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Sample records for multidisciplinary team working

  1. Multidisciplinary mental health teams.

    PubMed

    Slade, M; Rosen, A; Shankar, R

    1995-01-01

    This study surveyed current practice amongst 91 Indian and Australian staff working within multidisciplinary mental health teams, looking at leadership skills, conflict resolution and therapeutic abilities. Length of training was associated with management skills, though these skill were more developed by psychiatric nurses and occupational therapists working in community settings. Hospital settings involved less consensual decision-making than community teams. Psychiatric nurses spent most time in clinical work, and occupational therapists were rated as less skilled in the therapeutic activities assessed than any other profession. Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists undertook most research. The activities assessed in this study could be undertaken by a team comprising psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses and social workers, with clinical psychologists employed where possible, especially for research or service evaluation. PMID:8847199

  2. Overcoming obstacles to establish a multidisciplinary team approach to hepatobiliary diseases: a working model in a Caribbean setting

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Johnson, Peter B; Shah, Sundeep; Roberts, Patrick; Arthurs, Milton; Murphy, Trevor; Bonadie, Kimon O; Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Abu Hilal, Mohammed; Pearce, Neil W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction By providing a structured forum to exchange information and ideas, multidisciplinary team meetings improve working relationships, expedite investigations, promote evidence-based treatment, and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. Methods This discursive paper reports the introduction of a multidisciplinary team approach to manage hepatobiliary diseases in Jamaica, focusing on the challenges encountered and the methods used to overcome these obstacles. Conclusion Despite multiple challenges in resource-limited environments, a multidisciplinary team approach can be incorporated into clinical practice in developing nations. Policy makers should make it a priority to support clinical, operational, and governance aspects of the multidisciplinary teams. PMID:24920917

  3. Language Differences or Learning Difficulties: The Work of the Multidisciplinary Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salend, Spencer J.; Salinas, AltaGracia

    2003-01-01

    The following recommendations are made to assist multidisciplinary teams in developing educational programs for second-language learners: diversify the team and offer training; compare student performance in native and secondary languages; consider factors associated with second-language acquisition; employ alternative assessments; identify life…

  4. Team OSCE: A Teaching Modality for Promotion of Multidisciplinary Work in Mental Health Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Chandra, Prabha S.; Chaturvedi, Santosh K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective structured clinical examination has been in use both as an assessment and a teaching modality within the mental health profession. It focuses on individual skill enhancement, the inter-professional understanding of role obligation is helpful in promoting competence as a team as well as role of other team members. The Team OSCE (TOSCE) is an effective way in promoting inter-professional learning. Materials and Methods: The present work assesses the trainee experience with TOSCE and its utility in clinical care. Twenty-two mental health trainees (17 male and 5 female from psychiatry, clinical psychology and psychiatric social work) got exposure to weekly OSCAF training as well as 2-3 Team OSCAFS on various aspects of clinical work as a part of their clinical training for 3 months. Rating from the trainees were taken on TOSCE feedback checklist. Results: TOSCE was helpful in promoting the understanding role of other team members; shared decision-making, problem-solving, handling unexpected events, giving feedback and closure. Conclusion: The TOSCE may be introduced as a way to work on clinical performance, shared decision-making and inter-professional understanding. PMID:26664082

  5. Creating a culture to support patient safety. The contribution of a multidisciplinary team development programme to collaborative working.

    PubMed

    Benson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Effective teamwork is crucial for ensuring the provision of safe high quality care. Teams whose members collaborate through questioning, reflecting on and reviewing their work, offering each other feedback and where reporting is encouraged are more likely to promote a safe environment of care. This paper describes a multidisciplinary development programme intended to increase team effectiveness. The teams that took part developed their ability to work collaboratively together with levels of open dialogue, critical reflection and direct feedback increasing. The paper goes on to discuss aspects of the programme which were helpful in enabling these positive changes and concludes with a number of recommendations for those commissioning and facilitating team development initiatives. These include: the need for people from different disciplines and different levels within the hierarchy to spend time reviewing their work together, the need to explicitly address issues of power and authority, the usefulness taking an action orientated approach and requiring participants to work on real issues together, the importance of providing sufficient time and resource to support people to work with the challenges associated with implementing change and addressing team dynamics, The importance of skilled facilitation. PMID:20369440

  6. The Problems Facing Multidisciplinary Teams: As Perceived by Team Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the problems team members perceive to exist on multidisciplinary teams. Results indicated the two major areas of concern for urban, multidisciplinary team members were: too constrictive a set of team roles and goals, and teams functioning under extensive pressure with minimal support. (Author)

  7. Temporomandibular joint multidisciplinary team clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nabeela; Poate, Tim; Nacher-Garcia, Cristina; Pugh, Nicola; Cowgill, Helen; Page, Lisa; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) commonly present to oral and maxillofacial departments and are increasingly being managed by a subspecialist group of surgeons. We review the outcomes of patients attending a specialist TMJ multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic. All patients are simultaneously reviewed by a consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, consultant in oral medicine, specialist physiotherapist, and maxillofacial prosthetist, and they can also see a consultant liaison psychiatrist. They are referred from primary, secondary, and tertiary care when medical and surgical treatment in the routine TMJ clinic has failed, and are triaged by the attending maxillofacial surgeon. On discharge they are returned to the care of the referring practitioner. We review the outcomes of patients attending this clinic over a 2-year period and show improvements in pain scores and maximal incisal opening, as well as quality of life outcome measures. All units in the UK with an interest in the management of diseases of the TMJ should consider establishing this type of clinic and should use available resources and expertise to maximise outcomes. PMID:25179688

  8. Using an Undergraduate Materials Research Project to Foster Multidisciplinary Teaming Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, James A.; Cleary, Doug D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the use of undergraduate materials multidisciplinary research projects as a means of addressing the growing industrial demand for graduates experienced in working in multidisciplinary teams. It includes a detailed description of a project in which a multidisciplinary team of chemical engineering and civil engineering students…

  9. Using an Undergraduate Materials Research Project to Foster Multidisciplinary Teaming Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, James A.; Cleary, Doug D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the use of undergraduate materials multidisciplinary research projects as a means of addressing the growing industrial demand for graduates experienced in working in multidisciplinary teams. It includes a detailed description of a project in which a multidisciplinary team of chemical engineering and civil engineering students

  10. Work Teams that Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galagan, Patricia

    1986-01-01

    Describes a line manager's successful attempt to design an autonomously run plant. The author discusses the assembly of a team of workers to develop the plant, product design, characteristics of the team members, the employee reward system, role of the plant manager, and the manager's evaluation of the plant's success. (CT)

  11. [Secondary lymphedema--the importance of a multidisciplinary team approach].

    PubMed

    Heldenberg, Eitan; Bass, Arie

    2013-03-01

    Secondary lymphedema is the most common type of lymphedema. Malignancy, mainly breast carcinoma, is the main cause of upper extremity lymphedema, while groin dissection, irradiation and trauma are the cause of lower extremity lymphedema. Early recognition of the pathology followed by early referral to a vascular surgeon, leading a multidisciplinary team, who takes care of those patients, can prevent a miserable Life from these patients. Lifelong commitment of the patients, prolonged financial support of the health insurance supplier, as well as team work of the group taking care of the patient, is the only way to help these patients. PMID:23713374

  12. Building collaborative teams for multidisciplinary educational projects in optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokerst, Nan Marie; Brooke, Martin A.; Laskar, Joy; Wills, D. Scott; Brown, April S.; Ingram, Mary Ann

    2000-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team-oriented research is an effective method for investigating systems spanning multiple knowledge areas. Building on cross-functional team strategies developed for highly competitive industries, experts from a variety of technical domains can be brought together in a team and focused toward a common set of goals. However, building and maintaining these teams is an art that combines technical, social, and management skills, and requires proactive, conscious attention to enable and achieve positive results. This paper explores some avenues toward effective multi-disciplinary team building, and explores the educational potential associated with team-oriented research.

  13. Evaluating Multidisciplinary Child Abuse and Neglect Teams: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalayants, Marina; Epstein, Irwin

    2005-01-01

    A review of child welfare research literature reveals that although multidisciplinary teams are increasingly used to investigate and intervene in child abuse and neglect cases, the field does not know enough about their structural variations, implementation processes, or effectiveness. Moreover, although articles advocating multidisciplinary teams…

  14. Making Science Teams Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    2004-01-01

    Science teachers, likely have more experience with students working together than teachers in any other subject area due to teaming students for hands-on activities. While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, getting teams to actually work-meaning getting students to share equally in the academic…

  15. Making Science Teams Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Roxanne Greitz

    2004-01-01

    Science teachers, likely have more experience with students working together than teachers in any other subject area due to teaming students for hands-on activities. While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, getting teams to actually work-meaning getting students to share equally in the academic

  16. Assessing and evaluating multidisciplinary translational teams: a mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Kevin C; Rose, Robert M; Ostir, Glenn V; Calhoun, William J; Ameredes, Bill T; Brasier, Allan R

    2014-03-01

    A case report illustrates how multidisciplinary translational teams can be assessed using outcome, process, and developmental types of evaluation using a mixed-methods approach. Types of evaluation appropriate for teams are considered in relation to relevant research questions and assessment methods. Logic models are applied to scientific projects and team development to inform choices between methods within a mixed-methods design. Use of an expert panel is reviewed, culminating in consensus ratings of 11 multidisciplinary teams and a final evaluation within a team-type taxonomy. Based on team maturation and scientific progress, teams were designated as (a) early in development, (b) traditional, (c) process focused, or (d) exemplary. Lessons learned from data reduction, use of mixed methods, and use of expert panels are explored. PMID:24064432

  17. Assessing and Evaluating Multidisciplinary Translational Teams: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Rose, Robert M.; Ostir, Glenn V.; Calhoun, William J.; Ameredes, Bill T.; Brasier, Allan R.

    2014-01-01

    A case report illustrates how multidisciplinary translational teams can be assessed using outcome, process, and developmental types of evaluation using a mixed methods approach. Types of evaluation appropriate for teams are considered in relation to relevant research questions and assessment methods. Logic models are applied to scientific projects and team development to inform choices between methods within a mixed methods design. Use of an expert panel is reviewed, culminating in consensus ratings of 11 multidisciplinary teams and a final evaluation within a team type taxonomy. Based on team maturation and scientific progress, teams were designated as: a) early in development, b) traditional, c) process focused, or d) exemplary. Lessons learned from data reduction, use of mixed methods, and use of expert panels are explored. PMID:24064432

  18. Charting Multidisciplinary Team External Dynamics Using a Systems Thinking Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Waszak, Martin R.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Using the formalism provided by the Systems Thinking approach, the dynamics present when operating multidisciplinary teams are examined in the context of the NASA Langley Research and Technology Group, an R&D organization organized along functional lines. The paper focuses on external dynamics and examines how an organization creates and nurtures the teams and how it disseminates and retains the lessons and expertise created by the multidisciplinary activities. Key variables are selected and the causal relationships between the variables are identified. Five "stories" are told, each of which touches on a different aspect of the dynamics. The Systems Thinking Approach provides recommendations as to interventions that will facilitate the introduction of multidisciplinary teams and that therefore will increase the likelihood of performing successful multidisciplinary developments. These interventions can be carried out either by individual researchers, line management or program management.

  19. The interplay of conflict and analogy in multidisciplinary teams.

    PubMed

    Paletz, Susannah B F; Schunn, Christian D; Kim, Kevin H

    2013-01-01

    Creative teamwork in multidisciplinary teams is a topic of interest to cognitive psychologists on the one hand, and to both social and organizational psychologists on the other. However, the interconnections between cognitive and social layers have been rarely explored. Drawing on mental models and dissonance theories, the current study takes a central variable studied by cognitive psychologists-analogy-and examines its relationship to a central variable examined by social psychologists-conflict. In an observational, field study, over 11h of audio-video data from conversations of the Mars Exploration Rover scientists were coded for different types of analogy and micro-conflicts that reveal the character of underlying psychological mechanisms. Two different types of time-lagged logistic models applied to these data revealed asymmetric patterns of associations between analogy and conflict. Within-domain analogies, but not within-discipline or outside-discipline analogies, preceded science and work process conflicts, suggesting that in multidisciplinary teams, representational gaps in very close domains will be more likely to spark conflict. But analogies also occurred in reaction to conflict: Process and negative conflicts, but not task conflicts, preceded within-discipline analogies, but not to within-domain or outside-discipline analogies. This study demonstrates ways in which cognition can be bidirectionally tied to social processes and discourse. PMID:22980920

  20. Reflections on Knowledge Brokering within a Multidisciplinary Research Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, Robin; Porter, Geoffrey A.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge brokering (KB) may be one approach of helping researchers and decision makers effectively communicate their needs and abilities, and move toward increased use of evidence in health care. A multidisciplinary research team in Nova Scotia, Canada, has created a dedicated KB position with the goal of improving access to quality colorectal

  1. Reflections on Knowledge Brokering within a Multidisciplinary Research Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, Robin; Porter, Geoffrey A.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge brokering (KB) may be one approach of helping researchers and decision makers effectively communicate their needs and abilities, and move toward increased use of evidence in health care. A multidisciplinary research team in Nova Scotia, Canada, has created a dedicated KB position with the goal of improving access to quality colorectal…

  2. The Interplay of Conflict and Analogy in Multidisciplinary Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paletz, Susannah B. F.; Schunn, Christian D.; Kim, Kevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Creative teamwork in multidisciplinary teams is a topic of interest to cognitive psychologists on the one hand, and to both social and organizational psychologists on the other. However, the interconnections between cognitive and social layers have been rarely explored. Drawing on mental models and dissonance theories, the current study takes a

  3. The Interplay of Conflict and Analogy in Multidisciplinary Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paletz, Susannah B. F.; Schunn, Christian D.; Kim, Kevin H.

    2013-01-01

    Creative teamwork in multidisciplinary teams is a topic of interest to cognitive psychologists on the one hand, and to both social and organizational psychologists on the other. However, the interconnections between cognitive and social layers have been rarely explored. Drawing on mental models and dissonance theories, the current study takes a…

  4. Heterogeneity and Work Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyaram, Lata; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper attempts to extend and contribute to the domestic diversity literature by presenting a comprehensive model that takes into consideration the Indian work set up. It proposes to examine the effects of the composition of information systems development teams in Indian firms. Besides the conventional demographics which were studied

  5. Randomized controlled trial of Anticipatory and Preventive multidisciplinary Team Care

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Dahrouge, Simone; Liddy, Clare; Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Legault, Frances; Dalziel, Bill; Zhang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE T o examine whether quality of care (QOC) improves when nurse practitioners and pharmacists work with family physicians in community practice and focus their work on patients who are 50 years of age and older and considered to be at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes. DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. SETTING A family health network with 8 family physicians, 5 nurses, and 11 administrative personnel serving 10 000 patients in a rural area near Ottawa, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Patients 50 years of age and older at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes (N = 241). INTERVENTIONS At-risk patients were randomly assigned to receive usual care from their family physicians or Anticipatory and Preventive Team Care (APTCare) from a collaborative team composed of their physicians, 1 of 3 nurse practitioners, and a pharmacist. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of care for chronic disease management (CDM) for diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. RESULTS Controlling for baseline demographic characteristics, the APTCare approach improved CDM QOC by 9.2% (P < .001) compared with traditional care. The APTCare intervention also improved preventive care by 16.5% (P < .001). We did not observe significant differences in other secondary outcome measures (intermediate clinical outcomes, quality of life [Short-Form 36 and health-related quality of life scales], functional status [instrumental activities of daily living scale] and service usage). CONCLUSION Additional resources in the form of collaborative multidisciplinary care teams with intensive interventions in primary care can improve QOC for CDM in a population of older at-risk patients. The appropriateness of this intervention will depend on its cost-effectiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT00238836 (CONSORT) PMID:20008582

  6. Predictors of Team Work Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlyn-Harris, James H.; Hurst, Barbara J.; von Baggo, Karola; Bayley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to work in teams is an attribute highly valued by employers of information technology (IT) graduates. For IT students to effectively engage in team work tasks, the process of working in teams should be satisfying for the students. This work explored whether university students who were involved in compulsory team work were satisfied…

  7. Predictors of Team Work Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlyn-Harris, James H.; Hurst, Barbara J.; von Baggo, Karola; Bayley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-01

    The ability to work in teams is an attribute highly valued by employers of information technology (IT) graduates. For IT students to effectively engage in team work tasks, the process of working in teams should be satisfying for the students. This work explored whether university students who were involved in compulsory team work were satisfied

  8. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

  9. A multidisciplinary team approach to increasing AV fistula creation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vo D; Griffith, Chris; Treat, Lynn

    2003-06-01

    Despite high patient comorbid factors, our Renal Care [table: see text] Group program was able to totally eliminate placement of AV grafts and to use only fistulae with an acceptable rate of catheter use--all within four years' time. This demonstrated the importance and value of a multidisciplinary vascular access team. Organization was the key element. All the team members were already in place prior to 1996, but they were not focused on vascular access and lacked education in this area. With the nephrologist not trained in fistula creation and not involved in that process, the absence of leadership led to a high number of dialysis grafts and catheters and frequent thrombotic and infectious complications. The nephrologist must assume the team leadership since he or she is the only provider who can interact with all other team members (see Table 3, p. 60). It is recommended that each nephrology group select a lead nephrologist to begin the team-building process (see Table 4, p. 60). A checklist (see Table 5) should be maintained for each pre-dialysis or dialysis patient as documentation for vein mapping and a surgical plan. This will make preoperative vein mapping mandatory for every patient. Education is important at all levels of the multidisciplinary team. This training effort should be started during nephrology fellowship, surgery and radiology residency, dialysis staff education programs, and renal networks. In 2002, the NW Renal Network led the way with fistula creation seminars, focusing on practicing nephrologists, surgeons, radiologists, and dialysis caregivers. The result of this Vascular Access Quality Improvement Program is pending. PMID:12847963

  10. Team Teaching Will Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engman, Leila

    Research has indicated that teachers are willing to be involved and are capable of being involved in instructional development. According to Kingham and Benham, team teaching has failed in the past due to three causes: a) no planning time, b) personality clashes, and c) inability to integrate the material. To solve these three problems, one can

  11. Team Teaching Will Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engman, Leila

    Research has indicated that teachers are willing to be involved and are capable of being involved in instructional development. According to Kingham and Benham, team teaching has failed in the past due to three causes: a) no planning time, b) personality clashes, and c) inability to integrate the material. To solve these three problems, one can…

  12. Improving recovery time following heart transplantation: the role of the multidisciplinary health care team

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, Maureen G; Gorham, Noreen; Wilson, Lynn; Mangi, Abeel A

    2013-01-01

    Background The care of cardiac transplant patients is complex requiring a finely orchestrated endeavor to save a patients life. Given the chronic and complex nature of these patients, multiple disciplines are involved in their care. Recognizing difficulties with communication among team members and striving for improved efficiencies in our pretransplant listing process and in our inpatient care, our team was prompted to change the existing approach to patient care related to heart transplantation. Methods Daily multidisciplinary rounds were instituted and the format of the weekly Multidisciplinary Review Committee (MDRC) meetings was modified with the list of attendees broadened to include a larger interdisciplinary team. Additionally, the approach to patient care was analyzed for process improvement. Results The quality improvements are improved communication and throughput, quantified in an 85% decrease in time to complete transplant evaluation, a 37% decrease in median length of stay posttransplantation, and a 33% reduction in the 30 day readmission rate. In addition, pre- and posttransplant caregivers now participate in MDRC in person or via an electronic meeting platform to support the continuum of care. Quality metrics were chosen and tracked via a transparent electronic platform allowing all involved to assess progress toward agreed upon goals. These were achieved in an 18 month time period following the recruitment of new leadership and invested team members working together as a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of cardiac transplant care. Discussion: Implementation of daily multidisciplinary rounds and expansion of the attendees for the MDRC meetings improved care related to heart transplantation. PMID:24009423

  13. Teams make it work: how team work engagement mediates between social resources and performance in teams.

    PubMed

    Torrente, Pedro; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

    2012-02-01

    In this study we analyze the mediating role of team work engagement between team social resources (i.e., supportive team climate, coordination, teamwork), and team performance (i.e., in-role and extra-role performance) as predicted by the Job Demands-Resources Model. Aggregated data of 533 employees nested within 62 teams and 13 organizations were used, whereas team performance was assessed by supervisor ratings. Structural equation modeling revealed that, as expected, team work engagement plays a mediating role between social resources perceived at the team level and team performance as assessed by the supervisor. PMID:22269372

  14. From misery to mission: forensic social workers on multidisciplinary mitigation teams.

    PubMed

    Guin, Cecile C; Noble, Dorinda N; Merrill, Thomas S

    2003-07-01

    Social workers are well-equipped by experience and education to play a pivotal role in death penalty mitigation teams. They offer expertise in researching complete social histories, providing for people under threat of execution, and helping those individuals cope with that threat. The social worker's primary role is to develop the client's story through an extensive empirical inquiry into the person's life. An equally important role for social workers is to work with the multidisciplinary defense team to ensure that the client's life story becomes a part of the defense. This article, through a case example of a condemned prisoner, examines the mitigation team concept, focusing on the social work role. PMID:12899283

  15. Multidisciplinary Team Costs for a Rural Model Early Childhood-Exceptional Educational Needs Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Nancy

    1980-01-01

    The article outlines the cooperative educational service agency (CESA) preschool multidisciplinary team (M-Team) processing cost as defined in the "Rules Implementing Subchapter IV of Chapter 115, Wisconsin Statutes." Eight steps of the M-Team process are itemized including diagnostic evaluation, M-Team staffing, and receipt of parental approval.

  16. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  17. Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries.

    PubMed

    Silbermann, M; Pitsillides, B; Al-Alfi, N; Omran, S; Al-Jabri, K; Elshamy, K; Ghrayeb, I; Livneh, J; Daher, M; Charalambous, H; Jafferri, A; Fink, R; El-Shamy, M

    2013-10-01

    This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists. PMID:24001762

  18. Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries

    PubMed Central

    Silbermann, M.; Pitsillides, B.; Al-Alfi, N.; Omran, S.; Al-Jabri, K.; Elshamy, K.; Ghrayeb, I.; Livneh, J.; Daher, M.; Charalambous, H.; Jafferri, A.; Fink, R.; El-Shamy, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists. PMID:24001762

  19. Medical Team Training: Using Simulation as a Teaching Strategy for Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Michael R.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Described is an innovative approach currently being used to inspire group work, specifically a medical team training model, referred to as The Simulation Model, which includes as its major components: (1) Prior Training in Group Work of Medical Team Members; (2) Simulation in Teams or Groups; (3) Multidisciplinary Teamwork; (4) Team Leader…

  20. Medical Team Training: Using Simulation as a Teaching Strategy for Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Michael R.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Described is an innovative approach currently being used to inspire group work, specifically a medical team training model, referred to as The Simulation Model, which includes as its major components: (1) Prior Training in Group Work of Medical Team Members; (2) Simulation in Teams or Groups; (3) Multidisciplinary Teamwork; (4) Team Leader

  1. Improving post-stroke recovery: the role of the multidisciplinary health care team

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, David J; Forster, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability, the effects of which may be prolonged with physical, emotional, social, and financial consequences not only for those affected but also for their family and friends. Evidence for the effectiveness of stroke unit care and the benefits of thrombolysis have transformed treatment for people after stroke. Previously viewed nihilistically, stroke is now seen as a medical emergency with clear evidence-based care pathways from hospital admission to discharge. However, stroke remains a complex clinical condition that requires health professionals to work together to bring to bear their collective knowledge and specialist skills for the benefit of stroke survivors. Multidisciplinary team working is regarded as fundamental to delivering effective care across the stroke pathway. This paper discusses the contribution of team working in improving recovery at key points in the post-stroke pathway. PMID:26445548

  2. Improving post-stroke recovery: the role of the multidisciplinary health care team.

    PubMed

    Clarke, David J; Forster, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability, the effects of which may be prolonged with physical, emotional, social, and financial consequences not only for those affected but also for their family and friends. Evidence for the effectiveness of stroke unit care and the benefits of thrombolysis have transformed treatment for people after stroke. Previously viewed nihilistically, stroke is now seen as a medical emergency with clear evidence-based care pathways from hospital admission to discharge. However, stroke remains a complex clinical condition that requires health professionals to work together to bring to bear their collective knowledge and specialist skills for the benefit of stroke survivors. Multidisciplinary team working is regarded as fundamental to delivering effective care across the stroke pathway. This paper discusses the contribution of team working in improving recovery at key points in the post-stroke pathway. PMID:26445548

  3. Learning geomicrobiology as a team using microbial mats, a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Casillas-Martinez, Lilliam; Visscher, Pieter T

    2007-01-01

    Microbial mats are one of the best suited laminar organo-sedimentary ecosystems for students from different educational backgrounds to visualize the direct relationship between microbes and minerals. We have used tropical hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico as educational tools to promote active learning of geomicrobiology introductory concepts for undergraduate students organized in multidisciplinary teams with biological and geological backgrounds. Besides field trips and independent research projects focused on microbial mats, four intensive workshops and one capstone activity were designed to expose students to the different geomicrobiology subdisciplines (microbiology, molecular biology, geology, and geochemistry). The teaching-learning process was assessed using pre- and posttests, group discussions, activities including Gallery Walks and exquisite cadaver's, case studies, and focal interviews. While the posttest showed a significant difference in conceptual understanding, the Gallery Walk and the capstone activities demonstrated increase in the depth, coherence, and thoughtfulness in answering questions, including a clear integration of the different subdisciplines during their presentations. Finally, the main themes described by the students as important outcomes of their participation in the Research at Undergraduate Institutions: Microbial Observatory (RUI-MO) program were: (i) the opportunity to study and learn new and different science disciplines, (ii) the microbial mats were excellent tools to learn from and integrate different science disciplines, and (iii) working in multidisciplinary teams gave them the opportunity to learn from their peers' discipline backgrounds. To our knowledge this is the first educational initiative that uses tropical hypersaline microbial mats to teach geomicrobiology in a multidisciplinary fashion. PMID:23653817

  4. In Absentia: An Exploratory Study of How Patients Are Considered in Multidisciplinary Cancer Team Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Hahlweg, Pola; Hoffmann, Jana; Härter, Martin; Frosch, Dominick L; Elwyn, Glyn; Scholl, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary team meetings and shared decision-making are potential means of delivering patient-centred care. Not much is known about how those two paradigms fit together in cancer care. This study aimed to investigate how decisions are made in multidisciplinary team meetings and whether patient perspectives are incorporated in these decisions. Materials and Methods A qualitative study was conducted using non-participant observation at multidisciplinary team meetings (also called tumor boards) at the University Cancer Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. Two researchers recorded structured field notes from a total of N = 15 multidisciplinary team meetings. Data were analyzed using content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results Physicians mainly exchanged medical information and based their decision-making on this information. Individual patient characteristics or their treatment preferences were rarely considered or discussed. In the few cases where patient preferences were raised as a topic, this information did not seem to be taken into account in decision-making processes about treatment recommendations. Conclusion The processes in multidisciplinary team meetings we observed did not exhibit shared decision-making. Patient perspectives were absent. If multidisciplinary team meetings wish to become more patient-centred they will have to modify their processes and find a way to include patient preferences into the decision-making process. PMID:26441328

  5. Invisible walls within multidisciplinary teams: Disciplinary boundaries and their effects on integrated care.

    PubMed

    Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Gorli, Mara; Scaratti, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Delivery of interdisciplinary integrated care is central to contemporary health policy. Hospitals worldwide are therefore attempting to move away from a functional organisation of care, built around discipline-based specialisation, towards an approach of delivering care through multidisciplinary teams. However, the mere existence of such teams may not guarantee integrated and collaborative work across medical disciplines, which can be hindered by boundaries between and within professions. This paper analyses the boundaries that affect collaboration and care integration in newly created multidisciplinary teams. Empirical data are drawn from an ethnographic research conducted in the sub-intensive stroke unit of an Italian public hospital. Data collection involved 180 h of observations and conversations with 42 healthcare providers. Findings show that disciplinary boundaries hinder both intra-professional and inter-professional collaboration. Doctors from different disciplines adopt different, and sometimes conflicting, clinical approaches, doctors and nurses construct discipline-specific professional identities, and conflicts emerge between doctors and nurses from different disciplines over the regulation of the medical-nursing boundary. Achieving collaboration and integration between professionals from different disciplines may be particularly challenging when the group with less institutional power (nurses, in this case) has developed a high level of expertise on the needs of the patients targeted by the team. Effective interdisciplinary work thus requires not only bridging boundaries within the medical professional group, but also addressing the dynamics of resistance in merging doctors and nurses with different disciplinary backgrounds. In the paper, we summarise these results in a framework that contributes knowledge to the field of professional boundaries in healthcare while offering practical insights to forge new interdisciplinary relationships, which are more embedded in the daily experience of care providers. PMID:26730879

  6. [Nurses' participation in the development of a multidisciplinary team for chronic and terminal patients].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H E; Guitierrez, B A

    1997-08-01

    Since long ago the nurse has become more concerned about the delivery of care for patients with chronic and degeneratives diseases. Nevertheless, the accomplishment of this task is not an easy one. Moreover, when the patient reaches the final stage. Usually this patient experiences emotional and physical alteration. The family is deeply involved in this process and generally they seek nurses help because they are the closest ones to the patient and his/her family. When the patient go trough this dramatic acute change in health condition or in face of chronic degenerative or final stage disease is made, the relationship with the family becomes more difficult demanding nursing intervention. The objective of this study is to report the experience of nurse's participation in the implantation and development of multidisciplinary group for treatment of chronical and final stage patients. This group has been working for two years and has had good results. This group has worked treatment schemes for treatment used by all members of multidisciplinary team. From previous experiences, we knew that there is always a discrepancy between the information given by professional and friends and relatives ones. Which could increase fear and anxiety the reassurance given by the health team, a fair distribution of tasks and the information delivery to the patient proved to be successful. PMID:9369758

  7. The CTSA as an Exemplar Framework for Developing Multidisciplinary Translational Teams

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, William J.; Wooten, Kevin; Bhavnani, Suresh; Anderson, Karl E.; Freeman, Jean; Brasier, Allan R.

    2013-01-01

    Translational science requires that scientists from multiple disciplines work together to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. Although a literature exists on the design and management of multidisciplinary teams, little has been written on multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs). MTTs are distinct hybrid entities, with goals taken from both industry and academic models. We identified 30 design factors in 10 domains from a literature survey relevant to our MTT model: specific goals, structures, and processes. These dimensions were adapted to our own institutional environment in the selection and management of 11 MTTs that exploited resources of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA). Case illustrations of two specific MTTs illustrate some of the challenges encountered and opportunities realized in terms of education and scientific advances. Network depiction of disciplinarity indicated that CTSA KRs and CTSA leadership contributed to discipline diversity especially in small (or nascent) MTTs. A separate depiction of MTT-KR utilization indicated that data analysis, translational technologies, and novel methods were heavily utilized by MTTs, whereas other KRs contributed significant effort to infrastructure development. We conclude that the CTSA can provide a rich infrastructural framework and scientific environment for the development of successful MTTs. PMID:23399092

  8. [Prader-Willi syndrome: specific management by a multidisciplinary team].

    PubMed

    Salmon, C; Gaillez, S; Pieltain, C; Sacré, F; Misson, J P; Rocour-Brumioul, D; Bourguignon, J P; Lebrethon, M C

    2006-01-01

    Prader Willi syndrome can be viewed as a physiopathological model of obesity. Such patients deserve specific management, preferably in a multidisciplinary setting. The paper reports on 6 patients followed in the paediatric endocrine service at the University of Liege. PMID:17020234

  9. Employee Knowledge Sharing in Work Teams: Effects of Team Diversity, Emergent States, and Team Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noh, Jae Hang

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge sharing in work teams is one of the critical team processes. Without sharing of knowledge, work teams and organizations may not be able to fully utilize the diverse knowledge brought into work teams by their members. The purpose of this study was to investigate antecedents and underlying mechanisms influencing the extent to which team

  10. The Organization of Multidisciplinary Care Teams: Modeling Internal and External Influences on Cancer Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu Das, Irene; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care. PMID:20386055

  11. Organizing person-centred care in paediatric diabetes: multidisciplinary teams, long-term relationships and adequate documentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes is one of the most frequent long-term endocrine childhood disorders and the Swedish National Diabetes Register for children states that adolescents (1218 years) constitute the most vulnerable patient group in terms of metabolic control. The aim of this study was to examine how a multidisciplinary team functions when caring for adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods Qualitative interviews were performed with 17 health professionals at a Paediatric Diabetes Care Unit in a Swedish university hospital. The interviews were analysed to gain insight into a multidisciplinary care teams experiences of various organizational processes and circumstances related to the provision of person-centred paediatric diabetes care. Results Building long-term relationships with adolescents, the establishment of a multidisciplinary care team and ensuring adequate documentation are vital for the delivery of person-centred care (PCC). Furthermore, a PCC process and/or practice requires more than the mere expression of person-centred values. The contribution of this study is that it highlights the necessity of facilitating and safeguarding the organization of PCC, for which three processes are central: 1. Facilitating long-term relationships with adolescents and their families; 2. Facilitating multi-professional teamwork; and 3. Ensuring adequate documentation. Conclusion Three processes emerged as important for the functioning of the multidisciplinary team when caring for adolescents with type 1 diabetes: building a long-term relationship, integrating knowledge by means of multidisciplinary team work and ensuring adequate documentation. This study demonstrates the importance of clearly defining and making use of the specific role of each team member in the paediatric diabetes care unit (PDCU). Team members should receive training in PCC and a PCC approach should form the foundation of all diabetes care. Every adolescent suffering from type 1 diabetes should be offered individual treatment and support according to her/his needs. However, more research is required to determine how a PCC approach can be integrated into adolescent diabetes care, and especially how PCC education programmes for team members should be implemented. PMID:24490659

  12. Employee Knowledge Sharing in Work Teams: Effects of Team Diversity, Emergent States, and Team Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noh, Jae Hang

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge sharing in work teams is one of the critical team processes. Without sharing of knowledge, work teams and organizations may not be able to fully utilize the diverse knowledge brought into work teams by their members. The purpose of this study was to investigate antecedents and underlying mechanisms influencing the extent to which team…

  13. Psychopathological aspects of kidney transplantation: Efficacy of a multidisciplinary team

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Concetta; Veroux, Massimiliano; Indelicato, Luisa; Sinagra, Nunzia; Giaquinta, Alessia; Fornaro, Michele; Veroux, Pierfrancesco; Pistorio, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    Renal transplantation is a well established treatment for end-stage renal disease, allowing most patients to return to a satisfactory quality of life. Studies have identified many problems that may affect adaptation to the transplanted condition and post-operative compliance. The psychological implications of transplantation have important consequences even on strictly physical aspects. Organ transplantation is very challenging for the patient and acts as an intense stressor stimulus to which the patient reacts with neurotransmitter and endocrine-metabolic changes. Transplantation can result in a psychosomatic crisis that requires the patient to mobilize all bio-psycho-social resources during the process of adaptation to the new foreign organ which may result in an alteration in self-representation and identity, with possible psychopathologic repercussions. These reactions are feasible in mental disorders, e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder, and psychosomatic disorders. In organ transplantation, the fruitful collaboration between professionals with diverse scientific expertise, calls for both a guarantee for mental health and greater effectiveness in challenging treatments for a viable association between patients, family members and doctors. Integrated and multidisciplinary care should include uniform criteria and procedures for standard assessments, for patient autonomy, adherence to therapy, new coping strategies and the adoption of more appropriate lifestyles. PMID:25540735

  14. The MUSES Satellite Team and Multidisciplinary System Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, John C.; Paiz, Alfred R.; Young, Donald L.

    1997-01-01

    In a unique partnership between three minority-serving institutions and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a new course sequence, including a multidisciplinary capstone design experience, is to be developed and implemented at each of the schools with the ambitious goal of designing, constructing and launching a low-orbit Earth-resources satellite. The three universities involved are North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T), University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP), and California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA). The schools form a consortium collectively known as MUSES - Minority Universities System Engineering and Satellite. Four aspects of this project make it unique: (1) Including all engineering disciplines in the capstone design course, (2) designing, building and launching an Earth-resources satellite, (3) sustaining the partnership between the three schools to achieve this goal, and (4) implementing systems engineering pedagogy at each of the three schools. This paper will describe the partnership and its goals, the first design of the satellite, the courses developed at NCA&T, and the implementation plan for the course sequence.

  15. A Multidisciplinary, Hospital-Based Team for Child Abuse Cases: A "Hands-on" Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitworth, Jay M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a hospital-based program for providing consultation to persons who provide direct services in child abuse/neglect cases. Conceptual issues in multidisciplinary team formation and involvement are discussed. Some topics mentioned are types of service, follow-up, educational components, and long-term involvement with families. (DB)

  16. Undergraduate Students' Self-Efficacy and Cognitive Behaviors for Learning in Multidisciplinary Project Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate individual students' learning from the perspectives of self-efficacy and cognitive learning expressions in multidisciplinary project teams. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected to address the major research questions, which are aimed at understanding individual students'…

  17. Vascular Imaging: The Evolving Role of the Multidisciplinary Team Meeting in Peripheral Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew; Roditi, Giles

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the importance of preinterventional cross-sectional imaging in the evaluation of peripheral arterial disease, as well as discussing the pros and cons of each imaging modality. The importance of a multidisciplinary team approach is emphasized. PMID:25435657

  18. Evolution of Multidisciplinary Translational Teams (MTTs): Insights for Accelerating Translational Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Kevin C.; Calhoun, William J.; Bhavnani, Suresh; Rose, Robert M.; Ameredes, Bill; Brasier, Allan R.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing consensus about the factors critical for development and productivity of multidisciplinary teams, but few studies have evaluated their longitudinal changes. We present a longitudinal study of 10 multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs), based on team process and outcome measures, evaluated before and after 3 years of CTSA collaboration. Using a mixed methods approach, an expert panel of five judges (familiar with the progress of the teams) independently rated team performance based on four process and four outcome measures, and achieved a rating consensus. Although all teams made progress in translational domains, other process and outcome measures were highly variable. The trajectory profiles identified four categories of team performance. Objective bibliometric analysis of CTSA-supported MTTs with positive growth in process scores showed that these teams tended to have enhanced scientific outcomes and published in new scientific domains, indicating the conduct of innovative science. Case exemplars revealed that MTTs that experienced growth in both process and outcome evaluative criteria also experienced greater innovation, defined as publications in different areas of science. Of the eight evaluative criteria, leadership-related behaviors were the most resistant to the interventions introduced. Well-managed MTTs demonstrate objective productivity and facilitate innovation. PMID:25801998

  19. Evolution of Multidisciplinary Translational Teams (MTTs): Insights for Accelerating Translational Innovations.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Kevin C; Calhoun, William J; Bhavnani, Suresh; Rose, Robert M; Ameredes, Bill; Brasier, Allan R

    2015-10-01

    There is growing consensus about the factors critical for development and productivity of multidisciplinary teams, but few studies have evaluated their longitudinal changes. We present a longitudinal study of 10 multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs), based on team process and outcome measures, evaluated before and after 3 years of CTSA collaboration. Using a mixed methods approach, an expert panel of five judges (familiar with the progress of the teams) independently rated team performance based on four process and four outcome measures, and achieved a rating consensus. Although all teams made progress in translational domains, other process and outcome measures were highly variable. The trajectory profiles identified four categories of team performance. Objective bibliometric analysis of CTSA-supported MTTs with positive growth in process scores showed that these teams tended to have enhanced scientific outcomes and published in new scientific domains, indicating the conduct of innovative science. Case exemplars revealed that MTTs that experienced growth in both process and outcome evaluative criteria also experienced greater innovation, defined as publications in different areas of science. Of the eight evaluative criteria, leadership-related behaviors were the most resistant to the interventions introduced. Well-managed MTTs demonstrate objective productivity and facilitate innovation. PMID:25801998

  20. The Workings of a Multicultural Research Team

    PubMed Central

    Friedemann, Marie-Luise; Pagan-Coss, Harald; Mayorga, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Transcultural nurse researchers are exposed to the challenges of developing and maintaining a multiethnic team. With the example of a multicultural research study of family caregivers conducted in the Miami-Dade area, the authors guide the readers through steps of developing a culturally competent and effective team. Design Pointing out challenges and successes, the authors illustrate team processes and successful strategies relative to recruitment of qualified members, training and team maintenance, and evaluation of team effectiveness. Method With relevant concepts from the literature applied to practical examples, the authors demonstrate how cultural team competence grows in a supportive work environment. PMID:18390824

  1. Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes. Method This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary team work, and the perceptions of over 253 staff from 11 community rehabilitation and intermediate care teams in the UK. These data sources were merged using qualitative content analysis to arrive at a framework that identifies characteristics and proposes ten competencies that support effective interdisciplinary team work. Results Ten characteristics underpinning effective interdisciplinary team work were identified: positive leadership and management attributes; communication strategies and structures; personal rewards, training and development; appropriate resources and procedures; appropriate skill mix; supportive team climate; individual characteristics that support interdisciplinary team work; clarity of vision; quality and outcomes of care; and respecting and understanding roles. Conclusions We propose competency statements that an effective interdisciplinary team functioning at a high level should demonstrate. PMID:23663329

  2. Harnessing Team Work. Close Call.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Experienced teams competing in multiple adventure activities, several of which involved ropes, kept their harnesses on all day. Safety procedures included an initial check of buckles and harnesses by an instructor, but failed to recognize that participants would remove their harnesses for toilet purposes. Lists other possible safety errors for

  3. Geophysics in the multidisciplinary reservoir description team: The RAZOR Project, Prudhoe Bay unit, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.; Natenstedt, C.; Wiener, R.; Montague, S.; Clippard, M.; Gallagher, P.; Vralsted, D.; Romine, K.

    1994-12-31

    The RAZOR Project was a multi-disciplinary multi-company team formed to provide a detailed geologic description of the Lower Ivishak reservoir in support of comprehensive reservoir management efforts. Interpreting and mapping multiple stratigraphic horizons, interpreting and tying faults in three dimensions,and detailed integration with sequence stratigraphy resulted in an improved understanding of reservoir architecture. The overall impact has been to achieve a more proactive and effective integration of geoscience products into the reservoir management process.

