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1

Multidisciplinary Mental Health Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study surveyed current practice amongst 91 Indian and Australian staff working within multidisciplinary mental health teams, looking at leadership skills, conflict resolution and therapeutic abilities. Length of training was asso ciated with management skills, though these skills were more developed by psychiatric nurses and occupational therapists working in community settings. Hospital settings involved less consensual decision-making than community teams.

Mike Slade; Alan Rosen; Radha Shankar

1995-01-01

2

Multidisciplinary team working, clinical networks, and chambers; opportunities to work differently in the NHS  

PubMed Central

Recently in the United Kingdom some new organisational structures for clinicians have been discussed. So far little has changed, but the intensity of interest suggests this may be an opportunity to link change in working practices with improvements in quality. Multidisciplinary team working is developing within the National Health Service (NHS) and some groups are expanding their roles across traditional institutional boundaries to form complex clinical networks. It would require little to make these functional networks autonomous from current NHS structures. Other models of working without traditional institutional boundaries have been discussed, including the formation of "chambers" for doctors and other professionals. We describe the first tentative steps of one group as an example and suggest that further experimentation with evaluation is required.

Carter, S; Garside, P; Black, A

2003-01-01

3

Overcoming obstacles to establish a multidisciplinary team approach to hepatobiliary diseases: a working model in a Caribbean setting  

PubMed Central

Introduction By providing a structured forum to exchange information and ideas, multidisciplinary team meetings improve working relationships, expedite investigations, promote evidence-based treatment, and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. Methods This discursive paper reports the introduction of a multidisciplinary team approach to manage hepatobiliary diseases in Jamaica, focusing on the challenges encountered and the methods used to overcome these obstacles. Conclusion Despite multiple challenges in resource-limited environments, a multidisciplinary team approach can be incorporated into clinical practice in developing nations. Policy makers should make it a priority to support clinical, operational, and governance aspects of the multidisciplinary teams.

Cawich, Shamir O; Johnson, Peter B; Shah, Sundeep; Roberts, Patrick; Arthurs, Milton; Murphy, Trevor; Bonadie, Kimon O; Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Abu Hilal, Mohammed; Pearce, Neil W

2014-01-01

4

HIV multidisciplinary teams work: Support services improve access to and retention in HIV primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The multidisciplinary team model of HIV care evolved out of necessity due to the diverse characteristics and needs of people living with HIV disease. Though it is now accepted as the international standard of care, it represents a significant departure from methods of care for other infectious diseases, and debate continues regarding the effectiveness of its interventions. The debate has

R. Sherer; K. Stieglitz; J. Narra; J. Jasek; L. Green; B. Moore; S. Shott; M. Cohen

2002-01-01

5

Community learning disability teams: perceived effectiveness, multidisciplinary working and service user satisfaction.  

PubMed

The locus of care for people with learning disabilities has shifted from institutional/residential care to community care, with Community Learning Disability Teams (CLDTs) providing support for people with learning disabilities, and their family caregivers, in the community. A survey of the perceived effectiveness of 145 CLDT members, 27 family caregivers and 21 people with a learning disability was undertaken. Findings suggest high levels of perceived effectiveness with the services provided by the CLDTs, but caregivers gave the lowest satisfaction ratings. Although overall effectiveness was rated highly there is no room for complacency. There was limited evidence to support the view that multidisciplinary CLDTs are more effective than unidisciplinary teams. Further research is required in this area and ongoing evaluation of the effectiveness of CLDTs is suggested. PMID:18029410

Slevin, Eamonn; McConkey, Roy; Truesdale-Kennedy, Maria; Barr, Owen; Taggart, Laurence

2007-12-01

6

Multidisciplinary health teams.  

PubMed

The medical profession needs to learn team skills and review its managerial functions in anticipation of increasing involvement with other health professionals in a team setting. Educatinal techniques for acquiring these skills are already available or are being developed for other organizations. Review of the traditional medical hierarchy and its legal implications, architecture of health institutions, medical records systems, and the selection of medical students are other areas for specific attention. PMID:1207585

Burr, M

1975-11-29

7

Effects of multidisciplinary team working on breast cancer survival: retrospective, comparative, interventional cohort study of 13 722 women  

PubMed Central

Objectives To describe the effect of multidisciplinary care on survival in women treated for breast cancer. Design Retrospective, comparative, non-randomised, interventional cohort study. Setting NHS hospitals, health boards in the west of Scotland, UK. Participants 14?358 patients diagnosed with symptomatic invasive breast cancer between 1990 and 2000, residing in health board areas in the west of Scotland. 13?722 (95.6%) patients were eligible (excluding 16 diagnoses of inflammatory cancers and 620 diagnoses of breast cancer at death). Intervention In 1995, multidisciplinary team working was introduced in hospitals throughout one health board area (Greater Glasgow; intervention area), but not in other health board areas in the west of Scotland (non-intervention area). Main outcome measures Breast cancer specific mortality and all cause mortality. Results Before the introduction of multidisciplinary care (analysed time period January 1990 to September 1995), breast cancer mortality was 11% higher in the intervention area than in the non-intervention area (hazard ratio adjusted for year of incidence, age at diagnosis, and deprivation, 1.11; 95% confidence interval 1.00 to 1.20). After multidisciplinary care was introduced (time period October 1995 to December 2000), breast cancer mortality was 18% lower in the intervention area than in the non-intervention area (0.82, 0.74 to 0.91). All cause mortality did not differ significantly between populations in the earlier period, but was 11% lower in the intervention area than in the non-interventional area in the later period (0.89, 0.82 to 0.97). Interrupted time series analyses showed a significant improvement in breast cancer survival in the intervention area in 1996, compared with the expected survival in the same year had the pre-intervention trend continued (P=0.004). This improvement was maintained after the intervention was introduced. Conclusion Introduction of multidisciplinary care was associated with improved survival and reduced variation in survival among hospitals. Further analysis of clinical audit data for multidisciplinary care could identify which aspects of care are most associated with survival benefits.

2012-01-01

8

Are Multidisciplinary Teams Worth the Investment?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current research data provide only weak support for the continued use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). It is argued that MDTs have not had a fair chance to be implemented and that the complexity of organizational changes needed for MDTs to function effectively have been overlooked by team members and administrators. (Author/PN)

Yoshida, Roland K.

1983-01-01

9

Multi-Disciplinary Team Project With Software  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Multi-disciplinary team projects are an important element in the ABET accreditation of engineering programs. The basic manufacturing processes course in the Industrial Engineering (IE) Program at West Virginia University is one of only two IE courses which are required by other engineering majors. A software program was developed to assist students in the evaluation of costs when selecting different materials and shapes to meet specific load and deflection requirements. The program has been used for four semesters to develop an appreciation of the effect of material selection and design upon the total cost of a multi-constrained project. Students have indicated several problems which resulted in model changes and the development of an instruction manual. The project has been modified so that several reports are required before the final project. This paper discusses the student responses and the effect of the use of multiple reports.

Creese, Robert; Deepak, Gupta

2009-09-11

10

Work-team implementation.  

PubMed

The authors describe the implementation of the Work-Team Concept at the Frigidaire plans in Jefferson, Iowa. By forming teams, plant staff have made significant improvements in worker safety, product quality, customer service, cost-effectiveness, and overall employee well-being. PMID:10154936

Reiste, K K; Hubrich, A

1996-02-01

11

Charting Multidisciplinary Team External Dynamics Using a Systems Thinking Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using the formalism provided by the Systems Thinking approach, the dynamics present when operating multidisciplinary teams are examined in the context of the NASA Langley Research and Technology Group, an R&D organization organized along functional lines. The paper focuses on external dynamics and examines how an organization creates and nurtures the teams and how it disseminates and retains the lessons and expertise created by the multidisciplinary activities. Key variables are selected and the causal relationships between the variables are identified. Five "stories" are told, each of which touches on a different aspect of the dynamics. The Systems Thinking Approach provides recommendations as to interventions that will facilitate the introduction of multidisciplinary teams and that therefore will increase the likelihood of performing successful multidisciplinary developments. These interventions can be carried out either by individual researchers, line management or program management.

Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Waszak, Martin R.; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

1998-01-01

12

The interplay of conflict and analogy in multidisciplinary teams.  

PubMed

Creative teamwork in multidisciplinary teams is a topic of interest to cognitive psychologists on the one hand, and to both social and organizational psychologists on the other. However, the interconnections between cognitive and social layers have been rarely explored. Drawing on mental models and dissonance theories, the current study takes a central variable studied by cognitive psychologists-analogy-and examines its relationship to a central variable examined by social psychologists-conflict. In an observational, field study, over 11h of audio-video data from conversations of the Mars Exploration Rover scientists were coded for different types of analogy and micro-conflicts that reveal the character of underlying psychological mechanisms. Two different types of time-lagged logistic models applied to these data revealed asymmetric patterns of associations between analogy and conflict. Within-domain analogies, but not within-discipline or outside-discipline analogies, preceded science and work process conflicts, suggesting that in multidisciplinary teams, representational gaps in very close domains will be more likely to spark conflict. But analogies also occurred in reaction to conflict: Process and negative conflicts, but not task conflicts, preceded within-discipline analogies, but not to within-domain or outside-discipline analogies. This study demonstrates ways in which cognition can be bidirectionally tied to social processes and discourse. PMID:22980920

Paletz, Susannah B F; Schunn, Christian D; Kim, Kevin H

2013-01-01

13

Teams work (panel session)  

Microsoft Academic Search

“I didn't think I'd like group work, but I ended up in a good team and it was a great experience. But I feel if you end up in a bad team it can really get you down and will affect your mark.” This student response (University of Exeter, U.K.) is typical and telling. At least some of the time

Sally Fincher; James Caristi

2000-01-01

14

Heterogeneity and Work Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper attempts to extend and contribute to the domestic diversity literature by presenting a comprehensive model that takes into consideration the Indian work set up. It proposes to examine the effects of the composition of information systems development teams in Indian firms. Besides the conventional demographics which were studied…

Dyaram, Lata; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

2008-01-01

15

Collaborative practice teams: from multidisciplinary to interdisciplinary.  

PubMed

The current competitive health care market includes consumers and payers who are demanding that providers demonstrate and validate the effectiveness of their interventions in promoting patient outcomes. Collaboration in the form of interdisciplinary teams is an effective mechanism for enhancing patient outcomes. The CPT acts as the vehicle for driving the outcomes management process. Seven skills used by CPT members enhance collaboration: clinical competence, credibility, consistency, assertiveness, structured meetings, valuing of time, and marketing of the CPT. Change is inevitable, and strategies for change will be useful in achieving the outcomes of carefully planned objectives and goals. PMID:9775914

Warren, M L; Houston, S; Luquire, R

1998-01-01

16

Randomized controlled trial of Anticipatory and Preventive multidisciplinary Team Care  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE T o examine whether quality of care (QOC) improves when nurse practitioners and pharmacists work with family physicians in community practice and focus their work on patients who are 50 years of age and older and considered to be at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes. DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. SETTING A family health network with 8 family physicians, 5 nurses, and 11 administrative personnel serving 10 000 patients in a rural area near Ottawa, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Patients 50 years of age and older at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes (N = 241). INTERVENTIONS At-risk patients were randomly assigned to receive usual care from their family physicians or Anticipatory and Preventive Team Care (APTCare) from a collaborative team composed of their physicians, 1 of 3 nurse practitioners, and a pharmacist. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Quality of care for chronic disease management (CDM) for diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. RESULTS Controlling for baseline demographic characteristics, the APTCare approach improved CDM QOC by 9.2% (P < .001) compared with traditional care. The APTCare intervention also improved preventive care by 16.5% (P < .001). We did not observe significant differences in other secondary outcome measures (intermediate clinical outcomes, quality of life [Short-Form 36 and health-related quality of life scales], functional status [instrumental activities of daily living scale] and service usage). CONCLUSION Additional resources in the form of collaborative multidisciplinary care teams with intensive interventions in primary care can improve QOC for CDM in a population of older at-risk patients. The appropriateness of this intervention will depend on its cost-effectiveness. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT00238836 (CONSORT)

Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Dahrouge, Simone; Liddy, Clare; Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Legault, Frances; Dalziel, Bill; Zhang, Wei

2009-01-01

17

Improving recovery time following heart transplantation: the role of the multidisciplinary health care team  

PubMed Central

Background The care of cardiac transplant patients is complex requiring a finely orchestrated endeavor to save a patient’s life. Given the chronic and complex nature of these patients, multiple disciplines are involved in their care. Recognizing difficulties with communication among team members and striving for improved efficiencies in our pretransplant listing process and in our inpatient care, our team was prompted to change the existing approach to patient care related to heart transplantation. Methods Daily multidisciplinary rounds were instituted and the format of the weekly Multidisciplinary Review Committee (MDRC) meetings was modified with the list of attendees broadened to include a larger interdisciplinary team. Additionally, the approach to patient care was analyzed for process improvement. Results The quality improvements are improved communication and throughput, quantified in an 85% decrease in time to complete transplant evaluation, a 37% decrease in median length of stay posttransplantation, and a 33% reduction in the 30 day readmission rate. In addition, pre- and posttransplant caregivers now participate in MDRC in person or via an electronic meeting platform to support the continuum of care. Quality metrics were chosen and tracked via a transparent electronic platform allowing all involved to assess progress toward agreed upon goals. These were achieved in an 18 month time period following the recruitment of new leadership and invested team members working together as a multidisciplinary team to improve the quality of cardiac transplant care. Discussion: Implementation of daily multidisciplinary rounds and expansion of the attendees for the MDRC meetings improved care related to heart transplantation.

Roussel, Maureen G; Gorham, Noreen; Wilson, Lynn; Mangi, Abeel A

2013-01-01

18

Making Science Teams Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards , getting teams to share equally in the academic assignments and interact in a positive and productive manner often eludes even the best of teachers. These strategies for creating effective student teams include planning, student pre-assessment, communication with students and parents, motivational strategies, and arrangement of the classroom and activities.

Miller, Roxanne G.

2004-09-01

19

Training Work Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 10-step model of techniques for developing effective teams encompasses credibility, ventilation of issues, orientation, group process, group goals, facilitation, intragroup procedures, intergroup processes, different roles for trainers, and setting groups free to function on their own. (JOW)

Brauchle, Paul E.; Wright, David W.

1993-01-01

20

Multidisciplinary workshops: learning to work together.  

PubMed

Health and social care professional practice needs to move with the times and to respond to the ever-changing combination of health needs, economic realities and health-policy imperatives. A clear understanding of the variety of forces at play and the ability to marshal these to good effect by working in partnership with multidisciplinary colleagues and children/families is a must, not least in this time of economic austerity and ever-rising health inequalities, when vulnerable children's lives and complex family relationships and behaviours so easily become increasingly strained and challenged. This sad reality calls out for relevant joined-up solutions by all participants--an agenda so often called into question by court judgement after court judgement. The multidisciplinary workshops to be discussed have developed and changed over the past decade and provide a safe but realistic learning environment for students from health and social care backgrounds to experience the difficulties and barriers to good multidisciplinary working, to better understand others' perspectives and activities and consider and develop new and better practical strategies for working with multidisciplinary professional colleagues, children and families. All of the workshops are underpinned by specific discipline-focused theoretical work. PMID:23540014

Fatchett, Anita; Taylor, Dawn

2013-03-01

21

What is a virtual multidisciplinary team (vMDT)?  

PubMed Central

Background: Multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTs), also known as tumour boards or multidisciplinary case conferences, are an integral component of contemporary cancer care. There are logistical problems with setting up and maintaining participation in these meetings. An ill-defined concept, the virtual MDT (vMDT), has arisen in response to these difficulties. We have, in order to provide clarity and to generate discussion, attempted to define the concept of the vMDT, outline its advantages and disadvantages, and consider some of the practical aspects involved in setting up a virtual MDT. Methods: This is an unstructured review of published evidence and personal experience relating to virtual teams in general, and to MDTs in particular. Results: We have devised a simple taxonomy for MDTs, discussed some of the practicalities involved in setting up a vMDT, and described some of the potential advantages and disadvantages associated with vMDTs. Conclusion: The vMDT may be useful for discussions concerning rare or unusual tumours, or for helping guide the assessment and management of patients with uncommon complications related to treatment. However, the vMDT is a niche concept and is currently unlikely to replace the more traditional face-to-face MDT in the management of common tumours at specific sites.

Munro, A J; Swartzman, S

2013-01-01

22

Management of ovarian cancer: referral to a multidisciplinary team matters.  

PubMed Central

Differences in survival outcome for patients with ovarian cancer in Scotland led to an investigation of whether these differences were due to variation in presenting prognostic features or to the organisation and delivery of cancer services. A retrospective study of all 533 cases of ovarian cancer registered in Scotland in 1987 was carried out. After adjustment for age, stage, pathology, degree of differentiation and presence of ascites, survival improved when patients (1) were first seen by a gynaecologist (P < 0.05); (2) were operated on by a gynaecologist (P < 0.05); (3) had residual disease of less than 2 cm post-operatively (P < 0.001); (4) were prescribed platinum chemotherapy (P < 0.05); and (5) were referred to a joint clinic (P < 0.001). When gynaecologists operated the likelihood of smaller residual disease increased (P < 0.001). The improved survival from management by a multidisciplinary team at a joint clinic was not solely due to the prescription of platinum chemotherapy. The results of this study support the contents of the 1991 Department of Health report on present acceptable practice in the management of ovarian cancer, circulated to gynaecologists and surgeons in Scotland in 1992. The new finding that in a common cancer management by a multidisciplinary team at a joint clinic directly affects survival requires urgent attention.

Junor, E. J.; Hole, D. J.; Gillis, C. R.

1994-01-01

23

Teams make it work: how team work engagement mediates between social resources and performance in teams.  

PubMed

In this study we analyze the mediating role of team work engagement between team social resources (i.e., supportive team climate, coordination, teamwork), and team performance (i.e., in-role and extra-role performance) as predicted by the Job Demands-Resources Model. Aggregated data of 533 employees nested within 62 teams and 13 organizations were used, whereas team performance was assessed by supervisor ratings. Structural equation modeling revealed that, as expected, team work engagement plays a mediating role between social resources perceived at the team level and team performance as assessed by the supervisor. PMID:22269372

Torrente, Pedro; Salanova, Marisa; Llorens, Susana; Schaufeli, Wilmar B

2012-02-01

24

Teaching Engineering Students Team Work  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

Levi, Daniel

1998-01-01

25

Pharmacist contributions as members of the multidisciplinary ICU team.  

PubMed

Critical care pharmacy services in the ICU have expanded from traditional dispensing responsibilities to being recognized as an essential component of multidisciplinary care for critically ill patients. Augmented by technology and resource utilization, this shift in roles has allowed pharmacists to provide valuable services in the form of assisting physicians and clinicians with pharmacotherapy decision-making, reducing medication errors, and improving medication safety systems to optimize patient outcomes. Documented improvements in the management of infections, anticoagulation therapy, sedation, and analgesia for patients receiving mechanical ventilation and in emergency response help to justify the need for clinical pharmacy services for critically ill patients. Contributions to quality improvement initiatives, scholarly and research activities, and the education and training of interdisciplinary personnel are also valued services offered by clinical pharmacists. Partnering with physician and nursing champions can garner support from hospital administrators for the addition of clinical pharmacy critical care services. The addition of a pharmacist to an interprofessional critical care team should be encouraged as health-care systems focus on improving the quality and efficiency of care delivered to improve patient outcomes. PMID:24189862

Preslaski, Candice R; Lat, Ishaq; MacLaren, Robert; Poston, Jason

2013-11-01

26

Learning geomicrobiology as a team using microbial mats, a multidisciplinary approach.  

PubMed

Microbial mats are one of the best suited laminar organo-sedimentary ecosystems for students from different educational backgrounds to visualize the direct relationship between microbes and minerals. We have used tropical hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico as educational tools to promote active learning of geomicrobiology introductory concepts for undergraduate students organized in multidisciplinary teams with biological and geological backgrounds. Besides field trips and independent research projects focused on microbial mats, four intensive workshops and one capstone activity were designed to expose students to the different geomicrobiology subdisciplines (microbiology, molecular biology, geology, and geochemistry). The teaching-learning process was assessed using pre- and posttests, group discussions, activities including Gallery Walks and exquisite cadaver's, case studies, and focal interviews. While the posttest showed a significant difference in conceptual understanding, the Gallery Walk and the capstone activities demonstrated increase in the depth, coherence, and thoughtfulness in answering questions, including a clear integration of the different subdisciplines during their presentations. Finally, the main themes described by the students as important outcomes of their participation in the Research at Undergraduate Institutions: Microbial Observatory (RUI-MO) program were: (i) the opportunity to study and learn new and different science disciplines, (ii) the microbial mats were excellent tools to learn from and integrate different science disciplines, and (iii) working in multidisciplinary teams gave them the opportunity to learn from their peers' discipline backgrounds. To our knowledge this is the first educational initiative that uses tropical hypersaline microbial mats to teach geomicrobiology in a multidisciplinary fashion. PMID:23653817

Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Casillas-Martinez, Lilliam; Visscher, Pieter T

2007-01-01

27

Learning Geomicrobiology as a Team Using Microbial Mats, a Multidisciplinary Approach  

PubMed Central

Microbial mats are one of the best suited laminar organo-sedimentary ecosystems for students from different educational backgrounds to visualize the direct relationship between microbes and minerals. We have used tropical hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico as educational tools to promote active learning of geomicrobiology introductory concepts for undergraduate students organized in multidisciplinary teams with biological and geological backgrounds. Besides field trips and independent research projects focused on microbial mats, four intensive workshops and one capstone activity were designed to expose students to the different geomicrobiology subdisciplines (microbiology, molecular biology, geology, and geochemistry). The teaching-learning process was assessed using pre- and posttests, group discussions, activities including Gallery Walks and exquisite cadaver’s, case studies, and focal interviews. While the posttest showed a significant difference in conceptual understanding, the Gallery Walk and the capstone activities demonstrated increase in the depth, coherence, and thoughtfulness in answering questions, including a clear integration of the different subdisciplines during their presentations. Finally, the main themes described by the students as important outcomes of their participation in the Research at Undergraduate Institutions: Microbial Observatory (RUI-MO) program were: (i) the opportunity to study and learn new and different science disciplines, (ii) the microbial mats were excellent tools to learn from and integrate different science disciplines, and (iii) working in multidisciplinary teams gave them the opportunity to learn from their peers’ discipline backgrounds. To our knowledge this is the first educational initiative that uses tropical hypersaline microbial mats to teach geomicrobiology in a multidisciplinary fashion.

Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Casillas-Martinez, Lilliam; Visscher, Pieter T.

2007-01-01

28

Virtual teams: team control structure, work processes, and team effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seeks to determine the impact managerial controls have on the effectiveness of virtual teams. Using an experimental design compares self-directed virtual teams to counterparts where behavior controls are used as a method of managerial control. The data were collected using 51 student teams of three or four members each from three different countries. The results indicate that the most satisfied

Gabriele Piccoli; Anne Powell; Blake Ives

2004-01-01

29

Multidisciplinary medical team meetings: a field study of collaboration in health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an observational study that was conducted to guide the design of an enhanced collaboration platform to support distributed multidisciplinary team meetings between two hospitals. Our goal was to find out how the breast cancer multidisciplinary team collaborates in their face-to-face meetings and in their discussions using an existing video-conferencing system and to identify obstacles and issues to their

Jane Li; Toni Robertson; Susan Hansen; Tim Mansfield; Jesper Kjeldskov

2008-01-01

30

Learning to work in teams.  

PubMed

Optimum individual and team functioning can be progressed through organizational learning. Organizational learning is facilitated through positive team interactions. However, the process of shifting and shaping team behavior is not simple. This article offers strategies to help teams modify their interactions to better engage with and learn from each other. The effectiveness of these strategies in continuing staff development is evidenced in the development of highly functioning teams. PMID:24896235

Schoonbeek, Sue; Henderson, Amanda

2014-06-01

31

The At-Home Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Team: A New Trend in Cancer Rehabilitation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The implementation of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation team in providing rehabilitative services to discharged cancer patients in an in-home situation is outlined in this article. The characteristics of effective team coordinators, their functions, the nature of their services, and evaluation results are discussed. (Author)

Bluhm, Harry P.; And Others

1979-01-01

32

Language Facilitation with the Mentally Handicapped: Preparation of the Multidisciplinary Team.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author recommends the use of a multidisciplinary team approach to language facilitation with mentally handicapped children. The role of the team in developing communication skills in the child is discussed, and a model of communication with three principle components (linguistic aspects, paralinguistic aspects, and interaction management) is…

Wirz, Sheila

33

Enhanced clarity and holism: the outcome of implementing the ICF with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team in England  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Although it is recommended that the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) should be implemented to aid communication within multidisciplinary stroke services, there is no empirical evidence to demonstrate the outcomes of such implementation. Working with one stroke service, this project aimed to address this gap and sought to evaluate the outcomes of implementing an ICF-based clinical tool into practice. Method: Using an action research framework with mixed methods, data were collected from individual interviews, a focus group, questionnaires, email communications, minutes from relevant meetings and field notes. Thematic analysis was undertaken, using immersion and crystallisation, to define overall themes. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data. Data from both sources were combined to create key findings. Results: Three findings were determined from the data analysis. The ICF (1) fosters communication within and beyond the multidisciplinary stroke team; (2) promotes holistic thinking; and (3) helps to clarify team roles. Conclusions: The ICF enhanced clarity of communication and team roles within the acute stroke multidisciplinary team as well as with other clinicians, patients and their relatives. In addition, the ICF challenged stroke clinicians to think holistically, thereby appropriately extending their domain of concern beyond their traditional remit. Implications for Rehabilitation The ICF is a globally accepted framework to describe functioning and is in use in a variety of clinical settings. Yet, the outcomes of using it in clinical practice have yet to be fully explored. This study found that the ICF enhanced clarity of communication and team roles within an acute stroke multidisciplinary team and to others beyond the team, including clinicians, patients and their relatives. Using the ICF also challenged clinicians to think holistically about patient needs following a stroke.

Harries, Priscilla; Kilbride, Cherry; De Souza, Lorraine

2013-01-01

34

The Organization of Multidisciplinary Care Teams: Modeling Internal and External Influences on Cancer Care Quality  

PubMed Central

Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care.

Prabhu Das, Irene; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

2010-01-01

35

Can we optimize our teams? Multidisciplinary care for multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

Established in 2003, the multiple sclerosis (MS) regional hospital network in the Auvergne area of France links not only neurologists but also many other specialists (e.g., urologists, ophthalmologists) and more than 400 other allied healthcare professionals (including physiotherapists, nurses, occupational therapists) involved in the care of patients with MS. This multidisciplinary network aims to improve quality of care for an estimated 1600 + MS patients in the Auvergne region through numerous training courses and medical support programs. The initiative is supported by the regional regulatory authority and receives public funding from the Auvergne regional state health insurance office. The Auvergne MS network has facilitated improvements in quality of care by coordinating patient care in the proximal vicinity of the patient's home and has provided useful information about MS epidemiology (incidence and prevalence) in the region. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the Auvergne MS network has explored other avenues of domiciliary-based care to seek improvements in the patient-centered management of MS. These include: access to high-dose methylprednisolone in the home, ensuring appropriate supervision and support; participation in national clinical research programs coordinated from hospital centers of excellence; provision of multidisciplinary clinic services where healthcare professionals across different disciplines can attend to the patient on the same day in the same center of care; development of individual and group-based cognitive therapy programs; educational programs focusing on the management of fatigue and cognitive impairment associated with MS; and educational programs focusing on optimal use of immunomodulating agents in MS patients. PMID:24289841

Clavelou, Pierre

2013-12-01

36

Normative Model of Work Team Effectiveness.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Descriptive research on group performance has produced neither a set of empirical generalizations sturdy enough to guide the design and management of work teams, nor interventions that reliably improve team effectiveness. As an alternative, a normative mo...

J. R. Hackman

1983-01-01

37

Partnering to prevent falls: using a multimodal multidisciplinary team.  

PubMed

An organizational goal to decrease fall rates was initiated using a multidisciplinary, multimodal approach. One innovative strategy was the Friday fall review, where nurse managers present each fall that occurred to determine causes and potential preventive measures. Results of the project include a fall rate below the benchmark for 9 of 10 recent consecutive quarters. Because of the success of this initiative, the quality department has adopted the format to review all core measure indicators where there is noncompliance or less than optimal performance. PMID:23708501

Volz, Tina M; Swaim, T Jane

2013-06-01

38

The Workings of a Multicultural Research Team  

PubMed Central

Purpose Transcultural nurse researchers are exposed to the challenges of developing and maintaining a multiethnic team. With the example of a multicultural research study of family caregivers conducted in the Miami-Dade area, the authors guide the readers through steps of developing a culturally competent and effective team. Design Pointing out challenges and successes, the authors illustrate team processes and successful strategies relative to recruitment of qualified members, training and team maintenance, and evaluation of team effectiveness. Method With relevant concepts from the literature applied to practical examples, the authors demonstrate how cultural team competence grows in a supportive work environment.

Friedemann, Marie-Luise; Pagan-Coss, Harald; Mayorga, Carlos

2013-01-01

39

A Multidisciplinary, Hospital-Based Team for Child Abuse Cases: A "Hands-on" Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a hospital-based program for providing consultation to persons who provide direct services in child abuse/neglect cases. Conceptual issues in multidisciplinary team formation and involvement are discussed. Some topics mentioned are types of service, follow-up, educational components, and long-term involvement with families. (DB)

Whitworth, Jay M.; And Others

1981-01-01

40

Communication in and clinician satisfaction with multidisciplinary team meetings in neuro-oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) meetings are critical in the management of complex cancer cases. There are limited data regarding the effectiveness of neuro-oncology MDT meetings and the impact of documenting and disseminating the recommended patient management. We established a weekly neuro-oncology MDT meeting and developed a standard electronic communication process. A survey was issued to participating clinicians to assess their level

K. M. Field; M. A. Rosenthal; J. Dimou; M. Fleet; P. Gibbs; K. Drummond

2010-01-01

41

Learning Geomicrobiology as a Team Using Microbial Mats, a Multidisciplinary Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbial mats are one of the best suited laminar organo-sedimentary ecosystems for students from different educational backgrounds to visualize the direct relationship between microbes and minerals. We have used tropical hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico as educational tools to promote active learning of geomicrobiology introductory concepts for undergraduate students organized in multidisciplinary teams with biological and geological backgrounds. Besides

Carlos Rios-Velazquez; Lilliam Casillas-Martinez; Pieter T. Visscher

2007-01-01

42

The MUSES Satellite Team and Multidisciplinary System Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a unique partnership between three minority-serving institutions and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a new course sequence, including a multidisciplinary capstone design experience, is to be developed and implemented at each of the schools with the ambitious goal of designing, constructing and launching a low-orbit Earth-resources satellite. The three universities involved are North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T), University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP), and California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA). The schools form a consortium collectively known as MUSES - Minority Universities System Engineering and Satellite. Four aspects of this project make it unique: (1) Including all engineering disciplines in the capstone design course, (2) designing, building and launching an Earth-resources satellite, (3) sustaining the partnership between the three schools to achieve this goal, and (4) implementing systems engineering pedagogy at each of the three schools. This paper will describe the partnership and its goals, the first design of the satellite, the courses developed at NCA&T, and the implementation plan for the course sequence.

Chen, John C.; Paiz, Alfred R.; Young, Donald L.

1997-01-01

43

Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work  

PubMed Central

Background Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes. Method This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary team work, and the perceptions of over 253 staff from 11 community rehabilitation and intermediate care teams in the UK. These data sources were merged using qualitative content analysis to arrive at a framework that identifies characteristics and proposes ten competencies that support effective interdisciplinary team work. Results Ten characteristics underpinning effective interdisciplinary team work were identified: positive leadership and management attributes; communication strategies and structures; personal rewards, training and development; appropriate resources and procedures; appropriate skill mix; supportive team climate; individual characteristics that support interdisciplinary team work; clarity of vision; quality and outcomes of care; and respecting and understanding roles. Conclusions We propose competency statements that an effective interdisciplinary team functioning at a high level should demonstrate.

2013-01-01

44

Establishing a multidisciplinary diabetic foot team in a large tertiary hospital: a workshop.  

PubMed

Every year, over 1 million people with diabetes lose a leg due to diabetic foot disease. Most amputations are preceded by a foot ulcer. Causes for the development of foot ulcers are generally multifactorial and may include neuropathy, peripheral vasculopathy, abnormal foot mechanics and infection. Multidisciplinary approach to the patient with acute diabetic foot is mandatory and has been shown to reduce amputation rate. In our article we describe the establishment of a multidisciplinary diabetic foot team in a large tertiary hospital and its outcomes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24446250

Cahn, Avivit; Elishuv, Ofer; Olshtain-Pops, Keren

2014-07-01

45

Multidisciplinary teams of case managers in the implementation of an innovative integrated services delivery for the elderly in France  

PubMed Central

Background The case management process is now well defined, and teams of case managers have been implemented in integrated services delivery. However, little is known about the role played by the team of case managers and the value in having multidisciplinary case management teams. The objectives were to develop a fuller understanding of the role played by the case manager team and identify the value of inter-professional collaboration in multidisciplinary teams during the implementation of an innovative integrated service in France. Methods We conducted a qualitative study with focus groups comprising 14 multidisciplinary teams for a total of 59 case managers, six months after their recruitment to the MAIA program (Maison Autonomie Integration Alzheimer). Results Most of the case managers saw themselves as being part of a team of case managers (91.5%). Case management teams help case managers develop a comprehensive understanding of the integration concept, meet the complex needs of elderly people and change their professional practices. Multidisciplinary case management teams add value by helping case managers move from theory to practice, by encouraging them develop a comprehensive clinical vision, and by initiating the interdisciplinary approach. Conclusions The multidisciplinary team of case managers is central to the implementation of case management and helps case managers develop their new role and a core inter-professional competency.

2014-01-01

46

The Role of the Multidisciplinary Team in Recruiting to Cancer Clinical Trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

This paper explores factors influencing patient recruitment to breast cancer clinical trials from the perspective of multidisciplinary research teams. Based on the results of the study, the authors recommend numerous strategies to improve recruitment, including having a recruitment plan, having flexibility in recruitment strategies, recording information on women eligible for and approached to join clinical trials, using financial incentives for recruiters and participants, educating patients and clinicians about clinical trials, and allowing women to make their own treatment decisions.

47

Design and Management of Work Teams.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the final report for the project, Design and Management of Work Teams. The report describes the contributions of the project to (a) basic theory about group performance, (b) the development of research methodologies suitable for studying group tas...

J. R. Hackman

1986-01-01

48

A Multidisciplinary Allied Health Faculty Team: Formation and First Year Production of Problem-Based Learning in Gerontology/Geriatrics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how a multidisciplinary team developed problem-based cases related to older adults for allied health students to explore gerontology/geriatrics issues in the Mid-Atlantic Allied Health Geriatric Education Center. (SK)

Silver, Sylvia

1998-01-01

49

Cancer control after low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy performed by a multidisciplinary team with no previous prostate brachytherapy experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesTo describe the biochemical disease-free survival observed in the first cohort men treated by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians with no previous experience in low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDRPB).

Kevin P. McMullen; Allan F. deGuzman; David L. McCullough; W. Robert Lee

2004-01-01

50

Part 1: Participatory Ergonomics Approach to Waste Container Handling Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Team  

SciTech Connect

This multidisciplinary team approach to waste container handling, developed within the Grassroots Ergonomics process, presents participatory ergonomic interpretations of quantitative and qualitative aspects of this process resulting in a peer developed training. The lower back, shoulders, and wrists were identified as frequently injured areas, so these working postures were a primary focus for the creation of the workers' training. Handling procedures were analyzed by the team to identify common cycles involving one 5 gallon (60 pounds), two 5 gallons (60 and 54 pounds), 30 gallon (216 pounds), and 55 gallon (482 pounds) containers: lowering from transporting to/from transport vehicles, loading/unloading on transport vehicles, and loading onto pallet. Eleven experienced waste container handlers participated in this field analysis. Ergonomic exposure assessment tools measuring these field activities included posture analysis, posture targeting, Lumbar Motion Monitor{trademark} (LMM), and surface electromyography (sEMG) for the erector spinae, infraspinatus, and upper trapezius muscles. Posture analysis indicates that waste container handlers maintained non-neutral lower back postures (flexion, lateral bending, and rotation) for a mean of 51.7% of the time across all activities. The right wrist was in non-neutral postures (radial, ulnar, extension, and flexion) a mean of 30.5% of the time and the left wrist 31.4%. Non-neutral shoulder postures (elevation) were the least common, occurring 17.6% and 14.0% of the time in the right and left shoulders respectively. For training applications, each cycle had its own synchronized posture analysis and posture target diagram. Visual interpretations relating to the peak force modifications of the posture target diagrams proved to be invaluable for the workers' understanding of LMM and sEMG results (refer to Part II). Results were reviewed by the team's field technicians and their interpretations were developed into ergonomic training that address the issues originally raised. This training includes intervention methods, ergonomic tools used, dam acquired, and effects of waste container handling techniques on lower back, shoulder, and wrists and methods to help proactively reduce injuries associated with this profession.

Zalk, D.M.; Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Biggs, T.W.; Perry, C.M.; Tageson, R.; Barsnick, L.

2000-02-07

51

Integrated team working: a literature review  

PubMed Central

Introduction This literature review was conducted to provide a background understanding of the literature around integrated health and social care prior to a research project evaluating two integrated health and social care teams in England, UK. Methods A systematic literature search of relevant databases was employed to identify all articles relating to integrated health and social care teams produced in the last 10 years in the UK. Results Sixteen articles were found and reviewed; all were reviewed by the first reviewer and half by the second reviewer. Discussion Key themes identified were: drivers, barriers and benefits of integrated working; staff development; and meeting the needs of service users. Conclusion Recommendations for integrated working include; a focus on the management of integrated teams; a need to invest in resources for the successful integration of teams; a need for the development of clear standards for monitoring the success and failure of integrated teams; and the need for further empirical evidence of the processes used by integrated teams. These findings will be valuable for practitioners who are establishing services or want to improve integrated care in their own practice.

Maslin-Prothero, Sian E.; Bennion, Amy E.

2010-01-01

52

Game playbooks: tools to guide multidisciplinary teams in developing videogame-based behavior change interventions.  

PubMed

As mobile technologies and videogaming platforms are becoming increasingly prevalent in the realm of health and healthcare, so are the opportunities to use these resources to conduct behavioral interventions. The creation and empirical testing of game style interventions, however, is challenged by the requisite collaboration of multidisciplinary teams, including researchers and game developers who have different cultures, terminologies, and standards of evidence. Thus, traditional intervention development tools such as logic models and intervention manuals may need to be augmented by creating what we have termed "Game Playbooks" which are intervention guidebooks that are created by, understood by, and acceptable to all members of the multidisciplinary game development team. The purpose of this paper is to describe the importance and content of a Game Playbook created to aide in the development of a videogame intervention designed specifically for health behavior change in young teens as well as the process for creating such a tool. We draw on the experience of our research and game design team to describe the critical components of the Game Playbook and the necessity of creating such a tool. PMID:24653781

Duncan, Lindsay R; Hieftje, Kimberly D; Culyba, Sabrina; Fiellin, Lynn E

2014-03-01

53

A multidisciplinary team approach to the management of patients with suspected or diagnosed invasive fungal disease.  

PubMed

Implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of invasive fungal disease (IFD) requires collaboration among numerous clinical and laboratory services, as partners in patient care. The multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach has emerged as a way of providing comprehensive medical care by bringing together professionals from a wide range of disciplines in a coordinated and effective manner. Here, we propose an MDT model for IFD management aimed at facilitating communication among consultants, adherence to clinical pathways and optimized use of resources available at each centre. PMID:24155143

Ben-Ami, Ronen; Halaburda, Kazimierz; Klyasova, Galina; Metan, Gökhan; Torosian, Tigran; Akova, Murat

2013-11-01

54

Team Leadership: School Boards at Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Local school boards are responsible for the two most important issues in most people's lives--their money and their children. Why do school boards fail to develop into high-performance teams? Why do they often work as micromanagers rather than as moral and cultural leaders of their communities? This book explores the current state of board…

Rosenberger, Michal K.

55

How teams use indicators for quality improvement - a multiple-case study on the use of multiple indicators in multidisciplinary breast cancer teams.  

PubMed

A crucial issue in healthcare is how multidisciplinary teams can use indicators for quality improvement. Such teams have increasingly become the core component in both care delivery and in many quality improvement methods. This study aims to investigate the relationships between (1) team factors and the way multidisciplinary teams use indicators for quality improvement, and (2) both team and process factors and the intended results. An in-depth, multiple-case study was conducted in the Netherlands in 2008 involving four breast cancer teams using six structure, process and outcome indicators. The results indicated that the process of using indicators involves several stages and activities. Two teams applied a more intensive, active and interactive approach as they passed through these stages. These teams were perceived to have achieved good results through indicator use compared to the other two teams who applied a simple control approach. All teams experienced some difficulty in integrating the new formal control structure, i.e. measuring and managing performance, in their operational task, and in using their 'new' managerial task to decide as a team what and how to improve. Our findings indicate the presence of a network of relationships between team factors, the controllability and actionability of indicators, the indicator-use process, and the intended results. PMID:24034953

Gort, Marjan; Broekhuis, Manda; Regts, Gerdien

2013-11-01

56

Incorporating Wireless Technology into Virtual Organizations Supporting the Work of Healthcare Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigates how a virtual organization can be built in a distributed computing environment which includes wireless technology to support the work of a multi-disciplinary healthcare team collaborating to provide patient care in the cancer domain. It focuses on identifying the functionality required at the wireless device interface to provide the information from distributed resources needed by different members

Mohyuddin; W. A. Gray; David Morrey; Wendy Jones

2006-01-01

57

Multidisciplinary decisions in breast cancer: does the patient receive what the team has recommended?  

PubMed Central

Background: A multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to breast cancer management is the gold standard. The aim is to evaluate MDT decision making in a modern breast unit. Methods: All referrals to the breast MDT where breast cancer was diagnosed from 1 July 2009 to 30 June 2011 were included. Multidisciplinary team decisions were compared with subsequent patient management and classified as concordant or discordant. Results: Over the study period, there were 3230 MDT decisions relating to 705 patients. Overall, 91.5% (2956 out of 3230) of decisions were concordant, 4.5% (146 out of 3230), were discordant and 4% (128 out of 3230) had no MDT decision. Of 146 discordant decisions, 26 (17.8%) were considered ‘unjustifiable' as there was no additional information available after the MDT to account for the change in management. The remaining 120 discordant MDT decisions were considered ‘justifiable', as management was altered due to patient choice (n=61), additional information available after MDT (n=54) or MDT error (n=5). Conclusion: The vast majority of MDT decisions are implemented. Management alteration was most often due to patient choice or additional information available after the MDT. A minority of management alterations were ‘unjustifiable' and the authors recommend that any patient whose treatment is subsequently changed should have MDT rediscussion prior to treatment.

Rajan, S; Foreman, J; Wallis, M G; Caldas, C; Britton, P

2013-01-01

58

Reducing major lower extremity amputations after the introduction of a multidisciplinary team for the diabetic foot.  

