should ultimately focus on the improvement of the quality of life of patients suffering from lymphedema and on the prevention of lymphedema in high-risk patients. PMID:22336900

Papadopoulou, Maria-Christina; Tsiouri, Ioanna; Salta-Stankova, Roumiana; Drakou, Aikaterini; Rousas, Nikolaos; Roussaki-Schulze, Aggeliki-Victoria; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

2012-03-01

124

Mercury Orbiter: Report of the Science Working Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results are presented of the Mercury Orbiter Science Working Team which held three workshops in 1988 to 1989 under the auspices of the Space Physics and Planetary Exploration Divisions of NASA Headquarters. Spacecraft engineering and mission design studies at the Jet Propulsion Lab were conducted in parallel with this effort and are detailed elsewhere. The findings of the engineering study, summarized herein, indicate that spin stabilized spacecraft carrying comprehensive particles and fields experiments and key planetology instruments in high elliptical orbits can survive and function in Mercury orbit without costly sun shields and active cooling systems.

Belcher, John W.; Slavin, James A.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Akasofu, Syun I.; Baker, Daniel N.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Chupp, Edward L.; Clark, Pamela E.

1991-01-01

125

Creating a Classroom Team: How Teachers and Paraprofessionals Can Make Working Together Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Respect and communication. That's what teachers and paraprofessionals say makes an effective classroom team. In speaking with paraprofessionals and teachers, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has gathered several tips about how to make working together work. These tips include: (1) Creating a healthy, open relationship between teacher and…

American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2004

2004-01-01

126

Proposal for a Harvard-wide Multidisciplinary Center on Aging The Interfaculty Working Group on Aging* March 20, 2008  

E-print Network

of aging in cells and organisms (e.g., Glenn Laboratories) · Preventing disease and disability in humans (eProposal for a Harvard-wide Multidisciplinary Center on Aging The Interfaculty Working Group on Aging* March 20, 2008 Background: The rapid expansion of the global elderly population over the next 25

Goodrich, Lisa V.

127

Multidisciplinary Treatment Planning Questionnaire  

Cancer.gov

Multidisciplinary care, which incorporates Multidisciplinary Treatment Planning (MTP), is increasingly being adopted within oncology care settings with the intent of enhancing the quality of care delivered to patients. However, what is not known is its impact on improving patient outcomes and the quality of care being delivered. A targeted review of the literature was conducted to examine the organization and operation of the Multidisciplinary Care (MDC) team structure1. Findings revealed that a variety of implementation models exist within the health care system.

128

Making Explicit the Implicit Knowledge Assets in Healthcare: The Case of Multidisciplinary Teams in Care and Cure Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in Australia and the United States offers evidence of sophisticated, implicit, knowledge assets in two diverse healthcare environments, care and cure. Two case studies representing these two distinct archetypal environments are presented (a palliative care organization in Australia and a spinal care unit in the United States); both are based around multidisciplinary service delivery and demonstrate the existence of

Nilmini Wickramasinghe; Graydon Davison

2004-01-01

129

Integration of Multidisciplinary Design and Technical Communication  

E-print Network

, require a mastery of written and oral communication skills and the ability to work as part of a multidisciplinary team. In the sophomore year, communication (written and oral) and design (semester long in the technical prin- ciples, but, as importantly, require a mastery of written and oral communication skills

Ramachandran, Ravi

130

Preschool Work Teams' View of Ways of Working with Gender--Parents' Involvement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lately the interest to develop a gender-perspective in preschool has grown in Sweden. The aim of this study is to focus on Swedish preschool work teams understanding of gender and gender-sensitive pedagogy and their descriptions of what they actually do to be gender-sensitive preschools. Studies of gender and children often focus construction of…

Karlson, Ingrid; Simonsson, Maria

2008-01-01

131

The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT): A Multidisciplinary group for an improvement of Nanorisk Assessment and Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanotechnology allows the ability to design many new materials and devices with multiple applications, such as in medicine, electronics, and energy production. However, nanotechnology also raises several concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials. A report published by the Council of Canadian Academies points out the necessity to respond about many uncertainties associated with risk assessment for ensuring the safety of health and environment. Nanotoxicology (or Nanosafety) is a part of the toxicology science that aims to study adverse effects of nanomaterials or nanoparticles on living organisms. This field includes different aspects from workers prevention to the environment protection. Group of researchers have initiated an international powerful interactive milieu for researchers to work in concert for a global and integrated study of many aspects of nanotoxicology. The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT) is composed of research scientists from 5 different countries (Canada, USA, Japan, France and Germany) working together on 6 different specific thematics, and organized as 9 different technology platforms (www.titnt.com). TITNT aims to study different features of nanomaterials related to nanosafety, such as in vivo and in vitro studies, life cycle, occupational protections and monitoring, early biomarkers detection, characterization and nanotoxicokinetic/dynamic assessment during and after nanoparticles synthesis and the societal, public policy and environmental aspects. While the rapid growth of nanotechnology is opening up a floodgate of opportunities, the legislation related is lagging behind mainly because of a lack of knowledge in the biosafety of most nanomaterials. The main goal of TITNT is to improve knowledge in nanosafety science for the benefit of the discipline, for better public policies and for the public itself.

Emond, C.; Rolando, C.; Hirano, S.; Schuster, F.; Jolliet, O.; Maghni, K.; Meyer-Plath, A.; Hallé, S.; Vandelac, L.; Sentein, C.; Torkaski, C.

2011-07-01

132

Multidisciplinary Civics Lessons. Teacher's Handbook. Our Democracy: How America Works Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The lessons in this handbook are multidisciplinary, integrating social, legal, economic, and political content presented in new and thought-provoking ways. The lessons may be used in existing courses for grades 8 and 9 or in creating an interdisciplinary course focusing on civic education. The lessons are entitled: (1) "'More Than Just a Set of…

Banaszak, Ronald A., Ed.; Khadjenouri, Carol Adair; Laugen, Linda

133

Multidisciplinary Concurrent Design Optimization via the Internet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A methodology is presented which uses commercial design and analysis software and the Internet to perform concurrent multidisciplinary optimization. The methodology provides a means to develop multidisciplinary designs without requiring that all software be accessible from the same local network. The procedures are amenable to design and development teams whose members, expertise and respective software are not geographically located together. This methodology facilitates multidisciplinary teams working concurrently on a design problem of common interest. Partition of design software to different machines allows each constituent software to be used on the machine that provides the most economy and efficiency. The methodology is demonstrated on the concurrent design of a spacecraft structure and attitude control system. Results are compared to those derived from performing the design with an autonomous FORTRAN program.

Woodard, Stanley E.; Kelkar, Atul G.; Koganti, Gopichand

2001-01-01

134

The Massachusetts General Hospital Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (MGH PERT): creation of a multidisciplinary program to improve care of patients with massive and submassive pulmonary embolism.  

PubMed

New and innovative tools have emerged for the treatment of massive and submassive pulmonary embolism (PE). These novel treatments, when considered alongside existing therapy, such as anticoagulation, systemic intravenous thrombolysis, and open surgical pulmonary embolectomy, have the potential to improve patient outcomes. However, data comparing different treatment modalities are sparse, and guidelines provide only general advice for their use. Treatment decisions rest on clinician expertise and institutional resources. Because various medical and surgical specialties offer different perspectives and expertise, a multidisciplinary approach to patients with massive and submassive PE is required. To address this need, we created a novel multidisciplinary program - the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (PERT) - which brings together multiple specialists to rapidly evaluate intermediate- and high-risk patients with PE, formulate a treatment plan, and mobilize the necessary resources to provide the highest level of care. Development of a clinical, educational, and research infrastructure, as well as the creation of a national PERT consortium, will make our experience available to other institutions and serve as a platform for future studies to improve the care of complex patients with massive and submassive PE. PMID:24566594

Provias, Tim; Dudzinski, David M; Jaff, Michael R; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Channick, Richard; Baker, Joshua; Weinberg, Ido; Donaldson, Cameron; Narayan, Rajeev; Rassi, Andrew N; Kabrhel, Christopher

2014-02-01

135

The Anonymity Factor in Making Multicultural Teams Work: Virtual and Real Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major purpose of courses in intercultural communication is often to improve students' ability to perform well in situations with the potential to be both highly enlightening and highly difficult--in multicultural teams. This article reports the results of exercises in which members of a dysfunctional multicultural class were assigned to teams

Berg, Roberta Wiig

2012-01-01

136

A Theoretical Model and New Test of Managerial Legitimacy in Work Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines endorsement and authorization as two social mechanisms that can induce perceptions of legitimacy for individuals who manage work teams. "Endorsement" is the support of a manager by one's own team members, whereas "authorization" is the support of a team manager stemming from a higher bureaucratic level. Applying these…

Yoon, Jeongkoo; Thye, Shane

2011-01-01

137

A Case of Innovative Integration of High-Performance Work Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A case study of a Fortune 500 company was used to develop an integrated model of high-performance work organizations. Components are systems thinking, team interaction, team principles, and results. The model requires an ongoing training plan, change agents or champions, and recognition of teams' productive potential and fragile nature. (SK)

Thompson, Faye; Baughan, Donna; Motwani, Jaideep

1998-01-01

138

Evaluating Team Work on Student Projects: The Use of Behaviorally Anchored Scales To Evaluate Student Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the biggest problems students face in team projects is social loafing, a situation in which students may view team projects as a free ride. Social loafers let others do the work, knowing that the professor will only grade the completed project. This research examined the performance of students grading other student team members on a group…

Levi, Daniel; Cadiz, David

139

TEAM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents materials covering the television campaign against drunk driving called "TEAM" (Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management). It is noted that TEAM's purpose is to promote effective alcohol management in public facilities and other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. TEAM sponsors are listed, including the…

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

140

Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

2010-01-01

141

Teaming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaming is a method of grouping students so they share the same set of teachers for their core subject areas--science, math, language arts, social studies, and sometimes physical education and health. Most often, teams are created when an entire grade is broken into groups who share the same set of teachers. Small schools that do not have enough students to form teams can create a grade-level team or multigrade-level teams. The core subject teachers usually share a common planning period and, in many situations, also share a team planning period. Teaming is most often used in middle grades education because its positive outcomes are particularly appropriate to the developmental needs of young adolescents.

C. Jill Swango

2003-01-01

142

Leading team learning: what makes interprofessional teams learn to work well?  

PubMed

This article describes an ethnographic study focused on exploring leaders of team learning in well-established nephrology teams in an academic healthcare organization in Canada. Employing situational theory of leadership, the article provides details on how well established team members advance as "learning leaders". Data were gathered by ethnographic methods over a 9-month period with the members of two nephrology teams. These learning to care for the sick teams involved over 30 regulated health professionals, such as physicians, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, dietitians and other healthcare practitioners, staff, students and trainees, all of whom were collectively managing obstacles and coordinating efforts. Analysis involved an inductive thematic analysis of observations, reflections, and interview transcripts. The study indicated how well established members progress as team-learning leaders, and how they adapt to an interprofessional culture through the activities they employ to enable day-to-day learning. The article uses situational theory of leadership to generate a detailed illumination of the nature of leaders' interactions within an interprofessional context. PMID:24654793

Chatalalsingh, Carole; Reeves, Scott

2014-11-01

143

IMPORTANCE OF SELF-EFFICACY OF WORKING IN TEAM ENVIRONMENT IN DETERMINING INDIVIDUAL SATISFACTION AND PERFORMANCE: DOES IT DEPEND ON THE TEAM PERFORMANCE?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utilization of teams is increasingly becoming prevalent in high-tech entrepreneurial organizations. As the team approach is becoming popular, more and more employees are getting involved in teams. According to management literature, individual satisfaction is an important variable for long term organizational performance. Therefore, individual satisfaction of working in a team becomes an important consideration for the entrepreneurial organizations. This study

SANJIB CHOWDHURY

144

Reducing patients’ suicide ideation through training mental health teams in the application of the Dutch multidisciplinary practice guideline on assessment and treatment of suicidal behavior: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background To strengthen suicide prevention skills in mental health care in The Netherlands, multidisciplinary teams throughout the country are trained in the application of the new Dutch guideline on the assessment and treatment of suicidal behavior. Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of additional efforts for guideline implementation on professionals’ attitude, knowledge, and skills. However, the effects on patients are equally important, but are rarely measured. The main objective of this study is to examine whether patients of multidisciplinary teams who are trained in guideline application show greater recovery from suicide ideation than patients of untrained teams. Methods/Design This is a multicentre cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which multidisciplinary teams from mental health care institutions are matched in pairs, and randomly allocated to either the experimental or control condition. In the experimental condition, next to the usual dissemination of the guideline (internet, newsletter, books, publications, and congresses), teams will be trained in the application of the guideline via a 1-day small interactive group training program supported by e-learning modules. In the control condition, no additional actions next to usual dissemination of the guideline will be undertaken. Assessments at patient level will start when the experimental teams are trained. Assessments will take place upon admission and after 3 months, or earlier if the patient is discharged. The primary outcome is suicide ideation. Secondary outcomes are non-fatal suicide attempts, level of treatment satisfaction, and societal costs. Both a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis will be performed. The effects of the intervention will be examined in multilevel models. Discussion The strengths of this study are the size of the study, RCT design, training of complete multidisciplinary teams, and the willingness of both management and staff to participate. Trial registration Netherlands trial register: NTR3092 PMID:24195781

2013-01-01

145

Cornell Waste Management Institute Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals  

E-print Network

Cornell Waste Management Institute ­ Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals Program Work Team ­ Annual Meeting Summary Cornell Waste Management Institute Date: March 10, 2011 Location's meeting discussed 1) NY State's Solid Waste Management Plan and its focus on management of organics, 2

Wang, Z. Jane

146

Cross-Cultural Study into ICT Student Attitudes and Behaviours Concerning Teams and Project Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a project involving information and communication technology (ICT) students in Australia and Singapore, working together as a virtual global team. The authors investigated the question: Can differences be found in the behaviours and attitudes of our two cohorts to working in teams? This would allow…

Richards, Deborah; Bilgin, Ayse

2012-01-01

147

Fostering the Work Motivation of Individuals and Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes strategies for fostering individual motivation, focusing on unique motivation issues faced by teams and how to overcome them. Suggests that motivational programs can improve performance and solve performance problems, and that the challenge is to find ways to support individual and cultural beliefs about success and what makes them…

Clark, Richard E.

2003-01-01

148

Team Teaching Styles Utilized in Japan: Do They Really Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper continues the debate over TT (team-teaching) benefits and detriments. TT has been utilized extensively in Japan in English Language instructional courses at the elementary and junior high school levels over the past 20 years. Although at times satirical, the author in all seriousness discusses TT and; its advantages and disadvantages in…

Carley, Harry F., III

2013-01-01

149

A New Concept of Working Environment Improvement Within Multicultural Teams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multicultural team leaders under the conditions of globalisation process must understand that acquiring cultural awareness and diversity management skills is one of the premises for gaining competitive advantage and satisfying the employee? need for social cohesion. The concept presented in this paper goes beyond standard understanding of what cultural diversity management means, as it is not perceived as a set of activities that a business as a whole should be responsible for, but encourage every leader to take responsibility for its own awareness firstly. After understanding that cross-cultural competence is a lifelong learning process it is possible to start recognising one’s own cultural mindset before attempting to recognise those of people from other cultures. At this point it is a right time to spread the experience amongst other team members or associates.

Makraiová, Jana; Cagá?ová, Dagmar; ?ambál, Miloš

2012-12-01

150

Interdisciplinary child protection team work in a hospital setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  A retrospective study consisting of a data analysis of the Salzburg Child Protection Team (CPT) documentation and medical documentation was carried out. The objective was to investigate the frequency and distribution of maltreatment diagnoses and the spectrum of clinical symptoms of children reported to the interdisciplinary Salzburg CPT between 1996 and 2001.Results and discussion  The documentation covered a total of 286

L. Thun-Hohenstein

2006-01-01

151

"Teamwork" or "Working as a Team"? The Theory and Practice of Top Team Working in UK Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article focuses on the theory and practice of teamwork in "top management teams" in UK higher education institutions. It is informed by some of the key findings from a recent two-year research project sponsored by the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education that investigated the different ways in which UK higher education institutions…

Woodfield, Steve; Kennie, Tom

2008-01-01

152

Client-centred practices and work in inpatient rehabilitation teams: results from four case studies.  

PubMed

Abstract Purpose: To explore the relationship between client-centredness (CC) and work in teams in inpatient rehabilitation. Methods: Case study, mixed-method design, with strong qualitative component. Methods include ethnographic observations of team and clinical encounters for 6 months; healthcare professional (HCP) interviews. HCP n=45; Observations = 40 encounters & meetings. Results: Based on HCP perceptions, intra-team and organizational factors were identified that influence client-centred practice in rehabilitation. Team factors included relational and communication dimensions affecting work that can hinder or facilitate CC. These dimensions are presented in detail. HCP perceived organizational factors such as workload, schedules and hospital culture to influence their work on teams and with clients. Conclusion: CC is not a "one size fits all". It is affected by similar factors that affect work in teams such as organizational policies, team characteristics and culture. CC can be seen as an outcome of team performance. Implications for Rehabilitation Client-centred practice (CCP) is influenced by client, provider and organizational factors. CCP is not just about client-provider communication. How inter-professional teams work together is an important aspect of CCP. Shared knowledge, shared goals and mutual respect characterize the relationships among members in a team. These three dimensions influence, and are influenced by, the nature of team members' communication and the organizational structures and culture in which they take place. Effective teamwork does not automatically lead to enhanced client-centredness. Strategies are needed that ensure teamwork does not merely perpetuate the health professionals' control of the patient or that decisions are the "right" decisions from the health care professionals' perspectives. PMID:25163833

Papadimitriou, Christina; Cott, Cheryl

2014-08-28

153

The effects of extended work under sleep deprivation conditions on team-based performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teamwork is becoming increasingly common in today's workplaces; however, little research has examined how well teams perform under sleep deprivation conditions. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of extended work under sleep deprivation conditions on team performance. A total of 24 participants were sleep deprived for 30 h and completed 16 h of sustained operations during the

June J. Pilcher; Melissa A. Vander Wood; Kristina L. OConnell

2011-01-01

154

A Multidisciplinary Engineering Summer School in an Industrial Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most university-level engineering studies produce technically skilled engineers. However, typically students face several difficulties when working in multidisciplinary teams when they initiate their industrial careers. In a globalised world, it becomes increasingly important that engineers are capable of collaborating across disciplinary…

Larsen, Peter Gorm; Fernandes, Joao M.; Habel, Jacek; Lehrskov, Hanne; Vos, Richard J. C.; Wallington, Oliver; Zidek, Jan

2009-01-01

155

Multidisciplinary Management of Oral Cavity and Maxillary Sinus Cancers  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a During the last 30 years the belief that oral\\/head and neck cancer management is based on team work has been established.\\u000a The functions of tumor boards and combined clinics is a common contemporary practice with an exceedingly large number of medical,\\u000a surgical, and other specialties being part of comprehensive, multidisciplinary therapeutic head and neck teams. The basic\\u000a treatment modalities remain

Alexander D. Rapidis

156

APS team works smarter, cuts substation construction costs by 36%  

SciTech Connect

An aggressive, cost-cutting, team of T D employees at Arizona Public Service Co (APS) is building a new distribution substation in Phoenix for less than half the original cost that APS planners had calculated for the project's land, labor and materials. Scheduled for service in June of this year, APS analysts had originally projected land, labor and materials costs for the 20-MVA Bell substation at nearly $1.7-million-not including major equipment such as transformers, circuit breakers, and switches. However, after studying the project, an empowered APS crew was able to slash 36% off the original estimate-more than $610,000. What's more, APS spokesmen say that its new approach to substation construction and design has given its engineers and construction crews a laundry list of additional ideas to try out on future substation ventures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1993-05-01

157

SUCCESSFUL CLIENTS ARE: Fully engaged and committed to work with the team  

E-print Network

SUCCESSFUL CLIENTS ARE: · Fully engaged and committed to work with the team for the duration, but the agreement can be written to mask proprietary information - for example, substituting a pseudonym Supplier X

Awtar, Shorya

158

Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior  

PubMed Central

Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

2013-01-01

159

Interdisciplinary and Team Teaching: How Do We Make It Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Integrating academic and career tech curriculum is one of the primary objectives of the Carl Perkins Vocational Education Act (1998 reauthorization) and a guiding principle of the School to Work Opportunities Act. It has proven to be an invaluable approach to teaching, and educators across the nation have experienced firsthand how the application…

Gibbs, Hope J.

2003-01-01

160

A case study of team work and performance-linked payment of family physicians in Portugal.  

PubMed

In Portugal, the design and the implementation of models of primary care teams has a history of 30 years. The evolution observed is from individual medical work, in Health Centres, supported on an ad hoc basis by other health professionals, to health centres integrating a diversity of formal working groups, including primary care/family health teams called "Family Health Units" (FHU). This evolution included the creation and gradual affirmation of the speciality of family medicine and the experimentation with different models of primary health care provision: voluntary primary care health teams without financial incentives (Alfa project), voluntary primary care health teams with a performance-related-remuneration system and the current phase of scaling up FHU. The process described here illustrates how a group of physicians has established a non-formal strategy of reform throughout 30 years. This strategy involves mobilization policies and the development of field experiences by individual leaders, groups and organizations. PMID:17665838

Conceiçăo, Claudia; Van Lerberghe, Wim; Ramos, Vitor; Hipólito, Fátima; Ferrinho, Paulo

2007-01-01

161

Relationship between leadership behaviors and performance : The moderating role of a work team's level of age, gender, and cultural heterogeneity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – In today's organizations, the heterogeneity of work teams is increasing. For example, members of work teams have different ages, genders, and\\/or cultural backgrounds. As a consequence, team leaders have to face the challenge of taking into account the various needs, values, and motives of their followers. However, there has been very little empirical research to test whether the

Jens Rowold

2011-01-01

162

Work with Psychotic Patients in a Rehabilitation Unit: A Short Term Staff Support Group with a Nursing Team  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author documents difficulties that arose in the work of a team working in a residential setting providing 24 hour care for patients with repeated or long-term admissions, and the different, inter-related and mutually dependent aspects of this work. Issues that emerged included the difficult nature of work with this patient group, collaborative work in the team, management issues and

2002-01-01

163

Challenges and opportunities for donors in reducing maternal death and morbidity: lessons from the PMM 1 The Prevention of Maternal Mortality (PMM) Network is a research network, established in 1987, consisting of 11 research teams in West Africa conducting multidisciplinary operations research on maternal health. These teams consist of an obstetrician\\/gynecologist, a community physician, a nurse-midwife and a social scientist. A team at Columbia University has provided technical assistance to these teams throughout the project. 1 experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experience of the PMM Network offers several insights for donors seeking to work on maternal mortality, particularly in Africa where the risk of maternal death is highest. First, the projects provide evidence that multidisciplinary operations research can result in the development and implementation of successful, relatively low-cost interventions. In addition, the work of PMM highlights the need for greater

Y. C Richardson

1997-01-01

164

The Future of Disaster Response: Humans Working with Multiagent Teams using DEFACTO  

E-print Network

, such as a terrorist attack. A key aspect of such a response will be agent-assisted vehicles working together. SpecifiThe Future of Disaster Response: Humans Working with Multiagent Teams using DEFACTO Nathan Schurr University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-0781 Abstract When addressing terrorist threats we

Scerri, Paul

165

An Evidence-Based Multidisciplinary Practice Guideline to Reduce the Workload due to Lifting for Preventing Work-Related Low Back Pain.  

PubMed

We developed an evidence-based practice guideline to support occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals in assessing the risk due to lifting and in selecting effective preventive measures for low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. The guideline was developed at the request of the Dutch government by a project team of experts and OSH professionals in lifting and work-related LBP. The recommendations for risk assessment were based on the quality of instruments to assess the risk on LBP due to lifting. Recommendations for interventions were based on a systematic review of the effects of worker- and work directed interventions to reduce back load due to lifting. The quality of the evidence was rated as strong (A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on consensus (D). Finally, eight experts and twenty-four OSH professionals commented on and evaluated the content and the feasibility of the preliminary guideline. For risk assessment we recommend loads heavier than 25 kg always to be considered a risk for LBP while loads less than 3 kg do not pose a risk. For loads between 3-25 kg, risk assessment shall be performed using the Manual handling Assessment Charts (MAC)-Tool or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) lifting equation. Effective work oriented interventions are patient lifting devices (Level A) and lifting devices for goods (Level C), optimizing working height (Level A) and reducing load mass (Level C). Ineffective work oriented preventive measures are regulations to ban lifting without proper alternatives (Level D). We do not recommend worker-oriented interventions but consider personal lift assist devices as promising (Level C). Ineffective worker-oriented preventive measures are training in lifting technique (Level A), use of back-belts (Level A) and pre-employment medical examinations (Level A). This multidisciplinary evidence-based practice guideline gives clear criteria whether an employee is at risk for LBP while lifting and provides an easy-reference for (in)effective risk reduction measures based on scientific evidence, experience, and consensus among OSH experts and practitioners. PMID:24999432

Kuijer, P Paul Fm; Verbeek, Jos Ham; Visser, Bart; Elders, Leo Am; Van Roden, Nico; Van den Wittenboer, Marion Er; Lebbink, Marian; Burdorf, Alex; Hulshof, Carel Tj

2014-01-01

166

The impact of subgroup type and subgroup configurational properties on work team performance.  

PubMed

Scholars have invoked subgroups in a number of theories related to teams, yet certain tensions in the literature remain unresolved. In this article, we address 2 of these tensions, both relating to how subgroups are configured in work teams: (a) whether teams perform better with a greater number of subgroups and (b) whether teams perform better when they have imbalanced subgroups (majorities and minorities are present) or balanced subgroups (subgroups are of equal size). We predict that the impact of the number and balance of subgroups depends on the type of subgroup-whether subgroups are formed according to social identity (i.e., identity-based subgroups) or information processing (i.e., knowledge-based subgroups). We first propose that teams are more adversely affected by 2 identity-based subgroups than by any other number, yet the uniquely negative impact of a 2-subgroup configuration is not apparent for knowledge-based subgroups. Instead, a larger number of knowledge-based subgroups is beneficial for performance, such that 2 subgroups is worse for performance when compared with 3 or more subgroups but better for performance when compared with no subgroups or 1 subgroup. Second, we argue that teams perform better when identity-based subgroups are imbalanced yet knowledge-based subgroups are balanced. We also suggest that there are interactive effects between the number and balance of subgroups-however, the nature of this interaction depends on the type of subgroup. To test these predictions, we developed and validated an algorithm that measures the configurational properties of subgroups in organizational work teams. Results of a field study of 326 work teams from a multinational organization support our predictions. PMID:23915429

Carton, Andrew M; Cummings, Jonathon N

2013-09-01

167

Effective Team Support: From Task and Cognitive Modeling to Software Agents for Time-Critical Complex Work Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in completing a system for empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support a team's tasks, and in running experiments for the collection of baseline data.

Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie E.; Sycara, Katia

2005-01-01

168

Realisation of Strategic Leadership in Leadership Teams' Work as Experienced by the Leadership Team Members of Basic Education Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces a quantitative research into how the leadership team members of 49 basic education schools in the city of Vantaa, Finland, experienced the realisation of strategic leadership in their leadership teams' work. The data were collected by a survey of 24 statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, and analysed with the…

Lahtero, Tapio Juhani; Kuusilehto-Awale, Lea

2013-01-01

169

[Multidisciplinary management of angiomas].  

PubMed

Angiomas are heterogenous vascular abnormalities, in terms of anatomy, biology and clinical course. Patients and families are often emotionally concerned. For all these reasons, a multidisciplinary approach is necessary in order to structure diagnostic and therapeutic work-up, and to ensure proper advice. The present paper summarizes contemporary classification of angiomas and presents some principles of multidisciplinary approach as it is applied for the past fifteen years at the University Hospitals of Geneva. PMID:20218177

Bounameaux, Henri; Calza, Anne-Marie; de Tonnac, Nicolas; La Scala, Giorgio; Pittet-Cuenod, Brigitte; Yilmaz, Hasan; Rüfenacht, Daniel

2010-02-10

170

How Peer Review Teams will work Cesnik, Catherine M 0 'Darren.Mollot@HQ.DOE.GOV'  

E-print Network

Marcia, How Peer Review Teams will work I Cesnik, Catherine M 0 'Darren.Mollot@HQ.DOE.GOV' Cc: ~Mc, plume, etc.) already include groups of peers, that their numbers could be considered peer reviewed. Thus that would eliminate the need for duplicate subteams to peer review each subteam. That would leave Bill Rees

Fleskes, Joe

171

Minutes of TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team Meeting and Ocean Tides Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This third TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team meeting was held on December 4, 1994 to review progress in defining ocean tide models, precision Earth orbits, and various science algorithms. A related workshop on ocean tides convened to select the best models to be used by scientists in the Geophysical Data Records.

Fu, Lee-Lueng (editor)

1995-01-01

172

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, breast cancer in the elderly and patients at high risk for breast cancer · A Weekly Breast Tumor Board where patient care is discussed and coordinated Provide surgical

Arizona, University of

173

Assessment of Student Work on Geographically Distributed Information Technology Project Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are issues in assessing the contributions of individual students on geographically distributed student teams working on information technology projects. At Pace University we have been using real-world student projects in capstone computing courses for about ten years. While the courses were conducted in a classroom environment during the early years, the current course has been essentially online for the

Charles C. Tappert; Allen Stix

2009-01-01

174

Creativity and Creative Teams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

2001-01-01

175

Work Groups: From the Hawthorne Studies to Work Teams of the 1990s and Beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes the Hawthorne studies related to work groups and their legacy and traces applications of work groups and related empirical research through the 1990s. A selective review of empirical studies of work group effectiveness conducted in work settings and published in the last 20 years addresses 4 questions: (a) What identifying features have field researchers used in operationally

Eric Sundstrom; Michael McIntyre; Terry Halfhill; Heather Richards

2000-01-01

176

Prerequisites for sustainable care improvement using the reflective team as a work model  

PubMed Central

Several work models for care improvement have been developed in order to meet the requirement for evidence-based care. This study examines a work model for reflection, entitled the reflective team (RT). The main idea behind RTs is that caring skills exist among those who work closest to the patients. The team leader (RTL) encourages sustainable care improvement, rooted in research and proven experience, by using a lifeworld perspective to stimulate further reflection and a developmental process leading to research-based caring actions within the team. In order to maintain focus, it is important that the RTL has a clear idea of what sustainable care improvement means, and what the prerequisites are for such improvement. The aim of the present study is, therefore, to explore the prerequisites for improving sustainable care, seeking to answer how RTLs perceive these and use RTs for concrete planning. Nine RTLs were interviewed, and their statements were phenomenographically analysed. The analysis revealed three separate qualitative categories, which describe personal, interpersonal, and structural aspects of the prerequisites. In the discussion, these categories are compared with previous research on reflection, and the conclusion is reached that the optimal conditions for RTs to work, when focussed on sustainable care improvement, occur when the various aspects of the prerequisites are intertwined and become a natural part of the reflective work. PMID:25361530

Jonasson, Lise-Lotte; Carlsson, Gunilla; Nyström, Maria

2014-01-01

177

Prerequisites for sustainable care improvement using the reflective team as a work model.  

PubMed

Several work models for care improvement have been developed in order to meet the requirement for evidence-based care. This study examines a work model for reflection, entitled the reflective team (RT). The main idea behind RTs is that caring skills exist among those who work closest to the patients. The team leader (RTL) encourages sustainable care improvement, rooted in research and proven experience, by using a lifeworld perspective to stimulate further reflection and a developmental process leading to research-based caring actions within the team. In order to maintain focus, it is important that the RTL has a clear idea of what sustainable care improvement means, and what the prerequisites are for such improvement. The aim of the present study is, therefore, to explore the prerequisites for improving sustainable care, seeking to answer how RTLs perceive these and use RTs for concrete planning. Nine RTLs were interviewed, and their statements were phenomenographically analysed. The analysis revealed three separate qualitative categories, which describe personal, interpersonal, and structural aspects of the prerequisites. In the discussion, these categories are compared with previous research on reflection, and the conclusion is reached that the optimal conditions for RTs to work, when focussed on sustainable care improvement, occur when the various aspects of the prerequisites are intertwined and become a natural part of the reflective work. PMID:25361530

Jonasson, Lise-Lotte; Carlsson, Gunilla; Nyström, Maria

2014-01-01

178

Multidisciplinary work on barium contamination of the karstic upper Kupa River drainage basin (Croatia and Slovenia); calling for watershed management.  

PubMed

The present work was designed as an extension of a previous study of a barium anomaly observed in stream sediments of the Kupa River. In its upper part the Kupa River drains a region underlain by a trans-boundary aquifer. The river is a significant water resource in a region of tourism, sport, and fishing in both Croatia and Slovenia. The contamination source is situated in Homer (Lokve), Croatia, where barite was mined until 10 years ago. The barium processing waste material (<3-mm fraction) was carelessly deposited in gardens, forests, and into a sinkhole, which has an underground link with the Kupica River, a tributary of the Kupa River. Barium waste and stream sediments were analyzed using comparative techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and grain size analysis. XRD of the waste material identified the major minerals quartz, barite, and dolomite and the Fe-containing minor minerals muscovite and goethite. Barite was identified as a minor or trace mineral in the Kupica River sediments. XRF analysis of the waste material has shown Ba and Fe to be the predominant elements, Ca and K to be minor elements, and Mn, Zn, Sr, Pb, Co, Cu, As, Zr, Rb, Y, and Mo to be trace elements. Mössbauer spectroscopy performed at room temperature (RT) was used to study iron minerals, particularly to obtain information on the valence status of Fe ions. Grain size analysis of the waste material (<63-microm fraction) has shown that it contains 23.5% clay-size material in comparison with 7-8% clay-size material in stream sediments. It is our aim to combine geochemical and medical methods to investigate the possible impact of waste disposal on human health in Lokve. At this stage of the work, concentrations of Ba and other toxic elements in the water compartment of the Kupica River (a source of drinking water) have not been monitored by Croatian Waters (name of the Croatian water authorities). The necessity of such measurements in future studies has been highlighted. A preliminary study of diseases diagnosed in Lokve shows that about 18% of the total inhabitants have serious medical problems. Diseases of the circulatory system, endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases, neoplasms, and respiratory diseases predominate. This paper calls for further multidisciplinary research on the health effects of barium and trace elements, as well as for bioremediation of contaminated gardens and for watershed management of vulnerable karstic aquifers. PMID:17203367

Franciskovi?-Bilinski, S; Bilinski, H; Grbac, R; Zuni?, J; Necemer, M; Hanzel, D

2007-02-01

179

Participatory Concepts of Multidisciplinary/Professional Working on an Early Childhood Studies Degree Course in the UK  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper aims to explore democratic values in higher education pedagogies, as related to an Early Childhood Studies (ECS) degree course in an English university. It seeks to find out what constitutes a multi-disciplinary course from both student and tutor perspectives. It is contextualised by the concepts of participation embedded in the idea of…

Bath, Caroline

2011-01-01

180

Burnout in nurses working in Portuguese palliative care teams: a mixed methods study.  

PubMed

Repeat contact with suffering, dying, and death is considered to be a risk factor for burnout among health professionals, particularly nurses working in palliative care. A mixed methods study was conducted to identify burnout levels, risk and protective factors, prevention strategies, and the emotional impact of working in palliative care among nurses in Portugal. A quantitative questionnaire was completed by nursing members of nine different palliative care teams and was supported by interviews and observation. Although the participants were exposed to risk factors, such as work overload, disorganisation, difficult relationships within the team and with patients' relatives, they showed a low risk of burnout. These results appear to be related both to the protective factors identified-namely the ethic of care in the relationship the nurses establish with patients, families, and within their teams-and to the preventive strategies they actively adopt for burnout prevention. The positive aspects of the nurses' roles help them to build a positive view of their work, which also promotes their own personal and professional development. PMID:23123982

Fonseca, Antonio; Pereira, Sandra; Carvalho, Ana Sofia

2012-08-01

181

Exploring varieties of knowledge in safe work practices - an ethnographic study of surgical teams  

PubMed Central

Background Within existing research in health and medicine, the nature of knowledge on how teams conduct safe work practices has yet to be properly explored. Methods We address this concern by exploring the varieties in which knowledge is expressed during interdisciplinary surgical operations. Specifically, the study was conducted in a surgical section of a Norwegian regional general hospital, between January and April of 2010, by means of an ethnographic design combining detailed non-participant observations, conversations and semi-structured interviews. Results Based on an analysis of the gathered data, we identify three particular themes in how knowledge is expressed by operating room personnel: (i) the ability and variety individuals demonstrate in handling multiple sources of information, before reaching a particular decision, (ii) the variety of ways awareness or anticipation of future events is expressed, and (iii) the different ways sudden and unexpected situations are handled by the individual team members. Conclusions We conclude that these facets of knowledge bring different insights into how safe work practices are achieved at an individual and team level in surgical operations, thus adding to the existing understanding of the nature of knowledge in safe work practices in surgical operations. Future research should focus on exploring and documenting the relationships between various elements of knowledge and safe work practices, in different surgical settings and countries. PMID:21914183

2011-01-01

182

The combined use of quality management programs and work teams : A comparative analysis of its impact in the organizational structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The main goal of the work presented here is the study and comparative analysis of the changes that take place in the structure of organizations when managers decide to establish work teams in the context of quality management. It can be observed that team characteristics change and adapt to evolving management programs. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The authors selected a

M. Angeles Escriba-Moreno; M. Teresa Canet-Giner

2006-01-01

183

Novel technique for tracking manpower and work packages: a useful tool for the team and management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In these times of austerity it is becoming more and more important to justify the need for manpower to management. Additionally, with the fast pace of today's projects the need for tools that facilitate teams to not only plan, but also track their work, are essential. The practice of planning work packages and the associated manpower has been about for a while but little is done to really cross-check that planning against reality. In this paper these elements are brought together through a number of tools that make up the end to end process of planning, tracking and reporting of work package progress and manpower usage.

Gill, R.; Gracia, G.; Lupton, R. H.; O'Mullane, W.

2014-08-01

184

Making contracting work better and cost less: Report of the Contract Reform Team  

SciTech Connect

In June 1993, Secretary of Energy Hazel O`Leary formed a Contract Reform Team, chaired by Deputy Secretary Bill White, to evaluate the contracting practices of the Department of Energy and to formulate specific proposals for improving those practices. This report summarizes the results of the work of the Contract Reform Team. It recommends actions for implementation that will significantly improve the Department`s contracting practices and will enable the Department to help create a government that -- in the words of Vice President Gore -- {open_quotes}works better and costs less.{close_quotes} These actions and the deadlines for their implementation are listed. Among other things, they recommend replacing the Department`s standard Management and Operating Contract with a new Performance-Based Management Contract and strengthening the Department`s systems for selecting and managing contractors.

Not Available

1994-02-01

185

Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory Across Generations. An emerging Multidisciplinary Work Area and an NEA Project - 12218  

SciTech Connect

Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference means for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, i.e. not dependent on human presence and intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. There is however no intention to forgo, at any time, knowledge and awareness either of the repository or of the waste that it contains. The preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) is seen as an integral part of radioactive waste management, supporting lengthy and complex socio-technical processes across pre-operational, operational and post-operational lifetimes. Long-term preservation of RK and M is an emerging multidisciplinary work area in which much learning is expected over the coming years. Novel methods are being sought that are least vulnerable to both natural degradation and to changes in socio-economic conditions. Progress has been made in individual countries, but there is a need to internationalise the thinking, compare approaches, investigate potential solutions and share decisions. This is the task of the NEA RK and M project. A major outcome of the project will be a 'menu-driven document' that will allow people to identify the main elements of a strategic action plan for RK and M preservation. In sum, the preservation of RK and M is a unprecedented task in which technical, scientific and social information is interwoven and needs to be developed and preserved across generations and across specialist boundaries. Important studies have been undertaken in the past decades to explore a variety of approaches to preserving RK and M across different timescales, including archives and markers. The work of the past in this area is useful, but innovative thinking is also needed. Seen from today's perspective, very little work is available on for example the contextualization of data for later use; on the systematic identification of mechanisms for RK and M transfer; on implementing a culture of RK and M-keeping in organisations; and on creating cultural links between the waste disposals and the siting communities. Moreover, international cooperation is recognised as being crucial in providing shared means and meanings for memory transmission over longer timescales. International cooperation has also been identified as a catalyst to ensure that a wide range of approaches and experiences is considered, thus potentially reducing uncertainty related to variations in approach. Overall, multiple approaches, requiring active and less active care, need to be considered from the start of the radioactive waste management programme and refined in the course of time. The RK and M project members want to further investigate and deliver support to fulfil this task. (authors)

Schroeder, Jantine [Belgian Nuclear Research Institute SCK.CEN, Mol (Belgium); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD NEA, Paris (France)

2012-07-01

186

Pediatric pain management: the multidisciplinary approach  

PubMed Central

Chronic pain in children and adolescents is a growing problem and one that is increasingly being addressed with multidisciplinary treatment teams. This review summarizes different multidisciplinary clinics, focusing specifically on intensive pediatric pain rehabilitation centers. This review offers a summary of the challenges faced by these programs and areas for future study. PMID:24250232

Odell, Shannon; Logan, Deirdre E

2013-01-01

187

Designing Multidisciplinary Integrated Curriculum Units  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term "integrated curriculum" has many different, sometimes conflicting, meanings to educators. In this manual, integrated curriculum refers to the materials and pedagogical strategies used by "multidisciplinary" teams of teachers to organize their instruction so that students are encouraged to make meaningful connections across subject areas.…

Clayton, Marla; Hagan, Jill; Ho, Pier Sun; Hudis, Paula M.

2010-01-01

188

Multidisciplinary cancer care in Spain, or when the function creates the organ: qualitative interview study  

PubMed Central

Background The Spanish National Health System recognised multidisciplinary care as a health priority in 2006, when a national strategy for promoting quality in cancer care was first published. This institutional effort is being implemented on a co-operative basis within the context of Spain's decentralised health care system, so a high degree of variability is to be expected. This study was aimed to explore the views of professionals working with multidisciplinary cancer teams and identify which barriers to effective team work should be considered to ensure implementation of health policy. Methods Qualitative interview study with semi-structured, one-to-one interviews. Data were examined inductively, using content analysis to generate categories and an explanatory framework. 39 professionals performing their tasks, wholly or in part, in different multidisciplinary cancer teams were interviewed. The breakdown of participants' medical specialisations was as follows: medical oncologists (n = 10); radiation oncologists (n = 8); surgeons (n = 7); pathologists or radiologists (n = 6); oncology nurses (n = 5); and others (n = 3). Results Teams could be classified into three models of professional co-operation in multidisciplinary cancer care, namely, advisory committee, formal co-adaptation and integrated care process. The following barriers to implementation were posed: existence of different gateways for the same patient profile; variability in development and use of clinical protocols and guidelines; role of the hospital executive board; outcomes assessment; and the recording and documenting of clinical decisions in a multidisciplinary team setting. All these play a key role in the development of cancer teams and their ability to improve quality of care. Conclusion Cancer team development results from an specific adaptation to the hospital environment. Nevertheless, health policy plays an important role in promoting an organisational approach that changes the way in which professionals develop their clinical practice. PMID:21356063

2011-01-01

189

The influence of interpersonal flexibility on work team conflict over time  

E-print Network

, Northcraft, & Neale, 1999; Ely & Thomas, 2001) have provided empirical support for the notion that member differences within a team context encourage the sharing of diverse perspectives, ideas, and skills that increase the team?s ability to develop...

Baugh, Frank Godard

2004-11-15

190

What Makes Teacher Teams in a Vocational Education Context Effective?: A Qualitative Study of Managers' View on Team Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: At a time when secondary vocational education is implementing competence-based education (CBE) on a large scale, to adapt to the needs of students and of the labour market in a modern society, many vocational schools have recognised that interdisciplinary teacher teams are an important condition for this implementation. In order to…

Truijen, K. J. P.; Sleegers, P. J. C.; Meelissen, M. R. M.; Nieuwenhuis, A. F. M.

2013-01-01

191

Using multi-disciplinary strategic master facilities planning for organizations experiencing programmatic re-direction  

SciTech Connect

Facility master planning is critical to the future productivity of a laboratory and the quality of worklife for the laboratory staff. For organizations undergoing programmatic re-direction, a master facility planning approach linked to the organization`s strategic planning process is even more important. Major changes in an organization such as programmatic re-direction can significantly impact a broad range of variables which exceed the expertise of traditional planning teams, e.g., capacity variability, work team organization, organizational culture, and work process simplification. By expanding the diversity of the participants of the planning team, there is a greater likelihood that a research organization`s scientific, organizational, economic, and employees` needs can be meshed in the strategic plan and facility plan. Recent recommendations from facility planners suggest drawing from diverse fields in building multi-disciplinary planning teams: Architecture, engineering, natural science, social psychology, and strategic planning (Gibson,1993). For organizations undergoing significant operational or culture change, the master facility planning team should also include members with expertise in organizational effectiveness, industrial engineering, human resources, and environmental psychology. A recent planning and design project provides an example which illustrates the use of an expanded multi-disciplinary team engaged in planning laboratory renovations for a research organization undergoing programmatic re-direction. The purpose of the proposed poster session is to present a multi-disciplinary master facility planning process linked to an organization`s strategic planning process or organizational strategies.

Heubach, J.G.; Weimer, W.C.; Bruce, W.A.

1993-12-01

192

Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting.  

PubMed

Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that 'core' competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health 'programme' or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified. PMID:24427175

Rush, Brian; McPherson-Doe, Catherine; Behrooz, Reneé C; Cudmore, Alan

2013-06-01

193

[Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the mentally retarded: guidelines of a multidisciplinary consensus work group. Dutch Association of Physicians in Care of Mentally Handicapped].  

PubMed

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is more frequent among people with intellectual disability than among the intellectually normal population. Also GORD is more serious in this population. The diagnosis is often missed, because most intellectually disabled cannot express their complaints of GORD. For that reason a multidisciplinary working group of the Dutch Association of physicians active in the care of persons with a mental handicap has developed guidelines. The working group recommends endoscopy in case of a (alarm) symptoms: haematemesis, prolonged vomiting, irondeficiency anaemia e.c.i., and a 24 hour oesophageal pH test in case of b (aspecific) symptoms: recurrent pneumonia, refusal of food, regurgitation, rumination, dental erosions. In general most patients are cured with drug treatment (omeprazol or another proton pump inhibitor). If symptoms are not improved after 6 months of optimal treatment, surgical treatment may be considered. PMID:10876695

Gimbel, H

2000-06-10

194

AE Space Utilization Work Team Short Roster v 1.5 2012-02-21 dgk Project Member Team Role UW-Madison Role  

E-print Network

Team Member VCA (Budget Office) Scott Owczarek Team Member Enrollment Management Ed McGlinn Team Member, Planning & Management Angela Pakes Ahlman Team Member Facilities, Planning & Management Phillip Braithwaite Enrollment Management Chris Bruhn Team Member College of Letters & Science Nancy Kujak-Ford Team Member WI

Sheridan, Jennifer

195

Student Action Teams: An Evaluation, 1999-2000. Working Paper 21.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student Action Teams (SATs) were established in 20 Victoria, Australia, secondary schools in 1999, with 11 of those schools continuing with their teams in 2000. The Student Action Teams are comprised of groups of students who identify a school or community issue, research it, make plans and proposals about it, and take action on it. Such…

Holdsworth, Roger; Stafford, John; Stokes, Helen; Tyler, Debra

196

Roundtable Concerning Teaching in Educational Administration: Organizing, Leading and Monitoring Effective Work Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides data from students in an educational administration class on use of teaming and collaboration to research educational problems. The instructor taught group dynamics and modeled the process of facilitating and developing collaboration in teams. Classes were offered in 3-1/2 hour sessions for 5 weeks. Various team-building…

McCabe, Donna Hagen

197

Team Development of Virtual Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Advanced technologies, globalization, the competitiveness of business, flexible working practices, and other rapid changes in the nature of work have all led to the booming of "virtual teams." This paper will provide an overview of virtual teams, including a description of their emergence, a definition and typology of the term "virtual team," an…

Kim, Sooyoung

2004-01-01

198

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Educating Preschool Children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia and Septo-Optic Nerve Dysplasia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the observations and experiences of a multidisciplinary team at the Blind Childrens Center in Los Angeles, which works specifically with children from birth to 5 years of age who have been diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia and may have septo-optic displasia. Strategies for educational interventions are explained.…

Bahar, Cheryl; Brody, Jill; McCann, Mary Ellen; Mendiola, Rosalinda; Slott, Gayle

2003-01-01

199

Unpacking Race, Culture, and Class in Rural Alaska: Native and Non-Native Multidisciplinary Professionals' Perceptions of Child Sexual Abuse  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to unpack notions of class, culture, and race as they relate to multidisciplinary team (MDT) professionals and their perceptions of prevalence in child sexual abuse cases in Native and non-Native rural Alaska communities. Power and privilege within professional settings is significant for all social work professionals…

Bubar, Roe; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly

2011-01-01

200

Drawing inspiration from different sources, teams work to build an environmentally sound car  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

100 Years after the Ford Model T, what does the future hold for our cars?http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/technology/technology.html?in_article_id=506493&in_page_id=1965Automotive X Prizehttp://auto.xprize.org/Howstuffworks: "How Electric Cars Work" [Macromedia Flash Player]http://auto.howstuffworks.com/electric-car.htmAptera [Macromedia Flash Player]http://www.aptera.com/Classic Car Commercialshttp://www.tvparty.com/vaultcomm.htmlWalkable Communities [pdf]http://www.walkable.org/Americans love their automobiles, and the quickly expanding ranks of the middle-class in India and China feel the same way about this particular form of transportation. Unfortunately, the majority of cars produced around the world are still powered by variations on the internal combustion engine, which has had some rather deleterious effects on the environment. In recent months, journalists and engineers have been paying more attention to groups of innovators around the country who are competing to build a 100-mile-per-gallon car. Some of these groups hope to enter their car in the running for the Automotive X Prize, which will award $10 million to the team that both builds this car and then wins a race against other green vehicles. All of the successful entries must produce less than 200 grams of greenhouse gases per mile, get at least 100 miles per gallon, and also be economically viable, which might be the hardest part of this challenge. "If we do this right, we're going to draw a line in the sand and say all the cars we drove before this date are relegated to the history museums", notes Peter Diamandis, Founder and Chairman of the X Prize Foundation. Interest from large traditional auto manufacturers in the contest has been minimal, but teams from downstate Illinois to central California continue to look forward to 2009, when the remainder of the qualifying races will be held. The first link offered here will take users to a nice piece from the December 2007 edition of Wired Magazine. Along with learning about the Automotive X Prize, they can find out more about the teams working on this project. The second link leads to an article from this Sunday's Daily Mail by Michael Hanlon that delves into the past, present, and future of automotive technology. Moving on, the third link will whisk visitors away to the homepage of the Automotive X Prize. Here, visitors can learn about the competition, read their weblog, and read a bit more about their other activities. The fourth link will take users to a video-enhanced site that will teach interested parties how electric cars work. The fifth link leads to the homepage of Aptera, which is one of the companies working on making a fuel-efficient vehicle. For those who might be longing for a bit of old-school automotive history, the sixth link provides a selection of commercials for such legendary vehicles as the 1957 Plymouth Sport Suburban and the 1965 VW Bug. And finally, for those who are interested in creating and living in pedestrian friendly places, the last link provides access to resources for doing just that.

2008-01-01

201

Communication, and Team-Working Skills in Second-Year Undergraduate Chemistry Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 2002, a multidisciplinary program has been used to encourage science students to build on their chemical knowledge and to appreciate how it applies to the world around them. The program is interactive and instills a new set of core learning skills that are often underrepresented in undergraduate curricula, namely, cooperative learning,…

Mc Goldrick, Niamh B.; Marzec, Bartosz; Scully, P. Noelle; Draper, Sylvia M.

2013-01-01

202

Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach.  

PubMed

Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover,halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear-nose-throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear-nose-throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo.Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins. PMID:22722640

Bollen, Curd M L; Beikler, Thomas

2012-06-01

203

Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach  

PubMed Central

Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover, halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear–nose–throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear–nose–throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo. Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins. PMID:22722640

Bollen, Curd ML; Beikler, Thomas

2012-01-01

204

An Object-oriented Environment for Developing Finite Element Codes for Multi-disciplinary Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this work is to describe the design and implementation of a framework for building multi-disciplinary finite\\u000a element programs. The main goals are generality, reusability, extendibility, good performance and memory efficiency. Another\\u000a objective is preparing the code structure for team development to ensure the easy collaboration of experts in different fields\\u000a in the development of multi-disciplinary applications.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Kratos,

Pooyan Dadvand; Riccardo Rossi; Eugenio Ońate

2010-01-01

205

Improving Working Relationships between Certified Nursing Assistants and Professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The isolation of home health care practice can create barriers to communication among the home care team members. This project was an attempt to improve collaboration among professionals and paraprofessionals through a series of sessions, including self-assessment, didactic presentations by a multidisciplinary team, and interactive exercises. The results included self-report of increased positive feelings about work, increased appreciation of coworkers'

Elaine D. Sullivan

1998-01-01

206

Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.  