  4. Multidisciplinary teams of case managers in the implementation of an innovative integrated services delivery for the elderly in France

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The case management process is now well defined, and teams of case managers have been implemented in integrated services delivery. However, little is known about the role played by the team of case managers and the value in having multidisciplinary case management teams. The objectives were to develop a fuller understanding of the role played by the case manager team and identify the value of inter-professional collaboration in multidisciplinary teams during the implementation of an innovative integrated service in France. Methods We conducted a qualitative study with focus groups comprising 14 multidisciplinary teams for a total of 59 case managers, six months after their recruitment to the MAIA program (Maison Autonomie Integration Alzheimer). Results Most of the case managers saw themselves as being part of a team of case managers (91.5%). Case management teams help case managers develop a comprehensive understanding of the integration concept, meet the complex needs of elderly people and change their professional practices. Multidisciplinary case management teams add value by helping case managers move from theory to practice, by encouraging them develop a comprehensive clinical vision, and by initiating the interdisciplinary approach. Conclusions The multidisciplinary team of case managers is central to the implementation of case management and helps case managers develop their new role and a core inter-professional competency. PMID:24708721

  5. OUTCOME OF IMPLEMENTATION OF A MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAM APPROACH TO THE CARE OF PATIENTS AFTER TRANSSPHENOIDAL SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Carminucci, Arthur S.; Ausiello, John C.; Page-Wilson, Gabrielle; Lee, Michelle; Good, Laura; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Freda, Pamela U.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transsphenoidal surgery (TS) for sellar lesions is an established and safe procedure, but complications can occur, particularly involving the neuroendocrine system. We hypothesized that postoperative care of TS patients would be optimized when performed by a coordinated team including a pituitary neurosurgeon, endocrinologists, and a specialty nurse. Methods We implemented a formalized, multidisciplinary team approach and standardized postoperative protocols for the care of adult patients undergoing TS by a single surgeon (J.N.B.) at our institution beginning in July 2009. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of 214 consecutive TS-treated cases: 113 cases prior to and 101 following the initiation of the team approach and protocol implementation. Outcomes assessed included the incidence of neurosurgical and endocrine complications, length of stay (LOS), and rates of hospital readmission and unscheduled clinical visits. Results The median LOS decreased from 3 days preteam to 2 days postteam (P<.01). Discharge occurred on postoperative day 2 in 46% of the preteam group patients compared to 69% of the postteam group (P<.01). Rates of early postoperative diabetes insipidus (DI) and readmissions within 30 days for syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or other complications did not differ between groups. Conclusion Implementation of a multidisciplinary team approach was associated with a reduction of LOS. Despite earlier discharge, postoperative outcomes were not compromised. The endocrinologist is central to the success of this team approach, which could be successfully applied to care of patients undergoing TS, as well as other types of endocrine surgery at other centers. PMID:26437216

  6. The Multidisciplinary Translational Team (MTT) Model for Training and Development of Translational Research Investigators.

    PubMed

    Ameredes, Bill T; Hellmich, Mark R; Cestone, Christina M; Wooten, Kevin C; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Anderson, Karl E; Brasier, Allan R

    2015-10-01

    Multiinstitutional research collaborations now form the most rapid and productive project execution structures in the health sciences. Effective adoption of a multidisciplinary team research approach is widely accepted as one mechanism enabling rapid translation of new discoveries into interventions in human health. Although the impact of successful team-based approaches facilitating innovation has been well-documented, its utility for training a new generation of scientists has not been thoroughly investigated. We describe the characteristics of how multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs) promote career development of translational research scholars through competency building, interprofessional integration, and team-based mentoring approaches. Exploratory longitudinal and outcome assessments from our experience show that MTT membership had a positive effect on the development of translational research competencies, as determined by a self-report survey of 32 scholars. We also observed that all trainees produced a large number of collaborative publications that appeared to be associated with their CTSA association and participation with MTTs. We conclude that the MTT model provides a unique training environment for translational and team-based learning activities, for investigators at early stages of career development. PMID:26010046

  7. Multidisciplinary Team Approach for Identifying Potential Candidate for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Jin; Ko, Young-Guk; Choi, Donghoon; Hong, Geu-Ru; Shim, Jae-Kwang; Kwak, Young-Lan; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung-Chul; Jang, Yangsoo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We sought to evaluate the clinical usefulness of decision making by a multidisciplinary heart team for identifying potential candidates for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. Materials and Methods The multidisciplinary team consisted of two interventional cardiologists, two cardiovascular surgeons, one cardiac imaging specialist, and two cardiac anesthesiologists. Results Out of 60 patients who were screened as potential TAVI candidates, 31 patients were initially recommended as appropriate for TAVI, and 20 of these 31 eventually underwent TAVI. Twenty-two patients underwent surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR), and 17 patients received only medical treatment. Patients who underwent TAVI and medical therapy were older than those who underwent surgical AVR (p<0.001). The logistic Euroscore was significantly highest in the TAVI group and lowest in the surgical AVR group (p=0.012). Most patients in the TAVI group (90%) and the surgical AVR group (91%) had severe cardiac symptoms, but only 47% in the medical therapy group had severe symptoms. The cumulative percentages of survival without re-hospitalization or all-cause death at 6 months for the surgical AVR, TAVI, and medical therapy groups were 84%, 75%, and 28%, respectively (p=0.007, by log-rank). Conclusion TAVI was recommended in half of the potential candidates following a multidisciplinary team approach and was eventually performed in one-third of these patients. One-third of the patients who were initially considered potential candidates received surgical AVR with favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:25048481

  8. (Working Team meeting of IEA-CADDET)

    SciTech Connect

    Broders, M.A.

    1990-10-25

    The traveler serving as Delegate from the United States, Center for the Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy, (CADDET) National Team, participated in the activities of the annual International Energy Agency, CADDET Working Team meeting. Highlights of this meeting included progress/status presentations by 12 to 13 CADDET National Teams, development of future CADDET work plans including a prioritization of activities, and discussions of long range expectations for CADDET. Follow-up discussions were held with CADDET staff members which focused on US CADDET National Team contributions to the CADDET newsletter, brochures and register of demonstrated energy technologies.

  9. Using peer observers to assess the quality of cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a qualitative proof of concept study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jenny; Green, James SA; Sevdalis, Nick; Taylor, Cath

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary team (MDT) working is well established as the foundation for providing cancer services in the UK and elsewhere. A core activity is the weekly meeting (or case conference/tumor boards) where the treatment recommendations for individual patients are agreed. Evidence suggests that the quality of team working varies across cancer teams, and this may impact negatively on the decision-making process, and ultimately patient care. Feedback on performance by expert observers may improve performance, but can be resource-intensive to implement. This proof of concept study sought to: develop a structured observational assessment tool for use by peers (managers or clinicians from the local workforce) and explore its usability; assess the feasibility of the principle of observational assessment by peers; and explore the views of MDT members and observers about the utility of feedback from observational assessment. Methods For tool development, the content was informed by national clinical consensus recommendations for best practice in cancer MDTs and developed in collaboration with an expert steering group. It consisted of ten subdomains of team working observable in MDT meetings that were rated on a 10-point scale (very poor to very good). For observational assessment, a total of 19 peer observers used the tool (assessing performance in 20 cancer teams from four hospitals). For evaluation, telephone interviews with 64 team members and all peer observers were analyzed thematically. Results The tool was easy to use and areas for refinement were identified. Peer observers were identified and most indicated that undertaking observation was feasible. MDT members generally reported that observational assessment and feedback was useful, with the potential to facilitate improvements in team working. Conclusion This study suggests that observation and feedback by peers may provide a feasible and acceptable approach to enhance MDT performance. Further tool refinement and validation is required. PMID:25143743

  10. The Benefits of Multidisciplinary Learning in Clinical Practice for Law, Finance, and Social Work Students: An Australian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyams, Ross; Brown, Grace; Foster, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In July 2010, the faculties of Law, Business and Economics, and Medicine at Monash University, Australia commenced placing law, finance, and social work students in a multidisciplinary clinic at a community legal service operated by the University. Students from the three disciplines began seeing legal service clients at the same time as a team.…

  11. The Benefits of Multidisciplinary Learning in Clinical Practice for Law, Finance, and Social Work Students: An Australian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyams, Ross; Brown, Grace; Foster, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In July 2010, the faculties of Law, Business and Economics, and Medicine at Monash University, Australia commenced placing law, finance, and social work students in a multidisciplinary clinic at a community legal service operated by the University. Students from the three disciplines began seeing legal service clients at the same time as a team.

  12. Teams That Work: Preparing Student Teams for the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Diane D.; Webb, Fred L.

    2013-01-01

    Organizations today often require collaboration in the form of work teams. Many tasks completed within organizations, whether in the workplace or in academia, however, can be beyond the capabilities of individuals alone. Productive teamwork and cooperative activities in business are expected and can begin very early in a person's career. The…

  13. Feeding difficulties in children with esophageal atresia: treatment by a multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, M; Birnbaum, R

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is one of the congenital neonatal anomalies whose immediate consequence for the newborn is the inability to feed. Most centers strive to minimize the effects of surgeries and subsequent postoperative complications such as esophageal strictures, respiratory problems, and gastrointestinal reflux on the child's ability or motivation to feed. Feeding difficulties in early infancy may not only interrupt maternal expectations of becoming providers of nutrition to their infants but may also influence the infant's development of sensory motor skills and parent-child relationships. Early involvement by a multidisciplinary team consisting of occupational therapist, nutritionist, and psychologist is an important addition to the surgical and medical team. The team assists in preparing mothers for feeding-related difficulties, providing anticipatory guidance to improve feeding abilities and relationships, especially for children with multiple surgical involvements and prolonged periods of non-oral feeding. PMID:23679033

  14. Part 1: Participatory Ergonomics Approach to Waste Container Handling Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Team

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D.M.; Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Biggs, T.W.; Perry, C.M.; Tageson, R.; Barsnick, L.

    2000-02-07

    This multidisciplinary team approach to waste container handling, developed within the Grassroots Ergonomics process, presents participatory ergonomic interpretations of quantitative and qualitative aspects of this process resulting in a peer developed training. The lower back, shoulders, and wrists were identified as frequently injured areas, so these working postures were a primary focus for the creation of the workers' training. Handling procedures were analyzed by the team to identify common cycles involving one 5 gallon (60 pounds), two 5 gallons (60 and 54 pounds), 30 gallon (216 pounds), and 55 gallon (482 pounds) containers: lowering from transporting to/from transport vehicles, loading/unloading on transport vehicles, and loading onto pallet. Eleven experienced waste container handlers participated in this field analysis. Ergonomic exposure assessment tools measuring these field activities included posture analysis, posture targeting, Lumbar Motion Monitor{trademark} (LMM), and surface electromyography (sEMG) for the erector spinae, infraspinatus, and upper trapezius muscles. Posture analysis indicates that waste container handlers maintained non-neutral lower back postures (flexion, lateral bending, and rotation) for a mean of 51.7% of the time across all activities. The right wrist was in non-neutral postures (radial, ulnar, extension, and flexion) a mean of 30.5% of the time and the left wrist 31.4%. Non-neutral shoulder postures (elevation) were the least common, occurring 17.6% and 14.0% of the time in the right and left shoulders respectively. For training applications, each cycle had its own synchronized posture analysis and posture target diagram. Visual interpretations relating to the peak force modifications of the posture target diagrams proved to be invaluable for the workers' understanding of LMM and sEMG results (refer to Part II). Results were reviewed by the team's field technicians and their interpretations were developed into ergonomic training that address the issues originally raised. This training includes intervention methods, ergonomic tools used, dam acquired, and effects of waste container handling techniques on lower back, shoulder, and wrists and methods to help proactively reduce injuries associated with this profession.

  15. Low Educational Status, Smoking, and Multidisciplinary Team Experience Predict Hospital Length of Stay After Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marchini, Julio F.M.; Souza, Fernanda L.N.; Schmidt, Andre; Cunha, Selma F.C.; Salgado, Wilson; Marchini, Julio S.; Nonino, Carla B.; Ceneviva, Reginaldo; Santos, Jose E.D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to identify new risk factors associated with longer hospitalization following bariatric surgery. Methods: Patient clinical, social, and biochemical data in addition to multidisciplinary team experience were analyzed in a cohort that included all patients undergoing bariatric surgery at our hospital. The primary outcome was length of hospital stay (LOS). Mortality was recorded to validate the obesity surgery mortality risk score (OS-MRS). Results: This study included 299 sequential patients, 41 10 years of age, and BMI of 50 8 kg/m2 who underwent bariatric surgery. Two thirds (196) of patients were hypertensive, a third (86) were diabetic and a third (91) were current or former smokers. Overall, LOS was 8 5 days. The predictors of a longer LOS were smoking (P < 0.05) and less multidisciplinary team experience (P < 0.05). Looking at only the last three years of data, LOS was 6 5 days, and the predictors of a longer LOS were low educational attainment (P < 0.02) and smoking (P < 0.01) but not team experience. The global mortality was 2.6%, with the OS-MRS identifying a high-risk group. Conclusion: Excluding the initial learning phase, longer LOS independent predictors were patient low educational attainment and smoking. These predictors can help guide care to reduce complications. PMID:23882150

  16. Game playbooks: tools to guide multidisciplinary teams in developing videogame-based behavior change interventions.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Lindsay R; Hieftje, Kimberly D; Culyba, Sabrina; Fiellin, Lynn E

    2014-03-01

    As mobile technologies and videogaming platforms are becoming increasingly prevalent in the realm of health and healthcare, so are the opportunities to use these resources to conduct behavioral interventions. The creation and empirical testing of game style interventions, however, is challenged by the requisite collaboration of multidisciplinary teams, including researchers and game developers who have different cultures, terminologies, and standards of evidence. Thus, traditional intervention development tools such as logic models and intervention manuals may need to be augmented by creating what we have termed "Game Playbooks" which are intervention guidebooks that are created by, understood by, and acceptable to all members of the multidisciplinary game development team. The purpose of this paper is to describe the importance and content of a Game Playbook created to aide in the development of a videogame intervention designed specifically for health behavior change in young teens as well as the process for creating such a tool. We draw on the experience of our research and game design team to describe the critical components of the Game Playbook and the necessity of creating such a tool. PMID:24653781

  17. Multidisciplinary members perspectives on a pharmacist joining a rheumatology practice team

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Kerry; Kur, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pharmacist participation in chronic disease management benefits patients in many ambulatory settings. We explored the attitudes and perceptions among multidisciplinary members of a rheumatology team towards the skills and responsibilities of a pharmacist joining their practice. Methods: The physicians, nurse, physiotherapist and staff of a rheumatology clinic were invited to participate in focus group and semistructured interviews. Practice members also completed an inventory of perceived health professional roles in the medication use process. Results: Discussions with 2 physicians, a nurse, physiotherapist and 1 office administrator were conducted. Concepts related to 3 key themes included positively viewed pharmacist roles broadly related to activities that encompass provision of medication-related services for the patients, the providers and the practice. Examples of such care included educational tasks related to therapies (rheumatological and otherwise) and maintenance of accurate drug histories. These findings were reflected in high scores for perceived pharmacist roles in education and medication review responsibilities using the Medication Use Processes Matrix instrument. Most members were not comfortable with pharmacists conducting physical assessments and emphasized the need for a team member who could adapt to variations in workflow preferences across rheumatologists in the practice. Interpretation: Perceived pharmacist roles expressed by existing rheumatology team members were largely consistent with the scope of pharmacist knowledge, skills and responsibilities in primary care. Conclusion: Overall, existing multidisciplinary staff exhibited favourable attitudes towards a pharmacist joining their practice setting. Data from this job analysis exercise were used to inform the development of a job description for a rheumatology clinical pharmacist. PMID:26862335

  18. Effects of Education and Team Projects on Student Attitudes toward Team Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Daniel; Rinzel, Lawrence; Cadiz, David; Cacapit, Maria

    This study compared the effects of team projects alone with team projects coupled with team-work education on college students' attitudes toward team work. The study modified a 30-item survey originally developed to study team work in professional research and development teams. The survey was administered to 250 students at the beginning and end

  19. What is the role of the multidisciplinary team in the management of urinary incontinence?

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Aswini; Duckett, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Multidisciplinary teams (MDT) are a well-established part of service provision and clinical care in the UK. In 2013, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Urinary Incontinence guideline recommended that MDT review should be mandatory before invasive therapy is offered to all patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder (OAB). Currently, there is no evidence in the literature regarding the use of MDTs in urogynaecology. The aim of this paper is to assess the potential benefits and disadvantages of the creation of routine MDT meetings for the management of urinary incontinence. PMID:25416023

  20. Building a multidisciplinary team for burn treatment – Lessons learned from the Montreal tendon transfer experience

    PubMed Central

    Karam, E.; Lévesque, M.C.; Jacquemin, G.; Delure, A.; Robidoux, I.; Laramée, M.T.; Odobescu, A.; Harris, P.G..; Danino, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) represent a recognized component of care in the treatment of complex conditions such as burns. However, most institutions do not provide adequate support for the formation of these teams. Furthermore, the majority of specialists lack the managerial skills required to create a team and have difficulties finding the proper tools. Our objective is to provide an insight for health care professionals, who wish to form a MDT for burn treatment, on the challenges that are likely to be faced, and to identify key elements that may facilitate the establishment of such a project. The setting for this was a plastic surgery department and rehabilitation center at a national reference center. A qualitative analysis was performed on all correspondences related to our tetraplegia project, from 2006 to 2008. To guide our thematic analysis, we used a form of systems theory known as the complexity theory. The qualitative analysis was performed using the NVivo software (Version 8.0 QSR International Melbourne, Australia). Lastly, the data was organized in chronologic order. Three main themes emerged from the results: knowledge acquisition, project organizational setup and project steps design. These themes represented respectively 24%, 50% and 26% of all correspondences. Project steps design and knowledge acquisition correspondences increased significantly after the introduction of the mentor team to our network. We conclude that an early association with a mentor team is beneficial for the establishment of a MDT. PMID:25249840

  1. Implementing critical pathways and a multidisciplinary team approach to cardiovascular disease management.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eric D; Albert, Nancy M; Amin, Alpesh; Patterson, J Herbert; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2008-09-01

    According to several medical registries, there is a need to improve the care of post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients, especially those with left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) and heart failure. This can potentially be achieved by implementing disease management programs, which include critical pathways, patient education, and multidisciplinary hospital teams. Currently, algorithms for critical pathways, including discharge processes, are lacking for post-MI LVD patients. Such schemes can increase the use of evidence-based medicines proved to reduce mortality. Educational programs are aimed at increasing patients' awareness of their condition, promoting medication compliance, and encouraging the adoption of healthy behaviors; such programs have been shown to be effective in improving outcomes of post-MI LVD patients. Reductions in all-cause hospitalizations and medical costs as well as improved survival rates have been observed when a multidisciplinary team (a nurse, a pharmacist, and a hospitalist) is engaged in patient care. In addition, the use of the "pay for performance" method, which can be advantageous for patients, physicians, and hospitals, may potentially improve the care of post-MI patients with LVD. PMID:18722192

  2. [Should cases of hepatocellular carcinoma be discussed by non-specialized multidisciplinary team meetings?].

    PubMed

    Barbare, Jean-Claude; Franco, Dominique; Andr, Thierry; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Merle, Philippe; Pron, Jean-Marie; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Seitz, Jean-Franois; Ychou, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is difficult due to the underlying cirrhosis which has its own influence on therapeutic issues. An inquiry was performed in centres with specialized multidisciplinary team meetings dedicated to HCC (HCC-MTM) or in centres with non-specialized (digestive oncology or general oncology) multidisciplinary team meetings (NS-MTM). The number of cases of HCCs taken in charge yearly was significantly higher in HCC-MTM than in NS-MTM (p=0,0014). Interventional radiologists and transplant surgeons were more frequently implied in HCC-MTM than in NS-MTM (respectively p=0,009 and p=0,02). On site availability of every treatment of HCC was higher in RCP-MTM than in NS-MTM (p=0,015). There were no inclusion in clinical trials in 40.5 % of NS-MTM versus only 17.6 % of HCC-MTM (p=0,0086). In three clinical cases out of seven there were discrepancies between the therapeutic options of HCC-MTM and NS-MTM. In all three cases, the treatment offered to the patient by HCC-MTM was more consistent with clinical standards. These results prompt to perform more studies on the quality of management of patients with HCCs by MTMs. PMID:24898934

  3. The emergence of multidisciplinary teams for interagency service delivery in europe: is historical institutionalism wrong?

    PubMed

    van Raak, Arno; Paulus, Aggie

    2008-12-01

    In Europe, a well-known problem is the coordination of interagency service delivery to independently living older persons, disabled persons or persons suffering from chronic illness. Coordination is necessary in order for the users to receive services at the appropriate time and place. Based on historical institutionalism, which focuses on the path dependency of the development of government policy and organizational and professional rules, it can be stated that coordination requires organizational models or other solutions that fit the characteristics of the context ('configuration') for which the solution is intended. The western European countries have different configurations. Remarkably, across these countries, we see the emergence of multidisciplinary teams as a solution to the problem of coordination. Consequently, if we take the above statement to mean that a solution should fit all the configuration's characteristics, we must reject the statement. However, when we assume that a solution should fit particular configurational characteristics, we must not. We take the second position and we argue that multidisciplinary teams have emerged because they fit one particular feature that is similar in the countries: professionalism and professional fragmentation. PMID:17965939

  4. How teams use indicators for quality improvement - a multiple-case study on the use of multiple indicators in multidisciplinary breast cancer teams.

    PubMed

    Gort, Marjan; Broekhuis, Manda; Regts, Gerdien

    2013-11-01

    A crucial issue in healthcare is how multidisciplinary teams can use indicators for quality improvement. Such teams have increasingly become the core component in both care delivery and in many quality improvement methods. This study aims to investigate the relationships between (1) team factors and the way multidisciplinary teams use indicators for quality improvement, and (2) both team and process factors and the intended results. An in-depth, multiple-case study was conducted in the Netherlands in 2008 involving four breast cancer teams using six structure, process and outcome indicators. The results indicated that the process of using indicators involves several stages and activities. Two teams applied a more intensive, active and interactive approach as they passed through these stages. These teams were perceived to have achieved good results through indicator use compared to the other two teams who applied a simple control approach. All teams experienced some difficulty in integrating the new formal control structure, i.e. measuring and managing performance, in their operational task, and in using their 'new' managerial task to decide as a team what and how to improve. Our findings indicate the presence of a network of relationships between team factors, the controllability and actionability of indicators, the indicator-use process, and the intended results. PMID:24034953

  5. Making Teamwork Work: Team Knowledge for Team Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Guchait, Priyanko; Lei, Puiwa; Tews, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the impact of two types of team knowledge on team effectiveness. The study assessed the impact of taskwork knowledge and teamwork knowledge on team satisfaction and performance. A longitudinal study was conducted with 27 service-management teams involving 178 students in a real-life restaurant setting. Teamwork knowledge was found to impact both team outcomes. Furthermore, team learning behavior was found to mediate the relationships between teamwork knowledge and team outcomes. Educators and managers should therefore ensure these types of knowledge are developed in teams along with learning behavior for maximum effectiveness. PMID:25856724

  6. High Involvement Work Teams [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium on high involvement work teams that was facilitated by Catherine M. Sleezer at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. "An Empirical Study of Employee Involvement in Designing and Managing Reward Systems" (William M. Kahnweiler) reports on a study of 300 organizations that found the

  7. Alcohol brief interventions practice following training for multidisciplinary health and social care teams: A qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Niamh; Molloy, Heather; MacDonald, Fiona; McCambridge, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Few studies of the implementation of alcohol brief interventions (ABI) have been conducted in community settings such as mental health, social work and criminal justice teams. This qualitative interview study sought to explore the impact of training on ABI delivery by staff from a variety of such teams. Design and Methods Fifteen semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out with trained practitioners and with managers to explore the use of, perceived need for and approaches to ABI delivery and recording with clients, and compatibility of ABIs with current practice. Interviews were analysed thematically using an inductive approach. Results Very few practitioners reported delivery of any ABIs following training primarily because they felt ABIs to be inappropriate for their clients. According to practitioners, this was either because they drank too much or too little to benefit. Practitioners reported a range of current activities relating to alcohol, and some felt that their knowledge and confidence were improved following training. One practitioner reported ABI delivery and was considered a training success, while expectations of ABIs did not fit with current practice including assessment procedures for the remainder. Discussion and Conclusions Identified barriers to ABI delivery included issues relating to individual practitioners, their teams, current practice and the ABI model. They are likely to be best addressed by strategic team- and setting-specific approaches to implementation, of which training is only one part. [Fitzgerald N, Molloy H, MacDonald F, McCambridge J. Alcohol brief interventions practice following training for multidisciplinary health and social care teams: A qualitative interview study. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;34:18593] PMID:25196713

  8. A multidisciplinary team approach to hydroxyurea-associated chronic wound with squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stone, Tamar; Berger, Alexandra; Blumberg, Sheila; O'Neill, Daniel; Ross, Frank; McMeeking, Alexander; Chen, Weiliam; Pastar, Irena

    2012-06-01

    Hydroxyurea (HU) has been shown to induce a variety of cutaneous adverse reactions, including severe leg ulcers. This report shows a successful treatment of a HU-induced chronic wound associated with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). A 62-year-old patient affected with polycythemia vera and treated with HU for 10 years, presented with a non healing ulcer on a left heel. The patient gave a history of suffering from the wound for over 2 years. Biopsy showed evidence of invasive SCC. The patient underwent Mohs surgery and a greater saphenous vein ablation for polycythemia vera-associated vascular complications. The wound consistently decreased in size following successive debridements and coverage with human skin equivalent. The wound healed completely after a 6-month period. A multidisciplinary team approach to the treatment proved to be effective resulting in healing of this multifactorial chronic ulcer. PMID:22099725

  9. [Taking into account spiritual dimension of the patient in multidisciplinary team].

    PubMed

    Rochat, E; Vollenweider, P; Rubli, E; Odier, C

    2015-11-01

    In the current healthcare environment, there is an increasing consensus for a holistic approach to the patient by means of a bio-psychosocial and spiritual model. The first part of this article describes how, in the context of a laic healthcare environment, physicians, nurses and spiritual caregivers are asked to change their way to communicate and to take into account this spiritual dimension. In the second part we will discuss some of the challenges of this interdisciplinary approach of the spiritual dimension in the hospital and the community. We will describe potential benefits for the patients, their family members and the caregivers. At the end, taking into account the spiritual dimension of the patient without proselytism will depend on the capacity of each caregiver to speak about it and to share this information in multidisciplinary team. PMID:26685648

  10. Virtual Teams and Human Work Interaction Design - Learning to Work in and Designing for Virtual Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orngreen, Rikke; Clemmensen, Torkil; Pejtersen, Annelise Mark

    The boundaries and work processes for how virtual teams interact are undergoing changes, from a tool and stand-alone application orientation, to the use of multiple generic platforms chosen and redesigned to the specific context. These are often at the same time designed both by professional software developers and the individual members of the virtual teams, rather than determined on a single organizational level. There may be no impact of the technology per se on individuals, groups or organizations, as the technology for virtual teams rather enhance situation ambiguity and disrupt existing task-artifact cycles. This ambiguous situation calls for new methods for empirical work analysis and interaction design that can help us understand how organizations, teams and individuals learn to organize, design and work in virtual teams in various networked contexts.

  11. Distributed expertise: qualitative study of a British network of multidisciplinary teams supporting parents of children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Swallow, V; Smith, T; Webb, N J A; Wirz, L; Qizalbash, L; Brennan, E; Birch, A; Sinha, M D; Krischock, L; van der Voort, J; King, D; Lambert, H; Milford, D V; Crowther, L; Saleem, M; Lunn, A; Williams, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term childhood conditions are often managed by hospital-based multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) of professionals with discipline specific expertise of a condition, in partnership with parents. However, little evidence exists on professionalparent interactions in this context. An exploration of professionals' accounts of the way they individually and collectively teach parents to manage their child's clinical care at home is, therefore, important for meeting parents' needs, informing policy and educating novice professionals. Using chronic kidney disease as an exemplar this paper reports on one aspect of a study of interactions between professionals and parents in a network of 12 children's kidney units in Britain. Methods We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a convenience sample of 112 professionals (clinical-psychologists, dietitians, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, play-workers, therapists and social workers), exploring accounts of their parent-educative activity. We analysed data using framework and the concept of distributed expertise. Results Four themes emerged that related to the way expertise was distributed within and across teams: (i) recognizing each other's' expertise, (ii) sharing expertise within the MDT, (iii) language interpretation, and (iv) acting as brokers. Two different professional identifications were also seen to co-exist within MDTs, with participants using the term we both as the intra-professional we (relating to the professional identity) when describing expertise within a disciplinary group (for example: As dietitians we aim to give tailored advice to optimize children's growth), and the inter-professional we (a team-identification), when discussing expertise within the team (for example: We work as a team and make sure we're all happy with every aspect of their training before they go home). Conclusions This study highlights the dual identifications implicit in being professional in this context (to the team and to one's profession) as well as the unique role that each member of a team contributes to children's care. Our methodology and results have the potential to be transferred to teams managing other conditions. PMID:24827413

  12. International Preoperative Rectal Cancer Management: Staging, Neoadjuvant Treatment, and Impact of Multidisciplinary Teams

    PubMed Central

    Augestad, Knut M.; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Stulberg, Jonah; Reynolds, Harry; Senagore, Anthony; Champagne, Brad; Heriot, Alexander G.; Leblanc, Fabien

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding variations in preoperative treatment and practice for rectal cancer (RC) on an international level, yet practice variation may result in differences in recurrence and survival rates. Methods One hundred seventy-three international colorectal centers were invited to participate in a survey of preoperative management of rectal cancer. Results One hundred twenty-three (71%) responded, with a majority of respondents from North America, Europe, and Asia. Ninety-three percent have more than 5years experience with rectal cancer surgery. Fifty-five percent use CT scan, 35% MRI, 29% ERUS, 12% digital rectal examination and 1% PET scan in all RC cases. Seventy-four percent consider threatened circumferential margin (CRM) an indication for neoadjuvant treatment. Ninety-two percent prefer 5-FU-based long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). A significant difference in practice exists between the US and non-US surgeons: poor histological differentiation as an indication for CRT (25% vs. 7.0%, p=0.008), CRT for stage II and III rectal cancer (92% vs. 43%, p=0.0001), MRI for all RC patients (20% vs. 42%, p=0.03), and ERUS for all RC patients (43% vs. 21%, p=0.01). Multidisciplinary team meetings significantly influence decisions for MRI (RR=3.62), neoadjuvant treatment (threatened CRM, RR=5.67, stage II+III RR=2.98), quality of pathology report (RR=4.85), and sphincter-saving surgery (RR=3.81). Conclusions There was little consensus on staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and preoperative management of rectal cancer. Regular multidisciplinary team meetings influence decisions about neoadjuvant treatment and staging methods. PMID:20703471

  13. A Multidisciplinary Health Care Team's Efforts to Improve Educational Attainment in Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia and Cerebral Infarcts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Allison; Herron, Sonya; McKinstry, Robert; Bacak, Stephen; Armstrong, Melissa; White, Desiree; DeBaun, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to improve the educational success of children with sickle-cell disease (SCD) and cerebral infarcts. A prospective intervention trial was conducted; a multidisciplinary team was created to maximize educational resources for children with SCD and cerebral infarcts. Students were evaluated systematically…

  14. A Multidisciplinary Health Care Team's Efforts to Improve Educational Attainment in Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia and Cerebral Infarcts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Allison; Herron, Sonya; McKinstry, Robert; Bacak, Stephen; Armstrong, Melissa; White, Desiree; DeBaun, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to improve the educational success of children with sickle-cell disease (SCD) and cerebral infarcts. A prospective intervention trial was conducted; a multidisciplinary team was created to maximize educational resources for children with SCD and cerebral infarcts. Students were evaluated systematically

  15. Hospital-Based Multidisciplinary Teams Can Prevent Unnecessary Child Abuse Reports and Out-of-Home Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Gregory H.; Makoroff, Kathi L.; Malott, Heidi A.; Shapiro, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine how often and for what reasons a hospital-based multidisciplinary child abuse team concluded that a report of alleged or suspected child abuse was unnecessary in young children with fractures. Methods: A retrospective review was completed of all children less than 12 months of age who, because of fractures, were referred to

  16. Hospital-Based Multidisciplinary Teams Can Prevent Unnecessary Child Abuse Reports and Out-of-Home Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Gregory H.; Makoroff, Kathi L.; Malott, Heidi A.; Shapiro, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine how often and for what reasons a hospital-based multidisciplinary child abuse team concluded that a report of alleged or suspected child abuse was unnecessary in young children with fractures. Methods: A retrospective review was completed of all children less than 12 months of age who, because of fractures, were referred to…

  17. Psychiatric Approaches for Disorders of Sex Development: Experience of a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    zbaran, Burcu; zen, Samim; Gk?en, Damla; Korkmaz, zlem; Onay, Hseyin; zk?nay, Ferda; o?ulu, zgr; Erermi?, Serpil; Kse, Sezen; Avano?lu, Ali; Ulman, ?brahim; Darcan, ?kran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Disorders of sex development (DSD) are a group of congenital medical conditions that affect life as a whole. In this study, we aimed to reflect the experience of a multidisciplinary team in the clinical/psychiatric follow-up of a group of children and adolescents with DSD. Methods: The study group consisted of 51 patients diagnosed with DSD. The Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, Draw a Person Test and Childrens Apperception Test, and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGIS) were used for psychiatric evaluations. Results: The mean age of the patients was 7.8 years (median: 7.8; min: 1.0; max: 18.0). Genetic evaluation showed 46,XX configuration in 15 patients (29.4%) and 46,XY in 35 (68.6%). One patient (2.0%) was diagnosed to have a sex chromosome disorder. Forty patients (78.4%) had no problems with their given gender identity and gender role. Thirty-four (66.7%) patients had normal intellectual capacity. Twenty-eight (54.9%) patients did not have any psychiatric problem. Depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and adjustment disorders were the common diagnoses. The mean score of symptom severity on CGIS-severity-baseline was 6.150.68 and after one year, it was 1.460.51 (Z=-3.236 p=0.001). The mean score of CGIImprovement was 1.230.44. Conclusion: It is important to identify and treat the psychiatric disorders encountered in patients with DSD. A psychiatrist needs to be included in the professional team following these patients. Examination and observation results need to be shared by holding periodic team meetings to establish a wholesome point of view for every unique child. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379031

  18. Psychological Safety and Learning Behavior in Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Tests a team-learning model in a multimethod field study. A study of 51 work teams in a manufacturing company showed that team psychological safety is associated with learning behavior, but team efficacy is not, when controlling for team psychological safety. Learning behavior mediates between safety and performance. (54 references) (MLH)

  19. Multidisciplinary Team Contributions Within a Dedicated Outpatient Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic: A Prospective Descriptive Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pituskin, Edith; Fairchild, Alysa; Dutka, Jennifer; Gagnon, Lori; Driga, Amy; Tachynski, Patty; Borschneck, Jo-Ann; Ghosh, Sunita

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient palliative RT clinic. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients referred for RT for painful bone metastases were screened for symptoms and needs relevant to their medications, nutritional intake, activities of daily living, and psychosocial and spiritual concerns from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Consultations by appropriate team members and resulting recommendations were collected prospectively. Patients who received RT were contacted by telephone 4 weeks later to assess symptom outcomes. Results: A total of 106 clinic visits by 82 individual patients occurred. As determined by screening form responses, the clinical Pharmacist, Occupational Therapist, Registered Dietician and Social Worker were consulted to provide assessments and recommendations within the time constraints presented by 1-day palliative RT delivery. In addition to pain relief, significant improvements in tiredness, depression, anxiety, drowsiness and overall well-being were reported at 4 weeks. Conclusions: Systematic screening of this population revealed previously unmet needs, addressed in the form of custom verbal and written recommendations. Multidisciplinary assessment is associated with a high number of recommendations and decreased symptom distress. Our findings lend strong support to the routine assessment by multiple supportive care professionals for patients with advanced cancer being considered for palliative RT.

  20. Performer: An Instrument for Multidisciplinary Courseware Teams to Share Knowledge and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Aalst, Jan-Willem; van der Mast, Charles

    2003-01-01

    One of the traditional problems in courseware development that is recognized as hard to solve, is the communication and co-operation between various disciplines in project teams that are working on a courseware product [Alber (1996) "Multimedia: a management perspective." California: Wadsworth; Boyle (1997) "Design for multimedia learning." UK:…

  1. Performer: An Instrument for Multidisciplinary Courseware Teams to Share Knowledge and Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Aalst, Jan-Willem; van der Mast, Charles

    2003-01-01

    One of the traditional problems in courseware development that is recognized as hard to solve, is the communication and co-operation between various disciplines in project teams that are working on a courseware product [Alber (1996) "Multimedia: a management perspective." California: Wadsworth; Boyle (1997) "Design for multimedia learning." UK:

  2. Mind Builders: Multidisciplinary Challenges for Cooperative Team-Building and Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleisher, Paul; Ziegler, Donald

    2006-01-01

    For more than twenty years, the Richmond, Virginia Public Schools' program for gifted students has conducted an interscholastic competition similar to the nationally known competition, Destination Imagination. In the featured contest of this yearly event, teams of five students present solutions to engineering problems that they have worked on for

  3. Cancer Multidisciplinary Team Meetings: Evidence, Challenges, and the Role of Clinical Decision Support Technology

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Vivek; Acosta, Dionisio; Davidson, Tim; Jones, Alison; Fox, John; Keshtgar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) model in cancer care was introduced and endorsed to ensure that care delivery is consistent with the best available evidence. Over the last few years, regular MDT meetings have become a standard practice in oncology and gained the status of the key decision-making forum for patient management. Despite the fact that cancer MDT meetings are well accepted by clinicians, concerns are raised over the paucity of good-quality evidence on their overall impact. There are also concerns over lack of the appropriate support for this important but overburdened decision-making platform. The growing acceptance by clinical community of the health information technology in recent years has created new opportunities and possibilities of using advanced clinical decision support (CDS) systems to realise full potential of cancer MDT meetings. In this paper, we present targeted summary of the available evidence on the impact of cancer MDT meetings, discuss the reported challenges, and explore the role that a CDS technology could play in addressing some of these challenges. PMID:22295234

  4. Building the multidisciplinary team for management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Naugler, Willscott E; Alsina, Angel E; Frenette, Catherine T; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Sellers, Marty T

    2015-05-01

    Optimal care of the patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) necessitates the involvement of multiple providers. Because the patient with HCC often carries 2 conditions with competing mortality risks (cancer and underlying cirrhosis), no single provider is equipped to deal with all of these patients' needs adequately. Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) have evolved to facilitate care coordination, reassessments of clinical course, and nimble changes in treatment plans required for this complex group of patients. Providers or sites that elect to manage patients with HCC thus are increasingly aware of the need to build their own MDT or communicate with an established one. The availability of new communication technologies, such as teleconferencing or teleconsultation, offers the possibility of MDT expansion into underserved or rural areas, as well as areas such as correctional facilities. Although the availability of resources for HCC patient care varies from site to site, construction of an MDT is possible in a wide spectrum of clinical practices, and this article suggests a blueprint for assembly of such collaboration. Research strategies are needed to explain how MDTs improve clinical outcomes so that MDTs themselves can be improved. PMID:24909910

  5. Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit

    PubMed Central

    Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. Practitioner Summary: This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams PMID:24837514

  6. Experiences of Multidisciplinary Development Team Members During User-Centered Design of Telecare Products and Services: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background User-centered design (UCD) methodologies can help take the needs and requirements of potential end-users into account during the development of innovative telecare products and services. Understanding how members of multidisciplinary development teams experience the UCD process might help to gain insight into factors that members with different backgrounds consider critical during the development of telecare products and services. Objective The primary objective of this study was to explore how members of multidisciplinary development teams experienced the UCD process of telecare products and services. The secondary objective was to identify differences and similarities in the barriers and facilitators they experienced. Methods Twenty-five members of multidisciplinary development teams of four Research and Development (R&D) projects participated in this study. The R&D projects aimed to develop telecare products and services that can support self-management in elderly people or patients with chronic conditions. Seven participants were representatives of end-users (elderly persons or patients with chronic conditions), three were professional end-users (geriatrician and nurses), five were engineers, four were managers (of R&D companies or engineering teams), and six were researchers. All participants were interviewed by a researcher who was not part of their own development team. The following topics were discussed during the interviews: (1) aim of the project, (2) role of the participant, (3) experiences during the development process, (4) points of improvement, and (5) what the project meant to the participant. Results Experiences of participants related to the following themes: (1) creating a development team, (2) expectations regarding responsibilities and roles, (3) translating user requirements into technical requirements, (4) technical challenges, (5) evaluation of developed products and services, and (6) valorization. Multidisciplinary team members from different backgrounds often reported similar experienced barriers (eg, different members of the development team speak a “different language”) and facilitators (eg, team members should voice expectations at the start of the project to prevent miscommunication at a later stage). However, some experienced barriers and facilitators were reported only by certain groups of participants. For example, only managers reported the experience that having different ideas about what a good business case is within one development team was a barrier, whereas only end-users emphasized the facilitating role of project management in end-user participation and the importance of continuous feedback from researchers on input of end-users. Conclusions Many similarities seem to exist between the experienced barriers and facilitators of members of multidisciplinary development teams during UCD of telecare products and services. However, differences in experiences between team members from various backgrounds exist as well. Insights into these similarities and differences can improve understanding between team members from different backgrounds, which can optimize collaboration during the development of telecare products and services. PMID:24840245

  7. Multidisciplinary team care for people with rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bearne, Lindsay M; Byrne, Anne-Marie; Segrave, Hannah; White, Claire M

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically review the evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effectiveness of multidisciplinary team (MDT) care for the management of disability, disease activity and quality of life (QoL) in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data sources identified published (MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, CENTRAL) and unpublished (OpenGrey) literature. Independent data extraction and quality assessment, using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, were conducted by two reviewers. The primary outcome was change in disability at 12months; secondary outcomes included disability at other time points and disease activity and QoL at 12months. Where possible, the pooled effect sizes were calculated for inpatient or outpatient MDT interventions. Four hundred and fifteen studies were retrieved. Twelve manuscripts, which reported 10 RCTs, representing 1147 participants were included. Only data from five high- or moderate-quality trials were pooled according to clinical setting. There was no difference in disability between inpatient MDT care and any comparison group [mean difference (95% confidence intervals) 0.04, -0.13 to 0.20] or between outpatient MDT care and comparison groups (0.09, -0.07 to 0.25) at 12months. There was no difference in disability at 2years or <12months or disease activity and QoL at 12months between MDT care and any comparison group. There is limited evidence evaluating the effect of MDT care on disability, disease activity or QoL in people with RA. There is likely to be no effect of MDT care on disability at 12months or other time points. PMID:26563338

  8. Experience of multidisciplinary team meetings in vestibular schwannoma: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Daveau, Clmentine; Zaouche, Sandra; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Favrel, Vronique; Artru, Sverine; Dubreuil, Christian; Tringali, Stphane

    2015-11-01

    To assess the contribution of multidisciplinary team meetings (MTM) on vestibular schwannoma management as well as to (1) compare professional compliance to national guidelines and (2) study the percentage of loss to follow-up in cases of conservative management by radiologic observation. A retrospective descriptive study of MTMs held between January 2011 and May 2013 in a tertiary referral center. Patients were classified in three groups according to the MTM decision (observation, surgery or radiotherapy). A total of 363 cases were discussed during the study period (29 months). One hundred and ninety-four decisions (53.4%) were for conservative management with radiologic observation, 130 (35.8%) for surgery, and 39 (10.7%) for radiation therapy. The sex ratio was 0.94, and the patients had a median age of 59 years (range 18-86 years). Most of the vestibular schwannomas (74.2%) were small (stages I and II). Global concordance between the MTM decision and International Radiosurgery Association guidelines was 88.7%. Twenty-three percent of the 104 files that were discussed in MTMs between January 2011 and July 2012, for which conservative management was decided, were lost to follow-up by 18 months. Management of vestibular schwannoma remains controversial, but it usually depends on the evolutive status. MTMs improve practice and facilitate the creation and maintenance of local registries. Future studies in MTMs are warranted to evaluate the benefit and evaluated if MTM could optimize long-term follow-up, limiting loss to follow-up in the observation of vestibular schwannomas that may be evolutive. PMID:25359198

  9. Radiologist participation in multi-disciplinary teams in breast cancer improves reflective practice, decision making and isolation.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, S B; Reed, W; Willis, K; Lee, W; Brennan, P; Lewis, S

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to explore Australian radiologists' experiences of participating in breast cancer multi-disciplinary team (MDT) meetings to identify enablers and barriers to participation as well their perception of confidence and patient care. Qualitative methods incorporating observation and interviews were used. Twenty-one breast cancer MDT meetings were observed across Sydney to study the dynamics of the meetings, the level of participation by radiologists and their most important interactions. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 radiologists participating in these meetings regarding participation, educational opportunities and improvements to work practices. Radiologists' participation in breast cancer MDT meetings is influenced by the type of meeting they attend with higher levels of participation and a more dominant 'valued' role being evident in pre-interventional meetings. The key themes to emerge from the data include the importance of 'sharing experiences', the 'radiologist-pathologist relationship' and the value of 'continuing participation'. Radiologists believed their confidence in their clinical decision making increased when there was immediate feedback from pathologists. This study highlights the benefits of radiologists regularly participating in breast cancer MDT meetings in terms of continuing professional education resulting from collegial experiential learning. Radiologists' perceived patient care and workplace isolation were improved by sharing experiences with other cancer care colleagues. PMID:24372588

  10. Program design by a multidisciplinary team. [for structural finite element analysis on STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, S.