PubMed

We analyzed the incidence of lower extremity amputations (LEAs) in the 3rd Health Care Area of Madrid before and after the March 2008 introduction of a multidisciplinary team for managing diabetic foot disease. We compared the amputation rates in people with and without diabetes during 2 periods: before (2001-2007) and after (2008-2011) the introduction of a Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot Unit (MDFU). We also analyzed the trend of the amputation rates by joinpoint regression analysis and measured the annual percentage change (APC). During the study period, 514 nontraumatic LEAs were performed, 374 (73%) in people with diabetes and 140 (27%) in people without the disease. The incidence of LEAs showed a significant reduction in major amputations in people with diabetes, from 6.1 per 100 000 per year (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9 to 7.2), in the 2001 to 2007 period, to 4.0 per 100 000 per year (95% CI = 2.6 to 5.5) in the 2008 to 2011 period (P = .020). There were no changes in incidence of minor or total amputations in the diabetic population or in amputations in the nondiabetic population during the study period. Joinpoint regression analysis showed a significant reduction in the incidence of major LEAs in diabetic population with an APC of -6.6% (95% CI = -10.2 to -2.8; P = .003), but there were no other significant changes. This study demonstrates that the introduction of a multidisciplinary team, coordinated by an endocrinologist and a podiatrist, for managing diabetic foot disease is associated with a reduction in the incidence of major amputations in patients with diabetes. PMID:24659624

Rubio, José Antonio; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Jiménez, Sara; Guadalix, Gregorio; Albarracín, Agustín; Salido, Carmen; Sanz-Moreno, José; Ruiz-Grande, Fernando; Gil-Fournier, Nuria; Álvarez, Julia

2014-03-01

59

Virtual Teams and Human Work Interaction Design - Learning to Work in and Designing for Virtual Teams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The boundaries and work processes for how virtual teams interact are undergoing changes, from a tool and stand-alone application orientation, to the use of multiple generic platforms chosen and redesigned to the specific context. These are often at the same time designed both by professional software developers and the individual members of the virtual teams, rather than determined on a single organizational level. There may be no impact of the technology per se on individuals, groups or organizations, as the technology for virtual teams rather enhance situation ambiguity and disrupt existing task-artifact cycles. This ambiguous situation calls for new methods for empirical work analysis and interaction design that can help us understand how organizations, teams and individuals learn to organize, design and work in virtual teams in various networked contexts.

Orngreen, Rikke; Clemmensen, Torkil; Pejtersen, Annelise Mark

60

Reducing errors in health care: cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary team training in obstetric emergencies (TOSTI study); a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background There are many avoidable deaths in hospitals because the care team is not well attuned. Training in emergency situations is generally followed on an individual basis. In practice, however, hospital patients are treated by a team composed of various disciplines. To prevent communication errors, it is important to focus the training on the team as a whole, rather than on the individual. Team training appears to be important in contributing toward preventing these errors. Obstetrics lends itself to multidisciplinary team training. It is a field in which nurses, midwives, obstetricians and paediatricians work together and where decisions must be made and actions must be carried out under extreme time pressure. It is attractive to belief that multidisciplinary team training will reduce the number of errors in obstetrics. The other side of the medal is that many hospitals are buying expensive patient simulators without proper evaluation of the training method. In the Netherlands many hospitals have 1,000 or less annual deliveries. In our small country it might therefore be more cost-effective to train obstetric teams in medical simulation centres with well trained personnel, high fidelity patient simulators, and well defined training programmes. Methods/design The aim of the present study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of multidisciplinary team training in a medical simulation centre in the Netherlands to reduce the number of medical errors in obstetric emergency situations. We plan a multicentre randomised study with the centre as unit of analysis. Obstetric departments will be randomly assigned to receive multidisciplinary team training in a medical simulation centre or to a control arm without any team training. The composite measure of poor perinatal and maternal outcome in the non training group was thought to be 15%, on the basis of data obtained from the National Dutch Perinatal Registry and the guidelines of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (NVOG). We anticipated that multidisciplinary team training would reduce this risk to 5%. A sample size of 24 centres with a cluster size of each at least 200 deliveries, each 12 centres per group, was needed for 80% power and a 5% type 1 error probability (two-sided). We assumed an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) value of maximum 0.08. The analysis will be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle and stratified for teaching or non-teaching hospitals. Primary outcome is the number of obstetric complications throughout the first year period after the intervention. If multidisciplinary team training appears to be effective a cost-effective analysis will be performed. Discussion If multidisciplinary team training appears to be cost-effective, this training should be implemented in extra training for gynaecologists. Trial Registration The protocol is registered in the clinical trial register number NTR1859

2010-01-01

61

Communication in and clinician satisfaction with multidisciplinary team meetings in neuro-oncology.  

PubMed

Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) meetings are critical in the management of complex cancer cases. There are limited data regarding the effectiveness of neuro-oncology MDT meetings and the impact of documenting and disseminating the recommended patient management. We established a weekly neuro-oncology MDT meeting and developed a standard electronic communication process. A survey was issued to participating clinicians to assess their level of satisfaction. The survey revealed that 100% felt the meeting and its documentation was very or extremely important, and 94% (n=15) felt the meeting was effective in documentation and communication of plans. There was a mixed response regarding which patients should be discussed: 44% (n=7) thought all patients should be discussed and 56% (n=9) thought only those patients with complex management issues should be discussed. We have developed an efficient method of documenting and disseminating patient information arising from our neuro-oncology MDT meeting. Clinician satisfaction was high. PMID:20570520

Field, K M; Rosenthal, M A; Dimou, J; Fleet, M; Gibbs, P; Drummond, K

2010-09-01

62

A survey of multidisciplinary cleft palate and craniofacial team examination formats.  

PubMed

We surveyed 229 multidisciplinary cleft and craniofacial teams listed in the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association directory regarding frequency of meetings, numbers of patients treated, sources of funding, their format of examination of children, and their satisfaction with that format. One hundred fifteen (50%) of 229 surveys were completed. Thirty-seven percent of clinics report meeting monthly; 43% of clinics report actively following up 300 or less patients; 40% of clinics report funding by third-party insurance reimbursement, and 38% by government funding; 48% of clinics report the patients moving from one examination room to another to see specialists, in another 33%, the patient stays in 1 examination room while the specialists move, and in only 20%, all specialists see a patient simultaneously. Significantly more specialists are dissatisfied with clinics where they move to examine children; significantly more families are satisfied in clinics where specialists move to examine the child or examine them simultaneously. PMID:22777453

Laub, Donald R; Ajar, Amir H

2012-07-01

63

Team Dynamics, Decision Making, and Attitudes Toward Multidisciplinary Cancer Meetings: Health Professionals' Perspectives  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Multidisciplinary cancer care is a standard feature of high quality care. In many centers, the multidisciplinary meeting (MDM) is an integral component. A qualitative study was performed to explore health professionals' attitudes towards this model of care, the decision making processes, and dynamics among team members. Methods: A series of focus groups was conducted with health professionals who attend MDMs at our institution. Focus groups followed a semistructured format with open-ended questions. A thematic analysis was performed. Results: Four focus groups were held, attended by 23 participants including allied health professionals, specialist nurses, medical oncologists, and surgeons. All participants believed the primary objective of the MDM was to develop an individualized treatment plan. Several other key themes emerged. The MDM provided opportunities to improve communication, efficiency, and education as well as enhance professional relationships. Medical information was prioritized ahead of psychosocial details, with allied health professionals describing difficulty contributing to MDM discussion. Patient attendance at MDMs was opposed by health professionals because of concerns about the patient's ability to cope with the information discussed and the effect their presence would have on the dynamics of the decision-making process. Conclusion: Health professionals endorse MDMs as a useful tool in treating patients with cancer. Within this forum, both opportunities and constrains exist, with many benefits extending beyond the meeting itself into other clinical areas. Further study is warranted to establish an evidence base to ensure that both the possibilities and the limitations of this model of care are fully understood.

Devitt, Bianca; Philip, Jennifer; McLachlan, Sue-Anne

2010-01-01

64

International Preoperative Rectal Cancer Management: Staging, Neoadjuvant Treatment, and Impact of Multidisciplinary Teams  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known regarding variations in preoperative treatment and practice for rectal cancer (RC) on an international level, yet practice variation may result in differences in recurrence and survival rates. Methods One hundred seventy-three international colorectal centers were invited to participate in a survey of preoperative management of rectal cancer. Results One hundred twenty-three (71%) responded, with a majority of respondents from North America, Europe, and Asia. Ninety-three percent have more than 5 years’ experience with rectal cancer surgery. Fifty-five percent use CT scan, 35% MRI, 29% ERUS, 12% digital rectal examination and 1% PET scan in all RC cases. Seventy-four percent consider threatened circumferential margin (CRM) an indication for neoadjuvant treatment. Ninety-two percent prefer 5-FU-based long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). A significant difference in practice exists between the US and non-US surgeons: poor histological differentiation as an indication for CRT (25% vs. 7.0%, p = 0.008), CRT for stage II and III rectal cancer (92% vs. 43%, p = 0.0001), MRI for all RC patients (20% vs. 42%, p = 0.03), and ERUS for all RC patients (43% vs. 21%, p = 0.01). Multidisciplinary team meetings significantly influence decisions for MRI (RR = 3.62), neoadjuvant treatment (threatened CRM, RR = 5.67, stage II + III RR = 2.98), quality of pathology report (RR = 4.85), and sphincter-saving surgery (RR = 3.81). Conclusions There was little consensus on staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and preoperative management of rectal cancer. Regular multidisciplinary team meetings influence decisions about neoadjuvant treatment and staging methods.

Augestad, Knut M.; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Stulberg, Jonah; Reynolds, Harry; Senagore, Anthony; Champagne, Brad; Heriot, Alexander G.; Leblanc, Fabien

2010-01-01

65

Hospital-Based Multidisciplinary Teams Can Prevent Unnecessary Child Abuse Reports and Out-of-Home Placements  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To determine how often and for what reasons a hospital-based multidisciplinary child abuse team concluded that a report of alleged or suspected child abuse was unnecessary in young children with fractures. Methods: A retrospective review was completed of all children less than 12 months of age who, because of fractures, were referred to…

Wallace, Gregory H.; Makoroff, Kathi L.; Malott, Heidi A.; Shapiro, Robert A.

2007-01-01

66

Mind Builders: Multidisciplinary Challenges for Cooperative Team-Building and Competition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For more than twenty years, the Richmond, Virginia Public Schools' program for gifted students has conducted an interscholastic competition similar to the nationally known competition, Destination Imagination. In the featured contest of this yearly event, teams of five students present solutions to engineering problems that they have worked on for…

Fleisher, Paul; Ziegler, Donald

2006-01-01

67

Performer: An Instrument for Multidisciplinary Courseware Teams to Share Knowledge and Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the traditional problems in courseware development that is recognized as hard to solve, is the communication and co-operation between various disciplines in project teams that are working on a courseware product [Alber (1996) "Multimedia: a management perspective." California: Wadsworth; Boyle (1997) "Design for multimedia learning." UK:…

van Aalst, Jan-Willem; van der Mast, Charles

2003-01-01

68

Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit  

PubMed Central

Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamworkand leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. Practitioner Summary: This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams

Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M.; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

2014-01-01

69

Using team cognitive work analysis to reveal healthcare team interactions in a birthing unit.  

PubMed

Cognitive work analysis (CWA) as an analytical approach for examining complex sociotechnical systems has shown success in modelling the work of single operators. The CWA approach incorporates social and team interactions, but a more explicit analysis of team aspects can reveal more information for systems design. In this paper, Team CWA is explored to understand teamwork within a birthing unit at a hospital. Team CWA models are derived from theories and models of teamwork and leverage the existing CWA approaches to analyse team interactions. Team CWA is explained and contrasted with prior approaches to CWA. Team CWA does not replace CWA, but supplements traditional CWA to more easily reveal team information. As a result, Team CWA may be a useful approach to enhance CWA in complex environments where effective teamwork is required. Practitioner Summary: This paper looks at ways of analysing cognitive work in healthcare teams. Team Cognitive Work Analysis, when used to supplement traditional Cognitive Work Analysis, revealed more team information than traditional Cognitive Work Analysis. Team Cognitive Work Analysis should be considered when studying teams. PMID:24837514

Ashoori, Maryam; Burns, Catherine M; d'Entremont, Barbara; Momtahan, Kathryn

2014-07-01

70

Putting Management Team-Building To Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the design and delivery of outdoor-based team-building programs that enable management teams to transfer what they learn back to the workplace. Discusses a model of group development, five phases of the team-building process, combining tasks and review processes to yield outcomes, and an experiential-learning cycle. (TD)

Larcher, Bob

1999-01-01

71

Transactive Memory System Links Work Team Characteristics and Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teamwork and coordination of expertise among team members with different backgrounds are increasingly recognized as important for team effectiveness. Recently, researchers have examined how team members rely on transactive memory system (TMS; D. M. Wegner, 1987) to share their distributed knowledge and expertise. To establish the ecological validity and generality of TMS research findings, this study sampled 104 work teams

Zhi-Xue Zhang; Paul S. Hempel; Yu-Lan Han; Dean Tjosvold

2007-01-01

72

Developing a Multidisciplinary Team for Disorders of Sex Development: Planning, Implementation, and Operation Tools for Care Providers  

PubMed Central

In the treatment of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) represent a new standard of care. While DSDs are too complex for care to be delivered effectively without specialized team management, these conditions are often considered to be too rare for their medical management to be a hospital priority. Many specialists involved in DSD care want to create a clinic or team, but there is no available guidance that bridges the gap between a group of like-minded DSD providers who want to improve care and the formation of a functional MDT. This is an important dilemma, and one with serious implications for the future of DSD care. If a network of multidisciplinary DSD teams is to be a reality, those directly involved in DSD care must be given the necessary program planning and team implementation tools. This paper offers a protocol and set of tools to meet this need. We present a 6-step process to team formation, and a sample set of tools that can be used to guide, develop, and evaluate a team throughout the course of its operation.

Moran, Mary Elizabeth; Karkazis, Katrina

2012-01-01

73

Palliative Radiotherapy with or without Additional Care by a Multidisciplinary Palliative Care Team: A Retrospective Comparison  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To analyze pattern of care and survival after palliative radiotherapy (RT) in patients managed exclusively by regular oncology staff or a multidisciplinary palliative care team (MPCT) in addition. Methods. Retrospective analysis of 522 RT courses. Comparison of Two Groups: MPCT versus none. Results. We analyzed 140 RT courses (27%) with MPCT care and 382 without it. The following statistically significant differences were observed: 33% of female patients had MPCT care versus only 23% of male patients and 37% of patients <65 years had MPCT care versus only 22% of older patients. MPCT patients were more likely to have poor performance status and liver metastases. In the MPCT group steroid and opioid use was significantly more common. Dose-fractionation regimens were similar. Median survival was significantly shorter in the MPCT group, 3.9 versus 6.9 months. In multivariate analysis, MPCT care was not associated with survival. Adjusted for confounders, MPCT care reduced the likelihood of incomplete RT by 33%, P > 0.05. Conclusions. Patterns of referral and care differed, for example, regarding age and medication use. It seems possible that MPCT care reduces likelihood of incomplete RT. Therefore, the impact of MPCT care on symptom control should be investigated and objective referral criteria should be developed.

Dalhaug, Astrid; Pawinski, Adam; Aandahl, Gro; Haukland, Ellinor; Engljahringer, Kirsten

2014-01-01

74

[From adolescence to pregnancy: a model of multidisciplinary team support for future pregnant women].  

PubMed

The frequency and severity of maternal and neonatal complications of diabetes are strongly related to the degree of metabolic control. The major goal of therapeutic management of the diabetic mother requires the achievement of euglycaemia during the pre- and peri-conceptional periods, during pregnancy until delivery. Besides the need for frequent and individualized insulin dose adjustment, the patient's adhesion to the treatment, with the constraints it implies, is directly related to the prognosis of pregnancy for the mother and the newborn. An extended longitudinal follow-up allows the patient to become familiar with the multidisciplinary specialist team who will be in charge of her pregnancy. This condition seems a prerequisite to the completion of a form of reciprocal "contract of confidence" in order to strengthen the motivation of the mother and make more efficient the conditions of her supervision. The quality of metabolic control has been studied by retrospective analysis of the evolution of 32 pregnancies in 21 diabetic patients who received this form of longitudinal follow-up. The mean and median HbA1c measurements at childbirth, respectively 6.2 and 6.3%, seem to confirm the relevance of this model of longitudinal follow-up. PMID:21812220

Vokaer, Alain

2010-01-01

75

Multidisciplinary case teams: an approach to the future management of advanced colorectal cancer.  

PubMed Central

The effective management of advanced colorectal cancer has traditionally been viewed in terms of treatment outcome measures such as efficacy (survival, objective response and palliation) and safety. Although these outcomes are of paramount importance and are essential for the evaluation of the effectiveness and tolerability of treatment, they do not take account of the global effect of therapy on patients, society and healthcare systems. Furthermore, they may not reveal important differences between treatments of equivalent anti-tumour efficacy that might influence the overall effectiveness in terms of acceptability of therapy. To achieve this, a broader, patient-centred evaluation of advanced cancer treatment is required that acknowledges the views, experience and perspectives of all involved in the treatment process. To this end, the International Working Group in Colorectal Cancer, a multidisciplinary group that encompasses expertise from a range of relevant fields and disciplines, has advocated a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer that is likely to deliver the best possible overall care.

Minsky, B. D.

1998-01-01

76

The Impact of Transformational Leadership on Individual and Team Performance: Evidence from Knowledge Work Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current study explored the effect of transformational leadership of knowledge work team leaders on team members' individual performance, which included both in-role behavior and organizational citizenship behavior(OCB), and team performance. Survey data was collected from a sample of 54 knowledge work teams in high-tech organizations in four cities of China. The results of hierarchical regression showed that relationship-oriented transformational

Wu Xin; Wu Zhiming

2007-01-01

77

A Predictive Model of Self-Managing Work Team Effectiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper tests a theoretically-driven model of self-managing work team effectiveness. Self-managing work team effectiveness is defined as both high performance and employee quality of work life. Drawing on different theoretical perspectives including work design, self-leadership, sociotechnical, and participative management, four categories of variables are theorized to predict self-managing work team effectiveness: group task design, encouraging supervisor behaviors, group characteristics,

Susan G. Cohen; Gerald E. Ledford; Gretchen M. Spreitzer

1996-01-01

78

Selected Research on Work Team Diversity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains seven exploratory research papers from a conference on diversity and workplace teams. The authors examine diversity in terms of a variety of attributes, including race and sex. The book is divided into three sections. The first contains three papers that deal with the management of diverse teams. The following papers are…

Ruderman, Marian N., Ed.; And Others

79

Balancing Individual and Collaborative Work in Agile Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the agile approach, the self-organizing team itself decides how work is coordinated. For individuals in a team to be motivated\\u000a and satisfied with their job they need to have control over their work and over the scheduling and implementation of their\\u000a own tasks. However, individual and team level autonomy may conflict, and reduce the effectiveness of the team. Therefore,

Hamish T. Barney; Nils Brede Moe; Tore Dybå; Aybüke Aurum; Martha Winata

2009-01-01

80

Admitting offenders with antisocial personality disorder to a medium secure unit: a qualitative examination of multidisciplinary team decision-making  

PubMed Central

This paper reports on the results of a qualitative study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) looking at multidisciplinary team decisions to admit sentenced offenders with antisocial personality disorder to a medium secure unit. The aim of the study was to examine admission decision-making from a multidisciplinary perspective, and to explore the interprofessional dynamics and contextual pressures informing those decisions. The primary method of data collection was 12 semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of various multidisciplinary staff involved in pre-admission assessment and post-assessment decision-making. Data was then coded according to the dialectic of competitive and cooperative goal seeking within groups. The findings suggest that, whilst both forms of goal seeking inform admission decisions, the presence of significant resource pressures will lead to decisional solidarity among the multidisciplinary team. When minor professional disagreements arise, they are resolved by the group leader, the Responsible Clinician, in order to maximise group productivity. It is argued that the discursive-limiting effect of resource pressures on group decision-making may weaken the morale of certain front line staff, if not undermine institutional purpose.

McRae, Leon

2012-01-01

81

A Multidisciplinary Team Approach for the Optimal Clinical Management of Metastatic Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer—Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with prostate cancer often require a multimodal treatment approach and the expertise of a multidisciplinary team for optimal management. This is illustrated by the case study of a 59-yr-old man with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of 11.4ng\\/ml, who was otherwise fit and well. He had negative bone scans and transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies revealed a Gleason score of 8

John Fitzpatrick

2006-01-01

82

Experiences of Multidisciplinary Development Team Members During User-Centered Design of Telecare Products and Services: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

Background User-centered design (UCD) methodologies can help take the needs and requirements of potential end-users into account during the development of innovative telecare products and services. Understanding how members of multidisciplinary development teams experience the UCD process might help to gain insight into factors that members with different backgrounds consider critical during the development of telecare products and services. Objective The primary objective of this study was to explore how members of multidisciplinary development teams experienced the UCD process of telecare products and services. The secondary objective was to identify differences and similarities in the barriers and facilitators they experienced. Methods Twenty-five members of multidisciplinary development teams of four Research and Development (R&D) projects participated in this study. The R&D projects aimed to develop telecare products and services that can support self-management in elderly people or patients with chronic conditions. Seven participants were representatives of end-users (elderly persons or patients with chronic conditions), three were professional end-users (geriatrician and nurses), five were engineers, four were managers (of R&D companies or engineering teams), and six were researchers. All participants were interviewed by a researcher who was not part of their own development team. The following topics were discussed during the interviews: (1) aim of the project, (2) role of the participant, (3) experiences during the development process, (4) points of improvement, and (5) what the project meant to the participant. Results Experiences of participants related to the following themes: (1) creating a development team, (2) expectations regarding responsibilities and roles, (3) translating user requirements into technical requirements, (4) technical challenges, (5) evaluation of developed products and services, and (6) valorization. Multidisciplinary team members from different backgrounds often reported similar experienced barriers (eg, different members of the development team speak a “different language”) and facilitators (eg, team members should voice expectations at the start of the project to prevent miscommunication at a later stage). However, some experienced barriers and facilitators were reported only by certain groups of participants. For example, only managers reported the experience that having different ideas about what a good business case is within one development team was a barrier, whereas only end-users emphasized the facilitating role of project management in end-user participation and the importance of continuous feedback from researchers on input of end-users. Conclusions Many similarities seem to exist between the experienced barriers and facilitators of members of multidisciplinary development teams during UCD of telecare products and services. However, differences in experiences between team members from various backgrounds exist as well. Insights into these similarities and differences can improve understanding between team members from different backgrounds, which can optimize collaboration during the development of telecare products and services.

