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1

Multidisciplinary team working, clinical networks, and chambers; opportunities to work differently in the NHS  

PubMed Central

Recently in the United Kingdom some new organisational structures for clinicians have been discussed. So far little has changed, but the intensity of interest suggests this may be an opportunity to link change in working practices with improvements in quality. Multidisciplinary team working is developing within the National Health Service (NHS) and some groups are expanding their roles across traditional institutional boundaries to form complex clinical networks. It would require little to make these functional networks autonomous from current NHS structures. Other models of working without traditional institutional boundaries have been discussed, including the formation of "chambers" for doctors and other professionals. We describe the first tentative steps of one group as an example and suggest that further experimentation with evaluation is required. PMID:14645745

Carter, S; Garside, P; Black, A

2003-01-01

2

Overcoming obstacles to establish a multidisciplinary team approach to hepatobiliary diseases: a working model in a Caribbean setting  

PubMed Central

Introduction By providing a structured forum to exchange information and ideas, multidisciplinary team meetings improve working relationships, expedite investigations, promote evidence-based treatment, and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. Methods This discursive paper reports the introduction of a multidisciplinary team approach to manage hepatobiliary diseases in Jamaica, focusing on the challenges encountered and the methods used to overcome these obstacles. Conclusion Despite multiple challenges in resource-limited environments, a multidisciplinary team approach can be incorporated into clinical practice in developing nations. Policy makers should make it a priority to support clinical, operational, and governance aspects of the multidisciplinary teams. PMID:24920917

Cawich, Shamir O; Johnson, Peter B; Shah, Sundeep; Roberts, Patrick; Arthurs, Milton; Murphy, Trevor; Bonadie, Kimon O; Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Abu Hilal, Mohammed; Pearce, Neil W

2014-01-01

3

Teams: communication in multidisciplinary care.  

PubMed

Shortly before his death in 1995, Kenneth B. Schwartz, a cancer patient at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), founded The Kenneth B. Schwartz Center at MGH. The Schwartz Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting and advancing compassionate health care delivery that provides hope to the patient and support to caregivers, and encourages the healing process. The Center sponsors the Schwartz Center Rounds, a monthly multidisciplinary forum where caregivers reflect on important psychosocial issues faced by patients, their families, and their caregivers, and gain insight and support from fellow staff members. The evolving field of oncology increasingly requires a team of medical specialists working in unison to deliver optimal medical care. While this coordination may maximize the technical synergy of care, it can challenge interprofessional and interdisciplinary connections. Poor and miscommunication and conflicts between staff and between the family and providers adversely affect patient care and quality of life. Furthermore, lack of communication leaves a vacuum that sucks in fear. A recent Newsweek article highlighted the challenges of practicing in the age of high-tech medicine. The author had to beg for a prognosis for her critically ill and dying husband, with unhelpful subspecialists failing to communicate the bigger picture. This article explores the tough issue of how teams handle uncertainty and bad news and how patients and families can be better supported in the multifaceted paradigm of modern care. PMID:16720852

Penson, Richard T; Kyriakou, Helena; Zuckerman, Dan; Chabner, Bruce A; Lynch, Thomas J

2006-05-01

4

A National Look at Elder Abuse Multidisciplinary Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elder abuse multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) include professionals from diverse disciplines who work together to review cases of elder abuse and address systemic problems. Using an e-mail survey format, the authors received information from 31 MDT coordinators across the country representing fatality review teams, financial abuse specialist teams, medically oriented teams, and “traditional” teams. The coordinators provided information on the functions

Pamela B. Teaster; Lisa Nerenberg; Kim L. Stansbury

2003-01-01

5

Multidisciplinary team working in an adult male prison establishment in the UK.  

PubMed

The first two articles in this series exploring the oral and dental health of male prisoners in the UK demonstrated how the general and oral health of prisoners is compromised compared to those of a similar age who are not prisoners. In caring for the oral health needs of this group the high demand for emergency dental services often precludes the delivery of preventive and routine care. Comprehensive oral care for this population requires a level of training to gain the skills and knowledge to manage prisoners' complex medical, dental and social needs and the heightened dental anxiety that prisoners exhibit. The type of training that might be required for prison dentistry will be discussed in the final article. This article will describe a number of cases selected to demonstrate the complex problems presented by male prisoners in Her Majesty's Prison (HMP), Brixton. This article will also discuss the establishment of a primary care inter-professional relationship network (IRN) developed within a prison setting involving a dentist and other healthcare professionals. After informal discussions between the dentist and other prison healthcare professionals, it became apparent that vulnerable patients were not accessing dental services. These patients also cancel/fail to attend their dental appointments more frequently. In order to improve access and provision of dental care for this group of prisoners, an IRN was developed between the dentist, diabetic nurse, forensic psychology team, communicable disease lead, general medical practitioner (GMP), prison officers and healthcare manager within HMP Brixton. The nature of the IRN is presented along with reviews with relevant patient cases. The IRN allowed information sharing between professionals and an open care culture. The network was valued by prisoners. Prison populations show higher rates of general and oral disease, therefore an IRN can help to identify vulnerable groups and allow healthcare providers to give appropriate, targeted and focused care in a timely fashion. PMID:25104690

Heidari, E; Dickinson, C; Newton, T

2014-08-01

6

Collaborative information seeking: A field study of a multidisciplinary patient care team  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multidisciplinary teams are an essential aspect of modern organizational work. These teams often work in information-rich environments but little is known about their collaborative information seeking (CIS) behavior. We have been studying the CIS behavior of teams in the context of medical care. We conducted an ethnographic field study of a multidisciplinary patient care team in an emergency department to

Madhu C. Reddy; Patricia Ruma Spence

2008-01-01

7

Evaluating Multidisciplinary Child Abuse and Neglect Teams: A Research Agenda  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A review of child welfare research literature reveals that although multidisciplinary teams are increasingly used to investigate and intervene in child abuse and neglect cases, the field does not know enough about their structural variations, implementation processes, or effectiveness. Moreover, although articles advocating multidisciplinary teams

Lalayants, Marina; Epstein, Irwin

2005-01-01

8

Registered Dietitian's Role in Multi-Disciplinary Team  

Microsoft Academic Search

LEARNING OUTCOME: To assess the role of the Registered Dietitian among other members in a multi-disciplinary team.Due to the evolving role of the registered dietitian (RD), a questionnaire was administered to multi-disciplinary team members in a hospital based clinical setting to assess current attitude toward the RD. The tool contained 6 closed and open-ended questions pertaining to knowledge of availability

K. S. Ramage

1997-01-01

9

Crisis resource management: evaluating outcomes of a multidisciplinary team.  

PubMed

Crisis resource management (CRM) is a team-training program that teaches nontechnical skills such as: collaboration, communication, task management, teamwork, and leadership. The purpose of this study was to evaluate improvement in the nontechnical skills of a multidisciplinary team of pediatric residents, anesthesiology residents and pediatric nurses following participation in the CRM educational program. Self-efficacy theory guided the teaching method used in the CRM program. The Collaboration and Satisfaction about Care Decisions instrument and the Anesthetists' Nontechnical Skills System served as outcome measures. Seven multidisciplinary groups were studied with a total of 40 subjects. A significant increase was found in posttest scores for perceived collaboration and satisfaction with care and in numerical ratings of observed team skills following the CRM program. The results suggest multidisciplinary team participation in the CRM program increased perceived team collaboration, satisfaction with care, and observed teamwork skills. PMID:19088613

Jankouskas, Tara; Bush, Mary Chasko; Murray, Bosseau; Rudy, Sally; Henry, Jody; Dyer, Anne Marie; Liu, Wenlei; Sinz, Elizabeth

2007-01-01

10

Charting Multidisciplinary Team External Dynamics Using a Systems Thinking Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using the formalism provided by the Systems Thinking approach, the dynamics present when operating multidisciplinary teams are examined in the context of the NASA Langley Research and Technology Group, an R&D organization organized along functional lines. The paper focuses on external dynamics and examines how an organization creates and nurtures the teams and how it disseminates and retains the lessons and expertise created by the multidisciplinary activities. Key variables are selected and the causal relationships between the variables are identified. Five "stories" are told, each of which touches on a different aspect of the dynamics. The Systems Thinking Approach provides recommendations as to interventions that will facilitate the introduction of multidisciplinary teams and that therefore will increase the likelihood of performing successful multidisciplinary developments. These interventions can be carried out either by individual researchers, line management or program management.

Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Waszak, Martin R.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

1998-01-01

11

Teams work (panel session)  

Microsoft Academic Search

“I didn't think I'd like group work, but I ended up in a good team and it was a great experience. But I feel if you end up in a bad team it can really get you down and will affect your mark.” This student response (University of Exeter, U.K.) is typical and telling. At least some of the time

Sally Fincher; James Caristi

2000-01-01

12

Reflections on Knowledge Brokering within a Multidisciplinary Research Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Knowledge brokering (KB) may be one approach of helping researchers and decision makers effectively communicate their needs and abilities, and move toward increased use of evidence in health care. A multidisciplinary research team in Nova Scotia, Canada, has created a dedicated KB position with the goal of improving access to quality colorectal…

Urquhart, Robin; Porter, Geoffrey A.; Grunfeld, Eva

2011-01-01

13

Heterogeneity and Work Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper attempts to extend and contribute to the domestic diversity literature by presenting a comprehensive model that takes into consideration the Indian work set up. It proposes to examine the effects of the composition of information systems development teams in Indian firms. Besides the conventional demographics which were studied…

Dyaram, Lata; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

2008-01-01

14

Module Work Teams Training and  

E-print Network

Module Work Teams Training and Support CMS Executive Committee( PAB) Project Update from Executive month User Work Team * Meeting 4 hours every week SA & SIS+/Finance Integration Work Team (as needed) Finance/HR Integration Work Team (as needed) CSU Fullerton Common Management System (CMS) Project

de Lijser, Peter

15

Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review  

PubMed Central

Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

Epstein, Nancy E.

2014-01-01

16

Effective multidisciplinary working: the key to high-quality care.  

PubMed

This article explores multidisciplinary team working, inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary and effective collaborative practice in order to provide high-quality patient care. It discusses different views on collaboration, some of the issues around cross-discipline and multi-agency working and concerns around promoting 'high-quality' care. It also discusses the importance of evidence-based practice in multidisciplinary teams. Issues around good-quality care, clinical governance and the audit cycle in MDTs are addressed. The article highlights the importance of the 6Cs (care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment) in MDTs if quality care is to be achieved. The article also explores advantages and limitations of multidisciplinary team working, trans-disciplinary working and inter-professional working in developing and delivering high-quality patient-centred care. Further research is needed on how clinical audits can help to improve how MDTs function in order improve the quality of service provided to clients. PMID:25072333

Ndoro, Samuel

17

Multidisciplinary workshops: learning to work together.  

PubMed

Health and social care professional practice needs to move with the times and to respond to the ever-changing combination of health needs, economic realities and health-policy imperatives. A clear understanding of the variety of forces at play and the ability to marshal these to good effect by working in partnership with multidisciplinary colleagues and children/families is a must, not least in this time of economic austerity and ever-rising health inequalities, when vulnerable children's lives and complex family relationships and behaviours so easily become increasingly strained and challenged. This sad reality calls out for relevant joined-up solutions by all participants--an agenda so often called into question by court judgement after court judgement. The multidisciplinary workshops to be discussed have developed and changed over the past decade and provide a safe but realistic learning environment for students from health and social care backgrounds to experience the difficulties and barriers to good multidisciplinary working, to better understand others' perspectives and activities and consider and develop new and better practical strategies for working with multidisciplinary professional colleagues, children and families. All of the workshops are underpinned by specific discipline-focused theoretical work. PMID:23540014

Fatchett, Anita; Taylor, Dawn

2013-03-01

18

Critical care bug team: A multidisciplinary team approach to reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia rates in the medical-surgical intensive care unit first exceeded the 90th percentile in September 1997 and were significantly (P < .05) higher than National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System pooled mean data. In January 1998, a multidisciplinary “Critical Care Bug Team” was developed by the Infection Control Committee to review 1997 National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System data for

Judy Kaye; Vivian Ashline; Deborah Erickson; Kathy Zeiler; Dawn Gavigan; Lisa Gannon; Patricia Wynne; Janice Cooper; William Kittle; Kailash Sharma; Jared Morton

2000-01-01

19

Making Science Teams Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, getting teams to share equally in the academic assignments and interact in a positive and productive manner often eludes even the best of teachers. These strategies for creating effective student teams include planning, student pre-assessment, communication with students and parents, motivational strategies, and arrangement of the classroom and activities.

Miller, Roxanne G.

2004-01-01

20

What is a virtual multidisciplinary team (vMDT)?  

PubMed Central

Background: Multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTs), also known as tumour boards or multidisciplinary case conferences, are an integral component of contemporary cancer care. There are logistical problems with setting up and maintaining participation in these meetings. An ill-defined concept, the virtual MDT (vMDT), has arisen in response to these difficulties. We have, in order to provide clarity and to generate discussion, attempted to define the concept of the vMDT, outline its advantages and disadvantages, and consider some of the practical aspects involved in setting up a virtual MDT. Methods: This is an unstructured review of published evidence and personal experience relating to virtual teams in general, and to MDTs in particular. Results: We have devised a simple taxonomy for MDTs, discussed some of the practicalities involved in setting up a vMDT, and described some of the potential advantages and disadvantages associated with vMDTs. Conclusion: The vMDT may be useful for discussions concerning rare or unusual tumours, or for helping guide the assessment and management of patients with uncommon complications related to treatment. However, the vMDT is a niche concept and is currently unlikely to replace the more traditional face-to-face MDT in the management of common tumours at specific sites. PMID:23756866

Munro, A J; Swartzman, S

2013-01-01

21

Teamwork and Team Decision-making at Multidisciplinary Cancer Conferences: Barriers, Facilitators, and Opportunities for Improvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Anecdotally, multidisciplinary cancer conferences (MCCs) do not always function optimally. MCC members’ experiences with and\\u000a attitudes toward MCCs are explored, and barriers to and facilitators of effective team-working are identified.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A total of 19 semistructured interviews were conducted with surgeons, oncologists, nurses, and administrators. Interviews\\u000a explored participants’ opinions on MCC attendance, information presentation, case discussion, leadership, team decision-making,\\u000a and possible

Benjamin W. Lamb; Nick Sevdalis; Sonal Arora; Anna Pinto; Charles Vincent; James S. A. Green

22

Multidisciplinary team legislative language associated with elder abuse investigations.  

PubMed

Professionals from different disciplines providing care and services to persons at risk for or victims of elder abuse have formed various multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). The purpose of the study was to identify the adult protective services-related statutory trends in presence of MDT content and to determine the association of MDT legislation on the rates of reported, investigated, and substantiated domestic elder abuse. Aggregate reports of elder abuse and state statutes for 1999 and 2007 were retrieved from 50 states and the District of Columbia. Statutes of eight states in 2000 and nine in 2008 included text about MDTs. In 2007, investigation rates for those states having MDT text in the statutes were significantly higher than those states without. The incidence of MDTs in the country is unknown. Legislative text is but one factor associated with differences in elder abuse report, investigation, or substantiation rates. PMID:24313797

Daly, Jeanette M; Jogerst, Gerald J

2014-01-01

23

Medical Team Training: Using Simulation as a Teaching Strategy for Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is an innovative approach currently being used to inspire group work, specifically a medical team training model, referred to as The Simulation Model, which includes as its major components: (1) Prior Training in Group Work of Medical Team Members; (2) Simulation in Teams or Groups; (3) Multidisciplinary Teamwork; (4) Team Leader…

Moyer, Michael R.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas

2011-01-01

24

The importance of multidisciplinary teamwork and team climate for relational coordination among teams delivering care to older patients  

PubMed Central

Aim To identify predictors of relational coordination among professionals delivering care to older patients. Background Relational coordination is known to enhance quality of care in hospitals. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain poorly understood. Design This cross-sectional study was part of a larger evaluation study examining the opportunity to prevent loss of function in older patients due to hospitalization in the Netherlands. Methods This study was performed in spring 2010 among team members delivering care to older hospitalized patients (192 respondents; 44% response rate) in one hospital. Relational coordination was measured by the Relational Coordination survey; team climate by the Team Climate Inventory and questions were asked about participation in multidisciplinary team meetings and disciplines represented in these meetings. To account for the hierarchical structure, a multilevel analysis was performed. Results Correlation analysis revealed a positive relationship among being female, being a nurse and relational coordination; medical specialists showed a negative relationship. The number of disciplines represented during multidisciplinary team meetings and team climate were positively related with relational coordination. The multilevel analysis showed a positive relationship between the number of disciplines represented during multidisciplinary team meetings and team climate with relational coordination. Conclusions The enhancement of team climate and attendance of diverse professionals during multidisciplinary team meetings are expected to improve relational coordination. Furthermore, this study underscores the importance of enhancing relational coordination between medical specialists and other professionals. PMID:23980594

Hartgerink, JM; Cramm, JM; Bakker, TJEM; van Eijsden, AM; Mackenbach, JP; Nieboer, AP

2014-01-01

25

The CTSA as an Exemplar Framework for Developing Multidisciplinary Translational Teams  

PubMed Central

Translational science requires that scientists from multiple disciplines work together to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human disease. Although a literature exists on the design and management of multidisciplinary teams, little has been written on multidisciplinary translational teams (MTTs). MTTs are distinct hybrid entities, with goals taken from both industry and academic models. We identified 30 design factors in 10 domains from a literature survey relevant to our MTT model: specific goals, structures, and processes. These dimensions were adapted to our own institutional environment in the selection and management of 11 MTTs that exploited resources of University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Clinical and Translational Sciences Awards (CTSA). Case illustrations of two specific MTTs illustrate some of the challenges encountered and opportunities realized in terms of education and scientific advances. Network depiction of disciplinarity indicated that CTSA KRs and CTSA leadership contributed to discipline diversity especially in small (or nascent) MTTs. A separate depiction of MTT-KR utilization indicated that data analysis, translational technologies, and novel methods were heavily utilized by MTTs, whereas other KRs contributed significant effort to infrastructure development. We conclude that the CTSA can provide a rich infrastructural framework and scientific environment for the development of successful MTTs. PMID:23399092

Calhoun, William J.; Wooten, Kevin; Bhavnani, Suresh; Anderson, Karl E.; Freeman, Jean; Brasier, Allan R.

2013-01-01

26

Addressing sophisticated cyber threats demands a multidisciplinary team with a unique mindset. Sandia provides  

E-print Network

Addressing sophisticated cyber threats demands a multidisciplinary team with a unique mindset and recreational opportunities. For more information or to apply online visit: http://careers.sandia.gov/cyber #12;A Career in Cyber Security Research Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory

27

Psychologists as Leaders of Multidisciplinary Chronic Pain Management Teams: A Model for Health Care Delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychologists have the potential to improve the quality of life of chronic pain patients by intervening not only through direct services but also by using their training for promoting proactive leadership in multidisciplinary teams and in the larger health care environment. To significantly impact pain management, psychologists must not only deliver state-of-the-art care but also take an active role in

Kathleen Sitley Brown; Raymond A. Folen

2005-01-01

28

The MUSES Satellite Team and Multidisciplinary System Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a unique partnership between three minority-serving institutions and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a new course sequence, including a multidisciplinary capstone design experience, is to be developed and implemented at each of the schools with the ambitious goal of designing, constructing and launching a low-orbit Earth-resources satellite. The three universities involved are North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T), University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP), and California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA). The schools form a consortium collectively known as MUSES - Minority Universities System Engineering and Satellite. Four aspects of this project make it unique: (1) Including all engineering disciplines in the capstone design course, (2) designing, building and launching an Earth-resources satellite, (3) sustaining the partnership between the three schools to achieve this goal, and (4) implementing systems engineering pedagogy at each of the three schools. This paper will describe the partnership and its goals, the first design of the satellite, the courses developed at NCA&T, and the implementation plan for the course sequence.

Chen, John C.; Paiz, Alfred R.; Young, Donald L.

1997-01-01

29

Psychopathological aspects of kidney transplantation: Efficacy of a multidisciplinary team.  

PubMed

Renal transplantation is a well established treatment for end-stage renal disease, allowing most patients to return to a satisfactory quality of life. Studies have identified many problems that may affect adaptation to the transplanted condition and post-operative compliance. The psychological implications of transplantation have important consequences even on strictly physical aspects. Organ transplantation is very challenging for the patient and acts as an intense stressor stimulus to which the patient reacts with neurotransmitter and endocrine-metabolic changes. Transplantation can result in a psychosomatic crisis that requires the patient to mobilize all bio-psycho-social resources during the process of adaptation to the new foreign organ which may result in an alteration in self-representation and identity, with possible psychopathologic repercussions. These reactions are feasible in mental disorders, e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder, and psychosomatic disorders. In organ transplantation, the fruitful collaboration between professionals with diverse scientific expertise, calls for both a guarantee for mental health and greater effectiveness in challenging treatments for a viable association between patients, family members and doctors. Integrated and multidisciplinary care should include uniform criteria and procedures for standard assessments, for patient autonomy, adherence to therapy, new coping strategies and the adoption of more appropriate lifestyles. PMID:25540735

De Pasquale, Concetta; Veroux, Massimiliano; Indelicato, Luisa; Sinagra, Nunzia; Giaquinta, Alessia; Fornaro, Michele; Veroux, Pierfrancesco; Pistorio, Maria L

2014-12-24

30

Psychopathological aspects of kidney transplantation: Efficacy of a multidisciplinary team  

PubMed Central

Renal transplantation is a well established treatment for end-stage renal disease, allowing most patients to return to a satisfactory quality of life. Studies have identified many problems that may affect adaptation to the transplanted condition and post-operative compliance. The psychological implications of transplantation have important consequences even on strictly physical aspects. Organ transplantation is very challenging for the patient and acts as an intense stressor stimulus to which the patient reacts with neurotransmitter and endocrine-metabolic changes. Transplantation can result in a psychosomatic crisis that requires the patient to mobilize all bio-psycho-social resources during the process of adaptation to the new foreign organ which may result in an alteration in self-representation and identity, with possible psychopathologic repercussions. These reactions are feasible in mental disorders, e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder, and psychosomatic disorders. In organ transplantation, the fruitful collaboration between professionals with diverse scientific expertise, calls for both a guarantee for mental health and greater effectiveness in challenging treatments for a viable association between patients, family members and doctors. Integrated and multidisciplinary care should include uniform criteria and procedures for standard assessments, for patient autonomy, adherence to therapy, new coping strategies and the adoption of more appropriate lifestyles.

De Pasquale, Concetta; Veroux, Massimiliano; Indelicato, Luisa; Sinagra, Nunzia; Giaquinta, Alessia; Fornaro, Michele; Veroux, Pierfrancesco; Pistorio, Maria L

2014-01-01

31

Multidisciplinary design problem solving on product development teams  

E-print Network

This investigation, conducted under the auspices of the Lean Aerospace Initiative (LAI), studied how engineers from different specialties interpret and communicate about technical design problems while working on product ...

Bernstein, Joshua I. (Joshua Ian), 1974-

2001-01-01

32

Multidisciplinary teams of case managers in the implementation of an innovative integrated services delivery for the elderly in France  

PubMed Central

Background The case management process is now well defined, and teams of case managers have been implemented in integrated services delivery. However, little is known about the role played by the team of case managers and the value in having multidisciplinary case management teams. The objectives were to develop a fuller understanding of the role played by the case manager team and identify the value of inter-professional collaboration in multidisciplinary teams during the implementation of an innovative integrated service in France. Methods We conducted a qualitative study with focus groups comprising 14 multidisciplinary teams for a total of 59 case managers, six months after their recruitment to the MAIA program (Maison Autonomie Integration Alzheimer). Results Most of the case managers saw themselves as being part of a team of case managers (91.5%). Case management teams help case managers develop a comprehensive understanding of the integration concept, meet the complex needs of elderly people and change their professional practices. Multidisciplinary case management teams add value by helping case managers move from theory to practice, by encouraging them develop a comprehensive clinical vision, and by initiating the interdisciplinary approach. Conclusions The multidisciplinary team of case managers is central to the implementation of case management and helps case managers develop their new role and a core inter-professional competency. PMID:24708721

2014-01-01

33

The Role of the Multidisciplinary Team in Recruiting to Cancer Clinical Trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

This paper explores factors influencing patient recruitment to breast cancer clinical trials from the perspective of multidisciplinary research teams. Based on the results of the study, the authors recommend numerous strategies to improve recruitment, including having a recruitment plan, having flexibility in recruitment strategies, recording information on women eligible for and approached to join clinical trials, using financial incentives for recruiters and participants, educating patients and clinicians about clinical trials, and allowing women to make their own treatment decisions.

34

The Benefits of Multidisciplinary Learning in Clinical Practice for Law, Finance, and Social Work Students: An Australian Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In July 2010, the faculties of Law, Business and Economics, and Medicine at Monash University, Australia commenced placing law, finance, and social work students in a multidisciplinary clinic at a community legal service operated by the University. Students from the three disciplines began seeing legal service clients at the same time as a team.…

Hyams, Ross; Brown, Grace; Foster, Richard

2013-01-01

35

Using peer observers to assess the quality of cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a qualitative proof of concept study  

PubMed Central

Background Multidisciplinary team (MDT) working is well established as the foundation for providing cancer services in the UK and elsewhere. A core activity is the weekly meeting (or case conference/tumor boards) where the treatment recommendations for individual patients are agreed. Evidence suggests that the quality of team working varies across cancer teams, and this may impact negatively on the decision-making process, and ultimately patient care. Feedback on performance by expert observers may improve performance, but can be resource-intensive to implement. This proof of concept study sought to: develop a structured observational assessment tool for use by peers (managers or clinicians from the local workforce) and explore its usability; assess the feasibility of the principle of observational assessment by peers; and explore the views of MDT members and observers about the utility of feedback from observational assessment. Methods For tool development, the content was informed by national clinical consensus recommendations for best practice in cancer MDTs and developed in collaboration with an expert steering group. It consisted of ten subdomains of team working observable in MDT meetings that were rated on a 10-point scale (very poor to very good). For observational assessment, a total of 19 peer observers used the tool (assessing performance in 20 cancer teams from four hospitals). For evaluation, telephone interviews with 64 team members and all peer observers were analyzed thematically. Results The tool was easy to use and areas for refinement were identified. Peer observers were identified and most indicated that undertaking observation was feasible. MDT members generally reported that observational assessment and feedback was useful, with the potential to facilitate improvements in team working. Conclusion This study suggests that observation and feedback by peers may provide a feasible and acceptable approach to enhance MDT performance. Further tool refinement and validation is required. PMID:25143743

Harris, Jenny; Green, James SA; Sevdalis, Nick; Taylor, Cath

2014-01-01

36

Extreme Work Teams: Using SWAT Teams As a Model for Coordinating Distributed Robots  

E-print Network

Extreme Work Teams: Using SWAT Teams As a Model for Coordinating Distributed Robots Hank Jones observations. Keywords Distributed work, distributed teams, leadership, extreme work teams, field robotics in spatially distributed work teams, namely police Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams. The primary

37

Part 1: Participatory Ergonomics Approach to Waste Container Handling Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Team  

SciTech Connect

This multidisciplinary team approach to waste container handling, developed within the Grassroots Ergonomics process, presents participatory ergonomic interpretations of quantitative and qualitative aspects of this process resulting in a peer developed training. The lower back, shoulders, and wrists were identified as frequently injured areas, so these working postures were a primary focus for the creation of the workers' training. Handling procedures were analyzed by the team to identify common cycles involving one 5 gallon (60 pounds), two 5 gallons (60 and 54 pounds), 30 gallon (216 pounds), and 55 gallon (482 pounds) containers: lowering from transporting to/from transport vehicles, loading/unloading on transport vehicles, and loading onto pallet. Eleven experienced waste container handlers participated in this field analysis. Ergonomic exposure assessment tools measuring these field activities included posture analysis, posture targeting, Lumbar Motion Monitor{trademark} (LMM), and surface electromyography (sEMG) for the erector spinae, infraspinatus, and upper trapezius muscles. Posture analysis indicates that waste container handlers maintained non-neutral lower back postures (flexion, lateral bending, and rotation) for a mean of 51.7% of the time across all activities. The right wrist was in non-neutral postures (radial, ulnar, extension, and flexion) a mean of 30.5% of the time and the left wrist 31.4%. Non-neutral shoulder postures (elevation) were the least common, occurring 17.6% and 14.0% of the time in the right and left shoulders respectively. For training applications, each cycle had its own synchronized posture analysis and posture target diagram. Visual interpretations relating to the peak force modifications of the posture target diagrams proved to be invaluable for the workers' understanding of LMM and sEMG results (refer to Part II). Results were reviewed by the team's field technicians and their interpretations were developed into ergonomic training that address the issues originally raised. This training includes intervention methods, ergonomic tools used, dam acquired, and effects of waste container handling techniques on lower back, shoulder, and wrists and methods to help proactively reduce injuries associated with this profession.

Zalk, D.M.; Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Biggs, T.W.; Perry, C.M.; Tageson, R.; Barsnick, L.

2000-02-07

38

Building a multidisciplinary team for burn treatment – Lessons learned from the Montreal tendon transfer experience  

PubMed Central

Summary Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) represent a recognized component of care in the treatment of complex conditions such as burns. However, most institutions do not provide adequate support for the formation of these teams. Furthermore, the majority of specialists lack the managerial skills required to create a team and have difficulties finding the proper tools. Our objective is to provide an insight for health care professionals, who wish to form a MDT for burn treatment, on the challenges that are likely to be faced, and to identify key elements that may facilitate the establishment of such a project. The setting for this was a plastic surgery department and rehabilitation center at a national reference center. A qualitative analysis was performed on all correspondences related to our tetraplegia project, from 2006 to 2008. To guide our thematic analysis, we used a form of systems theory known as the complexity theory. The qualitative analysis was performed using the NVivo software (Version 8.0 QSR International Melbourne, Australia). Lastly, the data was organized in chronologic order. Three main themes emerged from the results: knowledge acquisition, project organizational setup and project steps design. These themes represented respectively 24%, 50% and 26% of all correspondences. Project steps design and knowledge acquisition correspondences increased significantly after the introduction of the mentor team to our network. We conclude that an early association with a mentor team is beneficial for the establishment of a MDT. PMID:25249840

Karam, E.; Lévesque, M.C.; Jacquemin, G.; Delure, A.; Robidoux, I.; Laramée, M.T.; Odobescu, A.; Harris, P.G..; Danino, A.M.

2014-01-01

39

[Should cases of hepatocellular carcinoma be discussed by non-specialized multidisciplinary team meetings?].  

PubMed

The treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is difficult due to the underlying cirrhosis which has its own influence on therapeutic issues. An inquiry was performed in centres with specialized multidisciplinary team meetings dedicated to HCC (HCC-MTM) or in centres with non-specialized (digestive oncology or general oncology) multidisciplinary team meetings (NS-MTM). The number of cases of HCCs taken in charge yearly was significantly higher in HCC-MTM than in NS-MTM (p=0,0014). Interventional radiologists and transplant surgeons were more frequently implied in HCC-MTM than in NS-MTM (respectively p=0,009 and p=0,02). On site availability of every treatment of HCC was higher in RCP-MTM than in NS-MTM (p=0,015). There were no inclusion in clinical trials in 40.5 % of NS-MTM versus only 17.6 % of HCC-MTM (p=0,0086). In three clinical cases out of seven there were discrepancies between the therapeutic options of HCC-MTM and NS-MTM. In all three cases, the treatment offered to the patient by HCC-MTM was more consistent with clinical standards. These results prompt to perform more studies on the quality of management of patients with HCCs by MTMs. PMID:24898934

Barbare, Jean-Claude; Franco, Dominique; André, Thierry; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Merle, Philippe; Péron, Jean-Marie; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Seitz, Jean-François; Ychou, Marc

2014-06-01

40

Surviving catastrophic disintegration of a large left atrial myxoma: the importance of multi-disciplinary team  

PubMed Central

Atrial myxomas are the most common primary cardiac tumors, representing ?50% of all benign cardiac tumors. Patients with a left atrial myxoma (LAM) generally present with symptoms of mechanical obstruction of blood flow, systemic emboli or constitutional symptoms. Embolic complications may occur any time with progression of the tumor; therefore, myxoma is usually considered an indication for urgent surgery. This report describes a patient with mobile large LAM who survived multiple emboli to the brain, spleen, kidneys, abdominal aorta and lower limbs during hospitalization for surgery, illustrating the critical nature of this finding and its possible catastrophic complications and demonstrating the importance of multi-disciplinary team in the decision-making process and the management of such complications and supporting the hypothesis that intravenous thrombolysis may be safely used in the treatment of embolic stroke due to cardiac myxoma. PMID:25217477

Habbab, Louay; Alfaraidi, Haifa; Lamy, Andre

2014-01-01

41

A Multidisciplinary Health Care Team's Efforts to Improve Educational Attainment in Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia and Cerebral Infarcts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary objective of this study was to improve the educational success of children with sickle-cell disease (SCD) and cerebral infarcts. A prospective intervention trial was conducted; a multidisciplinary team was created to maximize educational resources for children with SCD and cerebral infarcts. Students were evaluated systematically…

King, Allison; Herron, Sonya; McKinstry, Robert; Bacak, Stephen; Armstrong, Melissa; White, Desiree; DeBaun, Michael

2006-01-01

42

Hospital-Based Multidisciplinary Teams Can Prevent Unnecessary Child Abuse Reports and Out-of-Home Placements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To determine how often and for what reasons a hospital-based multidisciplinary child abuse team concluded that a report of alleged or suspected child abuse was unnecessary in young children with fractures. Methods: A retrospective review was completed of all children less than 12 months of age who, because of fractures, were referred to…

Wallace, Gregory H.; Makoroff, Kathi L.; Malott, Heidi A.; Shapiro, Robert A.

2007-01-01

43

Multidisciplinary Team Contributions Within a Dedicated Outpatient Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic: A Prospective Descriptive Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient palliative RT clinic. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients referred for RT for painful bone metastases were screened for symptoms and needs relevant to their medications, nutritional intake, activities of daily living, and psychosocial and spiritual concerns from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Consultations by appropriate team members and resulting recommendations were collected prospectively. Patients who received RT were contacted by telephone 4 weeks later to assess symptom outcomes. Results: A total of 106 clinic visits by 82 individual patients occurred. As determined by screening form responses, the clinical Pharmacist, Occupational Therapist, Registered Dietician and Social Worker were consulted to provide assessments and recommendations within the time constraints presented by 1-day palliative RT delivery. In addition to pain relief, significant improvements in tiredness, depression, anxiety, drowsiness and overall well-being were reported at 4 weeks. Conclusions: Systematic screening of this population revealed previously unmet needs, addressed in the form of custom verbal and written recommendations. Multidisciplinary assessment is associated with a high number of recommendations and decreased symptom distress. Our findings lend strong support to the routine assessment by multiple supportive care professionals for patients with advanced cancer being considered for palliative RT.

Pituskin, Edith, E-mail: pituskin@ualberta.c [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Dutka, Jennifer; Gagnon, Lori; Driga, Amy; Tachynski, Patty; Borschneck, Jo-Ann [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Department of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

2010-10-01

44

Mind Builders: Multidisciplinary Challenges for Cooperative Team-Building and Competition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than twenty years, the Richmond, Virginia Public Schools' program for gifted students has conducted an interscholastic competition similar to the nationally known competition, Destination Imagination. In the featured contest of this yearly event, teams of five students present solutions to engineering problems that they have worked on for…

Fleisher, Paul; Ziegler, Donald

2006-01-01

45

TeamSpace: An Environment for Team Articulation Work and Virtual Meetings  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present TeamSpace, a collaborative workspace system to support the articulation work of high performance development teams. TeamSpace distinguishes between individual, social, and meeting work modes, and facilitates transitions between modes. The system provides a shared workspace that supports understanding and reporting the team's past progress and activities. Awareness of current team activities is supported by a place-based representation of

Ludwin Fuchs; Steven E. Poltrock; Ingrid Wetzel

2001-01-01

46

Palliative Radiotherapy with or without Additional Care by a Multidisciplinary Palliative Care Team: A Retrospective Comparison  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To analyze pattern of care and survival after palliative radiotherapy (RT) in patients managed exclusively by regular oncology staff or a multidisciplinary palliative care team (MPCT) in addition. Methods. Retrospective analysis of 522 RT courses. Comparison of Two Groups: MPCT versus none. Results. We analyzed 140 RT courses (27%) with MPCT care and 382 without it. The following statistically significant differences were observed: 33% of female patients had MPCT care versus only 23% of male patients and 37% of patients <65 years had MPCT care versus only 22% of older patients. MPCT patients were more likely to have poor performance status and liver metastases. In the MPCT group steroid and opioid use was significantly more common. Dose-fractionation regimens were similar. Median survival was significantly shorter in the MPCT group, 3.9 versus 6.9 months. In multivariate analysis, MPCT care was not associated with survival. Adjusted for confounders, MPCT care reduced the likelihood of incomplete RT by 33%, P > 0.05. Conclusions. Patterns of referral and care differed, for example, regarding age and medication use. It seems possible that MPCT care reduces likelihood of incomplete RT. Therefore, the impact of MPCT care on symptom control should be investigated and objective referral criteria should be developed. PMID:25006507

Dalhaug, Astrid; Pawinski, Adam; Aandahl, Gro; Haukland, Ellinor; Engljähringer, Kirsten

2014-01-01

47

Building the Multidisciplinary Team for Management of Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma.  

PubMed

Optimal care of the patient with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) necessitates the involvement of multiple providers. Because the patient with HCC often carries 2 conditions with competing mortality risks (cancer and underlying cirrhosis), no single provider is equipped to deal with all of these patients' needs adequately. Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) have evolved to facilitate care coordination, reassessments of clinical course, and nimble changes in treatment plans required for this complex group of patients. Providers or sites that elect to manage patients with HCC thus are increasingly aware of the need to build their own MDT or communicate with an established one. The availability of new communication technologies, such as teleconferencing or teleconsultation, offers the possibility of MDT expansion into underserved or rural areas, as well as areas such as correctional facilities. Although the availability of resources for HCC patient care varies from site to site, construction of an MDT is possible in a wide spectrum of clinical practices, and this article suggests a blueprint for assembly of such collaboration. Research strategies are needed to explain how MDTs improve clinical outcomes so that MDTs themselves can be improved. PMID:24909910

Naugler, Willscott E; Alsina, Angel E; Frenette, Catherine T; Rossaro, Lorenzo; Sellers, Marty T

2014-06-01

48

Multidisciplinary case teams: an approach to the future management of advanced colorectal cancer.  