    1975-01-01

    The use of software engineering aids in the design of a structural finite-element analysis computer program for the STAR-100 computer is described. Nested functional diagrams to aid in communication among design team members were used, and a standardized specification format to describe modules designed by various members was adopted. This is a report of current work in which use of the functional diagrams provided continuity and helped resolve some of the problems arising in this long-running part-time project.

  11. A Method to Improve Learning Analysing Communication in Team Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermejo, Miren; Sanchez, Ana; Gutierrez, Julian; Perez, Tomas A.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years learning how to work in teams has become a common subject in higher education. Communication between student team members can be monitored using a bulletin board system, and hence, analyse individual and group role development. The composition and distribution of roles in a team are relevant characteristics that will considerably

  12. Training Students to Work Effectively in Partially Distributed Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocker, Rosalie; Rosson, Mary Beth; Kracaw, Dana; Hiltz, S. Roxanne

    2009-01-01

    Information technology teams are often partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT consists of two or more subteams that are separated geographically. This article describes research focused on the use of PDTs to engage students in "real world" IT team learning about the subject matter while also teaching them the skills they will need to work in…

  13. Training Students to Work Effectively in Partially Distributed Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocker, Rosalie; Rosson, Mary Beth; Kracaw, Dana; Hiltz, S. Roxanne

    2009-01-01

    Information technology teams are often partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT consists of two or more subteams that are separated geographically. This article describes research focused on the use of PDTs to engage students in "real world" IT team learning about the subject matter while also teaching them the skills they will need to work in

  14. A Method to Improve Learning Analysing Communication in Team Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermejo, Miren; Sanchez, Ana; Gutierrez, Julian; Perez, Tomas A.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years learning how to work in teams has become a common subject in higher education. Communication between student team members can be monitored using a bulletin board system, and hence, analyse individual and group role development. The composition and distribution of roles in a team are relevant characteristics that will considerably…

  15. Structured Learning Teams: Reimagining Student Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lendvay, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Even in a standards-based curriculum, teachers can apply constructivist practices such as structured learning teams. In this environment, students become invested in the learning aims, triggering the desire in students to awaken, get information, interpret, remix, share, and design scenarios.

  16. 'The Leadership Team': Is the Strategy Working?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, James

    1984-01-01

    Evaluates the 1975 California administrator group's decision to have principals form a leadership team instead of forming collective bargaining units. Although a 1984 survey of 100 principals found that most support the decision, it also revealed that 45 percent are dissatisfied with the concept. (MD)

  17. WIPDash: Work Item and People Dashboard for Software Development Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Mikkel R.; Fernandez, Roland; Czerwinski, Mary; Inkpen, Kori; Kulyk, Olga; Robertson, George G.

    We present WIPDash, a visualization for software development teams designed to increase group awareness of work items and code base activity. WIPDash was iteratively designed by working with two development teams, using interviews, observations, and focus groups, as well as sketches of the prototype. Based on those observations and feedback, we prototyped WIPDash and deployed it with two software teams for a one week field study. We summarize the lessons learned, and include suggestions for a future version.

  18. Multidisciplinary trauma team care in Kandahar, Afghanistan: current injury patterns and care practices.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Pelletier, Pierre; Mamczak, Christiaan; Benfield, Rodd; Elster, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Multidisciplinary trauma care systems have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Medical care in support of the global war on terror has provided opportunities to refine these systems. We report on the multidisciplinary trauma care system at the Role III Hospital at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. We reviewed the Joint Trauma System Registry, Kandahar database from 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010 and extracted data regarding patient demographics, clinical variables and outcomes. We also queried the operating room records from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. In the study period of 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010, 2599 patients presented to the trauma bay, with the most common source of injury being from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blasts (915), followed by gunshot wounds (GSW) (327). Importantly, 19 patients with triple amputations as a result of injuries from IEDs were seen. 127 patients were massively transfused. The in-hospital mortality was 4.45%. From 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2010, 4106.24 operating room hours were logged to complete 1914 patient cases. The mean number of procedures per case in 2009 was 1.27, compared to 3.11 in 2010. Multinational, multidisciplinary care is required for the large number of severely injured patients seen at Kandahar Airfield. Multidisciplinary trauma care in Kandahar is effective and can be readily employed in combat hospitals in Afghanistan and serve as a model for civilian centres. PMID:22305587

  19. Multidisciplinary performance improvement team for reducing health care-associated Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Waqar, Sana; Nigh, Kathy; Sisler, Lori; Fanning, Mary; Tancin, Steven; Brozik, Erin; Jones, Rebekah; Briggs, Frank; Keller, Lisa; LaSala, P Rocco; Krautz, Sam; Khakoo, Rashida

    2016-03-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequent cause of health care-associated diarrhea and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. It is also associated with a considerable financial burden. A concerted multidisciplinary approach is required for prevention. PMID:26541068

  20. Perspectives on a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Implementation of Planned Emergent Use Research.

    PubMed

    Racedo Africano, Carlos J; Gallo de Moraes, Alice; Smischney, Nathan J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the viewpoints of three members of a research team, on the approach to teamwork in the development of an emergent use clinical trial when dealing with diversity of opinions, in order to facilitate stakeholder buy-in. We also discuss a specific approach to the coordination of the team members, which in our opinion had a positive impact on the implementation of the project. We also comment on the influence of the team organization in the timeline and completion of a clinical trial. We hope to start a conversation on team dynamics in the design of clinical trials, especially in the context of emergent use research. PMID:26386913

  1. Quality Indicators for Multidisciplinary Team Functioning in Community-Based Childrens Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Kutash, Krista; Acri, Mary; Pollock, Michele; Armusewicz, Kelsey; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the organizational social context in 21 community-based programs serving youth at-risk for out-of-home care due to emotional or behavioral disorders and their families and program performance on five quality indicators of team functioning in teams that included a family support specialist. Results indicate that programs with higher performance on structures to facilitate teamwork, informal communication mechanisms among team members, and the ability to integrate family support specialists as equal members of the team showed more positive organizational functioning. Implications for the role of quality indicators in health care reform efforts are discussed. PMID:23873037

  2. Perspectives on a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Implementation of Planned Emergent Use Research

    PubMed Central

    Racedo Africano, Carlos J.; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Smischney, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the viewpoints of three members of a research team, on the approach to teamwork in the development of an emergent use clinical trial when dealing with diversity of opinions, in order to facilitate stakeholder buy-in. We also discuss a specific approach to the coordination of the team members, which in our opinion had a positive impact on the implementation of the project. We also comment on the influence of the team organization in the timeline and completion of a clinical trial. We hope to start a conversation on team dynamics in the design of clinical trials, especially in the context of emergent use research. PMID:26386913

  3. Impact of Virtual Work Environment on Traditional Team Domains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geroy, Gary D.; Olson, Joel; Hartman, Jackie

    2002-01-01

    Examines a virtual work team to determine the domains of the team and the effect the virtual work environment had on the domains. Discusses results of a literature review and a phenomenological heuristic case study, including the effects of post-modern philosophy and postindustrial society on changes in the marketplace. (Contains 79 references.)

  4. RefWorks in Three Steps: Undergraduate Team Bibliographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yorke-Barber, Phil; Ghiculescu, Cristina; Possin, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    RefWorks is ideally suited for undergraduate students with team-based research projects as part of their course assessment. The Dorothy Hill Physical Sciences and Engineering Library at the University of Queensland taught students from three engineering courses how to use RefWorks to manage project references and to create team-based…

  5. RefWorks in Three Steps: Undergraduate Team Bibliographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yorke-Barber, Phil; Ghiculescu, Cristina; Possin, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    RefWorks is ideally suited for undergraduate students with team-based research projects as part of their course assessment. The Dorothy Hill Physical Sciences and Engineering Library at the University of Queensland taught students from three engineering courses how to use RefWorks to manage project references and to create team-based

  6. Improving teamwork, confidence, and collaboration among members of a pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit multidisciplinary team using simulation-based team training.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Mayte I; Sepanski, Robert; Goldberg, Steven P; Shah, Samir

    2013-03-01

    Findings show that simulation-based team training (SBTT) is effective at increasing teamwork skills. Postpediatric cardiac surgery cardiac arrest (PPCS-CA) is a high-risk clinical situation with high morbidity and mortality. Whereas adult guidelines managing cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery are available, little exists for pediatric cardiac surgery. The authors developed a post-PPCS-CA algorithm and used SBTT to improve identification and management of PPCS-CA in the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. Their goal was to determine whether participation aids in improving teamwork, confidence, and communication during these events. The authors developed a simulation-based training course using common postcardiac surgical emergency scenarios with specific learning objectives. Simulated scenarios are followed by structured debriefings. Participants were evaluated based on critical performance criteria, key elements in the PPCS-CA algorithm, and Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (Team STEPPS) principles. Surveys performed before, immediately after, and 3months after participation evaluated perception of skill, knowledge, and confidence. The study had 37 participants (23 nurses, 5 cardiology/critical care trainees, 5 respiratory therapists, and 4 noncategorized subjects). Confidence and skill in the roles of team leader, advanced airway management, and cardioversion/defibrillation were increased significantly (p<0.05) immediately after training and 3months later. A significant increase (p<0.05) also was observed in the use of Team STEPPS concepts immediately after training and 3months later. This study showed SBTT to be effective in improving communication and increasing confidence among members of a multidisciplinary team during crisis scenarios. Thus, SBTT provides an excellent tool for teaching and implementing new processes. PMID:22972517

  7. Identifying vulnerable patients: role of the EAT-10 and the multidisciplinary team for early intervention and comprehensive dysphagia care.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Kala; Ekberg, Olle

    2012-01-01

    There is underdiagnosis and low awareness of dysphagia despite that the condition is modifiable and poorly managed symptoms diminish psychological well-being and overall quality of life. Frontline clinicians are in a unique position to be alert to the high prevalence of swallowing difficulty among elderly, evaluate and identify those who need intervention, and assure that individuals receive appropriate care. Proper diagnosis and treatment of oral-pharyngeal dysphagia involves a multidisciplinary healthcare team effort and starts with systematic screening of at-risk patients. The presence of a medical condition such as acute stroke, head and neck cancer, head trauma, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, pneumonia or bronchitis is adequate basis for predicting high risk. Systematic screening of dysphagia and resulting malnutrition among at-risk older adults is justified in an effort to avoid pneumonia and is recommended by clinical practice guidelines. Systematic screening with a validated method (e.g. the 10-item Eating Assessment Tool, EAT-10) as part of a comprehensive care protocol enables multidisciplinary teams to more effectively manage the condition, reduce the economic and societal burden, and improve patient quality of life. In fact, care settings with a systematic dysphagia screening program attain significantly better patient outcomes including reduced cases of pneumonia (by 55%) and reduced hospital length of stay. PMID:23051997

  8. To adopt is to adapt: the process of implementing the ICF with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team in England

    PubMed Central

    Tempest, Stephanie; Harries, Priscilla; Kilbride, Cherry; De Souza, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The success of the International Classifcation of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) depends on its uptake in clinical practice. This project aimed to explore ways the ICF could be used with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team and identify key learning from the implementation process. Method: Using an action research approach, iterative cycles of observe, plan, act and evaluate were used within three phases: exploratory; innovatory and refective. Thematic analysis was undertaken, using a model of immersion and crystallisation, on data collected via interview and focus groups, e-mail communications, minutes from relevant meetings, feld notes and a refective diary. Results: Two overall themes were determined from the data analysis which enabled implementation. There is a need to: (1) adopt the ICF in ways that meet local service needs; and (2) adapt the ICF language and format. Conclusions: The empirical fndings demonstrate how to make the ICF classifcation a clinical reality. First, we need to adopt the ICF as a vehicle to implement local service priorities e.g. to structure a multidisciplinary team report, thus enabling ownership of the implementation process. Second, we need to adapt the ICF terminology and format to make it acceptable for use by clinicians. PMID:22372376

  9. [Developing team reflexivity as a learning and working tool for medical teams].

    PubMed

    Riskin, Arieh; Bamberger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Team reflexivity is a collective activity in which team members review their previous work, and develop ideas on how to modify their work behavior in order to achieve better future results. It is an important learning tool and a key factor in explaining the varying effectiveness of teams. Team reflexivity encompasses both self-awareness and agency, and includes three main activities: reflection, planning, and adaptation. The model of briefing-debriefing cycles promotes team reflexivity. Its key elements include: Pre-action briefing--setting objectives, roles, and strategies the mission, as well as proposing adaptations based on what was previously learnt from similar procedures; Post-action debriefing--reflecting on the procedure performed and reviewing the extent to which objectives were met, and what can be learnt for future tasks. Given the widespread attention to team-based work systems and organizational learning, efforts should be made toward ntroducing team reflexivity in health administration systems. Implementation could be difficult because most teams in hospitals are short-lived action teams formed for a particular event, with limited time and opportunity to consciously reflect upon their actions. But it is precisely in these contexts that reflexive processes have the most to offer instead of the natural impulsive collective logics. Team reflexivity suggests a potential solution to the major problems of iatorgenesis--avoidable medical errors, as it forces all team members to participate in a reflexive process together. Briefing-debriefing technology was studied mainly in surgical teams and was shown to enhance team-based learning and to improve quality-related outcomes and safety. PMID:24791567

  10. Determinants of treatment plan implementation in multidisciplinary team meetings for patients with chronic diseases: a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Rosalind; Xanthopoulou, Penny; Wallace, Isla; Nic a’ Bháird, Caoimhe; Lanceley, Anne; Clarke, Alex; Livingston, Gill; Prentice, Archie; Ardron, Dave; Harris, Miriam; King, Michael; Michie, Susan; Blazeby, Jane M; Austin-Parsons, Natalie; Gibbs, Simon; Barber, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are assumed to produce better decisions and are extensively used to manage chronic disease in the National Health Service (NHS). However, evidence for their effectiveness is mixed. Our objective was to investigate determinants of MDT effectiveness by examining factors influencing the implementation of MDT treatment plans. This is a proxy measure of effectiveness, because it lies on the pathway to improvements in health, and reflects team decision making which has taken account of clinical and non-clinical information. Additionally, this measure can be compared across MDTs for different conditions. Methods We undertook a prospective mixed-methods study of 12 MDTs in London and North Thames. Data were collected by observation of 370 MDT meetings, interviews with 53 MDT members, and from 2654 patient medical records. We examined the influence of patient-related factors (disease, age, sex, deprivation, whether their preferences and other clinical/health behaviours were mentioned) and MDT features (as measured using the ‘Team Climate Inventory’ and skill mix) on the implementation of MDT treatment plans. Results The adjusted odds (or likelihood) of implementation was reduced by 25% for each additional professional group represented at the MDT meeting. Implementation was more likely in MDTs with clear goals and processes and a good ‘Team Climate’ (adjusted OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.15 to 3.31 for a unit increase in Team Climate Inventory (TCI) score). Implementation varied by disease category, with the lowest adjusted odds of implementation in mental health teams. Implementation was also lower for patients living in more deprived areas (adjusted odds of implementation for patients in the most compared with least deprived areas was 0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.91). Conclusions Greater multidisciplinarity is not necessarily associated with more effective decision making. Explicit goals and procedures are also crucial. Decision implementation should be routinely monitored to ensure the equitable provision of care. PMID:24915539

  11. The work of recovery on two assertive community treatment teams.

    PubMed

    Salyers, Michelle P; Stull, Laura G; Rollins, Angela L; Hopper, Kim

    2011-05-01

    The compatibility of recovery work with the Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) model has been debated; and little is known about how to best measure the work of recovery. Two ACT teams with high and low recovery orientation were identified by expert consensus and compared on a number of dimensions. Using an interpretive, qualitative approach to analyze interview and observation data, teams differed in the extent to which the environment, team structure, staff attitudes, and processes of working with consumers supported principles of recovery orientation. We present a model of recovery work and discuss implications for research and practice. PMID:20839045

  12. The Sznajd Model with Team Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong-Jun; Lin, Lu-Zi; Sun, He; He, Ming-Feng

    In 2000, Sznajd-weron and Sznajd introduced a model for the simulation of a closed democratic community with a two-party system, and it is found that a closed community has to evolve either to a dictatorship or a stalemate state. In this paper, we continued to study on this model. All the neighboring individuals holding the same opinion is defined as a team, which will influence its nearest neighbor's decision and realize the opinion evolution. After some time-steps, a steady state appeared and the stalemate state in original model is eliminated. Moreover, the demand of time-steps has decreased dramatically. In addition, we also analyzed the effect of the various dispersal degree of the initial opinion on the opinion converging at the probability of one steady state. Finally we analyzed the effect of noise on convergence and found that the ability of anti-noise was increased about 1000 times compared with Sznajd model.

  13. What Makes Teams Take? Employee Reactions to Work Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Larry W.; MacDuffie, John Paul; Doucet, Lorna

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted of employee reactions to work teams, reduced job classification, and skill-based pay established by an agreement between Chrysler and the United Auto Workers. Attitudes were more negative in plants threatened by closure, but individuals in those plants engaged in more team behaviors. Responses varied by demography and

  14. Work Teams in Schools. ERIC Digest, Number 103.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Lori Jo

    Quality work teams that are based on W. Edwards Deming's business-management theories have proliferated at the school and district levels to handle problem solving and decision making. Teams are said to build stronger relationships among those involved in education and, ultimately, to benefit students because more people with broader perspectives

  15. Multidisciplinary Teams and Obesity: Role of the Modern Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Kevin M; Manning, Debra A; Julian, Regina M

    2016-03-01

    With the growing obesity epidemic, it is difficult for individual primary care providers to devote the time and effort necessary to achieve meaningful weight loss for significant numbers of patients. A variety of health care professionals provide value and evidence-based care that is effective in treating obesity and other preventable diseases. Multidisciplinary collaboration between primary care physicians and other trained health professionals within patient-centered medical homes offers an effective approach to sustainable behavioral treatment options for individuals who are obese or overweight. PMID:26896199

  16. Pressure ulcer multidisciplinary teams via telemedicine: a pragmatic cluster randomized stepped wedge trial in long term care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The study was conducted to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of enhanced multi-disciplinary teams (EMDTs) vs. usual care for the treatment of pressure ulcers in long term care (LTC) facilities in Ontario, Canada Methods We conducted a multi-method study: a pragmatic cluster randomized stepped-wedge trial, ethnographic observation and in-depth interviews, and an economic evaluation. Long term care facilities (clusters) were randomly allocated to start dates of the intervention. An advance practice nurse (APN) with expertise in skin and wound care visited intervention facilities to educate staff on pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, supported by an off-site hospital based expert multi-disciplinary wound care team via email, telephone, or video link as needed. The primary outcome was rate of reduction in pressure ulcer surface area (cm2/day) measured on before and after standard photographs by an assessor blinded to facility allocation. Secondary outcomes were time to healing, probability of healing, pressure ulcer incidence, pressure ulcer prevalence, wound pain, hospitalization, emergency department visits, utility, and cost. Results 12 of 15 eligible LTC facilities were randomly selected to participate and randomized to start date of the intervention following the stepped wedge design. 137 residents with a total of 259 pressure ulcers (stage 2 or greater) were recruited over the 17month study period. No statistically significant differences were found between control and intervention periods on any of the primary or secondary outcomes. The economic evaluation demonstrated a mean reduction in direct care costs of $650 per resident compared to usual care. The qualitative study suggested that onsite support by APN wound specialists was welcomed, and is responsible for reduced costs through discontinuation of expensive non evidence based treatments. Insufficient allocation of nursing home staff time to wound care may explain the lack of impact on healing. Conclusion Enhanced multi-disciplinary wound care teams were cost effective, with most benefit through cost reduction initiated by APNs, but did not improve the treatment of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. Policy makers should consider the potential yield of strengthening evidence based primary care within LTC facilities, through outreach by APNs. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01232764 PMID:24559218

  17. Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the

  18. Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

  19. Impact of a Behavioral-Based Intervention on Inspiratory Muscle Training Prescription by a Multidisciplinary Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Alanna M.; Li, Linda C.; Geddes, E. Lynne; Brooks, Dina; Hoens, Alison M.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Our goal was to compare behavioral- and information-based interventions aimed at increasing prescription of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by interdisciplinary teams during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Methods: Six hospital PR programs were randomly assigned to a

  20. Multidisciplinary Teams and Group Decision-Making Techniques: Possible Solutions to Decision-Making Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Steven M.; Woodman, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    In placement decisions necessitated by PL 94-142, the multidimensional team approach may be hindered by group problems. The more structured nominal group technique (NGT) is suggested. NGT has six steps: silent, written generation of ideas; round robin reporting; group discussion for clarification; preliminary priority vote; discussion; and final

  1. Implementation of a multidisciplinary treatment team for hepatocellular cancer at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center improves survival

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy T.; Sawhney, Rajiv; Monto, Alexander; Ben Davoren, J.; Kirkland, Jacob G.; Stewart, Lygia

    2008-01-01

    Several methods of treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are often used in combination for either palliation or cure. We established a multidisciplinary treatment team (MDTT) at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center in November 2003 and assessed whether aggressive multimodality treatment strategies may affect survival. A prospective database was established and follow-up information from patients with presumed HCC was collected up to November 2006. Information from the American College of Surgeons (ACS) cancer registry from January 2000 to November 2003 identified patients with HCC that were evaluated at the same institution prior to the establishment of the MDTT. The establishment of a MDTT resulted in the doubling of patient referrals for treatment. Significantly more patients were evaluated at earlier stages of disease and received either palliative or curative therapies. The overall survival (p<0.0001) and length of follow-up (p<0.05) were significantly improved after the establishment of the MDTT. Stage-by-stage comparisons indicate that aggressive multimodality therapy conferred significant survival advantage to patients with American Joint Commission on Cancer (AJCC) stage II HCC (odds ratio 15.50, p<0.001). Multidisciplinary collaboration and multimodality treatment approaches are important in the management of hepatocelluar carcinoma and improves patient survival. PMID:19088925

  2. The challenges of meeting nutritional requirements in children and adults with epidermolysis bullosa: proceedings of a multidisciplinary team study day.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, L; Haynes, L; Sklar, M; Martinez, A E; Mellerio, J E

    2011-08-01

    This is a report of a study day held in London on 3 March 2010 to discuss measures with which to meet the nutritional requirements of patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Members of national and international multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) caring for patients with EB attended this event. The study day focused on four challenging aspects of management intimately associated with nutritional status in EB, necessitating close cooperation between MDT members: iron-deficiency anaemia, gastrostomy placement and feeding, muscle mass and mobility, and dental health. The study day provided a unique forum for dietitians, doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, psychologists, psychotherapists, dentists, dental hygienists and occupational therapists to share knowledge and debate problems common to all who strive to promote best practice in this rare and complex group of conditions. PMID:21671991

  3. The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Doo Hun; Petty, Gregory; Fontan, Johnny; Yoon, Seung Won

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between a self-directed work team and a traditional work team based on four work ethic subscales and identify differences in work ethic based on six demographic factors. The major findings from the study indicated there were significant differences in the work…

  4. [Close team work: sharing knowledge, solidarity and hope].

    PubMed

    Aubin, Diane; Abdel-Baki, Amal; Baret, Caroline; Cadieux, Christiane; Hill, Terri; Lafortune, David; Ltourneau, Pierre; Monast, Danielle; Tiberghien, Candice

    2011-01-01

    A proximity team was created more than eight years ago by a group of health professionals working with disaffiliated and homeless youth in the most precarious of situations. Proximity meetings have continued since that time, despite many changes within the team, including departures and new arrivals. The proximity team is a partnership project which revolves around common values and principles aimed at improving services for youth who find themselves marginalized or at risk of exclusion. Health professionals from various backgrounds explain why they believe in this approach to proximity work. PMID:22997646

  5. Management of infected nonunion of the long bones by a multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Bose, D; Kugan, R; Stubbs, D; McNally, M

    2015-06-01

    Infected nonunion of a long bone continues to present difficulties in management. In addition to treating the infection, it is necessary to establish bony stability, encourage fracture union and reconstruct the soft-tissue envelope. We present a series of 67 infected nonunions of a long bone in 66 patients treated in a multidisciplinary unit. The operative treatment of patients suitable for limb salvage was performed as a single procedure. Antibiotic regimes were determined by the results of microbiological culture. At a mean follow-up of 52 months (22 to 97), 59 patients (88%) had an infection-free united fracture in a functioning limb. Seven others required amputation (three as primary treatment, three after late failure of limb salvage and one for recalcitrant pain after union). The initial operation achieved union in 54 (84%) of the salvaged limbs at a mean of nine months (three to 26), with recurrence of infection in 9%. Further surgery in those limbs that remained ununited increased the union rate to 62 (97%) of the 64 limbs treated by limb salvage at final follow-up. The use of internal fixation was associated with a higher risk of recurrent infection than external fixation. PMID:26033062

  6. Replantation of an Amputated Hand: A Rare Case Report and Acknowledgement of a Multidisciplinary Team Input

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Vipul; Jacob, Joe; Alsafy, Taif; Punnoose, Thomas; Iyasere, G

    2011-01-01

    An amputation of the hand is a devastating injury. It adversely affects the victim’s ability to earn a livelihood, support a family, and carry out daily activities. It has a great psychological impact. We report a middle aged male with an amputation at the level of the distal forearm who underwent replantation. The operative details of this case are described. Awareness of the possibility of salvage should be spread among healthcare personnel and the need for immediate attention by a multispeciality team is advocated. This report reviews the literature related to the operative technique, contraindications and long term results. PMID:22043436

  7. Co-psychotherapy and multiple psychotherapy in multidisciplinary teams for ambulatory treatment.

    PubMed

    Nuytten, J

    1985-01-01

    In order to describe clearly and undoubtfully each psychotherapeutic situation, combining one or several therapists in one or several psychotherapeutic methods, an original classification is proposed. Evolution of concepts such as co-psychotherapy and multiple psychotherapy are studied. Advantages and disadvantages for both therapist and patient are listed, and generally accepted viewpoints as well as controversies are discussed. A statistical survey, using a large number of undifferentiated registrations made by a representative number of psychotherapeutic teams, permits a first approach of the present situation in this particular field of psychotherapy, and some significant conclusions are to be made. PMID:4061117

  8. Team Teaching in Social Work: Sharing Power with Bachelor of Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapf, Michael Kim; Jerome, Les; Williams, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Team teaching in social work education usually involves sequential lectures delivered by different instructors--relay or tag-team teaching. Truly collaborative or collegial team teaching involves a committed group of diverse instructors interacting together as equals in the classroom. Having more than one teacher in the classroom confounds…

  9. Team Teaching in Social Work: Sharing Power with Bachelor of Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapf, Michael Kim; Jerome, Les; Williams, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Team teaching in social work education usually involves sequential lectures delivered by different instructors--relay or tag-team teaching. Truly collaborative or collegial team teaching involves a committed group of diverse instructors interacting together as equals in the classroom. Having more than one teacher in the classroom confounds

  10. Utilization and impact of a pulsed-xenon ultraviolet room disinfection system and multidisciplinary care team on Clostridium difficile in a long-term acute care facility.

    PubMed

    Miller, Renee; Simmons, Sarah; Dale, Charles; Stachowiak, Julie; Stibich, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Health care-associated transmission of Clostridium difficile has been well documented in long-term acute care facilities. This article reports on 2 interventions aimed at reducing the transmission risk: multidisciplinary care teams and no-touch pulsed-xenon disinfection. C difficile transmission rates were tracked over a 39-month period while these 2 interventions were implemented. After a baseline period of 1 year, multidisciplinary teams were implemented for an additional 1-year period with a focus on reducing C difficile infection. During this time, transmission rates dropped 17% (P=.91). In the following 15-month period, the multidisciplinary teams continued, and pulsed-xenon disinfection was added as an adjunct to manual cleaning of patient rooms and common areas. During this time, transmission rates dropped 57% (P=.02). These results indicate that the combined use of multidisciplinary teams and pulsed-xenon disinfection can have a significant impact on C difficile transmission rates in long-term care facilities. PMID:26362699

  11. Ebola a reality of modern Public Health; need for Surveillance, Preparedness and Response Training for Health Workers and other multidisciplinary teams: a case for Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Bazeyo, William; Bagonza, James; Halage, Ali; Okure, Gildo; Mugagga, Malimbo; Musoke, Robert; Tumwebaze, Mathias; Tusiime, Suzan; Ssendagire, Steven; Nabukenya, Immaculate; Pande, Steven; Aanyu, Christine; Etajak, Samuel; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction West Africa is experiencing the largest ever reported Ebola outbreak. Over 20,000 people have been infected of which about 9000 have died. It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease. In this paper, we share Uganda's experiences on how the capacity of health workers and other multidisciplinary teams can be improved in preparing and responding to Ebola outbreaks. Methods Makerere University School of Public Health in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET), trained health care workers and other multidisciplinary teams from six border districts of Uganda so as to increase their alertness and response capabilities towards Ebola. We used participatory training methods to impart knowledge and skills and guided participants to develop district epidemic response plans. Communities were sensitized about Ebola through mass media, IEC materials, and infection control and prevention materials were distributed in districts. Results We trained 210 health workers and 120 other multidisciplinary team members on Ebola surveillance, preparedness and response. Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills. Communities were sensitized about Ebola and Districts received person protective equipments and items for infection prevention. Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed. Conclusion Training of multidisciplinary teams improves the country's preparedness, alertness and response capabilities in controlling Ebola. West African countries experiencing Ebola outbreaks could draw lessons from the Uganda experience to contain the outbreak. PMID:26301008

  12. Improving the Performance of Social Workers during Multi-Disciplinary Team Case Reviews of Delinquent Adolescents through Public Posting and Verbal Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbone, Vincent J.

    This practicum was implemented to improve the rehabilitation planning skills of social workers in a juvenile correctional facility. The goal was to increase social workers' discussion of all relevant rehabilitation planning data during multi-disciplinary team meetings (Case Review Committee). A related objective was the overall improvement of

  13. Multidisciplinary team care for CKD-MBD. Achieving KDIGO guideline recommendations in the bundling era.

    PubMed

    McCann, Linda; Hoefs, Meghan

    2014-04-01

    The increasing prevalence of end-stage renal disease and planned expansion of the Medicare bundled payment system will place a greater financial burden on dialysis providers. Management of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is dependent on interdisciplinary team (IDT) interventions such as dietary modification, medication, and adequate dialysis therapy. Optimizing adherence to diet and medications requires an educated and motivated IDT, patient, and patient support system. The financial constraints of bundling will increase the roles of social workers and dietitians in promoting therapy adherence. Innovative and relevant tactics provide opportunity to overcome monotonous routines, encourage adherence to diet and complex polypharmacy regimens, and achieve recommended biochemical targets as outlined in Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Guideline for Chronic Kidney Disease (KDIGO) - CKD-MBD. PMID:24960985

  14. Kalevala or Keats: poetic traditions as a model for multidisciplinary miscommunication and team splitting.

    PubMed

    Dodwell, D

    2008-09-01

    Attention is drawn to the oral tradition in poetry and some ways in which it differs from written, literary poetry. Some of these differences mirror differences between the oral communication typical of a psychiatric ward nursing handover and the writing-based communication styles of psychiatrists. In particular, the oral tradition tends to involve an interactive and participatory style, stewardship (rather than authorship) of the message, a less linear approach to time and valuing the use of familiar formulae. Neither style is intrinsically superior or inferior. The two styles have significant differences in context, intent and rules (i.e. in linguistic 'pragmatics'). In mental health practice, the apparently shared vocabulary and setting conceals these differences. The fact that these variations are hidden increases the risks of miscommunication and of team splitting. The use of an analogy from poetry is intended to make the differences more explicit, and thus generate awareness, discussion and problem solving. PMID:18768006

  15. Prenatal counseling tools for the pediatric radiologist as part of a multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Anne K; Menzel, Margaret B; Bulas, Dorothy I

    2016-02-01

    Fetal abnormalities are present in 3-5% of all pregnancies, leading to increased anxiety and the need for important discussions between patients and their care providers. Regardless of the severity of the anomaly, receiving the information can be traumatic for the pregnant patient and her partner. Most physicians who aren't trained to provide prenatal counseling understandably feel uncomfortable with the uncertainty and complex issues that arise in such high-stress counseling sessions. Genetic counselors are specifically trained to counsel patients in the setting of a fetal abnormality; however additional input from pediatric radiologists and other pediatric specialists is invaluable to parents in these situations and such input is an essential part of a team approach to prenatal counseling. The goal of this article is to provide a basic approach to counseling in the prenatal setting for pediatric radiologists and other specialists. PMID:26829948

  16. [General practice research units in Denmark: multidisciplinary research in support of practical work].

    PubMed

    Reventlow, Susanne; Broholm, Katalin Alexa Kirly; Mkel, Marjukka

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark the general practice research units operating in connection with universities provide a home base, training and methodology support for researchers in the field from medical students to general practitioners carrying out practical work. Research issues frequently require a multidisciplinary approach and use of different kinds of materials. Problems arising from the practical work of general practitioners take priority in the wide selection of topics. The units have networked efficiently with organizations of general practitioners and medical education. The combination of research environments has created synergy benefiting everybody and increased the scientific productivity and visibility of the field. PMID:24961064

  17. [Multidisciplinary team in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention, from the assessment to the education: an educational project].

    PubMed

    Da Vico, Letizia; Ciompi, Maddalena; Schinin, Francesca; Sogaro, Elena; Mannelli, Weruska; Cortini, Sandro

    2014-03-01

    The authors explain the training project: "Multidisciplinarity in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention: from the evaluation to the therapeutic education", the rationale and purpose of a pathway for patients with ischemic heart disease treated in the acute phase with both medical and surgical means, and then placed in a rehabilitation program. The training project was transformed into a learning event for the Region of Sicily and later for the Region of Tuscany that has adopted it, encouraging the spread over the entire region. It highlights the role of the team, which focuses on the patient, converging on it multidisciplinary expertise whose goal is the reintegration of the subjects in their life-context, with appropriate evaluation, treatment and changes in lifestyle. From the valuations and declining the specific interventions to each job profile according to the principle of synergy obtained by multi-professional integration. All phases of the training project (assessment, intervention, evaluation) are addressed by each of the professionals (nurse, dietitian, physiotherapist, psychologist) that under the responsibility of the cardiologist realize, within the welfare, a concrete process of therapeutic education from which no one can ignore the "vision" of a global care of the patient. PMID:25481939

  18. [Multidisciplinary team in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention, from the assessment to the education: an educational project].

    PubMed

    Da Vico, Letizia; Ciompi, Maddalena; Schinin, Francesca; Sogaro, Elena; Mannelli, Weruska; Cortini, Sandro

    2014-03-01

    The authors explain the training project: "Multidisciplinarity in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention: from the evaluation to the therapeutic education", the rationale and purpose of a pathway for patients with ischemic heart disease treated in the acute phase with both medical and surgical means, and then placed in a rehabilitation program. The training project was transformed into a learning event for the Region of Sicily and later for the Region of Tuscany that has adopted it, encouraging the spread over the entire region. It highlights the role of the team, which focuses on the patient, converging on it multidisciplinary expertise whose goal is the reintegration of the subjects in their life-context, with appropriate evaluation, treatment and changes in lifestyle. From the valuations and declining the specific interventions to each job profile according to the principle of synergy obtained by multi-professional integration. All phases of the training project (assessment, intervention, evaluation) are addressed by each of the professionals (nurse, dietitian, physiotherapist, psychologist) that under the responsibility of the cardiologist realize, within the welfare, a concrete process of therapeutic education from which no one can ignore the "vision" of a global care of the patient. PMID:25508791

  19. Social Work Students' Perceptions of Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macke, Caroline; Taylor, Jessica Averitt; Taylor, James E.; Tapp, Karen; Canfield, James

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to examine social work students' perceptions of Team-Based Learning (N = 154). Aside from looking at overall student perceptions, comparative analyses examined differences in perceptions between BSW and MSW students, and between Caucasian students and students of color. Findings for the overall sample revealed favorable…

  20. Social Work Students' Perceptions of Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macke, Caroline; Taylor, Jessica Averitt; Taylor, James E.; Tapp, Karen; Canfield, James

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to examine social work students' perceptions of Team-Based Learning (N=154). Aside from looking at overall student perceptions, comparative analyses examined differences in perceptions between BSW and MSW students, and between Caucasian students and students of color. Findings for the overall sample revealed favorable

  1. Implementing Self-Directed Work Teams at a College Newspaper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pillis, Emmeline; Parsons, Blake

    2013-01-01

    The problem: Motivating and retaining staff had become an ongoing problem at the student newspaper. Student staffers would quit abruptly when overwhelmed or dissatisfied, leaving the newspaper with critical positions vacant. This affected the performance of the newspaper. Method: The newspaper was organized into self directed work teams (SDWTs).

  2. Enhancing Social Work Education through Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Group learning strategies are used extensively in social work education, despite the challenges and negative outcomes regularly experienced by students and faculty. Building on principles of cooperative learning, team-based learning offers a more structured approach that maximizes the benefits of cooperative learning while also offering

  3. Implementing Self-Directed Work Teams at a College Newspaper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pillis, Emmeline; Parsons, Blake

    2013-01-01

    The problem: Motivating and retaining staff had become an ongoing problem at the student newspaper. Student staffers would quit abruptly when overwhelmed or dissatisfied, leaving the newspaper with critical positions vacant. This affected the performance of the newspaper. Method: The newspaper was organized into self directed work teams (SDWTs).…

  4. Making Workers Visible: Unmasking Learning in a Work Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Sharon L.; Carter, Vicki K.; Schied, Fred M.

    2001-01-01

    A case study of a work team in a company using quality management strategies found that training to improve customer service actually served to shape workers' attitudes and control their behavior. The focus of this organizational learning was instrumental and served the interests of the organization, not the workers. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  5. Improving guideline concordance in multidisciplinary teams: preliminary results of a cluster-randomized trial evaluating the effect of a web-based audit and feedback intervention with outreach visits

    PubMed Central

    van Engen-Verheul, Mariëtte M.; Gude, Wouter T.; van der Veer, Sabine N.; Kemps, Hareld M.C.; Jaspers, Monique M.W.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.; Peek, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Despite their widespread use, audit and feedback (A&F) interventions show variable effectiveness on improving professional performance. Based on known facilitators of successful A&F interventions, we developed a web-based A&F intervention with indicator-based performance feedback, benchmark information, action planning and outreach visits. The goal of the intervention was to engage with multidisciplinary teams to overcome barriers to guideline concordance and to improve overall team performance in the field of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). To assess its effectiveness we conducted a cluster-randomized trial in 18 CR clinics (14,847 patients) already working with computerized decision support (CDS). Our preliminary results showed no increase in concordance with guideline recommendations regarding prescription of CR therapies. Future analyses will investigate whether our intervention did improve team performance on other quality indicators. PMID:26958310

  6. Primary care team working in Ireland: a qualitative exploration of team members' experiences in a new primary care service.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Norelee; Armstrong, Claire; Woodward, Oonagh; Cullen, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Team working is an integral aspect of primary care, but barriers to effective team working can limit the effectiveness of a primary care team (PCT). The establishment of new PCTs in Ireland provides an excellent opportunity to explore team working in action. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of team members working in a PCT. Team members (n = 19) from two PCTs were interviewed from May to June 2010 using a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using NVivo (version 8). Thematic analysis was used to explore the data. We identified five main themes that described the experiences of the team members. The themes were support for primary care, managing change, communication, evolution of roles and benefits of team working. Team members were generally supportive of primary care and had experienced benefits to their practice and to the care of their patients from participation in the team. Regular team meetings enabled communication and discussion of complex cases. Despite the significant scope for role conflict due to the varied employment arrangements of the team members, neither role nor interpersonal conflict was evident in the teams studied. In addition, despite the unusual team structure in Irish PCTs - where there is no formally appointed team leader or manager - general issues around team working and its benefits and challenges were very similar to those found in other international studies. This suggests, in contrast to some studies, that some aspects of the leadership role may not be as important in successful PCT functioning as previously thought. Nonetheless, team leadership was identified as an important issue in the further development of the teams. PMID:25429985

  7. A successful methodology for designing and implementing virtual work teams

    SciTech Connect

    Stuewe, R.B.; Barnes, M.G.; Hughes, D.K.