2014-01-01

83

Multidisciplinary Team Care May Slow the Rate of Decline in Renal Function  

PubMed Central

Summary Background and objectives A multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach to chronic kidney disease (CKD) may help optimize care of CKD and comorbidities. We implemented an MDT quality improvement project for persons with stage 3 CKD and comorbid diabetes and/or hypertension. Our objective was to decrease the rate of decline of GFR. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We used a 4-year historical cohort to compare 1769 persons referred for usual nephrology care versus 233 referred for MDT care within an integrated, not-for-profit Health Maintenance Organization (HMO). Usual care consisted of referral to an outside nephrologist. The MDT consisted of an HMO-based nephrologist, pharmacy specialist, diabetes educator, dietitian, social worker, and nephrology nurse. Both groups received usual primary care. The primary outcome was rate of decline of GFR. Secondary outcomes were LDL, hemoglobin A1c, and BP. Results In multivariate repeated-measures analyses, MDT care was associated with a mean annual decline in GFR of 1.2 versus 2.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2 for usual care. In stratified analyses, the significant difference in GFR decline persisted only in those who completed their referrals. There were no differences in the secondary outcomes between groups. Conclusions In this integrated care setting, MDT care resulted in a slower decline in GFR than usual care. This occurred despite a lack of significant differences for secondary disease-specific measures, suggesting that other differences in the MDT population or care process accounted for the slower decline in GFR in the MDT group.

Bhardwaja, Bharati; Ross, Colleen; Beck, Arne; Lanese, Diane M.

2011-01-01

84

Training Students to Work Effectively in Partially Distributed Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology teams are often partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT consists of two or more subteams that are separated geographically. This article describes research focused on the use of PDTs to engage students in "real world" IT team learning about the subject matter while also teaching them the skills they will need to work in…

Ocker, Rosalie; Rosson, Mary Beth; Kracaw, Dana; Hiltz, S. Roxanne

2009-01-01

85

Using Sociometry to Predict Team Performance in the Work Place  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teams are becoming an increasingly popular way to improve performance and quality in the work place. Little research, however, has addressed the question of how to predict high performance from individuals who are placed on teams. Sociometry can provide an alternative to previous methods by measuring preferred pairings among team members across a number of tasks or settings. The choices

Randall H. Lucius; Karl W. Kuhnert

1997-01-01

86

A pre-post test evaluation of the impact of the PELICAN MDT-TME Development Programme on the working lives of colorectal cancer team members  

PubMed Central

Background The PELICAN Multidisciplinary Team Total Mesorectal Excision (MDT-TME) Development Programme aimed to improve clinical outcomes for rectal cancer by educating colorectal cancer teams in precision surgery and related aspects of multidisciplinary care. The Programme reached almost all colorectal cancer teams across England. We took the opportunity to assess the impact of participating in this novel team-based Development Programme on the working lives of colorectal cancer team members. Methods The impact of participating in the programme on team members' self-reported job stress, job satisfaction and team performance was assessed in a pre-post course study. 333/568 (59%) team members, from the 75 multidisciplinary teams who attended the final year of the Programme, completed questionnaires pre-course, and 6-8 weeks post-course. Results Across all team members, the main sources of job satisfaction related to working in multidisciplinary teams; whilst feeling overloaded was the main source of job stress. Surgeons and clinical nurse specialists reported higher levels of job satisfaction than team members who do not provide direct patient care, whilst MDT coordinators reported the lowest levels of job satisfaction and job stress. Both job stress and satisfaction decreased after participating in the Programme for all team members. There was a small improvement in team performance. Conclusions Participation in the Development Programme had a mixed impact on the working lives of team members in the immediate aftermath of attending. The decrease in team members' job stress may reflect the improved knowledge and skills conferred by the Programme. The decrease in job satisfaction may be the consequence of being unable to apply these skills immediately in clinical practice because of a lack of required infrastructure and/or equipment. In addition, whilst the Programme raised awareness of the challenges of teamworking, a greater focus on tackling these issues may have improved working lives further.

2010-01-01

87

Program design by a multidisciplinary team. [for structural finite element analysis on STAR-100 computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of software engineering aids in the design of a structural finite-element analysis computer program for the STAR-100 computer is described. Nested functional diagrams to aid in communication among design team members were used, and a standardized specification format to describe modules designed by various members was adopted. This is a report of current work in which use of the functional diagrams provided continuity and helped resolve some of the problems arising in this long-running part-time project.

Voigt, S.

1975-01-01

88

The Complete Toolkit for Building High-Performance Work Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This workbook is designed for leaders and members of work teams in educational and social-service systems. It presents in a systematic fashion a set of tested facilitation tools that will allow teams to work more efficiently and harmoniously, enabling them to achieve their goals, to deal directly with both personal and work-related issues that…

Golden, Nancy; Gall, Joyce P.

89

RefWorks in Three Steps: Undergraduate Team Bibliographies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

RefWorks is ideally suited for undergraduate students with team-based research projects as part of their course assessment. The Dorothy Hill Physical Sciences and Engineering Library at the University of Queensland taught students from three engineering courses how to use RefWorks to manage project references and to create team-based…

Yorke-Barber, Phil; Ghiculescu, Cristina; Possin, Gisela

2009-01-01

90

Install Modular Manufacturing Work Teams at a DAM, Phase I.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The PPFG T1-P1, Phase I short term project began the implementation of work teams in the manufacture of tailored Army Dress Uniform coats at the New Maryland Clothing Company. Phase I was to install four work teams at the end of the operation. CGA personn...

R. L. Lowder

1997-01-01

91

Practising evidence-based medicine: the design and implementation of a multidisciplinary team-driven extubation protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Evidence from recent literature shows that protocol-directed extubation is a useful approach to liberate patients from mechanical ventilation (MV). However, research evidence does not necessarily provide guidance on how to implement changes in individual intensive care units (ICUs). We conducted the present study to determine whether such an evidence-based strategy can be implemented safely and effectively using a multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach. Method We designed a MDT-driven extubation protocol. Multiple meetings were held to encourage constructive criticism of the design by attending physicians, nurses and respiratory care practitioners (RCPs), in order to define a protocol that was evidence based and acceptable to all clinical staff involved in the process of extubation. It was subsequently implemented and evaluated in our medical/ surgical ICU. Outcomes included response of the MDT to the initiative, duration of MV and stay in the ICU, as well as reintubation rate. Results The MDT responded favourably to the design and implementation of this MDT-driven extubation protocol, because it provided greater autonomy to the staff. Outcomes reported in the literature and in the historical control group were compared with those in the protocol group, and indicated similar durations of MV and ICU stay, as well as reintubation rates. No adverse events were documented. Conclusion An MDT approach to protocol-directed extubation can be implemented safely and effectively in a multidisciplinary ICU. Such an effort is viewed favourably by the entire team and is useful in enhancing team building.

Chan, Pik Kei O; Fischer, Sandra; Stewart, Thomas E; Hallett, David C; Hynes-Gay, Patricia; Lapinsky, Stephen E; MacDonald, Rod; Mehta, Sangeeta

2001-01-01

92

[Developing team reflexivity as a learning and working tool for medical teams].  

PubMed

Team reflexivity is a collective activity in which team members review their previous work, and develop ideas on how to modify their work behavior in order to achieve better future results. It is an important learning tool and a key factor in explaining the varying effectiveness of teams. Team reflexivity encompasses both self-awareness and agency, and includes three main activities: reflection, planning, and adaptation. The model of briefing-debriefing cycles promotes team reflexivity. Its key elements include: Pre-action briefing--setting objectives, roles, and strategies the mission, as well as proposing adaptations based on what was previously learnt from similar procedures; Post-action debriefing--reflecting on the procedure performed and reviewing the extent to which objectives were met, and what can be learnt for future tasks. Given the widespread attention to team-based work systems and organizational learning, efforts should be made toward ntroducing team reflexivity in health administration systems. Implementation could be difficult because most teams in hospitals are short-lived action teams formed for a particular event, with limited time and opportunity to consciously reflect upon their actions. But it is precisely in these contexts that reflexive processes have the most to offer instead of the natural impulsive collective logics. Team reflexivity suggests a potential solution to the major problems of iatorgenesis--avoidable medical errors, as it forces all team members to participate in a reflexive process together. Briefing-debriefing technology was studied mainly in surgical teams and was shown to enhance team-based learning and to improve quality-related outcomes and safety. PMID:24791567

Riskin, Arieh; Bamberger, Peter

2014-01-01

93

The Work of Recovery on Two Assertive Community Treatment Teams  

PubMed Central

The compatibility of recovery work with the Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) model has been debated; and little is known about how to best measure the work of recovery. Two ACT teams with high and low recovery orientation were identified by expert consensus and compared on a number of dimensions. Using an interpretive, qualitative approach to analyze interview and observation data, teams differed in the extent to which the environment, team structure, staff attitudes, and processes of working with consumers supported principles of recovery orientation. We present a model of recovery work and discuss implications for research and practice.

Salyers, Michelle P.; Stull, Laura G.; Rollins, Angela L.; Hopper, Kim

2011-01-01

94

Does in-house availability of multidisciplinary teams increase survival in upper gastrointestinal-cancer?  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the effect of the establishment of in-house multidisciplinary team (MDT) availability (iMDTa) on survival in upper gastrointestinal cancer (UGI) patients. METHODS: In 2001, a cancer centre with irradiation and chemotherapy facilities was established in the Norwegian county of West Agder with a change of iMDTa (WA/MDT-Change). “iMDTa”-status was defined according to the availability of the necessary specialists within one institution on one campus, serving the population of one county. We compared survival rates during 2000-2008 for UGI patients living in counties with (MDT-Yes), without (MDT-No), with a mix (MDT-Mix) and WA/MDT-Change. Survival was calculated with Kaplan-Meier method. Cox model was used to uncover differences between counties with different MDT status when adjusted for age, sex and stage. RESULTS: We analyzed 395 patients from WA/MDT-Change and compared their survival to 12?135 UGI patients from four other Norwegian regions. Median overall survival for UGI patients in WA/MDT-Change increased from 129 to 300 d from 2000-2008, P = 0.001. The regions with the highest level of iMDTa achieved the largest decrease in risk of death for UGI cancers (compared to the county with MDT-Mix: MDT-Yes 11%, P < 0.05 and WA/MDT-Change 15%, P < 0.05). Analyzing the different tumour entities separately, patients living in the WA/MDT-Change county reached a statistically significant reduction in the risk of death [hazard ratios (HR)] compared to patients in the county with MDT-Mix for oesophageal and gastric, but not for pancreatic cancer. HR for the study period 2000-2004 are given first and then for the period 2005-2008: The HR for oesophageal cancers was reduced from [HR = 1.12; 95%CI: 0.75-1.68 to HR = 0.60, 95%CI: 0.38-0.95] and for gastric cancers from [HR = 0.87, 95%CI: 0.66-1.15 to HR = 0.63, 95%CI: 0.43-0.93], but not for pancreatic cancer [HR = 1.04-, 95%CI: 0.83-1.3 for 2000-2004 and HR = 1.01, 95%CI: 0.78-1.3 for 2005-2008]. UGI patients treated during the second study period in the county of WA/MDT-Change had a higher probability of receiving chemotherapy. In the first study period, only one out of 43 patients (2.4%, 95%CI: 0-6.9) received chemotherapy, compared to 18 of 42 patients diagnosed during 2005-2008 (42.9%, 95%CI: 28.0-57.8). CONCLUSION: Introduction of iMDTa led to a two-fold increase of UGI patients, whereas no increase in survival was found in the MDT-No or MDT-Mix counties.

Kersten, Christian; Cvancarova, Milada; Mjaland, Svein; Mjaland, Odd

2013-01-01

95

Multidisciplinary Teams and the Case Conference: Format Guidelines for Affecting Teacher Attitude and Knowledge.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report describes the University of Florida Multidisciplinary Diagnostic and Training Program (MDTP), jointly administered through the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Special Education. It functions as a diagnostic, training, and consultative resource to local school districts in north central Florida and provides short-term…

Hendrickson, Jo M.; And Others

96

A multidisciplinary team approach for management of a giant congenital cervical teratoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Congenital cervical teratomas are associated with a high rate of perinatal mortality due to airway obstruction. We describe a multidisciplinary management of a neonate with prenatal diagnosis of giant cervical teratoma. An ‘operation on placenta support’ (OOPS) technique was carried out during delivery, and intubation was successfully performed with no perinatal anoxic damage. Postnatal computed tomography and angiography showed a

Jean-Yves Sichel; Ron Eliashar; Ido Yatsiv; John Moshe Gomori; Michel Nadjari; Chaim Springer; Yossef Ezra

2002-01-01

97

'Benign invigilation': using appreciative inquiry to reposition clinical risk in multi-disciplinary CAMH teams.  

PubMed

In response to a spate of serious untoward incident enquiries, CAMHS team leaders in East London, UK, embarked on a series of clinical risk workshops with staff teams. Complementary to what might be called retrospective organisational responses to high risk events, these prospective workshops were predicated on the idea that risk reduction is increased when individuals in teams are responsive to one another, when teams are positively risk-aware and when risk awareness is seen as having the capacity to predict what may go wrong in the future. PMID:22865799

Aggett, Percy; Messent, Philip; Staines, John

2013-04-01

98

[Efficacy of a multidisciplinary team for preventing hospital-acquired invasive aspergillosis: five years' experience].  

PubMed

Invasive hospital-acquired aspergillosis (IA) is responsible for lethal outbreaks. In 2002, an interdisciplinary team was created in the teaching hospital of Rouen in order to organize the surveillance of construction sites by the implementation of environmental measures of prevention. The aim of our study was to estimate the efficiency of these measures using an indirect indicator, reflecting the incidence of the cases of invasive nosocomial aspergillosis (AI): the consumption of antifungals. From the nominative prescriptions established, we studied the medical files about 210 patients to track down the number of IA cases in intensive care unit (ICUI) and in pediatric hematology-oncology units between 2002 and 2006. The incidence of the cases was put in parallel with the various periods of level 5-risk works during these five years. The relative risk of appearance of the disease was calculated. In pediatric haematology-oncology unit, 35 cases were diagnosed on 99 medical files which have been studied and in ICU 19 cases were classified on 93 studied files. The follow-up of the incidence in both units stake in parallel with the periods of level 5-risk works does not show increase of the number of cases. The calculated relative risk indicates the same result: the level 5-risk works are not a factor facilitating the appearance of invasive aspergillosis cases. This study shows the importance of the environmental measures of prevention during the periods of works within services for risk. The coordination of the actors within an interdisciplinary cell seems thus essential for the prevention of AIN. PMID:19157722

Etancelin, P; Silly, S; Merle, V; Bonmarchand, G; Richard, J-C; Vannier, J-P; Nouvellon, M

2009-02-01

99

Improving teamwork, confidence, and collaboration among members of a pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit multidisciplinary team using simulation-based team training.  

PubMed

Findings show that simulation-based team training (SBTT) is effective at increasing teamwork skills. Postpediatric cardiac surgery cardiac arrest (PPCS-CA) is a high-risk clinical situation with high morbidity and mortality. Whereas adult guidelines managing cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery are available, little exists for pediatric cardiac surgery. The authors developed a post-PPCS-CA algorithm and used SBTT to improve identification and management of PPCS-CA in the pediatric cardiovascular intensive care unit. Their goal was to determine whether participation aids in improving teamwork, confidence, and communication during these events. The authors developed a simulation-based training course using common postcardiac surgical emergency scenarios with specific learning objectives. Simulated scenarios are followed by structured debriefings. Participants were evaluated based on critical performance criteria, key elements in the PPCS-CA algorithm, and Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (Team STEPPS) principles. Surveys performed before, immediately after, and 3 months after participation evaluated perception of skill, knowledge, and confidence. The study had 37 participants (23 nurses, 5 cardiology/critical care trainees, 5 respiratory therapists, and 4 noncategorized subjects). Confidence and skill in the roles of team leader, advanced airway management, and cardioversion/defibrillation were increased significantly (p < 0.05) immediately after training and 3 months later. A significant increase (p < 0.05) also was observed in the use of Team STEPPS concepts immediately after training and 3 months later. This study showed SBTT to be effective in improving communication and increasing confidence among members of a multidisciplinary team during crisis scenarios. Thus, SBTT provides an excellent tool for teaching and implementing new processes. PMID:22972517

Figueroa, Mayte I; Sepanski, Robert; Goldberg, Steven P; Shah, Samir

2013-03-01

100

The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to compare work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between a self-directed work team and a traditional work team based on four work ethic subscales and identify differences in work ethic based on six demographic factors. The major findings from the study indicated there were significant differences in the work

Lim, Doo Hun; Petty, Gregory; Fontan, Johnny; Yoon, Seung Won

2008-01-01

101

Teacher Teams: Exploring Job Characteristics and Work-Related Outcomes of Work Group Enhancement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores how teacher teams (work group enhancement) influence teachers’ work characteristics and other work-related variables. The study uses a comparative design to test differences between teamed and nonteamed teachers on work characteristics and work-related variables suggested by Hackman and Oldham’s job characteristics model. The study results suggest that teachers whose jobs have a work group emphasis (interdisciplinary teams)

Diana G. Pounder

1999-01-01

102

Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

2010-01-01

103

4. APACHE INDIAN LABORER WITH TEAM AND SCRAPER WORKING ON ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. APACHE INDIAN LABORER WITH TEAM AND SCRAPER WORKING ON THE POWER CANAL LINE FOUR MILES ABOVE LIVINGSTONE, ARIZONA Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, June 14, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

104

Team players against headache: multidisciplinary treatment of primary headaches and medication overuse headache  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multidisciplinary approaches are gaining acceptance in headache treatment. However, there is a lack of scientific data about\\u000a the efficacy of various strategies and their combinations offered by physiotherapists, physicians, psychologists and headache\\u000a nurses. Therefore, an international platform for more intense collaboration between these professions and between headache\\u000a centers is needed. Our aims were to establish closer collaboration and an interchange

Charly Gaul; Corine M. Visscher; Rhia Bhola; Marjolijn J. Sorbi; Federica Galli; Annette V. Rasmussen; Rigmor Jensen

105

Assessment of the work environment of multidisciplinary hospital staff  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to investigate the performance of scales to assess the work environment of hospital professional staff, other than nurses or physicians. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A survey was conducted among professional (non-nursing or medical) staff at a 300-bed urban, university-affiliated Canadian hospital. A total of 24 work environment items were adapted from a scale previously

Jane McCusker; Nandini Dendukuri; Linda Cardinal; Lilly Katofsky; Michael Riccardi

2005-01-01

106

Pressure ulcer multidisciplinary teams via telemedicine: a pragmatic cluster randomized stepped wedge trial in long term care  

PubMed Central

Background The study was conducted to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of enhanced multi-disciplinary teams (EMDTs) vs. ‘usual care’ for the treatment of pressure ulcers in long term care (LTC) facilities in Ontario, Canada Methods We conducted a multi-method study: a pragmatic cluster randomized stepped-wedge trial, ethnographic observation and in-depth interviews, and an economic evaluation. Long term care facilities (clusters) were randomly allocated to start dates of the intervention. An advance practice nurse (APN) with expertise in skin and wound care visited intervention facilities to educate staff on pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, supported by an off-site hospital based expert multi-disciplinary wound care team via email, telephone, or video link as needed. The primary outcome was rate of reduction in pressure ulcer surface area (cm2/day) measured on before and after standard photographs by an assessor blinded to facility allocation. Secondary outcomes were time to healing, probability of healing, pressure ulcer incidence, pressure ulcer prevalence, wound pain, hospitalization, emergency department visits, utility, and cost. Results 12 of 15 eligible LTC facilities were randomly selected to participate and randomized to start date of the intervention following the stepped wedge design. 137 residents with a total of 259 pressure ulcers (stage 2 or greater) were recruited over the 17 month study period. No statistically significant differences were found between control and intervention periods on any of the primary or secondary outcomes. The economic evaluation demonstrated a mean reduction in direct care costs of $650 per resident compared to ‘usual care’. The qualitative study suggested that onsite support by APN wound specialists was welcomed, and is responsible for reduced costs through discontinuation of expensive non evidence based treatments. Insufficient allocation of nursing home staff time to wound care may explain the lack of impact on healing. Conclusion Enhanced multi-disciplinary wound care teams were cost effective, with most benefit through cost reduction initiated by APNs, but did not improve the treatment of pressure ulcers in nursing homes. Policy makers should consider the potential yield of strengthening evidence based primary care within LTC facilities, through outreach by APNs. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01232764

2014-01-01

107

The Effect of a Nurse-Led Multidisciplinary Team on Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Rates  

PubMed Central

Background. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a worrisome, yet potentially preventable threat in critically ill patients. Evidence-based clinical practices targeting the prevention of VAP have proven effective, but the most optimal methods to ensure consistent implementation and compliance remain unknown. Methods. A retrospective study of the trend in VAP rates in a community-hospital's open medical intensive care unit (MICU) after the enactment of a nurse-led VAP prevention team. The period of the study was between April 1, 2009, and September 30, 2012. The team rounded on mechanically ventilated patients every Tuesday and Thursday. They ensured adherence to the evidence-based VAP prevention. A separate and independent infection control team monitored VAP rates. Results. Across the study period, mean VAP rate was 3.20/1000 ventilator days ±5.71 SD. Throughout the study time frame, there was an average monthly reduction in VAP rate of 0.27/1000 ventilator days, P < 0.001 (CI: ?0.40–?0.13). Conclusion. A nurse-led interdisciplinary team dedicated to VAP prevention rounding twice a week to ensure adherence with a VAP prevention bundle lowered VAP rates in a community-hospital open MICU. The team had interdepartmental and administrative support and addressed any deficiencies in the VAP prevention bundle components actively.

Dosher, W. Bradley; Loomis, Elena C.; Richardson, Sherry L.; Crowell, Jennifer A.; Waltman, Richard D.; Miller, Lisa D.; Nazim, Muhammad; Khasawneh, Faisal A.

2014-01-01

108

(International Energy Agency Heat Pump Center Working Team meeting)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler, serving as Delegate from the United States Heat Pump Center National Team, participated in the activities of the second International Energy Agency Heat Pump Center (IEA-HPC) Working Team meeting. This included a 20 minute presentation by the traveler about the Development and Activities of the IEA Heat Pump Center US National Team.'' Highlights of this meeting included development of 1991 IEA-HPC work plans including a prioritization of activities, introduction of the newly appointed IEA-HPC Advisory Board, and discussion of a new IEA Clearinghouse Network initiative. Pre-meeting discussions were held with IEA-HPC staff members which focused on US Heat Pump Center National Team contributions to the IEA-HPC Newsletter and participation in other IEA-HPC sponsored activities.

Broders, M.A.