PubMed Central

The effective management of advanced colorectal cancer has traditionally been viewed in terms of treatment outcome measures such as efficacy (survival, objective response and palliation) and safety. Although these outcomes are of paramount importance and are essential for the evaluation of the effectiveness and tolerability of treatment, they do not take account of the global effect of therapy on patients, society and healthcare systems. Furthermore, they may not reveal important differences between treatments of equivalent anti-tumour efficacy that might influence the overall effectiveness in terms of acceptability of therapy. To achieve this, a broader, patient-centred evaluation of advanced cancer treatment is required that acknowledges the views, experience and perspectives of all involved in the treatment process. To this end, the International Working Group in Colorectal Cancer, a multidisciplinary group that encompasses expertise from a range of relevant fields and disciplines, has advocated a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer that is likely to deliver the best possible overall care. PMID:9579848

Minsky, B. D.

1998-01-01

49

Influence of top management team vision and work team characteristics on innovation : The Spanish case  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This work has three main objectives – to analyse whether the strategic vision of the top management team (TMT) directly affects firms' innovation performance; to shed some light on which of the intrinsic characteristics of work teams proposed in the literature influence innovation; and to analyse the joint effect that the TMT's vision and the work team's characteristics

Camelo-Ordaz Carmen; Martínez-Fierro Salustiano

2006-01-01

50

Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit  

PubMed Central

Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. Practitioner Summary: This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams PMID:24837514

Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

2014-01-01

51

Experiences of Multidisciplinary Development Team Members During User-Centered Design of Telecare Products and Services: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background User-centered design (UCD) methodologies can help take the needs and requirements of potential end-users into account during the development of innovative telecare products and services. Understanding how members of multidisciplinary development teams experience the UCD process might help to gain insight into factors that members with different backgrounds consider critical during the development of telecare products and services. Objective The primary objective of this study was to explore how members of multidisciplinary development teams experienced the UCD process of telecare products and services. The secondary objective was to identify differences and similarities in the barriers and facilitators they experienced. Methods Twenty-five members of multidisciplinary development teams of four Research and Development (R&D) projects participated in this study. The R&D projects aimed to develop telecare products and services that can support self-management in elderly people or patients with chronic conditions. Seven participants were representatives of end-users (elderly persons or patients with chronic conditions), three were professional end-users (geriatrician and nurses), five were engineers, four were managers (of R&D companies or engineering teams), and six were researchers. All participants were interviewed by a researcher who was not part of their own development team. The following topics were discussed during the interviews: (1) aim of the project, (2) role of the participant, (3) experiences during the development process, (4) points of improvement, and (5) what the project meant to the participant. Results Experiences of participants related to the following themes: (1) creating a development team, (2) expectations regarding responsibilities and roles, (3) translating user requirements into technical requirements, (4) technical challenges, (5) evaluation of developed products and services, and (6) valorization. Multidisciplinary team members from different backgrounds often reported similar experienced barriers (eg, different members of the development team speak a “different language”) and facilitators (eg, team members should voice expectations at the start of the project to prevent miscommunication at a later stage). However, some experienced barriers and facilitators were reported only by certain groups of participants. For example, only managers reported the experience that having different ideas about what a good business case is within one development team was a barrier, whereas only end-users emphasized the facilitating role of project management in end-user participation and the importance of continuous feedback from researchers on input of end-users. Conclusions Many similarities seem to exist between the experienced barriers and facilitators of members of multidisciplinary development teams during UCD of telecare products and services. However, differences in experiences between team members from various backgrounds exist as well. Insights into these similarities and differences can improve understanding between team members from different backgrounds, which can optimize collaboration during the development of telecare products and services. PMID:24840245

2014-01-01

52

Radiologist participation in multi-disciplinary teams in breast cancer improves reflective practice, decision making and isolation.  

PubMed

This study aims to explore Australian radiologists' experiences of participating in breast cancer multi-disciplinary team (MDT) meetings to identify enablers and barriers to participation as well their perception of confidence and patient care. Qualitative methods incorporating observation and interviews were used. Twenty-one breast cancer MDT meetings were observed across Sydney to study the dynamics of the meetings, the level of participation by radiologists and their most important interactions. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 radiologists participating in these meetings regarding participation, educational opportunities and improvements to work practices. Radiologists' participation in breast cancer MDT meetings is influenced by the type of meeting they attend with higher levels of participation and a more dominant 'valued' role being evident in pre-interventional meetings. The key themes to emerge from the data include the importance of 'sharing experiences', the 'radiologist-pathologist relationship' and the value of 'continuing participation'. Radiologists believed their confidence in their clinical decision making increased when there was immediate feedback from pathologists. This study highlights the benefits of radiologists regularly participating in breast cancer MDT meetings in terms of continuing professional education resulting from collegial experiential learning. Radiologists' perceived patient care and workplace isolation were improved by sharing experiences with other cancer care colleagues. PMID:24372588

Alcantara, S B; Reed, W; Willis, K; Lee, W; Brennan, P; Lewis, S

2014-09-01

53

A pre-post test evaluation of the impact of the PELICAN MDT-TME Development Programme on the working lives of colorectal cancer team members  

PubMed Central

Background The PELICAN Multidisciplinary Team Total Mesorectal Excision (MDT-TME) Development Programme aimed to improve clinical outcomes for rectal cancer by educating colorectal cancer teams in precision surgery and related aspects of multidisciplinary care. The Programme reached almost all colorectal cancer teams across England. We took the opportunity to assess the impact of participating in this novel team-based Development Programme on the working lives of colorectal cancer team members. Methods The impact of participating in the programme on team members' self-reported job stress, job satisfaction and team performance was assessed in a pre-post course study. 333/568 (59%) team members, from the 75 multidisciplinary teams who attended the final year of the Programme, completed questionnaires pre-course, and 6-8 weeks post-course. Results Across all team members, the main sources of job satisfaction related to working in multidisciplinary teams; whilst feeling overloaded was the main source of job stress. Surgeons and clinical nurse specialists reported higher levels of job satisfaction than team members who do not provide direct patient care, whilst MDT coordinators reported the lowest levels of job satisfaction and job stress. Both job stress and satisfaction decreased after participating in the Programme for all team members. There was a small improvement in team performance. Conclusions Participation in the Development Programme had a mixed impact on the working lives of team members in the immediate aftermath of attending. The decrease in team members' job stress may reflect the improved knowledge and skills conferred by the Programme. The decrease in job satisfaction may be the consequence of being unable to apply these skills immediately in clinical practice because of a lack of required infrastructure and/or equipment. In addition, whilst the Programme raised awareness of the challenges of teamworking, a greater focus on tackling these issues may have improved working lives further. PMID:20587062

2010-01-01

54

A systematic evaluation of a multidisciplinary social work-lawyer elder mistreatment intervention model.  

PubMed

This study introduces a conceptually based, systematic evaluation process employing multivariate techniques to evaluate a multidisciplinary social work-lawyer intervention model (JASA-LEAP). Logistic regression analyses were used with a random sample of case records (n = 250) from three intervention sites. Client retention, program fidelity, and exposure to multidisciplinary services were significantly related to reduction in mistreatment risk at case closure. Female gender, married status, and living with perpetrator significantly predicted unfavorable outcomes. This study extends the elder mistreatment program evaluation literature beyond descriptive/bivariate evaluation strategies. Findings suggest that a multidisciplinary social work-lawyer elder mistreatment intervention model is a successful approach. PMID:24965802

Rizzo, Victoria M; Burnes, David; Chalfy, Amy

2015-01-01

55

Information Sharing and Case Conference Among the Multidisciplinary Team Improve Patients’ Perceptions of Care  

PubMed Central

Background: As the advent of genomic technology accelerates personalized medicine and complex care, multidisciplinary care is essential for management of breast cancer. Objectives: To assess whether healthcare delivery systems are related to patients’ perceptions of care in breast cancer treatment institutions. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional nationwide study of breast cancer treatment institutions approved by the Japanese Breast Cancer Society in Japan. From 128 of the 457 institutions, 1,206 patients were included in the analysis. Each patient completed a questionnaire regarding perceptions of care that consisted of a multidisciplinary care subscale and a patient-centered care subscale. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed that the multidisciplinary care subscale was significantly related to implementation of patient-based medical record system that was paper-based (p<0.05). The results of the secondary analysis showed a significant relationship between the interdepartmental medical record system and the patient’s perception of multidisciplinary care (p<0.05) and patient-centered care (p<0.05). When a multidisciplinary case conference took place regularly or multidisciplinary viewpoints were incorporated into the conference records, the conference had a significantly higher correlation with both subscales (p<0.001). Conclusions: Integrated patient-based information and regular multidisciplinary case conferences that include records of viewpoints from different professionals improve patients’ perceptions of comprehensive breast cancer care. PMID:22135715

Komatsu, Hiroko; Nakayama, Kazuhiro; Togari, Taisuke; Suzuki, Kumi; Hayashi, Naoko; Murakami, Yoshie; Iioka, Yukiko; Osaka, Wakako; Yagasaki, Kaori; Nakamura, Seigo; Neumann, Joyce; Ueno, Naoto T

2011-01-01

56

A Method to Improve Learning Analysing Communication in Team Working  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years learning how to work in teams has become a common subject in higher education. Communication between student team members can be monitored using a bulletin board system, and hence, analyse individual and group role development. The composition and distribution of roles in a team are relevant characteristics that will considerably…

Bermejo, Miren; Sanchez, Ana; Gutierrez, Julian; Perez, Tomas A.

2011-01-01

57

Structured Learning Teams: Reimagining Student Group Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Even in a standards-based curriculum, teachers can apply constructivist practices such as structured learning teams. In this environment, students become invested in the learning aims, triggering the desire in students to awaken, get information, interpret, remix, share, and design scenarios.

Lendvay, Gregory C.

2014-01-01

58

RefWorks in Three Steps: Undergraduate Team Bibliographies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

RefWorks is ideally suited for undergraduate students with team-based research projects as part of their course assessment. The Dorothy Hill Physical Sciences and Engineering Library at the University of Queensland taught students from three engineering courses how to use RefWorks to manage project references and to create team-based…

Yorke-Barber, Phil; Ghiculescu, Cristina; Possin, Gisela

2009-01-01

59

Multidisciplinary trauma team care in Kandahar, Afghanistan: current injury patterns and care practices.  

PubMed

Multidisciplinary trauma care systems have been shown to improve patient outcomes. Medical care in support of the global war on terror has provided opportunities to refine these systems. We report on the multidisciplinary trauma care system at the Role III Hospital at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. We reviewed the Joint Trauma System Registry, Kandahar database from 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010 and extracted data regarding patient demographics, clinical variables and outcomes. We also queried the operating room records from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2010. In the study period of 1 October 2009 to 31 December 2010, 2599 patients presented to the trauma bay, with the most common source of injury being from Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blasts (915), followed by gunshot wounds (GSW) (327). Importantly, 19 patients with triple amputations as a result of injuries from IEDs were seen. 127 patients were massively transfused. The in-hospital mortality was 4.45%. From 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2010, 4106.24 operating room hours were logged to complete 1914 patient cases. The mean number of procedures per case in 2009 was 1.27, compared to 3.11 in 2010. Multinational, multidisciplinary care is required for the large number of severely injured patients seen at Kandahar Airfield. Multidisciplinary trauma care in Kandahar is effective and can be readily employed in combat hospitals in Afghanistan and serve as a model for civilian centres. PMID:22305587

Beckett, Andrew; Pelletier, Pierre; Mamczak, Christiaan; Benfield, Rodd; Elster, Eric

2012-12-01

60

Quality Indicators for Multidisciplinary Team Functioning in Community-Based Children’s Mental Health Services  

PubMed Central

The current study examined the organizational social context in 21 community-based programs serving youth at-risk for out-of-home care due to emotional or behavioral disorders and their families and program performance on five quality indicators of team functioning in teams that included a family support specialist. Results indicate that programs with higher performance on structures to facilitate teamwork, informal communication mechanisms among team members, and the ability to integrate family support specialists as equal members of the team showed more positive organizational functioning. Implications for the role of quality indicators in health care reform efforts are discussed. PMID:23873037

Kutash, Krista; Acri, Mary; Pollock, Michele; Armusewicz, Kelsey; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

2014-01-01

61

Finding Answers: Information Needs of a Multidisciplinary Patient Care Team in an Emergency Department  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emergency Departments (ED) are fast-paced, infor- mation-intensive environments where patient care team members must address their information needs quickly and accurately. We conducted a qualitative field study of an ED team in a rural hospital to under- stand their information needs. We observed that the most commonly asked questions related to patient specific information but that they also had number

Madhu Reddy; Patricia Ruma Spence

62

Determinants of treatment plan implementation in multidisciplinary team meetings for patients with chronic diseases: a mixed-methods study  

PubMed Central

Objective Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are assumed to produce better decisions and are extensively used to manage chronic disease in the National Health Service (NHS). However, evidence for their effectiveness is mixed. Our objective was to investigate determinants of MDT effectiveness by examining factors influencing the implementation of MDT treatment plans. This is a proxy measure of effectiveness, because it lies on the pathway to improvements in health, and reflects team decision making which has taken account of clinical and non-clinical information. Additionally, this measure can be compared across MDTs for different conditions. Methods We undertook a prospective mixed-methods study of 12 MDTs in London and North Thames. Data were collected by observation of 370 MDT meetings, interviews with 53 MDT members, and from 2654 patient medical records. We examined the influence of patient-related factors (disease, age, sex, deprivation, whether their preferences and other clinical/health behaviours were mentioned) and MDT features (as measured using the ‘Team Climate Inventory’ and skill mix) on the implementation of MDT treatment plans. Results The adjusted odds (or likelihood) of implementation was reduced by 25% for each additional professional group represented at the MDT meeting. Implementation was more likely in MDTs with clear goals and processes and a good ‘Team Climate’ (adjusted OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.15 to 3.31 for a unit increase in Team Climate Inventory (TCI) score). Implementation varied by disease category, with the lowest adjusted odds of implementation in mental health teams. Implementation was also lower for patients living in more deprived areas (adjusted odds of implementation for patients in the most compared with least deprived areas was 0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.91). Conclusions Greater multidisciplinarity is not necessarily associated with more effective decision making. Explicit goals and procedures are also crucial. Decision implementation should be routinely monitored to ensure the equitable provision of care. PMID:24915539

Raine, Rosalind; Xanthopoulou, Penny; Wallace, Isla; Nic a’ Bháird, Caoimhe; Lanceley, Anne; Clarke, Alex; Livingston, Gill; Prentice, Archie; Ardron, Dave; Harris, Miriam; King, Michael; Michie, Susan; Blazeby, Jane M; Austin-Parsons, Natalie; Gibbs, Simon; Barber, Julie

2014-01-01

63

The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to compare work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between a self-directed work team and a traditional work team based on four work ethic subscales and identify differences in work ethic based on six demographic factors. The major findings from the study indicated there were significant differences in the work

Lim, Doo Hun; Petty, Gregory; Fontan, Johnny; Yoon, Seung Won

2008-01-01

64

Pressure ulcer multidisciplinary teams via telemedicine: a pragmatic cluster randomized stepped wedge trial in long term care  

PubMed Central

Background The study was conducted to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of enhanced multi-disciplinary teams (EMDTs) vs. ‘usual care’ for the treatment of pressure ulcers in long term care (LTC) facilities in Ontario, Canada Methods We conducted a multi-method study: a pragmatic cluster randomized stepped-wedge trial, ethnographic observation and in-depth interviews, and an economic evaluation. Long term care facilities (clusters) were randomly allocated to start dates of the intervention. An advance practice nurse (APN) with expertise in skin and wound care visited intervention facilities to educate staff on pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, supported by an off-site hospital based expert multi-disciplinary wound care team via email, telephone, or video link as needed. The primary outcome was rate of reduction in pressure ulcer surface area (cm2/day) measured on before and after standard photographs by an assessor blinded to facility allocation. Secondary outcomes were time to healing, probability of healing, pressure ulcer incidence, pressure ulcer prevalence, wound pain, hospitalization, emergency department visits, utility, and cost. Results 12 of 15 eligible LTC facilities were randomly selected to participate and randomized to start date of the intervention following the stepped wedge design. 137 residents with a total of 259 pressure ulcers (stage 2 or greater) were recruited over the 17 month study period. No statistically significant differences were found between control and intervention periods on any of the primary or secondary outcomes. The economic evaluation demonstrated a mean reduction in direct care costs of $650 per resident compared to ‘usual care’. The qualitative study suggested that onsite support by APN wound specialists was welcomed, and is responsible for reduced costs through discontinuation of expensive non evidence based treatments. Insufficient allocation of nursing home staff time to wound care may explain the lack of impact on healing. Conclusion Enhanced multi-disciplinary wound care teams were cost effective, with most benefit through cost reduction initiated by APNs, but did not improve the treatment of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. Policy makers should consider the potential yield of strengthening evidence based primary care within LTC facilities, through outreach by APNs. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01232764 PMID:24559218

2014-01-01

65

Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

2010-01-01

66

The Effect of a Nurse-Led Multidisciplinary Team on Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Rates  

PubMed Central

Background. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a worrisome, yet potentially preventable threat in critically ill patients. Evidence-based clinical practices targeting the prevention of VAP have proven effective, but the most optimal methods to ensure consistent implementation and compliance remain unknown. Methods. A retrospective study of the trend in VAP rates in a community-hospital's open medical intensive care unit (MICU) after the enactment of a nurse-led VAP prevention team. The period of the study was between April 1, 2009, and September 30, 2012. The team rounded on mechanically ventilated patients every Tuesday and Thursday. They ensured adherence to the evidence-based VAP prevention. A separate and independent infection control team monitored VAP rates. Results. Across the study period, mean VAP rate was 3.20/1000 ventilator days ±5.71 SD. Throughout the study time frame, there was an average monthly reduction in VAP rate of 0.27/1000 ventilator days, P < 0.001 (CI: ?0.40–?0.13). Conclusion. A nurse-led interdisciplinary team dedicated to VAP prevention rounding twice a week to ensure adherence with a VAP prevention bundle lowered VAP rates in a community-hospital open MICU. The team had interdepartmental and administrative support and addressed any deficiencies in the VAP prevention bundle components actively. PMID:25061525

Dosher, W. Bradley; Loomis, Elena C.; Richardson, Sherry L.; Crowell, Jennifer A.; Waltman, Richard D.; Miller, Lisa D.; Nazim, Muhammad; Khasawneh, Faisal A.

2014-01-01

67

Impact of a Behavioral-Based Intervention on Inspiratory Muscle Training Prescription by a Multidisciplinary Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: Our goal was to compare behavioral- and information-based interventions aimed at increasing prescription of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by interdisciplinary teams during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Methods: Six hospital PR programs were randomly assigned to a…

Simms, Alanna M.; Li, Linda C.; Geddes, E. Lynne; Brooks, Dina; Hoens, Alison M.; Reid, W. Darlene

2012-01-01

68

Assessment in Adult Protective Services: Do Multidisciplinary Teams Make a Difference?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared 2 approaches to the assessment of Adult Protective Services (APS) cases. Using administrative data from 869 cases in 2 counties in Maryland, the differences between a nurse\\/social worker team and a lone social worker in case disposition, risk reduction, recidivism, and cost effectiveness were examined. Lone social workers were significantly more likely to confirm financial exploitation, physical

Joy Swanson Ernst; Charles A. Smith

2012-01-01

69

Can instant messaging empower teams at work?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Instant messaging (IM) has become increasingly prevalent as a communication tool of choice for social networking. However, application of IM at work remains controversial due to the inherent challenges associated with quantifying the benefits for organizations. In this study we integrate social network theory and transactive memory theory to examine IM's significance for organizations. We propose that IM has the

Carol X. J. Ou; Xuepan Zhong; Robert M. Davison; Yi Liang

2010-01-01

70

Humanitarian cardiac care in Arequipa, Peru: experiences of a multidisciplinary Canadian cardiovascular team  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence of cardiovascular disease and its associated mortality continue to increase in developing countries despite unparalleled improvements in cardiovascular medicine over the last century. Cardiovascular care in developing nations is often constrained by limited resources, poor access, lack of specialty training and inadequate financial support. Medical volunteerism by experienced health care teams can provide mentorship, medical expertise and health policy advice to local teams and improve cardiovascular patient outcomes. Methods We report our experience from annual successive humanitarian medical missions to Arequipa, Peru, and describe the challenges faced when performing cardiovascular interventions with limited resources. Results Over a 2-year period, we performed a total of 15 cardiac repairs in patients with rheumatic, congenital and ischemic heart disease. We assessed and managed 150 patients in an outpatient clinic, including 7 patients at 1-year postoperative follow-up. Conclusion Despite multiple challenges, we were able to help the local team deliver advanced cardiovascular care to many patients with few alternatives and achieve good early and 1-year outcomes. Interdisciplinary education at all levels of cardiac care, including preoperative assessment, intraoperative surgical and anesthetic details, and postoperative critical care management, were major goals for our medical missions. PMID:22630071

Adams, Corey; Kiefer, Philipp; Ryan, Kenneth; Smith, David; McCabe, Greg; Allen, Peter; Sridhar, Kumar; Torres, Pedro; Chu, Michael W.A.

2012-01-01

71

76 FR 10403 - Hewlett Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working On-Site...Technology Business Development Team, the Engineering Application Support Team, and the Engineering Workstation Refresh Team. On...

2011-02-24

72

Team work project 1A The bird flu  

E-print Network

Team work project 1A The bird flu By Huy Quang Nguyen Kari Johanne Kihle Attramadal Brattøra................................................................................................................. 3 2. What is the bird flu? And which virus cause bird flu? What is the situation now?.... 3 3. How be expected from Norwegian Food Safety Authority on field work area that have bird flu or in areas

Bech, Claus

73

Multidisciplinary team care for CKD-MBD. Achieving KDIGO guideline recommendations in the bundling era.  

PubMed

The increasing prevalence of end-stage renal disease and planned expansion of the Medicare bundled payment system will place a greater financial burden on dialysis providers. Management of chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is dependent on interdisciplinary team (IDT) interventions such as dietary modification, medication, and adequate dialysis therapy. Optimizing adherence to diet and medications requires an educated and motivated IDT, patient, and patient support system. The financial constraints of bundling will increase the roles of social workers and dietitians in promoting therapy adherence. Innovative and relevant tactics provide opportunity to overcome monotonous routines, encourage adherence to diet and complex polypharmacy regimens, and achieve recommended biochemical targets as outlined in Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Guideline for Chronic Kidney Disease (KDIGO) - CKD-MBD. PMID:24960985

McCann, Linda; Hoefs, Meghan

2014-04-01

74

Consensus in Guidelines for Evaluation of DSD by the Texas Children's Hospital Multidisciplinary Gender Medicine Team.  

PubMed

The Gender Medicine Team (GMT), comprised of members with expertise in endocrinology, ethics, genetics, gynecology, pediatric surgery, psychology, and urology, at Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine formed a task force to formulate a consensus statement on practice guidelines for managing disorders of sexual differentiation (DSD) and for making sex assignments. The GMT task force reviewed published evidence and incorporated findings from clinical experience. Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the quality of evidence presented in the literature for establishing evidence-based guidelines. The task force presents a consensus statement regarding specific diagnostic and therapeutic issues in the management of individuals who present with DSD. The consensus statement includes recommendations for (1) laboratory workup, (2) acute management, (3) sex assignment in an ethical framework that includes education and involvement of the parents, and (4) surgical management. PMID:20981291

Douglas, Ganka; Axelrad, Marni E; Brandt, Mary L; Crabtree, Elizabeth; Dietrich, Jennifer E; French, Shannon; Gunn, Sheila; Karaviti, Lefkothea; Lopez, Monica E; Macias, Charles G; McCullough, Laurence B; Suresh, Deepa; Sutton, V Reid

2010-01-01

75

Consensus in Guidelines for Evaluation of DSD by the Texas Children's Hospital Multidisciplinary Gender Medicine Team  

PubMed Central

The Gender Medicine Team (GMT), comprised of members with expertise in endocrinology, ethics, genetics, gynecology, pediatric surgery, psychology, and urology, at Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine formed a task force to formulate a consensus statement on practice guidelines for managing disorders of sexual differentiation (DSD) and for making sex assignments. The GMT task force reviewed published evidence and incorporated findings from clinical experience. Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the quality of evidence presented in the literature for establishing evidence-based guidelines. The task force presents a consensus statement regarding specific diagnostic and therapeutic issues in the management of individuals who present with DSD. The consensus statement includes recommendations for (1) laboratory workup, (2) acute management, (3) sex assignment in an ethical framework that includes education and involvement of the parents, and (4) surgical management. PMID:20981291

Douglas, Ganka; Axelrad, Marni E.; Brandt, Mary L.; Crabtree, Elizabeth; Dietrich, Jennifer E.; French, Shannon; Gunn, Sheila; Karaviti, Lefkothea; Lopez, Monica E.; Macias, Charles G.; McCullough, Laurence B.; Suresh, Deepa; Sutton, V. Reid

2010-01-01

76

Motivating Effects of Task and Outcome Interdependence in Work Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivation and performance theories in organizational psychology tend to have a predominantly individualistic scope, relating characteristics of individual tasks to personal work outcomes of individuals (e.g., the Job Characteristics Model [JCM]). The present study goes beyond the realm of individual job characteristics by examining the effects of two interpersonal characteristics: task and outcome interdependence of team members. Subscales for the

Gerben Van Der Vegt; Ben Emans; Evert Van De Vliert

1998-01-01

77

Enhancing Social Work Education through Team-Based Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Group learning strategies are used extensively in social work education, despite the challenges and negative outcomes regularly experienced by students and faculty. Building on principles of cooperative learning, team-based learning offers a more structured approach that maximizes the benefits of cooperative learning while also offering…

Gillespie, Judy

2012-01-01

78

Primary care team working in Ireland: a qualitative exploration of team members' experiences in a new primary care service.  

PubMed

Team working is an integral aspect of primary care, but barriers to effective team working can limit the effectiveness of a primary care team (PCT). The establishment of new PCTs in Ireland provides an excellent opportunity to explore team working in action. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of team members working in a PCT. Team members (n = 19) from two PCTs were interviewed from May to June 2010 using a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using NVivo (version 8). Thematic analysis was used to explore the data. We identified five main themes that described the experiences of the team members. The themes were support for primary care, managing change, communication, evolution of roles and benefits of team working. Team members were generally supportive of primary care and had experienced benefits to their practice and to the care of their patients from participation in the team. Regular team meetings enabled communication and discussion of complex cases. Despite the significant scope for role conflict due to the varied employment arrangements of the team members, neither role nor interpersonal conflict was evident in the teams studied. In addition, despite the unusual team structure in Irish PCTs - where there is no formally appointed team leader or manager - general issues around team working and its benefits and challenges were very similar to those found in other international studies. This suggests, in contrast to some studies, that some aspects of the leadership role may not be as important in successful PCT functioning as previously thought. Nonetheless, team leadership was identified as an important issue in the further development of the teams. PMID:25429985

Kennedy, Norelee; Armstrong, Claire; Woodward, Oonagh; Cullen, Walter

2014-11-28

79

Symptomatic Lumbar Osteochondroma Treated via a Multidisciplinary Military Surgical Team: Case Report and Review of the Literature.  

PubMed

The authors describe the case of a giant osteochondroma emanating from the L5 vertebral body and extending into the retroperitoneum of a 40-year-old man, causing low back pain. Osteochondromas are benign bony tumors that typically occur within the appendicular skeleton, although in the sporadic form, up to 4% occur in the spine. A review of the English language literature has returned 44 cases of lumbar osteochondroma, including the present example. The lesions were sporadic in 81% of cases. Mean age of presentation overall is 39.5 years, with a mean age of 18.4 years (range 8-34 years) for hereditary cases and 45.7 years (range 11-81 years) for solitary lesions. Of the instances where gender was reported, 64% were male. The most common level of origin was L4 (38%). The most common anatomic site of origin was the inferior articular process (one-third). Of those lesions treated operatively, 46% underwent simple decompression, with 22% requiring decompression and fusion. This particular lesion was resected via a transperitoneal approach performed by a multidisciplinary team of neurosurgeons, vascular surgeons, and urologists. The bony tumor measured 6.1 × 7.8 × 7.7 cm. Removal of the lesion resulted in a significant improvement of the patient's symptoms. PMID:25562870

Rymarczuk, George N; Dirks, Michael S; Whittaker, David R; Neal, Chris J

2015-01-01

80

A successful methodology for designing and implementing virtual work teams  

SciTech Connect

A system has been implemented at Los Alamos National Laboratory to rapidly staff and manage project teams. These project teams are created and subsequently perform their project functions using information technology as the communication medium. A simplified model of group interactions was used to guide the design and implementation of the system. The model uses three primary axes of group interactions to express the functional requirements that must be supported by a virtual work team application. The evolution of the approach and its relationship to traditional project management are described. A number of design characteristics were found to be critical to the success of the implementation and are presented. The technology and supporting processes and the business results stemming from implementation of the system are described in a limited manner.

Stuewe, R.B.; Barnes, M.G.; Hughes, D.K.

1997-11-01

81

¿No decision about me without me¿ in the context of cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a qualitative interview study.  

PubMed

BackgroundCancer care is commonly managed by multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) who meet to discuss and agree treatment for individual patients. Patients do not attend MDT meetings but recommendations for treatments made in the meetings directly influence the decision-making process between patients and their responsible clinician. No research to-date has considered patient perspectives (or understanding) regarding MDTs or MDT meetings, though research has shown that failure to consider patient-based information can lead to recommendations that are inappropriate or unacceptable, and can consequently delay treatment.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were conducted with current cancer patients from one cancer centre who had either upper gastrointestinal or gynaecological cancer (n¿=¿9) and with MDT members (n¿=¿12) from the teams managing their care. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using Framework approach. Key themes were identified and commonalities and discrepancies within and between individual transcripts and within and between patient and team member samples were identified and examined using the constant comparative method.ResultsPatients had limited opportunities to input to or influence the decision-making process in MDT meetings. Key explanatory factors included that patients were given limited and inconsistent information about MDTs and MDT meetings, and that MDT members had variable definitions of patient-centredness in the context of MDTs and MDT meetings. Patients that had knowledge of medicine (through current/previous employment themselves or that of a close family member) appeared to have greater understanding and access to the MDT. Reassurance emerged as a `benefit¿ of informing patients about MDTs and MDT meetings.ConclusionsThere is a need to ensure MDT processes are both efficient and patient-centred. The operationalization of ¿No decision about me without me¿ in the context of MDT models of care ¿ where patients are not present when recommendations for treatment are discussed - requires further consideration. Methods for ensuring that patients are actively integrated into the MDT processes are required to ensure patients have an informed choice regarding engagement, and to ensure recommendations are based on the best available patient-based and clinical evidence. PMID:25339192

Taylor, Cath; Finnegan-John, Jennifer; Green, James

2014-10-24

82

The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between self-directed work teams and traditional work groups using four work ethic subscales: dependable, considerate, ambitious, and cooperative (Dawson, [1999]; Petty, [1991]). Differences in measured work ethic scores were also compared across six demographic variables: age,…

Petty, Gregory C.; Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won; Fontan, Johnny

2008-01-01

83

Decision-making from multidisciplinary team meetings to the bedside: Factors influencing the recruitment of breast cancer patients into clinical trials | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

Multidisciplinary team meetings in comprehensive cancer centers identify potentially eligible patients and discuss clinical trial participation. However, a French study using retrospective chart review and physician surveys found that less than half (39%) of the identified patients were invited to participate by their physicians. Of those invited, 74% joined a trial. Physicians were most likely to offer diagnostic or prognostic trials and retired patients and executives were the most likely to enroll.

84

Quality Improvement in Multidisciplinary Cancer Teams: An Investigation of Teamwork and Clinical Decision-Making and Cross-Validation of Assessments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Teamworking and clinical decision-making are important in multidisciplinary cancer teams (MDTs). Our objective is to assess\\u000a the quality of information presentation and MDT members’ contribution to decision-making via expert observation and self-report,\\u000a aiming to cross-validate the two methods and assess the insight of MDT members into their own team performance.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods  Behaviors were scored using (i) a validated observational

B. W. Lamb; N. Sevdalis; H. Mostafid; C. Vincent; J. S. A. Green

85

The Open Science Grid - Support for Multi-Disciplinary Team Science - the Adolescent Years  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As it enters adolescence the Open Science Grid (OSG) is bringing a maturing fabric of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) services that supports an expanding HEP community to an increasingly diverse spectrum of domain scientists. Working closely with researchers on campuses throughout the US and in collaboration with national cyberinfrastructure initiatives, we transform their computing environment through new concepts, advanced tools and deep experience. We discuss examples of these including: the pilot-job overlay concepts and technologies now in use throughout OSG and delivering 1.4 Million CPU hours/day; the role of campus infrastructures- built out from concepts of sharing across multiple local faculty clusters (made good use of already by many of the HEP Tier-2 sites in the US); the work towards the use of clouds and access to high throughput parallel (multi-core and GPU) compute resources; and the progress we are making towards meeting the data management and access needs of non-HEP communities with general tools derived from the experience of the parochial tools in HEP (integration of Globus Online, prototyping with IRODS, investigations into Wide Area Lustre). We will also review our activities and experiences as HTC Service Provider to the recently awarded NSF XD XSEDE project, the evolution of the US NSF TeraGrid project, and how we are extending the reach of HTC through this activity to the increasingly broad national cyberinfrastructure. We believe that a coordinated view of the HPC and HTC resources in the US will further expand their impact on scientific discovery.

Bauerdick, Lothar; Ernst, Michael; Fraser, Dan; Livny, Miron; Pordes, Ruth; Sehgal, Chander; Würthwein, Frank; Open Science Grid

2012-12-01

86

[Team work and interdiciplinarity: challenges facing the implementation of comprehensive outpatient care for people with HIV/Aids in Pernambuco].  

PubMed

The complexity of providing healthcare to people with HIV/Aids requires investment in comprehensive action and care, constituting a challenge for the multidisciplinary work teams to build an interdisciplinary practice. This study sought to analyze comprehensive healthcare in the Specialized Assistance Services for HIV/Aids (SAE-HIV/Aids) in Recife, in the State of Pernambuco, starting with the process and organization of team work. This is a case study developed in three SAE-HIV/Aids units, based on a qualitative approach using different research techniques. The results show that SAE-HIV/Aids have complied with most of the Brazilian Health Ministry recommendations in terms of basic infrastructure, though none of them had a team of appropriate size. These services have shown signs of fragmentation and difficulty in establishing a systematic intersectorial and interdisciplinary practice, with failings in ensuring the reference and counter-reference flow. It was seen that there was little appreciation of the role of the manager as team leader. The need to perceive the user as a whole was identified, as well as for the team to work in a coordinated manner in order to ensure communicative and relational activities. PMID:22218548

Borges, Maria Jucineide Lopes; Sampaio, Aletheia Soares; Gurgel, Idê Gomes Dantas

2012-01-01

87

Individual autonomy in work teams: The role of team autonomy, self-efficacy, and social support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Task autonomy is long recognized as a means to improve functioning of individuals and teams. Taking a multilevel approach, we unravelled the constructs of team and individual autonomy and studied the interplay between team autonomy, self-efficacy, and social support in determining individual autonomy of team members. Hierarchical regression results of a survey among 733 members of 76 health care teams

H. van Mierlo; C. G. Rutte; J. K. Vermunt; M. A. J. Kompier; J. A. M. C. Doorewaard

2006-01-01

88

Creative Exchange: An Evolving Model of Multidisciplinary Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Often the traditional creative arts curriculum does not sufficiently respond to, nor reflect, contemporary work practice. Multidisciplinary teams are now increasingly the norm in creative arts practice especially when driven by technological innovation. Drawing on contemporary research that centres on the benefits of multidisciplinary

Fleischmann, Katja; Hutchison, Clive

2012-01-01

89

Mercury Orbiter: Report of the Science Working Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results are presented of the Mercury Orbiter Science Working Team which held three workshops in 1988 to 1989 under the auspices of the Space Physics and Planetary Exploration Divisions of NASA Headquarters. Spacecraft engineering and mission design studies at the Jet Propulsion Lab were conducted in parallel with this effort and are detailed elsewhere. The findings of the engineering study, summarized herein, indicate that spin stabilized spacecraft carrying comprehensive particles and fields experiments and key planetology instruments in high elliptical orbits can survive and function in Mercury orbit without costly sun shields and active cooling systems.

Belcher, John W.; Slavin, James A.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Akasofu, Syun I.; Baker, Daniel N.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Chupp, Edward L.; Clark, Pamela E.

1991-01-01

90

Creating a Classroom Team: How Teachers and Paraprofessionals Can Make Working Together Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Respect and communication. That's what teachers and paraprofessionals say makes an effective classroom team. In speaking with paraprofessionals and teachers, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) has gathered several tips about how to make working together work. These tips include: (1) Creating a healthy, open relationship between teacher and…

American Federation of Teachers (NJ), 2004

2004-01-01

91

Student Team Reading and Writing. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Student team reading and writing" refers to two cooperative learning programs for secondary students included in this intervention report: (1) "Student Team Reading and Writing" and (2) Student Team Reading. The "Student Team Reading and Writing" program (Stevens, 2003) is an integrated approach to reading and language arts for early adolescents.…

What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

2011-01-01

92

Talk that works: evaluating communication in a factory production team  

Microsoft Academic Search

What part does communication play in the success of a top-performing factory production team? To what extent are the effective communication skills and strategies used by this team transferable to other teams at the factory? These two questions provided the starting point for a collaborative action research project involving the Language in the Workplace Project and staff at the Lever

Maria Stubbe

93

Preschool Work Teams' View of Ways of Working with Gender--Parents' Involvement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lately the interest to develop a gender-perspective in preschool has grown in Sweden. The aim of this study is to focus on Swedish preschool work teams understanding of gender and gender-sensitive pedagogy and their descriptions of what they actually do to be gender-sensitive preschools. Studies of gender and children often focus construction of…

Karlson, Ingrid; Simonsson, Maria

2008-01-01

94

Modelling Human Behaviour at Work using Fuzzy Logic: The Challenge of Work Teams Configuration  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the first steps in the planning of a new engineering project in industry is its partition into subtasks and the configuration of a work team to execute it. This decision making process is typically performed by a project manager based on his\\/her past experience and the available (though frequently scarce, uncertain and dynamic) information about the cognitive and

Juan Martínez-Miranda; Matías Alvarado; Arantza Aldea; René Bañares-Alcántara

95

Practising evidence-based medicine: the design and implementation of a multidisciplinary team-driven extubation protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Evidence from recent literature shows that protocol-directed extubation is a useful approach to liberate patients from mechanical ventilation (MV). However, research evidence does not necessarily provide guidance on how to implement changes in individual intensive care units (ICUs). We conducted the present study to determine whether such an evidence-based strategy can be implemented safely and effectively using a multidisciplinary

Pik Kei O Chan; Sandra Fischer; Thomas E Stewart; David C Hallett; Patricia Hynes-Gay; Stephen E Lapinsky; Rod MacDonald; Sangeeta Mehta

2001-01-01

96

Should they have a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy? the importance of assessing decision-making capacity and the central role of a multidisciplinary team.  