PubMed

Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n?=?357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. PMID:22962847

Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

2013-10-01

207

Team formation methods for increasing interaction during in-class group work  

Microsoft Academic Search

In contrast to the student teams used for larger and longer group projects, in-class groups are often ephemeral, lasting for only a few minutes or until the end of the period. Because of this, little effort is put into forming these groups, usually letting the students self-select their teams. This paper argues that greater student interaction and learning can take

Katherine Deibel

2005-01-01

208

Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

2013-01-01

209

Every School, Every Team, Every Classroom: District Leadership for Growing Professional Learning Communities at Work[TM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What would a learning community look like "if we really meant it" when we committed to ensuring the learning of each student? What would we consider good enough for our own children? In "Every School, Every Team, Every Classroom," the authors suggest that these two questions drive PLC leaders to embed PLC at Work[TM] practices in their entire…

Eaker, Robert; Keating, Janel

2011-01-01

210

Work-in-progress - assessment of peer-led team learning in an engineering course for freshmen  

Microsoft Academic Search

ECE 110 is required for freshmen majoring in electrical engineering or computer engineering at Illinois. In ECE 110 in Fall 2007, we organized optional supervised study sessions to implement peer-led team learning workshops. Each session met for 90 minutes per week. In the sessions, students worked on difficult problems selected from examinations given in previous semesters. We obtained ACT-Math scores

Michael C. Loui; Brett A. Robbins

2008-01-01

211

Self-Directed Work Teams in a Post-Apartheid Gold Mine: Perspectives from the Rock Face.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A participant-observation study in a South African mining company that used self directed work team training identified organizational constraints that hindered training effectiveness: lack of materials, machinery breakdown, decentralized budget, and imposed standards. Miners more often used improvisation and initiative to solve daily problems,…

Phatkathi, Timothy Sizwe

2002-01-01

212

Study protocol of effectiveness of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-speficic sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Non-specific low back pain is a common cause for consultation with the general practitioner, generating increased health and social costs. This study will analyse the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention to reduce disability, severity of pain, anxiety and depression, to improve quality of life and to reduce the incidence of chronic low back pain in the working population with

Teresa Rodriguez-Blanco; Isabel Fernández-San-Martin; Montserrat Balagué-Corbella; Anna Berenguera; Jenny Moix; Elena Montiel-Morillo; Esther Núńez-Juárez; Maria J González-Moneo; Magda Pie-Oncins; Raquel Martín-Peńacoba; Mercč Roura-Olivan; Montse Núńez-Juárez; Enriqueta Pujol-Ribera

2010-01-01

213

The multidisciplinary management of bone and soft tissue sarcoma: an essential organizational framework.  

PubMed

The rarity of bone and soft tissue sarcoma, the difficulty in interpretation of imaging and histology, the plethora of treatment modalities, and the complexity and intensity of the treatment contribute to the need for systematic multidisciplinary team management of patients with these diseases. An integrated multidisciplinary clinic and team with a structured sarcoma tumor board facilitate team coordination and communication. This paper reviews the rationale for multidisciplinary management of sarcoma and details the operational structure of the Multidisciplinary Sarcoma Clinic and Sarcoma Tumor Board. The structured Multidisciplinary Sarcoma Tumor Board provides opportunity for improvement in logistics, teaching, quality, and enrollment in clinical trials. PMID:25733913

Siegel, Geoffrey W; Biermann, J Sybil; Chugh, Rashmi; Jacobson, Jon A; Lucas, David; Feng, Mary; Chang, Andrew C; Smith, Sean R; Wong, Sandra L; Hasen, Jill

2015-01-01

214

The multidisciplinary management of bone and soft tissue sarcoma: an essential organizational framework  

PubMed Central

The rarity of bone and soft tissue sarcoma, the difficulty in interpretation of imaging and histology, the plethora of treatment modalities, and the complexity and intensity of the treatment contribute to the need for systematic multidisciplinary team management of patients with these diseases. An integrated multidisciplinary clinic and team with a structured sarcoma tumor board facilitate team coordination and communication. This paper reviews the rationale for multidisciplinary management of sarcoma and details the operational structure of the Multidisciplinary Sarcoma Clinic and Sarcoma Tumor Board. The structured Multidisciplinary Sarcoma Tumor Board provides opportunity for improvement in logistics, teaching, quality, and enrollment in clinical trials. PMID:25733913

Siegel, Geoffrey W; Biermann, J Sybil; Chugh, Rashmi; Jacobson, Jon A; Lucas, David; Feng, Mary; Chang, Andrew C; Smith, Sean R; Wong, Sandra L; Hasen, Jill

2015-01-01

215

How physician/administrator teams work in small groups. Six steps to make it happen.  

PubMed

The physician/administrator team is frequently supported as the preferred model for physician group governance. Perhaps an obvious model for large groups, it remains true that the largest percentage of physicians are practicing in groups of 10 or fewer. This article explores the applicability of the physician/administrator team concept for small group practices. The article covers the significance of the physician/administrator team in managed care settings, difference in governance structures between large and small groups, the need for physicians to be willing to share leadership in organizations they own, understanding empowerment in small groups, the manager's need to assume more responsibility and how to form the team. PMID:10539338

Stearns, T H

1999-01-01

216

Effects of intensified work-related multidisciplinary rehabilitation on occupational participation: a randomized-controlled trial in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders.  

PubMed

This study examined the effects of work-related multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MR) on occupational participation in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders. A randomized-controlled trial was carried out. The sample included patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders and severe restrictions of work ability (n=222). Participants in the intervention group received a work-related rehabilitation programme following a comprehensive functional capacity evaluation (FCE MR). Controls completed a conventional MR. The analysis was based on 1-year follow-up data. The primary outcome was stable occupational participation (SOP), defined as employment with at most 6 months of sick leave after rehabilitation. The secondary outcomes were the duration of sick leave, employment status and the Pain Disability Index. We included 102 patients in our analysis (intervention: n=55, control: n=47). Despite randomization there were group differences. Adjusting these differences, patients of the FCE MR had 3.5 times higher odds of SOP [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-9.8, P=0.018]. However, there was neither a significant difference in the duration of sick leave between both groups (b=-8.0 weeks, 95% CI: -17.4 to 1.4, P=0.095) nor higher odds of employment in favour of the FCE MR after 1 year (odds ratio=2.3, 95% CI: 0.9-5.8, P=0.088). Participants in the FCE MR reported less pain-related disabilities (b=-6.5, 95% CI: -12.6 to -0.4, P=0.038). The study had a limitation in terms of group balance. However, the findings indicate that the work-related FCE MR was more effective for SOP, but did not significantly affect employment rate and sick leave duration. PMID:24056065

Streibelt, Marco; Bethge, Matthias

2014-03-01

217

The relationship of the emotional climate of work and threat to patient outcome in a high-volume thoracic surgery operating room team  

Microsoft Academic Search

ContextIt is widely believed that the emotional climate of surgical team's work may affect patient outcome.ObjectiveTo analyse the relationship between the emotional climate of work and indices of threat to patient outcome.DesignInterventional study.SettingOperating rooms in a high-volume thoracic surgery centre from September 2007 to June 2008.ParticipantsThoracic surgery operating room teams.InterventionTwo 90 min team-skills training sessions focused on findings from a

Michael Nurok; Linda A Evans; Stuart Lipsitz; Paul Satwicz; Andrea Kelly; Allan Frankel

2011-01-01

218

MULTIDISCIPLINARY ACTION PROJECTS  

E-print Network

skills, leading-edge knowledge, and broad business experience. 03 An opportunity to attract future talent assessment of the situation with actionable recommendations that will be implemented immediately. Outstanding work!" German Pasteris // Global Marketing Director Medasense Biometrics Ltd. "The team was very

Edwards, Paul N.

219

Search Results - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

A Template for Integrating Interdisciplinary Research and Team Science into the Tenure Track Offer Letter Although every recruitment is unique, emphasis on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary science is becoming quite common.

220

Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis for Commercial Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multidisciplinary design and analysis (MDA) has become the normal mode of operation within most aerospace companies, but the impact of these changes have largely not been reflected at many universities. On an effort to determine if the emergence of multidisciplinary design concepts should influence engineering curricula, NASA has asked several universities (Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech, Clemson, BYU, and Cal Poly) to investigate the practicality of introducing MDA concepts within their undergraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team of faculty, students, and industry partners evaluated the aeronautical engineering curriculum at Cal Poly. A variety of ways were found to introduce MDA themes into the curriculum without adding courses or units to the existing program. Both analytic and educational tools for multidisciplinary design of aircraft have been developed and implemented.

Cummings, Russell M.; Freeman, H. JoAnne

1999-01-01

221

Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare  

E-print Network

Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare Annual Report 2010-11 www.match.ac.uk ® #12; MATCH Team 2010/2011 Dr Matthew Allsop Anastasia Anagnostou Dr Julie Barnett Hiran Basnayake Summary 5 Commercial Mobilisation and Impact 6 The Centre 8 Tools and Training 9 Economic Evaluation 11

Oakley, Jeremy

222

American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: implications for social work.  

PubMed

When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to produce the "Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases" to promote the exceptional competence and diligence required when the consequence is life or death. This article summarizes the "Supplementary Guidelines," with implications for social work practice--that is, professional responsibility, competence, interviewing skill, knowledge of behavioral and mental impairment, records review, life history compilation, data interpretation, witness support, law-related knowledge, and testimony. The social work, which is scrutinized in a court of law, requires cultural competence, diverse oral and written communication skills, diligence, and the highest ethical standards. PMID:23038877

Andrews, Arlene Bowers

2012-04-01

223

Evaluating Team Project-Work Using Triangulation: Lessons from Communities in Northern Ghana  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper uses triangulation to assess key aspects of a team-based, participatory action research programme for undergraduates in rural communities across northern Ghana. The perceptions of the programme and its effects on the students, staff and host communities are compared, showing areas of agreement and disagreement. The successes of the…

Clark, Gordon; Jasaw, Godfred Seidu

2014-01-01

224

A Curriculum to Enhance Decision-Making Skills of Technical Personnel Working in Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rapidly changing engineering designs and business scenarios make it essential for engineers and technical personnel to be trained to be effective team players and project managers. This paper reports the experiences gained in developing and implementing a workshop to train engineers at a steel manufacturing plant. The objective of the workshop was…

Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan S.; Xue, Yajiong

2004-01-01

225

Building synergistic EDP teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

A team is termed “synergistic” when the members working together are able to achieve results significantly beyond what could be expected from the same team members working relatively independently. Unfortunately, placing several employees into a work group and calling them a team does not necessarily result in the desired synergy. On the contrary, a team can function so ineffectively as

Kathryn M. Bartol

1977-01-01

226

Interdisciplinary hospice team processes and multidimensional pain: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Hospice teams may address multidimensional pain through the synergistic interaction of team members from various professional disciplines during regularly scheduled team meetings. However, the occurrence of that critical exchange has not been adequately described or documented. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore two processes in team pain palliation: communication and collaboration. Data were gathered through individual interviews and a 1-year observation of team members from two hospices (physicians, nurses, aides, chaplains, social workers). Utilizing constant comparison, 14 final thematic categories were discovered. Use of biopsychosocial/spiritual terms by all team members meant that the team had the common language needed to communicate about multidimensional pain. Interviews and observation revealed a gap in translating multidisciplinary communication in team meetings into collaborative acts for pain treatment. In addition, structural influences inhibited creativity in pain palliation. There was no mutual understanding of the purpose for team meetings, no recognition of the need to reflect on team process, or common definition of leadership. Social work roles in hospice should include leadership that moves teams toward interdisciplinary care for multidimensional pain. PMID:22424384

Dugan Day, Michele

2012-01-01

227

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report  

SciTech Connect

This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

NONE

1994-09-01

228

[Observational Team work Assessment for Surgery as Quality and Safety improvement tool].  

PubMed

As in high reliability systems , also in surgery the causes of adverse events are primarily correlated to deficiencies in Non Technical Skills (individual and social skills), that contribute with Technical Skills to a safe surgical procedure. Non Technical Skills are cognitive behavioural and interpersonal abilities, that are not specific to the expertise of one profession, but very important to guarantee the patient safety and to reduce risk of errors and adverse events. The Observational Teamwork Assessment for Surgery (OTAS) is an useful tool to assess teamwork of the whole surgical team (surgeons, anaesthetists, nurses) in real time and through the surgical procedure (pre-intra-postoperative phases). OTAS consists of the two following parts: a) teamwork-related task checklist to fill by a surgeon, b) teamwork-related behaviours rated by a psychologist/human factors expert. Back translation in Italian language of the eight task checklists and of the rating scales of the five behavioural areas was performed by two Italian surgeons with certified English language knowledge. The OTAS model in Italian language was applied in four surgical procedures : the test-retest reliability was found to be acceptable with K- Pearson index. The internal consistency of behavioural scales appeared sound using Cronbach ?. OTAS is an useful tool to assess the risk factors correlated to patient and team and to detect the vulnerability areas where changes to reduce errors and improve surgical outcomes might be introduced. PMID:20859309

Amato, S; Basilico, O; Bevilacqua, L; Burato, E; Levati, A; Molinelli, V; Picchetti, C; Suardi, R; Trucco, P; Lucchina, C

2010-01-01

229

Multidisciplinary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Head and neck cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity worldwide. Multimodality treatment is often the only way to achieve improved function, quality of life, and survival, calling for a multidisciplinary team approach, particularly in view of the rapid advances being made in various fields. The roles of the head and neck surgeon and reconstructive surgeon are discussed, together with the input afforded by specialists in areas such as diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, medical oncology, and gene therapy. Telemedicine is of importance in centers where multidisciplinary expertise is not available. PMID:22550455

Varkey, Prashanth; Liu, Yi-Tien; Tan, Ngian Chye

2010-01-01

230

Housework and recovery from work among nursing teams: a gender perspective.  

PubMed

The impact on health of work carried out within the household is recognized by several authors in the occupational health field. The purpose of this article is to verify whether and to what extent the need for recovery is related to professional work hours and to housework duties in female nursing workers. Workers (N = 1122) completed a questionnaire with data on household chores and professional work, as well as the Need for Recovery from Work scale. Regression analysis showed that the odds for reporting poor recovery were significantly higher for workers showing long domestic work hours, high total work load (professional plus domestic work hours), and housework overload. No association was found for professional work hours per se. Findings highlight the potential detrimental effects of housework, either by itself or in combination with professional work for the group studied, and can generate discussion on gender equality in both the public and private domains. PMID:21342872

Rotenberg, Lúcia; Griep, Rosane Harter; Pessanha, Joseane; Gomes, Luciana; Portela, Luciana Fernandes; de Jesus Mendes Fonseca, Maria

2010-01-01

231

Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management  

SciTech Connect

Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

Wiederholt, Peggy A. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: wiederholt@humonc.wisc.edu; Connor, Nadine P. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Hartig, Gregory K. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Harari, Paul M. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2007-10-01

232

[Ergonomic working conditions for the nursing team in a cardiology unit].  

PubMed

Aiming at finding out the ergonomics conditions of the nursing personnel in a hospital admission unit, the authors utilized as a methodological presupposition the search for a global experienced work situation through the analysis of some elements as: the man (nursing worker); the work activity (prescribed duty, real activities and work position) and the environment (temperature, noise and illumination). The authors selected the Cardiology admission unit for the site of their research. The results verified that the nursing workers the mentioned unit face problems related to salaries, work installations, relationship, work organization, levels of formation and the activities executed. The authors suggested some recommendations. PMID:9592557

Marziale, M H; de Carvalho, E C

1998-01-01

233

Consensus statements regarding the multidisciplinary care of limb amputation patients in disasters or humanitarian emergencies: report of the 2011 Humanitarian Action Summit Surgical Working Group on amputations following disasters or conflict.  

PubMed

Limb amputations are frequently performed as a result of trauma inflicted during conflict or disasters. As demonstrated during the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, coordinating care of these patients in austere settings is complex. During the 2011 Humanitarian Action Summit, consensus statements were developed for international organizations providing care to limb amputation patients during disasters or humanitarian emergencies. Expanded planning is needed for a multidisciplinary surgical care team, inclusive of surgeons, anesthesiologists, rehabilitation specialists and mental health professionals. Surgical providers should approach amputation using an operative technique that optimizes limb length and prosthetic fitting. Appropriate anesthesia care involves both peri-operative and long-term pain control. Rehabilitation specialists must be involved early in treatment, ideally before amputation, and should educate the surgical team in prosthetic considerations. Mental health specialists must be included to help the patient with community reintegration. A key step in developing local health systems the establishment of surgical outcomes monitoring. Such monitoring can optimizepatient follow-up and foster professional accountability for the treatment of amputation patients in disaster settings and humanitarian emergencies. PMID:22559308

Knowlton, Lisa Marie; Gosney, James E; Chackungal, Smita; Altschuler, Eric; Black, Lynn; Burkle, Frederick M; Casey, Kathleen; Crandell, David; Demey, Didier; Di Giacomo, Lillian; Dohlman, Lena; Goldstein, Joshua; Gosselin, Richard; Ikeda, Keita; Le Roy, Andree; Linden, Allison; Mullaly, Catherine M; Nickerson, Jason; O'Connell, Colleen; Redmond, Anthony D; Richards, Adam; Rufsvold, Robert; Santos, Anna L R; Skelton, Terri; McQueen, Kelly

2011-12-01

234

23 CFR 630.1006 - Work zone safety and mobility policy.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...consideration and management of work zone impacts on all Federal-aid...projects. This policy shall address work zone impacts throughout the...characteristics and expected work zone impacts of individual projects...using a multi-disciplinary team and in partnership with the...

2010-04-01

235

On Cooperative Learning Teams for Multiagent Team Formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a team formation methodology based on cooperative learning teams, adopted from the area of educational research. Cooperative learning is a type of learning where students work in teams and learn through team-based interactions. In education, research in assigning students to appropriate teams and enforcing fair assessment of student performance in a team have generated useful

Leen-Kiat Soh

236

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review  

E-print Network

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production and Technology o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets DOE, Arlene Anderson o H2A Overview, NREL, Darlene Steward o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Cost Analysis DTI

237

Work in progress — An innovation merging “classroom flip” and team-based learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work in progress compares two versions of a “classroom flip” instructional strategy in which lectures are moved from inside class to outside class. Class time is then spent on problem solving and feedback. In previous offerings of this materials science course, students were asked to read instructor-supplied lecture notes and complete an on-line warmup assignment prior to class. Informal

Chrysanthe Demetry

2010-01-01

238

Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

2003-01-01

239

A Qualitative Investigation into How Problem-Based Learning Impacts on the Development of Team-Working Skills in Occupational Therapy Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It has been suggested that problem-based learning (PBL) has a positive impact on the team-working skills of medical, health and social care students. These skills are important for graduates to master to enable effective collaborative working in today's diverse health and social care settings. What is not clear from the literature is how…

Seymour, Alison

2013-01-01

240

Teamwork and team training in the ICU: where do the similarities with aviation end?  

PubMed

The aviation industry has made significant progress in identifying the skills and behaviors that result in effective teamwork. Its conceptualization of teamwork, development of training programs, and design of assessment tools are highly relevant to the intensive care unit (ICU). Team skills are important for maintaining safety in both domains, as multidisciplinary teams must work effectively under highly complex, stressful, and uncertain conditions. However, there are substantial differences in the nature of work and structure of teams in the ICU in comparison with those in aviation. While intensive care medicine may wish to use the advances made by the aviation industry for conceptualizing team skills and implementing team training programs, interventions must be tailored to the highly specific demands of the ICU. PMID:22136283

Reader, Tom W; Cuthbertson, Brian H

2011-01-01

241

Teamwork and team training in the ICU: Where do the similarities with aviation end?  

PubMed Central

The aviation industry has made significant progress in identifying the skills and behaviors that result in effective teamwork. Its conceptualization of teamwork, development of training programs, and design of assessment tools are highly relevant to the intensive care unit (ICU). Team skills are important for maintaining safety in both domains, as multidisciplinary teams must work effectively under highly complex, stressful, and uncertain conditions. However, there are substantial differences in the nature of work and structure of teams in the ICU in comparison with those in aviation. While intensive care medicine may wish to use the advances made by the aviation industry for conceptualizing team skills and implementing team training programs, interventions must be tailored to the highly specific demands of the ICU. PMID:22136283

2011-01-01

242

[The reciprocal reflecting team. A further modification of the reflecting team in inpatient child psychiatry].  

PubMed

The purpose of reflecting teams is to instigate change in systems that have become bogged down, including helper systems. The modifications that have been made in the Andersen reflecting team since it was first described (1987) are summarized. The reflecting team technique derives from family therapy and is epistemologically based on the radical constructivism of Bateson (1981), von Förster (1985), von Glaserfeld (1985) and others. Making use of the information resources of the key workers on our child psychiatry unit, we developed another variation, a "reciprocal reflecting team". This model is suitable for use in a clinical setting because it involves all of the key individuals working with a given child. The fundamental difference between our model and Andersen's is that initially we have no reflecting phase for psychotherapists. Rather, we start with a reflecting sequence in which the multidisciplinary clinical team discusses observations, information and hypotheses about the index patient and his or her family. Our impression is that our results are compatible with those of Höger et al. (1994) that family therapy using a reflecting team effects positive change in two of three cases. Because we have no follow-up data and our sample is still very small we base this on spontaneous positive feedback from the family members regarding their satisfaction with treatment. Further evidence is provided by clinical observations on the children's behavior and on changes in family interaction. PMID:7571878

Menz, W; Oswald, H P

1995-09-01

243

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Stephen M. Fiore, PhD, is President of the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research and faculty with the University of Central Florida's Cognitive Sciences Program in the Department of Philosophy and Director of the Cognitive Sciences Laboratory at UCF's Institute for Simulation and Training. He maintains a multidisciplinary research interest that incorporates aspects of the cognitive, social, organizational, and computational sciences in the investigation of learning and performance in individuals and teams.

244

The Component Packaging Problem: A Vehicle for the Development of Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Methodologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes academic research which has resulted in an increased appreciation for multidisciplinary efforts among our students, colleagues and administrators. It has also generated a number of research ideas that emerged from the interaction between disciplines. Overall, 17 undergraduate students and 16 graduate students benefited directly from the NASA grant: an additional 11 graduate students were impacted and participated without financial support from NASA. The work resulted in 16 theses (with 7 to be completed in the near future), 67 papers or reports mostly published in 8 journals and/or presented at various conferences (a total of 83 papers, presentations and reports published based on NASA inspired or supported work). In addition, the faculty and students presented related work at many meetings, and continuing work has been proposed to NSF, the Army, Industry and other state and federal institutions to continue efforts in the direction of multidisciplinary and recently multi-objective design and analysis. The specific problem addressed is component packing which was solved as a multi-objective problem using iterative genetic algorithms and decomposition. Further testing and refinement of the methodology developed is presently under investigation. Teaming issues research and classes resulted in the publication of a web site, (http://design.eng.clemson.edu/psych4991) which provides pointers and techniques to interested parties. Specific advantages of using iterative genetic algorithms, hurdles faced and resolved, and institutional difficulties associated with multi-discipline teaming are described in some detail.

Fadel, Georges; Bridgewood, Michael; Figliola, Richard; Greenstein, Joel; Kostreva, Michael; Nowaczyk, Ronald; Stevenson, Steve

1999-01-01

245

Team-level predictors of innovation at work: a comprehensive meta-analysis spanning three decades of research.  

PubMed

This article presents a meta-analysis of team-level antecedents of creativity and innovation in the workplace. Using a general input-process-output model, the authors examined 15 team-level variables researched in primary studies published over the last 30 years and their relation to creativity and innovation. An exhaustive search of the international innovation literature resulted in a final sample (k) of 104 independent studies. Results revealed that team process variables of support for innovation, vision, task orientation, and external communication displayed the strongest relationships with creativity and innovation (rhos between 0.4 and 0.5). Input variables (i.e., team composition and structure) showed weaker effect sizes. Moderator analyses confirmed that relationships differ substantially depending on measurement method (self-ratings vs. independent ratings of innovation) and measurement level (individual vs. team innovation). Team variables displayed considerably stronger relationships with self-report measures of innovation compared with independent ratings and objective criteria. Team process variables were more strongly related to creativity and innovation measured at the team than the individual level. Implications for future research and pragmatic ramifications for organizational practice are discussed in conclusion. PMID:19702361

Hülsheger, Ute R; Anderson, Neil; Salgado, Jesus F

2009-09-01

246

Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

2013-01-01

247

Developing and applying a cross-disciplinary team handover information system.  

PubMed

In order to avoid medical errors, it is very important to communicate with the medical team correctly, timely and efficiently. One of main reasons for the poor outcome of multidisciplinary handover in hospital is lacking effective tools for multidisciplinary handover. The project aimed to develop a workflow-based multidisciplinary handover information system, integrated with medical record browsing, multidisciplinary handover and event tracking, to improve the correctness and effectiveness of communication among the medical team members. PMID:23920959

Lee, Ying-Li; Chien, Tsai-Feng; Hsu, Su-Chen; Chang, Polun

2013-01-01

248

Team Up!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students explore the physical and psychological effect of stress and tension on human beings. They develop their observing, thinking, writing and teamwork skills by working on a group art project and reporting about it. They learn about the stages of group formation, group dynamics and team member roles that make for effective teams. In the process, they discover how collective action can foster a sense of community support, which can alleviate personal feelings of stress and tension. Note: The literacy activities for the Mechanics unit are based on physical themes that have broad application to our experience in the world — concepts of rhythm, balance, spin, gravity, levity, inertia, momentum, friction, stress and tension.