1990-11-20

109

Team Teaching in Social Work: Sharing Power With Bachelor of Social Work Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Team teaching in social work education usually involves sequential lectures delivered by different instructors—relay or tag-team teaching. Truly collaborative or collegial team teaching involves a committed group of diverse instructors interacting together as equals in the classroom. Having more than one teacher in the classroom confounds traditional student strategies of meeting expectations of a single authority or expert; they are

Michael Kim Zapf; Les Jerome; Margaret Williams

2011-01-01

110

The devil is in the detail: lessons for multi-disciplinary care teams from a local evaluation of coordinated care.  

PubMed

The national evaluation report on the first round of Coordinated Care Trials focused on relationships of care coordination from two main perspectives: that of the General Practitioner (GP) as care coordinator; and the GP perception of non-GP care coordinators. As the majority of the Tasmanian care coordinators came from a nursing background and dealt with a wide range of health care providers, in addition to GPs, a more complex local analysis was required. It was found that relations between care coordinators and other health providers varied considerably by profession and new strategies were required to ameliorate the resulting conflict. This aspect of the local evaluation provides useful lessons for analysing and avoiding some sources of conflict in the formation and functioning of multi-disciplinary health care teams. PMID:12046159

Shannon, Elizabeth

2002-01-01

111

Multidisciplinary Teams and Group Decision-Making Techniques: Possible Solutions to Decision-Making Problems.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In placement decisions necessitated by PL 94-142, the multidimensional team approach may be hindered by group problems. The more structured nominal group technique (NGT) is suggested. NGT has six steps: silent, written generation of ideas; round robin reporting; group discussion for clarification; preliminary priority vote; discussion; and final…

Kaiser, Steven M.; Woodman, Richard W.

1985-01-01

112

Evaluating multidisciplinary health care teams: taking the crisis out of CRM  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-reliability organisations are those, such as within the aviation industry, which operate in com- plex, hazardous environments and yet despite this are able to balance safety and effectiveness. Crew resource management (CRM) training is used to improve the non-technical skills of aviation crews and other high-reliability teams. To date, CRM within the health sector has been restricted to use with

Gigi Sutton

2009-01-01

113

Humanitarian cardiac care in Arequipa, Peru: experiences of a multidisciplinary Canadian cardiovascular team  

PubMed Central

Background The prevalence of cardiovascular disease and its associated mortality continue to increase in developing countries despite unparalleled improvements in cardiovascular medicine over the last century. Cardiovascular care in developing nations is often constrained by limited resources, poor access, lack of specialty training and inadequate financial support. Medical volunteerism by experienced health care teams can provide mentorship, medical expertise and health policy advice to local teams and improve cardiovascular patient outcomes. Methods We report our experience from annual successive humanitarian medical missions to Arequipa, Peru, and describe the challenges faced when performing cardiovascular interventions with limited resources. Results Over a 2-year period, we performed a total of 15 cardiac repairs in patients with rheumatic, congenital and ischemic heart disease. We assessed and managed 150 patients in an outpatient clinic, including 7 patients at 1-year postoperative follow-up. Conclusion Despite multiple challenges, we were able to help the local team deliver advanced cardiovascular care to many patients with few alternatives and achieve good early and 1-year outcomes. Interdisciplinary education at all levels of cardiac care, including preoperative assessment, intraoperative surgical and anesthetic details, and postoperative critical care management, were major goals for our medical missions.

Adams, Corey; Kiefer, Philipp; Ryan, Kenneth; Smith, David; McCabe, Greg; Allen, Peter; Sridhar, Kumar; Torres, Pedro; Chu, Michael W.A.

2012-01-01

114

76 FR 10403 - Hewlett Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working On-Site...Technology Business Development Team, the Engineering Application Support Team, and the Engineering Workstation Refresh Team. On...

2011-02-24

115

Piloting the role of a pharmacist in a community palliative care multidisciplinary team: an Australian experience  

PubMed Central

Background While the home is the most common setting for the provision of palliative care in Australia, a common problem encountered here is the inability of patient/carers to manage medications, which can lead to misadventure and hospitalisation. This can be averted through detection and resolution of drug related problems (DRPs) by a pharmacist; however, they are rarely included as members of the palliative care team. The aim of this study was to pilot a model of care that supports the role of a pharmacist in a community palliative care team. A component of the study was to develop a cost-effective model for continuing the inclusion of a pharmacist within a community palliative care service. Methods The study was undertaken (February March 2009-June 2010) in three phases. Development (Phase 1) involved a literature review; scoping the pharmacist's role; creating tools for recording DRPs and interventions, a communication and education strategy, a care pathway and evidence based patient information. These were then implemented in Phase 2. Evaluation (Phase 3) of the impact of the pharmacist's role from the perspectives of team members was undertaken using an online survey and focus group. Impact on clinical outcomes was determined by the number of patients screened to assess their risk of medication misadventure, as well as the number of medication reviews and interventions performed to resolve DRPs. Results The pharmacist screened most patients (88.4%, 373/422) referred to the palliative care service to assess their risk of medication misadventure, and undertook 52 home visits. Medication reviews were commonly conducted at the majority of home visits (88%, 46/52), and a variety of DRPs (113) were detected at this point, the most common being "patient requests drug information" (25%, 28/113) and "condition not adequately treated" (22%, 25/113). The pharmacist made 120 recommendations in relation to her interventions. Fifty percent of online survey respondents (10/20) had interacted 10 or more times with the pharmacist for advice. All felt that the pharmacist's role was helpful, improving their knowledge of the different medications used in palliative care. The six team members who participated in the focus group indicated that there were several benefits of the pharmacist's contributions towards medication screening and review. Conclusions The inclusion of a pharmacist in a community palliative care team lead to an increase in the medication-related knowledge and skills of its members, improved patients' medication management, and minimised related errors. The model of care created can potentially be duplicated by other palliative care services, although its cost-effectiveness was unable to be accurately tested within the study.

2011-01-01

116

Replantation of an amputated hand: a rare case report and acknowledgement of a multidisciplinary team input.  

PubMed

An amputation of the hand is a devastating injury. It adversely affects the victim's ability to earn a livelihood, support a family, and carry out daily activities. It has a great psychological impact. We report a middle aged male with an amputation at the level of the distal forearm who underwent replantation. The operative details of this case are described. Awareness of the possibility of salvage should be spread among healthcare personnel and the need for immediate attention by a multispeciality team is advocated. This report reviews the literature related to the operative technique, contraindications and long term results. PMID:22043436

Nanda, Vipul; Jacob, Joe; Alsafy, Taif; Punnoose, Thomas; Iyasere, G

2011-07-01

117

Enhancing Social Work Education through Team-Based Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Group learning strategies are used extensively in social work education, despite the challenges and negative outcomes regularly experienced by students and faculty. Building on principles of cooperative learning, team-based learning offers a more structured approach that maximizes the benefits of cooperative learning while also offering…

Gillespie, Judy

2012-01-01

118

Making Workers Visible: Unmasking Learning in a Work Team.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A case study of a work team in a company using quality management strategies found that training to improve customer service actually served to shape workers' attitudes and control their behavior. The focus of this organizational learning was instrumental and served the interests of the organization, not the workers. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

Howell, Sharon L.; Carter, Vicki K.; Schied, Fred M.

2001-01-01

119

Payroll Manual for Modular Work Teams at Maryland Clothing.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This section and Exhibit V are taken from the Final Report of INSTALL MODULAR MANUFACTURING WORK TEAMS AT A DAM, PHASE II, for the purpose to provide an adequate description of the reasons for the payroll procedures selected and the intent of the system. ...

1998-01-01

120

Implementing Self-Directed Work Teams at a College Newspaper  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The problem: Motivating and retaining staff had become an ongoing problem at the student newspaper. Student staffers would quit abruptly when overwhelmed or dissatisfied, leaving the newspaper with critical positions vacant. This affected the performance of the newspaper. Method: The newspaper was organized into self directed work teams (SDWTs).…

de Pillis, Emmeline; Parsons, Blake

2013-01-01

121

Consensus in Guidelines for Evaluation of DSD by the Texas Children's Hospital Multidisciplinary Gender Medicine Team  

PubMed Central

The Gender Medicine Team (GMT), comprised of members with expertise in endocrinology, ethics, genetics, gynecology, pediatric surgery, psychology, and urology, at Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine formed a task force to formulate a consensus statement on practice guidelines for managing disorders of sexual differentiation (DSD) and for making sex assignments. The GMT task force reviewed published evidence and incorporated findings from clinical experience. Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the quality of evidence presented in the literature for establishing evidence-based guidelines. The task force presents a consensus statement regarding specific diagnostic and therapeutic issues in the management of individuals who present with DSD. The consensus statement includes recommendations for (1) laboratory workup, (2) acute management, (3) sex assignment in an ethical framework that includes education and involvement of the parents, and (4) surgical management.

Douglas, Ganka; Axelrad, Marni E.; Brandt, Mary L.; Crabtree, Elizabeth; Dietrich, Jennifer E.; French, Shannon; Gunn, Sheila; Karaviti, Lefkothea; Lopez, Monica E.; Macias, Charles G.; McCullough, Laurence B.; Suresh, Deepa; Sutton, V. Reid

2010-01-01

122

The Work of Recovery on Two Assertive Community Treatment Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The compatibility of recovery work with the Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) model has been debated; and little is known\\u000a about how to best measure the work of recovery. Two ACT teams with high and low recovery orientation were identified by expert\\u000a consensus and compared on a number of dimensions. Using an interpretive, qualitative approach to analyze interview and observation\\u000a data,

Michelle P. SalyersLaura; Laura G. Stull; Angela L. Rollins; Kim Hopper

2011-01-01

123

Cost-effectiveness of Anticipatory and Preventive multidisciplinary Team Care for complex patients  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of Anticipatory and Preventive Team Care (APTCare). DESIGN Analysis of data drawn from a randomized controlled trial. SETTING A family health network in a rural area near Ottawa, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Patients 50 years of age or older at risk of experiencing adverse health outcomes. Analysis of cost-effectiveness was performed for a subsample of participants with at least 1 of the chronic diseases used in the quality of care (QOC) measure (74 intervention and 78 control patients). INTERVENTIONS At-risk patients were randomly assigned to receive usual care from their family physicians or APTCare from a collaborative team. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Cost-effectiveness and the net benefit to society of the APTCare intervention. RESULTS Costs not directly associated with delivery of the intervention were similar in the 2 arms: $9121 and $9222 for the APTCare and control arms, respectively. Costs directly associated with the program were $3802 per patient for a total cost per patient of $12 923 and $9222, respectively (P = .033). A 1% improvement in QOC was estimated to cost $407 per patient. Analysis of the net benefit to society in absolute dollars found a breakeven threshold of $750 when statistical significance was required. This implies that society must place a value of at least $750 on a 1% improvement in QOC in order for the intervention to be socially worthwhile. By any of the metrics used, the APTCare intervention was not cost-effective, at least not in a population for which baseline QOC was high. CONCLUSION Although our calculations suggest that the APTCare intervention was not cost-effective, our results need the following caveats. The costs of such a newly introduced intervention are bound to be higher than those for an established, up-and-running program. Furthermore, it is possible that some benefits of the secondary preventive measures were not captured in this limited 12- to 18-month study or were simply not measured. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER NCT00238836 (CONSORT).

Gray, David; Armstrong, Catherine Deri; Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Zhang, Wei

2010-01-01

124

Team behaviors in emergency care: a qualitative study using behavior analysis of what makes team work  

PubMed Central

Objective Teamwork has been suggested as a promising approach to improving care processes in emergency departments (ED). However, for teamwork to yield expected results, implementation must involve behavior changes. The aim of this study is to use behavior analysis to qualitatively examine how teamwork plays out in practice and to understand eventual discrepancies between planned and actual behaviors. Methods The study was set in a Swedish university hospital ED during the initial phase of implementation of teamwork. The intervention focused on changing the environment and redesigning the work process to enable teamwork. Each team was responsible for entire care episodes, i.e. from patient arrival to discharge from the ED. Data was collected through 3 days of observations structured around an observation scheme. Behavior analysis was used to pinpoint key teamwork behaviors for consistent implementation of teamwork and to analyze the contingencies that decreased or increased the likelihood of these behaviors. Results We found a great discrepancy between the planned and the observed teamwork processes. 60% of the 44 team patients observed were handled solely by the appointed team members. Only 36% of the observed patient care processes started according to the description in the planned teamwork process, that is, with taking patient history together. Beside this behavior, meeting in a defined team room and communicating with team members were shown to be essential for the consistent implementation of teamwork. Factors that decreased the likelihood of these key behaviors included waiting for other team members or having trouble locating each other. Getting work done without delay and having an overview of the patient care process increased team behaviors. Moreover, explicit instructions on when team members should interact and communicate increased adherence to the planned process. Conclusions This study illustrates how behavior analysis can be used to understand discrepancies between planned and observed behaviors. By examining the contextual conditions that may influence behaviors, improvements in implementation strategies can be suggested. Thereby, the adherence to a planned intervention can be improved, and/or revisions of the intervention be suggested.

2011-01-01

125

The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between self-directed work teams and traditional work groups using four work ethic subscales: dependable, considerate, ambitious, and cooperative (Dawson, [1999]; Petty, [1991]). Differences in measured work ethic scores were also compared across six demographic variables: age,…

Petty, Gregory C.; Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won; Fontan, Johnny

2008-01-01

126

Are self-directed work teams successful and effective tools for today`s organization?  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research is to (1) show the effectiveness and success of self-directed work teams within the organization, (2) emphasize the importance of team building in the success of the team, and (3) assist organizations in building self-directed work teams. The researcher used a direct survey and studied the following team building techniques: (1) Is the team`s mission clearly defined to each team member? (2) Are the goals clearly defined and achievable by all team members? (3) Will empowerment (decision-making power) be given equally to all team members? (4) Will open and honest communication be allowed among team members? (5) Will each team member be respected and valued for his/her position on the team? (6) Are self-directed work teams effectively rewarded for accomplishments? (7) Have team members received adequate training to effectively complete their job tasks? Upon completion of the literature review and statistical data, and after analyzing the seven areas of team building techniques, it was determined three of the four teams were successful and effective. The only area of concern to the organization is that the participants felt they did not have true ownership of their teams; that is, team members were not given full empowerment. According to this study and the review of literature, full empowerment must be given to achieve successful and effective teams. If true empowerment is not given, the team will suffer in other areas of team building, and the organization will lose a valuable tool.

Arnwine, A.D.

1995-03-01

127

[1st National Meeting of Multidisciplinary Work in Oncogeriatrics: expert consensus document].  

PubMed

On 2nd of June 2011 the Institut Català d' Oncologia l'Hospitalet--Hospital Duran i Reynals hosted the first Meeting of Multidisciplinary Work in Oncogeriatrics. The reason for the meeting, which follows on from an initiative of the Medical Societies of Radiotherapy, Oncology, Geriatrics and Gerontology and Palliative Care and Medical Oncology, was to initiate a joint line of work among the different specialties that generally take part in the handling of the elderly patient suffering from oncologic pathologies. This document summarises the different subjects covered during the Meeting. PMID:23044361

Antonio, Maite; Saldaña, Juana; Formiga, Francesc; Lozano, Alicia; González-Barboteo, Jesús; Fernández, Paz; Arias, Fernando; Arribas, Lorena; Barbero, Elisabeth; Bescós, María del Mar; Boya, Maria Jesús; Bueso, Pilar; Casas, Ana; Dotor, Emma; Fort, Eduard; García-Alfonso, Pilar; Herruzo, Ismael; Llonch, Mireia; Morlans, Germà; Murillo, Maria Teresa; Ossola, Gustavo; Peiró, Inma; Saiz, Fabiola; Sanz, Javier; Serra, José Antonio; Trelis, Jordi; Yuste, Antonio

2012-01-01

128

The Open Science Grid - Support for Multi-Disciplinary Team Science - the Adolescent Years  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As it enters adolescence the Open Science Grid (OSG) is bringing a maturing fabric of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) services that supports an expanding HEP community to an increasingly diverse spectrum of domain scientists. Working closely with researchers on campuses throughout the US and in collaboration with national cyberinfrastructure initiatives, we transform their computing environment through new concepts, advanced tools and deep experience. We discuss examples of these including: the pilot-job overlay concepts and technologies now in use throughout OSG and delivering 1.4 Million CPU hours/day; the role of campus infrastructures- built out from concepts of sharing across multiple local faculty clusters (made good use of already by many of the HEP Tier-2 sites in the US); the work towards the use of clouds and access to high throughput parallel (multi-core and GPU) compute resources; and the progress we are making towards meeting the data management and access needs of non-HEP communities with general tools derived from the experience of the parochial tools in HEP (integration of Globus Online, prototyping with IRODS, investigations into Wide Area Lustre). We will also review our activities and experiences as HTC Service Provider to the recently awarded NSF XD XSEDE project, the evolution of the US NSF TeraGrid project, and how we are extending the reach of HTC through this activity to the increasingly broad national cyberinfrastructure. We believe that a coordinated view of the HPC and HTC resources in the US will further expand their impact on scientific discovery.

Bauerdick, Lothar; Ernst, Michael; Fraser, Dan; Livny, Miron; Pordes, Ruth; Sehgal, Chander; Würthwein, Frank; Open Science Grid

2012-12-01

129

Decision-making from multidisciplinary team meetings to the bedside: Factors influencing the recruitment of breast cancer patients into clinical trials | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

Multidisciplinary team meetings in comprehensive cancer centers identify potentially eligible patients and discuss clinical trial participation. However, a French study using retrospective chart review and physician surveys found that less than half (39%) of the identified patients were invited to participate by their physicians. Of those invited, 74% joined a trial. Physicians were most likely to offer diagnostic or prognostic trials and retired patients and executives were the most likely to enroll.

130

Multidisciplinary Team-Based Approach for Comprehensive Preoperative Pulmonary Rehabilitation Including Intensive Nutritional Support for Lung Cancer Patients  

PubMed Central

Background To decrease the risk of postoperative complication, improving general and pulmonary conditioning preoperatively should be considered essential for patients scheduled to undergo lung surgery. Objective The aim of this study is to develop a short-term beneficial program of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation for lung cancer patients. Methods From June 2009, comprehensive preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (CHPR) including intensive nutritional support was performed prospectively using a multidisciplinary team-based approach. Postoperative complication rate and the transitions of pulmonary function in CHPR were compared with historical data of conventional preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation (CVPR) conducted since June 2006. The study population was limited to patients who underwent standard lobectomy. Results Postoperative complication rate in the CVPR (n?=?29) and CHPR (n?=?21) were 48.3% and 28.6% (p?=?0.2428), respectively. Those in patients with Charlson Comorbidity Index scores ?2 were 68.8% (n?=?16) and 27.3% (n?=?11), respectively (p?=?0.0341) and those in patients with preoperative risk score in Estimation of Physiologic Ability and Surgical Stress scores >0.3 were 57.9% (n?=?19) and 21.4% (n?=?14), respectively (p?=?0.0362). Vital capacities of pre- and post intervention before surgery in the CHPR group were 2.63±0.65 L and 2.75±0.63 L (p?=?0.0043), respectively; however, their transition in the CVPR group was not statistically significant (p?=?0.6815). Forced expiratory volumes in one second of pre- and post intervention before surgery in the CHPR group were 1.73±0.46 L and 1.87±0.46 L (p?=?0.0012), respectively; however, their transition in the CVPR group was not statistically significant (p?=?0.6424). Conclusions CHPR appeared to be a beneficial and effective short-term preoperative rehabilitation protocol, especially in patients with poor preoperative conditions.

Harada, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Misumi, Keizo; Tsubokawa, Norifumi; Nakao, Junichi; Matsutani, Junko; Yamasaki, Miyako; Ohkawachi, Tomomi; Taniyama, Kiyomi

2013-01-01

131

[Team work and interdiciplinarity: challenges facing the implementation of comprehensive outpatient care for people with HIV/Aids in Pernambuco].  

PubMed

The complexity of providing healthcare to people with HIV/Aids requires investment in comprehensive action and care, constituting a challenge for the multidisciplinary work teams to build an interdisciplinary practice. This study sought to analyze comprehensive healthcare in the Specialized Assistance Services for HIV/Aids (SAE-HIV/Aids) in Recife, in the State of Pernambuco, starting with the process and organization of team work. This is a case study developed in three SAE-HIV/Aids units, based on a qualitative approach using different research techniques. The results show that SAE-HIV/Aids have complied with most of the Brazilian Health Ministry recommendations in terms of basic infrastructure, though none of them had a team of appropriate size. These services have shown signs of fragmentation and difficulty in establishing a systematic intersectorial and interdisciplinary practice, with failings in ensuring the reference and counter-reference flow. It was seen that there was little appreciation of the role of the manager as team leader. The need to perceive the user as a whole was identified, as well as for the team to work in a coordinated manner in order to ensure communicative and relational activities. PMID:22218548

Borges, Maria Jucineide Lopes; Sampaio, Aletheia Soares; Gurgel, Idê Gomes Dantas

2012-01-01

132

Mercury Orbiter: Report of the Science Working Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results are presented of the Mercury Orbiter Science Working Team which held three workshops in 1988 to 1989 under the auspices of the Space Physics and Planetary Exploration Divisions of NASA Headquarters. Spacecraft engineering and mission design studies at the Jet Propulsion Lab were conducted in parallel with this effort and are detailed elsewhere. The findings of the engineering study, summarized herein, indicate that spin stabilized spacecraft carrying comprehensive particles and fields experiments and key planetology instruments in high elliptical orbits can survive and function in Mercury orbit without costly sun shields and active cooling systems.

Belcher, John W.; Slavin, James A.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Akasofu, Syun I.; Baker, Daniel N.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Chupp, Edward L.; Clark, Pamela E.

1991-01-01

133

Self-Managed Work Teams in Nursing Homes: Implementing and Empowering Nurse Aide Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article describes the progress of our study to examine the advantages and costs of using self-managed nurse aide teams in nursing homes, steps that are being taken to implement such teams, and management strategies being used to manage the teams. Design and Methods: A quasi-experimental design is underway where certified nurse aide…

Yeatts, Dale E.; Cready, Cynthia; Ray, Beth; DeWitt, Amy; Queen, Courtney

2004-01-01

134

Critical Education for Work: Multidisciplinary Approaches. Social and Policy Issues in Education: The David C. Anchin Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book expands the meaning of today's education for work by offering five multidisciplinary approaches--school-to-work transitions, gender equity, labor education, economic democracy, and vocational education--revealing the complexities of personal, social, and cultural transformation. "Critical Education for Work" (Richard D. Lakes) is an…

Lakes, Richard D., Ed.