PubMed

Decisions about percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) can be clinically and ethically challenging, particularly when patients lack decision-making capacity. As the age of the UK population rises, with the associated increase in prevalence of dementias and neurodegenerative diseases, it is becoming an increasingly important issue for clinicians. The recent review and subsequent withdrawal of the Liverpool Care Pathway highlighted feeding as a particular area of concern. The authors undertook a 1-year retrospective review of individuals referred to the feeding issues multidisciplinary team (FIMDT) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK, in 2011. The majority of patients referred (n = 158) had a primary diagnosis of cancer (44%). The second largest group was those who had had a stroke or brain haemorrhage (13%). Twenty-eight per cent of patients had no, or uncertain, decision-making capacity on at least one occasion during decision-making. There are reflections on the role of a multidisciplinary team in the process of decision-making for these complex patients. PMID:24889566

Clarke, Gemma; Galbraith, Sarah; Woodward, Jeremy; Holland, Anthony; Barclay, Stephen

2014-06-01

97

Multidisciplinary Treatment Planning Questionnaire  

Cancer.gov

Multidisciplinary care, which incorporates Multidisciplinary Treatment Planning (MTP), is increasingly being adopted within oncology care settings with the intent of enhancing the quality of care delivered to patients. However, what is not known is its impact on improving patient outcomes and the quality of care being delivered. A targeted review of the literature was conducted to examine the organization and operation of the Multidisciplinary Care (MDC) team structure1. Findings revealed that a variety of implementation models exist within the health care system.

98

Protocol-aware, enhanced cognition robot agent design for team work effort in lunar exploration missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work presents the design and prototyping of a protocol-aware and cognitively enhanced Robot agent. A set of protocols have been defined which support autonomous robot team mission activity. These include a Team Work Effort protocol and ancillary protocols which support situation awareness and assist the robot team in flexibly executing the mission. The Robot agents are engaged in a

Margaret Lyell; William Drozd

2010-01-01

99

Editorial Commentary A Step Toward Integration of an Ambulatory Pharmacist in a Multidisciplinary Diabetes Team Caring for the Elderly  

Microsoft Academic Search

The elderly population suffers from a high burden of chronic conditions whose management is best achieved by an inter- disciplinary team approach (1). In acute geriatric units, core members of the geriatric interdisciplinary team often com- prise a geriatrician, nurse, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, nutritionist, pharmacist and social worker, with each member contributing to improved patient outcomes. Pharmacists provide a unique

José A. Morais

100

The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT): A Multidisciplinary group for an improvement of Nanorisk Assessment and Management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanotechnology allows the ability to design many new materials and devices with multiple applications, such as in medicine, electronics, and energy production. However, nanotechnology also raises several concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials. A report published by the Council of Canadian Academies points out the necessity to respond about many uncertainties associated with risk assessment for ensuring the safety of health and environment. Nanotoxicology (or Nanosafety) is a part of the toxicology science that aims to study adverse effects of nanomaterials or nanoparticles on living organisms. This field includes different aspects from workers prevention to the environment protection. Group of researchers have initiated an international powerful interactive milieu for researchers to work in concert for a global and integrated study of many aspects of nanotoxicology. The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT) is composed of research scientists from 5 different countries (Canada, USA, Japan, France and Germany) working together on 6 different specific thematics, and organized as 9 different technology platforms (www.titnt.com). TITNT aims to study different features of nanomaterials related to nanosafety, such as in vivo and in vitro studies, life cycle, occupational protections and monitoring, early biomarkers detection, characterization and nanotoxicokinetic/dynamic assessment during and after nanoparticles synthesis and the societal, public policy and environmental aspects. While the rapid growth of nanotechnology is opening up a floodgate of opportunities, the legislation related is lagging behind mainly because of a lack of knowledge in the biosafety of most nanomaterials. The main goal of TITNT is to improve knowledge in nanosafety science for the benefit of the discipline, for better public policies and for the public itself.

Emond, C.; Rolando, C.; Hirano, S.; Schuster, F.; Jolliet, O.; Maghni, K.; Meyer-Plath, A.; Hallé, S.; Vandelac, L.; Sentein, C.; Torkaski, C.

2011-07-01

101

The Anonymity Factor in Making Multicultural Teams Work: Virtual and Real Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major purpose of courses in intercultural communication is often to improve students' ability to perform well in situations with the potential to be both highly enlightening and highly difficult--in multicultural teams. This article reports the results of exercises in which members of a dysfunctional multicultural class were assigned to teams

Berg, Roberta Wiig

2012-01-01

102

Teaming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaming is a method of grouping students so they share the same set of teachers for their core subject areas--science, math, language arts, social studies, and sometimes physical education and health. Most often, teams are created when an entire grade is broken into groups who share the same set of teachers. Small schools that do not have enough students to form teams can create a grade-level team or multigrade-level teams. The core subject teachers usually share a common planning period and, in many situations, also share a team planning period. Teaming is most often used in middle grades education because its positive outcomes are particularly appropriate to the developmental needs of young adolescents.

Swango, C. J.; Steward, Sally B.

2003-01-01

103

A Theoretical Model and New Test of Managerial Legitimacy in Work Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines endorsement and authorization as two social mechanisms that can induce perceptions of legitimacy for individuals who manage work teams. "Endorsement" is the support of a manager by one's own team members, whereas "authorization" is the support of a team manager stemming from a higher bureaucratic level. Applying these…

Yoon, Jeongkoo; Thye, Shane

2011-01-01

104

A multidisciplinary team approach to two-stage revision for the infected hip replacement: a minimum five-year follow-up study.  

PubMed

We report the five year outcomes of a two-stage approach for infected total hip replacement. This is a single-surgeon experience at a tertiary centre where the more straightforward cases are treated using single-stage exchange. This study highlights the vital role of the multidisciplinary team in managing these cases. A total of 125 patients (51 male, 74 female) with a mean age of 68 years (42 to 78) were reviewed prospectively. Functional status was assessed using the Harris hip score (HHS). The mean HHS improved from 38 (6 to 78.5) pre-operatively to 81.2 (33 to 98) post-operatively. Staphylococcus species were isolated in 85 patients (68%). The rate of control of infection was 96% at five years. In all, 19 patients died during the period of the study. This represented a one year mortality of 0.8% and an overall mortality of 15.2% at five years. No patients were lost to follow-up. We report excellent control of infection in a series of complex patients and infections using a two-stage revision protocol supported by a multidisciplinary approach. The reason for the high rate of mortality in these patients is not known. PMID:25274914

Ibrahim, M S; Raja, S; Khan, M A; Haddad, F S

2014-10-01

105

The Massachusetts General Hospital Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (MGH PERT): creation of a multidisciplinary program to improve care of patients with massive and submassive pulmonary embolism.  

PubMed

New and innovative tools have emerged for the treatment of massive and submassive pulmonary embolism (PE). These novel treatments, when considered alongside existing therapy, such as anticoagulation, systemic intravenous thrombolysis, and open surgical pulmonary embolectomy, have the potential to improve patient outcomes. However, data comparing different treatment modalities are sparse, and guidelines provide only general advice for their use. Treatment decisions rest on clinician expertise and institutional resources. Because various medical and surgical specialties offer different perspectives and expertise, a multidisciplinary approach to patients with massive and submassive PE is required. To address this need, we created a novel multidisciplinary program - the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (PERT) - which brings together multiple specialists to rapidly evaluate intermediate- and high-risk patients with PE, formulate a treatment plan, and mobilize the necessary resources to provide the highest level of care. Development of a clinical, educational, and research infrastructure, as well as the creation of a national PERT consortium, will make our experience available to other institutions and serve as a platform for future studies to improve the care of complex patients with massive and submassive PE. PMID:24566594

Provias, Tim; Dudzinski, David M; Jaff, Michael R; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Channick, Richard; Baker, Joshua; Weinberg, Ido; Donaldson, Cameron; Narayan, Rajeev; Rassi, Andrew N; Kabrhel, Christopher

2014-02-01

106

Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

2010-01-01

107

Multidisciplinary Concurrent Design Optimization via the Internet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A methodology is presented which uses commercial design and analysis software and the Internet to perform concurrent multidisciplinary optimization. The methodology provides a means to develop multidisciplinary designs without requiring that all software be accessible from the same local network. The procedures are amenable to design and development teams whose members, expertise and respective software are not geographically located together. This methodology facilitates multidisciplinary teams working concurrently on a design problem of common interest. Partition of design software to different machines allows each constituent software to be used on the machine that provides the most economy and efficiency. The methodology is demonstrated on the concurrent design of a spacecraft structure and attitude control system. Results are compared to those derived from performing the design with an autonomous FORTRAN program.

Woodard, Stanley E.; Kelkar, Atul G.; Koganti, Gopichand

2001-01-01

108

Reducing patients’ suicide ideation through training mental health teams in the application of the Dutch multidisciplinary practice guideline on assessment and treatment of suicidal behavior: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background To strengthen suicide prevention skills in mental health care in The Netherlands, multidisciplinary teams throughout the country are trained in the application of the new Dutch guideline on the assessment and treatment of suicidal behavior. Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of additional efforts for guideline implementation on professionals’ attitude, knowledge, and skills. However, the effects on patients are equally important, but are rarely measured. The main objective of this study is to examine whether patients of multidisciplinary teams who are trained in guideline application show greater recovery from suicide ideation than patients of untrained teams. Methods/Design This is a multicentre cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which multidisciplinary teams from mental health care institutions are matched in pairs, and randomly allocated to either the experimental or control condition. In the experimental condition, next to the usual dissemination of the guideline (internet, newsletter, books, publications, and congresses), teams will be trained in the application of the guideline via a 1-day small interactive group training program supported by e-learning modules. In the control condition, no additional actions next to usual dissemination of the guideline will be undertaken. Assessments at patient level will start when the experimental teams are trained. Assessments will take place upon admission and after 3 months, or earlier if the patient is discharged. The primary outcome is suicide ideation. Secondary outcomes are non-fatal suicide attempts, level of treatment satisfaction, and societal costs. Both a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis will be performed. The effects of the intervention will be examined in multilevel models. Discussion The strengths of this study are the size of the study, RCT design, training of complete multidisciplinary teams, and the willingness of both management and staff to participate. Trial registration Netherlands trial register: NTR3092 PMID:24195781

2013-01-01

109

Interventional valve surgery: building a team and working together.  

PubMed

Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a new modality that may change the therapeutic landscape in the management of aortic valve stenosis. Despite the excellent results of surgical aortic valve replacement, TAVI has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of elderly and high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. It therefore constitutes a new reality that cardiac surgeons have to acknowledge. As TAVI indications and techniques become better defined, the importance of a team approach to the implementation and performance of TAVI is becoming increasingly evident. The surgeon has a crucial role to play in the introduction, development, and sustainability of TAVI at any institution. In this article, we discuss the procedural technique involved in TAVI, as well as the cardiologist and heart surgeon individualities and team dynamics. We make a case for judicious team-based adoption of TAVI technologies, considering that evidence-based and health economics data are not yet available. We also illustrate how a team approach may lead to improved outcomes, better patient and institutional acceptance, and a better definition of the therapeutic niche of TAVI modalities, amid the excellent results of conventional aortic valve replacement surgery. PMID:21092892

Ruel, Marc; Dickie, Sean; Chow, Benjamin J W; Labinaz, Marino

2010-01-01

110

Cornell Waste Management Institute Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals  

E-print Network

Cornell Waste Management Institute ­ Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals Program Work Team ­ Annual Meeting Summary Cornell Waste Management Institute Date: March 10, 2011 Location's meeting discussed 1) NY State's Solid Waste Management Plan and its focus on management of organics, 2

Wang, Z. Jane

111

Cross-Cultural Study into ICT Student Attitudes and Behaviours Concerning Teams and Project Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a project involving information and communication technology (ICT) students in Australia and Singapore, working together as a virtual global team. The authors investigated the question: Can differences be found in the behaviours and attitudes of our two cohorts to working in teams? This would allow…

Richards, Deborah; Bilgin, Ayse

2012-01-01

112

Virtual Teaming among Pre-service Professionals in School Counseling, Special Education and Social Work Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University preparation programs in school counseling, special education, and social work services remain separate with pre-service collaboration virtually nonexistent. A multidisciplinary electronic discussion forum was implemented to overcome the traditional barriers of space and time to allow students to use the Internet to collaborate in their…

Stone, Carolyn B.; Seabrooks, Janice

2000-01-01

113

34 CFR 303.24 - Multidisciplinary.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Multidisciplinary. Multidisciplinary means the involvement of two or more separate disciplines or professions...The IFSP Team in § 303.340 must include the involvement of the parent and two or more individuals from separate...

2012-07-01

114

34 CFR 303.24 - Multidisciplinary.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Multidisciplinary. Multidisciplinary means the involvement of two or more separate disciplines or professions...The IFSP Team in § 303.340 must include the involvement of the parent and two or more individuals from separate...

2014-07-01

115

34 CFR 303.24 - Multidisciplinary.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Multidisciplinary. Multidisciplinary means the involvement of two or more separate disciplines or professions...The IFSP Team in § 303.340 must include the involvement of the parent and two or more individuals from separate...

2013-07-01

116

APS team works smarter, cuts substation construction costs by 36%  

SciTech Connect

An aggressive, cost-cutting, team of T D employees at Arizona Public Service Co (APS) is building a new distribution substation in Phoenix for less than half the original cost that APS planners had calculated for the project's land, labor and materials. Scheduled for service in June of this year, APS analysts had originally projected land, labor and materials costs for the 20-MVA Bell substation at nearly $1.7-million-not including major equipment such as transformers, circuit breakers, and switches. However, after studying the project, an empowered APS crew was able to slash 36% off the original estimate-more than $610,000. What's more, APS spokesmen say that its new approach to substation construction and design has given its engineers and construction crews a laundry list of additional ideas to try out on future substation ventures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1993-05-01

117

Team work increases fractionation capacity cost-effectively  

SciTech Connect

During the early stages of the Discovery project in 1996, Texaco-Bridgeline Gas Distribution LLC planned on refurbishing an existing mothballed four-column fractionation facility at Paradis, Louisiana. The goal was to process Y-grade feed from a new 600 MMscfd cryogenic gas processing plant at Larose, Louisiana, and from the existing cryogenic facilities at Paradis. The Paradis debottlenecking team (PDT) met its goals by identifying and removing obvious process bottlenecks, minimizing costs and eliminating schedule impact, while increasing the Paradis facility fractionation capacity from 34,000 bpd to 42,000 bpd. The changes were implemented in record time. Following is a fine example of true teamwork and superior achievement of results against all obstacles.

Talib, J.H.; Germinder, B. [Black and Veatch Pritchard, Inc., Overland Park, KS (United States); Hitchcock, M.P. [Texaco-Bridgeline Gas Distribution LLC, New Orleans, LA (United States)

1997-10-01

118

Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior  

PubMed Central

Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

2013-01-01

119

Multidisciplinary Teamworking Indicators of Good Practice. SCRE Spotlights 77.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Classrooms in the United Kingdom are beginning to open up, with teachers working in multidisciplinary teams composed of classroom assistants, nursery nurses, learning support auxiliaries, educational psychologists, community educators, health and social workers, and parent volunteers. This paper identifies published sources of information on…

Wilson, Valerie; Pirrie, Anne

120

A Multidisciplinary Engineering Summer School in an Industrial Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most university-level engineering studies produce technically skilled engineers. However, typically students face several difficulties when working in multidisciplinary teams when they initiate their industrial careers. In a globalised world, it becomes increasingly important that engineers are capable of collaborating across disciplinary…

Larsen, Peter Gorm; Fernandes, Joao M.; Habel, Jacek; Lehrskov, Hanne; Vos, Richard J. C.; Wallington, Oliver; Zidek, Jan

2009-01-01

121

A learning curve-based method to implement multifunctional work teams in the Brazilian footwear sector.  

PubMed

This paper presents a method for implementing multifunctional work teams in a footwear company that followed the Taylor/Ford system for decades. The suggested framework first applies a Learning Curve (LC) modeling to assess whether rotation between tasks of different complexities affects workers' learning rate and performance. Next, the Macroergonomic Work Analysis (MA) method (Guimarães, 1999, 2009) introduces multifunctional principles in work teams towards workers' training and resources improvement. When applied to a pilot line consisting of 100 workers, the intervention-reduced work related accidents in 80%, absenteeism in 45.65%, and eliminated work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), medical consultations, and turnover. Further, the output rate of the multifunctional team increased average 3% compared to the production rate of the regular lines following the Taylor/Ford system (with the same shoe model being manufactured), while the rework and spoilage rates were reduced 85% and 69%, respectively. PMID:21907970

Guimarães, L B de M; Anzanello, M J; Renner, J S

2012-05-01

122

Working With Interdisciplinary Teams Of Boundary Spanners: The Challenges And Potential For Adult Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Innovative research and development for holistic adult on-line health education (eHealth) is increasingly conducted by interdisciplinary teams of boundary spanners in grant-funded academic institutes. Typically, these teams include fields that represent the whole person with an illness in their social and technological context: medicine, nursing, social and counseling psychology, social work, systems engineering, and the communications and information sciences. However,

Meg Wise; Michelle Glowacki-Dudka

123

Review of Multidisciplinary Measures of Cultural Competence for Use in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reviews extant measures of cultural competence from many disciplines and evaluates their suitability for social work education based on 8 criteria: validity, reliability, relevance to social justice, item clarity, definition of diversity, coherence, social desirability, and appropriateness for social work. Nineteen instruments met…

Krentzman, Amy R.; Townsend, Aloen L.

2008-01-01

124

Group attributional training as an effective approach to human resource development under team work systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental programme of group attributional training under team work system was conducted as part of human resource development in Chinese industrial enterprises. One hundred and ten shopfloor employees participated in the study. Among them, 58 employees took part in the factorial-designed experiment to find out the effects of attributions on performance, and 52 employees of ten work groups participated

ZHONG-MING WANG

1994-01-01

125

Team Spirit Makes the Difference: The Interactive Effects of Team Work Engagement and Organizational Constraints during a Military Operation on Psychological Outcomes Afterwards.  

PubMed

This article prospectively explores the effects of collective team work engagement and organizational constraints during military deployment on individual-level psychological outcomes afterwards. Participants were 971 Dutch peacekeepers within 93 teams who were deployed between the end of 2008 and beginning of 2010, for an average of 4?months, in the International Security Assistance Force. Surveys were administered 2?months into deployment and 6?months afterwards. Multi-level regression analyses demonstrated that team work engagement during deployment moderated the relation between organizational constraints and post-deployment fatigue symptoms. Team members reported less fatigue symptoms after deployment if they were part of highly engaged teams during deployment, particularly when concerns about organizational constraints during deployment were high. In contrast, low team work engagement was related to more fatigue symptoms, particularly when concerns about organizational constraints were high. Contrary to expectations, no effects for team work engagement or organizational constraints were found for post-traumatic growth. The present study highlights that investing in team work engagement is important for those working in highly demanding jobs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25476963

Boermans, S M; Kamphuis, W; Delahaij, R; van den Berg, C; Euwema, M C

2014-12-01

126

Building Multidisciplinary Training Networks for Rural Development. Report of the Regional Workshop for Pre-service Training of Members of Multidisciplinary Educational Teams in Rural Areas (Pune, India, July 16-20, 1985).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Papers designed to help build multidisciplinary training networks for rural development are collected in this document, an outgrowth of a regional training workshop attended by participants from Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Thailand, and India. The six papers deal with the objectives of the workshop which were to:…

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

127

Realisation of Strategic Leadership in Leadership Teams' Work as Experienced by the Leadership Team Members of Basic Education Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces a quantitative research into how the leadership team members of 49 basic education schools in the city of Vantaa, Finland, experienced the realisation of strategic leadership in their leadership teams' work. The data were collected by a survey of 24 statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, and analysed with the…

Lahtero, Tapio Juhani; Kuusilehto-Awale, Lea

2013-01-01

128

An Evidence-Based Multidisciplinary Practice Guideline to Reduce the Workload due to Lifting for Preventing Work-Related Low Back Pain  

PubMed Central

We developed an evidence-based practice guideline to support occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals in assessing the risk due to lifting and in selecting effective preventive measures for low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. The guideline was developed at the request of the Dutch government by a project team of experts and OSH professionals in lifting and work-related LBP. The recommendations for risk assessment were based on the quality of instruments to assess the risk on LBP due to lifting. Recommendations for interventions were based on a systematic review of the effects of worker- and work directed interventions to reduce back load due to lifting. The quality of the evidence was rated as strong (A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on consensus (D). Finally, eight experts and twenty-four OSH professionals commented on and evaluated the content and the feasibility of the preliminary guideline. For risk assessment we recommend loads heavier than 25 kg always to be considered a risk for LBP while loads less than 3 kg do not pose a risk. For loads between 3–25 kg, risk assessment shall be performed using the Manual handling Assessment Charts (MAC)-Tool or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) lifting equation. Effective work oriented interventions are patient lifting devices (Level A) and lifting devices for goods (Level C), optimizing working height (Level A) and reducing load mass (Level C). Ineffective work oriented preventive measures are regulations to ban lifting without proper alternatives (Level D). We do not recommend worker-oriented interventions but consider personal lift assist devices as promising (Level C). Ineffective worker-oriented preventive measures are training in lifting technique (Level A), use of back-belts (Level A) and pre-employment medical examinations (Level A). This multidisciplinary evidence-based practice guideline gives clear criteria whether an employee is at risk for LBP while lifting and provides an easy-reference for (in)effective risk reduction measures based on scientific evidence, experience, and consensus among OSH experts and practitioners. PMID:24999432

2014-01-01

129

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under  

E-print Network

BREAST CANCER PROGRAM A team of breast cancer experts from multiple specialties work together under advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, breast cancer in the elderly and patients at high risk for breast cancer · A Weekly Breast Tumor Board where patient care is discussed and coordinated Provide surgical

Arizona, University of

130

Education and Outreach Work Team Recommendation to the University Sustainability Goals and Outcomes Committee  

E-print Network

Education and Outreach Work Team Recommendation to the University Sustainability Goals and Outcomes in sustainability reflects a shared realization that we need to better understand and influence how actions in one system domain affect outcomes in another domain (Figure 1). Decisions by present and future generations

Minnesota, University of

131

The influence of interpersonal flexibility on work team conflict over time  

E-print Network

for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2004 Major Subject: Counseling Psychology THE INFLUENCE OF INTERPERSONAL FLEXIBILITY ON WORK TEAM CONFLICT OVER TIME A Dissertation by FRANK GODARD BAUGH...) _________________________ Victor Willson (Head of Department) August 2004 Major Subject: Counseling Psychology iii ABSTRACT The Influence...

Baugh, Frank Godard

2004-11-15

132

[The nursing team and Maslow: (dis)satisfaction in the work].  

PubMed

This text tries to understand the Nursing team and their (dis)satisfactions in the work. We consider the association with the theory of basic human needs of Abraham Maslow as a way to systemize and to comprehend the recurrent situations and the day-by-day Nursing issues. The necessities are structuralized hierarchically in physiological, security, social, auto-esteem and auto-accomplishment indicating the degree of satisfaction (from the disease to the fullness) of an individual or group. The advantage of this approach consists of being able to use the solid, depth and rich Maslow theory in concrete and particular situations of the Nursing team. PMID:17340737

Vitória Regis, Lorena Fagundes Ladeia; Porto, Isaura Setenta

2006-01-01

133

Attitudes toward working on interdisciplinary healthcare teams: a comparison by discipline.  

PubMed

Interdisciplinary teams are important in providing care for older patients, but interdisciplinary teamwork is rarely a teaching focus, and little is known about trainees' attitudes towards it. To determine the attitudes of second-year post-graduate (PGY-2) internal medicine or family practice residents, advanced practice nursing (NP), and masters-level social work (MSW) students toward the value and efficiency of interdisciplinary teamwork and the physician's role on the team, a baseline survey was administered to 591 Geriatrics Interdisciplinary Team Training participants at eight U.S. academic medical centers from January 1997 to July 1999. Most students in each profession agreed that the interdisciplinary team approach benefits patients and is a productive use of time, but PGY-2s consistently rated their agreement lower than NP or MSW students. Interprofessional differences were greatest for beliefs about the physician's role; 73% of PGY-2s but only 44% to 47% of MSW and NP trainees agreed that a team's primary purpose was to assist physicians in achieving treatment goals for patients. Approximately 80% of PGY-2s but only 35% to 40% of MSW or NP trainees agreed that physicians have the right to alter patient care plans developed by the team. Although students from all three disciplines were positively inclined toward medical interdisciplinary teamwork, medical residents were the least so. Exposure to interdisciplinary teamwork may need to occur at an earlier point in medical training than residency. The question of who is ultimately responsible for the decisions of the team may be an "Achilles heel," interfering with shared decision-making. PMID:12110079

Leipzig, Rosanne M; Hyer, Kathryn; Ek, Kirsten; Wallenstein, Sylvan; Vezina, Maria L; Fairchild, Susan; Cassel, Christine K; Howe, Judith L

2002-06-01

134

Prerequisites for sustainable care improvement using the reflective team as a work model  

PubMed Central

Several work models for care improvement have been developed in order to meet the requirement for evidence-based care. This study examines a work model for reflection, entitled the reflective team (RT). The main idea behind RTs is that caring skills exist among those who work closest to the patients. The team leader (RTL) encourages sustainable care improvement, rooted in research and proven experience, by using a lifeworld perspective to stimulate further reflection and a developmental process leading to research-based caring actions within the team. In order to maintain focus, it is important that the RTL has a clear idea of what sustainable care improvement means, and what the prerequisites are for such improvement. The aim of the present study is, therefore, to explore the prerequisites for improving sustainable care, seeking to answer how RTLs perceive these and use RTs for concrete planning. Nine RTLs were interviewed, and their statements were phenomenographically analysed. The analysis revealed three separate qualitative categories, which describe personal, interpersonal, and structural aspects of the prerequisites. In the discussion, these categories are compared with previous research on reflection, and the conclusion is reached that the optimal conditions for RTs to work, when focussed on sustainable care improvement, occur when the various aspects of the prerequisites are intertwined and become a natural part of the reflective work. PMID:25361530

Jonasson, Lise-Lotte; Carlsson, Gunilla; Nyström, Maria

2014-01-01

135

Prerequisites for sustainable care improvement using the reflective team as a work model.  

PubMed

Several work models for care improvement have been developed in order to meet the requirement for evidence-based care. This study examines a work model for reflection, entitled the reflective team (RT). The main idea behind RTs is that caring skills exist among those who work closest to the patients. The team leader (RTL) encourages sustainable care improvement, rooted in research and proven experience, by using a lifeworld perspective to stimulate further reflection and a developmental process leading to research-based caring actions within the team. In order to maintain focus, it is important that the RTL has a clear idea of what sustainable care improvement means, and what the prerequisites are for such improvement. The aim of the present study is, therefore, to explore the prerequisites for improving sustainable care, seeking to answer how RTLs perceive these and use RTs for concrete planning. Nine RTLs were interviewed, and their statements were phenomenographically analysed. The analysis revealed three separate qualitative categories, which describe personal, interpersonal, and structural aspects of the prerequisites. In the discussion, these categories are compared with previous research on reflection, and the conclusion is reached that the optimal conditions for RTs to work, when focussed on sustainable care improvement, occur when the various aspects of the prerequisites are intertwined and become a natural part of the reflective work. PMID:25361530

Jonasson, Lise-Lotte; Carlsson, Gunilla; Nyström, Maria

2014-01-01

136

Culturally Diverse Teams that Work Kenji Klein, University of California, Irvine  

E-print Network

of the economy combined with increasing reliance on teams in the workplace has led to a dramatic increase communication that undermine team performance. Yet, diverse teams can also be a great benefit because team homogenous team because such teams benefit from higher cohesion, more rapid communication, and quicker, less

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

137

Novel technique for tracking manpower and work packages: a useful tool for the team and management  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In these times of austerity it is becoming more and more important to justify the need for manpower to management. Additionally, with the fast pace of today's projects the need for tools that facilitate teams to not only plan, but also track their work, are essential. The practice of planning work packages and the associated manpower has been about for a while but little is done to really cross-check that planning against reality. In this paper these elements are brought together through a number of tools that make up the end to end process of planning, tracking and reporting of work package progress and manpower usage.

Gill, R.; Gracia, G.; Lupton, R. H.; O'Mullane, W.

2014-08-01

138

The evaluation of team lifting on physical work demands and workload in ironworkers.  

PubMed

Lifting and carrying heavy loads occur frequently among ironworkers and result in high prevalence and incidence rates of low back complaints, injuries and work-disability. From a health perspective, little information is available on the effect of team lifting on work demands and workload. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the effects of team lifting of maximally 50 kg by two ironworkers (T50) with team lifting of maximally 100 kg by four ironworkers (T100). This study combined a field and laboratory study with the following outcome measures: duration and frequency of tasks and activities, energetic workload, perceived discomfort and maximal compression forces (Fc peak) on the low back. The physical work demands and workload of an individual iron worker during manual handling of rebar materials of 100 kg with four workers did not differ from the manual handling of rebar materials of 50 kg with two workers, with the exception of low back discomfort and Fc peak. The biomechanical workload of the low back exceeded for both T50 and T100 the NIOSH threshold limit of 3400N. Therefore, mechanical transport or other effective design solutions should be considered to reduce the biomechanical workload of the low back and the accompanying health risks among iron workers. PMID:22317295

van der Molen, Henk F; Visser, Steven; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Faber, Gert; Hoozemans, Marco J M; van Dieën, Jaap H; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

2012-01-01

139

Multidisciplinary work on barium contamination of the karstic upper Kupa River drainage basin (Croatia and Slovenia); calling for watershed management.  

PubMed

The present work was designed as an extension of a previous study of a barium anomaly observed in stream sediments of the Kupa River. In its upper part the Kupa River drains a region underlain by a trans-boundary aquifer. The river is a significant water resource in a region of tourism, sport, and fishing in both Croatia and Slovenia. The contamination source is situated in Homer (Lokve), Croatia, where barite was mined until 10 years ago. The barium processing waste material (<3-mm fraction) was carelessly deposited in gardens, forests, and into a sinkhole, which has an underground link with the Kupica River, a tributary of the Kupa River. Barium waste and stream sediments were analyzed using comparative techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and grain size analysis. XRD of the waste material identified the major minerals quartz, barite, and dolomite and the Fe-containing minor minerals muscovite and goethite. Barite was identified as a minor or trace mineral in the Kupica River sediments. XRF analysis of the waste material has shown Ba and Fe to be the predominant elements, Ca and K to be minor elements, and Mn, Zn, Sr, Pb, Co, Cu, As, Zr, Rb, Y, and Mo to be trace elements. Mössbauer spectroscopy performed at room temperature (RT) was used to study iron minerals, particularly to obtain information on the valence status of Fe ions. Grain size analysis of the waste material (<63-microm fraction) has shown that it contains 23.5% clay-size material in comparison with 7-8% clay-size material in stream sediments. It is our aim to combine geochemical and medical methods to investigate the possible impact of waste disposal on human health in Lokve. At this stage of the work, concentrations of Ba and other toxic elements in the water compartment of the Kupica River (a source of drinking water) have not been monitored by Croatian Waters (name of the Croatian water authorities). The necessity of such measurements in future studies has been highlighted. A preliminary study of diseases diagnosed in Lokve shows that about 18% of the total inhabitants have serious medical problems. Diseases of the circulatory system, endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic diseases, neoplasms, and respiratory diseases predominate. This paper calls for further multidisciplinary research on the health effects of barium and trace elements, as well as for bioremediation of contaminated gardens and for watershed management of vulnerable karstic aquifers. PMID:17203367

Franciskovi?-Bilinski, S; Bilinski, H; Grbac, R; Zuni?, J; Necemer, M; Hanzel, D

2007-02-01

140

Good practice guidelines for clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant teams.  

PubMed

There are relatively few clinical psychologists working in paediatric cochlear implant centres in the UK and in this respect we lag behind other countries such as the USA and The Netherlands. In an effort to promote the added value our profession can offer teams, the clinical psychologists working in paediatric CI centres have put together good practice guidelines. This article outlines the rationale for putting together the guidelines, highlights the unique contribution clinical psychologists can offer, outlines the evidence base for psychological input in this clinical population, and offers a fictional case study for illustration. PMID:24533761

Bathgate, Fionna; Bennett, Emily; Cropper, Jenny; Edwards, Lindsey; Emond, Alice; Gamble, Caroline; Kentish, Rosie; Samuel, Victoria

2013-11-01

141

Understanding the Work of Pediatric Inpatient Medicine Teams: Implications for Information System Requirements  

PubMed Central

Health information systems tend to be designed primarily for data retrieval and data entry, with insufficient attention paid to the larger contexts in which work occurs. As a result, low physician acceptance and satisfaction remain barriers to the successful integration of current informational and decision support systems (e.g., CPOE systems). This paper reports on a qualitative field study of team-based clinical care work and decision making. Our aim is to consider a radical redesign of clinical information systems, one that is built with context and the constraints of work practice in mind. We apply Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) methods to characterize the work at a large children’s hospital, and analyze these results to consider new designs for clinical information systems. In this study, we report on themes, constraints, and ideas for design, showing how our CWA analyses lead to designs that are very different from current technology information systems. PMID:22195099

Lin, Ching-Ping; Gennari, John H.

2011-01-01

142

Understanding the work of pediatric inpatient medicine teams: implications for information system requirements.  

PubMed

Health information systems tend to be designed primarily for data retrieval and data entry, with insufficient attention paid to the larger contexts in which work occurs. As a result, low physician acceptance and satisfaction remain barriers to the successful integration of current informational and decision support systems (e.g., CPOE systems). This paper reports on a qualitative field study of team-based clinical care work and decision making. Our aim is to consider a radical redesign of clinical information systems, one that is built with context and the constraints of work practice in mind. We apply Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) methods to characterize the work at a large children's hospital, and analyze these results to consider new designs for clinical information systems. In this study, we report on themes, constraints, and ideas for design, showing how our CWA analyses lead to designs that are very different from current technology information systems. PMID:22195099

Lin, Ching-Ping; Gennari, John H

2011-01-01

143

Effectiveness of a multidisciplinary care program on recovery and return to work of patients after gynaecological surgery; design of a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Return to work after gynaecological surgery takes much longer than expected, irrespective of the level of invasiveness. In order to empower patients in recovery and return to work, a multidisciplinary care program consisting of an e-health intervention and integrated care management including participatory workplace intervention was developed. Methods/Design We designed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of the multidisciplinary care program on full sustainable return to work in patients after gynaecological surgery, compared to usual clinical care. Two hundred twelve women (18-65 years old) undergoing hysterectomy and/or laparoscopic adnexal surgery on benign indication in one of the 7 participating (university) hospitals in the Netherlands are expected to take part in this study at baseline. The primary outcome measure is sick leave duration until full sustainable return to work and is measured by a monthly calendar of sickness absence during 26 weeks after surgery. Secondary outcome measures are the effect of the care program on general recovery, quality of life, pain intensity and complications, and are assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 2, 6, 12 and 26 weeks after surgery. Discussion The discrepancy between expected physical recovery and actual return to work after gynaecological surgery contributes to the relevance of this study. There is strong evidence that long periods of sick leave can result in work disability, poorer general health and increased risk of mental health problems. We expect that this multidisciplinary care program will improve peri-operative care, contribute to a faster return to work of patients after gynaecological surgery and, as a consequence, will reduce societal costs considerably. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2087 PMID:22296950

2012-01-01

144

Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory Across Generations. An emerging Multidisciplinary Work Area and an NEA Project - 12218  

SciTech Connect

Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference means for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, i.e. not dependent on human presence and intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. There is however no intention to forgo, at any time, knowledge and awareness either of the repository or of the waste that it contains. The preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) is seen as an integral part of radioactive waste management, supporting lengthy and complex socio-technical processes across pre-operational, operational and post-operational lifetimes. Long-term preservation of RK and M is an emerging multidisciplinary work area in which much learning is expected over the coming years. Novel methods are being sought that are least vulnerable to both natural degradation and to changes in socio-economic conditions. Progress has been made in individual countries, but there is a need to internationalise the thinking, compare approaches, investigate potential solutions and share decisions. This is the task of the NEA RK and M project. A major outcome of the project will be a 'menu-driven document' that will allow people to identify the main elements of a strategic action plan for RK and M preservation. In sum, the preservation of RK and M is a unprecedented task in which technical, scientific and social information is interwoven and needs to be developed and preserved across generations and across specialist boundaries. Important studies have been undertaken in the past decades to explore a variety of approaches to preserving RK and M across different timescales, including archives and markers. The work of the past in this area is useful, but innovative thinking is also needed. Seen from today's perspective, very little work is available on for example the contextualization of data for later use; on the systematic identification of mechanisms for RK and M transfer; on implementing a culture of RK and M-keeping in organisations; and on creating cultural links between the waste disposals and the siting communities. Moreover, international cooperation is recognised as being crucial in providing shared means and meanings for memory transmission over longer timescales. International cooperation has also been identified as a catalyst to ensure that a wide range of approaches and experiences is considered, thus potentially reducing uncertainty related to variations in approach. Overall, multiple approaches, requiring active and less active care, need to be considered from the start of the radioactive waste management programme and refined in the course of time. The RK and M project members want to further investigate and deliver support to fulfil this task. (authors)

Schroeder, Jantine [Belgian Nuclear Research Institute SCK.CEN, Mol (Belgium); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD NEA, Paris (France)

2012-07-01

145

Pediatric pain management: the multidisciplinary approach  

PubMed Central

Chronic pain in children and adolescents is a growing problem and one that is increasingly being addressed with multidisciplinary treatment teams. This review summarizes different multidisciplinary clinics, focusing specifically on intensive pediatric pain rehabilitation centers. This review offers a summary of the challenges faced by these programs and areas for future study. PMID:24250232

Odell, Shannon; Logan, Deirdre E

2013-01-01

146

Group attributional training as an effective approach to human resource development under team work systems.  

PubMed

An experimental programme of group attributional training under team work system was conducted as part of human resource development in Chinese industrial enterprises. One hundred and ten shopfloor employees participated in the study. Among them, 58 employees took part in the factorial-designed experiment to find out the effects of attributions on performance, and 52 employees of ten work groups participated in the group attributional training programme twice a week for two months. The results showed that the group attributional training was effective in modifying employees' attributional patterns and enhancing group performance and satisfaction. On the basis of the results, an attributional model of work motivation is proposed, and its theoretical and practical implications for human resource management discussed. PMID:8050402

Wang, Z M

1994-07-01

147

Simulation of a Forensic Chemistry Problem: A Multidisciplinary Project for Secondary School Chemistry Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a project that uses a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving in analyzing a crime scene and suspect evidence. Requires each student to work effectively in a team, communicate in both written and oral forms, perform hands-on laboratory manipulations, and realize that the entire class was depending on their individual contributions…

Long, G. A.

1995-01-01

148

A multidisciplinary approach to providing care to adolescents with spinal cord trauma resulting from all-terrain vehicle accidents.  