2014-09-18

249

The Challenges and Benefits of Employing a Mobile Research Fellow to Facilitate Team Work on a Large, Interdisciplinary, Multi-Sited Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the last few years research funding has increasingly moved in favour of large, multi-partner, interdisciplinary and multi-site research projects. This article explores the benefits and challenges of employing a full-time research fellow to work across multiple field sites, with all the local research teams, on an international,…

Sugden, Fraser; Punch, Samantha

2014-01-01

250

Computer-Based 3D Simulation: A Study of Communication Practices in a Trauma Team Performing Patient Examination and Diagnostic Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diagnostic work in trauma teams is critical for the patient's condition and for the possibility of survival. It is a difficult situation to train due to the inherently unpredictable and time-critical practice when an injured patient presents in the Emergency Room (ER). Different types of simulations have been developed for specialized training of…

Krange, Ingeborg; Moen, Anne; Ludvigsen, Sten

2012-01-01

251

Integrating Multidisciplinary Engineering Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to design two distinct engineering qualification levels for an existing University of Technology programme, empirical evidence based on the current diploma is necessary to illuminate the nature of and the relationship between the "contextual" and "conceptual" elements underpinning a multidisciplinary engineering…

Wolff, Karin; Luckett, Kathy

2013-01-01

252

Multidisciplinary undergraduate mechatronic experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mechatronics is a relatively new field that represents the integration of mechanical, electronics engineering and computer technology for the design of products. With the availability of microprocessors at low cost, more and more products are becoming mechatronic in nature. Engineers faced with the task of developing mechatronic products must understand the principles of mechatronic design, which requires multidisciplinary knowledge. Therefore,

Jawaharlal Mariappan; Timothy Cameron; Joel Berry

1996-01-01

253

Collaborative Design Processes: An Active and Reflective Learning Course in Multidisciplinary Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a capstone course, graduate students from two universities participated in collaborative design in the architectural, engineering, and construction industries in multidisciplinary teams via the Internet. Students also developed process designs to integrate technology into multidisciplinary teamwork, combining active and reflective learning.…

O'Brien, William J.; Soibelman, Lucio; Elvin, George

2003-01-01

254

Working with families of hospitalized older adults with dementia: caregivers are useful resources and should be part of the care team.  

PubMed

Families provide a considerable amount of informal care and support for older adults living with dementia. And when an older adult with dementia is hospitalized, family caregivers should be seen as important sources of information and included as valuable members of the health care team. This article describes a best-practice approach to working with families and includes recommendations for using the Information for the Hospital Team About a Patient with Memory Problems form. For a free online video demonstrating the use of this form, go to http://links.lww.com/A301. PMID:18827544

Bradway, Christine; Hirschman, Karen B

2008-10-01

255

Palliative medicine update: a multidisciplinary approach.  

PubMed

Palliative medicine is a young specialty that is officially recognized in relatively few countries. The World Health Organization published an adapted definition in 2002, describing palliative care as an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness. When the accent is shifting from curative to palliative, the goal of management is the maintenance or improvement of the patient's quality of life. The different dimensions of palliative care and the multitude of types of care to be provided require a multidisciplinary, well-functioning team, effective communication and a clear task division between primary and hospital care. Considering the complexity of care for incurable patients, a multidisciplinary approach is a prerequisite to balance curative and palliative intervention options. Optimal functioning of a team requires excellent training, communication and a description of the tasks and responsibilities of each team member. More and more advanced care planning is introduced in palliative care, focusing on an early identification of patients in a palliative trajectory and on the prevention of annoying symptoms, hoping that this approach results in an improved quality of life for the individual patient, less useless technical investigations and a better end-of-life care on the place the patient and his family desires. PMID:23241248

Vissers, Kris C P; van den Brand, Maria W M; Jacobs, Jose; Groot, Marieke; Veldhoven, Carel; Verhagen, Constans; Hasselaar, Jeroen; Engels, Yvonne

2013-09-01

256

IEEE Multidisciplinary Engineering Education Magazine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The IEEE Multidisciplinary Engineering Education Magazine is the official means of communication for IEEE student members and educators. This magazine publishes interesting, useful, and informative material on all aspects of multidisciplinary engineering education for the benefit of students and educators. With this mission statement in mind, IEEE Multidisciplinary Engineering Education Magazine encourages submissions, both feature articles and columns, on all aspects of multidisciplinary engineering education. Target Audience: Post-Graduate Students, 2-4 Year College Students

257

Advances in Multi-disciplinary Interoperability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The challenge for addressing issues such as climate change, food security or ecosystem sustainability is that they require multi-disciplinary collaboration and the ability to integrate information across scientific domains. Multidisciplinary collaborations are difficult because each discipline has its own "language", protocols and formats for communicating within its community and handling data and information. EuroGEOSS demonstrates the added value to the scientific community and to society of making existing systems and applications interoperable and useful within the GEOSS and INSPIRE frameworks. In 2010, the project built an initial operating capacity of a multi-disciplinary Information System addressing three areas: drought, forestry and biodiversity. It is now furthering this development into an advanced operating capacity (http://www.eurogeoss.eu). The key to this capability is the creation of a broker that supports access to multiple resources through a common user interface and the automation of data search and access using state of the art information technology. EuroGEOSS hosted a conference on information systems and multi-disciplinary applications of science and technology. "EuroGEOSS: advancing the vision of GEOSS" provided a forum for developers, users and decision-makers working with advanced multi-disciplinary information systems to improve science and decisions for complex societal issues. In particular, the Conference addressed: Information systems for supporting multi-disciplinary research; Information systems and modeling for biodiversity, drought, forestry and related societal benefit areas; and Case studies of multi-disciplinary applications and outcomes. This paper will discuss the major finding of the conference and the directions for future development.

Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.; Huerta, J.; Rubio-Iglesias, J. M.; Serrano, J. J.

2012-04-01

258

To do or not to do: use of the scope of professional practice in accident and emergency work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Scope of Professional Practice has the potential to revolutionise the practice of Accident and Emergency nursing. However, for such a revolution to take place re-evaluation of the thinking and doing of Accident and Emergency nursing is needed. In particular, many organisational approaches to work such as team-building and multidisciplinary work need to be recognised and the place of the

L. Sbaih

1995-01-01

259

A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure

Stephanie E Coen; Joan L Bottorff; Joy L Johnson; Pamela A Ratner

2010-01-01

260

Interactive Team Cognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team

Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

2013-01-01

261

Management system for multidisciplinary university research institutes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on multidisciplinary university research institutes and the management challenges that arise in developing and sustaining such institutes. The role of academic institutes is important, they bring together faculty to work on a specific scientific area, which can address a societal or commercial requirement. There are, however, certain issues with this approach, such as the need for effective

Simon P Philbin

2011-01-01

262

Strategic alliance, multidisciplinary teamwork enhance field development in Cotton Valley trend  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optimizing the development phase, and thus improving the profitability, of Amoco Exploration and Production Co.`s Glenwood natural gas field was the task assigned to a multidisciplinary reservoir management team (RMT) in 1996. The team`s primary emphasis was to strategically locate and fracture-stimulate the remaining wells to be drilled in Glenwood field`s initial development phase. This article illustrates the team process

H. G. Krus; K. Haley; L. Britt; R. H. Benson; K. W. England; R. Holt; N. C. Piskurich; R. A. Jr. Woodroof

1997-01-01

263

Person-Centred Teams - A Practical Guide to Delivering Personalisation Through Effective Team-work Sanderson Helen and Lepkowsky Mary Beth Person-Centred Teams - A Practical Guide to Delivering Personalisation Through Effective Team-work 168pp Ł19.99 Jessica Kingsley Publishers 978 1 8490 5455 3 184905455X [Formula: see text].  

PubMed

The state of health care today makes it a challenge to be part of a team that is happy and productive, and where the staff are engaged and valued. This book, although not specifically related to the NHS, has much to offer healthcare practitioners. PMID:25783265

2015-03-18

264

Multidisciplinary computational aerosciences  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As the challenges of single disciplinary computational physics are met, such as computational fluid dynamics, computational structural mechanics, computational propulsion, computational aeroacoustics, computational electromagnetics, etc., scientists have begun investigating the combination of these single disciplines into what is being called multidisciplinary computational aerosciences (MCAS). The combination of several disciplines not only offers simulation realism but also formidable computational challenges. The solution of such problems will require computers orders of magnitude larger than those currently available. Such computer power can only be supplied by massively parallel machines because of the current speed-of-light limitation of conventional serial systems. Even with such machines, MCAS problems will require hundreds of hours for their solution. To efficiently utilize such a machine, research is required in three areas that include parallel architectures, systems software, and applications software. The main emphasis of this paper is the applications software element. Examples that demonstrate application software for multidisciplinary problems currently being solved at NASA Ames Research Center are presented. Pacing items for MCAS are discussed such as solution methodology, physical modeling, computer power, and multidisciplinary validation experiments.

Kutler, Paul

1992-01-01

265

Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

2007-08-01

266

The delta cooperative model: a dynamic and innovative team-work activity to develop research skills in microbiology.  

PubMed

The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM) is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM) program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i) student's perception of the workshops' effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii) research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii) oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student's knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83% and 75% respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how the this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology. PMID:23653564

Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Robles-Suarez, Reynaldo; Gonzalez-Negron, Alberto J; Baez-Santos, Ivan

2006-05-01

267

American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: Implications for Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to…

Andrews, Arlene Bowers

2012-01-01

268

Challenges of Trainees in a Multidisciplinary Research Program: Nano-Biotechnology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The breadth of knowledge required for the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology challenges and extends traditional concepts of multidisciplinary graduate education. There is a paucity of information, both general reporting and peer-reviewed studies, on the challenges for graduate students working in this multidisciplinary paradigm, from the…

Kriegel, Christina; Koehne, Jessica; Tinkle, Sally; Maynard, Andrew D.; Hill, Rodney A.

2011-01-01

269

Developing a Web-Based Environment in Supporting Students Team-Working and Learning in a Problem-Based Learning Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a case study of applying problem-based learning in the format of web-based environment. It first describes the features and rationale behind problem-based learning approach, and then introduces the development of web-based environment as well as its implementation of a university classroom in facilitating students' team- working. It then discusses results of the evaluation conducted to understand the

Hsiu-ping Yueh; Wei-jane Lin

2005-01-01

270

Boundaries, gaps, and overlaps: defining roles in a multidisciplinary nephrology clinic  

PubMed Central

This study aims to explore how health care professionals in a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic interact with one another, patients, families, and caregivers to expand understanding of how this increasingly common form of chronic disease management functions in situ. Nonparticipatory observations were conducted of 64 consultations between patients and health care professionals and end-of-day rounds at a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic. Key themes in our findings revolved around the question of boundaries between the health professions that were expected to work cooperatively within the clinic, between medical specialties in the management of complex patients, and between caregivers and patients. Understanding the importance of various professional roles and how they are allocated, either formally as part of care design or organically as a clinical routine, may help us understand how multidisciplinary care teams function in real life and help us identify gaps in practice. This study highlights two areas for further study and reflection: the effect of discrepancies in health information and the role of caregivers in patient care. PMID:25336966

Stenfors-Hayes, Terese; Kang, Helen H

2014-01-01

271

NASA Team Collaboration Pilot: Enabling NASA's Virtual Teams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most NASA projects and work activities are accomplished by teams of people. These teams are often geographically distributed - across NASA centers and NASA external partners, both domestic and international. NASA "virtual" teams are stressed by the challenge of getting team work done - across geographic boundaries and time zones. To get distributed work done, teams rely on established methods - travel, telephones, Video Teleconferencing (NASA VITS), and email. Time is our most critical resource - and team members are hindered by the overhead of travel and the difficulties of coordinating work across their virtual teams. Modern, Internet based team collaboration tools offer the potential to dramatically improve the ability of virtual teams to get distributed work done.

Prahst, Steve

2003-01-01

272

Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

2013-01-01

273

How teams work--or don't--in primary care: a field study on internal medicine practices.  

PubMed

We conducted a field study in three primary care practices representing different practice types: a solo practice; a certified patient-centered medical home; and a multiphysician, multispecialty practice connected to a local university. All three practices shared a common culture in the way that practice members related to each other. In each instance, the practice team operated in separate social "silos," isolating physicians from each other and from the rest of the practice staff. We concluded that current practice structures are primarily focused on supporting physicians' hectic routines and have trouble accommodating the diversity of patients' needs. For practices to succeed in managing diverse patients and in helping them understand and manage their own health, it will be critical to break down the silos and organize teams with shared roles and responsibilities. PMID:20439874

Chesluk, Benjamin J; Holmboe, Eric S

2010-05-01

274

MedMyst: Animal Alert! Students learn how epidemiologists, microbiologists, and veterinarians work as a team to solve infectious disease outbreaks.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In MedMyst: Animal Alert!, players learn about a mysterious disease that is affecting people in a distant tropical region. Players can choose to work as an epidemiologist, microbiologist, or veterinarian to determine what is making people sick. Animal Alert! can be played after Disease Defenders or independently of that mission. While role-playing as an expert, players will learn how epidemiologists, microbiologists, and veterinarians work as a team to solve infectious disease outbreaks. Each expert path has its own learning objectives.

Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning

2011-09-28

275

The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. Settings This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme ‘On Your Own Feet Ahead!’ in the Netherlands. Participantss A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1?year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Interventions Transition programme. Primary outcome measures Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). Results The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents’ characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (p<0.01) and changes in team climate (p<0.001) predicted the quality of chronic care delivery at T2. Conclusions The implementation of transition programmes requires a supportive and stimulating team climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. PMID:24852302

Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

2014-01-01

276

Getting a Cohesive Answer from a Common Start: Scalable Multidisciplinary Analysis through Transformation of a Systems Model  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the challenges of systems engineering is in working multidisciplinary problems in a cohesive manner. When planning analysis of these problems, system engineers must trade between time and cost for analysis quality and quantity. The quality often correlates with greater run time in multidisciplinary models and the quantity is associated with the number of alternatives that can be analyzed. The trade-off is due to the resource intensive process of creating a cohesive multidisciplinary systems model and analysis. Furthermore, reuse or extension of the models used in one stage of a product life cycle for another is a major challenge. Recent developments have enabled a much less resource-intensive and more rigorous approach than hand-written translation scripts between multi-disciplinary models and their analyses. The key is to work from a core systems model defined in a MOF-based language such as SysML and in leveraging the emerging tool ecosystem, such as Query/View/Transformation (QVT), from the OMG community. SysML was designed to model multidisciplinary systems. The QVT standard was designed to transform SysML models into other models, including those leveraged by engineering analyses. The Europa Habitability Mission (EHM) team has begun to exploit these capabilities. In one case, a Matlab/Simulink model is generated on the fly from a system description for power analysis written in SysML. In a more general case, symbolic analysis (supported by Wolfram Mathematica) is coordinated by data objects transformed from the systems model, enabling extremely flexible and powerful design exploration and analytical investigations of expected system performance.

Cole, Bjorn; Chung, Seung

2012-01-01

277

Multidisciplinary Science Master of Science in Multidisciplinary Science  

E-print Network

, educational institutions, and agencies. The purpose of this handbook is to provide specific information.ttu.edu. Information about the College of Education can be found at www.educ.ttu.edu. Contact Middle School Level........ Multidisciplinary Science Master of Science in Multidisciplinary Science Program Handbook

Rock, Chris

278

Dynamic production teams with strategic behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze if intergenerational teams reveal workers’ productivities. Some uncertainty on agents’ productivities persists when (i) each agent must work independently, or (ii) technological shocks are agent-specific in compulsory teams. However, when technological shocks are team-specific in compulsory teams, each worker's productivity is revealed. When agents choose to work independently or in teams, that problem falls in the class of

Michčle Breton; Pascal St-Amour; Désiré Vencatachellum

2003-01-01

279

Asteroid team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this task is to support asteroid research and the operation of an Asteroid Team within the Earth and Space Sciences Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Asteroid Team carries out original research on asteroids in order to discover, better characterize and define asteroid properties. This information is needed for the planning and design of NASA asteroid flyby and rendezvous missions. The asteroid Team also provides scientific and technical advice to NASA and JPL on asteroid related programs. Work on asteroid classification continued and the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids was published. In the asteroid photometry program researchers obtained N or Q photometry for more than 50 asteroids, including the two M-earth-crossers. Compositional analysis of infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 micrometer) of asteroids is continuing. Over the next year the work on asteroid classification and composition will continue with the analysis of the 60 reduced infrared spectra which we now have at hand. The radiometry program will continue with the reduction of the N and Q bandpass data for the 57 asteroids in order to obtain albedos and diameters. This year the emphasis will shift to IRAS follow-up observations; which includes objects not observed by IRAS and objects with poor or peculiar IRAS data. As in previous year, we plan to give top priority to any opportunities for observing near-Earth asteroids and the support (through radiometric lightcurve observations from the IRTF) of any stellar occultations by asteroids for which occultation observation expeditions are fielded. Support of preparing of IRAS data for publication and of D. Matson for his participation in the NASA Planetary Astronomy Management and Operations Working Group will continue.

Matson, D. L.

1988-01-01

280

A Reflection on the Work of an Educational Psychologist in Providing Supervision for a Team of Community Based Support Workers, Supporting Families with Vulnerable Adolescents at Risk of Exclusion from School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evolving role of the educational psychologist (EP) is discussed with an emphasis on the supervision provided for a team of support workers for vulnerable adolescents, working within a Local Service Team. This development is considered in the context of the Every Child Matters (DfES, 2004) agenda and the Farrell, Woods, Lewis, Rooney, Squire…

Maxwell, Tim

2013-01-01

281

Team Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of principals in structuring teaching teams; to assess background and personality characteristics appearing essential to successful individual and team performance; and to select personality factor scores which would predict individual and team success. Subjects were 31 teaching teams (99…

Cunningham, David C.

1963-01-01

282

Study protocol of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-specific sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain (LBP), with high incidence and prevalence rate, is one of the most common reasons to consult the health system and is responsible for a significant amount of sick leave, leading to high health and social costs. The objective of the study is to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial educational group intervention (MBEGI) of non-specific sub-acute LBP in comparison with the usual care in the working population recruited in primary healthcare centres. Methods/design The study design is a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a MBEGI in comparison with the usual care of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Measures on effectiveness and costs of both interventions will be obtained from a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial carried out in 38 Catalan primary health care centres, enrolling 932 patients between 18 and 65 years old with a diagnosis of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Effectiveness measures are: pharmaceutical treatments, work sick leave (% and duration in days), Roland Morris disability, McGill pain intensity, Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB) and Golberg Questionnaires. Utility measures will be calculated from the SF-12. The analysis will be performed from a social perspective. The temporal horizon is at 3 months (change to chronic LBP) and 12 months (evaluate the outcomes at long term). Assessment of outcomes will be blinded and will follow the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion We hope to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of MBEGI, see an improvement in the patients' quality of life, achieve a reduction in the duration of episodes and the chronicity of non-specific low back pain, and be able to report a decrease in the social costs. If the intervention is cost-effectiveness and cost-utility, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58719694 PMID:21859489

2011-01-01

283

"Just working in a team was a great experience…" - Student perspectives on the learning experiences of an interprofessional education program.  

PubMed

Interprofessional education (IPE) programs aim to improve collaboration between health- and social-care professionals and to optimize clinical outcomes. Such programs are complex to design, and evaluation of effectiveness is difficult. Combining qualitative and quantitative data may provide greater understanding of how a program affects participants and what aspects are influential on attitudes and behavior. This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews and interpretative phenomenological analysis to explore undergraduate student perspectives on what attributes of a 4-week IPE program they considered contributed to a successful learning experience. Due to the fact that the students were not formally assessed, the realistic context of the activities and the quality of the facilitators created an environment where the students felt empowered to interact freely without fear of reproach. Learning the roles of other professions and their contribution to a healthcare team broadened the students' perspectives on healthcare and increased their sense of self-worth and pride in their professions. In addition, being able to identify the relevance of the learning experience to their future practice motivated the students. This information can be used to create optimal learning environments for facilitating the development of successful future healthcare teams. PMID:23421342

Mellor, Rebecca; Cottrell, Neil; Moran, Monica

2013-07-01

284

New Developments in Team Building  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work teams are viewed by today?s businesses as a new frontier to be explored. The effect that teams can have has been demonstrated by the tremendous quality improvement of the post-World War II Japanese products. Japan has set the example for the development of work teams throughout the world. Discusses eight characteristics which are: participatory leadership; shared responsibility; definition of

Kim Gustafson; Brian H. Kleiner

1994-01-01

285

MedMyst Disease Defenders. Students learn how experts work as a team to solve infectious disease outbreaks while using the scientific method.  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a problem-based learning adventure game in which players investigate infectious disease outbreaks. By interacting with professionals in the field and in the laboratory, players learn about the science of infectious disease and real medical science careers. Players can choose to train with an epidemiologist, microbiologist, or veterinarian to learn how these experts work as a team to solve infectious disease outbreaks while using the scientific method. Each expert path has its own learning objectives and stresses different parts of the scientific method. Key topics covered in this game: Scientific method, science process skills, rabies, necropsy, case-control study. Also available in Spanish.

Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning

2011-09-28

286

Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

1998-01-01

287

Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%–7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

2014-01-01

288

Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%-7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

2014-01-01

289

Multidelity methods for multidisciplinary system design  

E-print Network

Optimization of multidisciplinary systems is critical as slight performance improvements can provide significant benefits over the system's life. However, optimization of multidisciplinary systems is often plagued by ...

March, Andrew I. (Andrew Irving)

2012-01-01

290

Finding the team for Mars: a psychological and human factors analysis of a Mars Desert Research Station crew.  

PubMed

A two-week mission in March and April of 2011 sent six team members to the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS). MDRS, a research facility in the high Utah desert, provides an analogue for the harsh and unusual working conditions that will be faced by men and women who one day explore Mars. During the mission a selection of quantitative and qualitative psychological tests were administered to the international, multidisciplinary team. A selection of the results are presented along with discussion. PMID:22317591

Sawyer, Benjamin D; Hancock, P A; Deaton, John; Suedfeld, Peter

2012-01-01

291

Web Team Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dynamic world of the Web has provided libraries with a wealth of opportunities, including new approaches to the provision of information and varied internal staffing structures. The development of self-managed Web teams, endowed with authority and resources, can create an adaptable and responsive culture within libraries. This new working team

Church, Jennifer; Felker, Kyle

2005-01-01

292

Blog - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Empirical findings on the nature of scientific inquiry (i.e., "the science of science") indicate that research is increasingly being conducted by teams rather than individuals. Working on a cross-disciplinary research team also has been shown to be associated with producing more creative research that has higher scientific impact.

293

Project Year Project Team  

E-print Network

sufficient student involvement for a year-round team development effort. For the proposed project, during the 2005-2006 school year, three students will work on extending Alan Cheng's original #12;TechnologyProject Year 2005 Project Team Gregory Hager, Professor, Department of Computer Science, Whiting

Gray, Jeffrey J.

294

42 CFR 488.314 - Survey teams.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Facilities § 488.314 Survey teams. (a) Team composition. (1) Surveys must be conducted by an interdisciplinary team of professionals, which must include... (i) The surveyor currently works, or, within the past two...

2010-10-01

295

Breakfast: a multidisciplinary approach  

PubMed Central

Background The role of breakfast as an essential part of an healthy diet has been only recently promoted even if breakfast practices were known since the Middle Age. The growing scientific evidences on this topic are extremely sector-based nevertheless breakfast could be regarded from different point of views and from different expertises. This approach, that take into account history, sociology, anthropology, medicine, psychology and pedagogy, is useful to better understand the value of this meal in our culture. The aim of this paper was to analyse breakfast-related issues based on a multidisciplinary approach with input by specialists from different fields of learning. Discussion Breakfast is now recommended as part of a diet because it is associated with healthier macro- and micronutrient intakes, body mass index and lifestyle. Moreover recent studies showed that breakfast improves cognitive function, intuitive perception and academic performance. Research demonstrates the importance of providing breakfast not only to children but in adults and elderly too. Although the important role breakfast plays in maintaining the health, epidemiological data from industrialised countries reveal that many individuals either eat a nutritionally unhealthy breakfast or skip it completely. Summary The historical, bio-psychological and educational value of breakfast in our culture is extremely important and should be recognized and stressed by the scientific community. Efforts should be done to promote this practice for the individual health and well-being. PMID:23842429

2013-01-01

296

Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

297

Multidisciplinary Optimization Methods for Aircraft Preliminary Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes a research program aimed at improved methods for multidisciplinary design and optimization of large-scale aeronautical systems. The research involves new approaches to system decomposition, interdisciplinary communication, and methods of exploiting coarse-grained parallelism for analysis and optimization. A new architecture, that involves a tight coupling between optimization and analysis, is intended to improve efficiency while simplifying the structure of multidisciplinary, computation-intensive design problems involving many analysis disciplines and perhaps hundreds of design variables. Work in two areas is described here: system decomposition using compatibility constraints to simplify the analysis structure and take advantage of coarse-grained parallelism; and collaborative optimization, a decomposition of the optimization process to permit parallel design and to simplify interdisciplinary communication requirements.

Kroo, Ilan; Altus, Steve; Braun, Robert; Gage, Peter; Sobieski, Ian

1994-01-01

298

Initial Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Framework  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Within the Supersonics (SUP) Project of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), an initial multidisciplinary design & analysis framework has been developed. A set of low- and intermediate-fidelity discipline design and analysis codes were integrated within a multidisciplinary design and analysis framework and demonstrated on two challenging test cases. The first test case demonstrates an initial capability to design for low boom and performance. The second test case demonstrates rapid assessment of a well-characterized design. The current system has been shown to greatly increase the design and analysis speed and capability, and many future areas for development were identified. This work has established a state-of-the-art capability for immediate use by supersonic concept designers and systems analysts at NASA, while also providing a strong base to build upon for future releases as more multifidelity capabilities are developed and integrated.

Ozoroski, L. P.; Geiselhart, K. A.; Padula, S. L.; Li, W.; Olson, E. D.; Campbell, R. L.; Shields, E. W.; Berton, J. J.; Gray, J. S.; Jones, S. M.; Naiman, C. G.; Seidel, J. A.; Moore, K. T.; Naylor, B. A.; Townsend, S.

2010-01-01

299

Recent advances in multidisciplinary critical care.  