135

Factors Affecting University Teaching Team Effectiveness in Detached Working Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the outcomes of a study of the factors that contribute to teaching team effectiveness in situations where team members rarely meet face to face. Academic faculty within a university Business School were asked to report the degrees to which they believed that the module teaching teams to which they belonged contained members who…

Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

2014-01-01

136

Work in Progress: The Seven Rs of Team Building  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article argues that supportive teams--including professionals, paraprofessionals, and parents--can teach staff members how to identify and implement best practices in early intervention settings. The authors describe "the seven Rs of team building" distilled from their many years of team building and maintenance: 1) Reading cues; 2) Regular…

Brunelli, Jean; Schneider, Elaine Fogel

2004-01-01

137

Process Orientation, Integration of Work Teams and Management Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a trend in Swedish companies to use team-based organisational design when striving for process orientation. The first question put forth in this paper is whether this design supports a process orientation. Since the teams usually are rather autonomous it is not obvious that they become integrated with other teams in the process. The second question put forth is

Göran Nilsson

1998-01-01

138

Pan-Britain, mixed-methods study of multidisciplinary teams teaching parents to manage children's long-term kidney conditions at home: Study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background Care of children and young people (children) with long-term kidney conditions is usually managed by multidisciplinary teams. Published guidance recommends that whenever possible children with long-term conditions remain at home, meaning parents may be responsible for performing the majority of clinical care-giving. Multidisciplinary team members, therefore, spend considerable time promoting parents' learning about care-delivery and monitoring care-giving. However, this parent-educative aspect of clinicians' role is rarely articulated in the literature so little evidence exists to inform professionals' parent-teaching interventions. Methods/Design This ongoing study addresses this issue using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods involving the twelve children's kidney units in England, Scotland and Wales. Phase I involves a survey of multidisciplinary team members' parent-teaching interventions using: i) A telephone-administered questionnaire to determine: the numbers of professionals from different disciplines in each team, the information/skills individual professionals relay to parents and the teaching strategies/interventions they use. Data will be managed using SPSS to produce descriptive statistics ii) Digitally-recorded, qualitative group or individual interviews with multidisciplinary team members to explore their accounts of the parent-teaching component of their role. Interviews will be transcribed anonymously and analysed using Framework Technique. Sampling criteria will be derived from analysis to identify one/two unit(s) for subsequent in-depth study Phase II involves six prospective, ethnographic case-studies of professional-parent interactions during parent-teaching encounters. Parents of six children with a long-term kidney condition will be purposively sampled according to their child's age, diagnosis, ethnicity and the clinical care-giving required; snowball sampling will identify the professionals involved in each case-study. Participants will provide signed consent; data gathering will involve a combination of: minimally-obtrusive observations in the clinical setting and families' homes; de-briefing interviews with participants to obtain views on selected interactions; focussed 'verbatim' field-notes, and case-note reviews. Data gathering will focus on communication between parents and professionals as parents learn care-giving skills and knowledge. Interviews will be digitally recorded and transcribed anonymously. Discussion This study involves an iterative-inductive approach and will provide a unique, detailed insight into the social context in which professionals teach and parents learn; it will inform professionals' parent-educative roles, educational curricula, and health care policy

2012-01-01

139

How Often Do Students Working in Two-Person Teams Report that Work Was Shared Equitably?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There are many reasons to assign group projects but determining the grade for each individual working in a group can be problematic. Self and peer assessments of contributions to a group project can be used to adjust individual grades. Most studies of such assessments have considered teams with three to seven members. This study documents the…

Alkaslassy, Edmond

2011-01-01

140

Helping fluid teams work: A research agenda for effective team adaptation in healthcare.  

PubMed

Although membership changes within teams are a common practice, research into this phenomenon is relatively nascent (Summers et al.; Acad Manag J 55:314-338, 2012). The small literature base, however, does provide insight into skills required for effective adaptation. The purpose of this effort is to provide a brief research synopsis, leading to research hypotheses about medical team training. By generalizing previous scientific findings regarding skills required for effective membership adaptation in different kinds of teams, we posit mechanisms whereby teamwork training might also support adaptation among medical teams (Burke et al.; Qual & Saf Health Care 13:i96-i104, 2004 and Salas et al.; Theor Issues Ergon Sci 8:381-394, 2007). We provide an overview of the membership change literature. Drawing upon literature from both within and outside of the medical domain, we suggest a framework and research propositions to aid in research efforts designed to determine the best content for helping to create adaptable medical teams through team training efforts. For effective adaptation, we suggest ad hoc teams should be trained on generalizable teamwork skills, to share just "enough" and the "right" information, to engage in shared leadership, and to shift from explicit to implicit coordination. Our overarching goal was to present what is known from the general research literature on successful team adaptation to membership changes, and to propose a research agenda to evaluate whether findings generalize to member changes in medical teams. PMID:24073150

Bedwell, Wendy L; Ramsay, P Scott; Salas, Eduardo

2012-12-01

141

Creative Exchange: An Evolving Model of Multidisciplinary Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Often the traditional creative arts curriculum does not sufficiently respond to, nor reflect, contemporary work practice. Multidisciplinary teams are now increasingly the norm in creative arts practice especially when driven by technological innovation. Drawing on contemporary research that centres on the benefits of multidisciplinary

Fleischmann, Katja; Hutchison, Clive

2012-01-01

142

Working with Teams and Organizations to Help Them Involve Family Members  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we describe our work in trying to influence whole service teams to move their practice towards greater involvement of affected family members. Work with five teams is described. The process varied but in all cases it included recruitment of the team, training, continued support and evaluation of results. Use of a standard…

Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Ibanga, Akanidomo

2010-01-01

143

The Anonymity Factor in Making Multicultural Teams Work: Virtual and Real Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major purpose of courses in intercultural communication is often to improve students' ability to perform well in situations with the potential to be both highly enlightening and highly difficult--in multicultural teams. This article reports the results of exercises in which members of a dysfunctional multicultural class were assigned to teams

Berg, Roberta Wiig

2012-01-01

144

Working as a Learning Coach Team in Action Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A team of learning coaches facilitated an action learning group in a public utility. The coaches' diversity raised interpersonal issues but added a wealth of perspectives and experience. Important components were team formation, a balance of program and individual needs, and group diversity. (SK)

O'Neil, Judy A.; Lamm, Sharon L.

2000-01-01

145

Teaming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaming is a method of grouping students so they share the same set of teachers for their core subject areas--science, math, language arts, social studies, and sometimes physical education and health. Most often, teams are created when an entire grade is broken into groups who share the same set of teachers. Small schools that do not have enough students to form teams can create a grade-level team or multigrade-level teams. The core subject teachers usually share a common planning period and, in many situations, also share a team planning period. Teaming is most often used in middle grades education because its positive outcomes are particularly appropriate to the developmental needs of young adolescents.

Swango, C. J.; Steward, Sally B.

2003-01-01

146

Team resource management: a programme for troubled teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The necessity for effective multidisciplinary team working within increasingly complex health and social care environments has been emphasised in The NHS Plan. Good teamwork makes a critical contribution to effectiveness and innovation in health-care delivery and it is through such teams that the agenda of quality improvement through clinical governance can be delivered at local level. The NHS Clinical Governance

Howard Arthur; Debbie Wall; Aidan Halligan

2003-01-01

147

Should they have a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy? the importance of assessing decision-making capacity and the central role of a multidisciplinary team.  

PubMed

Decisions about percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) can be clinically and ethically challenging, particularly when patients lack decision-making capacity. As the age of the UK population rises, with the associated increase in prevalence of dementias and neurodegenerative diseases, it is becoming an increasingly important issue for clinicians. The recent review and subsequent withdrawal of the Liverpool Care Pathway highlighted feeding as a particular area of concern. The authors undertook a 1-year retrospective review of individuals referred to the feeding issues multidisciplinary team (FIMDT) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK, in 2011. The majority of patients referred (n = 158) had a primary diagnosis of cancer (44%). The second largest group was those who had had a stroke or brain haemorrhage (13%). Twenty-eight per cent of patients had no, or uncertain, decision-making capacity on at least one occasion during decision-making. There are reflections on the role of a multidisciplinary team in the process of decision-making for these complex patients. PMID:24889566

Clarke, Gemma; Galbraith, Sarah; Woodward, Jeremy; Holland, Anthony; Barclay, Stephen

2014-06-01

148

Are self-directed work teams successful and effective tools for today's organization.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this research is to (1) show the effectiveness and success of self-directed work teams within the organization, (2) emphasize the importance of team building in the success of the team, and (3) assist organizations in building self-directed...

A. D. Arnwine

1995-01-01

149

A Case of Innovative Integration of High-Performance Work Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A case study of a Fortune 500 company was used to develop an integrated model of high-performance work organizations. Components are systems thinking, team interaction, team principles, and results. The model requires an ongoing training plan, change agents or champions, and recognition of teams' productive potential and fragile nature. (SK)

Thompson, Faye; Baughan, Donna; Motwani, Jaideep

1998-01-01

150

Collective Efficacy Beliefs in Student Work Teams: Relation to Self-Efficacy, Cohesion, and Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A measure of collective efficacy was developed and administered to undergraduates working in project teams in engineering courses. Findings in each of two samples revealed that the measure contained a single factor and was related to ratings of team cohesion and personal efficacy. Collective efficacy was also found to relate to indicators of team

Lent, Robert W.; Schmidt, Janet; Schmidt, Linda

2006-01-01

151

School-Based Multidisciplinary Teacher Team-Building Combining On-Line Professional Development (ESSEA) and Field-Based Environmental Monitoring (GLOBE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The multidisciplinary nature of Earth system science provides a strong foundation for integrated science teaching at the K-12 level. In a Minneapolis-St. Paul based project, urban middle school teaching teams composed of language arts and math specialists as well as physical, Earth, and biological science teachers participate in the NASA Earth system science course (ESSEA) and in the international GLOBE environmental monitoring project. For students, the goal is to integrate science throughout the curriculum as well as involve classes from different subjects in a high-interest school science project. For teachers, the project provides greatly-needed classroom support and teacher team building, as well as professional development. The on-line course provides continuity and communication between the different team members. Face-to-face meetings with the instructors on site are conducted every 4 weeks. The problem-based learning approach to environmental issues developed in the ESSEA course lends itself to application to local environmental issues. New ESSEA modules developed for the project highlight environmental problems associated with flooding, introduced species, and eutrofication of lakes and rivers located near the participating schools. In addition, ESSEA participants are certified as GLOBE teachers, and assist their students in monitoring water quality. The synergistic partnership of ESSEA and GLOBE provides an attractive package upon which long-term school-based environmental monitoring projects can be based.

Low, R.

2003-12-01

152

Team Resource Management and patient safety : A team focused approach to clinical governance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To review three key areas of work managed by the Team Resource Management and Patient Safety Team (TRM), itself part of the Clinical Governance Support Team. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Information has been collected from TRM staff, UK NHS Trust staff, research publications and reports. Findings – As treatment programmes become more complex and health care is delivered by multidisciplinary

Ros Boddington; Howard Arthur; Dave Cummings; Sue Mellor; Denis Salter

2006-01-01

153

Team Teaching Styles Utilized in Japan: Do They Really Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper continues the debate over TT (team-teaching) benefits and detriments. TT has been utilized extensively in Japan in English Language instructional courses at the elementary and junior high school levels over the past 20 years. Although at times satirical, the author in all seriousness discusses TT and; its advantages and disadvantages in…

Carley, Harry F., III

2013-01-01

154

Multidisciplinary Treatment Planning Questionnaire  

Cancer.gov

Multidisciplinary care, which incorporates Multidisciplinary Treatment Planning (MTP), is increasingly being adopted within oncology care settings with the intent of enhancing the quality of care delivered to patients. However, what is not known is its impact on improving patient outcomes and the quality of care being delivered. A targeted review of the literature was conducted to examine the organization and operation of the Multidisciplinary Care (MDC) team structure1. Findings revealed that a variety of implementation models exist within the health care system.

155

Staff satisfaction with team conferences: development of a questionnaire  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Rehabilitation Activities Profile (RAP) is part of RAP-TEAM which is a novel method for structuring multidisciplinary team conferences. As such, RAP-TEAM is intended to facilitate interdisciplinary team work in rehabilitation medicine. Before the effects of RAP-TEAM in team conferences can be studied, an assessment method had to be chosen. A questionnaire was considered the most appropriate. The present study

F. Jelles; Cam van Bennekom; G. J. Lankhorst; L. M. Bouter

1996-01-01

156

A New Concept of Working Environment Improvement Within Multicultural Teams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multicultural team leaders under the conditions of globalisation process must understand that acquiring cultural awareness and diversity management skills is one of the premises for gaining competitive advantage and satisfying the employee? need for social cohesion. The concept presented in this paper goes beyond standard understanding of what cultural diversity management means, as it is not perceived as a set of activities that a business as a whole should be responsible for, but encourage every leader to take responsibility for its own awareness firstly. After understanding that cross-cultural competence is a lifelong learning process it is possible to start recognising one’s own cultural mindset before attempting to recognise those of people from other cultures. At this point it is a right time to spread the experience amongst other team members or associates.

Makraiová, Jana; Cagá?ová, Dagmar; ?ambál, Miloš

2012-12-01

157

Design and Implementation of Self-Directed Work Teams in a Pre-Erection Outfitting Department.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper discusses the suitability of work teams in a shipbuilding pre-erection outfitting area. Of special interest is NASSCO'S attempt at implementing work teams in their pre-election outfitting area, the On-Block Department. Although the On-Block wor...

S. Salata, T. Caffo, D. Webb, S. Ehrlich, S. Kent

1992-01-01

158

Management of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly: role of the pharmacist in a multidisciplinary health care team.  

PubMed

Intensive glycemic control using insulin therapy may be appropriate for many healthy older adults to reduce premature mortality and morbidity, improve quality of life, and reduce health care costs. However, frail elderly people are more prone to develop complications from hypoglycemia, such as confusion and dementia. Overall, older persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at greater risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) than from intermittent hyperglycemia; therefore, diabetes management should always include CVD prevention and treatment in this patient population. Pharmacists can provide a comprehensive medication review with subsequent recommendations to individualize therapy based on medical and cognitive status. As part of the patient's health care team, pharmacists can provide continuity of care and communication with other members of the patient's health care team. In addition, pharmacists can act as educators and patient advocates and establish patient-specific goals to increase medication effectiveness, adherence to a medication regimen, and minimize the likelihood of adverse events. PMID:21655341

Grossman, Samuel

2011-01-01

159

Multidisciplinary department of "Return to Work After a Cancer": a French experience of support groups for vocational rehabilitation.  

PubMed

This qualitative pilot exploratory study focuses on support groups for vocational rehabilitation after cancer implemented in a French and innovative multidisciplinary department of "Return to Work after a Cancer." Sixty-three patients were invited to participate to constitute two support groups of 20 participants. Questionnaires are sent to assess their benefit according to the participants' point of view. For 58% of participants, support groups helped the return to work, and for 70% it provided personal, family, and relational support. Support groups are a relevant response to expectations and specific issues of patients experiencing return to work after cancer. PMID:24428252

De Blasi, G; Bouteyre, E; Bretteville, J; Boucher, L; Rollin, L

2014-01-01

160

Self-managed work teams approach: creative management tool or a fad?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of employee empowerment through a self-managed work teams programme into an organization further requires the introduction of multifaceted changes in person-job relationships and the whole organizational hierarchy. The self-managed teams concept can be seen as a strategy to increase motivation, quality, productivity, customer satisfaction and to sustain high performance. Self-managed teams serve as the main building blocks of

Dean Elmuti

1997-01-01

161

Team systems in aviation maintenance: interaction and co-ordination across work teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of teamwork in aviation maintenance has increasingly been recognised over the past two decades in recognition of the demands of managing and organising more and more complex work processes and even more difficult communication and interaction patterns within and across distributed work units, departments and functions. This paper focuses on the problem of understanding and modelling the analysis

Daniele Baranzini; Sam Cromie

2002-01-01

162

What were the perceptions of primary care teams on learning from a single multidisciplinary simulation-based training intervention?  

PubMed

Medical emergencies in general practice are uncommon and their management requires good teamwork, communication and effective use of the available resources by the whole primary care team. To address this need the Montagu Clinical Simulation Centre developed and delivered a half-day simulation-based medical emergencies course for primary care teams (GPs, practice nurses and administrative staff). Each half-day course comprises two simulated medical emergencies, which are video-taped and then debriefed. The course was evaluated using a multi-level approach by seeking the staff's reactions to the course, their learning, the behaviour changes produced and the results for the organisation. We gained this information through self-reporting using end-of-course and follow-up questionnaires. The immediate feedback was very positive, showing they had learnt the objectives set. We then surveyed all those who had attended training between 2003 and 2007. A follow-up questionnaire was developed and sent to the practice managers who then co-ordinated their completion and return using a pre-paid return envelope. The survey was carried out in two cohorts. The first set of follow-up questionnaires was sent out in September 2004 to all those that had attended up to the end of May 2004 and the second set sent out in May 2008 to those who had attended between June 2004 and May 2007. Of the 338 available to complete the follow-up questionnaire, 208 responded, giving a response rate of 62%. Eighty percent of practices had made changes to equipment, emergency protocols or training and 20% of the participants had been involved in managing a medical emergency since attending the course. Of those, 86% indicated that their management and confidence had improved, that they were better able to take a lead role, give instruction and delegate tasks as required. Based on the self-reported perceptions of learning, we believe that the lessons learnt have been translated into positive changes at a personal and practice level for all members of the primary care team. The participants valued the chance to train as a complete unit. We plan to evaluate simulation-based training in the workplace to see if this has a greater impact. PMID:21781389

Strachan, Alasdair N; Graham, Alastair C; Hormis, Anil P; Hilton, Gill

2011-07-01

163

[The meaning of team work in the rehabilitation of people with congenital craniofacial malformation].  

PubMed

This study aimed to understand the meaning of teamwork of rehabilitation professionals in craniofacial anomalie. It was carried out a phenomenological analysis for contemplating the understanding and interpretation of the sense considering the subject. Twelve professionals from different areas were interviewed, guided to the subject: What does work in a team on the rehabilitation of craniofacial anomalies mean to you? These themes were brought up: training for the task, difficulty in working with a team, relationship with patient and family, work conditions and the professional insertion in the team. The analysis sought to reflect the phenomenon engendering convergences and divergences to express the differences and continuous learning. PMID:15551998

Spiri, Wilza Carla; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

2004-09-01

164

[Cancers of the thyroid. Value of a regional registry on 627 patients diagnosed, treated and followed by a multidisciplinary team].  

PubMed

Since 1966, data from 1536 patients with a thyroid carcinoma, living in the French region Champagne-Ardenne, a geographical area with 1,350,000 inhabitants were registered. The creation of a multidisciplinary group and the involvement of the general practitioners, allowed us to reach an exhaustive and continued registration process for the French administrative area of Marne and Ardennes (855,000 inhibitants, 627 patients). The sex-ratio F/M was 3.8 and the median ages were respectively equal to 46 [10-93] and 52 [13-82] in females and males. In the age groups 10-14 and 15-19, 3 cases and 13 cases were respectively registered. An history of external irradiation was noted in 2.9% of the patients. The study of the incidence around the Chooz nuclear plant (Ardennes) did not show an increase of the risk. For the French administrative area Marne and Ardennes, for the period 1975-1979, the incidence rates, standardized on the European population, were equal to 1.75/100,000 in males (SD = 0.15) and 6.38/100,000 (SD = 0.29) in females. These values among the highest from the data published by the other European registries should be explained by a more intensive diagnosis procedure and an improvement in the accuracy of histological diagnosis. An increase of the incidence rate was observed between the periods 1975-1983 and 1984-1992 from 1.04 to 2.05/100,000 and 4.99 to 6.39/100,000 in males and females respectively. This was associated with changes in clinical and histological features and an improvement in survival curves. For patients under the age of 19, we have compared both periods before and after the accident of Chernobyl. The incidence rates increased from 0.13 to 0.45/100,000 and 0.49 to 1.81/100,000 in the age groups 10-14 and 15-19 respectively. This change was at the order of magnitude to this observed in our adults population. We did not found the histological aggressiveness which characterized the Chernobyl-induced thyroid cancer in children. The knowledge of the significant prognostic factors determined by multifactorial analyses is a major foundation of our therapeutic strategy. PMID:8734288

Delisle, M J; Schvartz, C; Theobald, S; Maes, B; Vaudrey, C; Pochart, J M

1996-01-01

165

Multidisciplinary Concurrent Design Optimization via the Internet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A methodology is presented which uses commercial design and analysis software and the Internet to perform concurrent multidisciplinary optimization. The methodology provides a means to develop multidisciplinary designs without requiring that all software be accessible from the same local network. The procedures are amenable to design and development teams whose members, expertise and respective software are not geographically located together. This methodology facilitates multidisciplinary teams working concurrently on a design problem of common interest. Partition of design software to different machines allows each constituent software to be used on the machine that provides the most economy and efficiency. The methodology is demonstrated on the concurrent design of a spacecraft structure and attitude control system. Results are compared to those derived from performing the design with an autonomous FORTRAN program.

Woodard, Stanley E.; Kelkar, Atul G.; Koganti, Gopichand

2001-01-01

166

Examining Collaboration on Interdisciplinary Sport Science Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The attainment of optimal sport performance,has become increasingly scientific and requires sport scientists to collaborate on training programs in order totake a holistic view of performance (Cherebetiu, 1980; Patrick, 2001). Collaborative approaches range from multidisciplinary teams - where sport scientists work with athletes in a singular fashion (Reid, Stewart, & Thorne, 2004; Thomas, 2001), to interdisciplinary teams - where

Lisa J. Rogerson; William B. Strean

167

Multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary Educational models and nursing education.  

PubMed

In an effort to prepare health care professionals for the team-based work environment that exists in health care delivery systems today, some nursing faculty may consider collaborative, team-taught courses that integrate faculty and students from various disciplines. To assist nursing faculty in making an informed decision about integrated curriculum development and course implementation, multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary educational teams are defined. Examples are offered that reflect these three integrated educational team models. Finally, the benefits and potential problem areas that result from team initiatives are briefly reviewed. PMID:14528864

Dyer, Jean A

2003-01-01

168

Team-level flexibility, work-home spillover, and health behavior  

PubMed Central

Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline.

Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

2013-01-01

169

Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (UseIT): Preparing Students for the Twenty-First Century Work Force via a Multidisciplinary and Collaborative Learning Experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

UseIT is one of the three undergraduate research programs sponsored by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). The program allows students to work in multi-disciplinary collaborative teams to tackle a scientific “Grand Challenge.” The topic varies each year but it always entails performing computer science research that is needed by earthquake scientists, educators, and other target audiences. The program allows undergraduates to use the advanced tools of information technology to solve important problems in interdisciplinary earthquake research. Since the program began in 2002, 145 students have participated in UseIT. The program stresses problem solving and interdisciplinary cross training. A key aspect of the UseIT program is its flexible, yet structured, team approach. Students share their diverse skills and interests, creating a powerful synergy through this peer mentoring. The majority of UseIT interns have considerable computer science skill or aptitude, but successful UseIT interns have hailed from nearly three-dozen disciplines, all class levels, and all skill levels. Successful UseIT interns have in common a willingness to step outside their comfort zones and try new things. During the 2009 internship the focus of the program was to deliver SCEC Virtual Display of Objects (VDO) images and animations of faults and earthquake sequences to SCEC, the Earthquake Country Alliance, and other virtual organizations via a content management system that captures the metadata and guides the user. SCEC-VDO is the SCEC intern-developed visualization software that allows the user to see earthquake related phenomena in three and four dimensions. The 2009 Grand Challenge had special relevance for the interns because the products they created were used for The Great California ShakeOut. This talk will discuss lessons learned from this program, how it addresses the needs of the 21st century STEM work force, and highlights of the 2009 internship.

Degroot, R. M.; Jordan, T. H.; Benthien, M. L.; Ihrig, M.; Berti, R.

2009-12-01

170

A learning curve-based method to implement multifunctional work teams in the Brazilian footwear sector.  

PubMed

This paper presents a method for implementing multifunctional work teams in a footwear company that followed the Taylor/Ford system for decades. The suggested framework first applies a Learning Curve (LC) modeling to assess whether rotation between tasks of different complexities affects workers' learning rate and performance. Next, the Macroergonomic Work Analysis (MA) method (Guimarães, 1999, 2009) introduces multifunctional principles in work teams towards workers' training and resources improvement. When applied to a pilot line consisting of 100 workers, the intervention-reduced work related accidents in 80%, absenteeism in 45.65%, and eliminated work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), medical consultations, and turnover. Further, the output rate of the multifunctional team increased average 3% compared to the production rate of the regular lines following the Taylor/Ford system (with the same shoe model being manufactured), while the rework and spoilage rates were reduced 85% and 69%, respectively. PMID:21907970

Guimarães, L B de M; Anzanello, M J; Renner, J S

2012-05-01

171

[Culture and cultural gaps in work teams: implications for organisational commitment].  

PubMed

Some theoreticians of organisational commitment have proposed that culture is an important determinant of organisational commitment. Nevertheless, very few studies have examined the role that work teams culture (subculture) and their cultural gaps play in commitment. This study is an attempt to overcome this lack. Using a sample of 375 work teams from various public and private organisations, it was found that the results confirmed our proposals. Cultural gaps were negatively related to commitment; the teams subculture was positively related to commitment, and more highly to commitment to values than to commitment to continuing. Contrary to the results of other studies, the demographic variables (age, time on the team, time in the company) were not significant, except that educational level was related to the commitment to continue. The implications of these results are analysed. PMID:17425891

Sánchez, José C; Lanero, Ana; Yurrebaso, Amaia; Tejero, Blanca

2007-05-01

172

The impact of subgroup type and subgroup configurational properties on work team performance.  

PubMed

Scholars have invoked subgroups in a number of theories related to teams, yet certain tensions in the literature remain unresolved. In this article, we address 2 of these tensions, both relating to how subgroups are configured in work teams: (a) whether teams perform better with a greater number of subgroups and (b) whether teams perform better when they have imbalanced subgroups (majorities and minorities are present) or balanced subgroups (subgroups are of equal size). We predict that the impact of the number and balance of subgroups depends on the type of subgroup-whether subgroups are formed according to social identity (i.e., identity-based subgroups) or information processing (i.e., knowledge-based subgroups). We first propose that teams are more adversely affected by 2 identity-based subgroups than by any other number, yet the uniquely negative impact of a 2-subgroup configuration is not apparent for knowledge-based subgroups. Instead, a larger number of knowledge-based subgroups is beneficial for performance, such that 2 subgroups is worse for performance when compared with 3 or more subgroups but better for performance when compared with no subgroups or 1 subgroup. Second, we argue that teams perform better when identity-based subgroups are imbalanced yet knowledge-based subgroups are balanced. We also suggest that there are interactive effects between the number and balance of subgroups-however, the nature of this interaction depends on the type of subgroup. To test these predictions, we developed and validated an algorithm that measures the configurational properties of subgroups in organizational work teams. Results of a field study of 326 work teams from a multinational organization support our predictions. PMID:23915429

Carton, Andrew M; Cummings, Jonathon N

2013-09-01

173

Back to work: evaluation of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program with emphasis on mental symptoms; A two-year follow up  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this investigation was to analyze temporal changes in anxiety, depression, and stress in patients with musculoskeletal pain for a period of up to 2 years after a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program, in relation to sick-listing (registered with The Swedish Social Insurance Agency [Forsakringskassan] for sickness benefit). Methods Ten persons with full-time sick leave (absence from work for medical reasons) (group 1) and 49 with part-time or no sick leave (group 2) at the end of the 2-year study period participated. It was shown in a previous study that group 1 had higher pain rating and higher subjective physical disability than group 2, with little or no improvement during and after rehabilitation. In the present study, all participants were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale and a self-rated stress test. Results Participants with full-time sick leave during the study period (group 1) showed improved stress levels but no change in anxiety and depression levels. Anxiety, depression, and stress changed more favorably in participants with part-time or no sick leave than in those with full-time sick leave. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that investigation and appropriate treatment of psychological symptoms, including anxiety and depression, are important in multidisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with musculoskeletal disorders.

Sjostrom, Rita; Asplund, Ragnar; Alricsson, Marie

2012-01-01

174

Multidisciplinary approaches to climate change questions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Multidisciplinary approaches are required to address the complex environmental problems of our time. Solutions to climate change problems are good examples of situations requiring complex syntheses of ideas from a vast set of disciplines including science, engineering, social science, and the humanities. Unfortunately, most ecologists have narrow training, and are not equipped to bring their environmental skills to the table with interdisciplinary teams to help solve multidisciplinary problems. To address this problem, new graduate training programs and workshops sponsored by various organizations are providing opportunities for scientists and others to learn to work together in multidisciplinary teams. Two examples of training in multidisciplinary thinking include those organized by the Santa Fe Institute and Dahlem Workshops. In addition, many interdisciplinary programs have had successes in providing insight into climate change problems including the International Panel on Climate Change, the Joint North American Carbon Program, the National Academy of Science Research Grand Challenges Initiatives, and the National Academy of Science. These programs and initiatives have had some notable success in outlining some of the problems and solutions to climate change. Scientists who can offer their specialized expertise to interdisciplinary teams will be more successful in helping to solve the complex problems related to climate change.

Middleton, Beth A.

2011-01-01

175

Effective Team Support: From Task and Cognitive Modeling to Software Agents for Time-Critical Complex Work Environments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in completing a system for empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support a team's tasks, and in running experiments for the collection of baseline data.

Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie E.; Sycara, Katia

2005-01-01

176

Realisation of Strategic Leadership in Leadership Teams' Work as Experienced by the Leadership Team Members of Basic Education Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces a quantitative research into how the leadership team members of 49 basic education schools in the city of Vantaa, Finland, experienced the realisation of strategic leadership in their leadership teams' work. The data were collected by a survey of 24 statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, and analysed with the…

Lahtero, Tapio Juhani; Kuusilehto-Awale, Lea

2013-01-01

177

A multidisciplinary approach to the prevention, evaluation, and management of work disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational musculoskeletal disorders represent a major challenge to the injured worker, his or her family, the various health care, health and safety, and human resource professionals that work in this area as well as employers and the workers' compensation system. The epidemiology of the occupational musculoskeletal disorders and work disability indicate the problem is growing. Given the multiple factors that

Michael Feuerstein

1991-01-01

178

What roles do team climate, roster control, and work life conflict play in shiftworkers' fatigue longitudinally?  

PubMed

The study aimed to examine shiftworkers fatigue and the longitudinal relationships that impact on fatigue such as team climate, work life conflict, control of shifts and shift type in shift working nurses. We used a quantitative survey methodology and analysed data with a moderated hierarchical multiple regression. After matching across two time periods 18 months apart, the sample consisted of 166 nurses from one Australian hospital. Of these nurses, 61 worked two rotating day shifts (morning & afternoon/evening) and 105 were rotating shiftworkers who worked three shifts (morning afternoon/evening and nights). The findings suggest that control over shift scheduling can have significant effects on fatigue for both two-shift and three-shift workers. A significant negative relationship between positive team climate and fatigue was moderated by shift type. At both Time 1 and Time 2, work life conflict was the strongest predictor of concurrent fatigue, but over time it was not. PMID:24210672

Pisarski, Anne; Barbour, Jennifer P

2014-05-01

179

The Link between Self-Managed Work Teams and Learning Organisations Using Performance Indicators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both the learning organization literature and the self-managed work team literature have alluded to the potential links between teamwork and learning. However, as yet the link between these two concepts remains undeveloped. This study uses a survey of a random sample of 200 Australian organizations to empirically examine the relationships between…

Power, Joe; Waddell, Di

2004-01-01

180

Minutes of TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team Meeting and Ocean Tides Workshop  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This third TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team meeting was held on December 4, 1994 to review progress in defining ocean tide models, precision Earth orbits, and various science algorithms. A related workshop on ocean tides convened to select the best models to be used by scientists in the Geophysical Data Records.

Fu, Lee-Lueng (editor)

1995-01-01

181

The Supervisor as a Facilitator of Informal Learning in Work Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Supervisors who are effective facilitators use their own learning and interpersonal skills to encourage informal learning in work teams. Use of facilitation skills can be inhibited by lack of organizational support and reluctance to change power relationships. (Contains 66 references.) (SK)

Macneil, Christina

2001-01-01

182

Creativity and Creative Teams.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodyna...

R. M. Wood S. X. S. Bauer C. A. Hunter

2001-01-01

183

[The nursing team and Maslow: (dis)satisfaction in the work].  

PubMed

This text tries to understand the Nursing team and their (dis)satisfactions in the work. We consider the association with the theory of basic human needs of Abraham Maslow as a way to systemize and to comprehend the recurrent situations and the day-by-day Nursing issues. The necessities are structuralized hierarchically in physiological, security, social, auto-esteem and auto-accomplishment indicating the degree of satisfaction (from the disease to the fullness) of an individual or group. The advantage of this approach consists of being able to use the solid, depth and rich Maslow theory in concrete and particular situations of the Nursing team. PMID:17340737

Vitória Regis, Lorena Fagundes Ladeia; Porto, Isaura Setenta

2006-01-01

184

A Multidisciplinary Engineering Summer School in an Industrial Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most university-level engineering studies produce technically skilled engineers. However, typically students face several difficulties when working in multidisciplinary teams when they initiate their industrial careers. In a globalised world, it becomes increasingly important that engineers are capable of collaborating across disciplinary…

Larsen, Peter Gorm; Fernandes, Joao M.; Habel, Jacek; Lehrskov, Hanne; Vos, Richard J. C.; Wallington, Oliver; Zidek, Jan

2009-01-01

185

An Evidence-Based Multidisciplinary Practice Guideline to Reduce the Workload due to Lifting for Preventing Work-Related Low Back Pain  

PubMed Central

We developed an evidence-based practice guideline to support occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals in assessing the risk due to lifting and in selecting effective preventive measures for low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. The guideline was developed at the request of the Dutch government by a project team of experts and OSH professionals in lifting and work-related LBP. The recommendations for risk assessment were based on the quality of instruments to assess the risk on LBP due to lifting. Recommendations for interventions were based on a systematic review of the effects of worker- and work directed interventions to reduce back load due to lifting. The quality of the evidence was rated as strong (A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on consensus (D). Finally, eight experts and twenty-four OSH professionals commented on and evaluated the content and the feasibility of the preliminary guideline. For risk assessment we recommend loads heavier than 25 kg always to be considered a risk for LBP while loads less than 3 kg do not pose a risk. For loads between 3–25 kg, risk assessment shall be performed using the Manual handling Assessment Charts (MAC)-Tool or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) lifting equation. Effective work oriented interventions are patient lifting devices (Level A) and lifting devices for goods (Level C), optimizing working height (Level A) and reducing load mass (Level C). Ineffective work oriented preventive measures are regulations to ban lifting without proper alternatives (Level D). We do not recommend worker-oriented interventions but consider personal lift assist devices as promising (Level C). Ineffective worker-oriented preventive measures are training in lifting technique (Level A), use of back-belts (Level A) and pre-employment medical examinations (Level A). This multidisciplinary evidence-based practice guideline gives clear criteria whether an employee is at risk for LBP while lifting and provides an easy-reference for (in)effective risk reduction measures based on scientific evidence, experience, and consensus among OSH experts and practitioners.

2014-01-01

186

Making contracting work better and cost less: Report of the Contract Reform Team  

SciTech Connect

In June 1993, Secretary of Energy Hazel O`Leary formed a Contract Reform Team, chaired by Deputy Secretary Bill White, to evaluate the contracting practices of the Department of Energy and to formulate specific proposals for improving those practices. This report summarizes the results of the work of the Contract Reform Team. It recommends actions for implementation that will significantly improve the Department`s contracting practices and will enable the Department to help create a government that -- in the words of Vice President Gore -- {open_quotes}works better and costs less.{close_quotes} These actions and the deadlines for their implementation are listed. Among other things, they recommend replacing the Department`s standard Management and Operating Contract with a new Performance-Based Management Contract and strengthening the Department`s systems for selecting and managing contractors.

Not Available

1994-02-01

187

Creativity and Creative Teams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A review of the linkage between knowledge, creativity, and design is presented and related to the best practices of multidisciplinary design teams. The discussion related to design and design teams is presented in the context of both the complete aerodynamic design community and specifically the work environment at the NASA Langley Research Center. To explore ways to introduce knowledge and creativity into the research and design environment at NASA Langley Research Center a creative design activity was executed within the context of a national product development activity. The success of the creative design team activity gave rise to a need to communicate the experience in a straightforward and managed approach. As a result the concept of creative potential its formulated and assessed with a survey of a small portion of the aeronautics research staff at NASA Langley Research Center. The final section of the paper provides recommendations for future creative organizations and work environments.

Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Hunter, Craig A.

2001-01-01

188

Empowering certified nurse's aides to improve quality of work life through a team communication program.  

PubMed

The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the impact of a certified nurse's aide (CNA)-led interdisciplinary teamwork and communication intervention on perceived quality of work environment and six-month job intentions. CNAs are frequently excluded from team communication and decision-making, which often leads to job dissatisfaction with high levels of staff turnover. Using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach with pre- post-program design, the intervention utilized the strategy of debriefing from the national patient safety initiative, TeamSTEPPS. Inherent in the program design, entitled Long Term Care (LTC) Team Talk, was the involvement of the CNAs in the development of the intervention as an empowering process on two wings of a transitional care unit in a long-term care facility in upstate NY. CNAs' perceptions of work environment quality were measured using a Quality of Work Life (QWL) instrument. Additionally, job turnover intent within six months was assessed. Results indicated improved scores on nearly all QWL subscales anticipated to be impacted, and enhanced perceived empowerment of the CNAs on each wing albeit through somewhat different experiential processes. The program is highly portable and can potentially be implemented in a variety of long-term care settings. PMID:24314742

Howe, Erin E

2014-01-01

189

Multidisciplinary Computational Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this work is to develop advanced multidisciplinary numerical simulation capabilities for aerospace vehicles with emphasis on highly accurate, massively parallel computational methods for Direct and Large- Eddy simulation of turbulence, flow...

M. R. Visbal

2006-01-01

190

A multidisciplinary intervention to facilitate return to work in cancer patients: intervention protocol and design of a feasibility study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Returning to work can be problematic for cancer survivors due to suboptimal workplace support, a heavy workload, decreased physical functioning and fatigue. The timely and permanent return to work (RtW) of cancer patients favourably influences quality of life and economic independence. Multidisciplinary interventions aimed at timely and enduring RtW are lacking. The objectives of this article are (1) to describe the protocol of an intervention aimed at RtW of cancer patients, comprising of counselling by an oncological occupational physician and supervised physical exercise in a clinical setting during treatment and (2) to present the design of the study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of this intervention. Methods and analysis The intervention comprises three counselling sessions with an oncological occupational physician and a 12-week moderate-to-high intensity physical exercise programme, starting at the onset of chemotherapy. The intervention is aimed at cancer patients treated with curative intent, aged 18–60 years, employed and on sick leave. It will take place in two large medical centres in the Netherlands. The feasibility of the intervention will be evaluated as follows: the number of sessions, topics discussed and exercises executed will be registered by care providers; patients' and care providers' opinions will be assessed by questionnaires and interviews, respectively; and the proportion of invited patients that participated will be calculated. Ethics and dissemination The study results will be used for optimising the intervention content and may serve as a foundation for future implementation. The Medical Ethics Committees of the Academic Medical Center and the participating medical centres approved the study protocol.

de Boer, Angela G E M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

2012-01-01

191

Experiences of a health team working in a new urban settlement area in Istanbul.  

PubMed

A project aiming at creating a model for comprehensive maternal and child health care for urban underdeveloped areas was started in a new settlement area of migrants in the vicinity of Istanbul. The project had an impact on health care status, particularly among infants and children, but the results indicated that more effort was needed to reach the mothers. It was noted that building space and the appearance of the work place influenced the prestige of the team. Absentee problems could be partly surmounted by repeated home visits. Based on this experience, it was concluded that health services in underdeveloped areas need to be supported by non medical personnel to act as home visitors and as mediators between the community and the health team. It was also concluded that an established recording system to include both clinical data and attendance is needed to define the cases who need special care. PMID:1955576

Bulut, A; Uzel, N; Kutluay, T; Neyzi, O

1991-10-01

192

Designing Teams for First-of-a-Kind, Complex Systems Using the Initial Phases of Cognitive Work Analysis: Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a technique for team design based on cognitive work analysis (CWA). We first develop a rationale for this technique by discussing the limitations of conventional approaches for team design in light of the special characteristics of first-of-a-kind, complex systems. We then introduce the CWA-based technique for team design and provide a case study of how we used this

Neelam Naikar; Brett Pearce; Dominic Drumm; Penelope M. Sanderson

2003-01-01

193

An Organisational Climate Awareness Toolkit For Nurturing The Effectiveness of Team\\/Group Interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of innovative systems solutions for complex problems remains a challenge. To be able to develop modern information systems, we must include the use of multi-disciplinary teams, such as technical and non-technical specialists. Team members must work together and IS professionals can no longer work independently to design their own information system, but instead need to carefully include the

Shushma Patel; Dilip Patel

194

Exploring core competencies for mental health and addictions work within a Family Health Team setting  

PubMed Central

Approximately 200 Family Health Teams (FHTs) have been implemented in Ontario to improve access to primary healthcare, including mental health and addiction. The objectives of this project were to examine, through a focus group and qualitative methodology with three FHTs, the profile of patients' mental health and addiction-related needs and to identify the implications for the development of core competencies in these innovative organisations. A spectrum of needs and service trajectories was identified, as well as the importance of a wide range of clinical skills and knowledge. The results indicate that ‘core’ competencies for mental health work in the context of an FHT go well beyond those required for an embedded mental health ‘programme’ or specialised mental health counsellors, but rather they relate to the core and discipline-specific competencies of members of the entire team. In addition to specific knowledge and skills, competencies include common attitudes and values relating to teamwork, good communication and collaboration. Challenges were noted with regard to working with some community service providers, especially addiction services. Implications for core competencies at the individual and organisational level were identified.

2013-01-01

195

Thriving in Multidisciplinary Research: Advice for New Bioinformatics Students  

PubMed Central

The sciences have seen a large increase in demand for students in bioinformatics and multidisciplinary fields in general. Many new educational programs have been created to satisfy this demand, but navigating these programs requires a non-traditional outlook and emphasizes working in teams of individuals with distinct yet complementary skill sets. Written from the perspective of a current bioinformatics student, this article seeks to offer advice to prospective and current students in bioinformatics regarding what to expect in their educational program, how multidisciplinary fields differ from more traditional paths, and decisions that they will face on the road to becoming successful, productive bioinformaticists.

Auerbach, Raymond K.