PubMed

All-terrain vehicle accidents that affect the spine can lead to complex injuries in adolescents. This requires that many subspecialties work together on a multidisciplinary team to improve patient outcomes. Our case presentation will examine the multidisciplinary approach to care required for an 11-year-old adolescent involved in an all-terrain vehicle accident that resulted in traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:25584450

Rhodes, Leslie N; Weatherford, Blakely; Locke, Lindsey N; Chung, Hoi Sing; Tidwell, Chrisla; Paton, Elizabeth; Lee, Shirleatha

2015-01-01

149

Designing Multidisciplinary Integrated Curriculum Units  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term "integrated curriculum" has many different, sometimes conflicting, meanings to educators. In this manual, integrated curriculum refers to the materials and pedagogical strategies used by "multidisciplinary" teams of teachers to organize their instruction so that students are encouraged to make meaningful connections across subject areas.…

Clayton, Marla; Hagan, Jill; Ho, Pier Sun; Hudis, Paula M.

2010-01-01

150

Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting  

PubMed Central

Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that ‘core’ competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health ‘programme’ or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified. PMID:24427175

2013-01-01

151

Multidisciplinary optimization  

SciTech Connect

This talk will use aeroelastic design and reservoir characterization as examples to introduce some approaches to MDO, or Multidisciplinary Optimization. This problem arises especially in engineering design, where it is considered of paramount importance in today`s competitive global business climate. It is interesting to an optimizer because the constraints involve coupled dissimilar systems of parameterized partial differential equations each arising from a different discipline, like structural analysis, computational fluid dynamics, etc. Usually, these constraints are accessible only through pde solvers rather than through algebraic residual calculations as we are used to having. Thus, just finding a multidisciplinary feasible point is a daunting task. Many such problems have discrete variable disciplines, multiple objectives, and other challenging features. After discussing some interesting practical features of the design problem, we will give some standard ways to formulate the problem as well as some novel ways that lend themselves to divide-and-conquer parallelism.

Dennis, J.; Lewis, R.M.; Cramer, E.J.; Frank, P.M.; Shubin, G.R.

1994-12-31

152

Culturally Diverse Teams that Work Kenji Klein, PhD Candidate, University of California, Irvine  

E-print Network

Globalization of the economy and increasing reliance on teams in the workplace has led to a dramatic increase of cooperation and poor communication that undermine team performance. Yet, diverse teams can also be a great, more rapid communication, and quicker, less problematic implementation. Conversely, when dealing

Loudon, Catherine

153

Using multi-disciplinary strategic master facilities planning for organizations experiencing programmatic re-direction  

SciTech Connect

Facility master planning is critical to the future productivity of a laboratory and the quality of worklife for the laboratory staff. For organizations undergoing programmatic re-direction, a master facility planning approach linked to the organization`s strategic planning process is even more important. Major changes in an organization such as programmatic re-direction can significantly impact a broad range of variables which exceed the expertise of traditional planning teams, e.g., capacity variability, work team organization, organizational culture, and work process simplification. By expanding the diversity of the participants of the planning team, there is a greater likelihood that a research organization`s scientific, organizational, economic, and employees` needs can be meshed in the strategic plan and facility plan. Recent recommendations from facility planners suggest drawing from diverse fields in building multi-disciplinary planning teams: Architecture, engineering, natural science, social psychology, and strategic planning (Gibson,1993). For organizations undergoing significant operational or culture change, the master facility planning team should also include members with expertise in organizational effectiveness, industrial engineering, human resources, and environmental psychology. A recent planning and design project provides an example which illustrates the use of an expanded multi-disciplinary team engaged in planning laboratory renovations for a research organization undergoing programmatic re-direction. The purpose of the proposed poster session is to present a multi-disciplinary master facility planning process linked to an organization`s strategic planning process or organizational strategies.

Heubach, J.G.; Weimer, W.C.; Bruce, W.A.

1993-12-01

154

The Environmental Science and Policy Program (ESPP) and MSU AgBioResearch are pleased to announce the Interdisciplinary Team Building Initiative (ITBI), a funding mechanism designed to promote  

E-print Network

defined interdisciplinary environmental scholarship and to compete for external grants. Objectives the Interdisciplinary Team Building Initiative (ITBI), a funding mechanism designed to promote collaboration among, developing an interdisciplinary curriculum, or working on major multidisciplinary publications. Workgroup

155

Communication, and Team-Working Skills in Second-Year Undergraduate Chemistry Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since 2002, a multidisciplinary program has been used to encourage science students to build on their chemical knowledge and to appreciate how it applies to the world around them. The program is interactive and instills a new set of core learning skills that are often underrepresented in undergraduate curricula, namely, cooperative learning,…

Mc Goldrick, Niamh B.; Marzec, Bartosz; Scully, P. Noelle; Draper, Sylvia M.

2013-01-01

156

Preparing engineering students for working in teams through senior design projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores teaming and its cultivation in senior capstone design projects to better prepare students for occupational interaction with other professionals, clients, and management to solve complex or open-ended problems. Teaming is deemed an important skill for engineers, by organizations employing engineers and other professionals. In the global marketplace organizations that value and capitalize on these skills can be

Hodge Jenkins; Laura W. Lackey

2005-01-01

157

Understanding How PBL Teams Work: Re-Thinking the Dimensions of Teamwork.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the results of a 5-month study of 4, self-selected Problem-Based Learning (PBL) teams taking a leadership capacity-building course in the Educational Leadership Program in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA. Twenty-six students in the course were divided into five teams of five to eight members…

Rose, Linda P.

158

Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.  

PubMed

Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n?=?357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. PMID:22962847

Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

2013-10-01

159

Multi-volume reference work with authoritative, multi-disciplinary, and comprehensive coverage of the soil sciences.  

E-print Network

of the soil sciences. Encyclopedia of Soils in the Environment on ScienceDirect: Authoritative, Extensive/7 access. Benefits of Online Access 2004 Elsevier Reference Works on ScienceDirect Encyclopedia of Soils, Integrated R www.sciencedirect.com Reference Works on ScienceDirect: Authoritative, Extensive, Integrated

Sparks, Donald L.

160

Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

2013-01-01

161

Abstract--Multimedia groupware systems provide rich support for distributed team work. Yet effective design of these  

E-print Network

Abstract--Multimedia groupware systems provide rich support for distributed team work. Yet evolve design ideas. The problem is that multimedia groupware is hard to prototype because distributed designed to ease prototyping of multimedia groupware. The Collabrary blends real-time streaming multimedia

Greenberg, Saul

162

Abstract--Multimedia groupware systems provide rich support for distributed team work. Yet effective design of these systems is  

E-print Network

1 Abstract--Multimedia groupware systems provide rich support for distributed team work. Yet evolve design ideas. The problem is that multimedia groupware is hard to prototype because distributed specifically designed for easy prototyping of multimedia groupware. The Collabrary blends real-time streaming

Greenberg, Saul

163

Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach.  

PubMed

Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover,halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear-nose-throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear-nose-throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo.Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins. PMID:22722640

Bollen, Curd M L; Beikler, Thomas

2012-06-01

164

Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach  

PubMed Central

Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover, halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear–nose–throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear–nose–throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo. Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins. PMID:22722640

Bollen, Curd ML; Beikler, Thomas

2012-01-01

165

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Understanding Developmental Dyslexia Within Working-Memory Architecture: Genotypes, Phenotypes, Brain, and Instruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

A unifying theoretical framework of three working memory components provides a systems perspective for discussing past and new findings in a 12-year research program that point to heterogeneity in the genetic and brain basis and behavioral expression of dyslexia: (a) codes for word-form storage and processing, (b) time-sensitive phonological and orthographic loops for maintaining information in working memory or outputting

Virginia W. Berninger; Wendy Raskind; Todd Richards; Robert Abbott; Pat Stock

2008-01-01

166

How physician/administrator teams work in small groups. Six steps to make it happen.  

PubMed

The physician/administrator team is frequently supported as the preferred model for physician group governance. Perhaps an obvious model for large groups, it remains true that the largest percentage of physicians are practicing in groups of 10 or fewer. This article explores the applicability of the physician/administrator team concept for small group practices. The article covers the significance of the physician/administrator team in managed care settings, difference in governance structures between large and small groups, the need for physicians to be willing to share leadership in organizations they own, understanding empowerment in small groups, the manager's need to assume more responsibility and how to form the team. PMID:10539338

Stearns, T H

1999-01-01

167

Work In Progress: Use of Interdisciplinary Teams in Game Development Classes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of computer games is labor-intensive. Modern game development requires the effort of a team of skilled professionals to integrate multimedia content with complex software. Producing high-quality software game products requires large teams to rely on high levels of communication, organization, and planning to avoid costly delays and failures. The author created a two-semester sequence of courses focusing on

Bruce R. Maxim

2006-01-01

168

A multidisciplinary approach to understanding developmental dyslexia within working-memory architecture: genotypes, phenotypes, brain, and instruction.  

PubMed

A unifying theoretical framework of three working memory components provides a systems perspective for discussing past and new findings in a 12-year research program that point to heterogeneity in the genetic and brain basis and behavioral expression of dyslexia: (a) codes for word-form storage and processing, (b) time-sensitive phonological and orthographic loops for maintaining information in working memory or outputting it, and (c) executive functions for language (e.g., rapid automatic switching of attention). Results, which span the genetic to neurological to behavioral levels of analysis, point to possible impairment in any one or combination of these working memory components in individuals with dyslexia. A DNA variation on chromosome 15 may be linked with the phonological word-form in the first working-memory component. A DNA variation on chromosome 6 may be linked with slow rapid automatic switching, inattention ratings, and impaired goal-directed activity ratings in the third working-memory component. Brain and behavioral findings support (a) Triple Word Form Theory: phonological, orthographic, and morphological word-forms and their parts contribute to learning to read and spell words; and (b) Cross-Word Form Mapping: in the process of learning to read and spell words children compute the inter-relationships among the three word-forms and their parts. However, children with dyslexia may require more focus on the morphological word-form and its parts and their relationships with the other two word-forms and their parts than do normal readers. Also, children with dyslexia have unusual difficulties in sustaining phonological loop function in working memory over time; their impaired orthographic loop function may interfere with learning to write alphabet letters and spell, which may be as impaired as word decoding and reading. Impaired executive functions may interfere with the efficiency of working memory in processing oral and written language. PMID:19005912

Berninger, Virginia W; Raskind, Wendy; Richards, Todd; Abbott, Robert; Stock, Pat

2008-01-01

169

The relationship of the emotional climate of work and threat to patient outcome in a high-volume thoracic surgery operating room team  

Microsoft Academic Search

ContextIt is widely believed that the emotional climate of surgical team's work may affect patient outcome.ObjectiveTo analyse the relationship between the emotional climate of work and indices of threat to patient outcome.DesignInterventional study.SettingOperating rooms in a high-volume thoracic surgery centre from September 2007 to June 2008.ParticipantsThoracic surgery operating room teams.InterventionTwo 90 min team-skills training sessions focused on findings from a

Michael Nurok; Linda A Evans; Stuart Lipsitz; Paul Satwicz; Andrea Kelly; Allan Frankel

2011-01-01

170

Effects of intensified work-related multidisciplinary rehabilitation on occupational participation: a randomized-controlled trial in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders.  

PubMed

This study examined the effects of work-related multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MR) on occupational participation in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders. A randomized-controlled trial was carried out. The sample included patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders and severe restrictions of work ability (n=222). Participants in the intervention group received a work-related rehabilitation programme following a comprehensive functional capacity evaluation (FCE MR). Controls completed a conventional MR. The analysis was based on 1-year follow-up data. The primary outcome was stable occupational participation (SOP), defined as employment with at most 6 months of sick leave after rehabilitation. The secondary outcomes were the duration of sick leave, employment status and the Pain Disability Index. We included 102 patients in our analysis (intervention: n=55, control: n=47). Despite randomization there were group differences. Adjusting these differences, patients of the FCE MR had 3.5 times higher odds of SOP [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-9.8, P=0.018]. However, there was neither a significant difference in the duration of sick leave between both groups (b=-8.0 weeks, 95% CI: -17.4 to 1.4, P=0.095) nor higher odds of employment in favour of the FCE MR after 1 year (odds ratio=2.3, 95% CI: 0.9-5.8, P=0.088). Participants in the FCE MR reported less pain-related disabilities (b=-6.5, 95% CI: -12.6 to -0.4, P=0.038). The study had a limitation in terms of group balance. However, the findings indicate that the work-related FCE MR was more effective for SOP, but did not significantly affect employment rate and sick leave duration. PMID:24056065

Streibelt, Marco; Bethge, Matthias

2014-03-01

171

Tales from the Frontline: The Experiences of Early Childhood Practitioners Working with an "Embedded" Research Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In late 2006, SDN Children's Services, an Australian not-for-profit provider of services for children, families and communities, engaged a research team that was "embedded" within the organisation for 1 year. This action represented a significant investment of resources, such as staff time and organisational funds, and demonstrates SDN's strong…

Wong, Sandie

2009-01-01

172

Evaluating Team Project-Work Using Triangulation: Lessons from Communities in Northern Ghana  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper uses triangulation to assess key aspects of a team-based, participatory action research programme for undergraduates in rural communities across northern Ghana. The perceptions of the programme and its effects on the students, staff and host communities are compared, showing areas of agreement and disagreement. The successes of the…

Clark, Gordon; Jasaw, Godfred Seidu

2014-01-01

173

Working in Teams: A Cross-Cultural Experience Using the Internet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a project to link business students at Towson University (Maryland) and Sofia University (Bulgaria) through the Internet, in which student teams developed a feasibility study concerning starting a business in Bulgaria. Reports on successes and pitfalls (including politics and lack of appropriate incentives within the Bulgarian system),…

Kopka, Donald; Laurence, Louise; Madjar, Nora

1999-01-01

174

Search Results - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

A Template for Integrating Interdisciplinary Research and Team Science into the Tenure Track Offer Letter Although every recruitment is unique, emphasis on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary science is becoming quite common.

175

American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: implications for social work.  

PubMed

When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to produce the "Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases" to promote the exceptional competence and diligence required when the consequence is life or death. This article summarizes the "Supplementary Guidelines," with implications for social work practice--that is, professional responsibility, competence, interviewing skill, knowledge of behavioral and mental impairment, records review, life history compilation, data interpretation, witness support, law-related knowledge, and testimony. The social work, which is scrutinized in a court of law, requires cultural competence, diverse oral and written communication skills, diligence, and the highest ethical standards. PMID:23038877

Andrews, Arlene Bowers

2012-04-01

176

Information Sharing Tools and Behavior in Collaborative Human-Centered Design Teams.  

E-print Network

??Developing innovative products and services benefits from collaboration within multidisciplinary design teams. Design teams gather and generate large quantities of data, including user research, information… (more)

Oehlberg, Lora Ann

2012-01-01

177

Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis for Commercial Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multidisciplinary design and analysis (MDA) has become the normal mode of operation within most aerospace companies, but the impact of these changes have largely not been reflected at many universities. On an effort to determine if the emergence of multidisciplinary design concepts should influence engineering curricula, NASA has asked several universities (Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech, Clemson, BYU, and Cal Poly) to investigate the practicality of introducing MDA concepts within their undergraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team of faculty, students, and industry partners evaluated the aeronautical engineering curriculum at Cal Poly. A variety of ways were found to introduce MDA themes into the curriculum without adding courses or units to the existing program. Both analytic and educational tools for multidisciplinary design of aircraft have been developed and implemented.

Cummings, Russell M.; Freeman, H. JoAnne

1999-01-01

178

Interdisciplinary hospice team processes and multidimensional pain: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Hospice teams may address multidimensional pain through the synergistic interaction of team members from various professional disciplines during regularly scheduled team meetings. However, the occurrence of that critical exchange has not been adequately described or documented. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore two processes in team pain palliation: communication and collaboration. Data were gathered through individual interviews and a 1-year observation of team members from two hospices (physicians, nurses, aides, chaplains, social workers). Utilizing constant comparison, 14 final thematic categories were discovered. Use of biopsychosocial/spiritual terms by all team members meant that the team had the common language needed to communicate about multidimensional pain. Interviews and observation revealed a gap in translating multidisciplinary communication in team meetings into collaborative acts for pain treatment. In addition, structural influences inhibited creativity in pain palliation. There was no mutual understanding of the purpose for team meetings, no recognition of the need to reflect on team process, or common definition of leadership. Social work roles in hospice should include leadership that moves teams toward interdisciplinary care for multidimensional pain. PMID:22424384

Dugan Day, Michele

2012-01-01

179

A Cognitive Work Analysis of Physician Ordering in Pediatric Inpatient Medicine Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical work, including ordering, is known to be interruptive, multitasking, collaborative and distributed yet current clinical computer systems emphasize linear, normative and solitary work. Although the evidence of a work-technology disconnect is well documented by researchers, there is less understanding of the origins of this disconnect.…

Lin, Ching-Ping

2010-01-01

180

[Interdisciplinary team work in the treatment of cystic fibrosis: a model of psychosomatic cooperation].  

PubMed

The "team-approach" in the care of chronically ill children is one way of interdisciplinary cooperation. The care of CF-patients requires the coordination of all treatment-measures and the integration of psychosocial counselling and management into medical treatment. Not only emotionally straining situations--"telling" the diagnosis, non-compliance, care of terminally ill patients--have to be managed, but both, illness and treatment, produce a lot of problems, to which solutions have to be offered. The task of psychological staff is on the one hand to contribute their specific knowledge to treatment-concepts, to enhance the psychosocial competence of the medical staff and, on the other hand, to offer counselling to the patients and their parents. PMID:8367177

Smrekar, U; Ellemunter, H

1993-01-01

181

Virtuoso teams.  

PubMed

Managing a traditional team seems pretty straightforward: Gather up whoever's available, give them time and space to do their jobs, and make sure they all play nicely together. But these teams produce results that are often as unremarkable as the teams themselves. When big change and high performance are required, a virtuoso team is far more likely to deliver outstanding and innovative results. Virtuoso teams are fundamentally different from the garden-variety work groups that most organizations form to pursue more modest goals. They comprise the top experts in their particular fields, are specially convened for ambitious projects, work with frenetic rhythm, and emanate a discernible energy. Not surprisingly, however, the superstars who make up these teams are renowned for being elitist, temperamental, egocentric, and difficult to work with. As a result, many managers fear that if they force such people to interact on a high-stakes project, the group just might implode. In this article, Bill Fischer and Andy Boynton put the inner workings of highly successful virtuoso teams on full display through three examples: the creative group behind West Side Story, the team of writers for Sid Caesar's 1950s-era television hit Your Show of Shows, and the high-powered technologists who averted an investor-relations crisis for Norsk Hydro, the Norwegian energy giant. Each of these teams accomplished enormous goals and changed their businesses, their customers, even their industries. And they did so by breaking all the conventional rules of collaboration--from the way they recruited the best members to the way they enforced their unusual processes, and from the high expectations they held to the exceptional results they produced. PMID:16028822

Fischer, Bill; Boynton, Andy

2005-01-01

182

Multidisciplinary Optimization Branch Experience Using iSIGHT Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley is investigating frameworks for supporting multidisciplinary analysis and optimization research. A framework provides software and system services to integrate computational tasks and allows the researcher to concentrate more on the application and less on the programming details. A framework also provides a common working environment and a full range of optimization tools, and so increases the productivity of multidisciplinary research teams. Finally, a framework enables staff members to develop applications for use by disciplinary experts in other organizations. This year, the MDO Branch has gained experience with the iSIGHT framework. This paper describes experiences with four aerospace applications, including: (1) reusable launch vehicle sizing, (2) aerospike nozzle design, (3) low-noise rotorcraft trajectories, and (4) acoustic liner design. Brief overviews of each problem are provided, including the number and type of disciplinary codes and computation time estimates. In addition, the optimization methods, objective functions, design variables, and constraints are described for each problem. For each case, discussions on the advantages and disadvantages of using the iSIGHT framework are provided as well as notes on the ease of use of various advanced features and suggestions for areas of improvement.

Padula, S. L.; Korte, J. J.; Dunn, H. J.; Salas, A. O.

1999-01-01

183

Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management  

SciTech Connect

Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

Wiederholt, Peggy A. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: wiederholt@humonc.wisc.edu; Connor, Nadine P. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Hartig, Gregory K. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Harari, Paul M. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2007-10-01

184

Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmo- nary disease. Team member roles complement

Anne Marie Kuzma; Yvonne Meli; Catherine Meldrum; Patricia Jellen; Marianne Butler-Lebair; Debra Koczen-Doyle; Peter Rising; Kim Stavrolakes; Frances Brogan

2008-01-01

185

Toward an open shared workspace: computer and video fusion approach of TeamWorkStation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groupware is intended to create a shared workspace that supports dynamic collaboration in a work group over space and time constraints. To gain the collective benefits of groupware use, the groupware must be accepted by a majority of workgroup members as a common tool. Groupware must overcome the hurdle of critical mass.

Hiroshi Ishii; Naomi Miyake

1991-01-01

186

Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review  

E-print Network

Thomas o Integrated Short Contact Time Hydrogen Generator, GE Global Research, Wei Wei o Distributed Bio-Oil:30 Lunch 12:30 Research Review Continued o Investigation of Bio-ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt basedBio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production

187

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

My work in the science of team science (SciTS) field has focused on developing and supporting the SciTS field, conducting studies that aim to further elucidate the processes and outcomes of team science through multi-method approaches, and advancing methods, measures, models for evaluating team science broadly and transdisciplinary team science collaborations specifically. Additionally, I work to develop tools to facilitate and mechanisms to support the conduct of transdisciplinary team science.

188

Team Cognition in Experienced Command-and-Control Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members…

Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Duran, Jasmine L.; Taylor, Amanda R.

2007-01-01

189

Multidisciplinary Optimization Branch Experience Using iSIGHT Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley Research Center is investigating frameworks for supporting multidisciplinary analysis and optimization research. An optimization framework call improve the design process while reducing time and costs. A framework provides software and system services to integrate computational tasks and allows the researcher to concentrate more on the application and less on the programming details. A framework also provides a common working environment and a full range of optimization tools, and so increases the productivity of multidisciplinary research teams. Finally, a framework enables staff members to develop applications for use by disciplinary experts in other organizations. Since the release of version 4.0, the MDO Branch has gained experience with the iSIGHT framework developed by Engineous Software, Inc. This paper describes experiences with four aerospace applications: (1) reusable launch vehicle sizing, (2) aerospike nozzle design, (3) low-noise rotorcraft trajectories, and (4) acoustic liner design. All applications have been successfully tested using the iSIGHT framework, except for the aerospike nozzle problem, which is in progress. Brief overviews of each problem are provided. The problem descriptions include the number and type of disciplinary codes, as well as all estimate of the multidisciplinary analysis execution time. In addition, the optimization methods, objective functions, design variables, and design constraints are described for each problem. Discussions on the experience gained and lessons learned are provided for each problem. These discussions include the advantages and disadvantages of using the iSIGHT framework for each case as well as the ease of use of various advanced features. Potential areas of improvement are identified.

Padula, S. L.; Korte, J. J.; Dunn, H. J.; Salas, A. O.

1999-01-01

190

Major multidisciplinary ocean project seeks proposals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A major multidisciplinary oceanographic program in the North Atlantic is being put together by the French oceanographic community, and scientists who would like to participate are being asked to submit proposals immediately Field work will begin in September 2000. Known as Programme Océanographique Multidisciplinaire Méso-Echelle (POMME),the Meso-scale Multidisciplinary Oceanographic Program, it is supported by several French scientific agencies and will

Jean-François Minster

1999-01-01

191

A multidisciplinary protocol for face transplantation at Brigham and Women's Hospital.  

PubMed

Face transplantation introduces an unprecedented potential to restore form and function in patients with severe facial disfigurement. A successful face transplantation programme requires a sound research protocol, a solid infrastructure, expert personnel and adequate funding. There are only a few active face transplant programmes in the world and interest in the development of new such programmes continues to grow. After 2 years of working on the development of the face transplant programme, in 2009 the team at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) performed the 2nd face transplant in the United States. Since then, the team has continued to evaluate several possible face transplant candidates and performed three additional facial transplants. These experiences have helped refine a highly effective multidisciplinary protocol that carries a patient through recruitment, informed consent, screening, preoperative planning, face transplantation surgery and postoperative long-term follow-up. The members of the BWH face transplantation team responsible for carrying out this protocol include a team leader, a programme manager/coordinator, clinical and rehabilitation specialists, social workers, bioethicists, nurses and administrative staff. The roles of each team member during the various stages of the face transplant process are presented here. Additional insight into the interaction between the face transplant team, the Institutional Review Board and the regional Organ Procurement Organization is given. The BWH team's experience has shown that true collaboration, creativity and a unique approach to each candidate translate into the optimal care of the face transplant patient both before and after surgery. PMID:21872546

Bueno, E M; Diaz-Siso, J R; Pomahac, B

2011-12-01

192

Teamwork and team training in the ICU: Where do the similarities with aviation end?  

PubMed Central

The aviation industry has made significant progress in identifying the skills and behaviors that result in effective teamwork. Its conceptualization of teamwork, development of training programs, and design of assessment tools are highly relevant to the intensive care unit (ICU). Team skills are important for maintaining safety in both domains, as multidisciplinary teams must work effectively under highly complex, stressful, and uncertain conditions. However, there are substantial differences in the nature of work and structure of teams in the ICU in comparison with those in aviation. While intensive care medicine may wish to use the advances made by the aviation industry for conceptualizing team skills and implementing team training programs, interventions must be tailored to the highly specific demands of the ICU. PMID:22136283

2011-01-01

193

Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams.  

PubMed

Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members control a UAV to take reconnaissance photos. Experienced teams exceeded performance of inexperienced teams, suggesting transfer of previous command-and-control experience. Compared to inexperienced teams, experienced teams had fewer errors on process-related training knowledge, superior team process ratings, and communications containing fewer coordination-related utterances. These findings support the view that team cognition emerges through the interactions of team members, that interactions distinguish high-performing teams from average teams, and that these interactions transfer across different tasks. PMID:17924800

Cooke, Nancy J; Gorman, Jamie C; Duran, Jasmine L; Taylor, Amanda R

2007-09-01

194

Team Up!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students explore the physical and psychological effect of stress and tension on human beings. They develop their observing, thinking, writing and teamwork skills by working on a group art project and reporting about it. They learn about the stages of group formation, group dynamics and team member roles that make for effective teams. In the process, they discover how collective action can foster a sense of community support, which can alleviate personal feelings of stress and tension. Note: The literacy activities for the Mechanics unit are based on physical themes that have broad application to our experience in the world — concepts of rhythm, balance, spin, gravity, levity, inertia, momentum, friction, stress and tension.

2014-09-18

195

Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

2013-01-01

196

Computer-Based 3D Simulation: A Study of Communication Practices in a Trauma Team Performing Patient Examination and Diagnostic Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Diagnostic work in trauma teams is critical for the patient's condition and for the possibility of survival. It is a difficult situation to train due to the inherently unpredictable and time-critical practice when an injured patient presents in the Emergency Room (ER). Different types of simulations have been developed for specialized training of…

Krange, Ingeborg; Moen, Anne; Ludvigsen, Sten

2012-01-01

197

The Interdisciplinary Team Building Initiative (ITBI) is a funding mechanism designed to promote collaboration among faculty researchers from different disciplines, with the goal of enhancing our capacity  

E-print Network

to grow interdisciplinary environmental scholarship and to compete for external grants. ITBI is a jointThe Interdisciplinary Team Building Initiative (ITBI) is a funding mechanism designed to promote an interdisciplinary curriculum, or working on major multidisciplinary publications. Workgroup members are expected

198

A Team Education Project: An Evaluation of a Collaborative Education and Practice Development in a Continuing Care Unit for Older People.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evaluation of multidisciplinary team teaching about ongoing bereavement in an eldercare unit found that participants appreciated opportunities to discuss their experiences. Practice changes were observed in listening and receiving suggestions, although no changes were made in the way they worked with residents. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

Holman, Cheryl; Jackson, Sue

2001-01-01

199

Work in progress — Using the levenshtein distance to examine changes to teams' model-eliciting activity solutions throughout a semester  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the fall semester of 2008, students in a first-year engineering course at Purdue University completed three Model-Eliciting Activities (MEAs): Paper Airplane Challenge, Just-In-Time Manufacturing, and Travel Mode Selection. MEAs are realistic, open-ended, client-driven engineering problems designed to foster students' mathematical modeling abilities. The primary artifact produced by each team (N=295 teams, 1166 students) is a memo to the client

Jacob Bishop; Matthew Verleger

2011-01-01

200

Multidisciplinary management of Prostate Cancer: how and why  

PubMed Central

Background: A Prostate Cancer Unit is a place where men can be cared for by specialists in prostate cancer (PC), working together within a multi-disciplinary team (MDT). The MDT approach guarantees a higher probability for the PC patient to receive adequate information on the disease and on all possible therapeutic strategies, balancing advantages and related side effects. Objecive: To analyze the role of a MDT in PC management and to compare some results in terms of characteristics and distribution of PC cases, obtained by a MDT, with those reported by a monodisciplinary urological unit. Outcome measurements and results: A high percentage of cases (47.6%) referred to our MDT were in the low risk group. In the Prostate cancer Unit the indications for primary therapies were more equally distributed between surgery (51.5%) and radiotherapy (45.4%). Conclusions: The future of PC patients relies in a successful multidisciplinary collaboration between experienced physicians which can led to important advantages in all the phases of PC. PMID:25374895

Sciarra, Alessandro; Gentile, Vincenzo; Panebianco, Valeria

2013-01-01

201

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ISSUES INTERNATIONAL FUTURES PROGRAMME  

E-print Network

3. Work/family conflict and its impact on mothers` employment rates and patterns and on fertility 18MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ISSUES INTERNATIONAL FUTURES PROGRAMME OECD/IFP Project on the "Future of Families to 2030" Work/Family Life Balance: Future Trends and Challenges prepared by Jeanne Fagnani January

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

202

Interactive Team Cognition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cognition in work teams has been predominantly understood and explained in terms of shared cognition with a focus on the similarity of static knowledge structures across individual team members. Inspired by the current zeitgeist in cognitive science, as well as by empirical data and pragmatic concerns, we offer an alternative theory of team

Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Myers, Christopher W.; Duran, Jasmine L.

2013-01-01

203

Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

2007-08-01

204

Clinical audit of multidisciplinary care at a medium-sized hospital in Spain  

PubMed Central

Background Multidisciplinary care is a key enabler in the provision of high quality care for cancer patients. Despite compelling evidence supporting their benefit to patients and for providers, multidisciplinary cancer conferences (MCC) are not universally occurring. Team composition of MCC reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the body. Lack of nursing input can have a negative impact on team decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate multidisciplinary care and adherence to national recommendations at a medium-sized hospital through a clinical audit of cancer conferences and clinical records. Methods A total of 77 multidisciplinary cancer conferences were visited and 496 electronic health records were reviewed. The regularity of meetings and multidisciplinary attendance were evaluated. Each electronic health record was checked to verify documented prospective discussion before any treatment was started. Results Nine multidisciplinary teams meet on a weekly or biweekly basis at the hospital with an average number of ten people and six different specialties represented. Average duration of meetings was 46.8 min. Though most patients (64.5%) were discussed at some point at the relevant cancer conference, only 40% had a documented multidisciplinary team discussion prior to the first treatment. Pathological stage (pTNM) was documented in 53.6% of clinical records. Conclusions Nursing representatives should be included as usual attendees at cancer conferences. Prospective discussion of all cancer cases should be encouraged. Use of checklists and systematic collection of key information, specifically cancer staging, could improve clinical documentation in the electronic clinical record. PMID:24597686

2014-01-01

205

The delta cooperative model: a dynamic and innovative team-work activity to develop research skills in microbiology.  

PubMed

The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM) is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM) program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i) student's perception of the workshops' effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii) research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii) oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student's knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83% and 75% respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how the this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology. PMID:23653564

Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Robles-Suarez, Reynaldo; Gonzalez-Negron, Alberto J; Baez-Santos, Ivan

2006-05-01

206

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES BOARD AIRPORTA MULTIDISCIPLINARY  

E-print Network

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES BOARD JAMAICA BAYAND KENNEDY AIRPORTA MULTIDISCIPLINARY ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY Volume II A REPORT OF THE JAMAICA BAY ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY GROUP NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES NATIONAL II of the report, Jamaica Bay and Kennedy Airport: A Multidisciplinary Environmental Study, prepared

207

The Loci Multidisciplinary Simulation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contents include the following: 1. An overview of the Loci Multidisciplinary Simulation System. 2. Topologically adaptive mesh generation. 3. Multidisciplinary simulations using Loci with the CHEM chemically reacting flow solver.

Luke, Ed

2002-01-01

208

A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure

Stephanie E Coen; Joan L Bottorff; Joy L Johnson; Pamela A Ratner

2010-01-01

209

Improving the delivery of care for patients with diabetes through understanding optimised team work and organisation in primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness and is an important cause of avoidable mortality. Patients are managed by the integrated activities of clinical and non-clinical members of the primary care team. Studies of the quality of care for patients with diabetes suggest less than optimum care in a number of areas. AIM: The aim of this

Martin P Eccles; Gillian Hawthorne; Marie Johnston; Margaret Hunter; Nick Steen; Jill Francis; Susan Hrisos; Marko Elovainio; Jeremy M Grimshaw

2009-01-01

210

American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: Implications for Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to…

Andrews, Arlene Bowers

2012-01-01

211

Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

2013-01-01

212

Selective Mutism in Elementary School: Multidisciplinary Interventions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the symptoms of selective mutism and historical background for treatment. It provides a case study which illustrates successful multidisciplinary treatment outcomes for a child who was selectively mute. Issues relevant to speech-language pathologists working with elementary school children are discussed and treatment guidelines provided.…

Giddan, Jane J.; And Others

1997-01-01

213

Family physicians and the health care team.  

PubMed Central

Today, family medicine deals with a spectrum of physical, social, psychological, and developmental issues in day-to-day practice. It is unrealistic to expect family physicians to intervene with all issues. Multidisciplinary health care teams can provide comprehensive and effective care, but teamwork does not occur automatically. This article reviews the process required to develop an effective team and the role of family physicians on health care teams. Images p2166-a PMID:8219864

Huffman, M. C.

1993-01-01

214

NASA Team Collaboration Pilot: Enabling NASA's Virtual Teams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most NASA projects and work activities are accomplished by teams of people. These teams are often geographically distributed - across NASA centers and NASA external partners, both domestic and international. NASA "virtual" teams are stressed by the challenge of getting team work done - across geographic boundaries and time zones. To get distributed work done, teams rely on established methods - travel, telephones, Video Teleconferencing (NASA VITS), and email. Time is our most critical resource - and team members are hindered by the overhead of travel and the difficulties of coordinating work across their virtual teams. Modern, Internet based team collaboration tools offer the potential to dramatically improve the ability of virtual teams to get distributed work done.

Prahst, Steve

2003-01-01

215

Harnessing members' positive mood for team-directed learning behaviour and team innovation: The moderating role of perceived team feedback  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the role of individual team members' positive mood and perceived team feedback for their team-directed learning behaviour. Results obtained in a sample of 186 members from 27 work teams showed that positive mood was positively associated with team-directed learning behaviour if individual members perceived that the feedback they received was based on the performance of the team

Frank Walter; Gerben S. van der Vegt

2012-01-01

216

The Perception of Organizational Issues of Social Work Practitioners in Saudi Hospitals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care has evolved rapidly in Saudi Arabia, based upon a Western model of service that incorporates multidisciplinary professional teams. Social work practice forms part of patient care. This study explores how Saudi social workers perceive their role and how they describe their practice within the hospital context. A quantitative methodology was employed using a self-administered questionnaire. Analysis revealed that

Abdulaziz Albrithen; Nadir Yalli

2012-01-01

217

Growing our own: building a native research team.  

PubMed

In 2006, American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) made up less than 1% of the science, engineering and health doctorates in the U.S. Early introduction of AI/AN students to research and continued opportunities are necessary to develop successful AI/AN researchers who can better serve their communities. This team was developed to form a cohort of American Indian students, staff and faculty interested in research and becoming researchers. Since implementation, the program grew from one student to over 20 AI students ranging from freshmen just entering college to doctoral students working to complete their dissertations. This article highlights the team growth, increasing structure, student needs and the faculty and staff involved. It further addresses the support and educational aspects of growing an ongoing, multidisciplinary research team committed to ethical research in Native communities. The team addresses substance use prevalence, the relationship of substance abuse to other mental health diagnoses, and treatment issues. The team includes weekly team meetings, a Blackboard site on the Internet that is populated with resources and focused on sharing materials and information, a weekly journal club discussion of research articles, and collaborative discussions on each project and the barriers and challenges that need to be addressed to move forward. PMID:22880544

Gray, Jacqueline S; Carter, Paula M

2012-01-01

218

The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. Settings This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme ‘On Your Own Feet Ahead!’ in the Netherlands. Participantss A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1?year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Interventions Transition programme. Primary outcome measures Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). Results The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents’ characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (p<0.01) and changes in team climate (p<0.001) predicted the quality of chronic care delivery at T2. Conclusions The implementation of transition programmes requires a supportive and stimulating team climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. PMID:24852302

Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

2014-01-01

219

Challenges of Trainees in a Multidisciplinary Research Program: Nano-Biotechnology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The breadth of knowledge required for the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology challenges and extends traditional concepts of multidisciplinary graduate education. There is a paucity of information, both general reporting and peer-reviewed studies, on the challenges for graduate students working in this multidisciplinary paradigm, from the…

Kriegel, Christina; Koehne, Jessica; Tinkle, Sally; Maynard, Andrew D.; Hill, Rodney A.

2011-01-01

220

Boundaries, gaps, and overlaps: defining roles in a multidisciplinary nephrology clinic  

PubMed Central

This study aims to explore how health care professionals in a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic interact with one another, patients, families, and caregivers to expand understanding of how this increasingly common form of chronic disease management functions in situ. Nonparticipatory observations were conducted of 64 consultations between patients and health care professionals and end-of-day rounds at a multidisciplinary chronic kidney disease clinic. Key themes in our findings revolved around the question of boundaries between the health professions that were expected to work cooperatively within the clinic, between medical specialties in the management of complex patients, and between caregivers and patients. Understanding the importance of various professional roles and how they are allocated, either formally as part of care design or organically as a clinical routine, may help us understand how multidisciplinary care teams function in real life and help us identify gaps in practice. This study highlights two areas for further study and reflection: the effect of discrepancies in health information and the role of caregivers in patient care. PMID:25336966

Stenfors-Hayes, Terese; Kang, Helen H

2014-01-01

221

A Reflection on the Work of an Educational Psychologist in Providing Supervision for a Team of Community Based Support Workers, Supporting Families with Vulnerable Adolescents at Risk of Exclusion from School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evolving role of the educational psychologist (EP) is discussed with an emphasis on the supervision provided for a team of support workers for vulnerable adolescents, working within a Local Service Team. This development is considered in the context of the Every Child Matters (DfES, 2004) agenda and the Farrell, Woods, Lewis, Rooney, Squire…

Maxwell, Tim

2013-01-01

222

[Fournier syndrome: multidisciplinary approach].  