PubMed

The intensive care unit is a work environment where superior dedication is crucial for optimizing patients' outcomes. As this demanding commitment is multidisciplinary in nature, it requires special qualities of health care workers and organizations. Thus research in the field covers a broad spectrum of activities necessary to deliver cutting-edge care. However, given the numerous research articles and education activities available, it is difficult for modern critical care clinicians to keep up with the latest progress and innovation in the field. This article broadly summarizes new developments in multidisciplinary intensive care. It provides elementary information about advanced insights in the field via brief descriptions of selected articles grouped by specific topics. Issues considered include care for heart patients, mechanical ventilation, delirium, nutrition, pressure ulcers, early mobility, infection prevention, transplantation and organ donation, care for caregivers, and family matters. PMID:25554557

Blot, Stijn; Afonso, Elsa; Labeau, Sonia

2015-01-01

300

Implementing a High Performance Work Place in the Distribution and Logistics Industry: Recommendations for Leadership & Team Member Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Leadership development and employee engagement are two elements critical to the success of organizations. In response to growth opportunities, our Distribution and Logistics company set on a course to implement High Performance Work Place to meet the leadership and employee engagement needs, and to find methods for improving work processes. This…

McCann, Laura Harding

2012-01-01

301

Part of an Honors Residential College work team, Erica Bennett decorates windows at the Narrows Head Start  

E-print Network

assigned to work on school and community gardening projects with Plenty!Building strong community. Working with rural Head Start centers promised benefits to both community and college students, whose a website, coordinate a community garden, and start school gardens at two elementary schools. "The school

Buehrer, R. Michael

302

Interpersonal team leadership skills.  

PubMed

To say that a team leader's job is a tough one is certainly not saying enough. It is up to the team leader to manage a group of people to be individuals but yet work as a team. The team leader must keep the peace and yet create a revolution with this group all at the same time. The good leader will require a lot of education, training, and tons of practical application to be a success. The good news, however, is that the team leader's job is a rewarding one, one that they'll always feel good about if they do it right. How many of us get the opportunity to take a group of wonderful, thinking individual minds and pull from them ideas that a whole team can take to success? Yes, the job is indeed tough, but the paybacks are many. PMID:10142103

Nelson, M

1995-05-01

303

Back to the Future of Social Work: Child and Adolescent Mental Health and the Post Qualifying Curriculum in England and Wales  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first social work course to focus on children's mental health in the UK began in 1929 at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The subsequent child guidance movement spawned the genesis of child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) where social workers held a pivotal and much-respected role among multi-disciplinary teams. This role has been undermined in

Steven Walker

2010-01-01

304

Managing multicultural teams.  

PubMed

Multicultural teams offer a number of advantages to international firms, including deep knowledge of different product markets, culturally sensitive customer service, and 24-hour work rotations. But those advantages may be outweighed by problems stemming from cultural differences, which can seriously impair the effectiveness of a team or even bring itto a stalemate. How can managers best cope with culture-based challenges? The authors conducted in-depth interviews with managers and members of multicultural teams from all over the world. Drawing on their extensive research on dispute resolution and teamwork and those interviews, they identify four problem categories that can create barriers to a team's success: direct versus indirect communication, trouble with accents and fluency, differing attitudes toward hierarchy and authority, and conflicting norms for decision making. If a manager--or a team member--can pinpoint the root cause of the problem, he or she is likelier to select an appropriate strategy for solving it. The most successful teams and managers, the authors found, dealt with multicultural challenges in one of four ways: adaptation (acknowledging cultural gaps openly and working around them), structural intervention (changing the shape or makeup of the team), managerial intervention (setting norms early or bringing in a higher-level manager), and exit (removing a team member when other options have failed). Which strategy is best depends on the particular circumstances--and each has potential complications. In general, though, managers who intervene early and set norms; teams and managers who try to engage everyone on the team; and teams that can see challenges as stemming from culture, not personality, succeed in solving culture-based problems with good humor and creativity. They are the likeliest to harvest the benefits inherent in multicultural teams. PMID:17131565

Brett, Jeanne; Behfar, Kristin; Kern, Mary C

2006-11-01

305

[Multidisciplinary guideline irritable bowel syndrome].  

PubMed

The multidisciplinary guideline 'Diagnostics and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)' provides the basis for a properly coordinated collaboration between the patient suffering from IBS and all healthcare providers involved in his or her treatment, such as the general practitioner, gastroenterologist, internist, occupational-health physician, dietitian and psychologist. The diagnosis 'IBS' is often made in accordance with diagnostic criteria, such as the Rome III criteria, but a somatic condition needs to be excluded first. If there are no indications for this, additional diagnostic tests are not necessary. Management of the condition consists primarily of advice on life-style plus non-pharmacological interventions, in addition to explaining the condition and providing information. Drug treatment is rarely indicated. If the IBS symptoms have a significant impact on quality of life and patients do not respond to the measures taken in accordance with this general policy, there are three options for psychotherapeutic treatment. When the symptoms result in absenteeism or other work-related problems, the doctor can advise the patient to contact the occupational-health physician and to search for specific solutions in consultation with the employer. When individual advice is required or if the patient's diet is not well-balanced, a referral to the dietitian will follow. PMID:24326112

Woutersen-Koch, Hčlen; Smout, André J P M; Flik, Carla E; Hulshof, Carel T J; de Wit, Niek J; van der Horst, Henriëtte E

2013-01-01

306

Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer.  

PubMed

The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial) evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients' views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care) have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients' holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to reevaluate the structure and models of MDT-work to ensure that MDTs are an efficient use of resources. PMID:24648761

Taylor, Cath; Shewbridge, Amanda; Harris, Jenny; Green, James S

2013-01-01

307

Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial) evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients’ views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care) have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients’ holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to reevaluate the structure and models of MDT-work to ensure that MDTs are an efficient use of resources. PMID:24648761

Taylor, Cath; Shewbridge, Amanda; Harris, Jenny; Green, James S

2013-01-01

308

Safety teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Safety teams have become a popular means to recognize and prevent injuries in the workplace. In fact, organizations, such as OSHA, NIOSH, NIEHS, DOE, and the Ohio BWC, not only encourage safety teams, but have implemented them in their organizations. However, safety teams may not be legal as defined by NLRB Act Sections 2(5) and 8(a)(2). Objective: To determine

Joseph R. Muscatello; Brian P. Heshizer

2002-01-01

309

Creating the executive team to lead team-based organizations.  

PubMed

In team-based organizations, senior executives are often the last group to be truly a team. Many factors contribute to the individualism that is characteristic of the leadership of an organization. Factors that produce the success of an executive may be contradictory to the skills needed to be an effective team member. Team-based organizations continue to demonstrate their success in managing the changing and challenging work environments. Health care executive leadership groups must realize the impact they can have on the organization if they become a team. This article reviews how executives can become a team. PMID:10095712

Nevidjon, B

1998-12-01

310

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Demonstrated success at grant writing for NIH and other government institutes using team science approaches. Work in non-profit sector with federal contracts and grants. Have written book on successful grant writing.

311

A Faculty Team Works to Create Content Linkages among Various Courses to Increase Meaningful Learning of Targeted Concepts of Microbiology  

PubMed Central

As research faculty with expertise in the area of host–pathogen interactions (HPI), we used a research group model to effect our professional development as scientific educators. We have established a working hypothesis: The implementation of a curriculum that forms bridges between our seven HPI courses allows our students to achieve deep and meaningful learning of HPI concepts. Working collaboratively, we identified common learning goals, and we chose two microorganisms to serve as anchors for student learning. We instituted variations of published active-learning methods to engage students in research-oriented learning. In parallel, we are developing an assessment tool. The value of this work is in the development of a teaching model that successfully allowed faculty who already work collaboratively in the research area of HPI to apply a “research group approach” to further scientific teaching initiatives at a research university. We achieved results that could not be accomplished by even the most dedicated instructor working in isolation. PMID:17548877

Marbach-Ad, Gili; Briken, Volker; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Gao, Lian-Yong; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Joseph, Sam W.; Mosser, David; Parent, Beth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Swanson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina V.; Yuan, Robert

2007-01-01

312

Multidisciplinary Graduate Education in Bioprocess Engineering  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the accomplishments of the University of Georgia in establishing an academic program geared toward the emerging biobased products industry. By virtue of its strengths and structure, the University of Georgia is particularly well-suited for developing a program focused on plant- and microbial-based bioproducts, and it was in this general area that this program was developed. The program had several unique characteristics. First, we implemented a distinguished lecture series that brought outstanding scientists and engineers to our University to interact with students and share their vision of the biobased economy. Second, we offered industrially-oriented and multidisciplinary courses that provided students with a broad background on various facets of biobased business and technology. Third, we provided the students with opportunities to expand beyond the classroom by engaging in research lab rotations and industrial internships. Fourth, each student was engaged in a creative research project as led by a multidisciplinary faculty team. Throughout the implementation of these activities, we maintained a student-centered, mentoring approach to education. The most tangible outcome of this project was the graduation of two students who participated in a variety of scholarly activities, culminating in research toward the completion of a thesis and dissertation. Both research projects involved the use of microorganisms to produce industrial products from agricultural substrates via fermentation processes. The research advanced our understanding of microorganisms as used for industrial processes and products, as described in several articles published in scholarly journals and presentations made at scientific conferences (see information on pp. 14-15). Another outcome is one graduate course, Fermentation Engineering Laboratory, which is a unique experiential and multidisciplinary course. This course will be offered in the future as an elective to graduate students in several engineering and science degree programs. Other significant developments have arisen as direct or indirect consequences of this project. The University of Georgia has established a B.S. Biochemical Engineering degree and an M.S. Biochemical Engineering degree. A strong component of these degree programs is education toward a biobased economy. We will integrate particularly positive components of this project (such as the distinguished lecture series) into these degree programs. The University of Georgia is establishing a Center for Biorefining and Carbon Cycling. This multidisciplinary Center houses a pilot scale biorefinery, comprising a pyrolysis unit and an ethanol plant. Together with new faculty positions that are currently being advertised, this project has encouraged the University of Georgia to assume a leadership role in the preparation of students in the biobased industries of the future.

Mark A. Eiteman

2006-04-18

313

Team Learning: Collective Reflection Processes in Teacher Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to further studies of theoretical and conceptual understanding of teachers' team learning processes, with a main focus on team work, team atmosphere, and collective reflections. Design/methodology/approach: The empirical study was designed as a multi-case study in a research and development…

Ohlsson, Jon

2013-01-01

314

ED diversion: multidisciplinary approach engages high utilizers, helps them better navigate the health care system.  

PubMed

Working with partners, the St. Charles Health System in Bend, OR, has implemented an ED diversion project that is helping patients who frequent the ED connect with more appropriate settings for their primary care needs. The hospital identifies high ED utilizers using claims data, then a multidisciplinary engagement team establishes care plans for these patients. The most at-risk patients are paired with community health workers to help them better navigate the health care system. The ED diversion project has reduced unnecessary ED utilization by 45% to 70% in cohorts of patients that the hospital has analyzed thus far. The hospital contracts with a non-profit organization to supply and train community health workers. Community health workers follow a structured model that includes more than 80 different pathways to follow, based on patient conditions. PMID:22043590

2011-11-01

315

A Faculty Team Works to Create Content Linkages among Various Courses to Increase Meaningful Learning of Targeted Concepts of Microbiology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As research faculty with expertise in the area of host-pathogen interactions (HPI), we used a research group model to effect our professional development as scientific educators. We have established a working hypothesis: The implementation of a curriculum that forms bridges between our seven HPI courses allows our students to achieve deep and…

Marbach-Ad, Gili; Briken, Volker; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Gao, Lian-Yong; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Joseph, Sam W.; Mosser, David; Parent, Beth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Swanson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina V.; Yuan, Robert; Smith, Ann C.

2007-01-01

316

A framework for improving the effectiveness of distributed project teams  

E-print Network

Introduction: The focus of this work is on improving the effectiveness of distributed project teams - adopting a widely accepted definition of team as described in "Virtual Teams" as: "A team is a collection of individuals ...

Cherbonneau, Gregg

2005-01-01

317

Applications of collaborative helping maps: supporting professional development, supervision and work teams in family-centered practice.  

PubMed

Collaborative, family-centered practice has become an influential approach in helping efforts across a broad spectrum of human services. This article draws from previous work that presented a principle-based, practice framework of Collaborative Helping and highlighted the use of Collaborative Helping maps as a tool both to help workers think their way through complex situations and to provide a guideline for constructive conversations between families and helpers about challenging issues. It builds on that work to examine ways to utilize Collaborative Helping maps at worker, supervisory, and organizational levels to enhance and sustain collaborative, family-centered practice and weave its core values and principles into the everyday fabric of organizational cultures in human service agencies and government agencies that serve poor and marginalized families and communities. PMID:24215323

Madsen, William C

2014-03-01

318

Aria Coach Soccer Simulation Team Description  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the most important features of current work- ing coach program of the Aria Soccer Simulation Team and futures works which this team aim to do. Previously, this team participates successfully in 2D and 3D soccer simulation environment. This team is prepared to participate in coach competition in addition to 2D and 3D league.

Hesam Montazeri; Ahmad Nickabadi; Sajjad Moradi; Sayyed Ali; Rokni Dezfouli; Mojtaba Solgi; Hamid Reza Baghie; Omid Mola

319

Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

PubMed Central

The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Team member roles complement each other and contribute to the goal of providing the highest-quality medical care. The primary focus of the team is to reinforce the medical plan and to provide patient education and support. This article reviews the elements of the initial patient assessment and the functional and nutritional assessment. Patient education focuses on medication use, recognition and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation symptoms, smoking cessation, advance directives, and travel. PMID:18453373

Kuzma, Anne Marie; Meli, Yvonne; Meldrum, Catherine; Jellen, Patricia; Butler-Lebair, Marianne; Koczen-Doyle, Debra; Rising, Peter; Stavrolakes, Kim; Brogan, Frances

2008-01-01

320

Influence of an Infectious Diseases Specialist on ICU Multidisciplinary Rounds  

PubMed Central

Objective. To ascertain the influence of a physician infectious diseases specialist (IDS) on antibiotic use in a medical/surgical intensive care unit. Method. Over a 5-month period, the antibiotic regimens ordered by the ICU multidisciplinary team were studied. The days of antibiotic therapy (DOT) when management decisions included an IDS were compared to DOT in the absence of an IDS. The associated treatment expense was calculated. Results. Prior to multidisciplinary rounds (MDRs), 79-80% of the patients were receiving one or more antibiotic. IDS participation occurred in 61 multidisciplinary rounding sessions. There were 384 patients who before MDRs had orders for 669 days of antimicrobial therapy (DOT). After MDRs, the antimicrobial DOT were reduced to 511 with a concomitant cost saving of $3772. There were 51 MDR sessions that occurred in the absence of the IDS. There were 352 patients who before MDRs had orders for 593 DOT. After MDRs, the DOT were reduced to 572 with a cost savings of $727. The results were normalized by number of patients evaluated with statistically greater reductions when MDRs included the IDS. In addition, the number of rounding sessions with a reduction in DOT was greater with the participation of the IDS. Conclusion. The addition of an IDS to multidisciplinary ICU patient rounds resulted in a reduction in antibiotic DOT and attendant drug expense. PMID:24860663

Gilbert, David N.

2014-01-01

321

Influence of an infectious diseases specialist on ICU multidisciplinary rounds.  

PubMed

Objective. To ascertain the influence of a physician infectious diseases specialist (IDS) on antibiotic use in a medical/surgical intensive care unit. Method. Over a 5-month period, the antibiotic regimens ordered by the ICU multidisciplinary team were studied. The days of antibiotic therapy (DOT) when management decisions included an IDS were compared to DOT in the absence of an IDS. The associated treatment expense was calculated. Results. Prior to multidisciplinary rounds (MDRs), 79-80% of the patients were receiving one or more antibiotic. IDS participation occurred in 61 multidisciplinary rounding sessions. There were 384 patients who before MDRs had orders for 669 days of antimicrobial therapy (DOT). After MDRs, the antimicrobial DOT were reduced to 511 with a concomitant cost saving of $3772. There were 51 MDR sessions that occurred in the absence of the IDS. There were 352 patients who before MDRs had orders for 593 DOT. After MDRs, the DOT were reduced to 572 with a cost savings of $727. The results were normalized by number of patients evaluated with statistically greater reductions when MDRs included the IDS. In addition, the number of rounding sessions with a reduction in DOT was greater with the participation of the IDS. Conclusion. The addition of an IDS to multidisciplinary ICU patient rounds resulted in a reduction in antibiotic DOT and attendant drug expense. PMID:24860663

Gilbert, David N

2014-01-01

322

Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Optimization Frameworks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since July 2008, the Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed one major milestone, Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework Milestone (9/30/08), and is completing the Generation 1 Framework validation milestone, which is due December 2008. Included in the presentation are: details of progress on developing the Open MDAO framework, modeling and testing the Generation 1 Framework, progress toward establishing partnerships with external parties, and discussion of additional potential collaborations

Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

2009-01-01

323

Team Performance and Space Safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses how space safety is influenced by the ability of teams to work and communicate effectively together. A multi-national team of six authors provides different perspectives on human systems, from both research and operational points of view. When operations involve teams whose members cross organizational and cultural boundaries as they do in current space operations, it is especially critical and challenging to facilitate the most effective team performance. Three key factors that affect team performance and space safety are discussed: (1) communication as related to team performance; (2) the influence of organizations, teams and culture and (3) team training interventions. Relevant research and current practices are described for each of the three areas and a summary in the form of recommendations is provided.

Kanki, B. G.; Rogers, D. G.; Bessone, L.; Parke, B.; Sandal, G. M.; Whiteley, I.

324

What is Team X?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Team X is a concurrent engineering team for rapid design and analysis of space mission concepts. It was developed in 1995 by JPL to reduce study time and cost. More than 1100 studies have been completed It is institutionally endorsed and it has been emulated by many institutions. In Concurrent Engineering (i.e., Parallel) diverse specialists work in real time, in the same place, with shared data, to yield an integrated design

Warfield, Keith

2012-01-01

325

[Can we improve the general and nutritional management of elderly individuals living at a medical-social facility? A team work].  

PubMed

Can we improve comprehensive care of old people's home residents? Working in an interdisciplinary health network, health professionals tried to better answer the real needs of residents. Malnutrition is is highly prevalent in this population. We showed that it is possible to improve health care of these patients by better organizing meals with a more enriched protein content provided a better involvement in the process of every caring team member. Most of the new residents improved their nutritional state already after the first months in institution. However we still have to develop managerial tools to avoid routine, evaluate the results on the long term and stimulate caregivers as there is a clear relationship between health quality, nutritional state and survival in these old people. On the other hand, a better medical follow up of antibiotherapy allowed a 30% decrease in antibiotics consumption. We also showed a better acceptance of influenza vaccination with a vaccination prevalence going from 80% to 99% in residents and from 80% to 100% in caregivers. Such an approach shows that health care can be improved in old people's homes provided interdisciplinary coordinated work between physicians, nurses and other professionals. PMID:15095708

Métrailler, Alain; Emery, Gasparine; Zuber, Apoline; Robyr, Murielle; Mabillard, Françoise; Dolt, Gilles; Kunz, Ariane; Bettler, Stéphane; Bonvin, Louis

2003-03-01

326

Use of simulation to practice multidisciplinary anaphylaxis management.  

PubMed

Multidisciplinary clinical simulation can be an essential part of nursing education strategies to improve and enhance patient safety and experience. Clinical simulation can be utilized to change practice, reinforce practices, and direct patient and family education needs for a safe discharge. Anaphylaxis is potentially fatal and is increasing in occurrence. A simulation scenario was designed by a multidisciplinary team to review anaphylaxis recognition and to provide simulated practice for emergency response. Clinical scenarios were developed based on evidence-based practices and included a prebriefing and postdebriefing. Bandura's self-efficacy theory was used as a framework to develop the project, as it supports behavior change strategies well suited for clinical simulation. Clinical simulations provide a nonthreatening environment for staff to learn, practice, and receive feedback to improve patient care and serve as a vehicle to role-play expected practices, enhance communication between disciplines, demonstrate progress, and evaluate competency. PMID:24100428

Mason, Virginia M; Lyons, Patricia

2013-01-01

327

The foot clinic. Multidisciplinary management of the patient with diabetic foot.  

PubMed

Treatment of a complex disease as the diabetic foot requires a multidisciplinary management with the close collaboration of a team for care. The most important members of the team are the diabetologist as coordinator, the vascular surgeon, the orthopedist, the radiologist, the orthopedic technician, the podiatrist and the nurse specialist. The care based on this arrangement should be carried out in dedicated rooms and times to exploit at best the organizational potential in the patient's interest, implemented in the foot clinic. PMID:9550903

Ghirlanda, G; Mancini, L; Castagneto, M; Citterio, F; Serra, F; Cotroneo, A R; Marano, P

1997-01-01

328

Dynamic production teams with strategic behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze if intergenerational teams reveal workers' productivities. Some uncertainty on agents' productivities persists when (i) each agent must work independently, or (ii) technolog- ical shocks are agent-speci6c in compulsory teams. However, when technological shocks are team-speci6c in compulsory teams, each worker's productivity is revealed. When agents choose to work independently or in teams, that problem falls in the class

Pascal St-Amourb

329

Team Project - An Effective Tool for Application of Knowledge and Deriving Engineering Competencies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wide theoretical background and engineering (professional and personal) competencies are the natural skills of new hire. Student individual and team projects provide a nice environment for best engineering practice. Introduction of the team projects requires the creation of teams of 4 to 5 students, and application of the obtained multidisciplinary knowledge. The enhancement of students' motivation for active participation in

Daniel Donoval; Daniel Hajtas

2003-01-01

330

Reducing cancer disparities for minorities: a multidisciplinary research agenda to improve patient access to health systems, clinical trials, and effective cancer therapy. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

This report provides details on the successful efforts of an institution to consolidate the knowledge and experience of multidisciplinary teams (marketing, education, and outreach specialists) to advise clinical trial investigators on minority accrual.

331

Final Scientific \\/ Technical Report: Multidisciplinary Graduate Training Program on Technologies for a Biobased Economy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overall goal of this project was to develop a Multidisciplinary Graduate Training Program on Technologies for a Biobased Economy (TBE) at Michigan State University (MSU). Students completing the TBE Program are expected to be broadly trained in the disciplines relevant to the biobased products industry (BPI), to have strong research skills, to be able to work effectively in multidisciplinary

R. Mark Worden; Daina M. Briedis

2006-01-01

332

Understanding Diversity in Educational Psychology Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educational psychologists' work routinely involves facilitation of teams in which participants hold diverse points of view. In this article, the authors discuss diversity in team work and its place in the development of shared goals. They describe, as an example of educational psychologists' work team interaction, the structure and functioning of…

Annan, Jean; Bowler, Jo; Mentis, Mandia; Phillipson, Roger

2008-01-01

333

The Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale: Reliability, Validity, and Scale Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and preliminary reliability and validity studies are reported for the Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale, a 110-item Likert scale that assesses satisfaction with team health care services. The methods used to construct subscales may have implications for other psychometric studies of satisfaction and quality…

Martin, Pamela Davis; Brantley, Philip J.; McKnight, G. Tipton; Jones, Glenn N.; Springer, Annette

1997-01-01

334

Community-based participatory action research: transforming multidisciplinary practice in primary health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Health care systems throughout the world are in the process of restructuring and reforming their health service delivery systems, reorienting themselves to a primary health care (PHC) model that uses multidisciplinary practice (MDP) teams to provide a range of coordinated, integrated services. This study explores the challenges of putting the MDP ap- proach into practice in one community in

Marcia Hills; Jennifer Mullett; Simon Carroll

2007-01-01

335

The Carolina Abecedarian Project: A Longitudinal and Multidisciplinary Approach to the Prevention of Developmental Retardation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This progress report describes the subjects, program and curriculum development, and collected psychological and medical data of the Carolina Abecedarian Project, an intervention program, begun in 1972. The purpose of this project is to bring together a multidisciplinary team of researchers to demonstrate that the developmental retardation of…

Ramey, Craig T.; And Others

336

The Methodical Work Approach and the Reduction in the Use of Seclusion: How did it Work?  

PubMed

The prevention of seclusion and other coercive measures has become a priority for mental health facilities, and numerous comprehensive programs to reduce the use of these containment procedures, have been developed. It is, however, poorly understood which interventions or elements of programs are effective and by which mechanisms or processes change is mediated. The present study explores the effects of an intervention by which a reduction in the use of seclusion was achieved. The intervention concerned a transformation of the treatment process, based on the principles of the methodical work approach, at a ward for the intensive treatment of patients with psychosis and substance use disorders. Changes in the working practice and team process were analyzed on the basis of case examples and team evaluation. The methodical work approach appears to have provided a guidance for the multidisciplinary team, the patient and the family to work together in a systematic and goal-directed way with cyclic evaluation and readjustment of the treatment and nurse care plan. Also implicit, positive changes were found in the team process: increased interdisciplinary collaboration, team cohesion, and professionalization. It is argued that the implicit or non-specific effects of an intervention to prevent seclusion may constitute a major contribution to the results and therefore merit further research. PMID:25270895

Boumans, Christien E; Walvoort, Serge J W; Egger, Jos I M; Hutschemaekers, Giel J M

2014-10-01

337

Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

2013-01-01

338

Cyberinfrastructure and Scientific Collaboration: Application of a Virtual Team Performance Framework with Potential Relevance to Education. WCER Working Paper No. 2010-12  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify and describe some of the dimensions of scientific collaborations using high throughput computing (HTC) through the lens of a virtual team performance framework. A secondary purpose was to assess the viability of using a virtual team performance framework to study scientific collaborations using…

Kraemer, Sara; Thorn, Christopher A.

2010-01-01

339

Working with Your Treatment Team  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Vulvar Cancer Other Cancer Information Foundation for Women’s Cancer Information Bookshelf Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Complementary Therapies Coping and Empowerment Gynecologic Cancer Nutrition and Cancer Other Ovarian Cancer ...

340

Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization Generation 1 and Next Steps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed three major milestones during Fiscal Year (FY)08: "Requirements Definition" Milestone (1/31/08); "GEN 1 Integrated Multi-disciplinary Toolset" (Annual Performance Goal) (6/30/08); and "Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework" Milestone (9/30/08). Details of all three milestones are explained including documentation available, potential partner collaborations, and next steps in FY09.

Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

2008-01-01

341

Philosophizing about Teacher Dissatisfaction: A Multidisciplinary Hermeneutic Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this methodological reflection, I describe the multidisciplinary hermeneutic process of philosophizing about teacher dissatisfaction. I discuss how philosophy serves as a starting point for interpretive work based on interviews with former teachers and readings of qualitative and quantitative research on teacher attrition and dissatisfaction.…

Santoro, Doris A.