    1997-11-01

    A system has been implemented at Los Alamos National Laboratory to rapidly staff and manage project teams. These project teams are created and subsequently perform their project functions using information technology as the communication medium. A simplified model of group interactions was used to guide the design and implementation of the system. The model uses three primary axes of group interactions to express the functional requirements that must be supported by a virtual work team application. The evolution of the approach and its relationship to traditional project management are described. A number of design characteristics were found to be critical to the success of the implementation and are presented. The technology and supporting processes and the business results stemming from implementation of the system are described in a limited manner.

  8. Psychiatric team's experience of working in psychiatric wards

    PubMed Central

    Fard, Victoria Omrani; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Fanian, Nasrin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychiatric team plays an important role in treating and taking care of psychiatric patients. Using this team's experience seems necessary for enhancing care services. The aim of this study was to assess psychiatric team's experience of working in different psychiatric groups. METHODS: This is a qualitative study with phenomenological approach. Samples were chosen using purposive sampling method. Samples included 10 personnel from psychiatric wards of 4 hospitals in Isfahan city in 2007. Data was gathered using deep interviews which were recorded on tapes. Data was analyzed using Colaizzi's seven steps method. RESULTS: Results from participants experiences were summarized in 3 main concepts: communication, ability and conflict; and 5 sub concepts: cooperation, self acknowledgement, hope, qualification and multiple roles. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study could be used in future programming to enhance care services for psychiatric patients in hospitals. PMID:22039375

  9. The Open Science Grid - Support for Multi-Disciplinary Team Science - the Adolescent Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerdick, Lothar; Ernst, Michael; Fraser, Dan; Livny, Miron; Pordes, Ruth; Sehgal, Chander; Würthwein, Frank; Open Science Grid

    2012-12-01

    As it enters adolescence the Open Science Grid (OSG) is bringing a maturing fabric of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) services that supports an expanding HEP community to an increasingly diverse spectrum of domain scientists. Working closely with researchers on campuses throughout the US and in collaboration with national cyberinfrastructure initiatives, we transform their computing environment through new concepts, advanced tools and deep experience. We discuss examples of these including: the pilot-job overlay concepts and technologies now in use throughout OSG and delivering 1.4 Million CPU hours/day; the role of campus infrastructures- built out from concepts of sharing across multiple local faculty clusters (made good use of already by many of the HEP Tier-2 sites in the US); the work towards the use of clouds and access to high throughput parallel (multi-core and GPU) compute resources; and the progress we are making towards meeting the data management and access needs of non-HEP communities with general tools derived from the experience of the parochial tools in HEP (integration of Globus Online, prototyping with IRODS, investigations into Wide Area Lustre). We will also review our activities and experiences as HTC Service Provider to the recently awarded NSF XD XSEDE project, the evolution of the US NSF TeraGrid project, and how we are extending the reach of HTC through this activity to the increasingly broad national cyberinfrastructure. We believe that a coordinated view of the HPC and HTC resources in the US will further expand their impact on scientific discovery.

  10. The tough work of turning around a team.

    PubMed

    Parcells, B

    2000-01-01

    Bill Parcells, one of the NFL's winningest coaches, offers business leaders three rules for reversing the fortunes of a losing team. He contends that the keys to motivating people are much the same whether they're playing on a football field or working in an office. The first rule is to make it clear from day one that you're in charge. Parcells has found that holding frank one-on-one conversations with every member of the organization is essential to success. Leaders can do everything right with their teams and still fail if they aren't able to reach each member as an individual. Rule two is that confrontation is healthy. Parcells relishes confrontation because it provides an opportunity to get things straight with people. Confrontation does not mean putting someone down. When criticizing members of the team, he puts it in a positive context. Once he sets that context, he's not afraid to be blunt about players' failings. Parcells's third rule is to identify small goals and hit them. He believes that success breeds success. Once a team gets in the habit of losing, confidence dips and success seems unreachable. To break the habit of losing, Parcells focuses on achieving goals within immediate reach. In the end, Parcells is convinced that if you get people on your team who share the same goals and the same passion, and if you push them to achieve at the highest level, you're going to come out on top. PMID:11184972

  11. The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Gregory C.; Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won; Fontan, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between self-directed work teams and traditional work groups using four work ethic subscales: dependable, considerate, ambitious, and cooperative (Dawson, [1999]; Petty, [1991]). Differences in measured work ethic scores were also compared across six demographic variables: age,…

  12. The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Gregory C.; Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won; Fontan, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between self-directed work teams and traditional work groups using four work ethic subscales: dependable, considerate, ambitious, and cooperative (Dawson, [1999]; Petty, [1991]). Differences in measured work ethic scores were also compared across six demographic variables: age,

  13. Team behaviors in emergency care: a qualitative study using behavior analysis of what makes team work

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective Teamwork has been suggested as a promising approach to improving care processes in emergency departments (ED). However, for teamwork to yield expected results, implementation must involve behavior changes. The aim of this study is to use behavior analysis to qualitatively examine how teamwork plays out in practice and to understand eventual discrepancies between planned and actual behaviors. Methods The study was set in a Swedish university hospital ED during the initial phase of implementation of teamwork. The intervention focused on changing the environment and redesigning the work process to enable teamwork. Each team was responsible for entire care episodes, i.e. from patient arrival to discharge from the ED. Data was collected through 3 days of observations structured around an observation scheme. Behavior analysis was used to pinpoint key teamwork behaviors for consistent implementation of teamwork and to analyze the contingencies that decreased or increased the likelihood of these behaviors. Results We found a great discrepancy between the planned and the observed teamwork processes. 60% of the 44 team patients observed were handled solely by the appointed team members. Only 36% of the observed patient care processes started according to the description in the planned teamwork process, that is, with taking patient history together. Beside this behavior, meeting in a defined team room and communicating with team members were shown to be essential for the consistent implementation of teamwork. Factors that decreased the likelihood of these key behaviors included waiting for other team members or having trouble locating each other. Getting work done without delay and having an overview of the patient care process increased team behaviors. Moreover, explicit instructions on when team members should interact and communicate increased adherence to the planned process. Conclusions This study illustrates how behavior analysis can be used to understand discrepancies between planned and observed behaviors. By examining the contextual conditions that may influence behaviors, improvements in implementation strategies can be suggested. Thereby, the adherence to a planned intervention can be improved, and/or revisions of the intervention be suggested. PMID:22085585

  14. Participative Work Design in Lean Production: A Strategy for Dissolving the Paradox between Standardized Work and Team Proactivity by Stimulating Team Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz, Annika; Hansen, Niklas; Antoni, Conny

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore job design mechanisms that enhance team proactivity within a lean production system where autonomy is uttermost restricted. We propose and test a model where the team learning process of building shared meaning of work mediates the relationship between team participative decision-making, inter team

  15. [Team work as the way to back up consciousness].

    PubMed

    Maksakova, O A

    2014-01-01

    Conception of unconsciousness after brain injury had changed considerably due to high technologies. Nowadays some patients considered by clinicians as unconscious are admitted to awareness with neurovisual techniques. Physiologic and neurophysiologic signals' combining brings forward robust quantification of patients' clinical state too. These "Third Person View" approaches leave the question of patient's experience content open because of determined stimuli paradigms. Yet patient's response pattern becomes formed not only with brain deficits but by questions-stimuli, context, and inquiring person. Rehabilitation team work is sourcing of phenomenology knowledge of patient's processes due to "First-Second Person View" approach and chance to real-time change. Restoration of consciousness comes of building-up patients' contacts with their own bodies, other persons and outward things. The basic principle of this approach is feedback assignement to any minimal movement or vegetative signal of the patient. The net of feedbacks with the patient and inter-professional ones builds up the team as Non-linear Complex System. Characteristics of "Team-Patient" system status are energy, entropy, and complexity. Impairment of consciousness as the absence of linear contact with a patient may appear together with a loss of essential functions (low energy), vegetative-visceral fits (excessive energy and low order), motor agitation (excessive energy and order), and etc. Techniques of team work are different in these cases for resulting optimization of the system condition. System complexity rise is a powerful tool to arouse apatient with impairment of consciousness. System self-organization is a key process for awareness formation. Analysis of complex communication process in patient--team system may be useful for creation of the general theory of consciousness. PMID:24761598

  16. Building a healthy work environment: a nursing resource team perspective.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Leslie; Slinger, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    Leadership and staff from the London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) Nursing Resource Team (NRT), including members of their Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Council, attended the first Southern Ontario Nursing Resource Team Conference (SONRTC), held March 2012 in Toronto. The SONRTC highlighted healthy work environments (HWEs), noting vast differences among the province's various organizations. Conversely, CQI Council members anecdotally acknowledged similar inconsistencies in HWEs across the various inpatient departments at LHSC. In fact, the mobility of the NRT role allows these nurses to make an unbiased observation about the culture, behaviours and practices of specific units as well as cross-reference departments regarding HWEs. Studies have documented that HWEs have a direct impact on the quality of patient care. Furthermore, the literature supports a relationship between HWEs and nurse job satisfaction. Based on this heightened awareness, the NRT CQI Council aimed to investigate HWEs at LHSC. The American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN) Standards for Establishing and Sustaining Healthy Work Environments was adapted in developing a survey for measuring HWEs based on the perceptions of NRT staff. Each of the departments was evaluated in terms of the following indicators: skilled communication, true collaboration, effective decision-making, appropriate staffing, meaningful recognition and authentic leadership (AACN 2005). Ultimately, the Building a Healthy Work Environment: A Nursing Resource Team Perspective survey was employed with NRT nurses at LHSC, and data was collected for use by leadership and staff for creating HWE strategies aimed at improving the quality of patient care. PMID:24860954

  17. The Team Player Inventory: Reliability and Validity of a Measure of Predisposition toward Organizational Team-Working Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Theresa J. B.

    1999-01-01

    The 10-item Team Player Inventory assesses the degree to which individuals are positively predisposed toward organizational team-working environments. Discusses how this inventory will assist researchers in testing theoretical models of team effectiveness and practitioners in determining the degree to which specific individuals will react

  18. Are self-directed work teams successful and effective tools for today`s organization?

    SciTech Connect

    Arnwine, A.D.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to (1) show the effectiveness and success of self-directed work teams within the organization, (2) emphasize the importance of team building in the success of the team, and (3) assist organizations in building self-directed work teams. The researcher used a direct survey and studied the following team building techniques: (1) Is the team`s mission clearly defined to each team member? (2) Are the goals clearly defined and achievable by all team members? (3) Will empowerment (decision-making power) be given equally to all team members? (4) Will open and honest communication be allowed among team members? (5) Will each team member be respected and valued for his/her position on the team? (6) Are self-directed work teams effectively rewarded for accomplishments? (7) Have team members received adequate training to effectively complete their job tasks? Upon completion of the literature review and statistical data, and after analyzing the seven areas of team building techniques, it was determined three of the four teams were successful and effective. The only area of concern to the organization is that the participants felt they did not have true ownership of their teams; that is, team members were not given full empowerment. According to this study and the review of literature, full empowerment must be given to achieve successful and effective teams. If true empowerment is not given, the team will suffer in other areas of team building, and the organization will lose a valuable tool.

  19. Critical Education for Work: Multidisciplinary Approaches. Social and Policy Issues in Education: The David C. Anchin Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakes, Richard D., Ed.

    This book expands the meaning of today's education for work by offering five multidisciplinary approaches--school-to-work transitions, gender equity, labor education, economic democracy, and vocational education--revealing the complexities of personal, social, and cultural transformation. "Critical Education for Work" (Richard D. Lakes) is an…

  20. Critical Education for Work: Multidisciplinary Approaches. Social and Policy Issues in Education: The David C. Anchin Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakes, Richard D., Ed.

    This book expands the meaning of today's education for work by offering five multidisciplinary approaches--school-to-work transitions, gender equity, labor education, economic democracy, and vocational education--revealing the complexities of personal, social, and cultural transformation. "Critical Education for Work" (Richard D. Lakes) is an

  1. S.T.A.R.T.T. plus: addition of prehospital personnel to a national multidisciplinary crisis resource management trauma team training course

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Lawrence M.; Martin, Doug; Engels, Paul T.; Brindley, Peter; Widder, Sandy; French, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Simulated Trauma and Resuscitation Team Training (S.T.A.R.T.T.) course is a unique multidisciplinary trauma team training course deliberately designed to address the common crisis resource management (CRM) skills of trauma team members. Moreover, the curriculum has been updated to also target the specific learning needs of individual participating professionals: physicians, nurses and respiratory therapists. This commentary outlines further modifications to the course curriculum in order to address the needs of a relatively undertargeted group: prehospital personnel (i.e., emergency medical services). Maintenance of high participant satisfaction, regardless of profession, suggests that the S.T.A.R.T.T. course can be readily modified to incorporate prehospital personnel without losing its utility or popularity. PMID:26574706

  2. Mercury Orbiter: Report of the Science Working Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, John W.; Slavin, James A.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Akasofu, Syun I.; Baker, Daniel N.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Chupp, Edward L.; Clark, Pamela E.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the Mercury Orbiter Science Working Team which held three workshops in 1988 to 1989 under the auspices of the Space Physics and Planetary Exploration Divisions of NASA Headquarters. Spacecraft engineering and mission design studies at the Jet Propulsion Lab were conducted in parallel with this effort and are detailed elsewhere. The findings of the engineering study, summarized herein, indicate that spin stabilized spacecraft carrying comprehensive particles and fields experiments and key planetology instruments in high elliptical orbits can survive and function in Mercury orbit without costly sun shields and active cooling systems.

  3. Student Team Reading and Writing. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Student team reading and writing" refers to two cooperative learning programs for secondary students included in this intervention report: (1) "Student Team Reading and Writing" and (2) Student Team Reading. The "Student Team Reading and Writing" program (Stevens, 2003) is an integrated approach to reading and language arts for early adolescents.…

  4. Creating a Classroom Team: How Teachers and Paraprofessionals Can Make Working Together Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2004

    2004-01-01

    Respect and communication. That's what teachers and paraprofessionals say makes an effective classroom team. In speaking with paraprofessionals and teachers, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has gathered several tips about how to make working together work. These tips include: (1) Creating a healthy, open relationship between teacher and

  5. Participative Work Design in Lean Production: A Strategy for Dissolving the Paradox between Standardized Work and Team Proactivity by Stimulating Team Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz, Annika; Hansen, Niklas; Antoni, Conny

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore job design mechanisms that enhance team proactivity within a lean production system where autonomy is uttermost restricted. We propose and test a model where the team learning process of building shared meaning of work mediates the relationship between team participative decision-making, inter team…

  6. Creative Exchange: An Evolving Model of Multidisciplinary Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleischmann, Katja; Hutchison, Clive

    2012-01-01

    Often the traditional creative arts curriculum does not sufficiently respond to, nor reflect, contemporary work practice. Multidisciplinary teams are now increasingly the norm in creative arts practice especially when driven by technological innovation. Drawing on contemporary research that centres on the benefits of multidisciplinary

  7. RoboCup: Multi-disciplinary Senior Design Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Kevin Lee

    A cross-college team of educators has developed a collaborative, multi-disciplinary senior design course at Ohio University. This course offers an attractive opportunity for students from a variety of disciplines to work together in a learning community to accomplish a challenging task. It provides a novel multi-disciplinary learning environment…

  8. (Mis) Perceptions and Interactions of Sleep Specialists and Generalists: Obstacles to Referrals to Sleep Specialists and the Multidisciplinary Team Management of Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sean M.; Murray, Suzanne; Castriotta, Richard J.; Landrigan, Christopher P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study assessed generalists' perceptions and challenges in providing care to sleep disorders patients and the role of sleep specialists in improving gaps in care. Methods: A mixed-method approach included qualitative (semi-structured interviews, discussion groups) and quantitative (online surveys) data collection techniques regarding care of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and shift work disorder (SWD). Results: Participants: OSA: generalists n = 165, specialists (internists, neurologists, psychiatrists, pulmonologists) n = 12; SWD: generalists n = 216, specialists n = 108. Generalists reported challenges in assessing sleep disorders and diagnosing patients with sleep complaints. Generalists lacked confidence (selected ? 3 on a 5-pt Likert scale) in managing polypharmacy and drug interactions (OSA: 54.2%; SWD: 62.6%), addiction (OSA: 61.8%), and continuous positive airway pressure (OSA: 66.5%). Generalists in both studies reported deficits in knowledge of monitoring sleep disorders (OSA: 57.7%; SWD: 78.7%), rather relying on patients' subjective reports; 23% of SWD generalists did not identify SWD as a medical condition. Challenges to generalist-specialist collaboration were reported, with 66% of generalists and 68% of specialists in the SWD study reporting lack of coordination as a barrier. Generalists reported lack of consistency in sleep medicine and a perceived lack of value in consulting with sleep specialists. Conclusions: Knowledge and attitudinal challenges were found in primary care of patients with sleep disorders. Sleep specialists need to clarify and educate practitioners regarding primary care's approach. Citation: Hayes SM; Murray S; Castriotta RJ; Landrigan CP; Malhotra A. (Mis) perceptions and interactions of sleep specialists and generalists: obstacles to referrals to sleep specialists and the multidisciplinary team management of sleep disorders. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(6):633-642. PMID:23243396

  9. Affective mechanisms linking dysfunctional behavior to performance in work teams: a moderated mediation study.

    PubMed

    Cole, Michael S; Walter, Frank; Bruch, Heike

    2008-09-01

    The present study examines the association between dysfunctional team behavior and team performance. Data included measures of teams' dysfunctional behavior and negative affective tone as well as supervisors' ratings of teams' (nonverbal) negative emotional expressivity and performance. Utilizing a field sample of 61 work teams, the authors tested the proposed relationships with robust data analytic techniques. Results were consistent with the hypothesized conceptual scheme, in that negative team affective tone mediated the relationship between dysfunctional team behavior and performance when teams' nonverbal negative expressivity was high but not when nonverbal expressivity was low. On the basis of the findings, the authors conclude that the connection between dysfunctional behavior and performance in team situations is more complex than was previously believed--thereby yielding a pattern of moderated mediation. In sum, the findings demonstrated that team members' collective emotions and emotional processing represent key mechanisms in determining how dysfunctional team behavior is associated with team performance. PMID:18808218

  10. Factors Affecting University Teaching Team Effectiveness in Detached Working Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of a study of the factors that contribute to teaching team effectiveness in situations where team members rarely meet face to face. Academic faculty within a university Business School were asked to report the degrees to which they believed that the module teaching teams to which they belonged contained members who…

  11. Work in Progress: The Seven Rs of Team Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunelli, Jean; Schneider, Elaine Fogel

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that supportive teams--including professionals, paraprofessionals, and parents--can teach staff members how to identify and implement best practices in early intervention settings. The authors describe "the seven Rs of team building" distilled from their many years of team building and maintenance: 1) Reading cues; 2) Regular…

  12. Factors Affecting University Teaching Team Effectiveness in Detached Working Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of a study of the factors that contribute to teaching team effectiveness in situations where team members rarely meet face to face. Academic faculty within a university Business School were asked to report the degrees to which they believed that the module teaching teams to which they belonged contained members who

  13. 76 FR 10403 - Hewlett Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... Workstation Refresh Team, Working On-Site at General Motors Corporation, Milford, MI; Notice of Revised... Engineering Application Support Team, working on-site at General Motors Corporation, Milford, Michigan... Team, working on-site at General Motors Corporation, Milford, Michigan, who became totally or...

  14. Cost-Minimization Model of a Multidisciplinary Antibiotic Stewardship Team Based on a Successful Implementation on a Urology Ward of an Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alex W.; Luttjeboer, Jos; Nannan Panday, Prashant; Wilting, Kasper R.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Postma, Maarten J.; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to stimulate appropriate antimicrobial use and thereby lower the chances of resistance development, an Antibiotic Stewardship Team (A-Team) has been implemented at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Focus of the A-Team was a pro-active day 2 case-audit, which was financially evaluated here to calculate the return on investment from a hospital perspective. Methods Effects were evaluated by comparing audited patients with a historic cohort with the same diagnosis-related groups. Based upon this evaluation a cost-minimization model was created that can be used to predict the financial effects of a day 2 case-audit. Sensitivity analyses were performed to deal with uncertainties. Finally, the model was used to financially evaluate the A-Team. Results One whole year including 114 patients was evaluated. Implementation costs were calculated to be €17,732, which represent total costs spent to implement this A-Team. For this specific patient group admitted to a urology ward and consulted on day 2 by the A-Team, the model estimated total savings of €60,306 after one year for this single department, leading to a return on investment of 5.9. Conclusions The implemented multi-disciplinary A-Team performing a day 2 case-audit in the hospital had a positive return on investment caused by a reduced length of stay due to a more appropriate antibiotic therapy. Based on the extensive data analysis, a model of this intervention could be constructed. This model could be used by other institutions, using their own data to estimate the effects of a day 2 case-audit in their hospital. PMID:25955494

  15. Preschool Work Teams' View of Ways of Working with Gender--Parents' Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlson, Ingrid; Simonsson, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Lately the interest to develop a gender-perspective in preschool has grown in Sweden. The aim of this study is to focus on Swedish preschool work teams understanding of gender and gender-sensitive pedagogy and their descriptions of what they actually do to be gender-sensitive preschools. Studies of gender and children often focus construction of…

  16. How Often Do Students Working in Two-Person Teams Report that Work Was Shared Equitably?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkaslassy, Edmond

    2011-01-01

    There are many reasons to assign group projects but determining the grade for each individual working in a group can be problematic. Self and peer assessments of contributions to a group project can be used to adjust individual grades. Most studies of such assessments have considered teams with three to seven members. This study documents the

  17. Preschool Work Teams' View of Ways of Working with Gender--Parents' Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlson, Ingrid; Simonsson, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Lately the interest to develop a gender-perspective in preschool has grown in Sweden. The aim of this study is to focus on Swedish preschool work teams understanding of gender and gender-sensitive pedagogy and their descriptions of what they actually do to be gender-sensitive preschools. Studies of gender and children often focus construction of

  18. The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT): A Multidisciplinary group for an improvement of Nanorisk Assessment and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emond, C.; Rolando, C.; Hirano, S.; Schuster, F.; Jolliet, O.; Maghni, K.; Meyer-Plath, A.; Hallé, S.; Vandelac, L.; Sentein, C.; Torkaski, C.

    2011-07-01

    Nanotechnology allows the ability to design many new materials and devices with multiple applications, such as in medicine, electronics, and energy production. However, nanotechnology also raises several concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials. A report published by the Council of Canadian Academies points out the necessity to respond about many uncertainties associated with risk assessment for ensuring the safety of health and environment. Nanotoxicology (or Nanosafety) is a part of the toxicology science that aims to study adverse effects of nanomaterials or nanoparticles on living organisms. This field includes different aspects from workers prevention to the environment protection. Group of researchers have initiated an international powerful interactive milieu for researchers to work in concert for a global and integrated study of many aspects of nanotoxicology. The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT) is composed of research scientists from 5 different countries (Canada, USA, Japan, France and Germany) working together on 6 different specific thematics, and organized as 9 different technology platforms (www.titnt.com). TITNT aims to study different features of nanomaterials related to nanosafety, such as in vivo and in vitro studies, life cycle, occupational protections and monitoring, early biomarkers detection, characterization and nanotoxicokinetic/dynamic assessment during and after nanoparticles synthesis and the societal, public policy and environmental aspects. While the rapid growth of nanotechnology is opening up a floodgate of opportunities, the legislation related is lagging behind mainly because of a lack of knowledge in the biosafety of most nanomaterials. The main goal of TITNT is to improve knowledge in nanosafety science for the benefit of the discipline, for better public policies and for the public itself.

  19. Working with Teams and Organizations to Help Them Involve Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Ibanga, Akanidomo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe our work in trying to influence whole service teams to move their practice towards greater involvement of affected family members. Work with five teams is described. The process varied but in all cases it included recruitment of the team, training, continued support and evaluation of results. Use of a standard…

  20. Working with Teams and Organizations to Help Them Involve Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Ibanga, Akanidomo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe our work in trying to influence whole service teams to move their practice towards greater involvement of affected family members. Work with five teams is described. The process varied but in all cases it included recruitment of the team, training, continued support and evaluation of results. Use of a standard

  1. The Anonymity Factor in Making Multicultural Teams Work: Virtual and Real Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Roberta Wiig

    2012-01-01

    A major purpose of courses in intercultural communication is often to improve students' ability to perform well in situations with the potential to be both highly enlightening and highly difficult--in multicultural teams. This article reports the results of exercises in which members of a dysfunctional multicultural class were assigned to teams

  2. Interesting case of ovarian sarcoidosis: The value of multi disciplinary team working

    PubMed Central

    Wuntakal, Rekha; Bharathan, Rasiah; Rockall, Andrea; Jeyarajah, Arjun

    2007-01-01

    Background Sarcoidosis of the genital tract is a rare condition. Ovarian manifestation of this disease is rarer still. Case presentation The case presented here represents ovarian manifestation of sarcoidosis. At the point of referral to our hospital, based on computerised tomography (CT) ovarian carcinoma was a differential diagnosis. Further magnetic resonance imaging along with CT guided biopsy aided by laboratory study supported a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Patient responded to medical management by a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion The case shows the importance of FNAC and biopsy in case or ovarian masses and multi disciplinary team approach to management. PMID:17391534

  3. Working as a Learning Coach Team in Action Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Judy A.; Lamm, Sharon L.

    2000-01-01

    A team of learning coaches facilitated an action learning group in a public utility. The coaches' diversity raised interpersonal issues but added a wealth of perspectives and experience. Important components were team formation, a balance of program and individual needs, and group diversity. (SK)

  4. A Measure of the Parent-Team Alliance in Youth Residential Psychiatry: The Revised Short Working Alliance Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamers, Audri; Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; Vermeiren, Robert R. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic alliance between multidisciplinary teams and parents within youth (semi) residential psychiatry is essential for the treatment process and forms a promising process variable for Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM). No short evaluative instrument, however, is currently available to assess parent-team alliance. Objective: In…

  5. A Measure of the Parent-Team Alliance in Youth Residential Psychiatry: The Revised Short Working Alliance Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamers, Audri; Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; Vermeiren, Robert R. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic alliance between multidisciplinary teams and parents within youth (semi) residential psychiatry is essential for the treatment process and forms a promising process variable for Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM). No short evaluative instrument, however, is currently available to assess parent-team alliance. Objective: In

  6. School-Based Multidisciplinary Teacher Team-Building Combining On-Line Professional Development (ESSEA) and Field-Based Environmental Monitoring (GLOBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, R.

    2003-12-01

    The multidisciplinary nature of Earth system science provides a strong foundation for integrated science teaching at the K-12 level. In a Minneapolis-St. Paul based project, urban middle school teaching teams composed of language arts and math specialists as well as physical, Earth, and biological science teachers participate in the NASA Earth system science course (ESSEA) and in the international GLOBE environmental monitoring project. For students, the goal is to integrate science throughout the curriculum as well as involve classes from different subjects in a high-interest school science project. For teachers, the project provides greatly-needed classroom support and teacher team building, as well as professional development. The on-line course provides continuity and communication between the different team members. Face-to-face meetings with the instructors on site are conducted every 4 weeks. The problem-based learning approach to environmental issues developed in the ESSEA course lends itself to application to local environmental issues. New ESSEA modules developed for the project highlight environmental problems associated with flooding, introduced species, and eutrofication of lakes and rivers located near the participating schools. In addition, ESSEA participants are certified as GLOBE teachers, and assist their students in monitoring water quality. The synergistic partnership of ESSEA and GLOBE provides an attractive package upon which long-term school-based environmental monitoring projects can be based.

  7. Leading team learning: what makes interprofessional teams learn to work well?

    PubMed

    Chatalalsingh, Carole; Reeves, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This article describes an ethnographic study focused on exploring leaders of team learning in well-established nephrology teams in an academic healthcare organization in Canada. Employing situational theory of leadership, the article provides details on how well established team members advance as "learning leaders". Data were gathered by ethnographic methods over a 9-month period with the members of two nephrology teams. These learning to care for the sick teams involved over 30 regulated health professionals, such as physicians, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, dietitians and other healthcare practitioners, staff, students and trainees, all of whom were collectively managing obstacles and coordinating efforts. Analysis involved an inductive thematic analysis of observations, reflections, and interview transcripts. The study indicated how well established members progress as team-learning leaders, and how they adapt to an interprofessional culture through the activities they employ to enable day-to-day learning. The article uses situational theory of leadership to generate a detailed illumination of the nature of leaders' interactions within an interprofessional context. PMID:24654793

  8. NICE-Accredited Commissioning Guidance for Weight Assessment and Management Clinics: a Model for a Specialist Multidisciplinary Team Approach for People with Severe Obesity.

    PubMed

    Welbourn, Richard; Dixon, John; Barth, Julian H; Finer, Nicholas; Hughes, Carly A; le Roux, Carel W; Wass, John

    2016-03-01

    Despite increasing prevalence of obesity, no country has successfully implemented comprehensive pathways to provide advice to all the severely obese patients that seek treatment. We aimed to formulate pathways for referral into and out of weight assessment and management clinics (WAMCs) that include internal medicine/primary care physicians as part of a multidisciplinary team that could provide specialist advice and interventions, including referral for bariatric surgery. Using a National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE)-accredited process, a Guidance Development Group conducted a literature search identifying existing WAMCs. As very few examples of effective structures and clinical pathways existed, the current evidence base for optimal assessment and management of bariatric surgery patients was used to reach a consensus. The model we describe could be adopted internationally by health services to manage severely obese patients. PMID:26738895

  9. Increasing Work Group Effectiveness: Combining Corporate Adventure Training with Traditional Team Building Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Jon

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the goals of team building, scope of team-building interventions, and specific contributions of both experiential (corporate adventure training) and nonexperiential (traditional) methods for increasing work-group effectiveness. A model for effectively combining the two approaches involves establishing goals, clarifying team members'

  10. A Theoretical Model and New Test of Managerial Legitimacy in Work Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Jeongkoo; Thye, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines endorsement and authorization as two social mechanisms that can induce perceptions of legitimacy for individuals who manage work teams. "Endorsement" is the support of a manager by one's own team members, whereas "authorization" is the support of a team manager stemming from a higher bureaucratic level. Applying these…

  11. Collective Efficacy Beliefs in Student Work Teams: Relation to Self-Efficacy, Cohesion, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lent, Robert W.; Schmidt, Janet; Schmidt, Linda

    2006-01-01

    A measure of collective efficacy was developed and administered to undergraduates working in project teams in engineering courses. Findings in each of two samples revealed that the measure contained a single factor and was related to ratings of team cohesion and personal efficacy. Collective efficacy was also found to relate to indicators of team

  12. A Theoretical Model and New Test of Managerial Legitimacy in Work Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Jeongkoo; Thye, Shane

    2011-01-01

    This study examines endorsement and authorization as two social mechanisms that can induce perceptions of legitimacy for individuals who manage work teams. "Endorsement" is the support of a manager by one's own team members, whereas "authorization" is the support of a team manager stemming from a higher bureaucratic level. Applying these

  13. Evaluating Team Work on Student Projects: The Use of Behaviorally Anchored Scales To Evaluate Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Daniel; Cadiz, David

    One of the biggest problems students face in team projects is social loafing, a situation in which students may view team projects as a free ride. Social loafers let others do the work, knowing that the professor will only grade the completed project. This research examined the performance of students grading other student team members on a group

  14. Multidisciplinary department of "Return to Work After a Cancer": a French experience of support groups for vocational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    De Blasi, G; Bouteyre, E; Bretteville, J; Boucher, L; Rollin, L

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative pilot exploratory study focuses on support groups for vocational rehabilitation after cancer implemented in a French and innovative multidisciplinary department of "Return to Work after a Cancer." Sixty-three patients were invited to participate to constitute two support groups of 20 participants. Questionnaires are sent to assess their benefit according to the participants' point of view. For 58% of participants, support groups helped the return to work, and for 70% it provided personal, family, and relational support. Support groups are a relevant response to expectations and specific issues of patients experiencing return to work after cancer. PMID:24428252

  15. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

  16. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between

  17. The Anonymity Factor in Making Multicultural Teams Work: Virtual and Real Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Roberta Wiig

    2012-01-01

    A major purpose of courses in intercultural communication is often to improve students' ability to perform well in situations with the potential to be both highly enlightening and highly difficult--in multicultural teams. This article reports the results of exercises in which members of a dysfunctional multicultural class were assigned to teams…

  18. Interventional valve surgery: building a team and working together.

    PubMed

    Ruel, Marc; Dickie, Sean; Chow, Benjamin J W; Labinaz, Marino

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new modality that may change the therapeutic landscape in the management of aortic valve stenosis. Despite the excellent results of surgical aortic valve replacement, TAVI has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of elderly and high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. It therefore constitutes a new reality that cardiac surgeons have to acknowledge. As TAVI indications and techniques become better defined, the importance of a team approach to the implementation and performance of TAVI is becoming increasingly evident. The surgeon has a crucial role to play in the introduction, development, and sustainability of TAVI at any institution. In this article, we discuss the procedural technique involved in TAVI, as well as the cardiologist and heart surgeon individualities and team dynamics. We make a case for judicious team-based adoption of TAVI technologies, considering that evidence-based and health economics data are not yet available. We also illustrate how a team approach may lead to improved outcomes, better patient and institutional acceptance, and a better definition of the therapeutic niche of TAVI modalities, amid the excellent results of conventional aortic valve replacement surgery. PMID:21092892

  19. Team Teaching Styles Utilized in Japan: Do They Really Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Harry F., III

    2013-01-01

    This paper continues the debate over TT (team-teaching) benefits and detriments. TT has been utilized extensively in Japan in English Language instructional courses at the elementary and junior high school levels over the past 20 years. Although at times satirical, the author in all seriousness discusses TT and; its advantages and disadvantages in…

  20. Team Teaching Styles Utilized in Japan: Do They Really Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Harry F., III

    2013-01-01

    This paper continues the debate over TT (team-teaching) benefits and detriments. TT has been utilized extensively in Japan in English Language instructional courses at the elementary and junior high school levels over the past 20 years. Although at times satirical, the author in all seriousness discusses TT and; its advantages and disadvantages in

  1. A New Concept of Working Environment Improvement Within Multicultural Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makraiov, Jana; Cag?ov, Dagmar; ?ambl, Milo

    2012-12-01

    Multicultural team leaders under the conditions of globalisation process must understand that acquiring cultural awareness and diversity management skills is one of the premises for gaining competitive advantage and satisfying the employee? need for social cohesion. The concept presented in this paper goes beyond standard understanding of what cultural diversity management means, as it is not perceived as a set of activities that a business as a whole should be responsible for, but encourage every leader to take responsibility for its own awareness firstly. After understanding that cross-cultural competence is a lifelong learning process it is possible to start recognising ones own cultural mindset before attempting to recognise those of people from other cultures. At this point it is a right time to spread the experience amongst other team members or associates.

  2. [An emergency team working closely with the patient].

    PubMed

    Selma, Toufik; Chermak, Mustapha; Limani, Mohammed; Rochard, Jacques; Wendlandt, Jrme; Hernandez, Anglique

    2015-01-01

    ERIC77 is a rapid response team for emergency psychiatric situations. This cross-sector service based at Marne-la-Valle general hospital represents a supplementary network in psychiatric patient care. The analysis of the professionals receiving calls as well as the link with the sector are critical in determining the success of patient care. Each risk is measured in order to provide adapted and personalised care. PMID:26143216

  3. What were the perceptions of primary care teams on learning from a single multidisciplinary simulation-based training intervention?

    PubMed

    Strachan, Alasdair N; Graham, Alastair C; Hormis, Anil P; Hilton, Gill

    2011-07-01

    Medical emergencies in general practice are uncommon and their management requires good teamwork, communication and effective use of the available resources by the whole primary care team. To address this need the Montagu Clinical Simulation Centre developed and delivered a half-day simulation-based medical emergencies course for primary care teams (GPs, practice nurses and administrative staff). Each half-day course comprises two simulated medical emergencies, which are video-taped and then debriefed. The course was evaluated using a multi-level approach by seeking the staff's reactions to the course, their learning, the behaviour changes produced and the results for the organisation. We gained this information through self-reporting using end-of-course and follow-up questionnaires. The immediate feedback was very positive, showing they had learnt the objectives set. We then surveyed all those who had attended training between 2003 and 2007. A follow-up questionnaire was developed and sent to the practice managers who then co-ordinated their completion and return using a pre-paid return envelope. The survey was carried out in two cohorts. The first set of follow-up questionnaires was sent out in September 2004 to all those that had attended up to the end of May 2004 and the second set sent out in May 2008 to those who had attended between June 2004 and May 2007. Of the 338 available to complete the follow-up questionnaire, 208 responded, giving a response rate of 62%. Eighty percent of practices had made changes to equipment, emergency protocols or training and 20% of the participants had been involved in managing a medical emergency since attending the course. Of those, 86% indicated that their management and confidence had improved, that they were better able to take a lead role, give instruction and delegate tasks as required. Based on the self-reported perceptions of learning, we believe that the lessons learnt have been translated into positive changes at a personal and practice level for all members of the primary care team. The participants valued the chance to train as a complete unit. We plan to evaluate simulation-based training in the workplace to see if this has a greater impact. PMID:21781389

  4. Reducing patients suicide ideation through training mental health teams in the application of the Dutch multidisciplinary practice guideline on assessment and treatment of suicidal behavior: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To strengthen suicide prevention skills in mental health care in The Netherlands, multidisciplinary teams throughout the country are trained in the application of the new Dutch guideline on the assessment and treatment of suicidal behavior. Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of additional efforts for guideline implementation on professionals attitude, knowledge, and skills. However, the effects on patients are equally important, but are rarely measured. The main objective of this study is to examine whether patients of multidisciplinary teams who are trained in guideline application show greater recovery from suicide ideation than patients of untrained teams. Methods/Design This is a multicentre cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which multidisciplinary teams from mental health care institutions are matched in pairs, and randomly allocated to either the experimental or control condition. In the experimental condition, next to the usual dissemination of the guideline (internet, newsletter, books, publications, and congresses), teams will be trained in the application of the guideline via a 1-day small interactive group training program supported by e-learning modules. In the control condition, no additional actions next to usual dissemination of the guideline will be undertaken. Assessments at patient level will start when the experimental teams are trained. Assessments will take place upon admission and after 3months, or earlier if the patient is discharged. The primary outcome is suicide ideation. Secondary outcomes are non-fatal suicide attempts, level of treatment satisfaction, and societal costs. Both a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis will be performed. The effects of the intervention will be examined in multilevel models. Discussion The strengths of this study are the size of the study, RCT design, training of complete multidisciplinary teams, and the willingness of both management and staff to participate. Trial registration Netherlands trial register: NTR3092 PMID:24195781

  5. Cross-Cultural Study into ICT Student Attitudes and Behaviours Concerning Teams and Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Deborah; Bilgin, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a project involving information and communication technology (ICT) students in Australia and Singapore, working together as a virtual global team. The authors investigated the question: Can differences be found in the behaviours and attitudes of our two cohorts to working in teams? This would allow

  6. "Teamwork" or "Working as a Team"? The Theory and Practice of Top Team Working in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodfield, Steve; Kennie, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the theory and practice of teamwork in "top management teams" in UK higher education institutions. It is informed by some of the key findings from a recent two-year research project sponsored by the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education that investigated the different ways in which UK higher education institutions…

  7. "Teamwork" or "Working as a Team"? The Theory and Practice of Top Team Working in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodfield, Steve; Kennie, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the theory and practice of teamwork in "top management teams" in UK higher education institutions. It is informed by some of the key findings from a recent two-year research project sponsored by the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education that investigated the different ways in which UK higher education institutions

  8. Multidisciplinary Concurrent Design Optimization via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Kelkar, Atul G.; Koganti, Gopichand

    2001-01-01

    A methodology is presented which uses commercial design and analysis software and the Internet to perform concurrent multidisciplinary optimization. The methodology provides a means to develop multidisciplinary designs without requiring that all software be accessible from the same local network. The procedures are amenable to design and development teams whose members, expertise and respective software are not geographically located together. This methodology facilitates multidisciplinary teams working concurrently on a design problem of common interest. Partition of design software to different machines allows each constituent software to be used on the machine that provides the most economy and efficiency. The methodology is demonstrated on the concurrent design of a spacecraft structure and attitude control system. Results are compared to those derived from performing the design with an autonomous FORTRAN program.

  9. Characteristics of work groups and their relationship with social and task cohesion in student teams.

    PubMed

    Forrester, William R; Tashchian, Armen

    2004-08-01

    Results of an exploratory study of relationships between work-group characteristics and the social and task cohesion of 18 business students engaged in team class projects. Regression analysis of scores on workload sharing, team spirit, task flexibility, and team cohesiveness for scales of the Work Group Characteristics Inventory indicated sharing of the workload was significantly associated with both task and social cohesion; team spirit with task cohesion but not social cohesion; and task flexibility with social cohesion but not task cohesion. PMID:15460377

  10. Analyzing the Interprofessional Working of a Home-Based Primary Care Team.

    PubMed

    Smith-Carrier, Tracy; Neysmith, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Increasingly, interprofessional teams are responsible for providing integrated health care services. Effective teams, however, are not the result of chance but require careful planning and ongoing attention to team processes. Based on a case study involving interviews, participant observation, and a survey, we identified key attributes for effective interprofessional working (IPW) within a home-based primary care (HBPC) setting. Recognizing the importance of a theoretical model that reflects the multidimensional nature of team effectiveness research, we employed the integrated team effectiveness model to analyze our findings. The results indicated that a shared vision, common goals, respect, and trust among team members as well as processes for ongoing communication, effective leadership, and mechanisms for conflict resolution are vital in the development of a high-functioning IPW team. The ambiguity and uncertainty surrounding the context of service provision (clients' homes), as well the negotiation of external relationships in the HBPC field, require further investigation. PMID:26261888

  11. Harming high performers: a social comparison perspective on interpersonal harming in work teams.

    PubMed

    Lam, Catherine K; Van der Vegt, Gerben S; Walter, Frank; Huang, Xu

    2011-05-01

    This study developed a multilevel model of the interpersonal harming behavior associated with social comparison processes in work teams. We tested this model using temporally lagged data from a sample of student teams (Study 1) and cross-sectional data from a sample of work teams in a telecommunication services company (Study 2). In both studies, social relations analyses revealed that in teams with less cooperative goals, comparison to a higher performing team member was positively associated with interpersonal harming behavior, but only when expectations of future performance similarity to that member were low. The interactive relationship of social comparison and expected future performance similarity with interpersonal harming was buffered, however, in teams with more cooperative goals. PMID:21171734

  12. Team work increases fractionation capacity cost-effectively

    SciTech Connect

    Talib, J.H.; Germinder, B.; Hitchcock, M.P.