PubMed

Fournier's gangrene, a form of necrotizing fasciitis, is an uncommon, fulminant, rapidly progressing subcutaneous infection of the scrotum and genito-perineal region, and may occur in all age groups. Most cases involve a mixed synergistic infection of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and occur as a result of one of this mechanisms: local trauma, extension from a perineal, periurethral or ischiorectal infection. It is associated with a high mortality rate. Predisposing factors included diabetes mellitus, steroids or chemotherapy, alcohol abuse, malignancy and radiation therapy. This disease requires prompt treatment: early diagnosis, antibiotic therapy, nutritional support, immediate extensive surgical debridement and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The use of etherologue serum is a valuable adjunct in the therapy of Fournier's gangrene. We report a case of Fournier's syndrome treated with etherologue serum immuno-therapy, together with the conventional multidisciplinary approach. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 50 post intervention in good general conditions. The 3 years follow-up showed no recurrence of the disease. In conclusion we remark that the survival can be improved in patients with Fournier's gangrene by multidisciplinary approach. PMID:11765356

Vescio, G; Battaglia, M; Sommella, L; Gallelli, G; Manzo, F; Cristiano, S F; Valente, A; Musella, S

2001-01-01

223

Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

1998-01-01

224

MULTIDISCIPLINARY ACTION PROJECTS  

E-print Network

from one of the world's leading business schools. 04 High value at a low cost -- MAP sponsors are only responsible for costs associated with the project. MAP projects epitomize the Ross commitment to action." Udi Gafni // Director LATAM Airlines Group "Based on our request, the students selected for the team

Edwards, Paul N.

225

Blog - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Empirical findings on the nature of scientific inquiry (i.e., "the science of science") indicate that research is increasingly being conducted by teams rather than individuals. Working on a cross-disciplinary research team also has been shown to be associated with producing more creative research that has higher scientific impact.

226

Web Team Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dynamic world of the Web has provided libraries with a wealth of opportunities, including new approaches to the provision of information and varied internal staffing structures. The development of self-managed Web teams, endowed with authority and resources, can create an adaptable and responsive culture within libraries. This new working team

Church, Jennifer; Felker, Kyle

2005-01-01

227

Study protocol of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-specific sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain (LBP), with high incidence and prevalence rate, is one of the most common reasons to consult the health system and is responsible for a significant amount of sick leave, leading to high health and social costs. The objective of the study is to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial educational group intervention (MBEGI) of non-specific sub-acute LBP in comparison with the usual care in the working population recruited in primary healthcare centres. Methods/design The study design is a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a MBEGI in comparison with the usual care of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Measures on effectiveness and costs of both interventions will be obtained from a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial carried out in 38 Catalan primary health care centres, enrolling 932 patients between 18 and 65 years old with a diagnosis of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Effectiveness measures are: pharmaceutical treatments, work sick leave (% and duration in days), Roland Morris disability, McGill pain intensity, Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB) and Golberg Questionnaires. Utility measures will be calculated from the SF-12. The analysis will be performed from a social perspective. The temporal horizon is at 3 months (change to chronic LBP) and 12 months (evaluate the outcomes at long term). Assessment of outcomes will be blinded and will follow the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion We hope to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of MBEGI, see an improvement in the patients' quality of life, achieve a reduction in the duration of episodes and the chronicity of non-specific low back pain, and be able to report a decrease in the social costs. If the intervention is cost-effectiveness and cost-utility, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58719694 PMID:21859489

2011-01-01

228

Surgical leadership and standardization of multidisciplinary breast cancer care: the evolution of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers.  

PubMed

Evidence has shown that multidisciplinary specialist team evaluation and management for cancer results in better patient outcomes. For breast cancer, breast centers are where this evaluation and management occurs. The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers has helped standardize multidisciplinary breast cancer care by defining services and standards required of accredited breast centers. PMID:24882354

Bensenhaver, Jessica; Winchester, David P

2014-07-01

229

Finding the team for Mars: a psychological and human factors analysis of a Mars Desert Research Station crew.  

PubMed

A two-week mission in March and April of 2011 sent six team members to the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS). MDRS, a research facility in the high Utah desert, provides an analogue for the harsh and unusual working conditions that will be faced by men and women who one day explore Mars. During the mission a selection of quantitative and qualitative psychological tests were administered to the international, multidisciplinary team. A selection of the results are presented along with discussion. PMID:22317591

Sawyer, Benjamin D; Hancock, P A; Deaton, John; Suedfeld, Peter

2012-01-01

230

Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%–7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

2014-01-01

231

Project Team Selection Using Fuzzy Optimization Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

With their high potential, high motivation, great problem-solving ability and flexibility, project teams are important work structures for the business life. The success of these teams is highly dependent upon the people involved in the project team. This makes the project team selection an important factor for project success. The project team selection can be defined as selecting the right

Adil Baykasoglu; Türkay Dereli; Sena Das

2007-01-01

232

Multidelity methods for multidisciplinary system design  

E-print Network

Optimization of multidisciplinary systems is critical as slight performance improvements can provide significant benefits over the system's life. However, optimization of multidisciplinary systems is often plagued by ...

March, Andrew I. (Andrew Irving)

2012-01-01

233

Working Together: From School-Based Collaborative Teams to School-Community-Higher Education Connections. An Introductory Packet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet is designed to help in the development of collaborative efforts for educational improvement. "Working Together with Others To Enhance Programs and Resources" (from the Center for Mental Health in Schools) is the first selection. This discussion emphasizes that effectiveness is the real point of collaboration, and it explores the…

California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health Schools.

234

Team Learning: Collective Reflection Processes in Teacher Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to further studies of theoretical and conceptual understanding of teachers' team learning processes, with a main focus on team work, team atmosphere, and collective reflections. Design/methodology/approach: The empirical study was designed as a multi-case study in a research and development…

Ohlsson, Jon

2013-01-01

235

Applications of collaborative helping maps: supporting professional development, supervision and work teams in family-centered practice.  

PubMed

Collaborative, family-centered practice has become an influential approach in helping efforts across a broad spectrum of human services. This article draws from previous work that presented a principle-based, practice framework of Collaborative Helping and highlighted the use of Collaborative Helping maps as a tool both to help workers think their way through complex situations and to provide a guideline for constructive conversations between families and helpers about challenging issues. It builds on that work to examine ways to utilize Collaborative Helping maps at worker, supervisory, and organizational levels to enhance and sustain collaborative, family-centered practice and weave its core values and principles into the everyday fabric of organizational cultures in human service agencies and government agencies that serve poor and marginalized families and communities. PMID:24215323

Madsen, William C

2014-03-01

236

Ipilimumab and Its Toxicities: A Multidisciplinary Approach  

PubMed Central

The treatment for metastatic melanoma has evolved significantly in the past few years. Ipilimumab, an immunotherapy, is now in mainstream oncology practice given that it has shown improved overall survival in randomized clinical trials. Other immune modulating agents, such as programmed death receptor-1 and programmed death receptor ligand-1 antibodies, are showing promise in early clinical trials. This manuscript will review ipilimumab and its most common side effects. Immune-related adverse events (irAEs) are important to recognize early, and their presentation, timing of onset, and general recommendations for workup and management will be reviewed. Assembling a multidisciplinary team, as well as thorough education of the patient, is recommended to optimize patient care. PMID:23774827

Agarwala, Sanjiv S.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Weber, Jeffrey S.

2013-01-01

237

Recent advances in multidisciplinary critical care.  

PubMed

The intensive care unit is a work environment where superior dedication is crucial for optimizing patients' outcomes. As this demanding commitment is multidisciplinary in nature, it requires special qualities of health care workers and organizations. Thus research in the field covers a broad spectrum of activities necessary to deliver cutting-edge care. However, given the numerous research articles and education activities available, it is difficult for modern critical care clinicians to keep up with the latest progress and innovation in the field. This article broadly summarizes new developments in multidisciplinary intensive care. It provides elementary information about advanced insights in the field via brief descriptions of selected articles grouped by specific topics. Issues considered include care for heart patients, mechanical ventilation, delirium, nutrition, pressure ulcers, early mobility, infection prevention, transplantation and organ donation, care for caregivers, and family matters. PMID:25554557

Blot, Stijn; Afonso, Elsa; Labeau, Sonia

2015-01-01

238

Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

239

A holistic and multi-disciplinary treatment of the challenges in packaging of MMICs and RFMEMS switches is presented in this thesis. The work carried out aimed at developing the  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT A holistic and multi-disciplinary treatment of the challenges in packaging of MMICs of electrical and mechanical (thermal) aspects of packages used for packaging of high frequency MMICs and MEMS. New low cost and fabrication friendly packaging techniques have been evolved and presented alongwith

Kumar, M. Jagadesh

240

A team of equals: teaching writing in the sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Writing across the curriculum (WAC) is a way of integrating the teaching of writing into specific academic disciplines. A problem faced in the WAC literature is how to develop a process that integrates the skills of multi?disciplinary teams. In this project, action research was used to develop a team comprising faculty from the applied sciences and a writing teacher which

Lisa Emerson; Bruce R. MacKay; Marion B. MacKay; Keith A. Funnell

2006-01-01

241

A Team of Equals: Teaching Writing in the Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Writing across the curriculum (WAC) is a way of integrating the teaching of writing into specific academic disciplines. A problem faced in the WAC literature is how to develop a process that integrates the skills of multi-disciplinary teams. In this project, action research was used to develop a team comprising faculty from the applied sciences…

Emerson, Lisa; MacKay, Bruce R.; MacKay, Marion B.; Funnell, Keith A.

2006-01-01

242

An Elder Abuse Assessment Team in an Acute Hospital Setting.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a hospital-based multidisciplinary team designed to assess and respond to cases of suspected abuse or neglect of elders from both institutional and community settings. Presence of the team has increased the hospital staff's awareness of elder abuse and neglect, as well as their willingness to refer suspected cases for further assessment.…

The Beth Israel Hospital Elder Assessment Team

1986-01-01

243

Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial) evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients’ views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care) have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients’ holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to reevaluate the structure and models of MDT-work to ensure that MDTs are an efficient use of resources. PMID:24648761

Taylor, Cath; Shewbridge, Amanda; Harris, Jenny; Green, James S

2013-01-01

244

Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer.  

PubMed

The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial) evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients' views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care) have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients' holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to reevaluate the structure and models of MDT-work to ensure that MDTs are an efficient use of resources. PMID:24648761

Taylor, Cath; Shewbridge, Amanda; Harris, Jenny; Green, James S

2013-01-01

245

Learning through "huddles" for health care leaders: why do some work teams learn as a result of huddles and others do not?  

PubMed

The health care industry embraces the concept that collective learning occurs through group social interactions and has been initiating huddles as an avenue for collaborative learning. During change of shift or prior to beginning daily tasks, a huddle is initiated and facilitated by the manager or frontline supervisor. Given that "shared knowledge is obtained through group-based learning," why are some teams learning and others are not? The phenomenon is perplexing, given that the same resources are provided to all teams. Based on the findings in the literature review on learning in groups, teams learn from huddles and others do not because of the following: communication style and dialogue among the group members, communication style and dialogue facilitated by the leader, team and member perceptions, and team membership. Teams that learn from huddles do so because of the elements within the dialogue between team members (reflexive questioning, redundancy of information, metaphors, analogies, dramatic dialogue, strategic meaning) and because the huddle team exhibits higher levels of collegiality, tenure, heterogeneity, team identification, and collective efficacy. Facilitators must encourage a conversation in order to encourage reframing of cognitive maps that encourage learning by huddle members. PMID:25350023

Little, Johanna

2014-01-01

246

Working with Your Treatment Team  

MedlinePLUS

... MD, PhD Neil Horowitz, MD Andrew Berchuck, MD Robert Giuntoli, MD Chad Hamilton, MD Susan C. Modesitt, MD Stephanie Blank, MD Karen H. Lu, MD, Chair Scott D. McMeekin, MD David G. Mutch, MD Paige L. Whitaker Richard R. ...

247

Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Optimization Frameworks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since July 2008, the Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed one major milestone, Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework Milestone (9/30/08), and is completing the Generation 1 Framework validation milestone, which is due December 2008. Included in the presentation are: details of progress on developing the Open MDAO framework, modeling and testing the Generation 1 Framework, progress toward establishing partnerships with external parties, and discussion of additional potential collaborations

Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

2009-01-01

248

Cyberinfrastructure and Scientific Collaboration: Application of a Virtual Team Performance Framework with Potential Relevance to Education. WCER Working Paper No. 2010-12  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify and describe some of the dimensions of scientific collaborations using high throughput computing (HTC) through the lens of a virtual team performance framework. A secondary purpose was to assess the viability of using a virtual team performance framework to study scientific collaborations using…

Kraemer, Sara; Thorn, Christopher A.

2010-01-01

249

The Talent Acquisition team assists hiring managers in attracting, selecting, hiring and retaining the right people. In some cases this means hiring a foreign national to work at  

E-print Network

The Talent Acquisition team assists hiring managers in attracting, selecting, hiring and retaining of Calgary's policies and practices. THE TALENT ACQUISITION TEAM IMMIGRATION TOOLKIT Universities can be distinguished by the talent they attract and re- tain...We compete globally for talent at all levels. We must

Habib, Ayman

250

Aerobraking Teams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Group and team photos of Langely's Aerobraking teams. These photo's were taken right after the 75 day aerobraking phase. People in the photographs include: Paul V. Tartabini, Mary Kae Lockwood, Richard W. Powell, Eric M. Queen, Bob Tolson, Alicia Dwyer, Jill Hanna, Michelle Munk, Zack Q. Chavis, dick Wilmoth, Naru Takashima, Ruth Amundsen, John Aguirre, Allison Roberts, Loreyna Young, Charles W. Davis, John Dec, Joe Gasbarre, Scott Striepe, Paul Escalera and G. M. Keating.

2002-01-01

251

TeamSTEPPS(®) simulation-based training: an evidence-based strategy to improve trauma team performance.  

PubMed

Initial assessment and treatment of critically injured patients is time sensitive, creating a high-stress environment for trauma team members and patients. Effective leadership, communication, and clinical acumen are essential team dynamics for best patient outcomes. Innovative multidisciplinary TeamSTEPPS(®) simulation-based training is an effective model for teams in high-risk health care settings. Use of this simulation model has led to improved trauma team performance and patient outcomes while incorporating new physician and nursing personnel into a time-sensitive, high-stress environment. PMID:24199639

Harvey, Ellen M; Wright, Andrea; Taylor, Dallas; Bath, Jennifer; Collier, Bryan

2013-11-01

252

Research and Improvement of Team Software Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Team Software Process (TSP) has been widely used in many top software development enterprises, which has created great benefits for these enterprise. This paper describes researches and implementation of TSP and states TSP and three parts including team formation, team launch and team work. It introduces the implementation process of TSP, and analyzes the advantages and drawbacks of the process.

Hongyun Yu; Xiaohong Bao; Shunkun Yang

2009-01-01

253

Use of simulation to practice multidisciplinary anaphylaxis management.  

PubMed

Multidisciplinary clinical simulation can be an essential part of nursing education strategies to improve and enhance patient safety and experience. Clinical simulation can be utilized to change practice, reinforce practices, and direct patient and family education needs for a safe discharge. Anaphylaxis is potentially fatal and is increasing in occurrence. A simulation scenario was designed by a multidisciplinary team to review anaphylaxis recognition and to provide simulated practice for emergency response. Clinical scenarios were developed based on evidence-based practices and included a prebriefing and postdebriefing. Bandura's self-efficacy theory was used as a framework to develop the project, as it supports behavior change strategies well suited for clinical simulation. Clinical simulations provide a nonthreatening environment for staff to learn, practice, and receive feedback to improve patient care and serve as a vehicle to role-play expected practices, enhance communication between disciplines, demonstrate progress, and evaluate competency. PMID:24100428

Mason, Virginia M; Lyons, Patricia

2013-01-01

254

Reducing cancer disparities for minorities: a multidisciplinary research agenda to improve patient access to health systems, clinical trials, and effective cancer therapy. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

This report provides details on the successful efforts of an institution to consolidate the knowledge and experience of multidisciplinary teams (marketing, education, and outreach specialists) to advise clinical trial investigators on minority accrual.

255

Leading virtual teams: hierarchical leadership, structural supports, and shared team leadership.  

PubMed

Using a field sample of 101 virtual teams, this research empirically evaluates the impact of traditional hierarchical leadership, structural supports, and shared team leadership on team performance. Building on Bell and Kozlowski's (2002) work, we expected structural supports and shared team leadership to be more, and hierarchical leadership to be less, strongly related to team performance when teams were more virtual in nature. As predicted, results from moderation analyses indicated that the extent to which teams were more virtual attenuated relations between hierarchical leadership and team performance but strengthened relations for structural supports and team performance. However, shared team leadership was significantly related to team performance regardless of the degree of virtuality. Results are discussed in terms of needed research extensions for understanding leadership processes in virtual teams and practical implications for leading virtual teams. PMID:23205494

Hoch, Julia E; Kozlowski, Steve W J

2014-05-01

256

Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management  

PubMed Central

Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GS?s), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management. PMID:20667180

Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

2000-01-01

257

TumorsThe Multidisciplinary Neuroendocrine Program  

E-print Network

Pituitary TumorsThe Multidisciplinary Neuroendocrine Program The region's most advanced care for pituitary tumors and associated disorders. The Multidisciplinary Neuroendocrine Program offers patients the most complete and advanced care for pituitary adenomas and other disorders of the hypothalamic

Goldman, Steven A.

258

Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

2011-01-01

259

Manufacturing Change at the John Deere Harvester Works: Report on the Visit of the Ad Hoc Lean Aircraft Initiative Team, June 7, 1994  

E-print Network

On June 7, 1994, an Ad Hoc team from LAI visited John Deere to conduct an informal benchmark of John Deere's successful change to Leaner Manufacturing. This report summarizes the results of that trip, as well as summarizing ...

Stahl, Fred

260

The Carolina Abecedarian Project: A Longitudinal and Multidisciplinary Approach to the Prevention of Developmental Retardation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This progress report describes the subjects, program and curriculum development, and collected psychological and medical data of the Carolina Abecedarian Project, an intervention program, begun in 1972. The purpose of this project is to bring together a multidisciplinary team of researchers to demonstrate that the developmental retardation of…

Ramey, Craig T.; And Others

261

The Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale: Reliability, Validity, and Scale Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and preliminary reliability and validity studies are reported for the Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale, a 110-item Likert scale that assesses satisfaction with team health care services. The methods used to construct subscales may have implications for other psychometric studies of satisfaction and quality…

Martin, Pamela Davis; Brantley, Philip J.; McKnight, G. Tipton; Jones, Glenn N.; Springer, Annette

1997-01-01

262

Acute Intermittent Porphyria Associated with Respiratory Failure: A Multidisciplinary Approach  

PubMed Central

Despite being challenging, delivery of effective nursing care to patients with acute intermittent porphyria is a matter of utmost importance. In this paper, the diversity of symptoms and the difficult diagnosis of this condition are emphasized, and details concerning the treatment of this disorder in the intensive care unit are presented. We believe that acute intermittent porphyria should be borne in mind during performance of differential diagnosis of neurological, psychiatric, and gastroenterological disorders on patients whose routine investigation tests are normal, especially when precipitating factors exist. Intensive care measures and a multidisciplinary team approach are essential. PMID:21687623

Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Gil Cezar, Alkmim-Teixeira; Casarini, Karin Aparecida; Muniz Cordeiro, Kátia Simone; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

2011-01-01

263

Multidisciplinary Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

Lung cancer diagnosis and treatment has evolved to require the input and expertise of multiple diverse medical and surgical specialties. The approach to lung cancer patients requires the adherence to a few principles that include thorough use of staging modalities to assure the proper treatment for each patient, and an understanding of the limitations and advantages of each of these modalities. Evidence is continuing to emerge that supports the notion that diagnostic workup and treatment of lung cancer patients is best done within the context of a multidisciplinary team devoted to this purpose. PMID:20161592

Bauman, Kristy; Arenberg, Douglas

2009-01-01

264

Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization Generation 1 and Next Steps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed three major milestones during Fiscal Year (FY)08: "Requirements Definition" Milestone (1/31/08); "GEN 1 Integrated Multi-disciplinary Toolset" (Annual Performance Goal) (6/30/08); and "Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework" Milestone (9/30/08). Details of all three milestones are explained including documentation available, potential partner collaborations, and next steps in FY09.

Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

2008-01-01

265

A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Family Growth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the outreach services of an urban family health and social service organization catering to low-income young childbearing families in East Harlem, New York. Using an innovative multidisciplinary model, the organization's primary emphasis is on working with families in their own homes and eventually moving out into the community.…

Gordon, Gail

1985-01-01

266

Structuring a Project Management Course to Develop Team Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There is no escaping it. Working in industry requires working in teams. The industries hiring our graduates recognize this. TAC of ABET Criterion 2e requires it, stating graduates need an ability to function effectively on teams. How do we, as teachers, go about ensuring that our students learn how to work effectively on teams? How do we go about teaching them team work and team management skills? The traditional approach to developing team work and team management skills involves assigning students randomly to teams, giving them a project to work on, and expecting them to somehow magically learn to work effectively on teams. This they'll learn about teamwork if they work on teams approach fails to give students adequate preparation and insight into team work and team management skills. It doesn't work. Surveys of students reveal that they do not feel they knew how to effectively work on teams or how to be a team leader. This sentiment was echoed by respondents to last years project management survey. To effectively prepare students to work on teams, coordinated teambuilding and leadership skills training is needed. Beginning with a discussion of necessary project management and team skills, this paper will describe how to structure a project course to include techniques and exercises specifically designed to develop teamwork and team management skills and the benefits they provide.

Edmonson, Charlie P.

267

Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.  

SciTech Connect

Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from microarrays, we have made progress by combining very different analytic approaches.

Wang, Xuefel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kang, Huining (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fields, Chris (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Cowie, Jim R. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Mosquera-Caro, Monica P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Xu, Yuexian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Andries, Erik (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ar, Kerem (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Potter, Jeffrey (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Willman, Cheryl L. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Murphy, Maurice H. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-01-01

268

Making This Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the sponsors of the Cohort at Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia--a program to increase the number of minority male students in Advanced Placement (AP) classes--the authors view their work with the young men in this program as very similar to coaching a team. The Cohort asks these young men to challenge and push themselves; to test…

Beitler, Alan; Bushong, Delores; Reid, Al

2004-01-01

269

The Multidisciplinary Management of Osteosarcoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Patients with suspected or confirmed osteosarcoma should be evaluated and treated at a comprehensive cancer center within\\u000a a multidisciplinary sarcoma program that includes pediatric, medical and radiation oncologists, orthopedic and surgical oncologists,\\u000a musculoskeletal pathologists, and radiologists. Successful treatment involves proper diagnosis, neoadjuvant and adjuvant multi-agent\\u000a chemotherapy, and aggressive surgery with an emphasis toward limb-preserving procedures. Treatment of osteosarcoma should

Noah Federman; Nicholas Bernthal; Fritz C. Eilber; William D. Tap

2009-01-01

270

Child's Play: A Multidisciplinary Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Competition obscures the realities and significance of play, in particular, the bodily play originating in infancy and typical\\u000a of young children. A multidisciplinary perspective on child's play elucidates the nature of child's play and validates the\\u000a distinction between competition and play. The article begins with a consideration of ethological research on play in young\\u000a human and nonhuman animals, proceeds to

Maxine Sheets-Johnstone

2003-01-01

271

Dynamically Reconfigurable Approach to Multidisciplinary Problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The complexity and autonomy of the constituent disciplines and the diversity of the disciplinary data formats make the task of integrating simulations into a multidisciplinary design optimization problem extremely time-consuming and difficult. We propose a dynamically reconfigurable approach to MDO problem formulation wherein an appropriate implementation of the disciplinary information results in basic computational components that can be combined into different MDO problem formulations and solution algorithms, including hybrid strategies, with relative ease. The ability to re-use the computational components is due to the special structure of the MDO problem. We believe that this structure can and should be used to formulate and solve optimization problems in the multidisciplinary context. The present work identifies the basic computational components in several MDO problem formulations and examines the dynamically reconfigurable approach in the context of a popular class of optimization methods. We show that if the disciplinary sensitivity information is implemented in a modular fashion, the transfer of sensitivity information among the formulations under study is straightforward. This enables not only experimentation with a variety of problem formations in a research environment, but also the flexible use of formulations in a production design environment.

Alexandrov, Natalie M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

2003-01-01

272

Team Captain Kit National Team Initiative  

E-print Network

is supporting the Alzheimer's Association Memory Walk through the national team initiative in 2004. HOSA, and rewarding. As a Team Captain, you are a powerful force in the fight to end Alzheimer's disease. A Team liaison between their team and the Alzheimer's Association. This Team Captain kit will take you through

Rusu, Adrian

273

CASE STUDY -- LEAN 94-02: A Case Study of Self-Directed Work Teams at Boeing Defense and Space Group - Corinth  

E-print Network

Boeing Defense & Space Group - Corinth (BD&SG-C) is a self-directed team based unionized facility in the defense and commercial aircraft industry. The plant was a greenfield start-up in 1987. Due to the nature of the defense ...

Klein, Janice

1994-02-24

274

Efficient Multidisciplinary Analysis Procedure Using Multi-Level Parallelization Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multidisciplinary applications are suitable for parallel computing environment by adopting the domain decomposition method. Immediately, a multidisciplinary application can be parallelized by solving each discipline separately. In order to perform coupled multidisciplinary analysis, coupling of each discipline can be accomplished by exchanging boundary data at the interfaces. This is regarded as discipline-level parallelization. Next level could be a "coarse-grain" parallelization of each discipline, which mainly depends on the physical geometry and nature of each discipline. For example, it is almost impossible for structured-grid based computational fluid dynamics codes to do flow analysis of an aircraft by using a single grid because of the complexity of its configuration. Thus, multi-block grid is commonly used to describe the details of complex geometry. Similarly, in structural analysis, the structure is frequently subdivided into substructures. Thus, the computation of each subdomain can be easily parallelized since each subdomain is solved separately independent of other domains. The parallelization is accomplished by solving each subdomain separately on a separate processor and exchanging the boundary conditions at domain interfaces periodically. However, the physical decomposition of the domain introduces explicit boundary conditions at the domain interfaces. This is not desirable for critical areas such as those containing shock waves or flow separations. Thus, a "fine-grain" parallelization is introduced to overcome this problem. The "fine-grain" parallelization is one that solves exactly the same system of equations of a subdomain by using more than one processors without introducing any explicit boundary conditions. An efficient multidisciplinary analysis procedure can be accomplished by successfully combining the above multi-level parallelism. A multidisciplinary analysis code, ENSAERO developed at NASA Ames Research Center is used in this study to implement the proposed approach. The communication data structure required for the proposed approach will be studied in detail. This work will demonstrate the feasibility of using multi-level parallelization approach in multidisciplinary analysis applications.

Byun, Chansup; Hatay, Ferhat; Farhangnia, Mehrdad; Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William R. (Technical Monitor)

1997-01-01

275

Multidisciplinary approach decreases length of stay and reduces cost for ventricular assist device therapy.  

PubMed

High implantation costs and long postoperative length of stay (LOS) in debilitated patients complicate ventricular assist device (VAD) therapy. Between July 2000 and February 2005, 30 patients received a VAD at our institution. Of those, 20 patients were successfully discharged from the hospital with VADs. In August 2003, a multidisciplinary team was formed consisting of all services for VAD patients to replace a single-discipline (cardiac surgery) system. This team evaluated potential VAD candidates and identified optimal timing for implantation. These 20 VAD patients were divided into two groups according to the initiation of multidisciplinary team; the traditional group (n=7, July 2000-July 2003) and the multidisciplinary group (n=13, August 2003-February 2005). Patient demographics were not different. The LOS decreased from 61 to 15 days (P<0.01), especially LOS on the floor decreased from 35 to 7 days (P=0.03). The floor cost was significantly reduced ($47,111 vs. $8742, P<0.01), leading to a decrease in total postoperative cost ($202,238 vs. $161,744, P<0.01). The 30-day readmission rate decreased (5/7 patients vs. 1/13 patients, P<0.01). A multidisciplinary approach significantly decreased LOS and cost after VAD therapy, mostly by decreasing the cost of routine non-ICU care, without increasing the readmission rate. PMID:18940829

Murray, Margaret A; Osaki, Satoru; Edwards, Niloo M; Johnson, Maryl R; Bobadilla, Joseph L; Gordon, Elizabeth A; Sanderfoot, Mark; Kohmoto, Takushi

2009-01-01

276

The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Patient safety is of the utmost importance in health care. The patient safety culture in an institution has great impact on patient safety. To enhance patient safety and to design strategies to reduce medical injuries, there is a current focus on measuring the patient safety culture. The aim of the present study was to describe the patient safety culture in an ED at two different hospitals before and after a Quality improvement (QI) project that was aimed to enhance patient safety. Methods A repeated cross-sectional design, using the Hospital Survey On Patient Safety Culture questionnaire before and after a quality improvement project in two emergency departments at a county hospital and a university hospital. The questionnaire was developed to obtain a better understanding of the patient safety culture of an entire hospital or of specific departments. The Swedish version has 51 questions and 15 dimensions. Results At the county hospital, a difference between baseline and follow-up was observed in three dimensions. For two of these dimensions, Team-work within hospital and Communication openness, a higher score was measured at the follow-up. At the university hospital, a higher score was measured at follow-up for the two dimensions Team-work across hospital units and Team-work within hospital. Conclusion The result showed changes in the self-estimated patient safety culture, mainly regarding team-work and communication openness. Most of the improvements at follow-up were seen by physicians, and mainly at the county hospital. PMID:25005231

2014-01-01

277

Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team  

MedlinePLUS

Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Sep 2,2014 Patients with heart failure may work with multiple healthcare professionals. It's ... during their journey. Visit our Support Network today . Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

278

Multidisciplinary Lung Cancer Meetings: Improving the practice of radiation oncology and facing future challenges.  

PubMed

Clinical guidelines widely recognize the importance of multidisciplinary meetings (MDM) in the optimal care of lung cancer patients. The published literature suggest that dedicated Lung Cancer MDM lead to increased treatment utilization rates and improved survival outcomes for patients with lung cancer. For radiation oncologists, Lung Cancer MDM have been proven to support evidence-based practice and improve the utilization of radiotherapy. Lung Cancer MDM also allow for education and promotion of specialty radiotherapy services. The fast pace of modern medicine is also presenting new challenges for the multidisciplinary lung cancer team, and technological advances are likely to lead to new changes in the structure of traditional Lung Cancer MDM. PMID:25581058

Campbell, Belinda A; Ball, David; Mornex, Françoise

2015-02-01

279

Roles and Responsibilities in Feature Teams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Agile development requires self-organizing teams. The set-up of a (feature) team has to enable self-organization. Special care has to be taken if the project is not only distributed, but also large and more than one feature team is involved. Every feature team needs in such a setting a product owner who ensures the continuous focus on business delivery. The product owners collaborate by working together in a virtual team. Each feature team is supported by a coach who ensures not only the agile process of the individual feature team but also across all feature teams. An architect (or if necessary a team of architects) takes care that the system is technically sound. Contrariwise to small co-located projects, large global projects require a project manager who deals with—among other things—internal and especially external politics.

Eckstein, Jutta

280

Interdisciplinary Team-Based Disease Management of Heart Failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multidisciplinary team disease management has evolved into consensus `best practice' in the care of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The mission of disease management for patients with CHF is to shift care from the hospital to the clinic and to the home, optimize quality of care in concert with consensus guidelines, reduce admissions by 40% and improve functional status

Thomas G. Di Salvo; Lynne Warner Stevenson

2003-01-01

281

The Administrative Team: Dynamism vs. Dysfunction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Before real success can come to any school, the administrative team must become a dynamic entity. The team and its ability to work within the school setting are fundamental to improving instruction and increasing student achievement. The team spirit that this group develops has ramifications on school climate that directly affect teachers,…

Tyson, Nathan

2008-01-01

282

Team Tune-Up: Examining Team Transcripts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a worksheet that can be used to examine documentation of team meetings in light of goals the team has established. Materials for this worksheet include copies of team transcripts, yellow and pink highlighters, and pencils. Directions for examining team transcripts are presented.

Journal of Staff Development, 2010

2010-01-01

283

Adopting Team Contracts to Initiate Team Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creighton, Harris and Coleman (2005) suggest that educational leadership instructors introduce aspiring administrators to a sound knowledge base. Currently, engaging in teams is recommended for high performance and problem-solving. Bolton (1999) recommends that instructors coach teams so teaming skills are improved. But, oftentimes, there are team

Marcellino, Patricia Ann

2008-01-01

284

Teams Talking Trials: Results of an RCT to improve the communication of cancer teams about treatment trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

A randomized trial was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a Teams Talking Trials Workshop in increasing clinical trials awareness, involvement, communication, and recruitment. Members of 22 multidisciplinary cancer teams in Wales, UK, participated in workshops and were surveyed pre- and post-intervention about trial-related awareness; attitudes toward trial management and recruitment; involvement in trials; and perceptions about the level of trial involvement within their teams.

285

DITIS: A COLLABORATIVE VIRTUAL MEDICAL TEAM FOR HOME HEALTHCARE OF CANCER  

E-print Network

247 DITIS: A COLLABORATIVE VIRTUAL MEDICAL TEAM FOR HOME HEALTHCARE OF CANCER PATIENTS Andreas of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals. Care of chronic illnesses (e.g. cancer patients) by a team of health is to overcome the difficulty of coordination and communication, through DITIS ( , in Greek, stands for: Network

Pallis, George

286

Sounds like Team Spirit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always trying to improve on what they've done before. Second, success in any endeavor stems from people who know how to interpret a composition to sound beautiful when played in a different style. For Knowledge Sharing to work, it must be adapted, reinterpreted, shaped and played with at the centers. In this regard, we've been blessed with another crazy, passionate, inspired artist named Claire Smith. Claire has turned Ames Research Center in California into APPL-west. She is so good and committed to what she does that I just refer people to her whenever they have questions about implementing project management development at the field level. Finally, any great effort requires talented people working behind the scenes, the people who formulate a business approach and know how to manage the money so that the music gets heard. I have known many brilliant and creative people with a ton of ideas that never take off due to an inability to work the business. Again, the Knowledge Sharing team has been fortunate to have competent and passionate people, specifically Tony Maturo and his procurement team at Goddard Space Flight Center, to make sure the process is in place to support the effort. This kind of support is every bit as crucial as the activity itself, and the efforts and creativity that go into successful procurement and contracting is a vital ingredient of this successful team.

Hoffman, Edward

2002-01-01

287

Multidisciplinary treatment of dental phobia.  

PubMed

Using contributions from different schools of psychotherapy provides a range of treatment options for the complex needs of dental fear patients. A single case study of a severely phobic patient explores the advantages of the team approach, strategies of fear reduction and the evolution of a patient coping with the symptoms of dental phobia. PMID:7687272

Mazey, K A; Mito, R S

1993-03-01

288

Attitudes of nurses to donor organ retrieval and visiting surgical teams. The Papworth experience.  

PubMed

Donor organ retrieval can be a stressful procedure for theatre nurses. These experiences may be influenced by the relationship between visiting surgical teams and nurses at donor hospitals. When donor organs are referred to Papworth Hospital and a suitable recipient identified on the waiting list, a visit to the referring hospital is organised in order to retrieve the organs. The multidisciplinary donor team is comprised of a surgeon, anaesthetist, theatre nurse and technician who may find themselves called, often at short notice, to travel anywhere in the United Kingdom. Most donors are multi-organ donors which means that surgical teams, visiting or local, will be working together retrieving the heart and/or lungs, liver, kidneys, pancreas, cornea, long bones and skin. This multi faceted procedure on the donor and the number of visiting medical staff in theatre, may have an impact on local theatre nurses of which the visitors should be aware. The retrieval of thoracic organs takes 3-4 hours and the team needs to leave as soon as the excised organs have been packed so that preservation is not compromised. PMID:8695939

Lloyd-Jones, H

1996-02-01

289

Teaming. The Key to World Class Manufacturing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Lean manufacturing, a streamlined system of flow and job shop techniques, relies on self-directed work teams. Technology educators can prepare students for work in this environment by using problem-solving teams in the classroom to work on design briefs and other group projects. (SK)

Wright, John R.

1999-01-01

290

Heather described the event as a chance to celebrate the work of the different individuals and teams within Facilities, and to recognise and reward those members of staff who excel at their work by  

E-print Network

communication of information with all colleagues to ensure the best possible customer experience. `Unsung Hero at problem solving with quiet but efficient communication. And as one nominator said, it would be pretty for saving energy, both in the workplace and at home ­ and was issued to over 500 staff at team briefings

291

Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (including the Site 300 area), Livermore, California, conducted from February 26 to April 5, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety and Health (E SH) Programs at LLNL. LLNL is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE), and is a multi-program, mission-oriented institution engaged in fundamental and applied research programs that require a multidisciplinary approach. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, and consultants.

Not Available

1990-06-01

292

Multidisciplinary Obstetric Simulated Emergency Scenarios (MOSES): Promoting Patient Safety in Obstetrics with Teamwork-Focused Interprofessional Simulations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: We describe an example of simulation-based interprofessional continuing education, the multidisciplinary obstetric simulated emergency scenarios (MOSES) course, which was designed to enhance nontechnical skills among obstetric teams and, hence, improve patient safety. Participants' perceptions of MOSES courses, their learning, and…

Freeth, Della; Ayida, Gubby; Berridge, Emma Jane; Mackintosh, Nicola; Norris, Beverley; Sadler, Chris; Strachan, Alasdair

2009-01-01

293

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

294

Recent advances in multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A joint activity involving NASA and Army researchers at NASA LaRC to develop optimization procedures to improve the rotor blade design process by integrating appropriate disciplines and accounting for all of the important interactions among the disciplines is described. The disciplines involved include rotor aerodynamics, rotor dynamics, rotor structures, airframe dynamics, and acoustics. The work is focused on combining these five key disciplines in an optimization procedure capable of designing a rotor system to satisfy multidisciplinary design requirements. Fundamental to the plan is a three-phased approach. In phase 1, the disciplines of blade dynamics, blade aerodynamics, and blade structure are closely coupled while acoustics and airframe dynamics are decoupled and are accounted for as effective constraints on the design for the first three disciplines. In phase 2, acoustics is integrated with the first three disciplines. Finally, in phase 3, airframe dynamics is integrated with the other four disciplines. Representative results from work performed to date are described. These include optimal placement of tuning masses for reduction of blade vibratory shear forces, integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization, and integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization. Examples of validating procedures are described.

Adelman, Howard M.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.