2015-01-01

342

Teaching about Dying and Death in a Multidisciplinary Student Group.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses dimensions which emerged in a multidisciplinary class of medical, nursing, social work, and theology students about dying and death. Group process was the most important aspect. Students evaluated their roles and transactions in caring for the dying. The recognition of solidarity of purpose, shared feeling, and mutual support emerged.…

Barton, David; And Others

1979-01-01

343

The Applied Information Management Program: Multidisciplinary Continuing Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a description of the Applied Information Management Master of Science degree program at the University of Oregon, which was designed to serve in-career professionals working in high technology corporate settings. The need for a multidisciplinary approach is discussed, the curriculum is described, and the role of visual communication is…

Ettinger, Linda F.

1991-01-01

344

Team Building Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Anyone who has been to summer camp knows how difficult it can be to get a team of people working effectively on any number of projects, including the construction of a canoe or developing a plan to craft leather wallets. It can be even more trying to create team-building exercises for adults in any number of professions, including health care experts, vehicle maintenance specialists, and so on. This website provides interested parties with access to a number of team-building tools, including articles on developing efficient meetings, ethical conflict resolution, and performance review systems. The site is rounded out by a brief selection of team building games, including one that draws on the use of tennis balls and another that involves paper plates.

345

Concussion: key stakeholders and multidisciplinary participation in making sports safe.  

PubMed

As unstructured play declines, organized sports leagues have become a highly popular form of physical activity in young people. As concussive injuries are garnering increased media attention and public awareness, there is a growing concern for athlete safety. Although athletic trainers and physicians play a large role in keeping athletes healthy and safe, this article investigates nontraditional, multidisciplinary teams that are involved in promoting athlete safety, including the role of equipment makers, coaches, referees, governing bodies of sport, lawmakers, and fans. As opposed to a focus on diagnosing or managing concussive injuries, this article seeks to promote injury prevention strategies. PMID:25232875

Guskiewicz, Kevin; Teel, Elizabeth; McCrea, Michael

2014-10-01

346

Development and Implementation of a Junior-Year Design Course in a Multidisciplinary Environment Along with Media Art and Marketing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Contemporary thought in engineering education is to provide the students with as much hands-on, real world experience as possible. Students are expected to hit the ground running in the work force immediately after their graduation and be savvy in many divergent skills such as teamwork, communication, project, people and business management. ABET (Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology) has included the multidisciplinary team experience as one of the assessable outcomes for students enrolled in any accredited engineering program. Social commentators have highlighted the need for businesses to succeed in a global environment and as such the education system must attempt to create engineers with global perspectives. There are several solutions to achieve this objective such as internships, co-op programs, student exchange programs, laboratory-intensive classes and the ever-popular Capstone Senior Design Project. This last and the most important topic of integrated design has been reviewed and discussed extensively in literature and engineering education conferences. There is considerable variability in the scope; breadth and depth of these capstone projects, the team size and composition and the time, and sponsors and budget for the projects. Some of these projects are fairly involved requiring budgets of up to $40,000 while some projects require graduate students as an integral part of the design team. One common theme in most of these projects is that the courses are designed for senior students enrolled mainly in engineering and other disciplines. While these projects are multidisciplinary, synchronization of course syllabi across the disciplines was not made.

Jones, Cathleen

347

The value of intercultural competence for performance of multicultural teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Managers working in multinational companies carry out their organizational goals through multicultural teams. Performance of multicultural teams can be examined from an intercultural communication perspective. Executives, managers, management consultants, and educators interested in improving multicultural team performance need to know about intercultural competence and how it affects team performance. This article provides a working definition of high-performance multicultural teams and

Alexei V. Matveev; Richard G. Milter

2004-01-01

348

Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.  

SciTech Connect

Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from microarrays, we have made progress by combining very different analytic approaches.

Wang, Xuefel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kang, Huining (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fields, Chris (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Cowie, Jim R. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Mosquera-Caro, Monica P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Xu, Yuexian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Andries, Erik (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ar, Kerem (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Potter, Jeffrey (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Willman, Cheryl L. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Murphy, Maurice H. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-01-01

349

Multidisciplinary response to the Escherichia coli 0104 outbreak in Europe.  

PubMed

The 2011 outbreak of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O104 in northern Germany resulted in over 4,100 illnesses, 900 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome, and 50 deaths. The U.S. Army's Public Health Command Region-Europe established a multidisciplinary advisory team to prevent E. coli O104 exposure in the Department of Defense (DoD) population. This decentralized, interagency team engaged European public health authorities and coordinated control measures including risk communication. Following German public health investigations, the DoD advisory team compiled information from available official reports, assessed risk, and published guidance to halt the local procurement and supply of suspect foods for all DoD installations in Europe. Advisory team members processed outbreak information, adjusted advisories, and coordinated response efforts. The advisory team quickly identified authoritative information sources, coordinated case definitions, and streamlined potential case reporting. Timely and accurate risk assessment, management, and communication were vital in protecting the DoD population during this outbreak. There were no cases in DoD-related personnel. PMID:23198523

Dodd, Charles C; Cooper, Michael J

2012-11-01

350

Computational differentiation and multidisciplinary design  

SciTech Connect

Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) by means of formal sensitivity analysis requires that each single-discipline analysis code supply not only the output functions for the (usually constrained) optimization process and other discipline analysis inputs, but also the derivatives of all of these output functions with respect to its input variables. Computational differentiation techniques and automatic differentiation tools enable MDO by providing accurate and efficient derivatives of computer programs with little human effort. We discuss the principles behind automatic differentiation and give a brief overview of automatic differentiation tools and how they can be employed judiciously, for example, for sparse Jacobians and to exploit parallelism. We show how, and under what circumstances, automatic differentiation applied to iterative solvers delivers the mathematically desired derivatives. We then show how derivatives that can now be feasibly obtained by computational differentiation techniques can lead to improved solution schemes for nonlinear coupled systems and multidisciplinary design optimization.

Bischof, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Griewank, A. [Institute of Scientific Computing, Technical Univ. of Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

1993-12-31

351

Dynamically Reconfigurable Approach to Multidisciplinary Problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The complexity and autonomy of the constituent disciplines and the diversity of the disciplinary data formats make the task of integrating simulations into a multidisciplinary design optimization problem extremely time-consuming and difficult. We propose a dynamically reconfigurable approach to MDO problem formulation wherein an appropriate implementation of the disciplinary information results in basic computational components that can be combined into different MDO problem formulations and solution algorithms, including hybrid strategies, with relative ease. The ability to re-use the computational components is due to the special structure of the MDO problem. We believe that this structure can and should be used to formulate and solve optimization problems in the multidisciplinary context. The present work identifies the basic computational components in several MDO problem formulations and examines the dynamically reconfigurable approach in the context of a popular class of optimization methods. We show that if the disciplinary sensitivity information is implemented in a modular fashion, the transfer of sensitivity information among the formulations under study is straightforward. This enables not only experimentation with a variety of problem formations in a research environment, but also the flexible use of formulations in a production design environment.

Alexandrov, Natalie M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

2003-01-01

352

Arthrogryposis in infancy, multidisciplinary approach: case report  

PubMed Central

Background Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is an etiopathogenetically heterogeneous disorder characterised by non-progressive multiple intra-articular contractures, which can be recognised at birth. The frequency is estimated at 1 in 3,000 newborns. Etiopathogenesis of arthrogryposis is multifactorial. Case presentation We report first 26 weeks of life of a boy with severe arthrogryposis. Owing to the integrated rehabilitation approach and orthopaedic treatment a visible improvement in the range of motion as well as the functionality of the child was achieved. This article proposes a cooperation of various specialists: paediatrician, orthopaedist, specialist of medical rehabilitation and physiotherapist. Conclusions Rehabilitation of a child with arthrogryposis should be early, comprehensive and multidisciplinary. Corrective treatment of knee and hip joints in infants with arthrogryposis should be preceded by the ultrasound control. There are no reports in the literature on the ultrasound imaging techniques which can be used prior to the planned orthopaedic and rehabilitative treatment in infants with arthrogryposis. The experience of our team indicates that such an approach allows to minimise the diagnostic errors and to maintain an effective treatment without the risk of joint destabilisation. PMID:24215600

2013-01-01

353

Pancreatobiliary cytology in the multidisciplinary setting.  

PubMed

This review article discusses the role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS FNA) cytology in the clinical management of patients with pancreatic tumours in the setting of a multidisciplinary team (MDT). The commonest diagnosis encountered is pancreatic adenocarcinoma, which is seldom diagnosed early enough for surgical resection. Thus, cytology is likely to be the only form of diagnosis in the majority of cases. Nevertheless, about half the lesions discussed at the MDT meeting are lesions other than primary adenocarcinoma and a wide differential diagnosis must be considered in order to identify tumours, including neuroendocrine tumours, that are amenable to surgical resection. Cytology is not always definitive and the diagnosis may be helped by categorizing results according to whether they are malignant, suspicious, atypical/indeterminate, benign or inadequate. Discussion at MDT meetings and correlation with clinical and imaging findings along with review of cytology slides may allow equivocal results to be clarified before treatment is decided. Inadequate cytology results are avoided by rapid on-site evaluation of slides; although this is cost-effective in terms of overall patient care, attendance of cytopathologists on-site may not be feasible. At Imperial College NHS Trust, specially trained biomedical scientists successfully carry out rapid on-site evaluation. PMID:23711181

Dina, R; Tran-Dang, M-A; Mauri, F; Gudi, M; Cohen, P; Ahmad, R; Batav, L; Vlavianos, P; Spalding, D

2013-06-01

354

Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

2011-01-01

355

Structuring a Project Management Course to Develop Team Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There is no escaping it. Working in industry requires working in teams. The industries hiring our graduates recognize this. TAC of ABET Criterion 2e requires it, stating graduates need an ability to function effectively on teams. How do we, as teachers, go about ensuring that our students learn how to work effectively on teams? How do we go about teaching them team work and team management skills? The traditional approach to developing team work and team management skills involves assigning students randomly to teams, giving them a project to work on, and expecting them to somehow magically learn to work effectively on teams. This they'll learn about teamwork if they work on teams approach fails to give students adequate preparation and insight into team work and team management skills. It doesn't work. Surveys of students reveal that they do not feel they knew how to effectively work on teams or how to be a team leader. This sentiment was echoed by respondents to last years project management survey. To effectively prepare students to work on teams, coordinated teambuilding and leadership skills training is needed. Beginning with a discussion of necessary project management and team skills, this paper will describe how to structure a project course to include techniques and exercises specifically designed to develop teamwork and team management skills and the benefits they provide.

Edmonson, Charlie P.

356

Team training for surgical trainees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Healthcare professionals work in teams but are rarely trained together. Realizing the adverse impact of poor teamwork on patient care, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires surgical trainees to demonstrate a mastery of teamwork-related competencies. A number of team training curricula are available in the USA, the best known of which is TeamSTEPPS – developed by the U.S.

Hilary Sanfey; Christopher McDowell; Andreas H. Meier; Gary L. Dunnington

2011-01-01

357

TEAMS Model Analyzer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The TEAMS model analyzer is a supporting tool developed to work with models created with TEAMS (Testability, Engineering, and Maintenance System), which was developed by QSI. In an effort to reduce the time spent in the manual process that each TEAMS modeler must perform in the preparation of reporting for model reviews, a new tool has been developed as an aid to models developed in TEAMS. The software allows for the viewing, reporting, and checking of TEAMS models that are checked into the TEAMS model database. The software allows the user to selectively model in a hierarchical tree outline view that displays the components, failure modes, and ports. The reporting features allow the user to quickly gather statistics about the model, and generate an input/output report pertaining to all of the components. Rules can be automatically validated against the model, with a report generated containing resulting inconsistencies. In addition to reducing manual effort, this software also provides an automated process framework for the Verification and Validation (V&V) effort that will follow development of these models. The aid of such an automated tool would have a significant impact on the V&V process.

Tijidjian, Raffi P.

2010-01-01

358

Low-Educated Women with Chronic Pain Were Less Often Selected to Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Programs  

PubMed Central

Background There is a lack of research about a potential education-related bias in assessment of patients with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to analyze whether low-educated men and women with chronic pain were less often selected to multidisciplinary rehabilitation than those with high education. Methods The population consisted of consecutive patients (n?=?595 women, 266 men) referred during a three-year period from mainly primary health care centers for a multidisciplinary team assessment at a pain rehabilitation clinic at a university hospital in Northern Sweden. Patient data were collected from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation National Pain Register. The outcome variable was being selected by the multidisciplinary team assessment to a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. The independent variables were: sex, age, born outside Sweden, education, pain severity as well as the hospital, anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Results Low-educated women were less often selected to multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs than high-educated women (OR 0.55, CI 0.30–0.98), even after control for age, being born outside Sweden, pain intensity and HADS. No significant findings were found when comparing the results between high- and low-educated men. Conclusion Our findings can be interpreted as possible discrimination against low-educated women with chronic pain in hospital referrals to pain rehabilitation. There is a need for more gender-theoretical research emphasizing the importance of taking several power dimensions into account when analyzing possible bias in health care. PMID:24849625

Hammarström, Anne; Haukenes, Inger; Fjellman Wiklund, Anncristine; Lehti, Arja; Wiklund, Maria; Evengĺrd, Birgitta; Stĺlnacke, Britt-Marie

2014-01-01

359

Aeroelastic modeling for the FIT (Functional Integration Technology) team F/A-18 simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of Langley Research Center's commitment to developing multidisciplinary integration methods to improve aerospace systems, the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team was established to perform dynamics integration research using an existing aircraft configuration, the F/A-18. An essential part of this effort has been the development of a comprehensive simulation modeling capability that includes structural, control, and propulsion dynamics as well as steady and unsteady aerodynamics. The structural and unsteady aerodynamics contributions come from an aeroelastic mode. Some details of the aeroelastic modeling done for the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team research are presented. Particular attention is given to work done in the area of correction factors to unsteady aerodynamics data.

Zeiler, Thomas A.; Wieseman, Carol D.

1989-01-01

360

Risk Assessment in Mental Health: Introducing a Traffic Light System in a Community Mental Health Team  

PubMed Central

Aims: To reports a study in which action research approach was utilised to introduce a new system of risk assessment, based on traffic lights, into a community mental health team. Background: Risk management is a serious concern in community mental healthcare where there is less direct, real-time supervision of clients than in other settings, and because inadequate management of risk can have fatal consequences when service users are a risk to themselves and/or others. Design: An action research design was undertaken, using three phases of Look, Think and Act. Methods: Data were collected between January and March of 2012. In the action research phases, qualitative data were collected in focus groups with the team’s multi-disciplinary mental health professionals. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically, which involved agreement of themes and interpretations by two researchers. The Look, Think and Act phases guided the development of the project; team members worked collaboratively on the traffic light system, implemented and evaluated it. Findings: Themes were constructed that were discussed across the focus groups. These themes were: Ease of use; Risk identification and management; Legal status; Different teams’ views of risk; Post-implementation evaluation. Conclusion: Action research has been used to implement change in mental health risk management. Others internationally would benefit from considering a Traffic Light System, and in using action research to implement it. PMID:23878620

Croucher, S; Williamson, Graham R

2013-01-01

361

Blog - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Addressing complex societal challenges, such as climate change or the diabetes pandemic, requires bringing together different types of knowledge from disparate academic disciplines and societal stakeholders (Stirling, 2007). There is evidence to suggest that scientific teams and organizations with diverse types of expertise are more capable of solving complex problems than experts working individually in narrow areas of expertise (Page, 2007).

362

Team Assembly Mechanisms Determine Collaboration Network Structure and Team Performance  

PubMed Central

Agents in creative enterprises are embedded in networks that inspire, support, and evaluate their work. Here, we investigate how the mechanisms by which creative teams self-assemble determine the structure of these collaboration networks. We propose a model for the self-assembly of creative teams that has its basis in three parameters: team size, the fraction of newcomers in new productions, and the tendency of incumbents to repeat previous collaborations. The model suggests that the emergence of a large connected community of practitioners can be described as a phase transition. We find that team assembly mechanisms determine both the structure of the collaboration network and team performance for teams derived from both artistic and scientific fields. PMID:15860629

Guimerŕ, Roger; Uzzi, Brian; Spiro, Jarrett; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.

2007-01-01

363

Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines  

PubMed Central

Background Support for family carers is a core function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based on available evidence and consensus based expert opinion. Methods The guidelines were developed via the following methods: (1) A literature review; (2) Conceptual framework; (3) Refinement of the guidelines based on feedback from an expert panel and focus groups with multidisciplinary specialists from three palliative care units and three major teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Results The literature review revealed that no comprehensive exploration of the conduct and utility of family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting has occurred. Preliminary clinical guidelines were developed by the research team, based on relevant literature and a conceptual framework informed by: single session therapy, principles of therapeutic communication and models of coping and family consultation. A multidisciplinary expert panel refined the content of the guidelines and the applicability of the guidelines was then assessed via two focus groups of multidisciplinary palliative care specialists. The complete version of the guidelines is presented. Conclusion Family meetings provide an opportunity to enhance the quality of care provided to palliative care patients and their family carers. The clinical guidelines developed from this study offer a framework for preparing, conducting and evaluating family meetings. Future research and clinical implications are outlined. PMID:18710576

Hudson, Peter; Quinn, Karen; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Aranda, Sanchia

2008-01-01

364

NCC: A Multidisciplinary Design/Analysis Tool for Combustion Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A multi-disciplinary design/analysis tool for combustion systems is critical for optimizing the low-emission, high-performance combustor design process. Based on discussions between NASA Lewis Research Center and the jet engine companies, an industry-government team was formed in early 1995 to develop the National Combustion Code (NCC), which is an integrated system of computer codes for the design and analysis of combustion systems. NCC has advanced features that address the need to meet designer's requirements such as "assured accuracy", "fast turnaround", and "acceptable cost". The NCC development team is comprised of Allison Engine Company (Allison), CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE), NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This development team operates under the guidance of the NCC steering committee. The "unstructured mesh" capability and "parallel computing" are fundamental features of NCC from its inception. The NCC system is composed of a set of "elements" which includes grid generator, main flow solver, turbulence module, turbulence and chemistry interaction module, chemistry module, spray module, radiation heat transfer module, data visualization module, and a post-processor for evaluating engine performance parameters. Each element may have contributions from several team members. Such a multi-source multi-element system needs to be integrated in a way that facilitates inter-module data communication, flexibility in module selection, and ease of integration.

Liu, Nan-Suey; Quealy, Angela

1999-01-01

365

Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group and OPUS12 Foundation Consensus Statement on Creating A Coordinated, Multi-Disciplinary, Patient-Centered, Global Point-of-Care Biomarker Discovery Network  

PubMed Central

Biomarker science brings great promise to clinical medicine. This is especially true in the era of technology miniaturization, rapid dissemination of knowledge, and point-of-care (POC) implementation of novel diagnostics. Despite this tremendous progress, the journey from a candidate biomarker to a scientifically validated biomarker continues to be an arduous one. In addition to substantial financial resources, biomarker research requires considerable expertise and a multidisciplinary approach. Investigational designs must also be taken into account, with the randomized controlled trial remaining the “gold standard”. The authors present a condensed overview of biomarker science and associated investigational methods, followed by specific examples from clinical areas where biomarker development and/or implementation resulted in tangible enhancements in patient care. This manuscript also serves as a call to arms for the establishment of a truly global, well-coordinated infrastructure dedicated to biomarker research and development, with focus on delivery of the latest discoveries directly to the patient via point-of-care technology. PMID:25337481

Stawicki, Stanislaw P.; Stoltzfus, Jill C.; Aggarwal, Praveen; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Bhatt, Shashi; Kalra, O. P.; Bhalla, Ashish; Hoey, Brian A.; Galwankar, Sagar C.; Paladino, Lorenzo; Papadimos, Thomas J.

2014-01-01

366

Using Teams in Higher Education: Resources for Researchers and Practitioners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an annotated list of articles on use of teams in higher education, including organizing concepts for effective team-building, administrative strategies and effectiveness, case studies of teams at work, and lessons learned from the business context. (MSE)

Frost, Susan H.; Bidani, Pankaj

1998-01-01

367

Multi-disciplinary optimization of aeroservoelastic systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of the research project was to continue the development of new methods for efficient aeroservoelastic analysis and optimization. The main targets were as follows: to complete the development of analytical tools for the investigation of flutter with large stiffness changes; to continue the work on efficient continuous gust response and sensitivity derivatives; and to advance the techniques of calculating dynamic loads with control and unsteady aerodynamic effects. An efficient and highly accurate mathematical model for time-domain analysis of flutter during which large structural changes occur was developed in cooperation with Carol D. Wieseman of NASA LaRC. The model was based on the second-year work 'Modal Coordinates for Aeroelastic Analysis with Large Local Structural Variations'. The work on continuous gust response was completed. An abstract of the paper 'Continuous Gust Response and Sensitivity Derivatives Using State-Space Models' was submitted for presentation in the 33rd Israel Annual Conference on Aviation and Astronautics, Feb. 1993. The abstract is given in Appendix A. The work extends the optimization model to deal with continuous gust objectives in a way that facilitates their inclusion in the efficient multi-disciplinary optimization scheme. Currently under development is a work designed to extend the analysis and optimization capabilities to loads and stress considerations. The work is on aircraft dynamic loads in response to impulsive and non-impulsive excitation. The work extends the formulations of the mode-displacement and summation-of-forces methods to include modes with significant local distortions, and load modes. An abstract of the paper,'Structural Dynamic Loads in Response to Impulsive Excitation' is given in appendix B. Another work performed this year under the Grant was 'Size-Reduction Techniques for the Determination of Efficient Aeroservoelastic Models' given in Appendix C.

Karpel, Mardechay

1992-01-01

368

UVM Outing Club Trip Logistics Planner All leadership teams taking out Outing Club trips need to complete this form. This is a working  

E-print Network

UVM Outing Club Trip Logistics Planner All leadership teams taking out Outing Club trips need. Completed and detailed trip logistics planner 2. Copies of all participant AND leader medical forms 3? Copies of medical forms nad logistics planner? Picked up Purchase Orders, Gas Card, and Petty Cash? Food

Hayden, Nancy J.

369

CASE STUDY -- LEAN 94-02: A Case Study of Self-Directed Work Teams at Boeing Defense and Space Group - Corinth  

E-print Network

Boeing Defense & Space Group - Corinth (BD&SG-C) is a self-directed team based unionized facility in the defense and commercial aircraft industry. The plant was a greenfield start-up in 1987. Due to the nature of the defense ...

Klein, Janice

1994-02-24

370

Urban Garden Youth Employment Teams 2012 CityFresh Veggies I (2 teams, 1 leader 24hr/wk)  

E-print Network

community members. #12;Urban Garden Youth Employment Teams 2012 CityFresh New Products (2 teams, 2 leadersUrban Garden Youth Employment Teams 2012 CityFresh Veggies I (2 teams, 1 leader 24hr/wk) The CityFresh Veggies I work teams will plant, and tend, a vegetable and herb garden. The produce from the garden

Amin, S. Massoud

371

The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Patient safety is of the utmost importance in health care. The patient safety culture in an institution has great impact on patient safety. To enhance patient safety and to design strategies to reduce medical injuries, there is a current focus on measuring the patient safety culture. The aim of the present study was to describe the patient safety culture in an ED at two different hospitals before and after a Quality improvement (QI) project that was aimed to enhance patient safety. Methods A repeated cross-sectional design, using the Hospital Survey On Patient Safety Culture questionnaire before and after a quality improvement project in two emergency departments at a county hospital and a university hospital. The questionnaire was developed to obtain a better understanding of the patient safety culture of an entire hospital or of specific departments. The Swedish version has 51 questions and 15 dimensions. Results At the county hospital, a difference between baseline and follow-up was observed in three dimensions. For two of these dimensions, Team-work within hospital and Communication openness, a higher score was measured at the follow-up. At the university hospital, a higher score was measured at follow-up for the two dimensions Team-work across hospital units and Team-work within hospital. Conclusion The result showed changes in the self-estimated patient safety culture, mainly regarding team-work and communication openness. Most of the improvements at follow-up were seen by physicians, and mainly at the county hospital. PMID:25005231

2014-01-01

372

Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team  

MedlinePLUS

Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Apr 14,2015 Patients with heart failure may work with multiple healthcare professionals. It's ... give support. Join now - it's free and easy. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

373

Marine Protected Areas A Multidisciplinary Approach  

E-print Network

Marine Protected Areas A Multidisciplinary Approach Edited by JOACHIM CLAUDET National Centerfor boundaries (Russ and Alcala 1996; Claudet et al., 2006; Chapter 2), as well as regional increases outside; Stewart-Oaten, 1996a, Mari11e Protected Areas: A Multidisciplinary Approach, ed. Joachim Claudet

Osenberg, Craig W.

374

Professionals’ views on interprofessional stroke team functioning  

PubMed Central

Introduction The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals’ perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members. Methods We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39%) completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1) nested in 34 teams (level 2). Results Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion. Discussion and conclusion Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members’ social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams’ performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals’ interpersonal skills and interprofessional education. PMID:23390409

Cramm, Jane M; Nieboer, Anna P

2011-01-01

375

Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for chronic low back pain: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective To assess the long term effects of multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for patients with chronic low back pain. Design Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Electronic searches of Cochrane Back Review Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases up to February 2014, supplemented by hand searching of reference lists and forward citation tracking of included trials. Study selection criteria Trials published in full; participants with low back pain for more than three months; multidisciplinary rehabilitation involved a physical component and one or both of a psychological component or a social or work targeted component; multidisciplinary rehabilitation was delivered by healthcare professionals from at least two different professional backgrounds; multidisciplinary rehabilitation was compared with a non- multidisciplinary intervention. Results Forty one trials included a total of 6858 participants with a mean duration of pain of more than one year who often had failed previous treatment. Sixteen trials provided moderate quality evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation decreased pain (standardised mean difference 0.21, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.37; equivalent to 0.5 points in a 10 point pain scale) and disability (0.23, 0.06 to 0.40; equivalent to 1.5 points in a 24 point Roland-Morris index) compared with usual care. Nineteen trials provided low quality evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation decreased pain (standardised mean difference 0.51, ?0.01 to 1.04) and disability (0.68, 0.16 to 1.19) compared with physical treatments, but significant statistical heterogeneity across trials was present. Eight trials provided moderate quality evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation improves the odds of being at work one year after intervention (odds ratio 1.87, 95% confidence interval 1.39 to 2.53) compared with physical treatments. Seven trials provided moderate quality evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation does not improve the odds of being at work (odds ratio 1.04, 0.73 to 1.47) compared with usual care. Two trials that compared multidisciplinary rehabilitation with surgery found little difference in outcomes and an increased risk of adverse events with surgery. Conclusions Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation interventions were more effective than usual care (moderate quality evidence) and physical treatments (low quality evidence) in decreasing pain and disability in people with chronic low back pain. For work outcomes, multidisciplinary rehabilitation seems to be more effective than physical treatment but not more effective than usual care. PMID:25694111

Apeldoorn, A T; Chiarotto, A; Smeets, R J E M; Ostelo, R W J G; Guzman, J; van Tulder, M W

2015-01-01

376

Teams Talking Trials: Results of an RCT to improve the communication of cancer teams about treatment trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

A randomized trial was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a Teams Talking Trials Workshop in increasing clinical trials awareness, involvement, communication, and recruitment. Members of 22 multidisciplinary cancer teams in Wales, UK, participated in workshops and were surveyed pre- and post-intervention about trial-related awareness; attitudes toward trial management and recruitment; involvement in trials; and perceptions about the level of trial involvement within their teams.