    1997-10-01

    During the early stages of the Discovery project in 1996, Texaco-Bridgeline Gas Distribution LLC planned on refurbishing an existing mothballed four-column fractionation facility at Paradis, Louisiana. The goal was to process Y-grade feed from a new 600 MMscfd cryogenic gas processing plant at Larose, Louisiana, and from the existing cryogenic facilities at Paradis. The Paradis debottlenecking team (PDT) met its goals by identifying and removing obvious process bottlenecks, minimizing costs and eliminating schedule impact, while increasing the Paradis facility fractionation capacity from 34,000 bpd to 42,000 bpd. The changes were implemented in record time. Following is a fine example of true teamwork and superior achievement of results against all obstacles.

  13. Effects of Multidisciplinary Team Care on the Survival of Patients with Different Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chien-Chou; Wang, Yueh-Hsin; Chang, Yu-Chia; Wang, Shih-Ting

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan, cancer is the top cause of death, and the mortality rate of lung cancer is the highest of all cancers. Some studies have demonstrated that multidisciplinary team (MDT) care can improve survival rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. However, no study has discussed the effect of MDT care on different stages of NSCLC. The target population for this study consisted of patients with NSCLC newly diagnosed in the 20052010 Cancer Registry. The data was linked with the 20022011 National Health Insurance Research Database and the 20052011 Cause of Death Statistics Database. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to explore whether the involvement of MDT care had an effect on survival. This study applied the propensity score as a control variable to reduce selection bias between patients with and without involvement of MDT care. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of death of MDT participants with stage III & IV NSCLC was significantly lower than that of MDT non-participants (adjusted HR = 0.87, 95% confidence interval = 0.84-0.90). This study revealed that MDT care are significantly associated with higher survival rate of patients with stage III and IV NSCLC, and thus MDT care should be used in the treatment of these patients. PMID:25966317

  14. Perspectives of the multidisciplinary team on the quality of life of patients with cancer of the head and neck at 2 years.

    PubMed

    Parhar, Sukhdev; Rogers, Simon N; Lowe, Derek

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to assess the extent to which core members of the head and neck multidisciplinary team (MDT) use data on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and their familiarity with specific HRQoL outcomes for different groups of patients with cancer of the head and neck. We surveyed members of the head and neck MDT in the Merseyside Regional Head and Neck Cancer Centre (consultants, clinical nurse specialists, and allied health professionals) about their views on patient-reported outcomes for 8 common clinical situations after treatment for cancer. A total of 17/27 responded (63%), and of them, 12 use the data. Participants' estimates of patient-reported outcomes varied widely, and there were no notable differences between consultants and others. For speech, saliva, and swallowing, estimates tended to be worse than the outcomes reported by the patients themselves. Although HRQoL information is used by most clinicians, it is often used for research and not to inform them about the patient. Its use can enable discussions with patients and carers to be more relevant, but it is important to remember that individual HRQoL outcomes can differ. There is scope for further study to explore the decision-making process for different types of treatment that have equivalent survival from the perspective of both the MDT and the patient. PMID:26387073

  15. Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (UseIT): Preparing Students for the Twenty-First Century Work Force via a Multidisciplinary and Collaborative Learning Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroot, R. M.; Jordan, T. H.; Benthien, M. L.; Ihrig, M.; Berti, R.

    2009-12-01

    UseIT is one of the three undergraduate research programs sponsored by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). The program allows students to work in multi-disciplinary collaborative teams to tackle a scientific “Grand Challenge.” The topic varies each year but it always entails performing computer science research that is needed by earthquake scientists, educators, and other target audiences. The program allows undergraduates to use the advanced tools of information technology to solve important problems in interdisciplinary earthquake research. Since the program began in 2002, 145 students have participated in UseIT. The program stresses problem solving and interdisciplinary cross training. A key aspect of the UseIT program is its flexible, yet structured, team approach. Students share their diverse skills and interests, creating a powerful synergy through this peer mentoring. The majority of UseIT interns have considerable computer science skill or aptitude, but successful UseIT interns have hailed from nearly three-dozen disciplines, all class levels, and all skill levels. Successful UseIT interns have in common a willingness to step outside their comfort zones and try new things. During the 2009 internship the focus of the program was to deliver SCEC Virtual Display of Objects (VDO) images and animations of faults and earthquake sequences to SCEC, the Earthquake Country Alliance, and other virtual organizations via a content management system that captures the metadata and guides the user. SCEC-VDO is the SCEC intern-developed visualization software that allows the user to see earthquake related phenomena in three and four dimensions. The 2009 Grand Challenge had special relevance for the interns because the products they created were used for The Great California ShakeOut. This talk will discuss lessons learned from this program, how it addresses the needs of the 21st century STEM work force, and highlights of the 2009 internship.

  16. Leading Workers to Lead Themselves: The External Leadership of Self-Managing Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manz, Charles C.; Sims, Henry P., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Explores the paradoxical role of external leaders of self-managing work teams in a medium-sized manufacturing plant. External leaders' most important behaviors are those facilitating the team's management through self-observation, self-evaluation, and self-reinforcement. Leaders' dominant role is to lead others to lead themselves. Contains 6

  17. Psychiatrists as treatment team leaders: pitfalls and rewards.

    PubMed

    Rodenhauser, P

    1996-01-01

    The multidisciplinary treatment team has become a conventional component of inpatient psychiatric care delivery. Treatment team dynamics and their implications for the patient, the team members, the organization, and the team leader in particular have been generally understated in the training of psychiatrists, however, as has its value as a model for learning about administration. This article highlights the history and evolution of the multidisciplinary treatment team in psychiatry, the mix of mental health disciplines, philosophies, and roles involved, the characteristics of mental health care professionals, the conflicting manifest and latent work group tasks, and the dynamics and functions of team leadership. While reviewing information on which to base a systematic approach to team leadership, the author advocates for application of universal standards for education in administrative psychiatry including supervised leadership of multidisciplinary treatment teams and discussions of complimentary readings, examples of which are provided. PMID:8623036

  18. Integrating Social Work into Undergraduate Education through a Community Action and Social Change Multidisciplinary Minor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Schuster, Katie; Ruffolo, Mary C.; Nicoll, Kerri Leyda

    2015-01-01

    Social work education has a long and successful history of developing change agents through bachelor of social work, master's of social work, and PhD programs, but these programs often create boundaries limiting the reach and infusion of social work perspectives. With rapid changes in social, economic, and political contexts, students from all…

  19. Integrating Social Work into Undergraduate Education through a Community Action and Social Change Multidisciplinary Minor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Schuster, Katie; Ruffolo, Mary C.; Nicoll, Kerri Leyda

    2015-01-01

    Social work education has a long and successful history of developing change agents through bachelor of social work, master's of social work, and PhD programs, but these programs often create boundaries limiting the reach and infusion of social work perspectives. With rapid changes in social, economic, and political contexts, students from all

  20. Interdisciplinary and Team Teaching: How Do We Make It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Hope J.

    2003-01-01

    Integrating academic and career tech curriculum is one of the primary objectives of the Carl Perkins Vocational Education Act (1998 reauthorization) and a guiding principle of the School to Work Opportunities Act. It has proven to be an invaluable approach to teaching, and educators across the nation have experienced firsthand how the application

  1. Multidisciplinary approaches to climate change questions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2011-01-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches are required to address the complex environmental problems of our time. Solutions to climate change problems are good examples of situations requiring complex syntheses of ideas from a vast set of disciplines including science, engineering, social science, and the humanities. Unfortunately, most ecologists have narrow training, and are not equipped to bring their environmental skills to the table with interdisciplinary teams to help solve multidisciplinary problems. To address this problem, new graduate training programs and workshops sponsored by various organizations are providing opportunities for scientists and others to learn to work together in multidisciplinary teams. Two examples of training in multidisciplinary thinking include those organized by the Santa Fe Institute and Dahlem Workshops. In addition, many interdisciplinary programs have had successes in providing insight into climate change problems including the International Panel on Climate Change, the Joint North American Carbon Program, the National Academy of Science Research Grand Challenges Initiatives, and the National Academy of Science. These programs and initiatives have had some notable success in outlining some of the problems and solutions to climate change. Scientists who can offer their specialized expertise to interdisciplinary teams will be more successful in helping to solve the complex problems related to climate change.

  2. Team-level flexibility, workhome spillover, and health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

  3. A learning curve-based method to implement multifunctional work teams in the Brazilian footwear sector.

    PubMed

    Guimares, L B de M; Anzanello, M J; Renner, J S

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a method for implementing multifunctional work teams in a footwear company that followed the Taylor/Ford system for decades. The suggested framework first applies a Learning Curve (LC) modeling to assess whether rotation between tasks of different complexities affects workers' learning rate and performance. Next, the Macroergonomic Work Analysis (MA) method (Guimares, 1999, 2009) introduces multifunctional principles in work teams towards workers' training and resources improvement. When applied to a pilot line consisting of 100 workers, the intervention-reduced work related accidents in 80%, absenteeism in 45.65%, and eliminated work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), medical consultations, and turnover. Further, the output rate of the multifunctional team increased average 3% compared to the production rate of the regular lines following the Taylor/Ford system (with the same shoe model being manufactured), while the rework and spoilage rates were reduced 85% and 69%, respectively. PMID:21907970

  4. The impact of subgroup type and subgroup configurational properties on work team performance.

    PubMed

    Carton, Andrew M; Cummings, Jonathon N

    2013-09-01

    Scholars have invoked subgroups in a number of theories related to teams, yet certain tensions in the literature remain unresolved. In this article, we address 2 of these tensions, both relating to how subgroups are configured in work teams: (a) whether teams perform better with a greater number of subgroups and (b) whether teams perform better when they have imbalanced subgroups (majorities and minorities are present) or balanced subgroups (subgroups are of equal size). We predict that the impact of the number and balance of subgroups depends on the type of subgroup-whether subgroups are formed according to social identity (i.e., identity-based subgroups) or information processing (i.e., knowledge-based subgroups). We first propose that teams are more adversely affected by 2 identity-based subgroups than by any other number, yet the uniquely negative impact of a 2-subgroup configuration is not apparent for knowledge-based subgroups. Instead, a larger number of knowledge-based subgroups is beneficial for performance, such that 2 subgroups is worse for performance when compared with 3 or more subgroups but better for performance when compared with no subgroups or 1 subgroup. Second, we argue that teams perform better when identity-based subgroups are imbalanced yet knowledge-based subgroups are balanced. We also suggest that there are interactive effects between the number and balance of subgroups-however, the nature of this interaction depends on the type of subgroup. To test these predictions, we developed and validated an algorithm that measures the configurational properties of subgroups in organizational work teams. Results of a field study of 326 work teams from a multinational organization support our predictions. PMID:23915429

  5. Emerging treatments in neurogastroenterology: a multidisciplinary working group consensus statement on opioid-induced constipation

    PubMed Central

    CAMILLERI, M.; DROSSMAN, D. A.; BECKER, G.; WEBSTER, L. R.; DAVIES, A. N.; MAWE, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioids are effective for acute and chronic pain conditions, but their use is associated with often difficult-to-manage constipation and other gastrointestinal (GI) effects due to effects on peripheral μ-opioid receptors in the gut. The mechanism of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) differs from that of functional constipation (FC), and OIC may not respond as well to most first-line treatments for FC. The impact of OIC on quality of life (QoL) induces some patients to decrease or stop their opioid therapy to relieve or avoid constipation. Purpose At a roundtable meeting on OIC, a working group developed a consensus definition for OIC diagnosis across disciplines and reviewed current OIC treatments and the potential of treatments in development. By consensus, OIC is defined as follows: ‘A change when initiating opioid therapy from baseline bowel habits that is characterized by any of the following: reduced bowel movement frequency, development or worsening of straining to pass bowel movements, a sense of incomplete rectal evacuation, or harder stool consistency’. The working group noted the prior validation of a patient response outcome and end point for clinical trials and recommended future efforts to create treatment guidelines and QoL measures specific for OIC. Details from the working group’s discussion and consensus recommendations for patient care and research are presented in this article. PMID:25164154

  6. Multidisciplinary investigation links backward-speech trait and working memory through genetic mutation.

    PubMed

    Prekovic, Stefan; ?ur?evi?, Duica Filipovi?; Csifcsk, Gbor; veljo, Olivera; Stojkovi?, Oliver; Jankovi?, Milica; Koprivek, Katarina; Covill, Laura E; Lu?i?, Milos; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Helsen, Christine; Ceroni, Fabiola; Claessens, Frank; Newbury, Dianne F

    2016-01-01

    Case studies of unusual traits can provide unique snapshots of the effects of modified systems. In this study, we report on an individual from a Serbian family with the ability to rapidly, accurately and voluntarily speak backwards. We consider psychological, neural and genetic correlates of this trait to identify specific relevant neural mechanisms and new molecular pathways for working memory and speech-related tasks. EEG data suggest that the effect of word reversal precedes semantic integration of visually presented backward-words, and that event-related potentials above the frontal lobe are affected by both word reversal and the maintenance of backward-words in working memory. fMRI revealed that the left fusiform gyrus may facilitate the production of backward-speech. Exome sequencing identified three novel coding variants of potential significance in the RIC3, RIPK1 and ZBED5 genes. Taken together, our data suggest that, in this individual, the ability to speak backwards is afforded by an extraordinary working memory capacity. We hypothesise that this is served by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain to the frontal cortex and supported by visual semantic loops within the left fusiform gyrus and that these neural processes may be mediated by a genetic mutation in RIC3; a chaperone for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:26838027

  7. Multidisciplinary investigation links backward-speech trait and working memory through genetic mutation

    PubMed Central

    Prekovic, Stefan; Đurđević, Dušica Filipović; Csifcsák, Gábor; Šveljo, Olivera; Stojković, Oliver; Janković, Milica; Koprivšek, Katarina; Covill, Laura E; Lučić, Milos; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Helsen, Christine; Ceroni, Fabiola; Claessens, Frank; Newbury, Dianne F

    2016-01-01

    Case studies of unusual traits can provide unique snapshots of the effects of modified systems. In this study, we report on an individual from a Serbian family with the ability to rapidly, accurately and voluntarily speak backwards. We consider psychological, neural and genetic correlates of this trait to identify specific relevant neural mechanisms and new molecular pathways for working memory and speech-related tasks. EEG data suggest that the effect of word reversal precedes semantic integration of visually presented backward-words, and that event-related potentials above the frontal lobe are affected by both word reversal and the maintenance of backward-words in working memory. fMRI revealed that the left fusiform gyrus may facilitate the production of backward-speech. Exome sequencing identified three novel coding variants of potential significance in the RIC3, RIPK1 and ZBED5 genes. Taken together, our data suggest that, in this individual, the ability to speak backwards is afforded by an extraordinary working memory capacity. We hypothesise that this is served by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain to the frontal cortex and supported by visual semantic loops within the left fusiform gyrus and that these neural processes may be mediated by a genetic mutation in RIC3; a chaperone for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. PMID:26838027

  8. Building Multidisciplinary Training Networks for Rural Development. Report of the Regional Workshop for Pre-service Training of Members of Multidisciplinary Educational Teams in Rural Areas (Pune, India, July 16-20, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    Papers designed to help build multidisciplinary training networks for rural development are collected in this document, an outgrowth of a regional training workshop attended by participants from Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Thailand, and India. The six papers deal with the objectives of the workshop which were to:

  9. Team spirit makes the difference: the interactive effects of team work engagement and organizational constraints during a military operation on psychological outcomes afterwards.

    PubMed

    Boermans, S M; Kamphuis, W; Delahaij, R; van den Berg, C; Euwema, M C

    2014-12-01

    This article prospectively explores the effects of collective team work engagement and organizational constraints during military deployment on individual-level psychological outcomes afterwards. Participants were 971 Dutch peacekeepers within 93 teams who were deployed between the end of 2008 and beginning of 2010, for an average of 4?months, in the International Security Assistance Force. Surveys were administered 2?months into deployment and 6?months afterwards. Multi-level regression analyses demonstrated that team work engagement during deployment moderated the relation between organizational constraints and post-deployment fatigue symptoms. Team members reported less fatigue symptoms after deployment if they were part of highly engaged teams during deployment, particularly when concerns about organizational constraints during deployment were high. In contrast, low team work engagement was related to more fatigue symptoms, particularly when concerns about organizational constraints were high. Contrary to expectations, no effects for team work engagement or organizational constraints were found for post-traumatic growth. The present study highlights that investing in team work engagement is important for those working in highly demanding jobs. PMID:25476963

  10. Working practices and success of infection prevention and control teams: a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Hale, R; Powell, T; Drey, N S; Gould, D J

    2015-02-01

    Little research has been undertaken on how infection prevention and control (IPC) teams operate and how their effectiveness is assessed. This review aimed to explore how IPC teams embed IPC throughout hospitals, balance outbreak management with strategic aspects of IPC work (e.g. education), and how IPC team performance is measured. A scoping exercise was performed combining literature searches, evidence synthesis, and intelligence from expert advisers. Eleven publications were identified. One paper quantified how IPC nurses spend their time, two described daily activities of IPC teams, five described initiatives to embed IPC across organizations following legislation since 1999 in the UK or changes in the delivery of healthcare, and three explored the contribution of IPC intermediaries (link nurses and champions). Eight publications reported research findings. The others reported how IPC teams are embedding IPC practice in UK hospitals. In conclusion, there is scope for research to explore different models of IPC team-working and effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness. Other topics that need addressing are the willingness and ability of ward staff to assume increased responsibility for IPC and the effectiveness of intermediaries. PMID:25549828

  11. A Multidisciplinary Engineering Summer School in an Industrial Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Peter Gorm; Fernandes, Joao M.; Habel, Jacek; Lehrskov, Hanne; Vos, Richard J. C.; Wallington, Oliver; Zidek, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Most university-level engineering studies produce technically skilled engineers. However, typically students face several difficulties when working in multidisciplinary teams when they initiate their industrial careers. In a globalised world, it becomes increasingly important that engineers are capable of collaborating across disciplinary

  12. A Multidisciplinary Engineering Summer School in an Industrial Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Peter Gorm; Fernandes, Joao M.; Habel, Jacek; Lehrskov, Hanne; Vos, Richard J. C.; Wallington, Oliver; Zidek, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Most university-level engineering studies produce technically skilled engineers. However, typically students face several difficulties when working in multidisciplinary teams when they initiate their industrial careers. In a globalised world, it becomes increasingly important that engineers are capable of collaborating across disciplinary…

  13. Effective Team Support: From Task and Cognitive Modeling to Software Agents for Time-Critical Complex Work Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie E.; Sycara, Katia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in completing a system for empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support a team's tasks, and in running experiments for the collection of baseline data.

  14. Realisation of Strategic Leadership in Leadership Teams' Work as Experienced by the Leadership Team Members of Basic Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahtero, Tapio Juhani; Kuusilehto-Awale, Lea

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a quantitative research into how the leadership team members of 49 basic education schools in the city of Vantaa, Finland, experienced the realisation of strategic leadership in their leadership teams' work. The data were collected by a survey of 24 statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, and analysed with the

  15. Realisation of Strategic Leadership in Leadership Teams' Work as Experienced by the Leadership Team Members of Basic Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahtero, Tapio Juhani; Kuusilehto-Awale, Lea

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a quantitative research into how the leadership team members of 49 basic education schools in the city of Vantaa, Finland, experienced the realisation of strategic leadership in their leadership teams' work. The data were collected by a survey of 24 statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, and analysed with the…

  16. An Evidence-Based Multidisciplinary Practice Guideline to Reduce the Workload due to Lifting for Preventing Work-Related Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We developed an evidence-based practice guideline to support occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals in assessing the risk due to lifting and in selecting effective preventive measures for low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. The guideline was developed at the request of the Dutch government by a project team of experts and OSH professionals in lifting and work-related LBP. The recommendations for risk assessment were based on the quality of instruments to assess the risk on LBP due to lifting. Recommendations for interventions were based on a systematic review of the effects of worker- and work directed interventions to reduce back load due to lifting. The quality of the evidence was rated as strong (A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on consensus (D). Finally, eight experts and twenty-four OSH professionals commented on and evaluated the content and the feasibility of the preliminary guideline. For risk assessment we recommend loads heavier than 25 kg always to be considered a risk for LBP while loads less than 3 kg do not pose a risk. For loads between 325 kg, risk assessment shall be performed using the Manual handling Assessment Charts (MAC)-Tool or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) lifting equation. Effective work oriented interventions are patient lifting devices (Level A) and lifting devices for goods (Level C), optimizing working height (Level A) and reducing load mass (Level C). Ineffective work oriented preventive measures are regulations to ban lifting without proper alternatives (Level D). We do not recommend worker-oriented interventions but consider personal lift assist devices as promising (Level C). Ineffective worker-oriented preventive measures are training in lifting technique (Level A), use of back-belts (Level A) and pre-employment medical examinations (Level A). This multidisciplinary evidence-based practice guideline gives clear criteria whether an employee is at risk for LBP while lifting and provides an easy-reference for (in)effective risk reduction measures based on scientific evidence, experience, and consensus among OSH experts and practitioners. PMID:24999432

  17. The Link between Self-Managed Work Teams and Learning Organisations Using Performance Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Joe; Waddell, Di

    2004-01-01

    Both the learning organization literature and the self-managed work team literature have alluded to the potential links between teamwork and learning. However, as yet the link between these two concepts remains undeveloped. This study uses a survey of a random sample of 200 Australian organizations to empirically examine the relationships between

  18. Team Spirit: Teachers Work Together to Establish and Achieve Key Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troen, Vivian; Boles, Katherine C.

    2010-01-01

    Common experience, along with a vast collection of research, demonstrates that schools can expect a range of benefits to accrue when teachers work together. Teacher teaming can reduce teacher isolation, increase collegiality, facilitate the sharing of resources and ideas, and capitalize on teacher's individual and shared strengths. And most

  19. Minutes of TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team Meeting and Ocean Tides Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This third TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team meeting was held on December 4, 1994 to review progress in defining ocean tide models, precision Earth orbits, and various science algorithms. A related workshop on ocean tides convened to select the best models to be used by scientists in the Geophysical Data Records.

  20. [The nursing team and Maslow: (dis)satisfaction in the work].

    PubMed

    Vitria Regis, Lorena Fagundes Ladeia; Porto, Isaura Setenta

    2006-01-01

    This text tries to understand the Nursing team and their (dis)satisfactions in the work. We consider the association with the theory of basic human needs of Abraham Maslow as a way to systemize and to comprehend the recurrent situations and the day-by-day Nursing issues. The necessities are structuralized hierarchically in physiological, security, social, auto-esteem and auto-accomplishment indicating the degree of satisfaction (from the disease to the fullness) of an individual or group. The advantage of this approach consists of being able to use the solid, depth and rich Maslow theory in concrete and particular situations of the Nursing team. PMID:17340737

  1. Prerequisites for sustainable care improvement using the reflective team as a work model

    PubMed Central

    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte; Carlsson, Gunilla; Nystrm, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Several work models for care improvement have been developed in order to meet the requirement for evidence-based care. This study examines a work model for reflection, entitled the reflective team (RT). The main idea behind RTs is that caring skills exist among those who work closest to the patients. The team leader (RTL) encourages sustainable care improvement, rooted in research and proven experience, by using a lifeworld perspective to stimulate further reflection and a developmental process leading to research-based caring actions within the team. In order to maintain focus, it is important that the RTL has a clear idea of what sustainable care improvement means, and what the prerequisites are for such improvement. The aim of the present study is, therefore, to explore the prerequisites for improving sustainable care, seeking to answer how RTLs perceive these and use RTs for concrete planning. Nine RTLs were interviewed, and their statements were phenomenographically analysed. The analysis revealed three separate qualitative categories, which describe personal, interpersonal, and structural aspects of the prerequisites. In the discussion, these categories are compared with previous research on reflection, and the conclusion is reached that the optimal conditions for RTs to work, when focussed on sustainable care improvement, occur when the various aspects of the prerequisites are intertwined and become a natural part of the reflective work. PMID:25361530

  2. Prerequisites for sustainable care improvement using the reflective team as a work model.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Lise-Lotte; Carlsson, Gunilla; Nystrm, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Several work models for care improvement have been developed in order to meet the requirement for evidence-based care. This study examines a work model for reflection, entitled the reflective team (RT). The main idea behind RTs is that caring skills exist among those who work closest to the patients. The team leader (RTL) encourages sustainable care improvement, rooted in research and proven experience, by using a lifeworld perspective to stimulate further reflection and a developmental process leading to research-based caring actions within the team. In order to maintain focus, it is important that the RTL has a clear idea of what sustainable care improvement means, and what the prerequisites are for such improvement. The aim of the present study is, therefore, to explore the prerequisites for improving sustainable care, seeking to answer how RTLs perceive these and use RTs for concrete planning. Nine RTLs were interviewed, and their statements were phenomenographically analysed. The analysis revealed three separate qualitative categories, which describe personal, interpersonal, and structural aspects of the prerequisites. In the discussion, these categories are compared with previous research on reflection, and the conclusion is reached that the optimal conditions for RTs to work, when focussed on sustainable care improvement, occur when the various aspects of the prerequisites are intertwined and become a natural part of the reflective work. PMID:25361530

  3. Exploring varieties of knowledge in safe work practices - an ethnographic study of surgical teams

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Within existing research in health and medicine, the nature of knowledge on how teams conduct safe work practices has yet to be properly explored. Methods We address this concern by exploring the varieties in which knowledge is expressed during interdisciplinary surgical operations. Specifically, the study was conducted in a surgical section of a Norwegian regional general hospital, between January and April of 2010, by means of an ethnographic design combining detailed non-participant observations, conversations and semi-structured interviews. Results Based on an analysis of the gathered data, we identify three particular themes in how knowledge is expressed by operating room personnel: (i) the ability and variety individuals demonstrate in handling multiple sources of information, before reaching a particular decision, (ii) the variety of ways awareness or anticipation of future events is expressed, and (iii) the different ways sudden and unexpected situations are handled by the individual team members. Conclusions We conclude that these facets of knowledge bring different insights into how safe work practices are achieved at an individual and team level in surgical operations, thus adding to the existing understanding of the nature of knowledge in safe work practices in surgical operations. Future research should focus on exploring and documenting the relationships between various elements of knowledge and safe work practices, in different surgical settings and countries. PMID:21914183

  4. Creativity and Creative Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

  5. Making contracting work better and cost less: Report of the Contract Reform Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    In June 1993, Secretary of Energy Hazel O`Leary formed a Contract Reform Team, chaired by Deputy Secretary Bill White, to evaluate the contracting practices of the Department of Energy and to formulate specific proposals for improving those practices. This report summarizes the results of the work of the Contract Reform Team. It recommends actions for implementation that will significantly improve the Department`s contracting practices and will enable the Department to help create a government that -- in the words of Vice President Gore -- {open_quotes}works better and costs less.{close_quotes} These actions and the deadlines for their implementation are listed. Among other things, they recommend replacing the Department`s standard Management and Operating Contract with a new Performance-Based Management Contract and strengthening the Department`s systems for selecting and managing contractors.

  6. Multidisciplinary work on barium contamination of the karstic upper Kupa River drainage basin (Croatia and Slovenia); calling for watershed management.

    PubMed

    Franciskovi?-Bilinski, S; Bilinski, H; Grbac, R; Zuni?, J; Necemer, M; Hanzel, D

    2007-02-01

    The present work was designed as an extension of a previous study of a barium anomaly observed in stream sediments of the Kupa River. In its upper part the Kupa River drains a region underlain by a trans-boundary aquifer. The river is a significant water resource in a region of tourism, sport, and fishing in both Croatia and Slovenia. The contamination source is situated in Homer (Lokve), Croatia, where barite was mined until 10 years ago. The barium processing waste material (<3-mm fraction) was carelessly deposited in gardens, forests, and into a sinkhole, which has an underground link with the Kupica River, a tributary of the Kupa River. Barium waste and stream sediments were analyzed using comparative techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Mssbauer spectroscopy, and grain size analysis. XRD of the waste material identified the major minerals quartz, barite, and dolomite and the Fe-containing minor minerals muscovite and goethite. Barite was identified as a minor or trace mineral in the Kupica River sediments. XRF analysis of the waste material has shown Ba and Fe to be the predominant elements, Ca and K to be minor elements, and Mn, Zn, Sr, Pb, Co, Cu, As, Zr, Rb, Y, and Mo to be trace elements. Mssbauer spectroscopy performed at room temperature (RT) was used to study iron minerals, particularly to obtain information on the valence status of Fe ions. Grain size analysis of the waste material (<63-microm fraction) has shown that it contains 23.5% clay-size material in comparison with 7-8% clay-size material in stream sediments. It is our aim to combine geochemical and medical methods to investigate the possible impact of waste disposal on human health in Lokve. At this stage of the work, concentrations of Ba and other toxic elements in the water compartment of the Kupica River (a source of drinking water) have not been monitored by Croatian Waters (name of the Croatian water authorities). The necessity of such measurements in future studies has been highlighted. A preliminary study of diseases diagnosed in Lokve shows that about 18% of the total inhabitants have serious medical problems. Diseases of the circulatory system, endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases, neoplasms, and respiratory diseases predominate. This paper calls for further multidisciplinary research on the health effects of barium and trace elements, as well as for bioremediation of contaminated gardens and for watershed management of vulnerable karstic aquifers. PMID:17203367

  7. Participatory Concepts of Multidisciplinary/Professional Working on an Early Childhood Studies Degree Course in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bath, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to explore democratic values in higher education pedagogies, as related to an Early Childhood Studies (ECS) degree course in an English university. It seeks to find out what constitutes a multi-disciplinary course from both student and tutor perspectives. It is contextualised by the concepts of participation embedded in the idea of…

  8. Participatory Concepts of Multidisciplinary/Professional Working on an Early Childhood Studies Degree Course in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bath, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to explore democratic values in higher education pedagogies, as related to an Early Childhood Studies (ECS) degree course in an English university. It seeks to find out what constitutes a multi-disciplinary course from both student and tutor perspectives. It is contextualised by the concepts of participation embedded in the idea of

  9. Empowering certified nurse's aides to improve quality of work life through a team communication program.

    PubMed

    Howe, Erin E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the impact of a certified nurse's aide (CNA)-led interdisciplinary teamwork and communication intervention on perceived quality of work environment and six-month job intentions. CNAs are frequently excluded from team communication and decision-making, which often leads to job dissatisfaction with high levels of staff turnover. Using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach with pre- post-program design, the intervention utilized the strategy of debriefing from the national patient safety initiative, TeamSTEPPS. Inherent in the program design, entitled Long Term Care (LTC) Team Talk, was the involvement of the CNAs in the development of the intervention as an empowering process on two wings of a transitional care unit in a long-term care facility in upstate NY. CNAs' perceptions of work environment quality were measured using a Quality of Work Life (QWL) instrument. Additionally, job turnover intent within six months was assessed. Results indicated improved scores on nearly all QWL subscales anticipated to be impacted, and enhanced perceived empowerment of the CNAs on each wing albeit through somewhat different experiential processes. The program is highly portable and can potentially be implemented in a variety of long-term care settings. PMID:24314742

  10. Understanding the Work of Pediatric Inpatient Medicine Teams: Implications for Information System Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Ping; Gennari, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Health information systems tend to be designed primarily for data retrieval and data entry, with insufficient attention paid to the larger contexts in which work occurs. As a result, low physician acceptance and satisfaction remain barriers to the successful integration of current informational and decision support systems (e.g., CPOE systems). This paper reports on a qualitative field study of team-based clinical care work and decision making. Our aim is to consider a radical redesign of clinical information systems, one that is built with context and the constraints of work practice in mind. We apply Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) methods to characterize the work at a large childrens hospital, and analyze these results to consider new designs for clinical information systems. In this study, we report on themes, constraints, and ideas for design, showing how our CWA analyses lead to designs that are very different from current technology information systems. PMID:22195099

  11. Preparing students to work effectively in interprofessional health and social care teams.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Keith; Seenan, Chris; Morlan, Gordon; Smith, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has 'learning to work effectively in interprofessional teams' as one of its central learning outcomes. Whilst much is made in IPE of allocating health and social care students into interprofessional teams and setting them a task to complete, it has proved difficult to find a fair and equitable method of assessing how effective each individual has been in contributing to the task. This difficulty is compounded when the module is delivered predominantly online. This paper describes the recent push to establish meaningful educational outcomes for those involved in delivering IPE to pre-registration health and social care students. It then describes the use of a web-based peer assessment tool (Web PA) developed at Loughborough and Hull Universities (UK) which has been adapted by Glasgow Caledonian University (UK) for assessing the outcome of contributing effectively to IPE-related online group tasks. The paper outlines how the process of web-based peer assessment operates in theory and how it has been received in practice. An illustration is given that shows how the process successfully discriminates between those that are working effectively in interprofessional teams and those that are not. The value of the process is discussed. PMID:22828678

  12. Experiences of a health team working in a new urban settlement area in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Bulut, A; Uzel, N; Kutluay, T; Neyzi, O

    1991-10-01

    A project aiming at creating a model for comprehensive maternal and child health care for urban underdeveloped areas was started in a new settlement area of migrants in the vicinity of Istanbul. The project had an impact on health care status, particularly among infants and children, but the results indicated that more effort was needed to reach the mothers. It was noted that building space and the appearance of the work place influenced the prestige of the team. Absentee problems could be partly surmounted by repeated home visits. Based on this experience, it was concluded that health services in underdeveloped areas need to be supported by non medical personnel to act as home visitors and as mediators between the community and the health team. It was also concluded that an established recording system to include both clinical data and attendance is needed to define the cases who need special care. PMID:1955576

  13. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory Across Generations. An emerging Multidisciplinary Work Area and an NEA Project - 12218

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Jantine; Pescatore, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference means for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, i.e. not dependent on human presence and intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. There is however no intention to forgo, at any time, knowledge and awareness either of the repository or of the waste that it contains. The preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) is seen as an integral part of radioactive waste management, supporting lengthy and complex socio-technical processes across pre-operational, operational and post-operational lifetimes. Long-term preservation of RK and M is an emerging multidisciplinary work area in which much learning is expected over the coming years. Novel methods are being sought that are least vulnerable to both natural degradation and to changes in socio-economic conditions. Progress has been made in individual countries, but there is a need to internationalise the thinking, compare approaches, investigate potential solutions and share decisions. This is the task of the NEA RK and M project. A major outcome of the project will be a 'menu-driven document' that will allow people to identify the main elements of a strategic action plan for RK and M preservation. In sum, the preservation of RK and M is a unprecedented task in which technical, scientific and social information is interwoven and needs to be developed and preserved across generations and across specialist boundaries. Important studies have been undertaken in the past decades to explore a variety of approaches to preserving RK and M across different timescales, including archives and markers. The work of the past in this area is useful, but innovative thinking is also needed. Seen from today's perspective, very little work is available on for example the contextualization of data for later use; on the systematic identification of mechanisms for RK and M transfer; on implementing a culture of RK and M-keeping in organisations; and on creating cultural links between the waste disposals and the siting communities. Moreover, international cooperation is recognised as being crucial in providing shared means and meanings for memory transmission over longer timescales. International cooperation has also been identified as a catalyst to ensure that a wide range of approaches and experiences is considered, thus potentially reducing uncertainty related to variations in approach. Overall, multiple approaches, requiring active and less active care, need to be considered from the start of the radioactive waste management programme and refined in the course of time. The RK and M project members want to further investigate and deliver support to fulfil this task. (authors)

  14. Thriving in Multidisciplinary Research: Advice for New Bioinformatics Students

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Raymond K.

    2012-01-01

    The sciences have seen a large increase in demand for students in bioinformatics and multidisciplinary fields in general. Many new educational programs have been created to satisfy this demand, but navigating these programs requires a non-traditional outlook and emphasizes working in teams of individuals with distinct yet complementary skill sets. Written from the perspective of a current bioinformatics student, this article seeks to offer advice to prospective and current students in bioinformatics regarding what to expect in their educational program, how multidisciplinary fields differ from more traditional paths, and decisions that they will face on the road to becoming successful, productive bioinformaticists. PMID:23012580

  15. Effectiveness of a multidisciplinary care program on recovery and return to work of patients after gynaecological surgery; design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Return to work after gynaecological surgery takes much longer than expected, irrespective of the level of invasiveness. In order to empower patients in recovery and return to work, a multidisciplinary care program consisting of an e-health intervention and integrated care management including participatory workplace intervention was developed. Methods/Design We designed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of the multidisciplinary care program on full sustainable return to work in patients after gynaecological surgery, compared to usual clinical care. Two hundred twelve women (18-65 years old) undergoing hysterectomy and/or laparoscopic adnexal surgery on benign indication in one of the 7 participating (university) hospitals in the Netherlands are expected to take part in this study at baseline. The primary outcome measure is sick leave duration until full sustainable return to work and is measured by a monthly calendar of sickness absence during 26 weeks after surgery. Secondary outcome measures are the effect of the care program on general recovery, quality of life, pain intensity and complications, and are assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 2, 6, 12 and 26 weeks after surgery. Discussion The discrepancy between expected physical recovery and actual return to work after gynaecological surgery contributes to the relevance of this study. There is strong evidence that long periods of sick leave can result in work disability, poorer general health and increased risk of mental health problems. We expect that this multidisciplinary care program will improve peri-operative care, contribute to a faster return to work of patients after gynaecological surgery and, as a consequence, will reduce societal costs considerably. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2087 PMID:22296950

  16. Improving team meetings to support discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Tarling, Maggie; Jauffur, Hassam

    Following the establishment of a discharge working group, several concerns were raised about the management of multidisciplinary team (MDT) discharge meetings throughout the trust. A project was established to observe MDT meetings, identify good practice and produce practice guidance to improve standards and achieve consistency throughout the organisation. PMID:16845814

  17. What Makes Teacher Teams in a Vocational Education Context Effective?: A Qualitative Study of Managers' View on Team Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truijen, K. J. P.; Sleegers, P. J. C.; Meelissen, M. R. M.; Nieuwenhuis, A. F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: At a time when secondary vocational education is implementing competence-based education (CBE) on a large scale, to adapt to the needs of students and of the labour market in a modern society, many vocational schools have recognised that interdisciplinary teacher teams are an important condition for this implementation. In order to…

  18. What Makes Teacher Teams in a Vocational Education Context Effective?: A Qualitative Study of Managers' View on Team Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truijen, K. J. P.; Sleegers, P. J. C.; Meelissen, M. R. M.; Nieuwenhuis, A. F. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: At a time when secondary vocational education is implementing competence-based education (CBE) on a large scale, to adapt to the needs of students and of the labour market in a modern society, many vocational schools have recognised that interdisciplinary teacher teams are an important condition for this implementation. In order to

  19. Knowledge and attitude toward interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in teaching hospitals in South East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Ugwu, George Onyemaechi; Ajah, Leonard Ogbonna; Ezugwu, Euzebus Chinonye; Onah, Paul; Onwuka, Chidinma Ifechi

    2015-01-01

    Background Interdisciplinary team working could facilitate the efficient provision and coordination of increasingly diverse health services, thereby improving the quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to describe knowledge of interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in two teaching hospitals in South East Nigeria and to determine their attitude toward an interdisciplinary collaborative approach to patient care in these institutions. Methods This was a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics and was carried out using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software version 17.0 for Windows. Results In total, 116 doctors participated in the study. The mean age of the respondents was 31.9±7.0 (range 22–51) years. Approximately 74% of respondents were aware of the concept of interdisciplinary team working. Approximately 15% of respondents who were aware of the concept of interdisciplinary team working had very good knowledge of it; 52% had good knowledge and 33% had poor knowledge. Twenty-nine percent of knowledgeable respondents reported ever receiving formal teaching/training on interdisciplinary team working in the course of their professional development. About 78% of those aware of team working believed that interdisciplinary teams would be useful in obstetrics and gynecology practice in Nigeria, with 89% stating that it would be very useful. Approximately 77% of those aware of team working would support establishment and implementation of interdisciplinary teams at their centers. Conclusion There was a high degree of knowledge of the concept and a positive attitude toward interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in the study centers. This suggests that the attitude of physicians may not be an impediment to implementation of a collaborative interdisciplinary approach to clinical care in the study centers. PMID:26064058

  20. The Effects of the Team Organization of Elementary Schools on Teacher Influence and Work Attitudes: A Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, W.W., Jr.

    Two major studies reported in 1970 reached similar conclusions regarding the effect of team teaching in elementary schools on collegial decision making, faculty communication, and teacher sentiments. Among other things, teachers in team-organized schools were found to have higher levels of work autonomy and job satisfaction than those in

  1. Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting.

    PubMed

    Rush, Brian; McPherson-Doe, Catherine; Behrooz, Reneé C; Cudmore, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that 'core' competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health 'programme' or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified. PMID:24427175

  2. Effective Team Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Male, Mary

    1991-01-01

    The Student Study Team (SST) is described as a California intervention model that encourages effective multidisciplinary team participation. The development, training, operation, and evaluation of such teams are discussed, and implementation recommendations are offered. The article includes a flow chart of the SST process, a meeting competency

  3. Designing Multidisciplinary Integrated Curriculum Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Marla; Hagan, Jill; Ho, Pier Sun; Hudis, Paula M.

    2010-01-01

    The term "integrated curriculum" has many different, sometimes conflicting, meanings to educators. In this manual, integrated curriculum refers to the materials and pedagogical strategies used by "multidisciplinary" teams of teachers to organize their instruction so that students are encouraged to make meaningful connections across subject areas.

  4. [Mobile team of palliative care in a department of neurology: value of two multidisciplinary and professional groups fruit of a joint distribution of the palliative approach and ethical support].