1992-01-01

295

Student development in the co-curriculum through values-based teaming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A co-curricular multidisciplinary teaming and design center was started in 1997 to augment classical classroom engineering education with active and collaborative project-centered experiential learning. Design, creativity, inventiveness, hands-on learning, project management, teaming, and leadership become the value-added education in the center which now has thirteen teams. Projects such as Formula SAE, Baja SAE, Aero Design etc. are all based on

Dan Dolan; Mike Batchelder; Jim McReynolds; Kim Osberg; Ryan Koontz; Pat Mahon; Mike Keegan; John Weiss

2011-01-01

296

[Advantages of multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment of mandible fractures in alcohol abusing patients].  

PubMed

The diagnosis of traumatic injuries in patients with chronic and severe alcoholic abuse is very complicated especially in cases with associated brain injuries. It is particularly difficult to provide anesthesia and resuscitation, complications arise when taking certain groups of drugs. The associated immune system disorders are risk factors for complications. The most reasonable approach to diagnosis and treatment of mandible fractures in such patients is a multidisciplinary approach involving expert team with maxillofacial surgeon playing a leading role. PMID:23528403

Kulakov, A A; Khandzratian, A S; Korolev, V M

2013-01-01

297

Team Orientations, Interpersonal Relations, and Team Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contradictions in post research on the concepts of "cohesiveness" and team success seem to arise from the ways in which cohesiveness is measured and the nature of the teams investigated in each study. (MB)

Nixon, Howard L.

1976-01-01

298

Consequences of team charter quality: Teamwork mental model similarity and team viability in engineering design student teams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning---including team charters. Team charters were diffused into engineering education as one of many instructional activities to meet the ABET accreditation mandates. However, the implementation and execution of team charters into engineering team based classes has been inconsistent and accepted without empirical evidence of the consequences. The purpose of the current study was to investigate team effectiveness, operationalized as team viability, as an outcome of team charter implementation in an undergraduate engineering team based design course. Two research questions were the focus of the study: a) What is the relationship between team charter quality and viability in engineering student teams, and b) What is the relationship among team charter quality, teamwork mental model similarity, and viability in engineering student teams? Thirty-eight intact teams, 23 treatment and 15 comparison, participated in the investigation. Treatment teams attended a team charter lecture, and completed a team charter homework assignment. Each team charter was assessed and assigned a quality score. Comparison teams did not join the lecture, and were not asked to create a team charter. All teams completed each data collection phase: a) similarity rating pretest; b) similarity posttest; and c) team viability survey. Findings indicate that team viability was higher in teams that attended the lecture and completed the charter assignment. Teams with higher quality team charter scores reported higher levels of team viability than teams with lower quality charter scores. Lastly, no evidence was found to support teamwork mental model similarity as a partial mediator of the team charter quality on team viability relationship. Foci for future research opportunities include using: a) online data collection methods to improve participant adherence to similarity rating instructions; b) story or narratives during pre- and posttest similarity rating data collection to create common levels of contextual perception; and c) support to ensure charters are integrated into the full project life cycle, not just a pre-project one time isolated activity. Twenty five sections, on average, of EDSGN 100 are taught each spring and fall semester. Consistent instructor expectations are set for the technical aspects of the course. However, ideas to foster team effectiveness are often left to the discretion of the individual instructor. Implementing empirically tested team effectiveness instructional activities would bring consistency to EDGSN 100 curriculum. Other instructional activities that would be of benefit to engineering educators include qualitative inquiry---asking intrateam process questions (at the mid-point of the project) and in-class reflection---dedicated time, post project, to discuss what went well/not well within the team.

Conway Hughston, Veronica

299

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Team Science and Collaboration Practitioner. Consulting and advising for developing teams and institutions interested in participating in and supporting team science. Experience with bringing diverse groups together from various backgrounds and institutions to solve challenging scientific problems.

300

Diversity Team | Poster  

Cancer.gov

The Employee Diversity Team (EDT) is looking for bright, talented, and committed Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL) employees—both government and contractor—who want to share in the team’s mission.

301

Studying Team Science - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The science of team science (SciTS) is a rapidly emerging field focused on understanding and enhancing the processes and outcomes of team science. A key goal of SciTS is to learn more about factors that maximize the efficiency, productivity, and effectiveness of team science initiatives.

302

Multidisciplinary assessment of children with deficits relating to attention, motor activity and perception: evaluation of the ANSER model.  

PubMed

This study describes a process for multidisciplinary assessment of children having deficits in attention, motor activity and perception (DAMP) with an evaluation of that process based on the opinions of parents, teachers and team members. The process named the 'ANSER model' consists of six steps (I to VI) conducted over a 2-month period and a follow-up 2 years later (step VII). Parents and teachers are fully involved early in the process and their participation is considered essential for a good result. Particular consideration is given to directly helping a child understand him/herself and become aware of his/her own difficulties. Strategies to overcome those difficulties are developed together with the child, the parents and the teacher. A specific aspect of the assessment is the aim to provide therapy through discussion of the questions, thoughts and feelings evoked during, and by the process. The expectations of parents and teachers regarding the assessment, and their completion of six steps of the process were ascertained from questionnaires. A large majority of both parents and teachers had high expectations of the assessment. Slightly more parents than teachers were convinced of its necessity. Their expectations were satisfied. Parents, teachers and team members emphasized the importance of the participation of parents and teachers in the process. The average time required for a complete assessment according to the process and including the work of all the specialists was 33 hours. PMID:10494462

Isberg, E; Kjellman, B

1999-09-01

303

Bioenergy research: a new paradigm in multidisciplinary research  

PubMed Central

The field of biology is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary and cross-cutting. This changing research atmosphere is creating the way for a new kind of enquiry that while building upon the traditional research establishment is providing a new multidisciplinary framework to more effectively address scientific grand challenges. Using the US Department of Energy sponsored BioEnergy Science Center as an example, we highlight how impactful breakthroughs in biofuel science can be achieved within a large cross-disciplinary team environment. Such transformational insights are key to furthering our understanding and in generating models, theories and processes that can be used to overcome recalcitrance of biomass for sustainable biofuel production. Multidisciplinary approaches have an increasingly greater role to play in meeting rising demands for food, fibre, energy, clean environment and good health. Discoveries achieved by diverse minds and cross-applications of tools and analytical approaches have tremendous potential to fill existing knowledge gaps, clear roadblocks and facilitate translation of basic sciences discoveries as solutions towards addressing some of the most pressing global issues. PMID:20542958

Kalluri, Udaya C.; Keller, Martin

2010-01-01

304

A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure  

PubMed Central

Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation. PMID:20925953

2010-01-01

305

[Multidisciplinary therapy for gastric cancer with liver metastasis].  

PubMed

Gastric cancer with liver metastasis (GCLM) is the leading cause of death in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Multiple metastasis was common in GCLM and usually complicated with lesions outside the liver, especially peritoneal metastasis. Most of liver metastasis lesions could not be resected radically. Currently, main treatments for GCLM included radical operation, palliative resection of gastric cancer, ablation of metastatic lesions, intervention and systemic chemotherapy. Based on the current progress in the treatment for GCLM and our clinical experience, the general status of patients, the type of gastric cancer and the degree of liver metastasis should be analyzed, and a cooperative multidisciplinary team (MDT) should be applied to conduct and to choose active and suitable comprehensive treatment for GCLM patients based on individualized therapy principle. PMID:24577759

Chen, Lin; Xi, Hongqing; Shen, Weisong

2014-02-01

306

A multidisciplinary approach to the study of the fluminense vegetation.  

PubMed

The fluminense vegetation, more specifically the flora from the Jurubatiba restinga has been investigated by a multidisciplinary team of botanists, chemist, radiobiologist, insect physiologists and geneticist. Vouchers of 564 specimens have been collected, identified, organized in an herbarium, and a database is being build up containing, in addition to classical botanical data, chemical data and information on the potential economic use either for landscape gardening, alternative foods or as medicinal plants. Phytochemical studies of the Guttiferae, Clusia hilariana, yielded oleanolic acid and nemorosone. Their biological activities against the haematophagous insect Rhodnius prolixus vector of Chagas disease have been investigated. Finally, it has been observed that aquatic plants possessed high levels of the natural radionuclide polonium-210, which seems to be originated mainly from soil rather than from atmospheric supply. PMID:11960185

Kelecom, Alphonse; Reis, Geisa L; Fevereiro, Paulo C A; Silva, Janie G; Santos, Marcelo G; Mello Neto, Cicero B; Gonzalez, Marcelo S; Gouvea, Rita C S; Almeida, Gilberto S S

2002-03-01

307

Implementing a multidisciplinary disaster simulation for undergraduate nursing students.  

PubMed

A liberal-arts-based undergraduate nursing program engaged in curriculum enhancement activities that led to the implementation of a disaster simulation for 81 multidisciplinary undergraduate students. A pretest/posttest design was used to determine the effectiveness of preparation for the simulation. Nursing students in three levels of the program received didactic preparation in disaster preparedness and were assigned to five different simulation response teams. One-way ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences for pretest and posttest scores, p = 0.05. An evaluation of student performance indicated that five of the eight nursing students assigned to the disaster site correctly triaged 81.2 percent of the victims; all eight nursing students assigned to the emergency department correctly reassessed the victims. Classroom didactic content, followed by a simulated learning experience, was found to be an effective teaching strategy for preparing undergraduate nursing students in disaster preparedness. PMID:21923004

Hutchinson, Sharon W; Haynes, Sheila; Parker, Pamela; Dennis, Betty; McLin, Carlen; Welldaregay, Wodajo

2011-01-01

308

Who's in CHARGE? Multidisciplinary management of patients with CHARGE association.  

PubMed Central

Clinical experience of 50 patients with the CHARGE association is reviewed and problems with management of children born with multiple system involvement is highlighted. It was found that the outlook for survival was poor if more than one of the following three features was present: cyanotic cardiac lesions, bilateral posterior choanal atresia, or tracheo-oesophageal fistula. Mortality was largely due not to the structural heart defects or choanal abnormalities, but reflected underlying pharyngeal and laryngeal incoordination, which resulted in aspiration of secretions. Outcome is likely to be improved if collaboration between specialist surgical teams allows necessary procedures to be performed using the minimum number of anaesthetics. Examination of both the short and long term management of these children has stressed the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to their care. Images Figure 2 PMID:2317068

Blake, K D; Russell-Eggitt, I M; Morgan, D W; Ratcliffe, J M; Wyse, R K

1990-01-01

309

There Is No "We" in Team: Learning to Learn Across Difference in Problem-Based Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increased emphasis is being placed on working and learning through teams, especially online. While technical aspects of this process have largely been the focus of researchers and practitioners, the emotional dynamics of online teams has received considerably less attention. In this study of online, problem-based learning teams, membership evoked…

Dirkx, John M.; Smith, Regina O.

2004-01-01

310

Virtual Team Culture and the Amplification of Team Boundary Permeability on Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The implementation of virtual teams is briskly increasing, particularly among transnational organizations that find global virtual teams a natural way to address their needs for global reach. While proximal and virtual teams share many attributes, including similar performance measures, they differ in characteristics in the nature of the work.…

Workman, Michael

2005-01-01

311

Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)], E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu; Mancuso, Anthony A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Werning, John W. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Villaret, Douglas B. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2007-10-01

312

Pineal lesions: a multidisciplinary challenge.  

PubMed

The pineal region is a complex anatomical compartment, harbouring the pineal gland surrounded by the quadrigeminal plate and the confluents of the internal cerebral veins to form the vein of Galen. The complexity of lesions in that region, however, goes far beyond the pineal parenchyma proper. Originating in the pineal gland, there are not only benign cysts but also numerous different tumour types. In addition, lesions such as tectal gliomas, tentorial meningiomas and choroid plexus papillomas arise from the surrounding structures, occupying that regions. Furthermore, the area has an affinity for metastatic lesions. Vascular lesions complete the spectrum mainly as small tectal arteriovenous malformations or cavernous haemangiomas.Taken together, there is a wide spectrum of lesions, many unique to that region, which call for a multidisciplinary approach. The limited access and anatomical complexity have generated a spectrum of anatomical approaches and raised the interest for neuroendoscopic approaches. Equally complex is the spectrum of treatment modalities such as microsurgery as the main option but stereotactic radiosurgery as an alternative or adjuvant to surgery for selected cases, radiation as for germinoma (see below) and or combinatorial chemotherapy, which may need to precede any other ablative technique as constituents.In this context, we review the current literature and our own series to obtain a snapshot sentiment of how to approach pineal lesions, how to interrelate alternative/competing concepts and review the recent technological advances. PMID:25411146

Westphal, Manfred; Emami, Pedram

2015-01-01

313

A Multidisciplinary Performance Analysis of a Lifting-Body Single-Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lockheed Martin Skunk Works (LMSW) is currently developing a single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle called VentureStar(TM) A team at NASA Langley Research Center participated with LMSW in the screening and evaluation of a number of early VentureStar(TM) configurations. The performance analyses that supported these initial studies were conducted to assess the effect of a lifting body shape, linear aerospike engine and metallic thermal protection system (TPS) on the weight and performance of the vehicle. These performance studies were performed in a multidisciplinary fashion that indirectly linked the trajectory optimization with weight estimation and aerothermal analysis tools. This approach was necessary to develop optimized ascent and entry trajectories that met all vehicle design constraints. Significant improvements in ascent performance were achieved when the vehicle flew a lifting trajectory and varied the engine mixture ratio during flight. Also, a considerable reduction in empty weight was possible by adjusting the total oxidizer-to-fuel and liftoff thrust-to-weight ratios. However, the optimal ascent flight profile had to be altered to ensure that the vehicle could be trimmed in pitch using only the flow diverting capability of the aerospike engine. Likewise, the optimal entry trajectory had to be tailored to meet TPS heating rate and transition constraints while satisfying a crossrange requirement.

Tartabini, Paul V.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Korte, J. J.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

2000-01-01

314

Maintaining Team Performance. For the Practicing Manager. An Ideas into Action Guidebook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet provides ways for organizational team leaders to assess their team's effectiveness at regular intervals and to monitor their team's performance. The booklet identifies six key aspects, or dimensions, consistent across all teams. If all six dimensions are strong within a team, the team has the means to conduct its work and perform…

Kanaga, Kim; Browning, Henry

315

Team Knowledge Sharing Intervention Effects on Team Shared Mental Models and Student Performance in an Undergraduate Science Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a shared mental model (SMM) based intervention on student team mental model similarity and ultimately team performance in an undergraduate meteorology course. The team knowledge sharing (TKS) intervention was designed to promote team reflection, communication, and improvement planning. Results reveal that the TKS intervention was partially effective in enhancing student team SMM and team scores on meteorology lab assignments. The TKS intervention has potential for use in science courses where a teaming approach is used. Similar interventions could likely be developed, empirically examined, and potentially employed to promote success in handling complex challenges while working in teams in the classroom and beyond.

Sikorski, Eric G.; Johnson, Tristan E.; Ruscher, Paul H.

2012-12-01

316

Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care  

PubMed Central

Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by dementia. PMID:21655340

Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

2011-01-01

317

Traveling Blues: The Effect of Relocation on Partially Distributed Teams  

E-print Network

.1.2 User/Machine Systems, human factors; H.5.3 Group and organizational interfaces, computer and growing body of research on fully-distributed work (virtual teams), there is comparatively little research on partially distributed teams. Partially distributed teams are those that have some proportion of the team

Olson, Judith S.

318

A Contingency Model of Conflict and Team Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors develop and test theoretical extensions of the relationships of task conflict, relationship conflict, and 2 dimensions of team effectiveness (performance and team-member satisfaction) among 2 samples of work teams in Taiwan and Indonesia. Findings show that relationship conflict moderates the task conflict-team performance…

Shaw, Jason D.; Zhu, Jing; Duffy, Michelle K.; Scott, Kristin L.; Shih, Hsi-An; Susanto, Ely

2011-01-01

319

Using Scripted Video to Assess Interdisciplinary Team Effectiveness Training Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training (GITT) Program funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation, the authors of this article worked to create an instrument, the Trainee Test of Team Dynamics, to assess health care trainees' understanding of team dynamics. The Trainee Test of Team Dynamics is a five-question written test designed to capture GITT trainees' knowledge of

Kathryn Hyer; John H. Skinner; Robert L. Kane; Judith L. Howe; Nancy Whitelaw; Nancy Wilson; Ellen Flaherty; Lois Halstead; Terry Fulmer

2004-01-01

320

Multidisciplinary Management of Soft Tissue Sarcoma  

PubMed Central

Soft tissue sarcoma is a rare malignancy, with approximately 11,000 cases per year encountered in the United States. It is primarily encountered in adults but can affect patients of any age. There are many histologic subtypes and the malignancy can be low or high grade. Appropriate staging work up includes a physical exam, advanced imaging, and a carefully planned biopsy. This information is then used to guide the discussion of definitive treatment of the tumor which typically involves surgical resection with a negative margin in addition to neoadjuvant or adjuvant external beam radiation. Advances in imaging and radiation therapy have made limb salvage surgery the standard of care, with local control rates greater than 90% in most modern series. Currently, the role of chemotherapy is not well defined and this treatment is typically reserved for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease and for certain histologic subtypes. The goal of this paper is to review the current state of the art in multidisciplinary management of soft tissue sarcoma. PMID:23983648

Nystrom, Lukas M.; Reimer, Nickolas B.; Reith, John D.; Dang, Long; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker

2013-01-01

321

Multidisciplinary Russian biomedical research in space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research activities on a comprehensive multidisciplinary program are vital for enhancement of the system of crew's medical care, environmental health and hygiene in space missions. The primary goal of the program must be identification of patterns, intensity and dynamics of structural and functional shifts in organism induced by an aggregate of spaceflight factors including microgravity, isolation, artificial environment, space radiation, etc. Also, the program must pursue differential assessment of emerging deviations from the standpoint of adequacy to the spaceflight conditions and prospects of returning to Earth and guide the development of principles, methods and techniques necessary to maintain health and working capacity of humans during short- and long-duration missions and on return to Earth. Over 50 years, since 1963, the IBMP researchers apply systemic and innovational approaches to fundamental and exploratory studies in the fields of medical sciences, radiation biology, engineering science, biotechnology, etc. with participation of various biological specimens and human volunteers. Investigations aboard manned spacecrafts and biological satellites as well as in ground-based laboratories further enhancement of the medical care system for crews on orbital and remote space missions; they give insight into the fundamental problems of gravitational physiology and biology, psychophysiology, radiation biology, and contribute thereby to the development of knowledge, methods and technologies, as well as medical and scientific equipment.

Orlov, O. I.; Sychev, V. N.; Samarin, G. I.; Ilyin, E. A.; Belakovskiy, M. S.; Kussmaul, A. R.

2014-08-01

322

The Team Identification–Social Psychological Health Model: Sport Fans Gaining Connections to Others via Sport Team Identification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous work has consistently found positive relationships between levels of sport team identification and social psychological well-being. According to the Team Identification–Social Psychological Health Model, these effects result from the increased social connections fans generate through their interest in the team. The current pair of investigations was designed to test the hypotheses that (1) team identification is positively related to

Daniel L. Wann; Paula J. Waddill; Josh Polk; Stephen Weaver

2011-01-01

323

Sports Teams Extend Reach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

Shah, Nirvi

2012-01-01

324

Team learning center design principles  

SciTech Connect

This is a preliminary report of a multi-year collaboration of the authors addressing the subject: Can a facility be designed for team learning and would it improve the efficiency and effectiveness of team interactions? Team learning in this context is a broad definition that covers all activities where small to large groups of people come together to work, to learn, and to share through team activities. Multimedia, networking, such as World Wide Web and other tools, are greatly enhancing the capability of individual learning. This paper addresses the application of technology and design to facilitate group or team learning. Many organizational meetings need tens of people to come together to do work as a large group and then divide into smaller subgroups of five to ten to work and then to return and report and interact with the larger group. Current facilities were not, in general, designed for this type of meeting. Problems with current facilities are defined and a preliminary design solution to many of the identified problems is presented.

Daily, B.; Loveland, J.; Whatley, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01

325

What influences patient decision-making in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis multidisciplinary care? A study of patient perspectives  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are required to make decisions concerning quality of life and symptom management over the course of their disease. Clinicians perceive that patients’ ability to engage in timely decision-making is extremely challenging. However, we lack patient perspectives on this issue. This study aimed to explore patient experiences of ALS, and to identify factors influencing their decision-making in the specialized multidisciplinary care of ALS. Methods An exploratory study was conducted. Fourteen patients from two specialized ALS multidisciplinary clinics participated in semistructured interviews that were audio recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed for emergent themes. Results Decision-making was influenced by three levels of factors, ie, structural, interactional, and personal. The structural factor was the decision-making environment of specialized multidisciplinary ALS clinics, which supported decision-making by providing patients with disease-specific information and specialized care planning. Interactional factors were the patient experiences of ALS, including patients’ reaction to the diagnosis, response to deterioration, and engagement with the multidisciplinary ALS team. Personal factors were patients’ personal philosophies, including their outlook on life, perceptions of control, and planning for the future. Patient approaches to decision-making reflected a focus on the present, rather than anticipating future progression of the disease and potential care needs. Conclusion Decision-making for symptom management and quality of life in ALS care is enhanced when the patient’s personal philosophy is supported by collaborative relationships between the patient and the multidisciplinary ALS team. Patients valued the support provided by the multidisciplinary team; however, their focus on living in the present diverged from the efforts of health professionals to prepare patients and their carers for the future. The challenge facing health professionals is how best to engage each patient in decision-making for their future needs, to bridge this gap. PMID:23226006

Hogden, Anne; Greenfield, David; Nugus, Peter; Kiernan, Matthew C

2012-01-01

326

The myth of the top management team.  

PubMed

Companies all across the economic spectrum are making use of teams. They go by a variety of names and can be found at all levels. In fact, you are likely to find the group at the very top of an organization professing to be a team. But even in the best of companies, a so-called top team seldom functions as a real team. Real teams must follow a well-defined discipline to achieve their performance potential. And performance is the key issue--not the fostering of "team values" such as empowerment, sensitivity, or involvement. In recent years, the focus on performance was lost in many companies. Even today, CEOs and senior executives often see few gains in performance from their attempts to become more teamlike. Nevertheless, a team effort at the top can be essential to capturing the highest performance results possible--when the conditions are right. Good leadership requires differentiating between team and nonteam opportunities, and then acting accordingly. Three litmus tests must be passed for a team at the top to be effective. First, the team must shape collective work-products--these are tangible performance results that the group can achieve working together that surpass what the team members could have achieved working on their own. Second, the leadership role must shift, depending on the task at hand. And third, the team's members must be mutually accountable for the group's results. When these criteria can be met, senior executives should come together to achieve real team performance. When the criteria cannot be met, they should rely on the individual leadership skills that they have honed over the years. PMID:10174799

Katzenbach, J R

1997-01-01

327

Using Assessment for Developing Team Building Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Ability to function in teams," "good team building skills," and "teamwork" are all now common phrases in the classifieds. It is increasingly important in society today, both in social and work environments, to be a good team player. But how do we actually develop those skills and evaluate whether our efforts have had a measurable impact so that we can adjust our approach for maximum benefit? This booklet presents a team assessment process developed to track and improve students team building skill as well as a complete description of its implementation. Preliminary research on team building skills development was performed with a group of community college students in the Electrical Technology Program. The results from the two year study indicate that active participation in the team assessment process is beneficial in developing team building and leadership skills in college students. All the materials necessary to implement the team assessment process for a classroom or workplace setting are provided in this booklet. Using these materials and methods can yield evidence of improved team building and leadership skills important in meeting accreditation standards or for use in evaluating corporate team skills and leadership development.

Akins, Lean M.

328

Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

1972-01-01

329

Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) Report  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Review Panel Report represents the work of a review team contracted by NASA to analyze its programs and practices. The 135-page "Space Shuttle Independent Assessment Team (SIAT) Report" reviews the Space Shuttle's "sub-systems and maintenance practices." The report identifies systemic problems and organizes them into nine main issues, discusses technical issues, and offers recommendations. An additional report, from the Mars Independent Assessment Team chaired by Thomas Young, will be available by the end of March.

330

Multidisciplinary unmanned technology teammate (MUTT)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) held an autonomous robot competition called CANINE in June 2012. The goal of the competition was to develop innovative and natural control methods for robots. This paper describes the winning technology, including the vision system, the operator interaction, and the autonomous mobility. The rules stated only gestures or voice commands could be used for control. The robots would learn a new object at the start of each phase, find the object after it was thrown into a field, and return the object to the operator. Each of the six phases became more difficult, including clutter of the same color or shape as the object, moving and stationary obstacles, and finding the operator who moved from the starting location to a new location. The Robotic Research Team integrated techniques in computer vision, speech recognition, object manipulation, and autonomous navigation. A multi-filter computer vision solution reliably detected the objects while rejecting objects of similar color or shape, even while the robot was in motion. A speech-based interface with short commands provided close to natural communication of complicated commands from the operator to the robot. An innovative gripper design allowed for efficient object pickup. A robust autonomous mobility and navigation solution for ground robotic platforms provided fast and reliable obstacle avoidance and course navigation. The research approach focused on winning the competition while remaining cognizant and relevant to real world applications.

Uzunovic, Nenad; Schneider, Anne; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Del Giorno, Mark

2013-01-01

331

Developing Trust in Virtual Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rapid globalization, advances in technology, flatter organizational structures, synergistic cooperation among firms, and a shift to knowledge work environments have led to the increasing use of virtual teams in organizations. Selecting, training, and socializing employees in virtual teamwork has therefore become an important human resource…

Germain, Marie-Line

2011-01-01

332

Team Up to Increase Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The presentation describes the development of an interdisciplinary team approach to working with mildly retarded students (5-9 years old). The approach featured group discussions and activities to enhance students' listening, communication, and social skills, and to improve individual and group behavior. Individual and group goals were designed by…

Phelps, Barbara; And Others

333

What Is Team Science? - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Team science is a collaborative effort to address a scientific challenge that leverages the strengths and expertise of professionals trained in different fields. Although traditional single-investigator driven approaches are ideal for many scientific endeavors, coordinated teams of investigators with diverse skills and knowledge may be especially helpful for studies of complex social problems with multiple causes.

334

From: Marketplace Team To: Marketplace Team  

E-print Network

From: Marketplace Team To: Marketplace Team Cc: bfsMAIL-Purchasing; bfsMAIL-Disb Subject: New iRequests: Introducing PO Revisions & Subawards in Marketplace Date: Monday, June 04, 2012 2:55:52 PM Attachments: image002.png Dear Marketplace Community, Revising a PO or processing a Subaward can now be done through

California at San Diego, University of

335

Lessons learned from implementing multidisciplinary health professions educational models in community settings.  

PubMed

This article addresses sustainability elements for multidisciplinary health professions education in communities. The results are based on a 5 year program involving multiple health professions education institutions in seven states within the USA. We offer observations and suggestions to others who plan and implement multidisciplinary programs for health professions educators. Our findings are based on the outcomes of the Community Partnerships in Health Professions Education (CPHPE) initiative funded by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. Data sources included pre and post surveys of students and faculty, site visits, published evaluations and site reports, and a 2 year follow-up evaluation after the external funding phase. Elements of the partnership that facilitated the sustainability of the models were: leadership, complementary missions, curriculum that mirrors clinical community practice, change from outside in, partnership boards, and faculty development. Those elements that were barriers to sustaining the efforts were: professional identities and territorial boundaries, structural differences, costs, and unclear goals. The multidisciplinary components of the community partnership initiative were the most challenging. However, in most programs, they did succeed and are currently in place. By paying attention to the elements that enhance and detract from teaming, one can plan for more successful multidisciplinary education. PMID:12772466

Harris, Dona L; Henry, Rebecca C; Bland, Carole J; Starnaman, Sandra M; Voytek, Kristin L

2003-02-01

336

Multidisciplinary Approach to Linear Aerospike Nozzle Optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model of a linear aerospike rocket nozzle that consists of coupled aerodynamic and structural analyses has been developed. A nonlinear computational fluid dynamics code is used to calculate the aerodynamic thrust, and a three-dimensional fink-element model is used to determine the structural response and weight. The model will be used to demonstrate multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) capabilities for relevant engine concepts, assess performance of various MDO approaches, and provide a guide for future application development. In this study, the MDO problem is formulated using the multidisciplinary feasible (MDF) strategy. The results for the MDF formulation are presented with comparisons against sequential aerodynamic and structural optimized designs. Significant improvements are demonstrated by using a multidisciplinary approach in comparison with the single- discipline design strategy.

Korte, J. J.; Salas, A. O.; Dunn, H. J.; Alexandrov, N. M.; Follett, W. W.; Orient, G. E.; Hadid, A. H.

1997-01-01

337

Multidisciplinary Approach to Aerospike Nozzle Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model of a linear aerospike rocket nozzle that consists of coupled aerodynamic and structural analyses has been developed. A nonlinear computational fluid dynamics code is used to calculate the aerodynamic thrust, and a three-dimensional finite-element model is used to determine the structural response and weight. The model will be used to demonstrate multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) capabilities for relevant engine concepts, assess performance of various MDO approaches, and provide a guide for future application development. In this study, the MDO problem is formulated using the multidisciplinary feasible (MDF) strategy. The results for the MDF formulation are presented with comparisons against separate aerodynamic and structural optimized designs. Significant improvements are demonstrated by using a multidisciplinary approach in comparison with the single-discipline design strategy.

Korte, J. J.; Salas, A. O.; Dunn, H. J.; Alexandrov, N. M.; Follett, W. W.; Orient, G. E.; Hadid, A. H.

1997-01-01

338

Social Protocols for Agile Virtual Teams  

E-print Network

Despite many works on collaborative networked organizations (CNOs), CSCW, groupware, workflow systems and social networks, computer support for virtual teams is still insufficient, especially support for agility, i.e. the capability of virtual team members to rapidly and cost efficiently adapt the way they interact to changes. In this paper, requirements for computer support for agile virtual teams are presented. Next, an extension of the concept of social protocol is proposed as a novel model supporting agile interactions within virtual teams. The extended concept of social protocol consists of an extended social network and a workflow model.

Picard, Willy

2011-01-01

339

[Requisites for the leader of a stroke team].  

PubMed

I discussed on requisites for the reader of stroke team. Acute stroke management in a stroke unit (SU) can reduce the mortality and morbidity, and improve the long-term ADL and quality of life (QOL). The SU is a ward specializing in stroke where multidisciplinary stroke team performs intensive medical treatment and early rehabilitation. It is generally recommended that a manager or head in a hospital department should meet several requirements including achievements of theses, a license for his/her medical specialty, activities in scientific societies, etc. In addition, the most important for the leader of a stroke team is the ability to teach young stroke neurologists and other stroke team members with enthusiasm, confidence, politeness, and a tender heart. The theory of the group dynamics indicates that only a powerful reader can educate powerful followers, and vice versa. PMID:23196537

Minematsu, Kazuo

2012-01-01

340

Developing high-performance cross-functional teams: Understanding motivations, functional loyalties, and teaming fundamentals  

SciTech Connect

Teamwork is the key to the future of effective technology management. Today`s technologies and markets have become too complex for individuals to work alone. Global competition, limited resources, cost consciousness, and time pressures have forced organizations and project managers to encourage teamwork. Many of these teams will be cross-functional teams that can draw on a multitude of talents and knowledge. To develop high-performing cross-functional teams, managers must understand motivations, functional loyalties, and the different backgrounds of the individual team members. To develop a better understanding of these issues, managers can learn from experience and from literature on teams and teaming concepts. When studying the literature to learn about cross-functional teaming, managers will find many good theoretical concepts, but when put into practice, these concepts have varying effects. This issue of varying effectiveness is what drives the research for this paper. The teaming concepts were studied to confirm or modify current understanding. The literature was compared with a {open_quotes}ground truth{close_quotes}, a survey of the reality of teaming practices, to examine the teaming concepts that the literature finds to be critical to the success of teams. These results are compared to existing teams to determine if such techniques apply in real-world cases.

Miller, M.A.

1996-08-01

341

Tiger Team audits  

SciTech Connect

This paper will address the purpose, scope, and approach of the Department of Energy Tiger Team Assessments. It will use the Tiger Team Assessment experience of Sandia National Laboratories at Albuquerque, New Mexico, as illustration.

Cheney, G.T.

1992-01-01

342

Tiger Team audits  

SciTech Connect

This paper will address the purpose, scope, and approach of the Department of Energy Tiger Team Assessments. It will use the Tiger Team Assessment experience of Sandia National Laboratories at Albuquerque, New Mexico, as illustration.

Cheney, G.T.

1992-03-01

343

Team Competition Pingzhong Tang  

E-print Network

are matched up and how to score them. There are two types of manipulations by a team: Misreporting. Similar examples are the current international team competitions for table tennis (aka Corbillon Cup

Tang, Pingzhong

344

Health Care Team  

MedlinePLUS

... Story About the NKF You are here Home » Health Care Team Good health care is always a team effort - especially for people ... chronic kidney failure. Since each member of the health care staff contributes to your care, it is important ...

345

Your Dialysis Care Team  

MedlinePLUS

... the NKF You are here Home » Your Dialysis Care Team Good health care is always a team ... your family improve your quality of life. Patient Care Technician and Biomedical Technician There are two kinds ...

346

Considering Subcontractors in Distributed Scrum Teams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this chapter we present our experiences with working with subcontractors in distributed Scrum teams. The context of our experiences is a medium size software service provider company. We present the way the subcontractors are selected and how Scrum practices can be used in real-life projects. We discuss team arrangements and tools used in distributed development teams highlighting aspects that are important when working with subcontractors. We also present an illustrative example where different phases of a project working with subcontractors are described. The example also provides practical tips on work in such projects. Finally, we present a summary of our data that was collected from Scrum and non-Scrum projects implemented over a few years. This chapter should provide a practical point of view on working with subcontractors in Scrum teams for those who are considering such cooperation.

Rudzki, Jakub; Hammouda, Imed; Mikkola, Tuomas; Mustonen, Karri; Systä, Tarja

347

Attributes of top elite team-handball players.  

PubMed

Researchers in the field of excellence in sport performance are becoming increasingly focused on the study of sport-specific characteristics and requirements. In accordance with this, the purposes of this study were (a) to examine the morphologic-, fitness-, handball-specific skills and psychological and "biosocial" differences between top elite and nontop elite team-handball players and (b) to investigate the extent to which they may be used to identify top elite team-handball players. One hundred sixty-seven adult male team-handball players were studied and divided in 2 groups: top elite (n = 41) and nontop elite (n = 126). Twenty-eight morphologic-, 9 fitness-, 1 handball-specific skills and 2 psychological-based and 2 "biosocial"-based attributes were used. Top elite and nontop elite groups were compared for each variable of interest using Student's t-test, and 5 logistic regression analyses were performed with the athlete's performance group (top elite or nontop elite) as the dependent variable and the variables of each category as predictors. The results showed that (a) body mass, waist girth, radiale-dactylion length, midstylion-dactylion length, and absolute muscle mass (morphologic model); (b) 30-m sprint time, countermovement jump height and average power, abdominal strength and the class of performance in the Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance Test (fitness model); (c) offensive power (specific-skills model); (d) ego-based motivational orientation (psychological model); (e) socioeconomic status and the energy spent (for week) in handball activity (biosocial model); significantly (p < 0.05) contributed to predict the probability of an athlete to be a top elite team-handball player. Moreover, the fitness model exhibited higher percentages of correct classification (i.e., 91.5%) than all the other models did. This study provided (a) the rational to reduce the battery of tests for evaluation purposes, and (b) the initial step to work on building a multidisciplinary model to predict the probability of a handball athlete to be a top elite player. PMID:23591948

Massuça, Luís M; Fragoso, Isabel; Teles, Júlia

2014-01-01

348

Ground Rules in Team Projects: Findings from a Prototype System to Support Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student team project work in higher education is one of the best ways to develop team working skills at the same time as learning about the subject matter. As today's students require the freedom to learn at times and places that better match their lifestyles, there is a need for any support for team project work to be also available online. Team

Whatley, Janice

2009-01-01

349

Diversity Team | Poster  

Cancer.gov

The NCI at Frederick Employee Diversity Team (EDT) has prepared a new display that features a sample of the foreign films from the team’s collection in the Scientific Library. “Foreign films really help stimulate an awareness of different cultures and countries.

350

Your Health Care Team  

MedlinePLUS

... Size: A A A Listen En Español Your Health Care Team You You are the most important member of your health care team. After all, you are the one who ... are the first to notice any problems. Your health care team depends on you to talk to them ...

351

A Genuine TEAM Player  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Qualtech Systems, Inc. developed a complete software system with capabilities of multisignal modeling, diagnostic analysis, run-time diagnostic operations, and intelligent interactive reasoners. Commercially available as the TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System) tool set, the software can be used to reveal unanticipated system failures. The TEAMS software package is broken down into four companion tools: TEAMS-RT, TEAMATE, TEAMS-KB, and TEAMS-RDS. TEAMS-RT identifies good, bad, and suspect components in the system in real-time. It reports system health results from onboard tests, and detects and isolates failures within the system, allowing for rapid fault isolation. TEAMATE takes over from where TEAMS-RT left off by intelligently guiding the maintenance technician through the troubleshooting procedure, repair actions, and operational checkout. TEAMS-KB serves as a model management and collection tool. TEAMS-RDS (TEAMS-Remote Diagnostic Server) has the ability to continuously assess a system and isolate any failure in that system or its components, in real time. RDS incorporates TEAMS-RT, TEAMATE, and TEAMS-KB in a large-scale server architecture capable of providing advanced diagnostic and maintenance functions over a network, such as the Internet, with a web browser user interface.

2001-01-01

352

Contact - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The Team Science Toolkit was developed, and is maintained, by the Science of Team Science (SciTS) team at the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, Behavioral Research Program. To contact us, please email Dr. Kara L.

353

Constructing a team model: creating a foundation for evidence-based teams.  

PubMed

Teams are the fundamental element of work in the contemporary clinical setting. As interdisciplinary teams become an essential component of the evidence-based framework for clinical practice, their formalization, integration, and synthesis within the practice framework will become increasingly mandatory. Outlined here is a contextual model for team action that is formalized as the organizational leadership continuously addresses the structural and process components of team dynamics in a continuous and cybernetic frame that assures all of the elements of effective teamwork. The theoretical foundations for team modeling are explicated, the elements of the systems approach to team process are outlined, and a necessary synthesis of team processes is described and established as a foundation for evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:16878006

Porter-O'Grady, Tim; Alexander, Daniel R; Blaylock, Jo; Minkara, Nazem; Surel, Dominique

2006-01-01

354

Multidisciplinary Design and Communication: a Pedagogical Vision*  

E-print Network

Multidisciplinary Design and Communication: a Pedagogical Vision* JAMES A. NEWELL, ANTHONY J of Communication, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ 08080 USA. E-mail: newell@rowan.edu The Sophomore Engineering techniques and providing them with the necessary foundation for their careers as technical communicators

Ramachandran, Ravi

355

Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of UAV Airframes  

E-print Network

Multidisciplinary Design Optimization of UAV Airframes Andr´as S´obester , Andy J. Keane University, where simple, but versatile models and low cost analysis tools are used to guide the designer through of our chosen class of aircraft ­ Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs). To summarize: a CAD-based UAV conceptual

Sóbester, András

356

Directions in Environmental Gerontology: A Multidisciplinary Field  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article considers developments and directions for environmental gerontology drawing on the three papers in this Forum. The multidisciplinary field came of age during the 1960s with Powell Lawton's powerful environmental press paradigm and its applications to empirical research and building design. Recent theoretical developments in Europe and…

Kendig, Hal

2003-01-01

357

Marine Protected Areas A Multidisciplinary Approach  

E-print Network

Marine Protected Areas A Multidisciplinary Approach Edited by JOACHIM CLAUDET National Centerfor.1 Introduction Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly used as tools to conserve biodiversity, manage-lasting local increases in the density, size, diversity, and/or productivity of marine organisms within MPA

Osenberg, Craig W.