377

Team leadership at the 100-foot level  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since teams continue to be an important part of an organization's design, understanding how to enhance their success should be a primary objective. Research consistently shows that team leaders exert a disproportionate effect on the success or failure of organizational work teams, making leadership an area that managers cannot ignore. While creating an organizational vision or inspiring others to follow

Robert J. Trent

2004-01-01

378

Common Factors of High Performance Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Utilization of work teams is now wide spread in all types of organizations throughout the world. However, an understanding of the important factors common to high performance teams is rare. The purpose of this content analysis is to explore the literature and propose findings related to high performance teams. These include definition and types,…

Jackson, Bruce; Madsen, Susan R.

2005-01-01

379

Orientation Core Team 2015 Applicant Information Sheet  

E-print Network

Orientation Core Team 2015 Applicant Information Sheet The Orientation Core Team is comprised in the implementation of orientation programs for all new students at Hopkins. The team reports to the Coordinator of Orientation and First Year Experience and works closely with the university community to plan and implement

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

380

The Speech-Language Pathologist as a Member of the Learning-Disabilities Team.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The speech-language pathologist's training in language development, language comprehension, and language production makes that person an important member of the learning disabilities multidisciplinary assessment and instructional team. Specific roles of other team members in both assessment and remediation are delineated. (CL)

Davies, Darlene Gould

1984-01-01

381

Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents  

SciTech Connect

The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

Not Available

1993-11-01

382

Multidisciplinary Obstetric Simulated Emergency Scenarios (MOSES): Promoting Patient Safety in Obstetrics with Teamwork-Focused Interprofessional Simulations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: We describe an example of simulation-based interprofessional continuing education, the multidisciplinary obstetric simulated emergency scenarios (MOSES) course, which was designed to enhance nontechnical skills among obstetric teams and, hence, improve patient safety. Participants' perceptions of MOSES courses, their learning, and…

Freeth, Della; Ayida, Gubby; Berridge, Emma Jane; Mackintosh, Nicola; Norris, Beverley; Sadler, Chris; Strachan, Alasdair

2009-01-01

383

Team leaders' technology choice in virtual teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual teams face challenges arising from geographical distance, cultural differences, and differing modes of interaction. Team leaders in particular face these challenges because they are primarily responsible for efficient team management. Technology choices made by leaders have become a focus of interest in communication studies, but questions regarding media choice in virtual teams have not been widely studied. This article

ANU SIVUNEN; MAARIT VALO

2006-01-01

384

Adopting Team Contracts to Initiate Team Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creighton, Harris and Coleman (2005) suggest that educational leadership instructors introduce aspiring administrators to a sound knowledge base. Currently, engaging in teams is recommended for high performance and problem-solving. Bolton (1999) recommends that instructors coach teams so teaming skills are improved. But, oftentimes, there are team

Marcellino, Patricia Ann

2008-01-01

385

Recent advances in multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A joint activity involving NASA and Army researchers at NASA LaRC to develop optimization procedures to improve the rotor blade design process by integrating appropriate disciplines and accounting for all of the important interactions among the disciplines is described. The disciplines involved include rotor aerodynamics, rotor dynamics, rotor structures, airframe dynamics, and acoustics. The work is focused on combining these five key disciplines in an optimization procedure capable of designing a rotor system to satisfy multidisciplinary design requirements. Fundamental to the plan is a three-phased approach. In phase 1, the disciplines of blade dynamics, blade aerodynamics, and blade structure are closely coupled while acoustics and airframe dynamics are decoupled and are accounted for as effective constraints on the design for the first three disciplines. In phase 2, acoustics is integrated with the first three disciplines. Finally, in phase 3, airframe dynamics is integrated with the other four disciplines. Representative results from work performed to date are described. These include optimal placement of tuning masses for reduction of blade vibratory shear forces, integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization, and integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization. Examples of validating procedures are described.

Adelman, Howard M.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.

1992-01-01

386

Multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

KEYWORDS Geothermal sciences, geothermics, research, theory and application, numerical calculation, geothermal modeling, Technical University Darmstadt, Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) INTRODUCTION In times of global warming renewable, green energies are getting more and more important. The development of application of geothermal energy as a part of renewable energies in Germany is a multidisciplinary process of fast growing research and improvements. Geothermal energy is the energy, which is stored below earth's surface. The word geothermal derives from the Greek words geo (earth) and thermos (heat), so geothermal is a synonym to earth heat. Geothermal energy is one of the auspicious renewable energies. In average the temperature increases 3°C every 100 m of depth, which is termed as geothermal gradient. Therefore 99 percent of our planet is hotter than 1.000°C, while 99 percent of that last percent is even hotter than 100°C. Already in a depth of about 1 kilometer temperatures of 35 - 40°C can be achieved. While other renewable energies arise less or more from the sun, geothermal energy sources its heat from the earth's interior, which is caused mostly by radioactive decay of persistent isotopes. This means a possibility of a base-loadable form of energy supply. Especially efficient is the use of deep geothermal energy of high-enthalpie reservoirs, which means a high energy potential in low depths. In Germany no high-enthalpie reservoirs are given. To use the given low-enthalpie potential and to generate geothermal power efficiently inventions and improvements need to be performed. An important part of geothermal progresses is performed by universities with multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling. Especially in deep geothermal systems numerical calculations are essential for a correct dimensioning of the geothermal system. Therefore German universities and state aided organizations are developing numerical programs for a detailed use of application on geothermal systems. The history of this multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling performed by German universities is shown in this paper. Outstanding geothermal research programs of German universities and state aided organizations (BGR, LBEG, GGA) are pointed out. Actual geothermal modeling programs based on the Finite-Element-Method or the Finite-Differences-Method as well as analytical programs are introduced. National and international geothermal projects supported by German universities and state aided organizations are described. Examples of supervised shallow and deep geothermal systems are given. Actually the Technical University Darmstadt is performing a research program supported by a national organization, the Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi). Main aim of this research program titled experimental investigation for the verification of a Finite-Element-Multiphase-Model is to analyze the subsoil as a three-phases-model with separated consideration of conduction, convection and advection and their subsequent interaction. The latest developments of numerical projects as well as the actual state of the before mentioned research program are pointed out in the paper. REFERENCES Quick, H., Arslan, U., Meißner, S., Michael, J. 2007. Deep foundations and geothermal energy - a multi-purpose solution, IFHS: 8. International conference on multi-purpose high-rise towers and tall buildings, Abu Dhabi, 2007 Arslan, U. and Huber, H. 2008. Application of geothermal energy. University of Istanbul, Yapistanbul No. 3 / 2008, Turkey, 2008 Quick, Q., Michael, J., Arslan, U., Huber, H. 2010. History of International Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Projects in Germany, Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 Arslan, U., Huber, H. 2010. Education of Geothermal Sciences in Germany as part of an application orientated research, Proceedings European Civil Engineering Education and Training (EUCEET III) Special Volume, 2010

-Ing. Ulvi Arslan, Univ., ., Dr. _., Prof.; Heiko Huber, Dipl.-Ing.

2010-05-01

387

Sounds like Team Spirit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always trying to improve on what they've done before. Second, success in any endeavor stems from people who know how to interpret a composition to sound beautiful when played in a different style. For Knowledge Sharing to work, it must be adapted, reinterpreted, shaped and played with at the centers. In this regard, we've been blessed with another crazy, passionate, inspired artist named Claire Smith. Claire has turned Ames Research Center in California into APPL-west. She is so good and committed to what she does that I just refer people to her whenever they have questions about implementing project management development at the field level. Finally, any great effort requires talented people working behind the scenes, the people who formulate a business approach and know how to manage the money so that the music gets heard. I have known many brilliant and creative people with a ton of ideas that never take off due to an inability to work the business. Again, the Knowledge Sharing team has been fortunate to have competent and passionate people, specifically Tony Maturo and his procurement team at Goddard Space Flight Center, to make sure the process is in place to support the effort. This kind of support is every bit as crucial as the activity itself, and the efforts and creativity that go into successful procurement and contracting is a vital ingredient of this successful team.

Hoffman, Edward

2002-01-01

388

Teaming. The Key to World Class Manufacturing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lean manufacturing, a streamlined system of flow and job shop techniques, relies on self-directed work teams. Technology educators can prepare students for work in this environment by using problem-solving teams in the classroom to work on design briefs and other group projects. (SK)

Wright, John R.

1999-01-01

389

The Balancing Act of Team Curriculum Creation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Historically, teachers have primarily worked alone in their classrooms, have served as deliverers of standardized and textual materials, and have been managed. Now, however, they are expected to work in teams, create active-learning curricula, and manage themselves. This paper examines a self-initiated team of K-6 grade teachers working in a…

Buchwald, Claire

390

Multidisciplinary Project Plans Adapted from the Making Industry Meaningful in College (MIMIC) Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Making Industry Meaningful In College (MIMIC) is a multi-disciplinary project that exposes students to simulated business/industry experiences with the goal of preparing them for the workplace. Students in engineering design, electronics and business are placed in teams, called â??companies,â?ť to design, prototype, manufacture, market and sell a product. This guide, by Dorene Perez, Jim Gibson, and Rose Marie Lynch, presents eight example project plans using the MIMIC model applied to business, technical education, and environmental science.

Gibson, Jim

391

Strategic alliance, multidisciplinary teamwork enhance field development in Cotton Valley trend  

SciTech Connect

Optimizing the development phase, and thus improving the profitability, of Amoco Exploration and Production Co.`s Glenwood natural gas field was the task assigned to a multidisciplinary reservoir management team (RMT) in 1996. The team`s primary emphasis was to strategically locate and fracture-stimulate the remaining wells to be drilled in Glenwood field`s initial development phase. This article illustrates the team process used and decisions made that led to field cost savings and production improvements before year end 1996. Thorough data collection and evaluation were critical project elements and enabled the field`s hydraulic fracturing program to be modified, thus improving incremental production and eliminating ineffective fracturing costs.

Krus, H.G.; Haley, K.; Britt, L. [Amoco Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States); Benson, R.H.; England, K.W.; Holt, R.; Piskurich, N.C. [Schlumberger Co., Houston, TX (United States); Woodroof, R.A. Jr. [ProTechnics International, Houston, TX (United States)

1997-03-31

392

Cammp Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Space Station (ISS) Configuration Analysis Modeling and Mass Properties (CAMMP) Team is presenting a demo of certain CAMMP capabilities at a Booz Allen Hamilton conference in San Antonio. The team will be showing pictures of low fidelity, simplified ISS models, but no dimensions or technical data. The presentation will include a brief description of the contract and task, description and picture of the Topology, description of Generic Ground Rules and Constraints (GGR&C), description of Stage Analysis with constraints applied, and wrap up with description of other tasks such as Special Studies, Cable Routing, etc. The models include conceptual Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Lander images and animations created for promotional purposes, which are based entirely on public domain conceptual images from public NASA web sites and publicly available magazine articles and are not based on any actual designs, measurements, or 3D models. Conceptual Mars rover and lander are completely conceptual and are not based on any NASA designs or data. The demonstration includes High Fidelity Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of ISS provided by the ISS 3D CAD Team which will be used in a visual display to demonstrate the capabilities of the Teamcenter Visualization software. The demonstration will include 3D views of the CAD models including random measurements that will be taken to demonstrate the measurement tool. A 3D PDF file will be demonstrated of the Blue Book fidelity assembly complete model with no vehicles attached. The 3D zoom and rotation will be displayed as well as random measurements from the measurement tool. The External Configuration Analysis and Tracking Tool (ExCATT) Microsoft Access Database will be demonstrated to show its capabilities to organize and track hardware on ISS. The data included will be part numbers, serial numbers, historical, current, and future locations, of external hardware components on station. It includes dates of all external ISS events and flights and the associated hardware changes for each event. The hardware location information does not always reveal the exact location of the hardware, only the general location. In some cases the location is a module or carrier, in other cases it is a WIF socket, handrail, or attach point. Only small portions of the data will be displayed for demonstration purposes.

Evertt, Shonn F.; Collins, Michael; Hahn, William

2008-01-01

393

Team Characteristics and Team Member Knowledge, Skills, and Ability Relationships to the Effectiveness of Cross?Functional Teams in the Public Sector  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines members of cross?functional teams in the public sector for the necessary knowledge, skills, and ability (KSA) to be effective team members. It was determined that members of cross?functional teams in the public sector possess the necessary KSA to perform effectively. The following characteristics are statistically significant factors: (1) years of professional work experience; (2) frequency of team

Yvonne A. Athanasaw

2003-01-01

394

Pineal lesions: a multidisciplinary challenge.  

PubMed

The pineal region is a complex anatomical compartment, harbouring the pineal gland surrounded by the quadrigeminal plate and the confluents of the internal cerebral veins to form the vein of Galen. The complexity of lesions in that region, however, goes far beyond the pineal parenchyma proper. Originating in the pineal gland, there are not only benign cysts but also numerous different tumour types. In addition, lesions such as tectal gliomas, tentorial meningiomas and choroid plexus papillomas arise from the surrounding structures, occupying that regions. Furthermore, the area has an affinity for metastatic lesions. Vascular lesions complete the spectrum mainly as small tectal arteriovenous malformations or cavernous haemangiomas.Taken together, there is a wide spectrum of lesions, many unique to that region, which call for a multidisciplinary approach. The limited access and anatomical complexity have generated a spectrum of anatomical approaches and raised the interest for neuroendoscopic approaches. Equally complex is the spectrum of treatment modalities such as microsurgery as the main option but stereotactic radiosurgery as an alternative or adjuvant to surgery for selected cases, radiation as for germinoma (see below) and or combinatorial chemotherapy, which may need to precede any other ablative technique as constituents.In this context, we review the current literature and our own series to obtain a snapshot sentiment of how to approach pineal lesions, how to interrelate alternative/competing concepts and review the recent technological advances. PMID:25411146

Westphal, Manfred; Emami, Pedram

2015-01-01

395

Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)], E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu; Mancuso, Anthony A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Werning, John W. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Villaret, Douglas B. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2007-10-01

396

Building collaborative teams in neonatal intensive care.  

PubMed

The complex multidisciplinary nature of neonatal intensive care combined with the numerous hand-offs occurring in this shift-based environment, requires efficient and clear communication and collaboration among staff to provide optimal care. However, the skills required to function as a team are not typically assessed, discussed, or even taught on a regular basis among neonatal personnel. We developed a multidisciplinary, small group, interactive workshop based on Team STEPPS to provide staff with formal teamwork skills, and to introduce new team-based practices; 129 (95%) of the eligible 136 staff were trained. We then compared the results of the pretraining survey (completed by 114 (84%) of staff) with the post-training survey (completed by 104 (81%) of participants) 2 years later. We found an improvement in the overall teamwork score from 7.37 to 8.08 (p=<0.0001) based on a range of poor (1) to excellent (9). Respondents provided higher ratings in 9 out of 15 team-based categories after the training. Specifically, staff found improvements in communication (p=0.037), placed greater importance on situation awareness (p=<0.00010), and reported that they supported each other more (p=<0.0001). Staff satisfaction was rated higher post-training, with responses showing that staff had greater job fulfilment (p=<0.0001), believed that their abilities were being utilised properly (p=0.003), and felt more respected (p=0.0037). 90% of staff found the new practice of team meetings to help increase awareness of unit acuity, and 77% of staff noted that they had asked for help or offered assistance because of information shared during these meetings. In addition to summarising the results of our training programme, this paper also provides practical tools that may be of use in developing team training programmes in other neonatal units. PMID:23396854

Brodsky, Dara; Gupta, Munish; Quinn, Mary; Smallcomb, Jane; Mao, Wenyang; Koyama, Nina; May, Virginia; Waldo, Karen; Young, Susan; Pursley, DeWayne M

2013-05-01

397

Bioenergy research: a new paradigm in multidisciplinary research  

PubMed Central

The field of biology is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary and cross-cutting. This changing research atmosphere is creating the way for a new kind of enquiry that while building upon the traditional research establishment is providing a new multidisciplinary framework to more effectively address scientific grand challenges. Using the US Department of Energy sponsored BioEnergy Science Center as an example, we highlight how impactful breakthroughs in biofuel science can be achieved within a large cross-disciplinary team environment. Such transformational insights are key to furthering our understanding and in generating models, theories and processes that can be used to overcome recalcitrance of biomass for sustainable biofuel production. Multidisciplinary approaches have an increasingly greater role to play in meeting rising demands for food, fibre, energy, clean environment and good health. Discoveries achieved by diverse minds and cross-applications of tools and analytical approaches have tremendous potential to fill existing knowledge gaps, clear roadblocks and facilitate translation of basic sciences discoveries as solutions towards addressing some of the most pressing global issues. PMID:20542958

Kalluri, Udaya C.; Keller, Martin

2010-01-01

398

A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure  

PubMed Central

Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation. PMID:20925953

2010-01-01

399

Multidisciplinary management--an opportunity for service integration.  

PubMed

The management team of the future will enter an environment requiring facilitation, participation, clinical, and empowerment skills. Those individuals who possess a clinical orientation as well as business expertise will be sought to manage multidisciplinary units. The rapid changes in the health-care environment have forced organizations to restructure their operations. To achieve quality care, customer satisfaction, cost-effectiveness, and efficiency, service integration across the organization will be required. As we approach the 21st century, this standard will evolve until "all levels are managing patient care." Some of the restructuring trends occurring in the health-care industry have been collaboration service integration, management consolidation, and job elimination. The emphasis for the multidisciplinary manager of the future will include integrating the professional and clinical services, managing information, building community partnerships, promoting physician collaboration, and managing the change process. A model organization in the next century will move toward a people-oriented system with inclusion and empowerment initiatives. Service integration will affect all organizations, but the disciplines within the Clinical Support System will be the most affected. Future opportunities of leadership will exist for pathologists, nurses, or medical technologists as the professional silos of managers and clinicians continue to crumble. PMID:10175172

Cameron, M

1997-01-01

400

Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (including the Site 300 area), Livermore, California, conducted from February 26 to April 5, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety and Health (E SH) Programs at LLNL. LLNL is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE), and is a multi-program, mission-oriented institution engaged in fundamental and applied research programs that require a multidisciplinary approach. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, and consultants.

Not Available

1990-06-01

401

[Multidisciplinary therapy for gastric cancer with liver metastasis].  

PubMed

Gastric cancer with liver metastasis (GCLM) is the leading cause of death in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Multiple metastasis was common in GCLM and usually complicated with lesions outside the liver, especially peritoneal metastasis. Most of liver metastasis lesions could not be resected radically. Currently, main treatments for GCLM included radical operation, palliative resection of gastric cancer, ablation of metastatic lesions, intervention and systemic chemotherapy. Based on the current progress in the treatment for GCLM and our clinical experience, the general status of patients, the type of gastric cancer and the degree of liver metastasis should be analyzed, and a cooperative multidisciplinary team (MDT) should be applied to conduct and to choose active and suitable comprehensive treatment for GCLM patients based on individualized therapy principle. PMID:24577759

Chen, Lin; Xi, Hongqing; Shen, Weisong

2014-02-01

402

A Multidisciplinary Performance Analysis of a Lifting-Body Single-Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lockheed Martin Skunk Works (LMSW) is currently developing a single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle called VentureStar(TM) A team at NASA Langley Research Center participated with LMSW in the screening and evaluation of a number of early VentureStar(TM) configurations. The performance analyses that supported these initial studies were conducted to assess the effect of a lifting body shape, linear aerospike engine and metallic thermal protection system (TPS) on the weight and performance of the vehicle. These performance studies were performed in a multidisciplinary fashion that indirectly linked the trajectory optimization with weight estimation and aerothermal analysis tools. This approach was necessary to develop optimized ascent and entry trajectories that met all vehicle design constraints. Significant improvements in ascent performance were achieved when the vehicle flew a lifting trajectory and varied the engine mixture ratio during flight. Also, a considerable reduction in empty weight was possible by adjusting the total oxidizer-to-fuel and liftoff thrust-to-weight ratios. However, the optimal ascent flight profile had to be altered to ensure that the vehicle could be trimmed in pitch using only the flow diverting capability of the aerospike engine. Likewise, the optimal entry trajectory had to be tailored to meet TPS heating rate and transition constraints while satisfying a crossrange requirement.

Tartabini, Paul V.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Korte, J. J.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

2000-01-01

403

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

404

Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care  

PubMed Central

Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by dementia. PMID:21655340

Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

2011-01-01

405

Multidisciplinary Russian biomedical research in space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research activities on a comprehensive multidisciplinary program are vital for enhancement of the system of crew's medical care, environmental health and hygiene in space missions. The primary goal of the program must be identification of patterns, intensity and dynamics of structural and functional shifts in organism induced by an aggregate of spaceflight factors including microgravity, isolation, artificial environment, space radiation, etc. Also, the program must pursue differential assessment of emerging deviations from the standpoint of adequacy to the spaceflight conditions and prospects of returning to Earth and guide the development of principles, methods and techniques necessary to maintain health and working capacity of humans during short- and long-duration missions and on return to Earth. Over 50 years, since 1963, the IBMP researchers apply systemic and innovational approaches to fundamental and exploratory studies in the fields of medical sciences, radiation biology, engineering science, biotechnology, etc. with participation of various biological specimens and human volunteers. Investigations aboard manned spacecrafts and biological satellites as well as in ground-based laboratories further enhancement of the medical care system for crews on orbital and remote space missions; they give insight into the fundamental problems of gravitational physiology and biology, psychophysiology, radiation biology, and contribute thereby to the development of knowledge, methods and technologies, as well as medical and scientific equipment.

Orlov, O. I.; Sychev, V. N.; Samarin, G. I.; Ilyin, E. A.; Belakovskiy, M. S.; Kussmaul, A. R.

2014-08-01

406

Requirements of team effectiveness in neurosurgical rehabilitation.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to stress the importance of working with interdisciplinary teams in neurorehabilitation and describe requirements of team effectiveness. It is not sufficient to focus only on different impairments associated with brain injury and offer individuals a variety of therapy. The essential aspect in neurorehabilitation is the integration of disciplines and consistent goal setting to regard individual patient's needs. Interdisciplinary teams benefit from a leader qualified for neuroscience, neurorehabilitation, clinical neuropsychology and psychotherapy. A good structural organization of the team, notice of basic communication rules, understanding typical group dynamics and stressors of interdisciplinary teams, conflict management and a definite decision making increase productive interdisciplinary working and enable the team to continue to mature. Further empirical research is necessary to support the effectiveness of interdisciplinary teams as an important variable in the evaluation of rehabilitation outcome and quality control. PMID:11974983

Kemper, B; von Wild, K

2002-01-01

407

Work.  

PubMed

The very nature of work is changing because of rapid social change, a culture of abundance, and the ability to substitute information for equipment, inventory, and other material aspects of value creation. In America, we are experiencing an erosion of the concept of a "job," a dramatic shift to service and information as the basis for value added, market commercialism, and the importance of the self-managed career. In some of these areas, dentistry has been consistent with the patterns of innovation--even being a model in some cases. There are also areas where dentistry is moving in contrary directions. PMID:12602221

Chambers, David W

2002-01-01

408

Blog - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The Team Science Toolkit is a dynamic, interactive website to support team science and the Science of Team Science (SciTS) field. The Toolkit provides resources for investigators who are using team science approaches, as well as scholars and evaluators who are studying or evaluating the processes and outcomes of team science.

409

Augmenting team cognition in human-automation teams performing in complex operational environments.  

PubMed

There is a growing reliance on automation (e.g., intelligent agents, semi-autonomous robotic systems) to effectively execute increasingly cognitively complex tasks. Successful team performance for such tasks has become even more dependent on team cognition, addressing both human-human and human-automation teams. Team cognition can be viewed as the binding mechanism that produces coordinated behavior within experienced teams, emerging from the interplay between each team member's individual cognition and team process behaviors (e.g., coordination, communication). In order to better understand team cognition in human-automation teams, team performance models need to address issues surrounding the effect of human-agent and human-robot interaction on critical team processes such as coordination and communication. Toward this end, we present a preliminary theoretical framework illustrating how the design and implementation of automation technology may influence team cognition and team coordination in complex operational environments. Integrating constructs from organizational and cognitive science, our proposed framework outlines how information exchange and updating between humans and automation technology may affect lower-level (e.g., working memory) and higher-level (e.g., sense making) cognitive processes as well as teams' higher-order "metacognitive" processes (e.g., performance monitoring). Issues surrounding human-automation interaction are discussed and implications are presented within the context of designing automation technology to improve task performance in human-automation teams. PMID:17547306

Cuevas, Haydee M; Fiore, Stephen M; Caldwell, Barrett S; Strater, Laura

2007-05-01

410

The team role test: development and validation of a team role knowledge situational judgment test.  

PubMed

The main objectives in this research were to introduce the concept of team role knowledge and to investigate its potential usefulness for team member selection. In Study 1, the authors developed a situational judgment test, called the Team Role Test, to measure knowledge of 10 roles relevant to the team context. The criterion-related validity of this measure was examined in 2 additional studies. In a sample of academic project teams (N = 93), team role knowledge predicted team member role performance (r = .34). Role knowledge also provided incremental validity beyond mental ability and the Big Five personality factors in the prediction of role performance. The results of Study 2 revealed that the predictive validity of role knowledge generalizes to team members in a work setting (N = 82, r = .30). The implications of the results for selection in team environments are discussed. PMID:18361630

Mumford, Troy V; Van Iddekinge, Chad H; Morgeson, Frederick P; Campion, Michael A

2008-03-01

411

When do bad apples not spoil the barrel? negative relationships in teams, team performance, and buffering mechanisms.  