    PubMed

    Baudoin, D; Krebs, S

    2013-04-01

    This article describes how a mobile team of palliative care and a department of neurology learned to cope with many complex end-of-life situations. After a brief introduction to inter-team cooperation, clinical work of the mobile team with patients and families and its cooperation with the neurology team are presented. The specificity of supportive care in neurology is also analyzed. Two interdisciplinary and multi-professional tools - the Palliative Care Resource Group and the Ethics Consultation Group - are described, with their activities and their goals. The Palliative Care Resource Group is a specific entity whose identity lies at the crossroads between commonly recognized organizational units: clinic staff, clinical practice, ethical or organizational analysis groups (Balint, 1960), discussion groups (Rusznievski, 1999), training groups. It has several objectives: 1) create a robust conceptual environment enabling the pursuit of palliative care practices without relying on the empty paradigm of stereotypical actions; if suffering cannot be avoided, psychic development and transformation can be promoted; 2) attempt to prevent caregiver burnout; 3) help support and strengthen the collective dimension of the team, learning a mode of care which goes beyond the execution of coded actions; 4) enhance the primary dimension of care, i.e. taking care, especially in clinical situations where conventional wisdom declares that "nothing more can be done."; 5) promote group work so new ideas arising from the different teams influence the behavior of all caregivers. The Ethics Consultation Group organizes its work in several steps. The first step is discernment, clearly identifying the question at hand with the clinical staff. This is followed by a consultation between the clinical team, the patient, the family and the referring physician to arrive at a motivated decision, respecting the competent patient's opinion. The final step is an evaluation of the decision and its consequences. The Ethical Consultation Group, which meets at a scheduled time at a set place, unites the different members of the neurology and palliative care teams who come to a common decision. These specific moments have an important impact on team cohesion, creating a common culture and a convergence of individual representations about making difficult decisions. Specific clinical cases are described to illustrate some of the difficulties encountered in palliative care decision-making. These cases provide insight about the decision to create a palliative care gastrostomy for a man with progressive supranuclear palsy, the suffering experienced by a medical team caring for a young woman with Creutzfeldt-Jacob encephalopathy, or a woman's experience with the post-stroke life-and-death seesaw. Theoretical divisions, illustrated with clinical stories, can be useful touchstones for neurology teams. PMID:23453274

  5. Non-AIDS-related malignancies: expert consensus review and practical applications from the multidisciplinary CANCERVIH Working Group.

    PubMed

    Spano, J-P; Poizot-Martin, I; Costagliola, D; Bou, F; Rosmorduc, O; Lavol, A; Choquet, S; Heudel, P-E; Leblond, V; Gabarre, J; Valantin, M-A; Solas, C; Guihot, A; Carcelain, G; Autran, B; Katlama, C; Quro, L

    2016-03-01

    Malignancies represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. The introduction of combined antiretroviral therapy has modified the spectrum of malignancies in HIV infection with a decreased incidence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) malignancies such as Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma due to partial immune recovery and an increase in non-AIDS-defining malignancies due to prolonged survival. Management of HIV-infected patients with cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving both oncologists and HIV physicians to optimally manage both diseases and drug interactions between anticancer and anti-HIV drugs. The French CANCERVIH group presents here a review and an experience of managing non-AIDS malignancies in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26681686

  6. A multidisciplinary approach to nonpharmacologic pain management.

    PubMed

    Golden, Barbara A

    2002-09-01

    The multidisciplinary pain management team is the optimal method for delivery of comprehensive treatment to patients in pain. The biopsychosocial model of pain considers multiple factors for assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of pain. A structured approach to nonpharmacologic pain management includes medical and psychological interventions to educate and to empower patients to manage pain. Relaxation training, biofeedback, hypnosis, imagery, and cognitive-behavioral therapy are nonpharmacologic treatment modalities recommended by multidisciplinary pain management teams for effective pain control. PMID:12356034

  7. Roundtable Concerning Teaching in Educational Administration: Organizing, Leading and Monitoring Effective Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Donna Hagen

    This paper provides data from students in an educational administration class on use of teaming and collaboration to research educational problems. The instructor taught group dynamics and modeled the process of facilitating and developing collaboration in teams. Classes were offered in 3-1/2 hour sessions for 5 weeks. Various team-building…

  8. Simulation of a Forensic Chemistry Problem: A Multidisciplinary Project for Secondary School Chemistry Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project that uses a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving in analyzing a crime scene and suspect evidence. Requires each student to work effectively in a team, communicate in both written and oral forms, perform hands-on laboratory manipulations, and realize that the entire class was depending on their individual contributions

  9. Simulation of a Forensic Chemistry Problem: A Multidisciplinary Project for Secondary School Chemistry Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project that uses a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving in analyzing a crime scene and suspect evidence. Requires each student to work effectively in a team, communicate in both written and oral forms, perform hands-on laboratory manipulations, and realize that the entire class was depending on their individual contributions…

  10. Collaboration and Team Science

    Cancer.gov

    A Template for Integrating Interdisciplinary Research and Team Science into the Tenure Track Offer Letter Although every recruitment is unique, emphasis on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary science is becoming quite common. Research institutions wan

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the mentally retarded: guidelines of a multidisciplinary consensus work group. Dutch Association of Physicians in Care of Mentally Handicapped].

    PubMed

    Gimbel, H

    2000-06-10

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is more frequent among people with intellectual disability than among the intellectually normal population. Also GORD is more serious in this population. The diagnosis is often missed, because most intellectually disabled cannot express their complaints of GORD. For that reason a multidisciplinary working group of the Dutch Association of physicians active in the care of persons with a mental handicap has developed guidelines. The working group recommends endoscopy in case of a (alarm) symptoms: haematemesis, prolonged vomiting, irondeficiency anaemia e.c.i., and a 24 hour oesophageal pH test in case of b (aspecific) symptoms: recurrent pneumonia, refusal of food, regurgitation, rumination, dental erosions. In general most patients are cured with drug treatment (omeprazol or another proton pump inhibitor). If symptoms are not improved after 6 months of optimal treatment, surgical treatment may be considered. PMID:10876695

  12. "When Is a Teacher Not a Teacher?": Knowledge Creation and the Professional Identity of Teachers within Multi-Agency Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Mark; Anning, Angela; Frost, Nick

    2005-01-01

    Education is centre stage in current UK government initiatives to promote multi-agency team work. This paper draws on a research project which explored the way in which multi-disciplinary teams work and learn together in their practice with children, to consider the implications of "joined-up" practice for theorizing dilemmas of knowledge creation

  13. Team Development of Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyoung

    2004-01-01

    Advanced technologies, globalization, the competitiveness of business, flexible working practices, and other rapid changes in the nature of work have all led to the booming of "virtual teams." This paper will provide an overview of virtual teams, including a description of their emergence, a definition and typology of the term "virtual team," an

  14. Teams Do It Better!

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Toni C.

    2015-01-01

    I propose that interdisciplinarity and respectful team science become the norm for studying human development. This is not as simple a wish as it may seem because we tend to be trained in a single discipline. We tend to know much less about the theory, methods and findings of other disciplines. We often respect them less and minimize their contributions. It is now abundantly clear, however, that humans develop on multiple levels. Human development occurs from neurons to neighborhoods, cells to societies, and genes to geography. It is fundamentally evident that every level influences the others and all combine to constitute human development. While we may specialize, certainly a reasonable personal choice, it is critical to recognize and respect the contributions of other disciplines to the study of human development. This may best be achieved by recognizing the contributions of other disciplines and working in multidisciplinary teams. PMID:26877719

  15. Communication, and Team-Working Skills in Second-Year Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Goldrick, Niamh B.; Marzec, Bartosz; Scully, P. Noelle; Draper, Sylvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2002, a multidisciplinary program has been used to encourage science students to build on their chemical knowledge and to appreciate how it applies to the world around them. The program is interactive and instills a new set of core learning skills that are often underrepresented in undergraduate curricula, namely, cooperative learning,…

  16. Communication, and Team-Working Skills in Second-Year Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Goldrick, Niamh B.; Marzec, Bartosz; Scully, P. Noelle; Draper, Sylvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2002, a multidisciplinary program has been used to encourage science students to build on their chemical knowledge and to appreciate how it applies to the world around them. The program is interactive and instills a new set of core learning skills that are often underrepresented in undergraduate curricula, namely, cooperative learning,

  17. Using multi-disciplinary strategic master facilities planning for organizations experiencing programmatic re-direction

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Weimer, W.C.; Bruce, W.A.

    1993-12-01

    Facility master planning is critical to the future productivity of a laboratory and the quality of worklife for the laboratory staff. For organizations undergoing programmatic re-direction, a master facility planning approach linked to the organization`s strategic planning process is even more important. Major changes in an organization such as programmatic re-direction can significantly impact a broad range of variables which exceed the expertise of traditional planning teams, e.g., capacity variability, work team organization, organizational culture, and work process simplification. By expanding the diversity of the participants of the planning team, there is a greater likelihood that a research organization`s scientific, organizational, economic, and employees` needs can be meshed in the strategic plan and facility plan. Recent recommendations from facility planners suggest drawing from diverse fields in building multi-disciplinary planning teams: Architecture, engineering, natural science, social psychology, and strategic planning (Gibson,1993). For organizations undergoing significant operational or culture change, the master facility planning team should also include members with expertise in organizational effectiveness, industrial engineering, human resources, and environmental psychology. A recent planning and design project provides an example which illustrates the use of an expanded multi-disciplinary team engaged in planning laboratory renovations for a research organization undergoing programmatic re-direction. The purpose of the proposed poster session is to present a multi-disciplinary master facility planning process linked to an organization`s strategic planning process or organizational strategies.

  18. The Team Process: Realizing Effective Group Work and Enhancing School Improvement Plans (S.I.P.).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiter, David J.; And Others

    The use of the team process in school improvement plans may play a role in how effective the group is in achieving its goals and objectives. Representative efforts and perceptions of the use of teams in local educational agencies were surveyed in multiple measurements, such as interviews, self-assessments, self-perceptions, and observations. The…

  19. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. PMID:22962847

  20. Introduction to working with Animal Assisted Crisis Response animal handler teams.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Susan D

    2006-01-01

    Animal Assisted Crisis Response (AACR) is a discipline closely related to Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT), which gives crisis intervention teams, counselors, clergy, and other trained professionals an additional means with which to help people affected by crisis. AACR is a relatively new field, but can be effective when utilized as part of an overall incident response program. AACR teams can be used, for example, to establish rapport, build therapeutic bridges, normalize the experience, and act as a calming agent or as a catalyst for physical movement. Effective AACR requires a common language between the AACR teams and crisis counselors. The training requirements, versatility, limitations, and establishment of AACR teams are also addressed. PMID:16573252

  1. How physician/administrator teams work in small groups. Six steps to make it happen.

    PubMed

    Stearns, T H

    1999-01-01

    The physician/administrator team is frequently supported as the preferred model for physician group governance. Perhaps an obvious model for large groups, it remains true that the largest percentage of physicians are practicing in groups of 10 or fewer. This article explores the applicability of the physician/administrator team concept for small group practices. The article covers the significance of the physician/administrator team in managed care settings, difference in governance structures between large and small groups, the need for physicians to be willing to share leadership in organizations they own, understanding empowerment in small groups, the manager's need to assume more responsibility and how to form the team. PMID:10539338

  2. Every School, Every Team, Every Classroom: District Leadership for Growing Professional Learning Communities at Work[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaker, Robert; Keating, Janel

    2011-01-01

    What would a learning community look like "if we really meant it" when we committed to ensuring the learning of each student? What would we consider good enough for our own children? In "Every School, Every Team, Every Classroom," the authors suggest that these two questions drive PLC leaders to embed PLC at Work[TM] practices in their entire…

  3. Self-Directed Work Teams in a Post-Apartheid Gold Mine: Perspectives from the Rock Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phatkathi, Timothy Sizwe

    2002-01-01

    A participant-observation study in a South African mining company that used self directed work team training identified organizational constraints that hindered training effectiveness: lack of materials, machinery breakdown, decentralized budget, and imposed standards. Miners more often used improvisation and initiative to solve daily problems,…

  4. Every School, Every Team, Every Classroom: District Leadership for Growing Professional Learning Communities at Work[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaker, Robert; Keating, Janel

    2011-01-01

    What would a learning community look like "if we really meant it" when we committed to ensuring the learning of each student? What would we consider good enough for our own children? In "Every School, Every Team, Every Classroom," the authors suggest that these two questions drive PLC leaders to embed PLC at Work[TM] practices in their entire

  5. Self-Directed Work Teams in a Post-Apartheid Gold Mine: Perspectives from the Rock Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phatkathi, Timothy Sizwe

    2002-01-01

    A participant-observation study in a South African mining company that used self directed work team training identified organizational constraints that hindered training effectiveness: lack of materials, machinery breakdown, decentralized budget, and imposed standards. Miners more often used improvisation and initiative to solve daily problems,

  6. Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL

  7. Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Curd ML; Beikler, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover, halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear–nose–throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear–nose–throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo. Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins. PMID:22722640

  8. Demonstration Model: Garden City [Michigan] Resource Room-Helping Teacher Team. For School Year 1972-73.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garden City Public Schools, MI.

    Described is a multidisciplinary team approach to helping elementary and secondary students with learning or emotional problems to achieve educationally and socially. Resource room teachers and special education consultants, functioning as part of the full-time team in each school, work with the regular classroom teacher to meet student needs for

  9. First on-line survey of an international multidisciplinary working group (MightyMedic) on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias.

    PubMed

    Stefanutti, C; D'Alessandri, G; Petta, A; Harada-Shiba, M; Julius, U; Soran, H; Moriarty, P M; Romeo, S; Drogari, E; Jaeger, B R

    2015-05-01

    The MightyMedic (Multidisciplinary International Group for Hemapheresis TherapY and MEtabolic DIsturbances Contrast) Working Group has been founded in 2013. The leading idea was to establish an international network of interdisciplinary nature aimed at working to cross national borders research projects, clinical trials, educational initiatives (meetings, workshops, summer schools) in the field of metabolic diseases, namely hyperlipidemias, and diabetes, preventive cardiology, and atherosclerosis. Therapeutic apheresis, its indications and techniques, is a parallel field of investigation. The first on-line survey of the Group has been completed in the first half of 2014. The survey included # 24 Centers in Italy, Germany, Greece, UK, Sweden, Japan and USA. Relevant data have been collected on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias. 240 subjects with hyperlipidemia and treated with lipoprotein apheresis have been reported in the survey, but a large percentage of patients (35%) who could benefit from this therapeutic option are still treated by conventional drug approach. Genetic molecular diagnosis is performed in only 33% of patients while Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is included in cardiovascular disease risk assessment in 71% of participating Centers. New detailed investigations and prospective multicenter studies are needed to evaluate changes induced by the impact of updated indications and strategies, as well as new treatment options, targeting standardization of therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. PMID:25936332

  10. Multi-Disciplinary Approaches to Pupil Behaviour in School--The Role of Evaluation in Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnell, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the work of a multi-disciplinary Behaviour Support Team developed to support schools in managing problematic behaviour. An evidence base to inform future service delivery is developed, using a model of evaluation which incorporates both quantitative, outcome data and more explanatory qualitative data, incorporating the views

  11. Unpacking Race, Culture, and Class in Rural Alaska: Native and Non-Native Multidisciplinary Professionals' Perceptions of Child Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubar, Roe; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to unpack notions of class, culture, and race as they relate to multidisciplinary team (MDT) professionals and their perceptions of prevalence in child sexual abuse cases in Native and non-Native rural Alaska communities. Power and privilege within professional settings is significant for all social work professionals

  12. Requirements for multidisciplinary teamwork in psychiatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Liberman, R P; Hilty, D M; Drake, R E; Tsang, H W

    2001-10-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation by its very nature is multidisciplinary because of the many competencies required for its implementation. In promoting optimal levels of recovery from schizophrenia and other disabling mental disorders, teams must combine the expert contributions of professionals and paraprofessionals who can individualize a comprehensive array of evidence-based services with competency, consistency, continuity, coordination, collaboration, and fidelity. The authors describe the properties and functions of the multidisciplinary team and key attributes of effective teams. The importance of teams' involving clients, their relatives, and other supporters in setting personally relevant life goals is emphasized. The authors provide examples of the challenges posed by the need to individualize services and of the ways in which barriers to communication and coordination can be overcome. The roles of the various team members are described, including leadership roles and the unique role of the psychiatrist, in the context of newly emerging, evidence-based treatments for psychiatric rehabilitation. PMID:11585949

  13. Successful Group Work: Using Cooperative Learning and Team-Based Learning in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant-Vallone, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined student perceptions of group experiences in the classroom. The author used cooperative learning and team-based learning to focus on three characteristics that are critical for the success of groups: structure of activities, relationships of group members, and accountability of group members. Results indicated that…

  14. Tales from the Frontline: The Experiences of Early Childhood Practitioners Working with an "Embedded" Research Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sandie

    2009-01-01

    In late 2006, SDN Children's Services, an Australian not-for-profit provider of services for children, families and communities, engaged a research team that was "embedded" within the organisation for 1 year. This action represented a significant investment of resources, such as staff time and organisational funds, and demonstrates SDN's strong

  15. Successful Group Work: Using Cooperative Learning and Team-Based Learning in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant-Vallone, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined student perceptions of group experiences in the classroom. The author used cooperative learning and team-based learning to focus on three characteristics that are critical for the success of groups: structure of activities, relationships of group members, and accountability of group members. Results indicated that

  16. Evaluating Team Project-Work Using Triangulation: Lessons from Communities in Northern Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Gordon; Jasaw, Godfred Seidu

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses triangulation to assess key aspects of a team-based, participatory action research programme for undergraduates in rural communities across northern Ghana. The perceptions of the programme and its effects on the students, staff and host communities are compared, showing areas of agreement and disagreement. The successes of the…

  17. Working in Teams: A Cross-Cultural Experience Using the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopka, Donald; Laurence, Louise; Madjar, Nora

    1999-01-01

    Describes a project to link business students at Towson University (Maryland) and Sofia University (Bulgaria) through the Internet, in which student teams developed a feasibility study concerning starting a business in Bulgaria. Reports on successes and pitfalls (including politics and lack of appropriate incentives within the Bulgarian system),

  18. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: implications for social work.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-04-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to produce the "Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases" to promote the exceptional competence and diligence required when the consequence is life or death. This article summarizes the "Supplementary Guidelines," with implications for social work practice--that is, professional responsibility, competence, interviewing skill, knowledge of behavioral and mental impairment, records review, life history compilation, data interpretation, witness support, law-related knowledge, and testimony. The social work, which is scrutinized in a court of law, requires cultural competence, diverse oral and written communication skills, diligence, and the highest ethical standards. PMID:23038877

  19. Yea, Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinn, Fauneil J.; Weir, Sybil B.

    1984-01-01

    Four problems in higher education are identified: hardening curriculum, graying faculty, shrinking budget, and disappearing students. Team teaching is suggested as one solution. A conceptual framework for types of team teaching is presented and practical suggestions to those who want to work within that framework are provided. (Author/MLW)

  20. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

  1. The nature and correlates of paid and unpaid work among service users of London Community Mental Health Teams.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Evans, B; Marwaha, S; Burns, T; Secker, J; Latimer, E; Blizard, R; Killaspy, H; Totman, J; Tanskanen, S; Johnson, S

    2013-06-01

    Aims. Little is known about how the rates and characteristics of mental health service users in unpaid work, training and study compare with those in paid employment. Methods. From staff report and patient records, 1353 mental health service users of seven Community Mental Health Teams in two London boroughs were categorized as in paid work, unpaid vocational activity or no vocational activity. Types of work were described using Standard Occupational Classifications. The characteristics of each group were reported and associations with vocational status were explored. Results. Of the sample, 5.5% were in paid work and 12.7% were in unpaid vocational activity, (including 5.3% in voluntary work and 8.1% in study or training). People in paid work were engaged in a broader range of occupations than those in voluntary work and most in paid work (58.5%) worked part-time. Younger age and high educational attainment characterized both groups. Having sustained previous employment was most strongly associated with being in paid work. Conclusions. Rates of vocational activity were very low. Results did not suggest a clear clinical distinction between those in paid and unpaid activity. The motivations for and functions of unpaid work need further research. PMID:23089160

  2. A multidisciplinary approach to denials prevention.

    PubMed

    Leach, Rick; Daymont, Mary; Roby, Julie; Metro, Linda; Walter, Sandra

    2012-03-01

    Children's National Medical Center's approach to preventing denials and managing response to audits includes the following: Mapping out problem areas in the claims submission process and developing solutions with the help of a multidisciplinary team. Using case managers to help prevent denials and assist in the appeal of rejected claims. Requesting oral reconsideration of pended claims and supporting attending physicians in orally responding to the payer's medical team regarding the case. PMID:22420143

  3. A Cognitive Work Analysis of Physician Ordering in Pediatric Inpatient Medicine Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Ching-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Clinical work, including ordering, is known to be interruptive, multitasking, collaborative and distributed yet current clinical computer systems emphasize linear, normative and solitary work. Although the evidence of a work-technology disconnect is well documented by researchers, there is less understanding of the origins of this disconnect.

  4. [Young urban adults suffering from psychosis: the importance of close team work].

    PubMed

    Ouellet-Plamondon, Clairlaine; Abdel-Baki, Amal

    2011-01-01

    Untreated psychosis causes a lot of suffering and its impact echoes on different aspects of the affected individual's functioning. In city centers, youths presenting early psychosis face additional challenges because many of them live in precarious, unstable conditions and are isolated. Reorganisation of mental health care access and delivery is necessary to avoid delay for psychosis identification and treatment initiation. This article describes possible solutions which have been applied at Clinique JAP, a specialized early psychosis intervention clinic at the CHUM, which offers integrated services to optimize outcome. To increase engagement and adherence to treatment, treatment setting must include a welcoming and youth-friendly atmosphere, individualized and flexible interventions, and nourishing optimistic but realistic hope. Intensive interventions by a specialized interdisciplinary team, in collaboration with community organizations, must be offered in a proactive way to reduce delay in treatment and therefore avoid disastrous consequences of psychosis. PMID:22997645

  5. Global team keeps low profile as it works on next collider

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, A.

    1995-11-17

    A central part of a 25-kilometer-long Next Linear Collider (NLC) can be found at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, where its design, construction, and operation will be done by an international team of scientists, financed by governments around the world. The scientists hope the experiment will be running by early 1997, but the approach is low-key and very different from other big-physics projects. If built, the NLC would be a gigantic leap forward in the field of accelerator physics. The higher energy along with brighter synchrotrom radiation will allow researchers to explore the behavior and mass of several elementary practicals. There are dauting technical challenges confronting the project but the toughest fights will be over funding. This article describes both the technology involved and the funding problems.

  6. Empowerment, span of control, and safety performance in work teams after workforce reduction.

    PubMed

    Hechanova-Alampay, R; Beehr, T A

    2001-10-01

    Relationships of empowerment and span of control with 2 safety measures (unsafe behaviors and accidents) were investigated among 24 workgroups comprising 531 employees of a large chemical company in 3 U.S. states. The company recently implemented a reengineering process. Data were from an anonymous survey (unsafe behaviors), company records (accidents, span of control), and trained expert raters (empowerment). Span of control (positively) and level of empowerment (negatively) correlated with both measures of poor safety performance, but only empowerment predicted unique variance in safety criteria. Together, these structural measures predicted one third of the variance in safety measures. Structural variables such as span of control and team empowerment have been largely overlooked in past safety research but can be important. PMID:11605822

  7. Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis for Commercial Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Russell M.; Freeman, H. JoAnne

    1999-01-01

    Multidisciplinary design and analysis (MDA) has become the normal mode of operation within most aerospace companies, but the impact of these changes have largely not been reflected at many universities. On an effort to determine if the emergence of multidisciplinary design concepts should influence engineering curricula, NASA has asked several universities (Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech, Clemson, BYU, and Cal Poly) to investigate the practicality of introducing MDA concepts within their undergraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team of faculty, students, and industry partners evaluated the aeronautical engineering curriculum at Cal Poly. A variety of ways were found to introduce MDA themes into the curriculum without adding courses or units to the existing program. Both analytic and educational tools for multidisciplinary design of aircraft have been developed and implemented.

  8. A distributed system for visualizing and analyzing multivariate and multidisciplinary data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Allan S.; Allen, Mark; Bailey, Michael; Blom, Ronald; Blume, Leo; Elson, Lee

    1993-01-01

    THe Linked Windows Interactive Data System (LinkWinds) is being developed with NASA support. The objective of this proposal is to adapt and apply that system in a complex network environment containing elements to be found by scientists working multidisciplinary teams on very large scale and distributed data sets. The proposed three year program will develop specific visualization and analysis tools, to be exercised locally and remotely in the LinkWinds environment, to demonstrate visual data analysis, interdisciplinary data analysis and cooperative and interactive televisualization and analysis of data by geographically separated science teams. These demonstrators will involve at least two science disciplines with the aim of producing publishable results.

  9. A distributed system for visualizing and analyzing multivariate and multidisciplinary data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Allan S.; Allen, Mark; Bailey, Michael; Blom, Ronald; Blume, Leo; Elson, Lee

    1992-01-01

    The Linked Windows Interactive Data System (Link Winds) is being developed with NASA support. The objective of this proposal is to adapt and apply that system in a complex network environment containing elements to be found by scientists working multidisciplinary teams on very large scale and distributed data sets. The proposed three year program will develop specific visualization and analysis tools, to be exercised locally and remotely in the Link Winds environment, to demonstrate visual data analysis, interdisciplinary data analysis and cooperative and interactive televisualization and analysis of data by geographically separated science teams. These demonstrations will involve at least two science disciplines with the aim of producing publishable results.

  10. A multidisciplinary approach: group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Tamar H

    2013-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fastest growing cause of cancer death in the United States. The field of liver cancer is evolving rapidly with the emergence of new therapies, the potential for combining local and systemic therapies, and a better understanding of the molecular pathways that drive the development of liver cancer. HCC is a heterogeneous cancer, most often arising in a diseased organ, with a dizzying array of potential therapies that depend upon liver function, burden of tumor, and institutional expertise. Unlike other cancers, the diagnosis can be made by dynamic imaging alone, and it is the only solid organ tumor for which transplant offers a cure. The management of HCC involves: a thorough understanding of the severity of the patient's underlying liver disease; the benefits, risks, limitations, and sometimes trade-offs of potentially curative, bridging, and palliative therapies; and the role of the many specialties involved in treating HCC. Proper patient selection and multidisciplinary cooperation are essential to arrive at a rational plan of care for each patient and to achieve the best outcomes. A multidisciplinary conference or tumor board provides a forum wherein specialists can engage in patient selection, match the patient to the appropriate therapy, and consider patients for enrollment in clinical trials. When there is controversy or no clear evidence-based guidance, productive multidisciplinary teams will reach consensus and can often revisit challenging cases along the continuum of care. PMID:23632364

  11. Virtuoso teams.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Bill; Boynton, Andy

    2005-01-01

    Managing a traditional team seems pretty straightforward: Gather up whoever's available, give them time and space to do their jobs, and make sure they all play nicely together. But these teams produce results that are often as unremarkable as the teams themselves. When big change and high performance are required, a virtuoso team is far more likely to deliver outstanding and innovative results. Virtuoso teams are fundamentally different from the garden-variety work groups that most organizations form to pursue more modest goals. They comprise the top experts in their particular fields, are specially convened for ambitious projects, work with frenetic rhythm, and emanate a discernible energy. Not surprisingly, however, the superstars who make up these teams are renowned for being elitist, temperamental, egocentric, and difficult to work with. As a result, many managers fear that if they force such people to interact on a high-stakes project, the group just might implode. In this article, Bill Fischer and Andy Boynton put the inner workings of highly successful virtuoso teams on full display through three examples: the creative group behind West Side Story, the team of writers for Sid Caesar's 1950s-era television hit Your Show of Shows, and the high-powered technologists who averted an investor-relations crisis for Norsk Hydro, the Norwegian energy giant. Each of these teams accomplished enormous goals and changed their businesses, their customers, even their industries. And they did so by breaking all the conventional rules of collaboration--from the way they recruited the best members to the way they enforced their unusual processes, and from the high expectations they held to the exceptional results they produced. PMID:16028822

  12. Collaboration and Team Science

    Cancer.gov

    NCI Center for Cancer Research Criteria for Evaluating Contributions to Team Science If the PI is involved in collaborative, multidisciplinary, or interdisciplinary research: What is his/her role in driving the project(s) forward? Is she/he leading a majo

  13. Interdisciplinary hospice team processes and multidimensional pain: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dugan Day, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Hospice teams may address multidimensional pain through the synergistic interaction of team members from various professional disciplines during regularly scheduled team meetings. However, the occurrence of that critical exchange has not been adequately described or documented. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore two processes in team pain palliation: communication and collaboration. Data were gathered through individual interviews and a 1-year observation of team members from two hospices (physicians, nurses, aides, chaplains, social workers). Utilizing constant comparison, 14 final thematic categories were discovered. Use of biopsychosocial/spiritual terms by all team members meant that the team had the common language needed to communicate about multidimensional pain. Interviews and observation revealed a gap in translating multidisciplinary communication in team meetings into collaborative acts for pain treatment. In addition, structural influences inhibited creativity in pain palliation. There was no mutual understanding of the purpose for team meetings, no recognition of the need to reflect on team process, or common definition of leadership. Social work roles in hospice should include leadership that moves teams toward interdisciplinary care for multidimensional pain. PMID:22424384

  14. Working toward resilience: a retrospective report of actions taken in support of a New York school crisis team following 9/11.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kendall; Luna, Joanne M Tortorici

    2011-01-01

    A retrospective report details external support rendered to a Lower Manhattan school crisis team following the 9/11/01 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center This analysis occasions an opportunity for consideration of working assumptions, the formative use of data to plan support actions, and the subsequent emergence of a collaborative approach to post-disaster team support in school settings. The nature of assessment and nature of subsequent service delivery illustrates a community resilience-based approach to school crisis management. Recommendations for such work are based upon mixed qualitative and quantitative data gathered from on-scene team members as part of the ongoing support effort. PMID:21957722

  15. Social Media and Networking Technologies: An Analysis of Collaborative Work and Team Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoro, Ephraim A.; Hausman, Angela; Washington, Melvin C.

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication increases students' learning outcomes in higher education. Web 2.0 technologies encourages students' active engagement, collaboration, and participation in class activities, facilitates group work, and encourages information sharing among students. Familiarity with organizational use and sharing in social networks aids…

  16. Comparison of Teachers' Understanding of Team Work According to Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gülcan, Murat Gürkan

    2014-01-01

    People form organizations by getting together in order to realize the goals that they might not manage to realize alone. Organizations differ from one another by various distinctive characteristics. However, their success is related to the level of goal fulfillment. People working more effectively and efficiently within the organization may create…

  17. Comparison of Teachers' Understanding of Team Work According to Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glcan, Murat Grkan

    2014-01-01

    People form organizations by getting together in order to realize the goals that they might not manage to realize alone. Organizations differ from one another by various distinctive characteristics. However, their success is related to the level of goal fulfillment. People working more effectively and efficiently within the organization may create

  18. Rewarding Shared Experience: Assessing Individual Contributions to Team-Based Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    Continuing education students are usually mature students who have a wealth of experience from which their peers and the lecturer could profit. An effective teaching method with such students is the use of cooperative work assignments, but a problem that prevents lecturers from using this method is the difficulty of assigning grades to individual

  19. A Team Approach to Behaviour Management: A Training Guide for SENCOs Working with Teacher Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrington, Chris; Groom, Barry

    2004-01-01

    This training guide has been developed and written primarily for Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinators (SENCOs) in primary, secondary and special schools who manage the work of teaching assistants. It will also be of interest to other senior teachers or advisory staff who lead training in the area of behaviour management. There has been a…

  20. Multidisciplinary Optimization Branch Experience Using iSIGHT Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Korte, J. J.; Dunn, H. J.; Salas, A. O.

    1999-01-01

    The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley is investigating frameworks for supporting multidisciplinary analysis and optimization research. A framework provides software and system services to integrate computational tasks and allows the researcher to concentrate more on the application and less on the programming details. A framework also provides a common working environment and a full range of optimization tools, and so increases the productivity of multidisciplinary research teams. Finally, a framework enables staff members to develop applications for use by disciplinary experts in other organizations. This year, the MDO Branch has gained experience with the iSIGHT framework. This paper describes experiences with four aerospace applications, including: (1) reusable launch vehicle sizing, (2) aerospike nozzle design, (3) low-noise rotorcraft trajectories, and (4) acoustic liner design. Brief overviews of each problem are provided, including the number and type of disciplinary codes and computation time estimates. In addition, the optimization methods, objective functions, design variables, and constraints are described for each problem. For each case, discussions on the advantages and disadvantages of using the iSIGHT framework are provided as well as notes on the ease of use of various advanced features and suggestions for areas of improvement.

  1. Doing Interdisciplinary Mixed Methods Health Care Research: Working the Boundaries, Tensions, and Synergistic Potential of Team-Based Research.

    PubMed

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2016-04-01

    Current trends in health care research point to a shift from disciplinary models to interdisciplinary team-based mixed methods inquiry designs. This keynote address discusses the problems and prospects of creating vibrant mixed methods health care interdisciplinary research teams that can harness their potential synergy that holds the promise of addressing complex health care issues. We examine the range of factors and issues these types of research teams need to consider to facilitate efficient interdisciplinary mixed methods team-based research. It is argued that concepts such as disciplinary comfort zones, a lack of attention to team dynamics, and low levels of reflexivity among interdisciplinary team members can inhibit the effectiveness of a research team. This keynote suggests a set of effective strategies to address the issues that emanate from the new field of research inquiry known as team science as well as lessons learned from tapping into research on organizational dynamics. PMID:26984708

  2. Moving toward virtual interdisciplinary teams and a multi-stakeholder approach in community-based return-to-work care.

    PubMed

    Brunarski, David; Shaw, Lynn; Doupe, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    More efforts are needed to help stakeholders who are geographically isolated from one another become more collaborative in their approach to return-to-work (RTW). A review of the literature on team processes, and insights from the experiences of a federally funded Round Table Project on Safe and Timely Return to Function and Return to Work were used to inform strategies that might enhance collaboration among health professionals and stakeholders in injury and illness management and return-to-work. A case study serves to highlight the individual, identifies the problem and provides a potential solution at the broader service and system levels. It becomes evident that there is a need for a common language as well as policies that emphasize the importance of fostering awareness of interprofessional potentials and contributions of all stakeholders. Establishing shared goals, and building capacity for sustaining collaboration when multi-stakeholders do not function in the same physical location, but work virtually, might maximize effectiveness, efficiency and productivity. PMID:18525158

  3. Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederholt, Peggy A. Connor, Nadine P.; Hartig, Gregory K.; Harari, Paul M.

    2007-10-01

    Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

  4. The integrated model for interprofessional education: a design for preparing health professions' students to work in interprofessional teams.

    PubMed

    Grapczynski, Cynthia A; Schuurman, Shelley; Booth, Andrew D; Bambini, Deborah; Beel-Bates, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the process of helping students learn to work interprofessionally is figuring out how to design high-impact learning experiences that engage students in meaningful learning that is collaborative and experiential and can transform students understanding of their own and others' roles in the health care process. In this article, a model for interprofessional education, the Integrated Model for Interprofessional Education (IMIPE), is shared for introducing students in the health professions to the roles and responsibilities of some of the other healthcare professionals with whom they will work in practice. The IMIPE is a process model developed by an interprofessional faculty team used as the focal point of a pilot educational event for students from nursing, occupational therapy, physician assistant studies, and social work. The IMIPE is a derived model that combines concepts of holism, participation, and practical education, grounded in the adult educational philosophy of progressivism. Progressive adult education is focused on practical knowledge and problem-solving skills. The model uses collaborative, experiential, and transformative learning approaches to foster outcomes of communication, critical reflection, teamwork, ethics, and recognition of patient-client needs. These outcomes represent those identified by the World Health Organization and the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel. PMID:26046119

  5. Team Cognition in Experienced Command-and-Control Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Duran, Jasmine L.; Taylor, Amanda R.

    2007-01-01

    Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members

  6. Team Cognition in Experienced Command-and-Control Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Duran, Jasmine L.; Taylor, Amanda R.

    2007-01-01

    Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members…

  7. Multidisciplinary Optimization Branch Experience Using iSIGHT Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Korte, J. J.; Dunn, H. J.; Salas, A. O.

    1999-01-01

    The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley Research Center is investigating frameworks for supporting multidisciplinary analysis and optimization research. An optimization framework call improve the design process while reducing time and costs. A framework provides software and system services to integrate computational tasks and allows the researcher to concentrate more on the application and less on the programming details. A framework also provides a common working environment and a full range of optimization tools, and so increases the productivity of multidisciplinary research teams. Finally, a framework enables staff members to develop applications for use by disciplinary experts in other organizations. Since the release of version 4.0, the MDO Branch has gained experience with the iSIGHT framework developed by Engineous Software, Inc. This paper describes experiences with four aerospace applications: (1) reusable launch vehicle sizing, (2) aerospike nozzle design, (3) low-noise rotorcraft trajectories, and (4) acoustic liner design. All applications have been successfully tested using the iSIGHT framework, except for the aerospike nozzle problem, which is in progress. Brief overviews of each problem are provided. The problem descriptions include the number and type of disciplinary codes, as well as all estimate of the multidisciplinary analysis execution time. In addition, the optimization methods, objective functions, design variables, and design constraints are described for each problem. Discussions on the experience gained and lessons learned are provided for each problem. These discussions include the advantages and disadvantages of using the iSIGHT framework for each case as well as the ease of use of various advanced features. Potential areas of improvement are identified.