358

Improving Student Achievement in a Multidisciplinary Context  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article analyses interim findings of an ongoing action research project into the use of assessment criteria and grade descriptors in the assessment process. The project is multidisciplinary and covers areas as diverse as Sports Sociology, Economics, Youth and Community Studies, and Education. The idea is to equip first-year students with the…

Chapman, Amanda; Bloxham, Sue

2004-01-01

359

Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare  

E-print Network

Multidisciplinary Assessment of Technology Centre for Healthcare Year 7 Annual Report www of device users, the medical device industry, regulators and reimbursement agencies and healthcare providers healthcare users really need: more effective and efficient service, based on better technology that has been

Oakley, Jeremy

360

Multidisciplinary optimization for gas turbine airfoil design  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multidisciplinary optimization procedure for gas turbine airfoil design has been developed and demonstrated on a generic blade. Aerodynamic and heat transfer design objectives are integrated along with various constraints on the airfoil geometry. Heat transfer optimization and external aerodynamic shape optimization has been performed on a generic blade. Shape optimization is performed using geometric parameters associated with film cooling

S. S. Talya; J. N. Rajadas; A. Chattopadhyay

2000-01-01

361

The INTERMED: a screening instrument to identify multiple sclerosis patients in need of multidisciplinary treatment  

PubMed Central

Objective: To analyse the value of the INTERMED, a screening instrument to assess case complexity, compared with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Guy's Neurological Disability Scale (GNDS) to identify multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in need of multidisciplinary treatment. Methods: One hundred MS patients underwent INTERMED, EDSS, and GNDS examinations. Patient care needs were assessed by a multidisciplinary team and a goal oriented treatment plan was defined. Correlations between INTERMED, individual INTERMED domains, EDSS, GNDS sum score, and total number of proposed disciplines involved in the treatment plan were studied. Results: Mean (SD) age was 40.6 (10.1) years. Median scores were 14.0 for the INTERMED, 4.0 for the EDSS, and 13.5 for the GNDS sum score. Moderate correlations were found between the INTERMED sum score and EDSS (r=0.59) and GNDS sum score (r=0.60). The number of disciplines as proposed by the multidisciplinary team showed the highest statistically significant correlation with the INTERMED sum score (r=0.41) compared with EDSS (r=0.32) and GNDS sum score (r=0.34). No significant or only weak correlations were found between the psychological domain of the INTERMED and EDSS or GNDS. Conclusion: The findings in this study show that there is an additional value of the INTERMED compared with the EDSS and GNDS in identifying MS patients in need of multidisciplinary treatment. The INTERMED domains show the area of the patient's vulnerability and care needs: especially the INTERMED's psychological and social domains may guide the clinician to deal with specific problems that complicate healthcare delivery. PMID:12486260

Hoogervorst, E; de Jonge, P; Jelles, B; Huyse, F; Heeres, I; van der Ploeg, H M; Uitdehaag, B; Polman, C

2003-01-01

362

How to Suceed in Team Teaching--By Really Trying. Occasional Paper No. 13.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides guidelines in three areas for organizing and working in teaching teams: (1) getting started; (2) making the most of team meetings; and (3) minimizing team problems. Getting started requires a number of key decisions: (1) on what basis should team members be selected? (2) what should be the size of the team? (3) what areas…

Nolan, Robert R.; Roper, Susan Stavert

363

The Impact of Managerial Coaching on Learning Outcomes within the Team Context: An Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the relationship between coaching expertise, project difficulty, and team empowerment on team learning outcomes within the context of a high-performance work team. Variables were tested using multiple regression analysis. The data were analyzed for two groups--team leaders and team members--using t-tests, factor analysis,…

Hagen, Marcia; Aguilar, Mariya Gavrilova

2012-01-01

364

Multidisciplinary design optimization of an automotive magnetorheological brake design  

E-print Network

Multidisciplinary design optimization of an automotive magnetorheological brake design Edward J This paper presents the development of a new electromechanical brake system using magnetorheological (MR: Magnetorheological fluid; Automotive brake; Finite element analysis; Computational fluid dynamics; Multidisciplinary

Park, Edward

365

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Sustainable Management of Watershed Resources  

EPA Science Inventory

The lack of integration in the study and management of water resource problems suggests the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As practiced in the Shepherd Creek stormwater management study (Cincinnati OH), we envision a multidisciplinary approach involving economic incentive...

366

Trends in Multidisciplinary Engineering Education, MA&O 2006 Trends in Multidisciplinary Engineering  

E-print Network

Customer and societal needs Good communication skills Written Oral Graphic Listening High ethical standards ingenuity, creativity Good communication skills Business, management skills; leadership skills High ethical needed is skill rather than machinery" Wilbur Wright, 1902 #12;Trends in Multidisciplinary Engineering

Peraire, Jaime

367

Concurrent Mission and Systems Design at NASA Glenn Research Center: The Origins of the COMPASS Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Established at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in 2006 to meet the need for rapid mission analysis and multi-disciplinary systems design for in-space and human missions, the Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team is a multidisciplinary, concurrent engineering group whose primary purpose is to perform integrated systems analysis, but it is also capable of designing any system that involves one or more of the disciplines present in the team. The authors were involved in the development of the COMPASS team and its design process, and are continuously making refinements and enhancements. The team was unofficially started in the early 2000s as part of the distributed team known as Team JIMO (Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter) in support of the multi-center collaborative JIMO spacecraft design during Project Prometheus. This paper documents the origins of a concurrent mission and systems design team at GRC and how it evolved into the COMPASS team, including defining the process, gathering the team and tools, building the facility, and performing studies.

McGuire, Melissa L.; Oleson, Steven R.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

2012-01-01

368

Multidisciplinary Multiobjective Optimal Design for Turbomachinery Using Evolutionary Algorithm  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes Dr. Lian s efforts toward developing a robust and efficient tool for multidisciplinary and multi-objective optimal design for turbomachinery using evolutionary algorithms. This work consisted of two stages. The first stage (from July 2003 to June 2004) Dr. Lian focused on building essential capabilities required for the project. More specifically, Dr. Lian worked on two subjects: an enhanced genetic algorithm (GA) and an integrated optimization system with a GA and a surrogate model. The second stage (from July 2004 to February 2005) Dr. Lian formulated aerodynamic optimization and structural optimization into a multi-objective optimization problem and performed multidisciplinary and multi-objective optimizations on a transonic compressor blade based on the proposed model. Dr. Lian s numerical results showed that the proposed approach can effectively reduce the blade weight and increase the stage pressure ratio in an efficient manner. In addition, the new design was structurally safer than the original design. Five conference papers and three journal papers were published on this topic by Dr. Lian.

2005-01-01

369

Multidisciplinary Versus One-on-One Setting: A Qualitative Study of Clinicians' Perceptions of Their Relationship With Patients With Prostate Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Previous studies indicate that a multidisciplinary approach could be suitable for dealing with the complex issues faced by physicians in the management of prostate cancer; however, few studies have investigated clinicians' perceptions of multidisciplinary care. Our aim was to evaluate clinicians' perceptions of the patient-clinician relationship in a multidisciplinary context, and to compare this with physicians' perceptions of providing care independently. Methods: A qualitative observational study was performed in 2009. Three radiation oncologists, three urologists, three medical oncologists and one psychologist from the multidisciplinary clinic (MDC) team at the Prostate Program of Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy, were interviewed to assess their perceptions of their relationship with the patient. Results: Clinicians reported that the MDC has advantages regarding providing patients with more accurate information and acquiring information from patients, but a clear preference for a multidisciplinary setting did not emerge. Clinicians reported that in one-on-one examinations (1) they feel more comfortable listening to the patient and more able to manage communication, and that (2) the process of building trust is easier. Conclusion: Clinicians appear to recognize the value of the MDC in terms of effective communication with patients but feel that other aspects of relationship building are hindered in a multidisciplinary setting. Organizational and teamwork issues need to be addressed to optimize the implementation of a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:21532797

Bellardita, Lara; Donegani, Simona; Spatuzzi, Andrea L.; Valdagni, Riccardo

2011-01-01

370

Developing Good Team-working Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article offers advice to educators on developing learners' collaboration skills through problem solving. The author presents six categories of tasks, each of which addresses a set of teamwork skills (e.g. listening, sharing, reflecting) and includes several tasks which could serve as the vehicle. Links to the tasks, printable materials, and other resources are included.

2010-05-01

371

Confluence and convergence: team effectiveness in complex systems.  

PubMed

Complex adaptive systems require nursing leadership to rethink organizational work and the viability and effectiveness of teams. Much of emergent thinking about complexity and systems and organizations alter the understanding of the nature and function of teamwork and the configuration and leadership of team effort. Reflecting on basic concepts of complexity and their application to team formation, dynamics, and outcomes lays an important foundation for effectively guiding the strategic activity of systems through the focused tactical action of teams. Basic principles of complexity, their impact on teams, and the fundamental elements of team effectiveness are explored. PMID:25474670

Porter-O?Grady, Tim

2015-01-01

372

The Campus Lake Learning Community: Promoting a Multidisciplinary Approach to Environmental Problem Solving  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A multidisciplinary learning community provided environmental management students the opportunity to work with students in different classes and majors to create designs for improving the appearance and environmental quality of a lake on a university campus. The experience increased student appreciation for the contribution of other disciplines in solving real-world problems.

Jenkins, Dorothy; Powell, Katrina; Rusch, Kelly; Walsh, Maud

2005-03-01

373

The Campus Lake Learning Community: Promoting a Multidisciplinary Approach to Environmental Problem Solving  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A multidisciplinary learning community provided environmental management students the opportunity to work with students in different classes and majors to create designs for improving the appearance and environmental quality of a lake on a university campus. The experience increased student appreciation for the contribution of other disciplines in…

Walsh, Maud; Jenkins, Dorothy; Powell, Katrina; Rusch, Kelly

2005-01-01

374

Watershed Stewardship Education Program--A Multidisciplinary Extension Education Program for Oregon's Watershed Councils.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Watershed Stewardship Education Program (WSEP) is a multidisciplinary Oregon Extension designed to help watershed councils, landowners, and others work effectively together on water management. Components include practical, easy-to-use educational materials, training in effective collaboration, a Master Watershed Stewards program, and advanced…

Conway, Flaxen D. L.; Godwin, Derek; Cloughesy, Mike; Nierenberg, Tara

2003-01-01

375

Team Assessment of Geriatric Mental Patients: The Care of Functional Dementia Produced by Hysterical Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multidisciplinary team identified hysterical behavior, rather than depression, as one form of pseudodementia in many cases of cognitive impairment observed in geriatric patients. Seven cases required thorough medical and neuropsychological assessment and careful functional analysis of patients' behavior patterns to determine the adaptive utility…

Kirby, Henry B.; Harper, Robert G.

1987-01-01

376

A Unique Team Approach to the Total Education of the Student with a Neurological Disorder.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper outlines the program of services provided by a multidisciplinary professional team for the neurologically disordered child from preschool to young adulthood. Noted among the services offered are the following: an infant stimulation program, preschool prep program, group sensory integration program, special educational assistance, summer…

Cant, Malcolm J.

377

We Gain More Than We Give: Teaming in Middle Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite increases in the number of middle school using interdisciplinary team teaching, many are struggling to articulate a clear defense of their teaming work in light of confounding and conflicting public demands. This compilation examines teaming in middle schools--its characteristics, knowledge base, current concerns and future adaptations.…

Dickinson, Thomas S., Ed.; Erb, Thomas O., Ed.

378

Staying Alive! Training High-Risk Teams for Self Correction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research examining teams working in high-risk operations has been lacking. The present symposium showcases research on team training that helps to optimize team performance in environments characterized by life or death situations arising spontaneously after long periods of mundane activity by pulling experts from diverse areas of industry: space flight, health care, and medical simulation.

Slack, Kelley; Noe, Raymond; Weaver, Sallie

2011-01-01

379

Quantitative Analysis of Team Size and its Hierarchical Structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Typically, successful project teams are composed of compact groups of specialists, constituting a hierarchy. Obviously such a hierarchical construction of the project team has a deep rationale as the most desirable from the standpoint of maximizing productivity. This work is devoted to the quantitative study of the problem of justification of the hierarchical structure of project teams through the analysis

Pavel Barseghyan

2009-01-01

380

Managing Global Virtual Teams across Classrooms, Students and Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Virtual teams are becoming commonplace in business today so our business school students should have experience in effectively working in virtual teams. Based on a month-long virtual team project conducted by the authors between classes in South Africa and the United States, this paper discusses the opportunities and challenges of using global…

Shea, Timothy P.; Sherer, Pamela D.; Quilling, Rosemary D.; Blewett, Craig N.

2011-01-01

381

[Multidisciplinary treatment of head and neck cancer].  

PubMed

A new multidisciplinary treatment for head and neck cancer was shown by focusing on the maxillary and oropharyngeal carcinoma. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy which consists of cisplatin and peplomycin was incorporated into it. In terms of maxillary carcinoma, 2 courses of chemotherapy were given with an interval of 2 weeks, followed by radiotherapy (40 Gy) combined with intraarterial chemotherapy (5-FU). When no cancer cells were detected at the completion of this therapy, adjuvant chemoimmunotherapy was given. When an apparent tumor was still revealed by CT, radical surgery was performed. When cancer cells were detected only by histological examination, additional radiotherapy up to 60 Gy was given by Linac. The results obtained were analysed in 14 cases. We also presented another type of multidisciplinary treatment in oropharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:2414482

Inuyama, Y; Fujii, M; Tanaka, J; Takaoka, T; Hosoda, H; Kohno, N

1985-07-01

382

Convergence Estimates for Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A quantitative analysis of coupling between systems of equations is introduced. This analysis is then applied to problems in multidisciplinary analysis, sensitivity, and optimization. For the sensitivity and optimization problems both multidisciplinary and single discipline feasibility schemes are considered. In all these cases a "convergence factor" is estimated in terms of the Jacobians and Hessians of the system, thus it can also be approximated by existing disciplinary analysis and optimization codes. The convergence factor is identified with the measure for the "coupling" between the disciplines in the system. Applications to algorithm development are discussed. Demonstration of the convergence estimates and numerical results are given for a system composed of two non-linear algebraic equations, and for a system composed of two PDEs modeling aeroelasticity.

Arian, Eyal

1997-01-01

383

Antecedents of Transactive Memory Systems in Virtual Teams--The Role of Communication, Culture, and Team Size  

Microsoft Academic Search

One success factor of teams and organizations is an effectively managed knowledge management system (KMS). However, these systems are even hard to develop in regular face-to-face conditions. Virtual teams as a form of geographically dispersed work arrangement offer significant opportunities for companies and organizations around the globe. But besides the advantages of those teams they pose additional challenges to the

Bettina C. Riedl; Julia V. Gallenkamp; Arnold Picot; Isabell M. Welpe

2012-01-01

384

The relationship between team characteristics with team performance in Malaysian teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organisations depend on teams to implement its strategies and enables organisations to be flexible and responsive in the competitive global environment. Teams contribute to the organisation while at the same time providing opportunities to team members to develop relationships within team. Teams are viewed as a major source of ‘environmental forces’ that help shape team members (McGrath and Kravitz, 1982).

Agatha Heng Siok Sim

2006-01-01

385

Integrated multidisciplinary analysis tool IMAT users' guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Integrated Multidisciplinary Analysis Tool (IMAT) is a computer software system developed at Langley Research Center. IMAT provides researchers and analysts with an efficient capability to analyze satellite controls systems influenced by structural dynamics. Using a menu-driven executive system, IMAT leads the user through the program options. IMAT links a relational database manager to commercial and in-house structural and controls analysis codes. This paper describes the IMAT software system and how to use it.

Meissner, Frances T. (editor)

1988-01-01

386

Multidisciplinary optimization of injection molding systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design of injection molding systems for plastic parts relies heavily on experience and intuition. Recently, mold makers\\u000a have been compelled to shorten lead times, reduce costs and improve process performance due to global competition. This paper\\u000a presents a framework, based on a Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) methodology, which tackles the design of an injection\\u000a mold by integrating the structural,

Irene Ferreira; Olivier de Weck; Pedro Saraiva; José Cabral

2010-01-01

387

Is There a Career for Me? Antarctic Meteorite Teams  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about the scientific careers and opportunities in Antarctic meteorite team(s). Learners will view slides and read about meteorite recovery expeditions to Antarctica, explore science careers, evaluate the characteristics and skills required for curating and working with meteorites, create scientific teams, and make written and oral presentations about their chosen scientific teams. Materials and vocabulary lists, and advanced preparation and procedural tips are included. This is lesson 18 of 19 in Exploring Meteorite Mysteries.

388

Multidisciplinary Collaborations in Mid-Ocean Ridge Research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The global mid-ocean ridge (MOR) is one of Earth's most fundamental geologic structures. Active volcanic, tectonic, hydrothermal, and biological processes occurring at the MOR affect nearly every attribute of the world's oceans and oceanic crust. For the past quarter century the overarching goal of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded multidisciplinary Ridge 2000 program (http://www.ridge2000.org/) and its predecessor, Ridge Interdisciplinary Global Experiments (RIDGE), here collectively called “R2K,” has been to use observations, experiments, and models to answer fundamental questions about oceanic spreading center processes. Since its inception, R2K has worked to develop a holistic understanding of MORs. There are multiple interrelated consequences of oceanic crust generation at MORs, including transfer of material and energy from the mantle to the crust and ocean; impacts on marine ecology; and temporal, spatial, and rate-dependent interactions between biological and geological processes. Consequently, a diverse yet tightly knit community of collaborating scientists, including geologists, chemists, geophysical modelers, microbiologists, and oceanographers, has developed under R2K programs. This research community has spanned multiple generations of investigative effort, requiring it to confront transformations in communications technology, tools for use and access of data, and attitudes about cooperative approaches to scientific discovery. The tools and approaches R2K has used to enhance cross-disciplinary understanding of complex problems are adaptable to other multidisciplinary research efforts.

Rubin, Kennneth H.; Fornari, Daniel

2011-04-01

389

Measuring the quality of MDT working: an observational approach  

PubMed Central

Background Cancer multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) are established in many countries but little is known about how well they function. A core activity is regular MDT meetings (MDMs) where treatment recommendations are agreed. A mixed methods descriptive study was conducted to develop and test quality criteria for observational assessment of MDM performance calibrated against consensus from over 2000 MDT members about the “characteristics of an effective MDT”. Methods Eighteen of the 86 ‘Characteristics of Effective MDTs’ were considered relevant and feasible to observe. They collated to 15 aspects of MDT working covering four domains: the team (e.g. attendance, chairing, teamworking); infrastructure for meetings (venue, equipment); meeting organisation and logistics; and patient-centred clinical decision-making (patient-centredness, clarity of recommendations). Criteria for rating each characteristic from ‘very poor’ to ‘very good’ were derived from literature review, observing MDMs and expert input. Criteria were applied to 10 bowel cancer MDTs to assess acceptability and measure variation between and within teams. Feasibility and inter-rater reliability was assessed by comparing three observers. Results Observational assessment was acceptable to teams and feasible to implement. Total scores from 29 to 50 (out of 58) highlighted wide diversity in quality between teams. Eight teams were rated either ‘very good/good’ or ‘very poor/poor’ for at least three domains demonstrating some internal consistency. ‘Very good’ ratings were most likely for attendance and administrative preparation, and least likely for patient-centredness of decision-making and prioritisation of complex cases. All except two characteristics had intra-class correlations of ?0.50. Conclusions This observational tool (MDT-OARS) may contribute to the assessment of MDT performance. Further testing to confirm validity and reliability is required. PMID:22642614

2012-01-01

390

Collaborative multidisciplinary decision making using game theory and design capability indices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complexity of modern product realization processes requires collaborative work of engineering teams from different disciplines.\\u000a We apply principles from game theory to model the relationships between engineering teams and facilitate collaborative decision\\u000a making. In order to maintain design freedom in the early stages of product realization so that engineering teams in the later\\u000a stages can adjust their decisions while

Angran Xiao; Sai Zeng; Janet K. Allen; David W. Rosen; Farrokh Mistree

2005-01-01

391

Multidisciplinary Evaluation for Severity of Hazards Applied to Hemodialysis Devices: An Original Risk Analysis Method  

PubMed Central

Background and objectives: Risk analysis for medical devices is a crucial process to grant adequate levels of safety. Identification of device exposure–related hazards is one of the main objectives. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Hazard analysis for hemodialysis devices has been performed by a multidisciplinary team involving engineers and clinical experts. A potential harm list was identified from clinical and technical experience, postproduction information, and literature. Various hazardous situations (circumstances when the use of the dialysis device may lead to described harms) were described. Such hazardous situations were correlated to the extent of the deviation of a specific device parameter from expected ranges. The clinical severity that was relevant to any specific harm was categorized for each hazardous situation using a descriptive and numerical scale with five levels (from negligible [i.e., discomfort only] to catastrophic [i.e., potentially lethal]). Results: Harms in which the deviation of a parameter strictly coincides with the clinically measured effect on the patient are defined as “direct.” Otherwise, when another clinical parameter must be involved to quantify severity, the related harm is considered “indirect.” Two complete examples of multidisciplinary evaluation for severity of hazards (MESH) are given for a direct harm (air embolism) and for an indirect harm (hypothermia). For other harms, the maximum value of severity involved is provided. Conclusions: MESH represents a possible example of risk management for dialysis equipment in which, although the manufacturer is directly responsible, a multidisciplinary task force may contribute to a better link between engineering and clinical perspectives. PMID:20813858

Vasta, Alessandro; Hegbrant, Maria Alquist; Bosch, Juan P.; Paolini, Francesco; Garzotto, Francesco; Ronco, Claudio

2010-01-01

392

Treatment of difficult-to-control blood pressure in a multidisciplinary clinic at a public hospital.  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in disadvantaged populations remains high. Few innovative strategies or services to treat chronic diseases have been critically analyzed in these patients. We evaluated our initial experiences with a newly established multidisciplinary clinic For the treatment of difficult-to-control hypertension and describe reasons for poor blood pressure control as well as treatment strategies. Patients with blood pressures greater than 140/90 despite concurrent treatment with three or more medications for at least three months were referred to our clinic. Data regarding sociodemographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors were collected. Two physicians jointly proposed an explanation for lack of blood pressure control. A multidisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and nutritionists aggressively assessed and reinforced educational objectives tailored to individual needs. 58% of patients achieved target blood pressure at six months, but 22% were lost to follow-up. The most common reasons for previous treatment failure were volume overload and poor medication adherence. We conclude that a multidisciplinary clinic for difficult-to-control blood pressure can be successful in a large, urban hospital serving a disadvantaged minority population. However, more study is needed to delineate the specific reasons for success and further refine treatment strategies. PMID:12749616

Tao, Laurent S.; Hart, Peter; Edwards, Emma; Evans, Arthur T.; Whitaker, Eric; Smith, Pamela

2003-01-01

393

Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours in Response Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Teams, teamwork and team learning have been the subject of many research studies over the last decades. This article aims at investigating and confirming the Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours (TLB&B) model within a very specific population, i.e. police and firemen teams. Within this context, the paper asks whether the team's beliefs…

Boon, Anne; Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

2013-01-01

394

Accessibility - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is committed to providing access to all individuals—disabled or not—who are seeking information on the Team Science Toolkit. To provide this information, the Team Science Toolkit has been designed to comply with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act (as amended).

395

Assembling the Project Team.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the approval of a project's design and budget typically rests with the campus governing board, a project team determines the configuration, the cost, and the utility of the completed project. Because of the importance of these decisions, colleges and universities must select project team members carefully. (Author)

Mills, Donald B.

2003-01-01

396

Reaching Out: Team AETHER  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Embry Riddle Aeronautical University's Daytona Beach Campus Lunabotics Team took the opportunity to share the love of space, engineering and technology through the educational outreach portion of the competition. Through visits to elementary schools and high schools, and through support of science fairs and robotics competitions, younger generations were introduced to space, engineering and robotics. This report documents the outreach activities of team Aether.

Murphy, Gloria A.

2010-01-01

397

Green Team | Poster  

Cancer.gov

Those looking for a cost-effective way to spruce up their yards this spring can stop by the National Cancer Institute at Frederick Green Team’s booth during the Spring Research Festival (SRF) on May 7 and 8. Pick up a free plant, donate overgrown plants from your yard, or swap for a new plant.

398

TEAM Electron Microscope Animation  

SciTech Connect

The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

None

2012-01-01

399

Project Year Project Team  

E-print Network

Project Year 2003 Project Team Faculty: Deborah Mifflin, German Department, Krieger School of Arts of Engineering Project Title Advanced German Audience Students taking both second-year and third-year German, and customize their own studying. Consequently, this team proposes to develop online materials for vocabulary

Gray, Jeffrey J.

400

Planned Team Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agents situated in dynamic environments benefit from having a repertoire of plans,supplied in advance, that permit them to rapidly generate appropriate sequences of actions inresponse to important events. When agents can form teams, new problems emerge regardingthe representation and execution of joint actions. In this paper we introduce a languagefor representing joint plans for teams of agents, we describe how

David Kinny; Magnus Ljungberg; Anand S. Rao; Liz Sonenberg; Gil Tidhar; Eric Werner

1992-01-01

401

Nutrition in Team Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Team sports are based on intermittent high-intensity activity patterns, but the exact characteristics vary between and within codes, and from one game to the next. Despite the challenge of predicting exact game demands, performance in team sports is often dependent on nutritional factors. Chronic issues include achieving ideal levels of muscle mass and body fat, and supporting the nutrient needs

Iñigo Mujika; Louise M. Burke

2010-01-01

402

100 Ways To Build Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Created in response to requests from organizations across the country that wanted help in establishing teams for many purposes, this guide is an easy-to-use recipe book on the essential areas of teaming. It does not cover all the aspects of teaming, but focusses on the essential components of team development necessary for a team to function. The…

Scearce, Carol

403

Teams and teamwork at NASA Langley Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The recent reorganization and shift to managing total quality at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has placed an increasing emphasis on teams and teamwork in accomplishing day-to-day work activities and long-term projects. The purpose of this research was to review the nature of teams and teamwork at LaRC. Models of team performance and teamwork guided the gathering of information. Current and former team members served as participants; their collective experience reflected membership in over 200 teams at LaRC. The participants responded to a survey of open-ended questions which assessed various aspects of teams and teamwork. The participants also met in a workshop to clarify and elaborate on their responses. The work accomplished by the teams ranged from high-level managerial decision making (e.g., developing plans for LaRC reorganization) to creating scientific proposals (e.g., describing spaceflight projects to be designed, sold, and built). Teams typically had nine members who remained together for six months. Member turnover was around 20 percent; this turnover was attributed to heavy loads of other work assignments and little formal recognition and reward for team membership. Team members usually shared a common and valued goal, but there was not a clear standard (except delivery of a document) for knowing when the goal was achieved. However, members viewed their teams as successful. A major factor in team success was the setting of explicit a priori rules for communication. Task interdependencies between members were not complex (e.g., sharing of meeting notes and ideas about issues), except between members of scientific teams (i.e., reliance on the expertise of others). Thus, coordination of activities usually involved scheduling and attendance of team meetings. The team leader was designated by the team's sponsor. This leader usually shared power and responsibilities with other members, such that team members established their own operating procedures for decision making. Sponsors followed a hands-off policy during team operations, but they approved and reviewed team products. Most teams, particularly high-level decision-making teams, had little or no authority to carry out their decisions. Team members had few interpersonal conflicts. They monitored each other respectfully about meeting deadlines. Feedback and backup behaviors were seen as desirable aspects of teamwork, wanted by the members, and done appropriately.

Dickinson, Terry L.

1994-01-01

404

Iatrogenic Biliary Injuries: Multidisciplinary Management in a Major Tertiary Referral Center  

PubMed Central

Background. Iatrogenic biliary injuries are considered as the most serious complications during cholecystectomy. Better outcomes of such injuries have been shown in cases managed in a specialized center. Objective. To evaluate biliary injuries management in major referral hepatobiliary center. Patients & Methods. Four hundred seventy-two consecutive patients with postcholecystectomy biliary injuries were managed with multidisciplinary team (hepatobiliary surgeon, gastroenterologist, and radiologist) at major Hepatobiliary Center in Egypt over 10-year period using endoscopy in 232 patients, percutaneous techniques in 42 patients, and surgery in 198 patients. Results. Endoscopy was very successful initial treatment of 232 patients (49%) with mild/moderate biliary leakage (68%) and biliary stricture (47%) with increased success by addition of percutaneous (Rendezvous technique) in 18 patients (3.8%). However, surgery was needed in 198 patients (42%) for major duct transection, ligation, major leakage, and massive stricture. Surgery was urgent in 62 patients and elective in 136 patients. Hepaticojejunostomy was done in most of cases with transanastomotic stents. There was one mortality after surgery due to biliary sepsis and postoperative stricture in 3 cases (1.5%) treated with percutaneous dilation and stenting. Conclusion. Management of biliary injuries was much better with multidisciplinary care team with initial minimal invasive technique to major surgery in major complex injury encouraging early referral to highly specialized hepatobiliary center. PMID:25435672

Salama, Ibrahim Abdelkader; Shoreem, Hany Abdelmeged; Saleh, Sherif Mohamed; Hegazy, Osama; Housseni, Mohamed; Abbasy, Mohamed; Badra, Gamal; Ibrahim, Tarek

2014-01-01

405

National Combustion Code: A Multidisciplinary Combustor Design System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Internal Fluid Mechanics Division conducts both basic research and technology, and system technology research for aerospace propulsion systems components. The research within the division, which is both computational and experimental, is aimed at improving fundamental understanding of flow physics in inlets, ducts, nozzles, turbomachinery, and combustors. This article and the following three articles highlight some of the work accomplished in 1996. A multidisciplinary combustor design system is critical for optimizing the combustor design process. Such a system should include sophisticated computer-aided design (CAD) tools for geometry creation, advanced mesh generators for creating solid model representations, a common framework for fluid flow and structural analyses, modern postprocessing tools, and parallel processing. The goal of the present effort is to develop some of the enabling technologies and to demonstrate their overall performance in an integrated system called the National Combustion Code.

Stubbs, Robert M.; Liu, Nan-Suey

1997-01-01

406

Multidisciplinary integrated Parent and Child Centres in Amsterdam: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background In several countries centres for the integrated delivery of services to the parent and child have been established. In the Netherlands family health care service centres, called Parent and Child Centres (PCCs) involve multidisciplinary teams. Here doctors, nurses, midwives, maternity help professionals and educationists are integrated into multidisciplinary teams in neighbourhood-based centres. To date there has been little research on the implementation of service delivery in these centres. Study design A SWOT analysis was performed by use of triangulation data; this took place by integrating all relevant published documents on the origin and organization of the PCCs and the results from interviews with PCC experts and with PCC professionals (n=91). Structured interviews were performed with PCC-professionals [health care professionals (n=67) and PCC managers n=12)] and PCC-experts (n=12) in Amsterdam and qualitatively analysed thematically. The interview themes were based on a pre-set list of codes, derived from a prior documentation study and a focus group with PCC experts. Results Perceived advantages of PCCs were more continuity of care, shorter communication lines, low-threshold contact between professionals and promising future perspectives. Perceived challenges included the absence of uniform multidisciplinary guidelines, delays in communication with hospitals and midwives, inappropriate accommodation for effective professional integration, differing expectations regarding the PCC-manager role among PCC-partners and the danger of professionals’ needs dominating clients’ needs. Conclusions Professionals perceive PCCs as a promising development in the integration of services. Remaining challenges involved improvements at the managerial and organizational level. Quantitative research into the improvements in quality of care and child health is recommended. PMID:23882163

Busch, Vincent; Van Stel, Henk François; De Leeuw, Johannes Rob Josephus; Melhuish, Edward; Schrijvers, Augustinus Jacobus Petrus

2013-01-01

407

8 ways to build collaborative teams.  

PubMed

Executing complex initiatives like acquisitions or an IT overhaul requires a breadth of knowledge that can be provided only by teams that are large, diverse, virtual, and composed of highly educated specialists. The irony is, those same characteristics have an alarming tendency to decrease collaboration on a team. What's a company to do? Gratton, a London Business School professor, and Erickson, president of the Concours Institute, studied 55 large teams and identified those with strong collaboration despite their complexity. Examining the team dynamics and environment at firms ranging from Royal Bank of Scotland to Nokia to Marriott, the authors isolated eight success factors: (1) "Signature" relationship practices that build bonds among the staff, in memorable ways that are particularly suited to a company's business. (2) Role models of collaboration among executives, which help cooperation trickle down to the staff. (3) The establishment of a "gift culture," in which managers support employees by mentoring them daily, instead of a transactional "tit-for-tat culture", (4) Training in relationship skills, such as communication and conflict resolution. (5) A sense of community, which corporate HR can foster by sponsoring group activities. (6) Ambidextrous leadership, or leaders who are both task-oriented and relationship-oriented. (7) Good use of heritage relationships, by populating teams with members who know and trust one another. (8) Role clarity and task ambiguity, achieved by defining individual roles sharply but giving teams latitude on approach. As teams have grown from a standard of 20 members to comprise 100 or more, team practices that once worked well no longer apply. The new complexity of teams requires companies to increase their capacity for collaboration, by making long-term investments that build relationships and trust, and smart near-term decisions about how teams are formed and run. PMID:18159790

Gratton, Lynda; Erickson, Tamara J

2007-11-01

408

Multidisciplinary Techniques and Novel Aircraft Control Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley Research Center explores opportunities to improve airframe designs with smart technologies. Two elements of this basic research program are multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and advanced flow control. This paper describes examples where MDO techniques such as sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation, and genetic algorithms contribute to the design of novel control systems. In the test case, the design and use of distributed shape-change devices to provide low-rate maneuvering capability for a tailless aircraft is considered. The ability of MDO to add value to control system development is illustrated using results from several years of research funded by the Aircraft Morphing Program.

Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.; Raney, David L.

2000-01-01

409

Multidisciplinary Techniques and Novel Aircraft Control Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley Research Center explores opportunities to improve airframe designs with smart technologies. Two elements of this basic research program are multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and advanced flow control. This paper describes examples where MDO techniques such as sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation, and genetic algorithms contribute to the design of novel control systems. In the test case, the design and use of distributed shapechange devices to provide low-rate maneuvering capability for a tailless aircraft is considered. The ability of MDO to add value to control system development is illustrated using results from several years of research funded by the Aircraft Morphing Program.

Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.; Raney, David L.

2000-01-01

410

Multidisciplinary intensive care in extensive necrotizing fasciitis.  

PubMed

This is a case report of extensive necrotizing fasciitis (NF). A 65-year-old man presented with high fever, pain, swelling, and redness of the perineum, scrotum, and right lower limb. Based on the clinical symptoms and an imaging examination, a diagnosis of NF was made. The patient underwent an extensive exploration followed by daily bedside debridement. A diversion colostomy and six additional debridement procedures on the right thigh and perineum were subsequently performed. Although the patient had an eventful course, he recovered well under a multidisciplinary treatment regimen. The treatment and hospital course of the patient are described. PMID:23104255

Tu, Guo-Wei; Hwabejire, J O; Ju, Min-Jie; Yang, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Guang-Jian; Xu, Jian-Wei; Xue, Zhang-Gang; Jiang, Chun; Jiang, C; Luo, Zhe; Luo, Z

2013-04-01

411

Winglet design using multidisciplinary design optimization techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quasi-three-dimensional aerodynamic solver is integrated with a semi-analytical structural weight estimation method inside a multidisciplinary design optimization framework to design and optimize a winglet for a passenger aircraft. The winglet is optimized for minimum drag and minimum structural weight. The Pareto front between those two objective functions is found applying a genetic algorithm. The aircraft minimum take-off weight and the aircraft minimum direct operating cost are used to select the best winglets among those on the Pareto front.

Elham, Ali; van Tooren, Michel J. L.

2014-10-01

412

Simulation-based education for building clinical teams  

PubMed Central

Failure to work as an effective team is commonly cited as a cause of adverse events and errors in emergency medicine. Until recently, individual knowledge and skills in managing emergencies were taught, without reference to the additional skills required to work as part of a team. Team training courses are now becoming commonplace, however their strategies and modes of delivery are varied. Just as different delivery methods of traditional education can result in different levels of retention and transfer to the real world, the same is true in team training of the material in different ways in traditional forms of education may lead to different levels of retention and transfer to the real world, the same is true in team training. As team training becomes more widespread, the effectiveness of different modes of delivery including the role of simulation-based education needs to be clearly understood. This review examines the basis of team working in emergency medicine, and the components of an effective emergency medical team. Lessons from other domains with more experience in team training are discussed, as well as the variations from these settings that can be observed in medical contexts. Methods and strategies for team training are listed, and experiences in other health care settings as well as emergency medicine are assessed. Finally, best practice guidelines for the development of team training programs in emergency medicine are presented. PMID:21063559

Marshall, Stuart D; Flanagan, Brendan

2010-01-01

413

Transition manager is liaison between teams.  

PubMed

At University of Utah Health Care, a transition case manager acts as a liaison between the outpatient care team at community clinics and the inpatient care team. The transition navigator works with case managers at the hospital and the clinics to make sure both have the information they need to coordinate care for the patient. The transition navigator visits patients in the hospital and works with the unit case manager to make sure the discharge plan will work. To further smooth transitions, the patients receive a one-page sheet that summarizes their discharge instructions, follow-up appointments, and medication regimen. PMID:25065104

2014-08-01

414

Distributed teaming on JPL projects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper addresses structures, actions and technologies that contribute to real team development of a distributed team, and the leadership skills and tools that are used to implement that team development.

Baroff, L. E.

2002-01-01

415

A CEFAS Multidisciplinary Project Team The Rame Head Disposal Site Environmental impacts resulting from disposal of  

E-print Network

in sediments 33 3.5.2. Tributyl-tin 34 3.5.3 Trace organic compounds 35 Brominated Flame Retardants.4.2. Tributyl-tin 57 4.4.3. Trace organic compounds 57 Brominated Flame Retardants (BFR) 57 Polychlorinated

416

Forging a Healthier Path: A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Reducing Risk and Improving Child Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the age of 4 years, Joseph came to the Orleans Parish Early Childhood Supports and Services program (ECSS) for mental health services because of serious aggression and anger. His history included physical abuse before age 2, long-term maintenance on an atypical antipsychotic medication, and other biological, psychological, and…

Breidenstine, Angela S.; Couvillion, Joy; Many, Cecile

2012-01-01

417

MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TEAMS - A NECESSITY FOR RESEARCH IN PRECISION AGRICULTURE SYSTEMS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Precision agriculture may offer great promise for the future, but extensive additional research is required if that promise is to be realized. The research will not be easy, for few, if any, individuals have sufficiently broad training in the many disciplines (e.g. economics, engineering, crop and ...