PubMed

The study of negative relationships in teams has primarily focused on the impact of negative relationships on individual team member attitudes and performance in teams. The mechanisms and contingencies that can buffer against the damaging effects of negative relationships on team performance have received limited attention. Building on social interdependence theory and the multilevel model of team motivation, we examine in a sample of 73 work teams the team-level attributes that foster the promotive social interaction that can neutralize the adverse effect of negative relationships on team cohesion and, consequently, on team performance. The results indicate that high levels of team-member exchange as well as high task-interdependence attenuate how team cohesion and team performance suffer from negative relationships. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:24661274

de Jong, Jeroen P; Cur?eu, Petru L; Leenders, Roger Th A J

2014-05-01

412

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Team Science and Collaboration Practitioner. Consulting and advising for developing teams and institutions interested in participating in and supporting team science. Experience with bringing diverse groups together from various backgrounds and institutions to solve challenging scientific problems.

413

Diversity Team | Poster  

Cancer.gov

The Employee Diversity Team (EDT) is looking for bright, talented, and committed Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL) employees—both government and contractor—who want to share in the team’s mission.

414

Making virtual teams more effective: improving relational links  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose - To report on a study testing training methods to improve communications among virtual team members. Design\\/methodology\\/approach - Training methods for improving virtual team communications were developed and administered to 12 virtual teams. Surveys tracking cohesiveness, perceptions of the process and satisfaction with the outcomes were administered before, during and after teams working on a series of projects. These

Peggy M. Beranek; Ben Martz

2005-01-01

415

A Contingency Model of Conflict and Team Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors develop and test theoretical extensions of the relationships of task conflict, relationship conflict, and 2 dimensions of team effectiveness (performance and team-member satisfaction) among 2 samples of work teams in Taiwan and Indonesia. Findings show that relationship conflict moderates the task conflict-team performance…

Shaw, Jason D.; Zhu, Jing; Duffy, Michelle K.; Scott, Kristin L.; Shih, Hsi-An; Susanto, Ely

2011-01-01

416

Studying Team Science - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The science of team science (SciTS) is a rapidly emerging field focused on understanding and enhancing the processes and outcomes of team science. A key goal of SciTS is to learn more about factors that maximize the efficiency, productivity, and effectiveness of team science initiatives.

417

EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap (Report 2006, http://cordis.europa.eu/esfri/roadmap.htm), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. The development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90 and is being supported by several EU initiatives, as the on-going ESONET-NoE, coordinated by IFREMER (2007-2011, http://www.esonet-emso.org/esonet-noe/), and aims at gathering together the Research Community of the Ocean Observatories. In 2006 the FP7 Capacities Programme launched a call for Preparatory Phase (PP) projects, that will provide the support to create the legal and organisational entities in charge of managing the infrastructures, and coordinating the financial effort among the countries. Under this call the EMSO-PP project was approved in 2007 with the coordination of INGV and the participation of other 11 Institutions of 11 countries. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years. The EMSO is a key-infrastructure both for Ocean Sciences and for Solid Earth Sciences. In this respect it will enhance and complement profitably the capabilities of other European research infrastructures such as EPOS, ERICON-Aurora Borealis, and SIOS. The perspective of the synergy among EMSO and other ESFRI Research Infrastructures will be outlined. EMSO Partners: IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de Tecnologia Marina - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Spain, ref. Juan Jose Danobeitia); UGOT-Goteborgs Universitet (Sweden, ref. Per Hall); HCMR-Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (Greece, ref. Vasilios Likousis); NOCS-National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom, ref. Henry A. Ruhl); UiT-University of Tromsř (Norway, ref. Jürgen Mienert); FCT-Fundaçăo para a Cięncia e a Tecnologia (Portugal, ref. Jorge Miguel Alberto de Miranda); ITU-Istanbul Teknik Universitesi (Turkey, ref. Namik Çagatay); NIOZ-Stichting Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut voor Onderzoek der Zee (The Netherlands, ref. Jens Greinert).

Favali, Paolo

2010-05-01

418

EMSO: European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EMSO, a Research Infrastructure listed within ESFRI (European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures) Roadmap), is the European-scale network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories from the Arctic to the Black Sea with the scientific objective of long-term real-time monitoring of processes related to geosphere/biosphere/hydrosphere interactions. EMSO will enhance our understanding of processes through long time series appropriate to the scale of the phenomena, constituting the new frontier of studying Earth interior, deep-sea biology and chemistry and ocean processes. EMSO will reply also to the need expressed in the frame of GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) to develop a marine segment integrated in the in situ and satellite global monitoring system. The EMSO development relays upon the synergy between the scientific community and the industry to improve the European competitiveness with respect to countries like USA/Canada, NEPTUNE, VENUS and MARS projects, Taiwan, MACHO project, and Japan, DONET project. In Europe the development of an underwater network is based on previous EU-funded projects since early '90, and presently supported by EU initiatives. The EMSO infrastructure will constitute the extension to the sea of the land-based networks. Examples of data recorded by seafloor observatories will be presented. EMSO is presently at the stage of Preparatory Phase (PP), funded in the EC FP7 Capacities Programme. The project has started in April 2008 and will last 4 years with the participation of 12 Institutions representing 12 countries. EMSO potential will be significantly increased also with the interaction with other Research Infrastructures addressed to Earth Science. 2. IFREMER-Institut Français de Recherche pour l'exploitation de la mer (France, ref. Roland Person); KDM-Konsortium Deutsche Meeresforschung e.V. (Germany, ref. Christoph Waldmann); IMI-Irish Marine Institute (Ireland, ref. Michael Gillooly); UTM-CSIC-Unidad de Tecnologia Marina - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (Spain, ref. Juan Jose Danobeitia); UGOT-Goteborgs Universitet (Sweden, ref. Per Hall); HCMR-Hellenic Centre for Marine Research (Greece, ref. Vasilios Likousis); NOCS-National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom, ref. Henry A. Ruhl); UiT-University of Tromsř (Norway, ref. Jürgen Mienert); FCT-Fundaçăo para a Cięncia e a Tecnologia (Portugal, ref. Jorge Miguel Alberto de Miranda); ITU-Istanbul Teknik Universitesi (Turkey, ref. Namik Çagatay); NIOZ-Stichting Koninklijk Nederlands Instituut voor Zeeonderzoek (The Netherlands, ref. Tjeerd C.E. van Weering).

Favali, P.; Partnership, Emso

2009-04-01

419

Multidisciplinary unmanned technology teammate (MUTT)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) held an autonomous robot competition called CANINE in June 2012. The goal of the competition was to develop innovative and natural control methods for robots. This paper describes the winning technology, including the vision system, the operator interaction, and the autonomous mobility. The rules stated only gestures or voice commands could be used for control. The robots would learn a new object at the start of each phase, find the object after it was thrown into a field, and return the object to the operator. Each of the six phases became more difficult, including clutter of the same color or shape as the object, moving and stationary obstacles, and finding the operator who moved from the starting location to a new location. The Robotic Research Team integrated techniques in computer vision, speech recognition, object manipulation, and autonomous navigation. A multi-filter computer vision solution reliably detected the objects while rejecting objects of similar color or shape, even while the robot was in motion. A speech-based interface with short commands provided close to natural communication of complicated commands from the operator to the robot. An innovative gripper design allowed for efficient object pickup. A robust autonomous mobility and navigation solution for ground robotic platforms provided fast and reliable obstacle avoidance and course navigation. The research approach focused on winning the competition while remaining cognizant and relevant to real world applications.

Uzunovic, Nenad; Schneider, Anne; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Del Giorno, Mark

2013-01-01

420

WebBlow: a Web\\/agent-based multidisciplinary design optimization environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents some results of our recent work on the development of a distributed multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) environment (called WebBlow) using a number of enabling technologies including software agents, Internet\\/Web, and XML. The objective is to provide a powerful solution for project managers and designers working on multiple design projects to share product information and knowledge, and to

Ying Daisy Wang; Weiming Shen; Hamada Ghenniwa

2003-01-01

421

The Special Education Referral and Decision-Making Process for English Language Learners: Child Study Team Meetings and Placement Conferences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the special education referral and decision- making process for English language learners (ELLs), with a focus on Child Study Team (CST) meetings and placement conferences\\/multidisciplinary team meetings. We wished to learn how school personnel determined if ELLs who were struggling had disabilities, to what extent those involved in the process understood second

JANETTE K. KLINGNER; BETH HARRY

2006-01-01

422

The Special Education Referral and Decision-Making Process for English Language Learners: Child Study Team Meetings and Placement Conferences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the special education referral and decision-making process for English language learners (ELLs), with a focus on Child Study Team (CST) meetings and placement conferences/multidisciplinary team meetings. We wished to learn how school personnel determined if ELLs who were struggling had disabilities, to what…

Klingner, Janette K.; Harry, Beth

2006-01-01

423

Constructing a team performance prediction model for sport teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

In team sports, some constructs of the team process are important factors for team performance; therefore, exploring the group process of a team is crucial for improving team performance. The purpose of this article is to construct a team performance prediction model for sport teams, employing team-level variables. For this purpose, we reviewed the previous studies on group process in

Keita KAWAZU; Yoshio SUGIYAMA; Yuichi NAGAO; Masayuki YAMAZAKI; Xue Lian WANG; Eri KUMASAKI

2009-01-01

424

HowTheNorth Multidisciplinary  

E-print Network

, and then suggest ways to advance the work. One student looked at the correlation between violent video games bioethics, death, cell development, vaccines, health care politics, the death penalty, race, sports medicine

Wechsler, Risa H.

425

Instructional Design Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An instructional design team, composed of experts in nursing, education, and media production, is used at the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, Madison, to produce instructional units for a new curriculum. The authors summarize steps of team/faculty communications, team methodology, and factors influencing the team's effectiveness. (EA)

Bancroft, Judith A.; Collins, Keith

1974-01-01

426

Using Assessment for Developing Team Building Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Ability to function in teams," "good team building skills," and "teamwork" are all now common phrases in the classifieds. It is increasingly important in society today, both in social and work environments, to be a good team player. But how do we actually develop those skills and evaluate whether our efforts have had a measurable impact so that we can adjust our approach for maximum benefit? This booklet presents a team assessment process developed to track and improve students team building skill as well as a complete description of its implementation. Preliminary research on team building skills development was performed with a group of community college students in the Electrical Technology Program. The results from the two year study indicate that active participation in the team assessment process is beneficial in developing team building and leadership skills in college students. All the materials necessary to implement the team assessment process for a classroom or workplace setting are provided in this booklet. Using these materials and methods can yield evidence of improved team building and leadership skills important in meeting accreditation standards or for use in evaluating corporate team skills and leadership development.

Akins, Lean M.

427

OSMA Research and Technology Strategy Team Summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the work of the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA), and the OSMA Research and Technology Strategy (ORTS) team. There is discussion of the charter of the team, Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and how the teams responsibilities are related to these TRLs. In order to improve the safety of all levels of the development through the TRL phases, improved communication, understanding and cooperation is required at all levels, particularly at the mid level technologies development.

Wetherholt, Martha

2010-01-01

428

Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

1972-01-01

429

[Discourses of primary mental healthcare teams on addressing gender violence within the context of relationships].  

PubMed

Violence against women within relationships is a problem which is in the public eye and is mainly associated with the gender factor. It is therefore crucial to incorporate a gender perspective in order to understand and intervene in this phenomenon. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews and applying content analysis, to analyze if the declared discourse of the Primary Mental Healthcare teams in Valparaíso (physicians, psychologists, social workers), regarding tackling violence against women within the context of a relationship includes perceptions, knowledge and ideas based on the gender perspective. There is a general consensus on how to deal with battered women, as for all of them it is very important to create an empathic, therapeutic space of containment. Multidisciplinary and intersectoral work is considered important in the work discussions and the risk of repeat victimization was mentioned. In general, there was no intention to empower women from a gender perspective, with the exception of some psychologists (males and females). This work could lead to a critical evaluation of the various discourses of Primary Mental Healthcare Teams in addressing gender-based violence. PMID:23175406

Diez, Beatriz Salgado

2012-12-01

430

The Team Personality–Team Performance Relationship Revisited: The Impact of Criterion Choice, Pattern of Workflow, and Method of Aggregation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using meta-analytic evidence, this study tested trait- and task-based theoretical approaches to team personality management, using both team behaviors and team outcomes as criteria. Trait theories state that maximization of the team trait is harmful for Extroversion (complementary team fit) but beneficial for Conscientiousness, Agreeableness, and Emotional Stability (supplementary fit). Task-based theories state that tasks with few work exchanges are

Matthew S. Prewett; Ashley A. G. Walvoord; Frederick R. B. Stilson; Michael E. Rossi; Michael T. Brannick

2009-01-01

431

30 CFR 49.12 - Availability of mine rescue teams.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...contract mine rescue team. For the purpose of mine rescue work only, miners who are...their services. Rescue team members will be considered...though performing regular work duties or in an off-duty...requirement that mine rescue teams be available shall...

2010-07-01

432

30 CFR 49.2 - Availability of mine rescue teams.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...employed on the surface but work regularly underground...miners on a mine rescue team on the effective date...their services. Rescue team members will be considered...though performing regular work duties or in an off-duty...requirement that mine rescue teams be available shall...

2010-07-01

433

Enabling effective engineering teams: a program for teaching interaction skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

Working in teams is an integral part of modern engineering practice and education. However, successful team interaction depends on individuals possessing skills that allow them to communicate and interact with other people in adaptive and contributing styles. Simply putting people in teams does not teach them to work together effectively. A program for teaching interaction skills to engineers was developed

Elaine Seat; S. M. Lord

1998-01-01

434

Leader Delegation and Trust in Global Software Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Virtual teams are an important work structure in global software development. The distributed team structure enables access to a diverse set of expertise which is often not available in one location, to a cheaper labor force, and to a potentially accelerated development process that uses a twenty-four hour work structure. Many software teams

Zhang, Suling

2008-01-01

435

Development of a Multi-Disciplinary Aerothermostructural Model Applicable to Hypersonic Flight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The harsh and complex hypersonic flight environment has driven design and analysis improvements for many years. One of the defining characteristics of hypersonic flight is the coupled, multi-disciplinary nature of the dominant physics. In an effect to examine some of the multi-disciplinary problems associated with hypersonic flight engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed a non-linear 6 degrees-of-freedom, full vehicle simulation that includes the necessary model capabilities: aerothermal heating, ablation, and thermal stress solutions. Development of the tool and results for some investigations will be presented. Requirements and improvements for future work will also be reviewed. The results of the work emphasize the need for a coupled, multi-disciplinary analysis to provide accurate

Kostyk, Chris; Risch, Tim

2013-01-01

436

"They have no idea of what we do or what we know": Australian graduates' perceptions of working in a health care team.  

PubMed

Globally it has been suggested that interprofessional education can lead to improvements in patient safety as well as increased job satisfaction and understanding of professional roles and responsibilities. In many health care facilities staff report being committed to working collaboratively, however their practice does not always reflect their voiced ideologies. The inability to work effectively together can, in some measure, be attributed to a lack of knowledge and respect for others' professional roles, status and boundaries. In this paper, we will report on the findings of an interpretative study undertaken in Australia, focussing specifically on the experiences of new graduate nurses, doctors and pharmacists in relation to 'knowing about' and 'working with' other health care professionals. Findings indicated there was little understanding of the roles of other health professionals and this impacted negatively on communication and collaboration between and within disciplines. Furthermore, most new graduates recall interprofessional education as intermittent, largely optional, non-assessable, and of little value in relation to their roles, responsibilities and practice as graduate health professionals. Interprofessional education needs to be integrated into undergraduate health programs with an underlying philosophy of reciprocity, respect and role valuing, in order to achieve the proposed benefits for staff and patients. PMID:24999074

Ebert, Lyn; Hoffman, Kerry; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

2014-09-01

437

Asteroid team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work on asteroid classification continued was rewarded with the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids. The M class is rare and these are the first found among the near-Earth asteroids to have the spectral albedo characteristic of this class. The two asteroids are newly discovered 1986 DA and 1986 EB which were observed at N and Q bandpasses (i.e., 10 and 20 microns) with the 3 m IRTF telescope and at five wavelengths from 0.36 to 0.85 microns from Kitt peak National Observatory's 0.36 m telescope. The derived diameters are about 2 km for both objects. In the asteroid radiometry program N or Q photometry was obtained for more than 40 asteroids in Feb. 1986. Radiometric diameter calibration support were provided for stellar occultations of stars by 230 Athamantis and 129 Antigone. The data were reduced but not analyzed. Infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 microns) of 60 asteroids were reduced and are now ready for compositional analysis.

Matson, D. L.

1986-01-01

438

Asteroid team  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Work on asteroid classification continued was rewarded with the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids. The M class is rare and these are the first found among the near-Earth asteroids to have the spectral albedo characteristic of this class. The two asteroids are newly discovered 1986 DA and 1986 EB which were observed at N and Q bandpasses (i.e., 10 and 20 microns) with the 3 m IRTF telescope and at five wavelengths from 0.36 to 0.85 microns from Kitt peak National Observatory's 0.36 m telescope. The derived diameters are about 2 km for both objects. In the asteroid radiometry program N or Q photometry was obtained for more than 40 asteroids in Feb. 1986. Radiometric diameter calibration support were provided for stellar occultations of stars by 230 Athamantis and 129 Antigone. The data were reduced but not analyzed. Infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 microns) of 60 asteroids were reduced and are now ready for compositional analysis.

Matson, D. L.

1986-09-01

439

Multidisciplinary Management of Paradoxical Vocal Cord Dysfunction  

E-print Network

of Pediatric Pulmonary and Cystic Fibrosis, OHSU Joshua Schindler, MD Laryngologist, Medical Director, NW, it is critical for a variety of professionals to be familiar with evaluation and treatment of this disorder respiratory disorders, optimal multi-disciplinary management and behavioral treatment techniques. Presentation

Chapman, Michael S.

440

Man and Environment, A Multidisciplinary Teachers Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This multidisciplinary guide, developed for teachers in the secondary schools, stresses the use of Man and Environment in Arkansas. The guide illustrates how teachers in social studies, the arts, English, science, physical education and health, home economics, and mathematics can implement these materials into their present classroom situations. A…

Martin, F. H.; And Others

441

A Multidisciplinary Digital-Control-Systems Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a multipurpose and multidisciplinary control-systems laboratory that is being developed at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. It is shared by Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) students, allowing more efficient use of space and equipment, better use of funds, and elimination of overlap among individual departmental labs. The composition of

Gregory L. Plett; David K. Schmidt

2002-01-01

442

Emerging multidisciplinary research across database management systems  

E-print Network

Emerging multidisciplinary research across database management systems Anisoara Nica1 , Fabian M available inside a database management system. Three fundamental research problems under a database approach, agreement 226513. http://webdam.inria.fr/ ABSTRACT The database community is exploring more and more

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

443

Improving Student Achievement in a Multidisciplinary Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article analyses interim findings of an ongoing action research project into the use of assessment criteria and grade descriptors in the assessment process. The project is multidisciplinary and covers areas as diverse as Sports Sociology, Economics, Youth and Community Studies, and Education. The idea is to equip first-year students with the…

Chapman, Amanda; Bloxham, Sue

2004-01-01

444

Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare  

E-print Network

Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare Year 7 Annual Report www of device users, the medical device industry, regulators and reimbursement agencies and healthcare providers healthcare users really need: more effective and efficient service, based on better technology that has been

Oakley, Jeremy

445

29 CFR 1926.1076 - Qualifications of dive team.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Qualifications of dive team. 1926.1076 Section 1926.1076 Labor... § 1926.1076 Qualifications of dive team. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

2010-07-01

446

Teams Explore the Whole Frog  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the content and organization of a laboratory session in which student teams work on the organs, tissues, and parasites of a pithed frog. The procedure maximizes participation by every student, makes possible the fullest use of each frog, and permits a rather broad study in a limited time. (JR)

Cessna, Clair E.

1973-01-01

447

Developing Trust in Virtual Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rapid globalization, advances in technology, flatter organizational structures, synergistic cooperation among firms, and a shift to knowledge work environments have led to the increasing use of virtual teams in organizations. Selecting, training, and socializing employees in virtual teamwork has therefore become an important human resource…

Germain, Marie-Line

2011-01-01

448

Team Up to Increase Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The presentation describes the development of an interdisciplinary team approach to working with mildly retarded students (5-9 years old). The approach featured group discussions and activities to enhance students' listening, communication, and social skills, and to improve individual and group behavior. Individual and group goals were designed by…

Phelps, Barbara; And Others

449

AWARD RECOGNISES 1 Outstanding Team  

E-print Network

significant obstacles or have successfully utilised the skills of all members of the team and can demonstrate to innovation involving new ways of thinking or working. 3 Outstanding Customer Service Consider an individual-actively building and maintaining positive relationships between staff, students or Services. 4 Hero(es) / Heroine

Bearhop, Stuart

450

Integrated, multidisciplinary care for hand eczema: design of a randomized controlled trial and cost-effectiveness study  

PubMed Central

Background The individual and societal burden of hand eczema is high. Literature indicates that moderate to severe hand eczema is a disease with a poor prognosis. Many patients are hampered in their daily activities, including work. High costs are related to high medical consumption, productivity loss and sick leave. Usual care is suboptimal, due to a lack of optimal instruction and coordination of care, and communication with the general practitioner/occupational physician and people involved at the workplace. Therefore, an integrated, multidisciplinary intervention involving a dermatologist, a care manager, a specialized nurse and a clinical occupational physician was developed. This paper describes the design of a study to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of integrated care for hand eczema by a multidisciplinary team, coordinated by a care manager, consisting of instruction on avoiding relevant contact factors, both in the occupational and in the private environment, optimal skin care and treatment, compared to usual, dermatologist-led care. Methods The study is a multicentre, randomized, controlled trial with an economic evaluation alongside. The study population consists of patients with chronic, moderate to severe hand eczema, who visit an outpatient clinic of one of the participating 5 (three university and two general) hospitals. Integrated, multidisciplinary care, coordinated by a care manager, including allergo-dermatological evaluation by a dermatologist, occupational intervention by a clinical occupational physician, and counselling by a specialized nurse on optimizing topical treatment and skin care will be compared with usual care by a dermatologist. The primary outcome measure is the cumulative difference in reduction of the clinical severity score HECSI between the groups. Secondary outcome measures are the patient's global assessment, specific quality of life with regard to the hands, generic quality of life, sick leave and patient satisfaction. An economic evaluation will be conducted alongside the RCT. Direct and indirect costs will be measured. Outcome measures will be assessed at baseline and after 4, 12, 26 and 52 weeks. All statistical analyses will be performed on the intention-to-treat principle. In addition, per protocol analyses will be carried out. Discussion To improve societal participation of patients with moderate to severe hand eczema, an integrated care intervention was developed involving both person-related and environmental factors. Such integrated care is expected to improve the patients' clinical signs, quality of life and to reduce sick leave and medical costs. Results will become available in 2011. PMID:19951404

2009-01-01

451

Multidisciplinary design optimization of an automotive magnetorheological brake design  

E-print Network

Multidisciplinary design optimization of an automotive magnetorheological brake design Edward J This paper presents the development of a new electromechanical brake system using magnetorheological (MR: Magnetorheological fluid; Automotive brake; Finite element analysis; Computational fluid dynamics; Multidisciplinary

Park, Edward

452

Interdisciplinary Student Teams Projects: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In today's organizations team work has become an integral part of the day-to-day routine. For this reason, University professors are including group projects in many courses. In such group assessments, we advocate the use of interdisciplinary teams, where possible. As a case study, we report an interdisciplinary group technical project with…

Kruck, S. E.; Teer, Faye P.

2009-01-01

453

Time Series Trends in Corporate Team Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In two studies, the Team Development Indicator was repeatedly administered to intact work groups participating in intensive 48-hour residential corporate adventure training (CAT) and various follow-up procedures. CAT significantly improved team behaviors in all training groups, but improvements were maintained or increased only in groups that…

Priest, Simon; Lesperance, Mary Ann

1994-01-01

454

Team Effectiveness: Beyond Skills and Cognitive Ability  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the basis of job analysis results, the validity of using measures of general cognitive ability, job-specific skills, and personality traits jointly at both the individual level and the group level to predict the performance of 79 four-person, human resource work teams was evaluated. Team member trait and job skill scores were aggregated with a conjunctive model of task performance.

George A. Neuman; Julie Wright

1999-01-01

455

Multidisciplinary Multiobjective Optimal Design for Turbomachinery Using Evolutionary Algorithm  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes Dr. Lian s efforts toward developing a robust and efficient tool for multidisciplinary and multi-objective optimal design for turbomachinery using evolutionary algorithms. This work consisted of two stages. The first stage (from July 2003 to June 2004) Dr. Lian focused on building essential capabilities required for the project. More specifically, Dr. Lian worked on two subjects: an enhanced genetic algorithm (GA) and an integrated optimization system with a GA and a surrogate model. The second stage (from July 2004 to February 2005) Dr. Lian formulated aerodynamic optimization and structural optimization into a multi-objective optimization problem and performed multidisciplinary and multi-objective optimizations on a transonic compressor blade based on the proposed model. Dr. Lian s numerical results showed that the proposed approach can effectively reduce the blade weight and increase the stage pressure ratio in an efficient manner. In addition, the new design was structurally safer than the original design. Five conference papers and three journal papers were published on this topic by Dr. Lian.

2005-01-01

456

Ground Rules in Team Projects: Findings from a Prototype System to Support Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student team project work in higher education is one of the best ways to develop team working skills at the same time as learning about the subject matter. As today's students require the freedom to learn at times and places that better match their lifestyles, there is a need for any support for team project work to be also available online. Team

Whatley, Janice

2009-01-01

457

Multidisciplinary Care in the Oncology Setting: Historical Perspective and Data From Lung and Gynecology Multidisciplinary Clinics  

PubMed Central

Multidisciplinary care refers to a practice in which physicians from multiple specialties attend to the same patient population. There are many advantages to the model, including reduced time to treatment, coordinated treatment plans, increased patient and physician satisfaction, and increased enrollment onto clinical trials. At Central Dupage Hospital, multidisciplinary clinics have been instituted in lung and gynecologic cancer. We describe the structure and operation of each clinic and highlight their considerable success in improving patient care. PMID:21358946

Horvath, Laura Elise; Yordan, Edgardo; Malhotra, Deepak; Leyva, Ileana; Bortel, Katy; Schalk, Denise; Mellinger, Patricia; Huml, Marianne; Kesslering, Christy; Huml, Jeffrey

2010-01-01

458