  8. Speeding Up Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

  9. The Discipline of Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzenbach, Jon R.; Smith, Douglas K.

    1993-01-01

    Teams share commitment, translate purpose into performance goals, and have members be accountable with and to their teammates. Types of teams are those that recommend, make or do things, and run things. The distinction between teams and other working groups is performance: an effective team is worth more than the sum of its parts. (SK)

  10. A Qualitative Investigation into How Problem-Based Learning Impacts on the Development of Team-Working Skills in Occupational Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Alison

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that problem-based learning (PBL) has a positive impact on the team-working skills of medical, health and social care students. These skills are important for graduates to master to enable effective collaborative working in today's diverse health and social care settings. What is not clear from the literature is how

  11. A Qualitative Investigation into How Problem-Based Learning Impacts on the Development of Team-Working Skills in Occupational Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Alison

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that problem-based learning (PBL) has a positive impact on the team-working skills of medical, health and social care students. These skills are important for graduates to master to enable effective collaborative working in today's diverse health and social care settings. What is not clear from the literature is how…

  12. Making Team Differences Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strathman, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Most district and school leaders understand that recruiting group members who have differing backgrounds, perspectives, talents, and personalities makes for good decision-making. Unfortunately, simply assembling a variety of top-notch individuals does not necessarily mean their talents and perspectives will be fully considered. Beth Strathman…

  13. Making Team Differences Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strathman, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Most district and school leaders understand that recruiting group members who have differing backgrounds, perspectives, talents, and personalities makes for good decision-making. Unfortunately, simply assembling a variety of top-notch individuals does not necessarily mean their talents and perspectives will be fully considered. Beth Strathman

  14. Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

  15. Study protocol of effectiveness of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-speficic sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-specific low back pain is a common cause for consultation with the general practitioner, generating increased health and social costs. This study will analyse the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention to reduce disability, severity of pain, anxiety and depression, to improve quality of life and to reduce the incidence of chronic low back pain in the working population with non-specific low back pain, compared to usual clinical care. Methods/Design A Cluster randomised clinical trial will be conducted in 38 Primary Health Care Centres located in Barcelona, Spain and its surrounding areas. The centres are randomly allocated to the multidisciplinary intervention or to usual clinical care. Patients between 18 and 65 years old (n = 932; 466 per arm) and with a diagnostic of a non-specific sub-acute low back pain are included. Patients in the intervention group are receiving the recommendations of clinical practice guidelines, in addition to a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention consisting of group educational sessions lasting a total of 10 hours. The main outcome is change in the score in the Roland Morris disability questionnaire at three months after onset of pain. Other outcomes are severity of pain, quality of life, duration of current non-specific low back pain episode, work sick leave and duration, Fear Avoidance Beliefs and Goldberg Questionnaires. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analysis will be by intention to treat. The intervention effect will be assessed through the standard error of measurement and the effect-size. Responsiveness of each scale will be evaluated by standardised response mean and receiver-operating characteristic method. Recovery according to the patient will be used as an external criterion. A multilevel regression will be performed on repeated measures. The time until the current episode of low back pain takes to subside will be analysed by Cox regression. Discussion We hope to provide evidence of the effectiveness of the proposed biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in avoiding the chronification of low back pain, and to reduce the duration of non-specific low back pain episodes. If the intervention is effective, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial Registration ISRCTN21392091 PMID:20067619

  16. Team Building [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium that was facilitated by Susan Dougherty at the 1995 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD). "The Relationship between Productivity and Work Team Autonomy and Team Process Effectiveness" (Candice L. Phelan) reports that correlation analysis of results of a study of 21 work teams revealed

  17. Team coordination dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Cooke, Nancy J

    2010-07-01

    Team coordination consists of both the dynamics of team member interaction and the environmental dynamics to which a team is subjected. Focusing on dynamics, an approach is developed that contrasts with traditional aggregate-static concepts of team coordination as characterized by the shared mental model approach. A team coordination order parameter was developed to capture momentary fluctuations in coordination. Team coordination was observed in three-person uninhabited air vehicle teams across two experimental sessions. The dynamics of the order parameter were observed under changes of a team familiarity control parameter. Team members returned for the second session to either the same (Intact) or different (Mixed) team. 'Roadblock' perturbations, or novel changes in the task environment, were introduced in order to probe the stability of team coordination. Nonlinear dynamic methods revealed differences that a traditional approach did not: Intact and Mixed team coordination dynamics looked very different; Mixed teams were more stable than Intact teams and explored the space of solutions without the need for correction. Stability was positively correlated with the number of roadblock perturbations that were overcome successfully. The novel and non-intuitive contribution of a dynamical analysis was that Mixed teams, who did not have a long history working together, were more adaptive. Team coordination dynamics carries new implications for traditional problems such as training adaptive teams. PMID:20587302

  18. Diabetic foot - the need for comprehensive multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Korzon-Burakowska, Anna; Dziemidok, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered to be civilization disease development of which is influenced by environmental changes. Diabetic foot (ulceration, infection, gangrene) is one of the most disabling complication of diabetes mellitus. It contributes to the increased mortality and cardiovascular death. It also frequently leads to depression, social exclusion and physical impairment. Risk factors of diabetic foot are as follows: age, race, sex, duration of diabetes, biomechanical factors, level of glycemia, smoking habits. According to international standards diabetic foot can be successfully treated only by the multidisciplinary team which can provide more comprehensive and integrated care as compared to ordinary medical team or single specialist. Multidisciplinary team consists of: diabetologist, shoemaker, orthopedist, psychologist, surgeons both vascular and general, podologists, radiologists, educators, nurses and rehabilitation team. Such coordinated attitude to a patient may be the future solution for any civilization and environment-related disease requiring treatment which cannot be successfully provided by any ordinary medical team. PMID:22216805

  19. The Challenges and Benefits of Employing a Mobile Research Fellow to Facilitate Team Work on a Large, Interdisciplinary, Multi-Sited Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, Fraser; Punch, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years research funding has increasingly moved in favour of large, multi-partner, interdisciplinary and multi-site research projects. This article explores the benefits and challenges of employing a full-time research fellow to work across multiple field sites, with all the local research teams, on an international,

  20. Computer-Based 3D Simulation: A Study of Communication Practices in a Trauma Team Performing Patient Examination and Diagnostic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krange, Ingeborg; Moen, Anne; Ludvigsen, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic work in trauma teams is critical for the patient's condition and for the possibility of survival. It is a difficult situation to train due to the inherently unpredictable and time-critical practice when an injured patient presents in the Emergency Room (ER). Different types of simulations have been developed for specialized training of…

  1. The Challenges and Benefits of Employing a Mobile Research Fellow to Facilitate Team Work on a Large, Interdisciplinary, Multi-Sited Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, Fraser; Punch, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years research funding has increasingly moved in favour of large, multi-partner, interdisciplinary and multi-site research projects. This article explores the benefits and challenges of employing a full-time research fellow to work across multiple field sites, with all the local research teams, on an international,…

  2. Computer-Based 3D Simulation: A Study of Communication Practices in a Trauma Team Performing Patient Examination and Diagnostic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krange, Ingeborg; Moen, Anne; Ludvigsen, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic work in trauma teams is critical for the patient's condition and for the possibility of survival. It is a difficult situation to train due to the inherently unpredictable and time-critical practice when an injured patient presents in the Emergency Room (ER). Different types of simulations have been developed for specialized training of

  3. Development of Environmental Knowledge, Team Working Skills and Desirable Behaviors on Environmental Conservation of Matthayomsuksa 6 Students Using Good Science Thinking Moves Method with Metacognition Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladawan, Charinrat; Singseewo, Adisak; Suksringarm, Paitool

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate environmental knowledge, team working skills, and desirable behaviors of students learning through the good science thinking moves method with metacognition techniques. The sample group included Matthayomsuksa 6 students from Nadoon Prachasan School, Nadoon District, Maha Sarakham Province. The research tools were

  4. Development of Environmental Knowledge, Team Working Skills and Desirable Behaviors on Environmental Conservation of Matthayomsuksa 6 Students Using Good Science Thinking Moves Method with Metacognition Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladawan, Charinrat; Singseewo, Adisak; Suksringarm, Paitool

    2015-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate environmental knowledge, team working skills, and desirable behaviors of students learning through the good science thinking moves method with metacognition techniques. The sample group included Matthayomsuksa 6 students from Nadoon Prachasan School, Nadoon District, Maha Sarakham Province. The research tools were…

  5. [The reciprocal reflecting team. A further modification of the reflecting team in inpatient child psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Menz, W; Oswald, H P

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of reflecting teams is to instigate change in systems that have become bogged down, including helper systems. The modifications that have been made in the Andersen reflecting team since it was first described (1987) are summarized. The reflecting team technique derives from family therapy and is epistemologically based on the radical constructivism of Bateson (1981), von Frster (1985), von Glaserfeld (1985) and others. Making use of the information resources of the key workers on our child psychiatry unit, we developed another variation, a "reciprocal reflecting team". This model is suitable for use in a clinical setting because it involves all of the key individuals working with a given child. The fundamental difference between our model and Andersen's is that initially we have no reflecting phase for psychotherapists. Rather, we start with a reflecting sequence in which the multidisciplinary clinical team discusses observations, information and hypotheses about the index patient and his or her family. Our impression is that our results are compatible with those of Hger et al. (1994) that family therapy using a reflecting team effects positive change in two of three cases. Because we have no follow-up data and our sample is still very small we base this on spontaneous positive feedback from the family members regarding their satisfaction with treatment. Further evidence is provided by clinical observations on the children's behavior and on changes in family interaction. PMID:7571878

  6. Teamwork and team training in the ICU: Where do the similarities with aviation end?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aviation industry has made significant progress in identifying the skills and behaviors that result in effective teamwork. Its conceptualization of teamwork, development of training programs, and design of assessment tools are highly relevant to the intensive care unit (ICU). Team skills are important for maintaining safety in both domains, as multidisciplinary teams must work effectively under highly complex, stressful, and uncertain conditions. However, there are substantial differences in the nature of work and structure of teams in the ICU in comparison with those in aviation. While intensive care medicine may wish to use the advances made by the aviation industry for conceptualizing team skills and implementing team training programs, interventions must be tailored to the highly specific demands of the ICU. PMID:22136283

  7. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

  8. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning

  9. OECI accreditation at Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, general framework and multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Chiusole, Daniela; Cioffredi, Piero; Basso, Umberto; Bortolami, Alberto; Crivellari, Gino; Gennaro, Gisella; Spina, Romina; Opocher, Giuseppe

    2016-01-29

    The aim of this article is to describe the accreditation process of the Veneto Institute of Oncology (IOV-IRCCS) according to the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) model, with particular reference to the standards for the multidisciplinary approach. Through the analysis of the process and the activities of each multidisciplinary team (MDT) and the development, at a regional level, of diagnostic, therapeutic, and care pathways (PDTA), all the necessary steps to meet the OECI standards have been determined. Adjustment is ongoing. We are working on the inclusion of the MDT registration forms in the electronic medical records and on the possibility to extend the OECI model to the MDT not based at IOV, but participated in by IOV professionals. The sarcoma MDT has achieved results demonstrating that the OECI framework has allowed the professionals involved in the multidisciplinary meeting to systematically share the clinical information of the patient, who can benefit from better continuity of care. The model has also provided greater clarity in the management of patients who are enrolled in clinical trials and deviate from Guide Lines (GL)/PDTA. The accreditation process according to the OECI model has added value to the IOV's already well-developed multidisciplinary activities. PMID:26833373

  10. Working with the 'difficult' patient: the use of a contextual cognitive-analytic therapy based training in improving team function in a routine psychiatry service setting.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Rosangela; Biancosino, Bruno; Borghi, Cristiana; Marmai, Luciana; Kerr, Ian B; Grassi, Luigi

    2013-12-01

    The clinical management of 'difficult' patients is a major challenge which exposes mental health teams to an increased risk of frustration and stress and may lead to professional burnout. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a cognitive-analytic therapy (CAT) based training undertaken by a mental health team working with 'difficult' patients reduced professional burnout symptoms, improved patients' service engagement and increased the levels of team-cohesion. Twelve mental health staff members from different professional and educational backgrounds took part in five 2-hour sessions providing a basic CAT training intervention, an integrative and relational model of psychotherapy for the treatment of borderline personality disorders. Participants were administered the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), the Service Engagement Scale (SES) and the Group Environment Questionnaire (GEQ) before (T0) and after (T1) CAT training, and at 1-month follow-up (T2). A significant decrease were found, at T2, on the MBI Emotional Exhaustion scores, the SES Availability subscale, the GEQ Attraction to Group-Social and Group Integration-Social, while the MBI-Personal Accomplishment scores increased from baseline.The results of this study suggest that a CAT-based training can facilitate team cohesion and patient engagement with a service and reduce burnout levels among mental health team members dealing with 'difficult' patients. PMID:23292306

  11. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  12. The Delta Cooperative Model: a Dynamic and Innovative Team-Work Activity to Develop Research Skills in Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    RIOS-VELAZQUEZ, CARLOS; ROBLES-SUAREZ, REYNALDO; GONZALEZ-NEGRON, ALBERTO J.; BAEZ-SANTOS, IVAN

    2006-01-01

    The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM) is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM) program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i) student’s perception of the workshops’ effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii) research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii) oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student’s knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83% and 75% respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how the this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology. PMID:23653564

  13. The delta cooperative model: a dynamic and innovative team-work activity to develop research skills in microbiology.

    PubMed

    Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Robles-Suarez, Reynaldo; Gonzalez-Negron, Alberto J; Baez-Santos, Ivan

    2006-05-01

    The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM) is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM) program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i) student's perception of the workshops' effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii) research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii) oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student's knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83% and 75% respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how the this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology. PMID:23653564

  14. [Tourette syndrome: from a neurological clinic to a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Benarroch, Fortu; Warman, Orly; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    2006-04-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a chronic, familial disorder, characterized by involuntary motor and phonic tics that wax and wane in severity. TS is frequently accompanied by behavioral, emotional and cognitive problems that are often more incapacitating than the tic disorder itself. After a review of the disorder, in which the multidisciplinary aspects are emphasized, the article describes the clinical features of 60 children with TS, 49 boys and 11 girls, aged 13 +/- 3.6 years (mean SD), treated in the Neuropediatric Unit at Shaare Zedek Medical Center. The children described had both motor and vocal tics, but also had ADHD (n = 44), obsessive-compulsive disorder (n = 32), learning disabilities (with 12 children learning in special education frameworks) and behavioral disorders (n = 36). The clinical profile of this group of children with TS is similar to that reported on referred patients regardless of cultural background. Since children with TS manifest multiple comorbidities, optimal therapy mandates the cooperation of a multidisciplinary team including a pediatric neurologist, a child psychiatrist, a psychologist and a family therapist. Working in concert, these specialists can implement a multimodal approach, addressing the neurological and psychiatric aspects of TS as well as enhancing the child's coping skills with the disorder itself and its consequences. PMID:16642633

  15. Self-reported patient psychosocial needs in integrated primary health care: A role for social work in interdisciplinary teams.

    PubMed

    Craig, Shelley; Frankford, Rachel; Allan, Kate; Williams, Charmaine; Schwartz, Celia; Yaworski, Andrea; Janz, Gwen; Malek-Saniee, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Despite being identified as significant determinants of health, depression and anxiety continue to be underdiagnosed and undertreated in primary care settings. This study examined the psychosocial health needs of patients at four urban interdisciplinary primary health teams. Quantitative analysis revealed that nearly 80% of patients reported anxiety and/or depression. Self-reported anxiety and depression was correlated with poor social relationships, compromised health status and underdeveloped problem-solving skills. These findings suggest that social workers have a vital role to play within interdisciplinary primary health teams in the amelioration of factors associated with anxiety and depression. PMID:26727556

  16. Interactive Team Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team

  17. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: Implications for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-01-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to…

  18. Student Support Teams: Helping Students Succeed in General Education Classrooms or Working To Place Students in Special Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.; Hansen, Carol D.; Nieminen, Paul K.; Wright, E. Heath

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 24 elementary teachers found they were not using Student Support Teams (SST) as designed. Teachers believed the primary purpose of SST was to test and place students into special education, referred students with whom they had not been successful, and believed there was a covert evaluation process. (Contains references.)

  19. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: Implications for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-01-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to

  20. The Loci Multidisciplinary Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Ed

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. An overview of the Loci Multidisciplinary Simulation System. 2. Topologically adaptive mesh generation. 3. Multidisciplinary simulations using Loci with the CHEM chemically reacting flow solver.

  1. The Component Packaging Problem: A Vehicle for the Development of Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadel, Georges; Bridgewood, Michael; Figliola, Richard; Greenstein, Joel; Kostreva, Michael; Nowaczyk, Ronald; Stevenson, Steve

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes academic research which has resulted in an increased appreciation for multidisciplinary efforts among our students, colleagues and administrators. It has also generated a number of research ideas that emerged from the interaction between disciplines. Overall, 17 undergraduate students and 16 graduate students benefited directly from the NASA grant: an additional 11 graduate students were impacted and participated without financial support from NASA. The work resulted in 16 theses (with 7 to be completed in the near future), 67 papers or reports mostly published in 8 journals and/or presented at various conferences (a total of 83 papers, presentations and reports published based on NASA inspired or supported work). In addition, the faculty and students presented related work at many meetings, and continuing work has been proposed to NSF, the Army, Industry and other state and federal institutions to continue efforts in the direction of multidisciplinary and recently multi-objective design and analysis. The specific problem addressed is component packing which was solved as a multi-objective problem using iterative genetic algorithms and decomposition. Further testing and refinement of the methodology developed is presently under investigation. Teaming issues research and classes resulted in the publication of a web site, (http://design.eng.clemson.edu/psych4991) which provides pointers and techniques to interested parties. Specific advantages of using iterative genetic algorithms, hurdles faced and resolved, and institutional difficulties associated with multi-discipline teaming are described in some detail.

  2. Palliative medicine update: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Kris C P; van den Brand, Maria W M; Jacobs, Jose; Groot, Marieke; Veldhoven, Carel; Verhagen, Constans; Hasselaar, Jeroen; Engels, Yvonne

    2013-09-01

    Palliative medicine is a young specialty that is officially recognized in relatively few countries. The World Health Organization published an adapted definition in 2002, describing palliative care as an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness. When the accent is shifting from curative to palliative, the goal of management is the maintenance or improvement of the patient's quality of life. The different dimensions of palliative care and the multitude of types of care to be provided require a multidisciplinary, well-functioning team, effective communication and a clear task division between primary and hospital care. Considering the complexity of care for incurable patients, a multidisciplinary approach is a prerequisite to balance curative and palliative intervention options. Optimal functioning of a team requires excellent training, communication and a description of the tasks and responsibilities of each team member. More and more advanced care planning is introduced in palliative care, focusing on an early identification of patients in a palliative trajectory and on the prevention of annoying symptoms, hoping that this approach results in an improved quality of life for the individual patient, less useless technical investigations and a better end-of-life care on the place the patient and his family desires. PMID:23241248

  3. Advances in Multi-disciplinary Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.; Huerta, J.; Rubio-Iglesias, J. M.; Serrano, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    The challenge for addressing issues such as climate change, food security or ecosystem sustainability is that they require multi-disciplinary collaboration and the ability to integrate information across scientific domains. Multidisciplinary collaborations are difficult because each discipline has its own "language", protocols and formats for communicating within its community and handling data and information. EuroGEOSS demonstrates the added value to the scientific community and to society of making existing systems and applications interoperable and useful within the GEOSS and INSPIRE frameworks. In 2010, the project built an initial operating capacity of a multi-disciplinary Information System addressing three areas: drought, forestry and biodiversity. It is now furthering this development into an advanced operating capacity (http://www.eurogeoss.eu). The key to this capability is the creation of a broker that supports access to multiple resources through a common user interface and the automation of data search and access using state of the art information technology. EuroGEOSS hosted a conference on information systems and multi-disciplinary applications of science and technology. "EuroGEOSS: advancing the vision of GEOSS" provided a forum for developers, users and decision-makers working with advanced multi-disciplinary information systems to improve science and decisions for complex societal issues. In particular, the Conference addressed: Information systems for supporting multi-disciplinary research; Information systems and modeling for biodiversity, drought, forestry and related societal benefit areas; and Case studies of multi-disciplinary applications and outcomes. This paper will discuss the major finding of the conference and the directions for future development.

  4. How teams work--or don't--in primary care: a field study on internal medicine practices.

    PubMed

    Chesluk, Benjamin J; Holmboe, Eric S

    2010-05-01

    We conducted a field study in three primary care practices representing different practice types: a solo practice; a certified patient-centered medical home; and a multiphysician, multispecialty practice connected to a local university. All three practices shared a common culture in the way that practice members related to each other. In each instance, the practice team operated in separate social "silos," isolating physicians from each other and from the rest of the practice staff. We concluded that current practice structures are primarily focused on supporting physicians' hectic routines and have trouble accommodating the diversity of patients' needs. For practices to succeed in managing diverse patients and in helping them understand and manage their own health, it will be critical to break down the silos and organize teams with shared roles and responsibilities. PMID:20439874

  5. Multidisciplinary computational aerosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1992-01-01

    As the challenges of single disciplinary computational physics are met, such as computational fluid dynamics, computational structural mechanics, computational propulsion, computational aeroacoustics, computational electromagnetics, etc., scientists have begun investigating the combination of these single disciplines into what is being called multidisciplinary computational aerosciences (MCAS). The combination of several disciplines not only offers simulation realism but also formidable computational challenges. The solution of such problems will require computers orders of magnitude larger than those currently available. Such computer power can only be supplied by massively parallel machines because of the current speed-of-light limitation of conventional serial systems. Even with such machines, MCAS problems will require hundreds of hours for their solution. To efficiently utilize such a machine, research is required in three areas that include parallel architectures, systems software, and applications software. The main emphasis of this paper is the applications software element. Examples that demonstrate application software for multidisciplinary problems currently being solved at NASA Ames Research Center are presented. Pacing items for MCAS are discussed such as solution methodology, physical modeling, computer power, and multidisciplinary validation experiments.

  6. Clinical audit of multidisciplinary care at a medium-sized hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary care is a key enabler in the provision of high quality care for cancer patients. Despite compelling evidence supporting their benefit to patients and for providers, multidisciplinary cancer conferences (MCC) are not universally occurring. Team composition of MCC reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the body. Lack of nursing input can have a negative impact on team decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate multidisciplinary care and adherence to national recommendations at a medium-sized hospital through a clinical audit of cancer conferences and clinical records. Methods A total of 77 multidisciplinary cancer conferences were visited and 496 electronic health records were reviewed. The regularity of meetings and multidisciplinary attendance were evaluated. Each electronic health record was checked to verify documented prospective discussion before any treatment was started. Results Nine multidisciplinary teams meet on a weekly or biweekly basis at the hospital with an average number of ten people and six different specialties represented. Average duration of meetings was 46.8min. Though most patients (64.5%) were discussed at some point at the relevant cancer conference, only 40% had a documented multidisciplinary team discussion prior to the first treatment. Pathological stage (pTNM) was documented in 53.6% of clinical records. Conclusions Nursing representatives should be included as usual attendees at cancer conferences. Prospective discussion of all cancer cases should be encouraged. Use of checklists and systematic collection of key information, specifically cancer staging, could improve clinical documentation in the electronic clinical record. PMID:24597686

  7. [The multi-disciplinary treatment of adult head trauma, from treatment to reintegration].

    PubMed

    Le Strat, Olivier; Gautier, Arnaud; Rabasse, Yves; Boisseau, Nathalie; Roussennac, Virginie

    2012-03-01

    The treatment of patients with head trauma in neurological rehabilitation units must implement a coordinated care approach, involving rehabilitation and early reintegration. This integration is overseen by a specialised and multi-disciplinary team. PMID:22533289

  8. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

  9. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'

  10. Selective Mutism in Elementary School: Multidisciplinary Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giddan, Jane J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents the symptoms of selective mutism and historical background for treatment. It provides a case study which illustrates successful multidisciplinary treatment outcomes for a child who was selectively mute. Issues relevant to speech-language pathologists working with elementary school children are discussed and treatment guidelines provided.

  11. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  12. The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes

    PubMed Central

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. Settings This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme On Your Own Feet Ahead! in the Netherlands. Participantss A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1?year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Interventions Transition programme. Primary outcome measures Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). Results The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (p<0.01) and changes in team climate (p<0.001) predicted the quality of chronic care delivery at T2. Conclusions The implementation of transition programmes requires a supportive and stimulating team climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. PMID:24852302

  13. NASA Team Collaboration Pilot: Enabling NASA's Virtual Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Most NASA projects and work activities are accomplished by teams of people. These teams are often geographically distributed - across NASA centers and NASA external partners, both domestic and international. NASA "virtual" teams are stressed by the challenge of getting team work done - across geographic boundaries and time zones. To get distributed work done, teams rely on established methods - travel, telephones, Video Teleconferencing (NASA VITS), and email. Time is our most critical resource - and team members are hindered by the overhead of travel and the difficulties of coordinating work across their virtual teams. Modern, Internet based team collaboration tools offer the potential to dramatically improve the ability of virtual teams to get distributed work done.

  14. Asteroid team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to support asteroid research and the operation of an Asteroid Team within the Earth and Space Sciences Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Asteroid Team carries out original research on asteroids in order to discover, better characterize and define asteroid properties. This information is needed for the planning and design of NASA asteroid flyby and rendezvous missions. The asteroid Team also provides scientific and technical advice to NASA and JPL on asteroid related programs. Work on asteroid classification continued and the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids was published. In the asteroid photometry program researchers obtained N or Q photometry for more than 50 asteroids, including the two M-earth-crossers. Compositional analysis of infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 micrometer) of asteroids is continuing. Over the next year the work on asteroid classification and composition will continue with the analysis of the 60 reduced infrared spectra which we now have at hand. The radiometry program will continue with the reduction of the N and Q bandpass data for the 57 asteroids in order to obtain albedos and diameters. This year the emphasis will shift to IRAS follow-up observations; which includes objects not observed by IRAS and objects with poor or peculiar IRAS data. As in previous year, we plan to give top priority to any opportunities for observing near-Earth asteroids and the support (through radiometric lightcurve observations from the IRTF) of any stellar occultations by asteroids for which occultation observation expeditions are fielded. Support of preparing of IRAS data for publication and of D. Matson for his participation in the NASA Planetary Astronomy Management and Operations Working Group will continue.

  15. Team Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; Bentley, Scott

    Chapter 6 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter defines and explains management teams and describes several successful examples of team management. Superintendents have come to rely on their management team's expertise to resolve increasingly complex policy, administrative, and instructional issues. Although team management has

  16. Incorporating Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) knowledge and skills into the daily work of police officers: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Hanafi, Sonya; Bahora, Masuma; Demir, Berivan N; Compton, Michael T

    2008-12-01

    This qualitative focus group study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training for police officers. Thematic analysis of transcripts of focus group discussions revealed that officers report increased knowledge of mental illnesses (which manifests as an improved ability to recognize and respond, reduced stereotyping/stigmatization, greater empathy toward consumers and their caregivers, more patience when dealing with consumers, and fewer arrests/more redirection toward treatment), as well as practical application of learned skills (evidenced by an ability to put individuals with mental illnesses at ease, reduced unpredictability of the crisis situation, and reduced risk of injury). Results highlight the potential for collaboration between law enforcement (and other public safety/criminal justice professions) and the mental health professions in the expanding CIT collaborative model. PMID:18465226

  17. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Improving SCIP Compliance.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Ciara R; Strayer, Melissa; Huynh, Toan; Green, John M

    2015-07-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) is a national program aimed at reducing perioperative complications and is a quality benchmark metric for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This study evaluates whether a multidisciplinary program improved an institution's compliance with SCIP measures. Analysis of the facility's performance data identified three key areas of SCIP noncompliance: 1) timely discontinuation of perioperative antibiotics and urinary catheters, 2) initiation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, and 3) perioperative beta blocker administration. Multidisciplinary teams collaborated with providers and department chairs in reviewing and enable SCIP compliance. Anesthesia staff managed preoperative antibiotics. SCIP-compliant order sets, venous thromboembolism pop-up alerts, and progress note templates were added to the electronic medical record. Standardized education was provided to explain SCIP requirements, review noncompliant cases, and update teams on SCIP performance. Data were captured from January 2009 to March 2014. Ten SCIP fallouts were reported for general surgery specialties in January 2013, when the SCIP compliance project launched. Specifically, colon-related surgery achieved 100 per cent compliance. Six months after implementation, overall SCIP compliance at our institution improved by 65 per cent (from 90.7-98.6% compliance). PMID:26140888

  18. Maintaining School-based Prereferral Teams: An Eight Year Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Helen; Ingalls, Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    Prereferral teams have been found to reduce special education referrals. A followup study of 10 prereferral teams in a rural northwestern school district found that strategies for successful team maintenance included training and rotating members, utilizing various skills of multidisciplinary members, administrative support, and implementing a…

  19. The team approach to the management of children on chronic peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, E; Secker, D; Braj, B; Picone, G; Balfe, J W

    1996-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic renal failure has a profound and lasting impact on a child and family, with the potential for impairment of the child's physical, mental, and social development. To achieve an ideal outcome, the peritoneal dialysis (PD) team must focus on preparing the child and family to perform home dialysis, prescribe the dialysis regimen most compatible with the patient's lifestyle and clearance requirements, ensure optimal nutrition, and facilitate psychosocial adaptation to PD. Close follow-up is essential for early detection, prevention, and treatment of potential complications of dialysis. A multidisciplinary team approach encompassing nursing, medicine, nutrition, and social work best suits the needs of the child and family. PMID:8620366

  20. A Reflection on the Work of an Educational Psychologist in Providing Supervision for a Team of Community Based Support Workers, Supporting Families with Vulnerable Adolescents at Risk of Exclusion from School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The evolving role of the educational psychologist (EP) is discussed with an emphasis on the supervision provided for a team of support workers for vulnerable adolescents, working within a Local Service Team. This development is considered in the context of the Every Child Matters (DfES, 2004) agenda and the Farrell, Woods, Lewis, Rooney, Squire…

  1. A Reflection on the Work of an Educational Psychologist in Providing Supervision for a Team of Community Based Support Workers, Supporting Families with Vulnerable Adolescents at Risk of Exclusion from School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The evolving role of the educational psychologist (EP) is discussed with an emphasis on the supervision provided for a team of support workers for vulnerable adolescents, working within a Local Service Team. This development is considered in the context of the Every Child Matters (DfES, 2004) agenda and the Farrell, Woods, Lewis, Rooney, Squire

  2. Challenges of Trainees in a Multidisciplinary Research Program: Nano-Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriegel, Christina; Koehne, Jessica; Tinkle, Sally; Maynard, Andrew D.; Hill, Rodney A.

    2011-01-01

    The breadth of knowledge required for the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology challenges and extends traditional concepts of multidisciplinary graduate education. There is a paucity of information, both general reporting and peer-reviewed studies, on the challenges for graduate students working in this multidisciplinary paradigm, from the…

  3. Challenges of Trainees in a Multidisciplinary Research Program: Nano-Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kriegel, Christina; Koehne, Jessica; Tinkle, Sally; Maynard, Andrew D.; Hill, Rodney A.

    2011-01-01

    The breadth of knowledge required for the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology challenges and extends traditional concepts of multidisciplinary graduate education. There is a paucity of information, both general reporting and peer-reviewed studies, on the challenges for graduate students working in this multidisciplinary paradigm, from the

  4. Boundaries, gaps, and overlaps: defining roles in a multidisciplinary nephrology clinic.

    PubMed

    Stenfors-Hayes, Terese; Kang, Helen H

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore how health care professionals in a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic interact with one another, patients, families, and caregivers to expand understanding of how this increasingly common form of chronic disease management functions in situ. Nonparticipatory observations were conducted of 64 consultations between patients and health care professionals and end-of-day rounds at a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic. Key themes in our findings revolved around the question of boundaries between the health professions that were expected to work cooperatively within the clinic, between medical specialties in the management of complex patients, and between caregivers and patients. Understanding the importance of various professional roles and how they are allocated, either formally as part of care design or organically as a clinical routine, may help us understand how multidisciplinary care teams function in real life and help us identify gaps in practice. This study highlights two areas for further study and reflection: the effect of discrepancies in health information and the role of caregivers in patient care. PMID:25336966

  5. Boundaries, gaps, and overlaps: defining roles in a multidisciplinary nephrology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Stenfors-Hayes, Terese; Kang, Helen H

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore how health care professionals in a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic interact with one another, patients, families, and caregivers to expand understanding of how this increasingly common form of chronic disease management functions in situ. Nonparticipatory observations were conducted of 64 consultations between patients and health care professionals and end-of-day rounds at a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic. Key themes in our findings revolved around the question of boundaries between the health professions that were expected to work cooperatively within the clinic, between medical specialties in the management of complex patients, and between caregivers and patients. Understanding the importance of various professional roles and how they are allocated, either formally as part of care design or organically as a clinical routine, may help us understand how multidisciplinary care teams function in real life and help us identify gaps in practice. This study highlights two areas for further study and reflection: the effect of discrepancies in health information and the role of caregivers in patient care. PMID:25336966

  6. Implementing a High Performance Work Place in the Distribution and Logistics Industry: Recommendations for Leadership & Team Member Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Laura Harding

    2012-01-01

    Leadership development and employee engagement are two elements critical to the success of organizations. In response to growth opportunities, our Distribution and Logistics company set on a course to implement High Performance Work Place to meet the leadership and employee engagement needs, and to find methods for improving work processes. This

  7. Implementing a High Performance Work Place in the Distribution and Logistics Industry: Recommendations for Leadership & Team Member Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Laura Harding

    2012-01-01

    Leadership development and employee engagement are two elements critical to the success of organizations. In response to growth opportunities, our Distribution and Logistics company set on a course to implement High Performance Work Place to meet the leadership and employee engagement needs, and to find methods for improving work processes. This…

  8. On championship TEAMS.

    PubMed

    Jones, Daniel B

    2016-02-01

    Championship teams tap the strengths of the individuals working toward a common goal. Surgery is a team sport, which seeks to provide the very best patient care. For surgeons we seek to cure disease, alleviate suffering, and train the next generation of surgeons. When at our best, we build teamwork with a winning attitude, trust, respect, and love. Together there are no limits to what championship teams can achieve with passion, dedicated practice, mutual respect, and a little luck. PMID:26687961

  9. Evidence-based Medicine and Rapid Response Team Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Bruckel, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    The implementation of Rapid Response Teams is becoming commonplace in U.S. hospitals, following the model developed in Australia. The Rapid Response Team is a method of bringing ICU-level patient care to the bedside of critically ill patients using a multidisciplinary team. Acute care unit staff are trained to recognize clinical deterioration using a set of vital sign calling criteria (systolic blood pressure below 90 mmHg, pulse below 60 or above 100, etc.). Many hospitals have been facing problems gaining needed support to make the organizational changes needed for the team to function properly. Some faculty physicians have expressed apprehension about losing control over their patients, and they have also highlighted the lack of rigorous experimental evidence that the teams work. Since there are so many confounding factors at work when trying to design an experimental study of this type of change, the study may not accurately portray the situation. Other evaluation methods should therefore be considered. PMID:19529801

  10. The W(h)ine Club: Women Finding Joy in Academic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selepe, Mosa; Grobler, Christa; Dicks, Emsie; Oldewage-Theron, Wilna

    2012-01-01

    The W(h)ine Club is a multidisciplinary women's research team which has been working together for the past 10 years. The idea for this Viewpoint piece grew as we participated in a Women in Research programme. The aim of the programme was to improve academic publications among women. A group of us in the programme found ourselves repeatedly

  11. Study protocol of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-specific sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP), with high incidence and prevalence rate, is one of the most common reasons to consult the health system and is responsible for a significant amount of sick leave, leading to high health and social costs. The objective of the study is to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial educational group intervention (MBEGI) of non-specific sub-acute LBP in comparison with the usual care in the working population recruited in primary healthcare centres. Methods/design The study design is a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a MBEGI in comparison with the usual care of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Measures on effectiveness and costs of both interventions will be obtained from a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial carried out in 38 Catalan primary health care centres, enrolling 932 patients between 18 and 65 years old with a diagnosis of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Effectiveness measures are: pharmaceutical treatments, work sick leave (% and duration in days), Roland Morris disability, McGill pain intensity, Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB) and Golberg Questionnaires. Utility measures will be calculated from the SF-12. The analysis will be performed from a social perspective. The temporal horizon is at 3 months (change to chronic LBP) and 12 months (evaluate the outcomes at long term). Assessment of outcomes will be blinded and will follow the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion We hope to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of MBEGI, see an improvement in the patients' quality of life, achieve a reduction in the duration of episodes and the chronicity of non-specific low back pain, and be able to report a decrease in the social costs. If the intervention is cost-effectiveness and cost-utility, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58719694 PMID:21859489

  12. Enhancing quality improvement team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Mosel, D; Shamp, M J

    1993-01-01

    Quality improvement teams are different from other work groups in their purpose, leadership, membership, training, procedures, and dynamics. To have effective quality improvement teams, health care organizations must focus on six key process variables, with particular attention to group dynamics. Quality improvement teams progress through the "traditional" stages of team development--forming, storming, norming, and performing--with a "special stage" of closing. Within each stage, there are two core dimensions--team process ("relationship" issues) and the project itself ("task" issues)--and critical tasks that need to be performed by the Quality Council, team members, team leader, and the facilitator. PMID:10130709

  13. Interactive Team Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team…

  14. Web Team Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Jennifer; Felker, Kyle

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic world of the Web has provided libraries with a wealth of opportunities, including new approaches to the provision of information and varied internal staffing structures. The development of self-managed Web teams, endowed with authority and resources, can create an adaptable and responsive culture within libraries. This new working team

  15. Blog - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Empirical findings on the nature of scientific inquiry (i.e., "the science of science") indicate that research is increasingly being conducted by teams rather than individuals. Working on a cross-disciplinary research team also has been shown to be associated with producing more creative research that has higher scientific impact.

  16. Meeting the needs of vulnerable patients: The need for team working across general practice and community nursing services

    PubMed Central

    While, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    General practitioners and district nurses have a long history of providing care outside the hospital setting. With health care increasingly moving out of the hospital setting, there are more opportunities for general practitioners and district nurses to work together to meet the health needs of the local population. However, the reduction in qualified specialist practitioner district nurses over the last decade is concerning. The need for an effective district nursing service has been recognised by the Department of Health in their own model – the nature of district nursing work, often over a long period, enables relationships to develop with the patient, family and informal carers as a basis for anticipatory care to manage long-term conditions. Communication and understanding of the role are central to enhance effective working between general practitioners and district nurses, which can be fostered by engagement in community-oriented integrated care and case management. PMID:25949736

  17. Getting a Cohesive Answer from a Common Start: Scalable Multidisciplinary Analysis through Transformation of a System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Bjorn; Chung, Seung H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges of systems engineering is in working multidisciplinary problems in a cohesive manner. When planning analysis of these problems, system engineers must tradeoff time and cost for analysis quality and quantity. The quality is associated with the fidelity of the multidisciplinary models and the quantity is associated with the design space that can be analyzed. The tradeoff is due to the resource intensive process of creating a cohesive multidisciplinary system model and analysis. Furthermore, reuse or extension of the models used in one stage of a product life cycle for another is a major challenge. Recent developments have enabled a much less resource-intensive and more rigorous approach than handwritten translation scripts or codes of multidisciplinary models and their analyses. The key is to work from a core system model defined in a MOF-based language such as SysML and in leveraging the emerging tool ecosystem, such as Query-View- Transform (QVT), from the OMG community. SysML was designed to model multidisciplinary systems and analyses. The QVT standard was designed to transform SysML models. The Europa Hability Mission (EHM) team has begun to exploit these capabilities. In one case, a Matlab/Simulink model is generated on the fly from a system description for power analysis written in SysML. In a more general case, a symbolic mathematical framework (supported by Wolfram Mathematica) is coordinated by data objects transformed from the system model, enabling extremely flexible and powerful tradespace exploration and analytical investigations of expected system performance.

  18. Getting a Cohesive Answer from a Common Start: Scalable Multidisciplinary Analysis through Transformation of a Systems Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Bjorn; Chung, Seung

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges of systems engineering is in working multidisciplinary problems in a cohesive manner. When planning analysis of these problems, system engineers must trade between time and cost for analysis quality and quantity. The quality often correlates with greater run time in multidisciplinary models and the quantity is associated with the number of alternatives that can be analyzed. The trade-off is due to the resource intensive process of creating a cohesive multidisciplinary systems model and analysis. Furthermore, reuse or extension of the models used in one stage of a product life cycle for another is a major challenge. Recent developments have enabled a much less resource-intensive and more rigorous approach than hand-written translation scripts between multi-disciplinary models and their analyses. The key is to work from a core systems model defined in a MOF-based language such as SysML and in leveraging the emerging tool ecosystem, such as Query/View/Transformation (QVT), from the OMG community. SysML was designed to model multidisciplinary systems. The QVT standard was designed to transform SysML models into other models, including those leveraged by engineering analyses. The Europa Habitability Mission (EHM) team has begun to exploit these capabilities. In one case, a Matlab/Simulink model is generated on the fly from a system description for power analysis written in SysML. In a more general case, symbolic analysis (supported by Wolfram Mathematica) is coordinated by data objects transformed from the systems model, enabling extremely flexible and powerful design exploration and analytical investigations of expected system performance.

  19. A Faculty Team Works to Create Content Linkages among Various Courses to Increase Meaningful Learning of Targeted Concepts of Microbiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Briken, Volker; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Gao, Lian-Yong; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Joseph, Sam W.; Mosser, David; Parent, Beth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Swanson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina V.; Yuan, Robert; Smith, Ann C.

    2007-01-01

    As research faculty with expertise in the area of host-pathogen interactions (HPI), we used a research group model to effect our professional development as scientific educators. We have established a working hypothesis: The implementation of a curriculum that forms bridges between our seven HPI courses allows our students to achieve deep and

  20. A Faculty Team Works to Create Content Linkages among Various Courses to Increase Meaningful Learning of Targeted Concepts of Microbiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Briken, Volker; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Gao, Lian-Yong; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Joseph, Sam W.; Mosser, David; Parent, Beth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Swanson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina V.; Yuan, Robert; Smith, Ann C.

    2007-01-01

    As research faculty with expertise in the area of host-pathogen interactions (HPI), we used a research group model to effect our professional development as scientific educators. We have established a working hypothesis: The implementation of a curriculum that forms bridges between our seven HPI courses allows our students to achieve deep and…

  1. Submarine Landslides: A Multidisciplinary Crossroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscardelli, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    The study of submarine landslides has advanced considerably in the last decade. A multitude of geoscience disciplines, including marine, petroleum and planetary geology, as well as geohazard assessments, are concerned with the study of these units. Oftentimes, researchers working in these fields disseminate their findings within their own communities and a multidisciplinary approach seems to lack. This presentation showcases several case studies in which a broader approach has increased our understanding of submarine landslides in a variety of geologic settings. Three-dimensional seismic data from several continental margins (Trinidad, Brazil, Morocco, Canada, GOM), as well as data from outcrop localities are shown to explore geomorphological complexities associated with submarine landslides. Discussion associated with the characterization and classification of submarine landslides is also part of this work. Topics that will be cover include: 1) how data from conventional oil and gas exploration activities can be used to increase our understanding of the dynamic behavior of submarine landslides, 2) analogies between terrestrial submarine landslides and potential Martian counterparts, 3) impact of submarine landslides in margin construction, as well as their economic significance and 4) the importance of quantifying the morphology of submarine landslides in a systematic fashion.

  2. Breakfast: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of breakfast as an essential part of an healthy diet has been only recently promoted even if breakfast practices were known since the Middle Age. The growing scientific evidences on this topic are extremely sector-based nevertheless breakfast could be regarded from different point of views and from different expertises. This approach, that take into account history, sociology, anthropology, medicine, psychology and pedagogy, is useful to better understand the value of this meal in our culture. The aim of this paper was to analyse breakfast-related issues based on a multidisciplinary approach with input by specialists from different fields of learning. Discussion Breakfast is now recommended as part of a diet because it is associated with healthier macro- and micronutrient intakes, body mass index and lifestyle. Moreover recent studies showed that breakfast improves cognitive function, intuitive perception and academic performance. Research demonstrates the importance of providing breakfast not only to children but in adults and elderly too. Although the important role breakfast plays in maintaining the health, epidemiological data from industrialised countries reveal that many individuals either eat a nutritionally unhealthy breakfast or skip it completely. Summary The historical, bio-psychological and educational value of breakfast in our culture is extremely important and should be recognized and stressed by the scientific community. Efforts should be done to promote this practice for the individual health and well-being. PMID:23842429

  3. Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  4. Multidisciplinary care in pediatric oncology

    PubMed Central

    Cantrell, Mary Ann; Ruble, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the significant advances in the treatment of childhood cancer and supportive care that have occurred over the last several decades and details how these advances have led to improved survival and quality of life (QOL) for children with cancer through a multidisciplinary approach to care. Advances in the basic sciences, general medicine, cooperative research protocols, and policy guidelines have influenced and guided the multidisciplinary approach in pediatric oncology care across the spectrum from diagnosis through long-term survival. Two case studies are provided to highlight the nature and scope of multidisciplinary care in pediatric oncology care. PMID:21811384

  5. Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

  6. Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

  7. Multidisciplinary Manpower in the Nutrition Component of Comprehensive Health Care Delivery: Learning from the C and Y Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallstrom, Betty J.; Lauber, Doris E.

    1973-01-01

    Delegation, elaboration, and sharing of nutritional information and care within the multidisciplinary team of the Children and Youth Projects may well serve as the model for integrating nutrition into the Health Maintenance Organizations concept. (Authors)

  8. Integrating principles and multidisciplinary projects in design education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevill, Gale E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The critical need to improve engineering design education in the U.S. is presented and a number of actions to achieve that end are discussed. The importance of teaching undergraduates the latest methods and principles through the means of team design in multidisciplinary projects leading to a testable product is emphasized. Desirable training for design instructors is described and techniques for selecting and managing projects that teach effectively are discussed.

  9. A multidisciplinary approach to engage VFR migrants in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Miriam; Navaza, Brbara; Guionnet, Anne; Lpez-Vlez, Rogelio

    2012-05-01

    VFRs are at a greater risk of contracting travel-related illnesses such as malaria, and their knowledge about travel health tends to be poor. Since 2009, community-based activities targeting potential and impending VFRs were performed by a multidisciplinary team in Madrid, Spain. The design and distribution of multilingual and culturally-sensitive material following a qualitative research, and intercultural mediators were key tools of the health education programme. PMID:22592114

  10. Geriatric assessment teams.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L J; Cole, K D

    1987-02-01

    In geriatric care, a form of teamwork is the recommended modality because of the complex biopsychosocial needs of the patient. The goal of geriatric assessment programs is to establish an intensive assessment of older adults which requires the competencies of several coordinated disciplines. Not only do teams have the capacity to assess patients in much greater depth but also patients share different information with different providers. The composition of the team is dictated by the needs of the patient population in accordance with resources available. Next, one must identify a method of team practice in order for interactions to take place. The method of functioning determines what kind of team it is, ranging from independent functioning with minimal formal interfacing to interdependent activity interspersed with formal and informal interactions. In initiating a geriatric assessment program, one needs to determine which tasks demand interdisciplinary collaboration, which require interdisciplinary consultation, and which can be performed using a matrix or extended team model. In this model, the core team is supplemented by other disciplines as determined by the team, predicated on patient problems. Teams can profit from training, which can help with choosing an appropriate model, establishing a manual of procedure, and managing interactive issues and problems. This can occur early in the team's formation, or when a team takes on new members. The minimal level of team development would include establishing program goals, delineating professional responsibilities and roles, and implementing a system for exchanging and documenting information about patient plans. Saving input to share only in team meeting is inefficient, so health care teams need to recognize the importance of informal interchanges. It is still a matter of conjecture about what team works best with which patients under what circumstances or conditions. Multiple randomized clinical trials with teams will give us more information in this regard. In the meantime, organizers of geriatric assessment programs will have to make decisions based on clinical practice in the team development field and extrapolations from related health care team studies. PMID:3545426

  11. Pemphigus vulgaris: a multidisciplinary approach to management

    PubMed Central

    Vinall, Christopher; Stevens, Lucy; McArdle, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare but potentially life-threatening autoimmune disease affecting the mucosa and the skin. The disease is caused by circulating antibodies to desmosomes (important adhesion proteins linking cells together). Disruption of these intercellular connections results in a loss of cohesion between cells (acantholysis). The clinical result of this process is the development of multiple blisters that easily rupture, leaving behind painful sloughing eroded areas of mucosa and/or skin. We report a case of severe PV in a 56-year-old man presenting with widespread, painful, eroded mucocutaneous lesions. The severity of the disease demanded a range of medical and surgical specialties to successfully manage the problem. This paper highlights the importance of an early multidisciplinary team approach to improve the outcome of patients suffering with this disease. PMID:24343801

  12. Multidisciplinary Interventions in Motor Neuron Disease

    PubMed Central

    Williams, U. E.; Philip-Ephraim, E. E.; Oparah, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    Motor neuron disease is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of upper motor neuron in the motor cortex and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. Death occurs 2–4 years after the onset of the disease. A complex interplay of cellular processes such as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and impaired axonal transport are proposed pathogenetic processes underlying neuronal cell loss. Currently evidence exists for the use of riluzole as a disease modifying drug; multidisciplinary team care approach to patient management; noninvasive ventilation for respiratory management; botulinum toxin B for sialorrhoea treatment; palliative care throughout the course of the disease; and Modafinil use for fatigue treatment. Further research is needed in management of dysphagia, bronchial secretion, pseudobulbar affect, spasticity, cramps, insomnia, cognitive impairment, and communication in motor neuron disease. PMID:26317009

  13. Ipilimumab and Its Toxicities: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Weber, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment for metastatic melanoma has evolved significantly in the past few years. Ipilimumab, an immunotherapy, is now in mainstream oncology practice given that it has shown improved overall survival in randomized clinical trials. Other immune modulating agents, such as programmed death receptor-1 and programmed death receptor ligand-1 antibodies, are showing promise in early clinical trials. This manuscript will review ipilimumab and its most common side effects. Immune-related adverse events (irAEs) are important to recognize early, and their presentation, timing of onset, and general recommendations for workup and management will be reviewed. Assembling a multidisciplinary team, as well as thorough education of the patient, is recommended to optimize patient care. PMID:23774827

  14. Initial Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, L. P.; Geiselhart, K. A.; Padula, S. L.; Li, W.; Olson, E. D.; Campbell, R. L.; Shields, E. W.; Berton, J. J.; Gray, J. S.; Jones, S. M.; Naiman, C. G.; Seidel, J. A.; Moore, K. T.; Naylor, B. A.; Townsend, S.