418

The Emergence of Multidisciplinary Teams for Interagency Service Delivery in Europe: Is Historical Institutionalism Wrong?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Europe, a well-known problem is the coordination of interagency service delivery to independently living older persons,\\u000a disabled persons or persons suffering from chronic illness. Coordination is necessary in order for the users to receive services\\u000a at the appropriate time and place. Based on historical institutionalism, which focuses on the path dependency of the development\\u000a of government policy and organizational

Arno van Raak; Aggie Paulus

2008-01-01

419

Using Leadership Teams to Elevate English Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) works with administrators and teachers to build their skills in research-based ELL strategies that can be implemented in general education settings. This article discusses the five key elements that guide the work of the academies. These are: (1) Assemble a strong leadership team; (2)…

Hill, Jane D.; Lundquist, Anne M.

2008-01-01

420

Interdisciplinary medical social work: a working taxonomy.  

PubMed

Findings from a year-long exploratory study aimed at describing universal functions of medical social work with interdisciplinary teams in acute care settings are reported here. A universal taxonomy of interdisciplinary social work skills and competencies was empirically identified through a participatory action research framework. Findings support previous conceptual descriptions of medical social work's overarching and historical role to help interdisciplinary teams in acute care to consider patients' home environment, knowledge, beliefs, culture, and resources during assessment, treatment, and discharge planning. The empirically determined taxonomy reported is intended to provide social workers a framework with which to articulate and evaluate their core competencies on interdisciplinary medical teams. PMID:25050659

Maramaldi, Peter; Sobran, Alexandra; Scheck, Lisa; Cusato, Natalie; Lee, Irene; White, Erina; Cadet, Tamara J

2014-01-01

421

Adaptive heterogeneous multi-robot teams  

SciTech Connect

This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control in robot missions involving loosely coupled, largely independent tasks. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, the author describes in detail the experimental results of an implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative box pushing demonstration. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes in the capabilities of the robot team.

Parker, L.E.

1998-11-01

422

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Howard Gadlin Edit resource Area of Expertise: NIH Ombudsman. Conflict resolution

423

Help - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Help For technical help with this website, please contact: Sophia Tsakraklides Senior

424

Project Year Project Team  

E-print Network

Project Year 2005 Project Team Daniel Ursu, Student, Biomedical Engineering Department, Whiting, optimizations, finite element analysis and CNC manufacturing. However, most students enter these classes School of Engineering; Daniel Stoianovici, Faculty, Department of Urology, School of Medicine Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

425

Florida State Bowling Team  

E-print Network

we will continue our involvement with the Applied Sports Psychology Consulting Service to help of the FSU Bowling Team. We hope you will enjoy being a member of one of the most successful sports programs

McQuade, D. Tyler

426

JPL web team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) WEB Team activities were reported for activities which were directed toward identifying and attacking areas in the growth of dendritic web ribbon, to complement the program at Westinghouse Electric Corp.

Bickler, D. B.

1986-01-01

427

Opus: A Coordination Language for Multidisciplinary Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data parallel languages, such as High Performance fortran, can be successfully applied to a wide range of numerical applications. However, many advanced scientific and engineering applications are multidisciplinary and heterogeneous in nature, and thus do not fit well into the data parallel paradigm. In this paper we present Opus, a language designed to fill this gap. The central concept of Opus is a mechanism called ShareD Abstractions (SDA). An SDA can be used as a computation server, i.e., a locus of computational activity, or as a data repository for sharing data between asynchronous tasks. SDAs can be internally data parallel, providing support for the integration of data and task parallelism as well as nested task parallelism. They can thus be used to express multidisciplinary applications in a natural and efficient way. In this paper we describe the features of the language through a series of examples and give an overview of the runtime support required to implement these concepts in parallel and distributed environments.

Chapman, Barbara; Haines, Matthew; Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans; vanRosendale, John

1997-01-01

428

Panel Discussion on Multi-Disciplinary Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is hosting the Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS) during the week of September 10, 2001. Included in this year's TFAWS is a panel session on Multidisciplinary Analysis techniques. The intent is to provide an opportunity for the users to gain information as to what product may be best suited for their applications environment and to provide feedback to you, the developers, on future desired developments. Potential users of multidisciplinary analysis (MDA) techniques are often overwhelmed by the number of choices available to them via commercial products and by the pace of new developments in this area. The purpose of this panel session is to provide a forum wherein MDA tools available and under development can be discussed, compared, and contrasted. The intent of this panel is to provide the end-user with the information necessary to make educated decisions on how to proceed with selecting their MDA tool. It is anticipated that the discussions this year will focus on MDA techniques that couple discipline codes or algorithms (as opposed to monolithic, unified MDA approaches). The MDA developers will be asked to prepare a product overview presentation addressing specific questions provided by the panel organizers. The purpose of these questions will be to establish the method employed by the particular MDA technique for communication between the discipline codes, to establish the similarities and differences amongst the various approaches, and to establish the range of experience and applications for each particular MDA approach.

Garcia, Robert

2002-01-01

429

Privacy - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

NCI complies with requirements for privacy and security established by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Your visit to the Team Science Toolkit is private and secure. When you visit the Team Science Toolkit, we do not collect any personally identifiable information (PII) about you unless you choose to explicitly provide it to us.

430

=Student Affairs Leadership Team (SALT) =Campus and Student Engagement Team (CASE Team)  

E-print Network

Enhancement Information Technology University President Student Government Division of Student Affairs for Student Affairs Housing & Residential Life Owls Care Health Promotion Dean of Students Upward Bound=Student Affairs Leadership Team (SALT) =Campus and Student Engagement Team (CASE Team) Career

Marques, Oge

431

The “I” in Team: Coach Incivility, Coach Sex, and Team Performance in Female Basketball Teams  

E-print Network

With the continuing influx of teams in the workplace it is important to understand how incivility affects team success. The purpose of this study was to address this topic by investigating the effects of leader incivility towards team members...

Smittick, Amber Leola

2012-10-19

432

Developing Team Skills through a Collaborative Writing Assignment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Employers want students who are able to work effectively as members of a team, and expect universities to develop this ability in their graduates. This paper proposes a framework for a collaborative writing assignment that specifically develops students' ability to work in teams. The framework has been tested using two iterations of an action…

Thomas, Theda Ann

2014-01-01

433

The Business of Teaching and Learning through Multicultural Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Team working is a key skill students need in this era of global complexity. Here we combine research with practice to develop a model for working in multicultural teams which can be used in International Business curricula. We formulate the 4 Cs model focusing on two areas: composition and communication. These two Cs have been chosen because they…

Butler, Christina; Zander, Lena

2008-01-01

434

A Multilevel Model of Minority Opinion Expression and Team Decision-Making Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The consideration of minority opinions when making team decisions is an important factor that contributes to team effectiveness. A multilevel model of minority opinion influence in decision-making teams is developed to address the conditions that relate to adequate consideration of minority opinions. Using a sample of 57 teams working on a…

Park, Guihyun; DeShon, Richard P.

2010-01-01

435

The relationship between conflict and team performance in Taiwan: the moderating effect of goal orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study is set in Taiwan, a Chinese cultural context. It investigates how team conflict, as task and relationship conflict, relates to team performance. This study also considers the moderating effect of goal orientation on the relationship of task conflict and relationship conflict with team performance. The sample consists of 443 employees in 92 work teams. Results show that relationship

Jia-Chi Huang

2012-01-01

436

A transdisciplinary team approach to pain management in inpatient health care settings.  

PubMed

This paper will discuss the transition from multidisciplinary to interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary team approaches to pain management at New York University Langone Medical Center - Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine. A transdisciplinary team approach to pain management emphasizes mutual learning, training, and education, and the flexible exchange of discipline-specific roles. Clinicians are enabled to implement a unified, holistic, and integrated treatment plan with all members of the team responsible for the same patient-centered goals. The model promotes and empowers patient and family/support system goals within a cultural context. Topics of exploration include the descriptions of three team approaches to patient care, including their practical, philosophical, and historical basis, strengths and challenges, research support, and cultural diversity. Case vignettes will highlight the strengths and limitations of the transdisciplinary team approach to pain management throughout a broad and diverse continuum of care, including acute medical, palliative, and perioperative care and acute inpatient rehabilitation services. PMID:23522877

Gordon, Robert M; Corcoran, John R; Bartley-Daniele, Patricia; Sklenar, Dennis; Sutton, Phyllis Roach; Cartwright, Frances

2014-03-01

437

Translational Science Project Team Managers: Qualitative Insights and Implications from Current and Previous Postdoctoral Experiences  

PubMed Central

The development of leadership and project management skills is increasingly important to the evolution of translational science and team-based endeavors. Team science is dependent upon individuals at various stages in their careers, inclusive of postdocs. Data from case histories, as well as from interviews with current and former postdocs, and those supervising postdocs, indicate six essential tasks required of project managers in multidisciplinary translational teams, along with eight skill-related themes critical to their success. To optimize the opportunities available and to ensure sequential development of team project management skills, a life cycle model for the development of translational team skills is proposed, ranging from graduate trainees, postdocs, assistant professors, and finally to mature scientists. Specific goals, challenges and project management roles and tasks are recommended for each stage for the life cycle.

Wooten, Kevin C.; Dann, Sara M.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Kotarba, Joseph A.

2015-01-01

438

Software Hut 2008 teams. Team 1, client A, manager Mike  

E-print Network

Software Hut 2008 teams. Team 1, client A, manager Mike Steve Eyre Joe E Gooding Lewis A Mackay Si, manager Paul Charles Andrews Mathew Hall Christopher Beck Indi Singh Team 5, client A, manager Mike Graham Krzysztof Kubosz #12;Team 9, client A, manager Mike Hamza A. Shierani Nick Rutherford Tom Kitchin

Holcombe, Mike

439

Understanding the Team Dynamics of an Executive Virtual Team  

E-print Network

UNDERSTANDING THE TEAM DYNAMICS OF AN EXECUTIVE VIRTUAL TEAM A Dissertation by RAMONA LEONARD RILEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2011 Major Subject: Educational Human Resource Development Understanding the Team Dynamics of an Executive Virtual Team Copyright 2011 Ramona Leonard Riley...

Riley, Ramona Leonard

2011-10-21

440

Team Learning for Healthcare Quality Improvement  

PubMed Central

In organized healthcare quality improvement collaboratives (QICs), teams of practitioners from different hospitals exchange information on clinical practices with the aim of improving health outcomes at their own institutions. However, what works in one hospital may not work in others with different local contexts because of nonlinear interactions among various demographics, treatments, and practices. In previous studies of collaborations where the goal is a collective problem solving, teams of diverse individuals have been shown to outperform teams of similar individuals. However, when the purpose of collaboration is knowledge diffusion in complex environments, it is not clear whether team diversity will help or hinder effective learning. In this paper, we first use an agent-based model of QICs to show that teams comprising similar individuals outperform those with more diverse individuals under nearly all conditions, and that this advantage increases with the complexity of the landscape and level of noise in assessing performance. Examination of data from a network of real hospitals provides encouraging evidence of a high degree of similarity in clinical practices, especially within teams of hospitals engaging in QIC teams. However, our model also suggests that groups of similar hospitals could benefit from larger teams and more open sharing of details on clinical outcomes than is currently the norm. To facilitate this, we propose a secure virtual collaboration system that would allow hospitals to efficiently identify potentially better practices in use at other institutions similar to theirs without any institutions having to sacrifice the privacy of their own data. Our results may also have implications for other types of data-driven diffusive learning such as in personalized medicine and evolutionary search in noisy, complex combinatorial optimization problems. PMID:25360395

Eppstein, Margaret J.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.

2014-01-01

441

Greenwood/Asher & Associates is working in partnership with Texas Tech University seeking three worldclass researchers to comprise a research team in wind energy research. Texas Tech is committed  

E-print Network

worldclass researchers to comprise a research team in wind energy research. Texas Tech is committed, and Clay Cash Foundation Engineering Chair in Wind Energy provides a unique opportunity for leadership of a national effort to focus attention on wind energy solutions to energy problems. The individual selected

George, Steven C.

442

Team Expo: A State-of-the-Art JSC Advanced Design Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In concert with the NASA-wide Intelligent Synthesis Environment Program, the Exploration Office at the Johnson Space Center has assembled an Advanced Design Team. The purpose of this team is two-fold. The first is to identify, use, and develop software applications, tools, and design processes that streamline and enhance a collaborative engineering environment. The second is to use this collaborative engineering environment to produce conceptual, system-level-of-detail designs in a relatively short turnaround time, using a standing team of systems and integration experts. This includes running rapid trade studies on varying mission architectures, as well as producing vehicle and/or subsystem designs. The standing core team is made up of experts from all of the relevant engineering divisions (e.g. Power, Thermal, Structures, etc.) as well as representatives from Risk and Safety, Mission Operations, and Crew Life Sciences among others. The Team works together during 2- hour sessions in the same specially enhanced room to ensure real-time integration/identification of cross-disciplinary issues and solutions. All subsystem designs are collectively reviewed and approved during these same sessions. In addition there is an Information sub-team that captures and formats all data and makes it accessible for use by the following day. The result is Team Expo: an Advanced Design Team that is leading the change from a philosophy of "over the fence" design to one of collaborative engineering that pushes the envelope to achieve the next-generation analysis and design environment.

Tripathi, Abhishek

2001-01-01

443

Working towards integrated community care for older people: Empowering organisational features from a professional perspective.  

PubMed

Although multi-disciplinary cooperation between professionals is a prerequisite to provide integrated care in the community, this seems hard to realise in practice. Yet, little is known about the experiences of professionals who implement it nor about the organisational features professionals identify as empowering during this cooperation process. Therefore, a case study of a multi-disciplinary geriatric team was performed. The data-collection included observations of meetings, in-depth interviews and focus groups with professionals (N=12). Data were analysed inductively and related to the three organisational levels within the model of organisational empowerment of Peterson and Zimmerman. Signs of empowering organisational features on the intraorganisational level were mutual trust and clear working routines. On the interorganisational level important features included improved linkages between participating organisations and increased insight into each other's tasks. Tensions occurred relating to the inter- and the extraorganisational level. Professionals felt that the commitment of the management of involved organisations should be improved just as the capacity of the team to influence (local) policy. It is recommended that policymakers should not determine the nature of professional cooperation in advance, but to leave that to the local context as well as to the judgement of involved professionals. PMID:25445110

Janssen, Bienke M; Snoeren, Miranda W C; Van Regenmortel, Tine; Abma, Tineke A

2015-01-01

444

Endoscopic non-technical skills team training: The next step in quality assurance of endoscopy training  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate whether novel, non-technical skills training for Bowel Cancer Screening (BCS) endoscopy teams enhanced patient safety knowledge and attitudes. METHODS: A novel endoscopy team training intervention for BCS teams was developed and evaluated as a pre-post intervention study. Four multi-disciplinary BCS teams constituting BCS endoscopist(s), specialist screening practitioners, endoscopy nurses and administrative staff (A) from English BCS training centres participated. No patients were involved in this study. Expert multidisciplinary faculty delivered a single day’s training utilising real clinical examples. Pre and post-course evaluation comprised participants’ patient safety awareness, attitudes, and knowledge. Global course evaluations were also collected. RESULTS: Twenty-three participants attended and their patient safety knowledge improved significantly from 43%-55% (P ? 0.001) following the training intervention. 12/41 (29%) of the safety attitudes items significantly improved in the areas of perceived patient safety knowledge and awareness. The remaining safety attitude items: perceived influence on patient safety, attitudes towards error management, error management actions and personal views following an error were unchanged following training. Both qualitative and quantitative global course evaluations were positive: 21/23 (91%) participants strongly agreed/agreed that they were satisfied with the course. Qualitative evaluation included mandating such training for endoscopy teams outside BCS and incorporating team training within wider endoscopy training. Limitations of the study include no measure of increased patient safety in clinical practice following training. CONCLUSION: A novel comprehensive training package addressing patient safety, non-technical skills and adverse event analysis was successful in improving multi-disciplinary teams’ knowledge and safety attitudes. PMID:25516665

Matharoo, Manmeet; Haycock, Adam; Sevdalis, Nick; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan

2014-01-01

445

Multidisciplinary treatment of non-syndromic oligodontia.  

PubMed

Oligodontia is the agenesis of 6 or more teeth, excluding third molars. The etiology of congenital absence of teeth is believed to be rooted in heredity or developmental anomalies. The absence of teeth in patients can cause aesthetic, functional, and psychological problems, particularly if the anterior region is involved. This case report describes the multidisciplinary treatment approach toward a patient 17 years of age with non-syndromic oligodontia, with absence of 11 permanent teeth. Genetic counseling revealed non-syndromic, autosomal-recessive-linked oligodontia. The objectives of the first phase of therapy were pre-prosthetic orthodontic space opening for proper positioning of the missing teeth and correction of inter-maxillary relations, as a prerequisite for proper prosthetic restoration. The second phase of therapy was prosthetic restoration of the missing teeth and provision of occlusion with full-mouth porcelain fused to metal crowns and bridges after increasing occlusal vertical dimension by 2 mm. PMID:22509127

Bural, Canan; Oztas, Evren; Ozturk, Sukru; Bayraktar, Gulsen

2012-04-01

446

Cancer care decision making in multidisciplinary meetings.  

PubMed

Little research has been undertaken on the actual decision-making processes in cancer care multidisciplinary meetings (MDMs). This article was based on a qualitative observational study of two regional cancer treatment centers in New Zealand. We audiorecorded 10 meetings in which 106 patient cases were discussed. Members of the meetings categorized cases in varying ways, drew on a range of sources of authority, expressed different value positions, and utilized a variety of strategies to justify their actions. An important dimension of authority was encountered authority-the authority a clinician has because of meeting the patient. The MDM chairperson can play an important role in making explicit the sources of authority being drawn on and the value positions of members to provide more clarity to the decision-making process. Attending to issues of process, authority, and values in MDMs has the potential to improve cancer care decision making and ultimately, health outcomes. PMID:25281239

Dew, Kevin; Stubbe, Maria; Signal, Louise; Stairmand, Jeannine; Dennett, Elizabeth; Koea, Jonathan; Simpson, Andrew; Sarfati, Diana; Cunningham, Chris; Batten, Lesley; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Barton, Josh; Holdaway, Maureen

2015-03-01

447

A Unified Approach to Modeling Multidisciplinary Interactions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are a number of existing methods to transfer information among various disciplines. For a multidisciplinary application with n disciplines, the traditional methods may be required to model (n(exp 2) - n) interactions. This paper presents a unified three-dimensional approach that reduces the number of interactions from (n(exp 2) - n) to 2n by using a computer-aided design model. The proposed modeling approach unifies the interactions among various disciplines. The approach is independent of specific discipline implementation, and a number of existing methods can be reformulated in the context of the proposed unified approach. This paper provides an overview of the proposed unified approach and reformulations for two existing methods. The unified approach is specially tailored for application environments where the geometry is created and managed through a computer-aided design system. Results are presented for a blended-wing body and a high-speed civil transport.

Samareh, Jamshid A.; Bhatia, Kumar G.

2000-01-01

448

NASA Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Fellowship Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes the results of a multi-year training grant for the development and implementation of a Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis (MDA) Fellowship Program at Georgia Tech. The Program funded the creation of graduate MS and PhD degree programs in aerospace systems design, analysis and integration. It also provided prestigious Fellowships with associated Industry Internships for outstanding engineering students. The graduate program has become the foundation for a vigorous and productive research effort and has produced: 20 MS degrees, 7 Ph.D. degrees, and has contributed to 9 ongoing Ph.D. students. The results of the research are documented in 32 publications (23 of which are included on a companion CDROM) and 4 annual student design reports (included on a companion CDROM). The legacy of this critical funding is the Center for Aerospace Systems Analysis at Georgia Tech which is continuing the graduate program, the research, and the industry internships established by this grant.

Schrage, D. P.; Craig, J. I.; Mavris, D. N.; Hale, M. A.; DeLaurentis, D.

1999-01-01

449

NASA Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Fellowship Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report is a Year 1 interim report of the progress on the NASA multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Fellowship Program covering the period, January 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995. It summarizes progress in establishing the MDA Fellowship Program at Georgia Tech during the initial year. Progress in the advertisement of the program, recruiting results for the 1995-96 academic year, placement of the Fellows in industry during Summer 1995, program development at the M.S. and Ph.D. levels, and collaboration and dissemination of results are summarized in this report. Further details of the first year's progress will be included in the report from the Year 1 Workshop to be held at NASA Langley on December 7-8, 1995.

1995-01-01

450

Multidisciplinary treatment of non-syndromic oligodontia  

PubMed Central

Oligodontia is the agenesis of 6 or more teeth, excluding third molars. The etiology of congenital absence of teeth is believed to be rooted in heredity or developmental anomalies. The absence of teeth in patients can cause aesthetic, functional, and psychological problems, particularly if the anterior region is involved. This case report describes the multidisciplinary treatment approach toward a patient 17 years of age with non-syndromic oligodontia, with absence of 11 permanent teeth. Genetic counseling revealed non-syndromic, autosomal-recessive-linked oligodontia. The objectives of the first phase of therapy were pre-prosthetic orthodontic space opening for proper positioning of the missing teeth and correction of inter-maxillary relations, as a prerequisite for proper prosthetic restoration. The second phase of therapy was prosthetic restoration of the missing teeth and provision of occlusion with full-mouth porcelain fused to metal crowns and bridges after increasing occlusal vertical dimension by 2 mm. PMID:22509127

Bural, Canan; Oztas, Evren; Ozturk, Sukru; Bayraktar, Gulsen

2012-01-01

451

Multidisciplinary systems optimization by linear decomposition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a typical design process major decisions are made sequentially. An illustrated example is given for an aircraft design in which the aerodynamic shape is usually decided first, then the airframe is sized for strength and so forth. An analogous sequence could be laid out for any other major industrial product, for instance, a ship. The loops in the discipline boxes symbolize iterative design improvements carried out within the confines of a single engineering discipline, or subsystem. The loops spanning several boxes depict multidisciplinary design improvement iterations. Omitted for graphical simplicity is parallelism of the disciplinary subtasks. The parallelism is important in order to develop a broad workfront necessary to shorten the design time. If all the intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary iterations were carried out to convergence, the process could yield a numerically optimal design. However, it usually stops short of that because of time and money limitations. This is especially true for the interdisciplinary iterations.

Sobieski, J.

1984-01-01

452

Team Teaching: An Organizational Redefinition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although many definitions of team teaching have been proposed since its inception in 1957, none so far seems adequate in describing its complex organizational makeup. Although each team teaching plan may have unique characteristics, certain organizational elements typical of team teaching plans can be identified. A team must have a minimum of two…

Sterns, Harvey N.

453

Studying Trust in Virtual Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual teams, or geographically distributed groups, are becoming more prevalent in organizations with the development of globalization, interorganizational alliances and ICT development. Virtual teams enable organizations to pool the talents of their own employees in the competitive global environment. As an important factor of virtual teams' success, trust has been a hot topic in the research field of virtual teams.

Yihong Zhan; Feng Xiong

2008-01-01

454

Establishment of Interdisciplinary Child Protection Teams in Turkey 2002-2006: Identifying the Strongest Link Can Make a Difference!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The University of Iowa Child Protection Program collaborated with Turkish professionals to develop a training program on child abuse and neglect during 2002-2006 with the goals of increasing professional awareness and number of multidisciplinary teams (MDT), regional collaborations, and assessed cases. This paper summarizes the 5-year…

Agirtan, Canan A.; Akar, Taner; Akbas, Seher; Akdur, Recep; Aydin, Cahide; Aytar, Gulsen; Ayyildiz, Suat; Baskan, Sevgi; Belgemen, Tugba; Bezirci, Ozdecan; Beyazova, Ufuk; Beyaztas, Fatma Yucel; Buken, Bora; Buken, Erhan; Camurdan, Aysu D.; Can, Demet; Canbaz, Sevgi; Canturk, Gurol; Ceyhan, Meltem; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Celik, Ahmet; Cetin, Fusun C.; Coskun, Ayse Gul; Dagcinar, Adnan; Dallar, Yildiz; Demirel, Birol; Demirogullari, Billur; Derman, Orhan; Dilli, Dilek; Ersahin, Yusuf; Esiyok, Burcu; Evinc, Gulin; Gencer, Ozlem; Gokler, Bahar; Hanci, Hamit; Iseri, Elvan; Isir, Aysun Baransel; Isiten, Nukhet; Kale, Gulsev; Karadag, Ferda; Kanbur, Nuray; Kilic, Birim; Kultur, Ebru; Kurtay, Derya; Kuruoglu, Asli; Miral, Suha; Odabasi, Aysun B.; Oral, Resmiye; Orhon, Filiz Simsek; Ozbesler, Cengiz; Ozdemir, Dilsad Foto; Ozkok, M. Selim; Ozmert, Elif; Oztop, Didem B.; Ozyurek, Hamit; Pasli, Figen; Peksen, Yildiz; Polat, Onur; Sahin, Figen; Sahin, Ahmet Rifat; Salacin, Serpil; Suskan, Emine; Tander, Burak; Tekin, Deniz; Teksam, Ozlem; Tiras, Ulku; Tomak, Yilmaz; Tumer, Ali Riza; Turla, Ahmet; Ulukol, Betul; Uslu, Runa; Tas, Fatma V.; Vatandas, Nilgun; Velipasaoglu, Sevtap; Yagmur, Fatih; Yagmurlu, Aydin; Yalcin, Songul; Yavuz, Sukruye; Yurdakok, Kadriye

2009-01-01

455

Multidisciplinary Treatment for Thoracic and Abdominopelvic Endometriosis  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Thoracic endometriosis is a rare form of extragenital endometriosis with important clinical ramifications. Up to 80% of women with thoracic endometriosis have concomitant abdominopelvic endometriosis, yet the surgical treatment is usually performed with separate procedures. This is the largest published series of the combination of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and traditional laparoscopy for the treatment of abdominopelvic and thoracic endometriosis. The objectives of this series are to further evaluate the manifestations of thoracic endometriosis, assess the multidisciplinary surgical approach, and discuss our institution's protocols. Methods: This is a retrospective, institutional review board–approved case series of 25 consecutive women who underwent combined video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and traditional laparoscopy for the treatment of abdominopelvic, diaphragmatic, and thoracic endometriosis from January 1, 2008, to September 30, 2013. All surgeries were performed at a tertiary referral center by the same primary surgeons. Data were collected by chart review. Results: Twenty-five patients were included, with a mean age of 37.7 years. Eighty percent of patients had catamenial chest pain, and in 40% this was their only chest complaint. Shoulder pain was noted in 40% of patients, catamenial pneumothorax in 24%, and hemoptysis in 12%. One hundred percent of patients were found to have endometriosis in the pelvis, 100% in the diaphragm, 64% in the chest wall, and 40% in the parenchyma. There were 2 major postoperative complications: 1 diaphragmatic hernia and 1 vaginal cuff hematoma. Conclusion: Clinical suspicion and preoperative assessment are crucial in the diagnosis of thoracic endometriosis and allow for a multidisciplinary approach. The combination of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and traditional laparoscopy for the treatment of endometriosis optimally addresses the pelvis, diaphragm, and thoracic cavity in a single operation. PMID:25392636

Main, Jillian; Paka, Chandhana; Nezhat, Azadeh; Beygui, Ramin E.

2014-01-01

456

Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: a multidisciplinary approach.  

PubMed

Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED; Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome) is a genetic disorder characterized by sparse hair, oligodontia with peg-shaped teeth, reduced sweating, and defects in a number of other ectodermal organs. A partial or complete absence of eccrine glands can lead to recurrent severe overheating that may cause seizures and neurological deficits. This clinical report presents a 14-year-old male patient with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, including the clinical and radiographic findings, and multidisciplinary treatment. The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL) was administered to patient along with mother to assess for any psychiatric disorders. The screening and rating scales completed by mother and two teachers to evaluate the severity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, and other behavioral problems. Patient's academic performance, adaptive functioning, and problem behavior was evaluated using. The Teacher Report Form. Mental capacity was assessed with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-R). Illness Perception Questionnaire Revised was used to systematically assess illness representation attributes and emotional representations of illness. On the psychiatric diagnosis assessment using K-SADS-PL sub-threshold attention deficits and anxiety symptoms were determined. In this case we established a multidisciplinary approach in his treatment with pediatric, dermatological, and dental examinations, beside his psychiatric evaluation. The prosthetic rehabilitation included restoring upper teeth with copings and fabrication of upper and lower complete dentures. Metal framework was not incorporated in the partial denture design allowing modifications as the oral and maxillofacial development continued. Removable complete or partial dentures without metal framework is a treatment of choice until the completion of facial growth at which definitive treatment is considered. PMID:23586278

Bildik, Tezan; Ozbaran, Burcu; Kose, Sezen; Koturoglu, Guldane; Gokce, Bulent; Gunaydin, Asli; Altintas, Inci

2012-01-01

457

NASA Aeronautics Multidisciplinary Analysis and Design Fellowship Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This program began as a grant from NASA Headquarters, NGT-10025, which was in effect from 10/l/93 until 10/31/96. The remaining funding for this effort was transferred from NASA Headquarters to NASA Langley and a new grant NGT-1-52155 was issued covering the period II/l/96 to 5/15/99. This report serves as the final report of NGT-1-52155. For a number of years, Virginia Tech had been on the forefront of research in the area of multidisciplinary analysis and design. In June of 1994, faculty members from aerospace and ocean engineering, engineering science and mechanics, mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, mathematics and computer sciences, at Virginia Tech joined together to form the Multidisciplinary Analysis and Design (MAD) Center for Advanced Vehicles. The center was established with the single goal: to perform research that is relevant to the needs of the US industry and to foster collaboration between the university, government and industry. In October of 1994, the center was chosen by NASA headquarters as one of the five university centers to establish a fellowship program to develop a graduate program in multidisciplinary analysis and design. The fellowship program provides full stipend and tuition support for seven U. S. students per year during their graduate studies. The grant is currently being administered by the NMO Branch of NASA Langley. To advise us regarding the problems faced by the industry, an industrial advisory board has been formed consisting of representatives from industry as well as government laboratories. The present membership includes major aerospace companies: Aurora Flight Sciences, Boeing: Philadelphia, Boeing: Long Beach, Boeing: Seattle, Boeing: St. Louis, Cessna, Ford, General Electric, Hughes, Lockheed-Martin: Palo Alto, Northrop-Grumman, Sikorsky, smaller, aerospace software companies: Aerosoft, Phoenix Integration and Proteus Engineering, along with representatives from government agencies, including: NASA Ames, Langley and Lewis. The function of the advisory board is to channel information from its member companies to faculty members concerning problems that need research attention in the general area of multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO). The faculty and their graduate students make presentations to the board on their research. The board makes recommendations on the research and suggests new areas and problems which need attention. Many students participating in the program spend 3-6 months in industry working on their research projects. We are completing the fifth year of the fellowship program and have had four advisory board meetings in Blacksburg. Ten students have spent the three month periods in industry. In addition to the research element of the MAD Center efforts we also have an academic component. We have developed a menu of design-related graduate courses and two new courses: one in Aerospace Manufacturing and another in MDO. Some of the MAD Center activities are described on the world-wide web at http://www.aoe.vt.edu/mads.html The MAD Center represents an innovative approach for joint Industry-Government-University cooperation in the development of a comprehensive program in engineering education which addresses the design needs of industry. The following charts list detail of the grant: mission of the MAD center, faculty members, purpose of the advisory board, board members, summary of the graduate and undergraduate program, history of the fellowship program, mission of the fellowship program, requirements of MAD fellows, course requirements, students supported, advisory board participants, and MAD center research papers

Grossman, B.; Gurdal, Z.; Kapania, R. K.; Mason, W. H.; Schetz, J. A.

1999-01-01

458

How to turn a team of experts into an expert medical team: guidance from the aviation and military communities  

PubMed Central

There is no question that interdisciplinary teams are becoming ubiquitous in healthcare. It is also true that experts do not necessarily combine to make an expert team. However when teams work well they can serve as adaptive systems that allow organisations to mitigate errors within complex domains, thereby increasing safety. The medical community has begun to recognise the importance of teams and as such has begun to implement team training interventions. Over the past 20 years the military and aviation communities have made a large investment in understanding teams and their requisite training requirements. There are many lessons that can be learned from these communities to accelerate the impact of team training within the medical community. Therefore, the purpose of the current paper is to begin to translate some of the lessons learned from the military and aviation communities into practical guidance that can be used by the medical community. PMID:15465963

Burke, C; Salas, E; Wilson-Donnelly, K; Priest, H

2004-01-01

459

What problem are you working on?  

ScienceCinema

Superconductors, supercomputers, new materials, clean energy, big science - ORNL researchers' work is multidisciplinary and world-leading. Hear them explain it in their own words in this video first shown at UT-Battelle's 2013 Awards Night.

None

2014-09-15

460

What problem are you working on?  

SciTech Connect

Superconductors, supercomputers, new materials, clean energy, big science - ORNL researchers' work is multidisciplinary and world-leading. Hear them explain it in their own words in this video first shown at UT-Battelle's 2013 Awards Night.

None

2013-11-21

461

Autonomous mobile robot teams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes autonomous mobile robot teams performing tasks in unstructured environments. The behavior and the intelligence of the group is distributed, and the system does not include a central command base or leader. The novel concept of the Tropism-Based Cognitive Architecture is introduced, which is used by the robots in order to produce behavior transforming their sensory information to proper action. The results of a number of simulation experiments are presented. These experiments include worlds where the robot teams must locate, decompose, and gather objects, and defend themselves against hostile predators, while navigating around stationary and mobile obstacles.

Agah, Arvin; Bekey, George A.

1994-01-01

462

Team LunaCY Outreach Paper  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Iowa State University's Lunabotics Club, Team LunaCY, has worked hard to generate enthusiasm for robotics, engineering, and lunar activities. Team LunaCY participated in a variety of different outreach events making a strong impression on Iowa youth. These events led the chair of the mechanical engineering department, Dr. Ted Heindel, to refer to the club's outreach program as "the model that all other engineering clubs should follow." Team LunaCY's outreach activities totaled over 200 hours and captivated over 3000 students and adults throughout the course of this acaden1ic year, reaching out to people all over Iowa and to several special guests. These guests included Vice-President Joe Biden, during a visit to Iowa State University in March 2012, and astronaut Clayton Anderson, during a visit to Iowa State's campus in the fall 2011. Team LunaCY's outreach events created hands on learning opportunities for local youth ranging in age from elementary school children to high school students. The team strove to make a positive impression on Iowa youth and to encourage interest and involvement in scientific fields. The full list of events is shown in Table 1. Three of the major outreach events the team participated in were the FIRST LEGO League, Science Bound, and iExplore STEM Festival.

Heise, James; Hull, Bethanne J.

2012-01-01

463

Flying Cassini with Virtual Operations Teams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Cassini Program's challenge is to fly a large, complex mission with a reduced operations budget. A consequence of the reduced budget is elimination of the large, centrally located group traditionally used for uplink operations. Instead, responsibility for completing parts of the uplink function is distributed throughout the Program. A critical strategy employed to handle this challenge is the use of Virtual Uplink Operations Teams. A Virtual Team is comprised of a group of people with the necessary mix of engineering and science expertise who come together for the purpose of building a specific uplink product. These people are drawn from throughout the Cassini Program and participate across a large geographical area (from Germany to the West coast of the USA), covering ten time zones. The participants will often split their time between participating in the Virtual Team and accomplishing their core responsibilities, requiring significant planning and time management. When the particular uplink product task is complete, the Virtual Team disbands and the members turn back to their home organization element for future work assignments. This time-sharing of employees is used on Cassini to build mission planning products, via the Mission Planning Virtual Team, and sequencing products and monitoring of the sequence execution, via the Sequence Virtual Team. This challenging, multitasking approach allows efficient use of personnel in a resource constrained environment.

Dodd, Suzanne; Gustavson, Robert

1998-01-01

464

Technology Applications Team: Applications of aerospace technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Highlights of the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Applications Team activities over the past quarter are presented in Section 1.0. The Team's progress in fulfilling the requirements of the contract is summarized in Section 2.0. In addition to our market-driven approach to applications project development, RTI has placed increased effort on activities to commercialize technologies developed at NASA Centers. These Technology Commercialization efforts are summarized in Section 3.0. New problem statements prepared by the Team in the reporting period are presented in Section 4.0. The Team's transfer activities for ongoing projects with the NASA Centers are presented in Section 5.0. Section 6.0 summarizes the status of four add-on tasks. Travel for the reporting period is described in Section 7.0. The RTI Team staff and consultants and their project responsibilities are listed in Appendix A. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of many individuals to the RTI Technology Applications Team program. The time and effort contributed by managers, engineers, and scientists throughout NASA were essential to program success. Most important to the program has been a productive working relationship with the NASA Field Center Technology Utilization (TU) Offices. The RTI Team continues to strive for improved effectiveness as a resource to these offices. Industry managers, technical staff, medical researchers, and clinicians have been cooperative and open in their participation. The RTI Team looks forward to continuing expansion of its interaction with U.S. industry to facilitate the transfer of aerospace technology to the private sector.

1993-01-01

465

Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

2012-01-01

466

Porter Takes Reins of the FNL Green Team | Poster  

Cancer.gov

Melissa Porter, who recently joined the staff of Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, as administrative manager, has stepped forward to lead the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL) Green Team in its efforts to promote a “green” work environment. “I am excited to lead the FNL Green Team and have been impressed by the enthusiasm and commitment of the FNL Green Team,” Porter said.

467

Communication in interdisciplinary teams: exploring closed-loop communication during in situ trauma team training  

PubMed Central

Objectives Investigate the use of call-out (CO) and closed-loop communication (CLC) during a simulated emergency situation, and its relation to profession, age, gender, ethnicity, years in profession, educational experience, work experience and leadership style. Design Exploratory study. Setting In situ simulator-based interdisciplinary team training using trauma cases at an emergency department. Participants The result was based on 16 trauma teams with a total of 96 participants. Each team consisted of two physicians, two registered nurses and two enrolled nurses, identical to a standard trauma team. Results The results in this study showed that the use of CO and CLC in trauma teams was limited, with an average of 20 CO and 2.8 CLC/team. Previous participation in trauma team training did not increase the frequency of use of CLC while ?2 structured trauma courses correlated with increased use of CLC (risk ratio (RR) 3.17, CI 1.22 to 8.24). All professions in the trauma team were observed to initiate and terminate CLC (except for the enrolled nurse from the operation theatre). The frequency of team members’ use of CLC increased significantly with an egalitarian leade