    2010-01-01

    Within the Supersonics (SUP) Project of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), an initial multidisciplinary design & analysis framework has been developed. A set of low- and intermediate-fidelity discipline design and analysis codes were integrated within a multidisciplinary design and analysis framework and demonstrated on two challenging test cases. The first test case demonstrates an initial capability to design for low boom and performance. The second test case demonstrates rapid assessment of a well-characterized design. The current system has been shown to greatly increase the design and analysis speed and capability, and many future areas for development were identified. This work has established a state-of-the-art capability for immediate use by supersonic concept designers and systems analysts at NASA, while also providing a strong base to build upon for future releases as more multifidelity capabilities are developed and integrated.

  15. Multidisciplinary Optimization Methods for Aircraft Preliminary Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, Ilan; Altus, Steve; Braun, Robert; Gage, Peter; Sobieski, Ian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a research program aimed at improved methods for multidisciplinary design and optimization of large-scale aeronautical systems. The research involves new approaches to system decomposition, interdisciplinary communication, and methods of exploiting coarse-grained parallelism for analysis and optimization. A new architecture, that involves a tight coupling between optimization and analysis, is intended to improve efficiency while simplifying the structure of multidisciplinary, computation-intensive design problems involving many analysis disciplines and perhaps hundreds of design variables. Work in two areas is described here: system decomposition using compatibility constraints to simplify the analysis structure and take advantage of coarse-grained parallelism; and collaborative optimization, a decomposition of the optimization process to permit parallel design and to simplify interdisciplinary communication requirements.

  16. Team Learning: Collective Reflection Processes in Teacher Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlsson, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to further studies of theoretical and conceptual understanding of teachers' team learning processes, with a main focus on team work, team atmosphere, and collective reflections. Design/methodology/approach: The empirical study was designed as a multi-case study in a research and development

  17. Team Learning: Collective Reflection Processes in Teacher Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlsson, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to further studies of theoretical and conceptual understanding of teachers' team learning processes, with a main focus on team work, team atmosphere, and collective reflections. Design/methodology/approach: The empirical study was designed as a multi-case study in a research and development…

  18. Multidisciplinary management of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Michael E; Rothman, Russell L

    2010-01-01

    Although once considered a disease of adults, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in youth is increasing at a significant rate. Similar to adults, youth with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk for developing hypertension, lipid abnormalities, renal disease, and other diabetes-related complications. However, children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes also face many unique management challenges that are different from adults with type 2 diabetes or children with type 1 diabetes. To deliver safe, effective, high-quality, cost-effective health care to adolescents with type 2 diabetes, reorganization and redesign of health care systems are needed. Multidisciplinary health care teams, which allow individuals with specialized training to maximally utilize their skills within an organized diabetes treatment team, may increase efficiency and effectiveness and may improve outcomes in children with type 2 diabetes. This review article provides a brief review of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, provides an overview of multidisciplinary health care teams, and discusses the role of multidisciplinary health care management in youth with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21197360

  19. Multidisciplinary Treatment of Pediatric Obesity: Nutrition Evaluation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Michael M.; Kolbash, Stacy; Cohen, Gail M.; Skelton, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment and treatment methods for pediatric obesity are rapidly evolving. Thought to be caused by an imbalance of caloric intake and expenditure, obesity requires a comprehensive evaluation of patient, familial, environmental, genetic, and cultural characteristics so clinicians can design successful interventions. Quantitative nutrition assessment of caloric intake is difficult and time consuming and should be used only in isolated settings, such as in the research setting, or if initial approaches to management have been unsuccessful. As an alternative, providers should identify dietary patterns or behaviors that have been linked to obesity and are promising targets for change. Clinicians should tailor interventions by considering patient and family motivation and readiness to change. Current guidelines recommend stepwise increases in treatment plans, and multidisciplinary treatment teams are recommended for patients who require intense intervention. Providers involved at the multidisciplinary level must incorporate their area of expertise into that of the team to develop a comprehensive management plan. This article reviews current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of pediatric obesity with a focus on nutrition evaluation as part of a multidisciplinary team. PMID:20702836

  20. Team Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunyan, L. W.

    The purpose of this study was to review current developments in team teaching and to assess its potential in the Calgary, Alberta, schools. An investigation into team teaching situations in schools in the eastern half of the United States and Canada revealed characteristics common to successful programs (e.g., charismatic leadership and innovative

  1. Trauma team.

    PubMed

    Tiel Groenestege-Kreb, D; van Maarseveen, O; Leenen, L

    2014-08-01

    The introduction of trauma teams has improved patient outcome independently. The aim of establishing a trauma team is to ensure the early mobilization and involvement of more experienced medical staff and thereby to improve patient outcome. The team approach allows for distribution of the several tasks in assessment and resuscitation of the patient in a 'horizontal approach', which may lead to a reduction in time from injury to critical interventions and thus have a direct bearing on the patient's ultimate outcome. A trauma team leader or supervisor, who coordinates the resuscitation and ensures adherence to guidelines, should lead the trauma team. There is a major national and international variety in trauma team composition, however crucial are a surgeon, an Emergency Medicine physician or both and anaesthetist. Advanced Trauma Life Support training, simulation-based training, and video review have all improved patient outcome and trauma team performance. Developments in the radiology, such as the use of computed tomography scanning in the emergency room and the endovascular treatment of bleeding foci, have changed treatment algorithms in selected patients. These developments and new insights in shock management may have a future impact on patient management and trauma team composition. PMID:24980423

  2. Multidisciplinary Graduate Education in Bioprocess Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Eiteman

    2006-04-18

    This report describes the accomplishments of the University of Georgia in establishing an academic program geared toward the emerging biobased products industry. By virtue of its strengths and structure, the University of Georgia is particularly well-suited for developing a program focused on plant- and microbial-based bioproducts, and it was in this general area that this program was developed. The program had several unique characteristics. First, we implemented a distinguished lecture series that brought outstanding scientists and engineers to our University to interact with students and share their vision of the biobased economy. Second, we offered industrially-oriented and multidisciplinary courses that provided students with a broad background on various facets of biobased business and technology. Third, we provided the students with opportunities to expand beyond the classroom by engaging in research lab rotations and industrial internships. Fourth, each student was engaged in a creative research project as led by a multidisciplinary faculty team. Throughout the implementation of these activities, we maintained a student-centered, mentoring approach to education. The most tangible outcome of this project was the graduation of two students who participated in a variety of scholarly activities, culminating in research toward the completion of a thesis and dissertation. Both research projects involved the use of microorganisms to produce industrial products from agricultural substrates via fermentation processes. The research advanced our understanding of microorganisms as used for industrial processes and products, as described in several articles published in scholarly journals and presentations made at scientific conferences (see information on pp. 14-15). Another outcome is one graduate course, Fermentation Engineering Laboratory, which is a unique experiential and multidisciplinary course. This course will be offered in the future as an elective to graduate students in several engineering and science degree programs. Other significant developments have arisen as direct or indirect consequences of this project. The University of Georgia has established a B.S. Biochemical Engineering degree and an M.S. Biochemical Engineering degree. A strong component of these degree programs is education toward a biobased economy. We will integrate particularly positive components of this project (such as the distinguished lecture series) into these degree programs. The University of Georgia is establishing a Center for Biorefining and Carbon Cycling. This multidisciplinary Center houses a pilot scale biorefinery, comprising a pyrolysis unit and an ethanol plant. Together with new faculty positions that are currently being advertised, this project has encouraged the University of Georgia to assume a leadership role in the preparation of students in the biobased industries of the future.

  3. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cath; Shewbridge, Amanda; Harris, Jenny; Green, James S

    2013-01-01

    The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial) evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients’ views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care) have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients’ holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to reevaluate the structure and models of MDT-work to ensure that MDTs are an efficient use of resources. PMID:24648761

  4. Team-Based Care and Improved Blood Pressure Control

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Krista K.; Thota, Anilkrishna B.; Njie, Gibril J.; Finnie, Ramona K.C.; Hopkins, David P.; Mukhtar, Qaiser; Pronk, Nicolaas P.; Zeigler, Donald; Kottke, Thomas E.; Rask, Kimberly J.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Brooks, Joy F.; Braun, Lynne T.; Cooksey, Tonya

    2015-01-01

    Context Uncontrolled hypertension remains a widely prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in the U.S. team-based care, established by adding new staff or changing the roles of existing staff such as nurses and pharmacists to work with a primary care provider and the patient. Team-based care has the potential to improve the quality of hypertension management. The goal of this Community Guide systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of team-based care in improving blood pressure (BP) outcomes. Evidence acquisition An existing systematic review (search period, January 1980July 2003) assessing team-based care for BP control was supplemented with a Community Guide update (January 2003May 2012). For the Community Guide update, two reviewers independently abstracted data and assessed quality of eligible studies. Evidence synthesis Twenty-eight studies in the prior review (19802003) and an additional 52 studies from the Community Guide update (20032012) qualified for inclusion. Results from both bodies of evidence suggest that team-based care is effective in improving BP outcomes. From the update, the proportion of patients with controlled BP improved (median increase=12 percentage points); systolic BP decreased (median reduction=5.4 mmHg); and diastolic BP also decreased (median reduction=1.8 mmHg). Conclusions Team-based care increased the proportion of people with controlled BP and reduced both systolic and diastolic BP, especially when pharmacists and nurses were part of the team. Findings are applicable to a range of U.S. settings and population groups. Implementation of this multidisciplinary approach will require health systemlevel organizational changes and could be an important element of the medical home. PMID:24933494

  5. Existing Student Study Team Processes in Selected Volunteer Special Education Local Plan Areas, School Districts, and Schools in California: A Descriptive Evaluation Study. Draft Preliminary Findings. Working Paper No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moger, Roxanne L.

    The paper is the third of a series of working papers developed by a project which conducted a cooperative study of existing student study team (SST) processes in nine California special education local plan areas. The working papers augment the final report by providing detailed descriptions of the methods used and the preliminary findings. This

  6. Working with Your Treatment Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Wellness Forum Announcement: GCF Surgeons Raise Awareness through Rock Announcement: GCF is proud to introduce the Gynecologic ... The Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Movement Weekend Press Release: Rock & Roll Doctors to Release Debut CD “No Evidence ...

  7. Learning through "huddles" for health care leaders: why do some work teams learn as a result of huddles and others do not?

    PubMed

    Little, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    The health care industry embraces the concept that collective learning occurs through group social interactions and has been initiating huddles as an avenue for collaborative learning. During change of shift or prior to beginning daily tasks, a huddle is initiated and facilitated by the manager or frontline supervisor. Given that "shared knowledge is obtained through group-based learning," why are some teams learning and others are not? The phenomenon is perplexing, given that the same resources are provided to all teams. Based on the findings in the literature review on learning in groups, teams learn from huddles and others do not because of the following: communication style and dialogue among the group members, communication style and dialogue facilitated by the leader, team and member perceptions, and team membership. Teams that learn from huddles do so because of the elements within the dialogue between team members (reflexive questioning, redundancy of information, metaphors, analogies, dramatic dialogue, strategic meaning) and because the huddle team exhibits higher levels of collegiality, tenure, heterogeneity, team identification, and collective efficacy. Facilitators must encourage a conversation in order to encourage reframing of cognitive maps that encourage learning by huddle members. PMID:25350023

  8. Team Management of Cognitive Dysfunction in Children with Spina Bifida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Douglas D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The article presents a summary of the cognitive difficulties often encountered when a multidisciplinary team attempts to manage children with spina bifida. Suggestions for intervention and program planning are presented. A model for team management incorporating medical, allied health, and psychosocial professionals is presented. (Author/CL)

  9. An Elder Abuse Assessment Team in an Acute Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Beth Israel Hospital Elder Assessment Team

    1986-01-01

    Describes a hospital-based multidisciplinary team designed to assess and respond to cases of suspected abuse or neglect of elders from both institutional and community settings. Presence of the team has increased the hospital staff's awareness of elder abuse and neglect, as well as their willingness to refer suspected cases for further assessment.

  10. A Team of Equals: Teaching Writing in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Lisa; MacKay, Bruce R.; MacKay, Marion B.; Funnell, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Writing across the curriculum (WAC) is a way of integrating the teaching of writing into specific academic disciplines. A problem faced in the WAC literature is how to develop a process that integrates the skills of multi-disciplinary teams. In this project, action research was used to develop a team comprising faculty from the applied sciences

  11. What is Team X?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warfield, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Team X is a concurrent engineering team for rapid design and analysis of space mission concepts. It was developed in 1995 by JPL to reduce study time and cost. More than 1100 studies have been completed It is institutionally endorsed and it has been emulated by many institutions. In Concurrent Engineering (i.e., Parallel) diverse specialists work in real time, in the same place, with shared data, to yield an integrated design

  12. ED diversion: multidisciplinary approach engages high utilizers, helps them better navigate the health care system.

    PubMed

    2011-11-01

    Working with partners, the St. Charles Health System in Bend, OR, has implemented an ED diversion project that is helping patients who frequent the ED connect with more appropriate settings for their primary care needs. The hospital identifies high ED utilizers using claims data, then a multidisciplinary engagement team establishes care plans for these patients. The most at-risk patients are paired with community health workers to help them better navigate the health care system. The ED diversion project has reduced unnecessary ED utilization by 45% to 70% in cohorts of patients that the hospital has analyzed thus far. The hospital contracts with a non-profit organization to supply and train community health workers. Community health workers follow a structured model that includes more than 80 different pathways to follow, based on patient conditions. PMID:22043590

  13. The Use of Modern Information and Communication Systems and Technology and Experienced Stress at Work in Mixed Deaf-Hearing Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gils, Gardy; van den Bogaerde, Beppie; de Lange, Rob

    2010-01-01

    In this article we look at the use of ICST in two multilingual and deaf/hearing teams in an educational and research environment. We describe how job demands and job control (decision authority level) contribute to feelings of stress among the deaf and the hearing employees. We find that most information is received by all of the team members in…

  14. The Use of Modern Information and Communication Systems and Technology and Experienced Stress at Work in Mixed Deaf-Hearing Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Gils, Gardy; van den Bogaerde, Beppie; de Lange, Rob

    2010-01-01

    In this article we look at the use of ICST in two multilingual and deaf/hearing teams in an educational and research environment. We describe how job demands and job control (decision authority level) contribute to feelings of stress among the deaf and the hearing employees. We find that most information is received by all of the team members in

  15. Cyberinfrastructure and Scientific Collaboration: Application of a Virtual Team Performance Framework with Potential Relevance to Education. WCER Working Paper No. 2010-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, Sara; Thorn, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify and describe some of the dimensions of scientific collaborations using high throughput computing (HTC) through the lens of a virtual team performance framework. A secondary purpose was to assess the viability of using a virtual team performance framework to study scientific collaborations using…

  16. Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Optimization Frameworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

    2009-01-01

    Since July 2008, the Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed one major milestone, Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework Milestone (9/30/08), and is completing the Generation 1 Framework validation milestone, which is due December 2008. Included in the presentation are: details of progress on developing the Open MDAO framework, modeling and testing the Generation 1 Framework, progress toward establishing partnerships with external parties, and discussion of additional potential collaborations

  17. TNT: Teams Need Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centre County Vocational-Technical School, Pleasant Gap, PA. CIU 10 Bi-County Development Center for Adults.

    This document includes a final report and curriculum manual from a project to help adult educators teach team training by developing a curriculum for use in teaching teamwork skills in work force literacy programs and by providing two half-day seminars to assist adult educators with effectively using the curriculum. The manual for work force

  18. Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Anne Marie; Meli, Yvonne; Meldrum, Catherine; Jellen, Patricia; Butler-Lebair, Marianne; Koczen-Doyle, Debra; Rising, Peter; Stavrolakes, Kim; Brogan, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Team member roles complement each other and contribute to the goal of providing the highest-quality medical care. The primary focus of the team is to reinforce the medical plan and to provide patient education and support. This article reviews the elements of the initial patient assessment and the functional and nutritional assessment. Patient education focuses on medication use, recognition and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation symptoms, smoking cessation, advance directives, and travel. PMID:18453373

  19. Validation of the New Lucerne ICF Based Multidisciplinary Observation Scale (LIMOS) for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Claudia; Huberle, Elisabeth; Koenig-Bruhin, Monica; Plugshaupt, Tobias; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid and multidisciplinary assessment of a stroke patient's ability to perform activities of daily living is very important to define individual goals and to plan targeted rehabilitation. Until today, there is no observation scale that relies on International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate the reliability and validity of a new multidisciplinary observation scale for stroke patients, shortly called LIMOS, which is based on ICF. Methods In a first phase, LIMOS was defined, using a Delphi approach, by an expert panel and a pilot testing was conducted in a small group of stroke patients (n =10) to investigate feasibility and practicability. In a second phase, LIMOS was assessed for its reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability) and validity in a large cohort of stroke patients (n = 102). For convergent validity, the correlation between total scores of the LIMOS and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) was assessed. Results LIMOS consisted of seven ICF chapters incorporating 45 domains. A high internal consistency (=0.98) of LIMOS was found. Furthermore, good test-retest reliability at item and subscale level was found. Principal component analysis revealed that among the seven ICF chapters, four components could be found: (1) interpersonal activities, mobility and self-care, (2) communication, (3) knowledge and general tasks, and (4) domestic life. Significant associations were found between LIMOS and the FIM indicating good convergent validity. Conclusions The new LIMOS is a reliable and valid observation scale for stroke patients based on ICF, which can be used by a multidisciplinary team working in a neurorehabilitation setting. PMID:26110769

  20. Consequences of Team Charter Quality: Teamwork Mental Model Similarity and Team Viability in Engineering Design Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway Hughston, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning--including team charters. Team charters were diffused into…

  1. Consequences of Team Charter Quality: Teamwork Mental Model Similarity and Team Viability in Engineering Design Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway Hughston, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning--including team charters. Team charters were diffused into

  2. Team Teaching in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Kenneth; Eiserman, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Too often at the high school level, teachers work in isolation, without the ability to see other practitioners at work. Team teaching offers an effective antidote: It provides a comfortable environment in which to grow because it enables teachers to learn from another professional on a regular basis. "Teaming," notes the authors,…

  3. Team Teaching in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, Kenneth; Eiserman, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Too often at the high school level, teachers work in isolation, without the ability to see other practitioners at work. Team teaching offers an effective antidote: It provides a comfortable environment in which to grow because it enables teachers to learn from another professional on a regular basis. "Teaming," notes the authors,

  4. Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory

  5. Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

  6. Team Trust in Online Education: Assessing and Comparing Team-Member Trust in Online Teams versus Face-to-Face Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beranek, Peggy M.; French, Monique L.

    2011-01-01

    Trust is a key factor in enabling effective team performance and, in online teams, needs to be built quickly and early. As universities expand their online offerings students are increasingly working in online teams. Understanding how trust development may differ in online teams versus face-to-face can have implications for online education…

  7. Team Trust in Online Education: Assessing and Comparing Team-Member Trust in Online Teams versus Face-to-Face Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beranek, Peggy M.; French, Monique L.

    2011-01-01

    Trust is a key factor in enabling effective team performance and, in online teams, needs to be built quickly and early. As universities expand their online offerings students are increasingly working in online teams. Understanding how trust development may differ in online teams versus face-to-face can have implications for online education

  8. Understanding Diversity in Educational Psychology Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annan, Jean; Bowler, Jo; Mentis, Mandia; Phillipson, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Educational psychologists' work routinely involves facilitation of teams in which participants hold diverse points of view. In this article, the authors discuss diversity in team work and its place in the development of shared goals. They describe, as an example of educational psychologists' work team interaction, the structure and functioning of

  9. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is

  10. Multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma: a model for therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Gary S; Black, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A multidisciplinary model is a useful approach in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to coordinate, individualize, and optimize care. The HCC Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) at Temple University Hospital was established in 2008 and comprises hepatologists, interventional radiologists, transplant surgeons, oncologists, residents, midlevel providers, and support staff. Patients may be enrolled by referral from (1) oncologists at Temple, (2) the hepatitis screening clinic recently established at Temple and staffed by hepatology residents, or (3) community practices. MDT conferences are held weekly, during which cases are discussed (based on medical history, interpretation of images, and laboratory analyses) and treatment plans are formulated. The Temple treatment algorithm follows current standards of care, guided by tumor volume and morphology, but the novel multidisciplinary interaction challenges members to tailor therapy to achieve the best possible outcomes. Patients with a solitary lesion ? 2 cm may receive no treatment until eligible for transplantation or locoregional therapy or resection, with imaging every 3 to 6 months to monitor tumor progression. In patients with tumors > 2 cm and ? 5 cm, microwave ablation therapy is used if lesions are discrete and accessible. Conventional transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or drug-eluting bead TACE (DEB-TACE) or yttrium-90 microspheres are utilized in multifocal disease. Patients with lesions > 5 cm are candidates for TACE for downstaging the tumor. Sorafenib is typically reserved for unresectable lesions between 2 cm and 5 cm. Frequently, we administer sorafenib continuously and in combination with DEB-TACE. In our experience, sorafenib does not produce effects on the tumor vasculature or blood flow that would impair the efficacy of DEB-TACE. The literature documents improved outcomes in HCC and other cancers associated with the introduction of multidisciplinary care. The role and organization of the MDT is influenced by team culture, expertise, and process, as well as institutional and larger environmental contexts. PMID:23690690

  11. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient

  12. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  13. Team Spirit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Wendy Ann

    1989-01-01

    At the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, the public relations staff and the chief executive officer team up to improve community relations. To improve minority relations, the university participates in a precollege mentor program. Experiences at the University of Vermont are described. (MLW)

  14. Team building

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, C.

    1993-04-01

    Power plants are particularly complicated projects with abundant opportunities for disputes. Efforts are beginning in the power industry to change the way the industry does business. Key elements of a comprehensive team-building approach include partnering, constructability, use of incentives, and the disputes review board.

  15. The Importance of Multidisciplinary Management during Prenatal Care for Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyun Ho; Choi, Eun Jeong; Kim, Ji Min; Shin, Jong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background The prenatal ultrasound detection of cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) and its continuous management in the prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal periods using a multidisciplinary team approach can be beneficial for parents and their infants. In this report, we share our experiences with the prenatal detection of CL/P and the multidisciplinary management of this malformation in our institution's Congenital Disease Center. Methods The multidisciplinary team of the Congenital Disease Center for mothers of children with CL/P is composed of obstetricians, plastic and reconstructive surgeons, pediatricians, and psychiatrists. A total of 11 fetuses were diagnosed with CL/P from March 2009 to December 2013, and their mothers were referred to the Congenital Disease Center of our hospital. When CL/P is suspected in the prenatal ultrasound screening examination, the pregnant woman is referred to our center for further evaluation. Results The abortion rate was 28% (3/11). The concordance rate of the sonographic and final diagnoses was 100%. Ten women (91%) reported that they were satisfied with the multidisciplinary management in our center. Conclusions Although a child with a birth defect is unlikely to be received well, the women whose fetuses were diagnosed with CL/P on prenatal ultrasound screening and who underwent multidisciplinary team management were more likely to decide to continue their pregnancy.

  16. Multidisciplinary approach to genomics research in Africa: the AfriCRAN model

    PubMed Central

    Butali, Azeez; Mossey, Peter; Tiffin, Nikki; Adeyemo, Wasiu; Eshete, Mekonen; Mumena, Chrispinanus; Audu, Rosemary; Onwuamah, Chika; Agbenorku, Pius; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle; Adebola, Adetokunbo; Olasoji, Hecto; Aregbesola, Babatunde; Braimah, Ramat; Oladugba, Abimibola; Onah, Ifeanyichukwu; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Olaitan, Peter; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman; Adeyemo, Adebowale

    2015-01-01

    This article is an outcome of the African Craniofacial Anomalies Research Network (AfriCRAN) Human Hereditary and Health (H3A) grant planning meeting in 2012 in Lagos, Nigeria. It describes the strengths of a multidisciplinary team approach to solving complex genetic traits in the craniofacial region. It also highlights the different components and argues for the composition of similar teams to fast track the discovery of disease genes, diagnostic tools, improved clinical treatment and ultimately prevention of diseases. PMID:26523171

  17. Multidisciplinary approach to genomics research in Africa: the AfriCRAN model.

    PubMed

    Butali, Azeez; Mossey, Peter; Tiffin, Nikki; Adeyemo, Wasiu; Eshete, Mekonen; Mumena, Chrispinanus; Audu, Rosemary; Onwuamah, Chika; Agbenorku, Pius; Ogunlewe, Mobolanle; Adebola, Adetokunbo; Olasoji, Hecto; Aregbesola, Babatunde; Braimah, Ramat; Oladugba, Abimibola; Onah, Ifeanyichukwu; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Olaitan, Peter; Abdur-Rahman, Lukman; Adeyemo, Adebowale

    2015-01-01

    This article is an outcome of the African Craniofacial Anomalies Research Network (AfriCRAN) Human Hereditary and Health (H3A) grant planning meeting in 2012 in Lagos, Nigeria. It describes the strengths of a multidisciplinary team approach to solving complex genetic traits in the craniofacial region. It also highlights the different components and argues for the composition of similar teams to fast track the discovery of disease genes, diagnostic tools, improved clinical treatment and ultimately prevention of diseases. PMID:26523171

  18. TEAMS Model Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tijidjian, Raffi P.

    2010-01-01

    The TEAMS model analyzer is a supporting tool developed to work with models created with TEAMS (Testability, Engineering, and Maintenance System), which was developed by QSI. In an effort to reduce the time spent in the manual process that each TEAMS modeler must perform in the preparation of reporting for model reviews, a new tool has been developed as an aid to models developed in TEAMS. The software allows for the viewing, reporting, and checking of TEAMS models that are checked into the TEAMS model database. The software allows the user to selectively model in a hierarchical tree outline view that displays the components, failure modes, and ports. The reporting features allow the user to quickly gather statistics about the model, and generate an input/output report pertaining to all of the components. Rules can be automatically validated against the model, with a report generated containing resulting inconsistencies. In addition to reducing manual effort, this software also provides an automated process framework for the Verification and Validation (V&V) effort that will follow development of these models. The aid of such an automated tool would have a significant impact on the V&V process.

  19. Computational differentiation and multidisciplinary design

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.; Griewank, A.

    1993-12-31

    Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) by means of formal sensitivity analysis requires that each single-discipline analysis code supply not only the output functions for the (usually constrained) optimization process and other discipline analysis inputs, but also the derivatives of all of these output functions with respect to its input variables. Computational differentiation techniques and automatic differentiation tools enable MDO by providing accurate and efficient derivatives of computer programs with little human effort. We discuss the principles behind automatic differentiation and give a brief overview of automatic differentiation tools and how they can be employed judiciously, for example, for sparse Jacobians and to exploit parallelism. We show how, and under what circumstances, automatic differentiation applied to iterative solvers delivers the mathematically desired derivatives. We then show how derivatives that can now be feasibly obtained by computational differentiation techniques can lead to improved solution schemes for nonlinear coupled systems and multidisciplinary design optimization.

  20. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuefel; Kang, Huining; Fields, Chris; Cowie, Jim R.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy; Mosquera-Caro, Monica P.; Xu, Yuexian; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul; Andries, Erik; Ar, Kerem; Potter, Jeffrey; Willman, Cheryl L.; Murphy, Maurice H.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from microarrays, we have made progress by combining very different analytic approaches.

  1. Establishing a framework for building multidisciplinary programs

    PubMed Central

    Meguid, Cheryl; Ryan, Carrie E; Edil, Barish H; Schulick, Richard D; Gajdos, Csaba; Boniface, Megan; Schefter, Tracey E; Purcell, W Thomas; McCarter, Martin

    2015-01-01

    While most providers support the concept of a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, challenges exist to the implementation of successful multidisciplinary clinical programs. As patients become more knowledgeable about their disease through research on the Internet, they seek hospital programs that offer multidisciplinary care. At the University of Colorado Hospital, we utilize a formal multidisciplinary approach across a variety of clinical settings, which has been beneficial to patients, providers, and the hospital. We present a reproducible framework to be used as a guide to develop a successful multidisciplinary program. PMID:26664132

  2. Reducing cancer disparities for minorities: a multidisciplinary research agenda to improve patient access to health systems, clinical trials, and effective cancer therapy. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    This report provides details on the successful efforts of an institution to consolidate the knowledge and experience of multidisciplinary teams (marketing, education, and outreach specialists) to advise clinical trial investigators on minority accrual.

  3. GeoEnvironmental Education Through Multidisciplinary Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Hwang, S.

    2007-12-01

    The growing need to understand environmental and geological processes, their impacts, and solutions in a dynamic world requires a diverse, multidiscipline, and multicultural approach in science and engineering. In the last few years, faculty at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez have engaged in education and training activities aimed at developing a critical mass of students that can address a wide range of geoenvironmental problems through multidisciplinary research. Students of diverse age, gender, culture, and academic disciplines addressing different research questions work together in a common space. Hierarchy assignments use senior students as primary mentors, but foster work at parallel levels that require sharing and developing knowledge and research resources. The activities have resulted in a significant increase in the number of diverse students in science and engineering areas related to the environment.

  4. Evaluation of Multidisciplinary Tobacco Cessation Training Program in a Large Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Timothy C.; Hamlett-Berry, Kim W.; Watanabe, Jonathan H.; Bounthavong, Mark; Zillich, Alan J.; Christofferson, Dana E.; Myers, Mark G.; Himstreet, Julianne E.; Belperio, Pamela S.; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health care professionals can have a dramatic impact by assisting patients with tobacco cessation but most have limited training. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a 4-hour tobacco cessation training program. Methods: A team of multidisciplinary health care professionals created a veteran-specific tailored version of the Rx for

  5. Evaluation of Multidisciplinary Tobacco Cessation Training Program in a Large Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Timothy C.; Hamlett-Berry, Kim W.; Watanabe, Jonathan H.; Bounthavong, Mark; Zillich, Alan J.; Christofferson, Dana E.; Myers, Mark G.; Himstreet, Julianne E.; Belperio, Pamela S.; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health care professionals can have a dramatic impact by assisting patients with tobacco cessation but most have limited training. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a 4-hour tobacco cessation training program. Methods: A team of multidisciplinary health care professionals created a veteran-specific tailored version of the Rx for…

  6. The Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale: Reliability, Validity, and Scale Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Pamela Davis; Brantley, Philip J.; McKnight, G. Tipton; Jones, Glenn N.; Springer, Annette

    1997-01-01

    The development and preliminary reliability and validity studies are reported for the Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale, a 110-item Likert scale that assesses satisfaction with team health care services. The methods used to construct subscales may have implications for other psychometric studies of satisfaction and quality

  7. Multidisciplinary Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Kristy; Arenberg, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer diagnosis and treatment has evolved to require the input and expertise of multiple diverse medical and surgical specialties. The approach to lung cancer patients requires the adherence to a few principles that include thorough use of staging modalities to assure the proper treatment for each patient, and an understanding of the limitations and advantages of each of these modalities. Evidence is continuing to emerge that supports the notion that diagnostic workup and treatment of lung cancer patients is best done within the context of a multidisciplinary team devoted to this purpose. PMID:20161592

  8. Acute Intermittent Porphyria Associated with Respiratory Failure: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonalves; Gil Cezar, Alkmim-Teixeira; Casarini, Karin Aparecida; Muniz Cordeiro, Ktia Simone; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Despite being challenging, delivery of effective nursing care to patients with acute intermittent porphyria is a matter of utmost importance. In this paper, the diversity of symptoms and the difficult diagnosis of this condition are emphasized, and details concerning the treatment of this disorder in the intensive care unit are presented. We believe that acute intermittent porphyria should be borne in mind during performance of differential diagnosis of neurological, psychiatric, and gastroenterological disorders on patients whose routine investigation tests are normal, especially when precipitating factors exist. Intensive care measures and a multidisciplinary team approach are essential. PMID:21687623

  9. Concussion: key stakeholders and multidisciplinary participation in making sports safe.

    PubMed

    Guskiewicz, Kevin; Teel, Elizabeth; McCrea, Michael

    2014-10-01

    As unstructured play declines, organized sports leagues have become a highly popular form of physical activity in young people. As concussive injuries are garnering increased media attention and public awareness, there is a growing concern for athlete safety. Although athletic trainers and physicians play a large role in keeping athletes healthy and safe, this article investigates nontraditional, multidisciplinary teams that are involved in promoting athlete safety, including the role of equipment makers, coaches, referees, governing bodies of sport, lawmakers, and fans. As opposed to a focus on diagnosing or managing concussive injuries, this article seeks to promote injury prevention strategies. PMID:25232875

  10. Physics Education in a Multidisciplinary Materials Research Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, W. D.

    1997-03-01

    The MINT Center, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, is a multidisciplinary research program focusing on materials information storage. It involves 17 faculty, 10 post-doctoral fellows and 25 graduate students from six academic programs including Physics, Chemistry, Materials Science, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Electric al Engineering and Chemical Engineering, whose research is supported by university, federal and industrial funds. The research facilities (15,000 ft^2) which include faculty and student offices are located in one building and are maintained by the university and the Center at no cost to participating faculty. The academic requirements for the students are determined by the individual departments along relatively rigid, traditional grounds although several materials and device courses are offered for students from all departments. Within the Center, participants work in teams assigning responsibilities and sharing results at regularly scheduled meetings. Bi-weekly research seminars for all participants provide excellent opportunities for students to improve their communication skills and to receive critical input from a large, diverse audience. Strong collaboration with industrial partners in the storage industry supported by workshops, research reviews, internships, industrial visitors and participation in industry consortia give students a broader criteria for self-evaluation, higher motivation and excellent career opportunities. Physics students, because of their rigorous basic training, are an important element in a strong materials sciences program, but they often are deficient in the behavior and characterization of real materials. The curriculum for physics students should be broadened to prepare them fully for a rewarding career in this emerging discipline.

  11. Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization Generation 1 and Next Steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

    2008-01-01

    The Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed three major milestones during Fiscal Year (FY)08: "Requirements Definition" Milestone (1/31/08); "GEN 1 Integrated Multi-disciplinary Toolset" (Annual Performance Goal) (6/30/08); and "Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework" Milestone (9/30/08). Details of all three milestones are explained including documentation available, potential partner collaborations, and next steps in FY09.

  12. Multidisciplinary management of advanced lung neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Piero; Guerrera, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Travis, William D.; Rossi, Giulio; Lausi, Paolo Olivo; Oliaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The optimal clinical management of aggressive/advanced lung neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is still debated, due to their rarity and the lack of prospective randomized studies. Results derive from retrospective mono-Institutional series, and few dedicated prospective trials, recently designed, are still ongoing. In low-grade tumors [bronchial carcinoids (BCs)] surgery, whenever feasible, remains the mainstay of treatment, and chemo/radiotherapy (RT) should be reserved to progressive diseases (PD). In case of resected N1-N2 BCs, a “watch and see” policy associated with a close clinical/radiological follow-up is recommended. Somatostatin analogs (SSA) seem to be effective in controlling BCs associated endocrine syndromes, while SSA antiproliferative effect has also been reported in the past. Targeted therapy with new drugs (Everolimus) seems to be very promising, but further trials are needed. Surgery alone is not sufficient to treat high-grade NETs: adjuvant CT is required also in early stages. Platinum-Etoposide regimen demonstrated to be the most effective; irinotecan and other biological drugs are considered very promising. In conclusion, the management of advanced lung NETs should be individualized by multidisciplinary teams which include Medical and Radiation Oncologists, Surgeons, Pathologists, Pulmonologists, Endocrinologists, Interventional Radiologists, and the prognosis is mainly dependent on tumor grade and its anatomical extent. PMID:25984363

  13. Arthrogryposis in infancy, multidisciplinary approach: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is an etiopathogenetically heterogeneous disorder characterised by non-progressive multiple intra-articular contractures, which can be recognised at birth. The frequency is estimated at 1 in 3,000 newborns. Etiopathogenesis of arthrogryposis is multifactorial. Case presentation We report first 26 weeks of life of a boy with severe arthrogryposis. Owing to the integrated rehabilitation approach and orthopaedic treatment a visible improvement in the range of motion as well as the functionality of the child was achieved. This article proposes a cooperation of various specialists: paediatrician, orthopaedist, specialist of medical rehabilitation and physiotherapist. Conclusions Rehabilitation of a child with arthrogryposis should be early, comprehensive and multidisciplinary. Corrective treatment of knee and hip joints in infants with arthrogryposis should be preceded by the ultrasound control. There are no reports in the literature on the ultrasound imaging techniques which can be used prior to the planned orthopaedic and rehabilitative treatment in infants with arthrogryposis. The experience of our team indicates that such an approach allows to minimise the diagnostic errors and to maintain an effective treatment without the risk of joint destabilisation. PMID:24215600

  14. Making This Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitler, Alan; Bushong, Delores; Reid, Al

    2004-01-01

    As the sponsors of the Cohort at Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia--a program to increase the number of minority male students in Advanced Placement (AP) classes--the authors view their work with the young men in this program as very similar to coaching a team. The Cohort asks these young men to challenge and push themselves; to test

  15. Blog - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Addressing complex societal challenges, such as climate change or the diabetes pandemic, requires bringing together different types of knowledge from disparate academic disciplines and societal stakeholders (Stirling, 2007). There is evidence to suggest that scientific teams and organizations with diverse types of expertise are more capable of solving complex problems than experts working individually in narrow areas of expertise (Page, 2007).

  16. Philosophizing about Teacher Dissatisfaction: A Multidisciplinary Hermeneutic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Doris A.

    2015-01-01

    In this methodological reflection, I describe the multidisciplinary hermeneutic process of philosophizing about teacher dissatisfaction. I discuss how philosophy serves as a starting point for interpretive work based on interviews with former teachers and readings of qualitative and quantitative research on teacher attrition and dissatisfaction.

  17. Philosophizing about Teacher Dissatisfaction: A Multidisciplinary Hermeneutic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santoro, Doris A.

    2015-01-01

    In this methodological reflection, I describe the multidisciplinary hermeneutic process of philosophizing about teacher dissatisfaction. I discuss how philosophy serves as a starting point for interpretive work based on interviews with former teachers and readings of qualitative and quantitative research on teacher attrition and dissatisfaction.…

  18. Dynamically Reconfigurable Approach to Multidisciplinary Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalie M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

    2003-01-01

    The complexity and autonomy of the constituent disciplines and the diversity of the disciplinary data formats make the task of integrating simulations into a multidisciplinary design optimization problem extremely time-consuming and difficult. We propose a dynamically reconfigurable approach to MDO problem formulation wherein an appropriate implementation of the disciplinary information results in basic computational components that can be combined into different MDO problem formulations and solution algorithms, including hybrid strategies, with relative ease. The ability to re-use the computational components is due to the special structure of the MDO problem. We believe that this structure can and should be used to formulate and solve optimization problems in the multidisciplinary context. The present work identifies the basic computational components in several MDO problem formulations and examines the dynamically reconfigurable approach in the context of a popular class of optimization methods. We show that if the disciplinary sensitivity information is implemented in a modular fashion, the transfer of sensitivity information among the formulations under study is straightforward. This enables not only experimentation with a variety of problem formations in a research environment, but also the flexible use of formulations in a production design environment.

  19. The methodical work approach and the reduction in the use of seclusion: how did it work?

    PubMed

    Boumans, Christien E; Walvoort, Serge J W; Egger, Jos I M; Hutschemaekers, Giel J M

    2015-03-01

    The prevention of seclusion and other coercive measures has become a priority for mental health facilities, and numerous comprehensive programs to reduce the use of these containment procedures, have been developed. It is, however, poorly understood which interventions or elements of programs are effective and by which mechanisms or processes change is mediated. The present study explores the effects of an intervention by which a reduction in the use of seclusion was achieved. The intervention concerned a transformation of the treatment process, based on the principles of the methodical work approach, at a ward for the intensive treatment of patients with psychosis and substance use disorders. Changes in the working practice and team process were analyzed on the basis of case examples and team evaluation. The methodical work approach appears to have provided a guidance for the multidisciplinary team, the patient and the family to work together in a systematic and goal-directed way with cyclic evaluation and readjustment of the treatment and nurse care plan. Also implicit, positive changes were found in the team process: increased interdisciplinary collaboration, team cohesion, and professionalization. It is argued that the implicit or non-specific effects of an intervention to prevent seclusion may constitute a major contribution to the results and therefore merit further research. PMID:25270895

  20. Joining the visiting team

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, R.B.

    1990-01-04

    As an extention of The Selection and use of VA/VE Professionals'' this paper addresses the questions of: What will guarantee success for the VE studies Will the Job Plan always produce a study that saves 10% and yields a return on investment of 30:1 What help does the VE team need for it to do its job more effectively What work does the VE site coordinator need to do to raise the implementation rate on VE studies performed by visiting teams 3 refs.