2012-01-01

196

Effectiveness of a multidisciplinary care program on recovery and return to work of patients after gynaecological surgery; design of a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Return to work after gynaecological surgery takes much longer than expected, irrespective of the level of invasiveness. In order to empower patients in recovery and return to work, a multidisciplinary care program consisting of an e-health intervention and integrated care management including participatory workplace intervention was developed. Methods/Design We designed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of the multidisciplinary care program on full sustainable return to work in patients after gynaecological surgery, compared to usual clinical care. Two hundred twelve women (18-65 years old) undergoing hysterectomy and/or laparoscopic adnexal surgery on benign indication in one of the 7 participating (university) hospitals in the Netherlands are expected to take part in this study at baseline. The primary outcome measure is sick leave duration until full sustainable return to work and is measured by a monthly calendar of sickness absence during 26 weeks after surgery. Secondary outcome measures are the effect of the care program on general recovery, quality of life, pain intensity and complications, and are assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 2, 6, 12 and 26 weeks after surgery. Discussion The discrepancy between expected physical recovery and actual return to work after gynaecological surgery contributes to the relevance of this study. There is strong evidence that long periods of sick leave can result in work disability, poorer general health and increased risk of mental health problems. We expect that this multidisciplinary care program will improve peri-operative care, contribute to a faster return to work of patients after gynaecological surgery and, as a consequence, will reduce societal costs considerably. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2087

2012-01-01

197

Working Together for Safety: A State Team Approach to Preventing Occupational Injuries in Young People  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes the Northeast Young Worker Resource Center. It begins with two case studies that demonstrate the value of the State team approach. The remainder of the document describes the experiences and activities of the State teams in the Northeast; the products developed by the teams for teens, parents, employers, school staff, health…

Posner, Marc

2005-01-01

198

Roundtable Concerning Teaching in Educational Administration: Organizing, Leading and Monitoring Effective Work Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides data from students in an educational administration class on use of teaming and collaboration to research educational problems. The instructor taught group dynamics and modeled the process of facilitating and developing collaboration in teams. Classes were offered in 3-1/2 hour sessions for 5 weeks. Various team-building…

McCabe, Donna Hagen

199

Power and the Production of Knowledge: Collective Team Learning in Work Organizations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents findings of a study that examined the relationship between the outcome of collective team learning and the extent of differences in power that team members have available to them. This successful outcome is defined as the production of new knowledge. The study examined four teams in the research and development department of a…

Brooks, Annie

200

Drawing inspiration from different sources, teams work to build an environmentally sound car  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

100 Years after the Ford Model T, what does the future hold for our cars?http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/technology/technology.html?in_article_id=506493&in_page_id=1965Automotive X Prizehttp://auto.xprize.org/Howstuffworks: "How Electric Cars Work" [Macromedia Flash Player]http://auto.howstuffworks.com/electric-car.htmAptera [Macromedia Flash Player]http://www.aptera.com/Classic Car Commercialshttp://www.tvparty.com/vaultcomm.htmlWalkable Communities [pdf]http://www.walkable.org/Americans love their automobiles, and the quickly expanding ranks of the middle-class in India and China feel the same way about this particular form of transportation. Unfortunately, the majority of cars produced around the world are still powered by variations on the internal combustion engine, which has had some rather deleterious effects on the environment. In recent months, journalists and engineers have been paying more attention to groups of innovators around the country who are competing to build a 100-mile-per-gallon car. Some of these groups hope to enter their car in the running for the Automotive X Prize, which will award $10 million to the team that both builds this car and then wins a race against other green vehicles. All of the successful entries must produce less than 200 grams of greenhouse gases per mile, get at least 100 miles per gallon, and also be economically viable, which might be the hardest part of this challenge. "If we do this right, we're going to draw a line in the sand and say all the cars we drove before this date are relegated to the history museums", notes Peter Diamandis, Founder and Chairman of the X Prize Foundation. Interest from large traditional auto manufacturers in the contest has been minimal, but teams from downstate Illinois to central California continue to look forward to 2009, when the remainder of the qualifying races will be held. The first link offered here will take users to a nice piece from the December 2007 edition of Wired Magazine. Along with learning about the Automotive X Prize, they can find out more about the teams working on this project. The second link leads to an article from this Sunday's Daily Mail by Michael Hanlon that delves into the past, present, and future of automotive technology. Moving on, the third link will whisk visitors away to the homepage of the Automotive X Prize. Here, visitors can learn about the competition, read their weblog, and read a bit more about their other activities. The fourth link will take users to a video-enhanced site that will teach interested parties how electric cars work. The fifth link leads to the homepage of Aptera, which is one of the companies working on making a fuel-efficient vehicle. For those who might be longing for a bit of old-school automotive history, the sixth link provides a selection of commercials for such legendary vehicles as the 1957 Plymouth Sport Suburban and the 1965 VW Bug. And finally, for those who are interested in creating and living in pedestrian friendly places, the last link provides access to resources for doing just that.

2008-01-01

201

Designing Multidisciplinary Integrated Curriculum Units  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The term "integrated curriculum" has many different, sometimes conflicting, meanings to educators. In this manual, integrated curriculum refers to the materials and pedagogical strategies used by "multidisciplinary" teams of teachers to organize their instruction so that students are encouraged to make meaningful connections across subject areas.…

Clayton, Marla; Hagan, Jill; Ho, Pier Sun; Hudis, Paula M.

2010-01-01

202

The child psychotherapist and multi-disciplinary assessments for the family courts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on the contribution child psychotherapists can make to assessments for the family courts. It arises out of work undertaken as a member of a multi-disciplinary team in a small specialist family centre. The paper illustrates the way in which detailed observation and psychoanalytic thinking are used in the assessment of parent-child relationships. The paper seeks to highlight

Biddy Youell

2002-01-01

203

Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.  

PubMed

Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n?=?357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. PMID:22962847

Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

2013-10-01

204

Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

2013-01-01

205

Self-Directed Work Teams in a Post-Apartheid Gold Mine: Perspectives from the Rock Face.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A participant-observation study in a South African mining company that used self directed work team training identified organizational constraints that hindered training effectiveness: lack of materials, machinery breakdown, decentralized budget, and imposed standards. Miners more often used improvisation and initiative to solve daily problems,…

Phatkathi, Timothy Sizwe

2002-01-01

206

Consideration of the virtual team work and disabled citizens, as promising opportunity providers for the e government infrastructure's formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Information area has revolutionized the workplace. Douglas Kruse, a professor of human resources and the director of the program for disability research at Rutgers University, states that 7% of employed persons with disabilities work 20 hours or more a week from home. While some modern countries have established “virtual teams”, which are said to be comprised of people who

Mohammad Ali Shafia; Nader Ale Ebrahim; Shamsuddin Ahmed; Zahari Taha

207

Implementation of Multidisciplinary Documentation Tools in an Acute Care Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

A team of health care professionals from various disciplines was formed to create a multidisciplinary (MDS) documentation system in an acute care setting. The goals of the team were to increase early participation into the care of patients and to standardize documentation. A “Multidisciplinary Admission Assessment” (MAA) was developed and included medical nutrition therapy, rehabilitation therapies (physical, occupational & speech),

C. M. Vinci; G. Emerson; R. Landreneau; K. Clair; G. Lipscomb; G. Sutton; S. Livingston

1998-01-01

208

Working with young athletes: views of a nutritionist on the sports medicine team.  

PubMed

Athletes are influenced by coaches, other athletes, media, parents, the national sport governing body, members of the sports medicine team, and the athlete's own desire for success. It is impossible, therefore, for one member of the sports medicine team to unilaterally determine workable solutions that enhance performance and diminish health problems in an athlete. A focus on ensuring that the athlete can perform to the best of her ability is a key to encouraging discussion between the nutritionist, athlete, and coach. Using the assumption that health and top athletic performance are compatible, this focus on performance provides a discussion point that all parties can agree to and, if approached properly, also fulfills the nutritionist's goal of achieving optimal nutritional status. Membership on the sports medicine team mandates that the nutritionist know the paradigms and health risks associated with the sport and develop assessment and feedback procedures specific to the athlete's needs. PMID:8744784

Benardot, D

1996-06-01

209

Successful Group Work: Using Cooperative Learning and Team-Based Learning in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research study examined student perceptions of group experiences in the classroom. The author used cooperative learning and team-based learning to focus on three characteristics that are critical for the success of groups: structure of activities, relationships of group members, and accountability of group members. Results indicated that…

Grant-Vallone, E. J.

2011-01-01

210

Tales from the Frontline: The Experiences of Early Childhood Practitioners Working with an "Embedded" Research Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In late 2006, SDN Children's Services, an Australian not-for-profit provider of services for children, families and communities, engaged a research team that was "embedded" within the organisation for 1 year. This action represented a significant investment of resources, such as staff time and organisational funds, and demonstrates SDN's strong…

Wong, Sandie

2009-01-01

211

A multidisciplinary approach to understanding developmental dyslexia within working-memory architecture: genotypes, phenotypes, brain, and instruction.  

PubMed

A unifying theoretical framework of three working memory components provides a systems perspective for discussing past and new findings in a 12-year research program that point to heterogeneity in the genetic and brain basis and behavioral expression of dyslexia: (a) codes for word-form storage and processing, (b) time-sensitive phonological and orthographic loops for maintaining information in working memory or outputting it, and (c) executive functions for language (e.g., rapid automatic switching of attention). Results, which span the genetic to neurological to behavioral levels of analysis, point to possible impairment in any one or combination of these working memory components in individuals with dyslexia. A DNA variation on chromosome 15 may be linked with the phonological word-form in the first working-memory component. A DNA variation on chromosome 6 may be linked with slow rapid automatic switching, inattention ratings, and impaired goal-directed activity ratings in the third working-memory component. Brain and behavioral findings support (a) Triple Word Form Theory: phonological, orthographic, and morphological word-forms and their parts contribute to learning to read and spell words; and (b) Cross-Word Form Mapping: in the process of learning to read and spell words children compute the inter-relationships among the three word-forms and their parts. However, children with dyslexia may require more focus on the morphological word-form and its parts and their relationships with the other two word-forms and their parts than do normal readers. Also, children with dyslexia have unusual difficulties in sustaining phonological loop function in working memory over time; their impaired orthographic loop function may interfere with learning to write alphabet letters and spell, which may be as impaired as word decoding and reading. Impaired executive functions may interfere with the efficiency of working memory in processing oral and written language. PMID:19005912

Berninger, Virginia W; Raskind, Wendy; Richards, Todd; Abbott, Robert; Stock, Pat

2008-01-01

212

American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: implications for social work.  

PubMed

When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to produce the "Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases" to promote the exceptional competence and diligence required when the consequence is life or death. This article summarizes the "Supplementary Guidelines," with implications for social work practice--that is, professional responsibility, competence, interviewing skill, knowledge of behavioral and mental impairment, records review, life history compilation, data interpretation, witness support, law-related knowledge, and testimony. The social work, which is scrutinized in a court of law, requires cultural competence, diverse oral and written communication skills, diligence, and the highest ethical standards. PMID:23038877

Andrews, Arlene Bowers

2012-04-01

213

Multidisciplinary work on barium contamination of the karstic upper Kupa River drainage basin (Croatia and Slovenia); calling for watershed management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work was designed as an extension of a previous study of a barium anomaly observed in stream sediments of the\\u000a Kupa River. In its upper part the Kupa River drains a region underlain by a trans-boundary aquifer. The river is a significant\\u000a water resource in a region of tourism, sport, and fishing in both Croatia and Slovenia. The

S. Fran?iškovi?-Bilinski; H. Bilinski; R. Grbac; J. Žuni?; M. Ne?emer; D. Hanžel

2007-01-01

214

Halitosis: the multidisciplinary approach  

PubMed Central

Halitosis, bad breath or oral malodour are all synonyms for the same pathology. Halitosis has a large social and economic impact. For the majority of patients suffering from bad breath, it causes embarrassment and affects their social communication and life. Moreover, halitosis can be indicative of underlying diseases. Only a limited number of scientific publications were presented in this field until 1995. Ever since, a large amount of research is published, often with lack of evidence. In general, intraoral conditions, like insufficient dental hygiene, periodontitis or tongue coating are considered to be the most important cause (85%) for halitosis. Therefore, dentists and periodontologists are the first-line professionals to be confronted with this problem. They should be well aware of the origin, the detection and especially of the treatment of this pathology. In addition, ear–nose–throat-associated (10%) or gastrointestinal/endocrinological (5%) disorders may contribute to the problem. In the case of halitophobia, psychiatrical or psychological problems may be present. Bad breath needs a multidisciplinary team approach: dentists, periodontologists, specialists in family medicine, ear–nose–throat surgeons, internal medicine and psychiatry need to be updated in this field, which still is surrounded by a large taboo. Multidisciplinary bad breath clinics offer the best environment to examine and treat this pathology that affects around 25% of the whole population. This article describes the origin, detection and treatment of halitosis, regarded from the different etiological origins.

Bollen, Curd ML; Beikler, Thomas

2012-01-01

215

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report  

SciTech Connect

This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

NONE

1994-09-01

216

Study protocol of effectiveness of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-speficic sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Non-specific low back pain is a common cause for consultation with the general practitioner, generating increased health and social costs. This study will analyse the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention to reduce disability, severity of pain, anxiety and depression, to improve quality of life and to reduce the incidence of chronic low back pain in the working population with

Teresa Rodriguez-Blanco; Isabel Fernández-San-Martin; Montserrat Balagué-Corbella; Anna Berenguera; Jenny Moix; Elena Montiel-Morillo; Esther Núñez-Juárez; Maria J González-Moneo; Magda Pie-Oncins; Raquel Martín-Peñacoba; Mercè Roura-Olivan; Montse Núñez-Juárez; Enriqueta Pujol-Ribera

2010-01-01

217

Empowerment, span of control, and safety performance in work teams after workforce reduction.  

PubMed

Relationships of empowerment and span of control with 2 safety measures (unsafe behaviors and accidents) were investigated among 24 workgroups comprising 531 employees of a large chemical company in 3 U.S. states. The company recently implemented a reengineering process. Data were from an anonymous survey (unsafe behaviors), company records (accidents, span of control), and trained expert raters (empowerment). Span of control (positively) and level of empowerment (negatively) correlated with both measures of poor safety performance, but only empowerment predicted unique variance in safety criteria. Together, these structural measures predicted one third of the variance in safety measures. Structural variables such as span of control and team empowerment have been largely overlooked in past safety research but can be important. PMID:11605822

Hechanova-Alampay, R; Beehr, T A

2001-10-01

218

Industrialization of Remote Work: Is the Distributed-Team Model Slowly Melting Human Creativity and Motivation?  

Microsoft Academic Search

ICT has been the vehicle of progress for over thirty years and one of the main enablers of globalization. Early efforts in the computer supported cooperative work R&D were driven to make workers more productive. With globalization came teamwork remote distribution and the need for CSCW to refocus IT support from the distributed work perspective. This paper wants to bring

Ana C. Andrés del Valle

2010-01-01

219

Virtuoso teams.  

PubMed

Managing a traditional team seems pretty straightforward: Gather up whoever's available, give them time and space to do their jobs, and make sure they all play nicely together. But these teams produce results that are often as unremarkable as the teams themselves. When big change and high performance are required, a virtuoso team is far more likely to deliver outstanding and innovative results. Virtuoso teams are fundamentally different from the garden-variety work groups that most organizations form to pursue more modest goals. They comprise the top experts in their particular fields, are specially convened for ambitious projects, work with frenetic rhythm, and emanate a discernible energy. Not surprisingly, however, the superstars who make up these teams are renowned for being elitist, temperamental, egocentric, and difficult to work with. As a result, many managers fear that if they force such people to interact on a high-stakes project, the group just might implode. In this article, Bill Fischer and Andy Boynton put the inner workings of highly successful virtuoso teams on full display through three examples: the creative group behind West Side Story, the team of writers for Sid Caesar's 1950s-era television hit Your Show of Shows, and the high-powered technologists who averted an investor-relations crisis for Norsk Hydro, the Norwegian energy giant. Each of these teams accomplished enormous goals and changed their businesses, their customers, even their industries. And they did so by breaking all the conventional rules of collaboration--from the way they recruited the best members to the way they enforced their unusual processes, and from the high expectations they held to the exceptional results they produced. PMID:16028822

Fischer, Bill; Boynton, Andy

2005-01-01

220

Toward an open shared workspace: computer and video fusion approach of TeamWorkStation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Groupware is intended to create a shared workspace that supports dynamic collaboration in a work group over space and time constraints. To gain the collective benefits of groupware use, the groupware must be accepted by a majority of workgroup members as a common tool. Groupware must overcome the hurdle of critical mass.

Hiroshi Ishii; Naomi Miyake

1991-01-01

221

Comparison of Teachers' Understanding of Team Work According to Various Variables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

People form organizations by getting together in order to realize the goals that they might not manage to realize alone. Organizations differ from one another by various distinctive characteristics. However, their success is related to the level of goal fulfillment. People working more effectively and efficiently within the organization may create…

Gülcan, Murat Gürkan

2014-01-01

222

Establishment of heart teams in Portugal.  

PubMed

Whenever several therapeutic options exist, multidisciplinary decision-making is beneficial for the patient and for society at large. The main obstacles to the establishment of heart teams in Portugal are organizational and logistical. Implementing a heart team approach entails definition of the situations requiring multidisciplinary discussion, creation of clear lines of communication, written protocols and obtaining patient informed consent. The European Society of Cardiology guidelines define the clinical scenarios where intervention of the heart team is recommended. PMID:24462585

Sousa Uva, M; Leite Moreira, A; Gavina, C; Pereira, H; Lopes, M G

2014-01-01

223

Clinical Priorities: Strengthening Social Work Practice in Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the context of health services, decisions regarding priorities for social work intervention and, hence, the allocation of social work expertise and resources have traditionally been based on an interaction between social work knowledge, principles and skills, historical precedence, health policy, multidisciplinary team requirements, and manager opinion. In the current context of health services, traditional practices are questioned and it

Ros Giles; Susan Gould; Christopher Hart; Jennifer Swancott

2007-01-01

224

Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis for Commercial Aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multidisciplinary design and analysis (MDA) has become the normal mode of operation within most aerospace companies, but the impact of these changes have largely not been reflected at many universities. On an effort to determine if the emergence of multidisciplinary design concepts should influence engineering curricula, NASA has asked several universities (Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech, Clemson, BYU, and Cal Poly) to investigate the practicality of introducing MDA concepts within their undergraduate curricula. A multidisciplinary team of faculty, students, and industry partners evaluated the aeronautical engineering curriculum at Cal Poly. A variety of ways were found to introduce MDA themes into the curriculum without adding courses or units to the existing program. Both analytic and educational tools for multidisciplinary design of aircraft have been developed and implemented.

Cummings, Russell M.; Freeman, H. JoAnne

1999-01-01

225

A distributed system for visualizing and analyzing multivariate and multidisciplinary data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Linked Windows Interactive Data System (Link Winds) is being developed with NASA support. The objective of this proposal is to adapt and apply that system in a complex network environment containing elements to be found by scientists working multidisciplinary teams on very large scale and distributed data sets. The proposed three year program will develop specific visualization and analysis tools, to be exercised locally and remotely in the Link Winds environment, to demonstrate visual data analysis, interdisciplinary data analysis and cooperative and interactive televisualization and analysis of data by geographically separated science teams. These demonstrations will involve at least two science disciplines with the aim of producing publishable results.

Jacobson, Allan S.; Allen, Mark; Bailey, Michael; Blom, Ronald; Blume, Leo; Elson, Lee

1992-01-01

226

A distributed system for visualizing and analyzing multivariate and multidisciplinary data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

THe Linked Windows Interactive Data System (LinkWinds) is being developed with NASA support. The objective of this proposal is to adapt and apply that system in a complex network environment containing elements to be found by scientists working multidisciplinary teams on very large scale and distributed data sets. The proposed three year program will develop specific visualization and analysis tools, to be exercised locally and remotely in the LinkWinds environment, to demonstrate visual data analysis, interdisciplinary data analysis and cooperative and interactive televisualization and analysis of data by geographically separated science teams. These demonstrators will involve at least two science disciplines with the aim of producing publishable results.

Jacobson, Allan S.; Allen, Mark; Bailey, Michael; Blom, Ronald; Blume, Leo; Elson, Lee

1993-01-01

227

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

My work in the science of team science (SciTS) field has focused on developing and supporting the SciTS field, conducting studies that aim to further elucidate the processes and outcomes of team science through multi-method approaches, and advancing methods, measures, models for evaluating team science broadly and transdisciplinary team science collaborations specifically. Additionally, I work to develop tools to facilitate and mechanisms to support the conduct of transdisciplinary team science.

228

Multidisciplinary development of Belerofont Observatory.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Belerofont Astronomical Observatory in Kragujevac, inaugurated on the occasion of the appearance of Halley's comet on February 26, 1986, develops astronomical activities among pupils, university youth and people interested in cosmic phenomena. In preparing a course of astronomy and astrophysics in the physics study curriculum, the society tends toward a multidisciplinary way of work.

Babovi?, V.

1997-08-01

229

Team Cognition in Experienced Command-and-Control Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members…

Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Duran, Jasmine L.; Taylor, Amanda R.

2007-01-01

230

Speeding Up Team Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

2001-01-01

231

Relationships Among Team Ability Composition, Team Mental Models, and Team Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between the similarity and accuracy of team mental models and compared the extent to which each predicted team performance. The relationship between team ability composition and team mental models was also investigated. Eighty-three dyadic teams worked on a complex skill task in a 2-week training protocol. Results indicated that although similarity and accuracy of team

Bryan D. Edwards; Eric Anthony Day; Suzanne T. Bell

2006-01-01

232

Multidisciplinary Optimization Branch Experience Using iSIGHT Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley is investigating frameworks for supporting multidisciplinary analysis and optimization research. A framework provides software and system services to integrate computational tasks and allows the researcher to concentrate more on the application and less on the programming details. A framework also provides a common working environment and a full range of optimization tools, and so increases the productivity of multidisciplinary research teams. Finally, a framework enables staff members to develop applications for use by disciplinary experts in other organizations. This year, the MDO Branch has gained experience with the iSIGHT framework. This paper describes experiences with four aerospace applications, including: (1) reusable launch vehicle sizing, (2) aerospike nozzle design, (3) low-noise rotorcraft trajectories, and (4) acoustic liner design. Brief overviews of each problem are provided, including the number and type of disciplinary codes and computation time estimates. In addition, the optimization methods, objective functions, design variables, and constraints are described for each problem. For each case, discussions on the advantages and disadvantages of using the iSIGHT framework are provided as well as notes on the ease of use of various advanced features and suggestions for areas of improvement.

Padula, S. L.; Korte, J. J.; Dunn, H. J.; Salas, A. O.

1999-01-01

233

Multidisciplinary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer  

PubMed Central

Head and neck cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity worldwide. Multimodality treatment is often the only way to achieve improved function, quality of life, and survival, calling for a multidisciplinary team approach, particularly in view of the rapid advances being made in various fields. The roles of the head and neck surgeon and reconstructive surgeon are discussed, together with the input afforded by specialists in areas such as diagnostic imaging, radiation therapy, medical oncology, and gene therapy. Telemedicine is of importance in centers where multidisciplinary expertise is not available.

Varkey, Prashanth; Liu, Yi-Tien; Tan, Ngian Chye

2010-01-01

234

Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal t...

J. E. Flaherty K. J. Allwine

2007-01-01

235

Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management  

SciTech Connect

Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

Wiederholt, Peggy A. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: wiederholt@humonc.wisc.edu; Connor, Nadine P. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Hartig, Gregory K. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Harari, Paul M. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2007-10-01

236

Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

2003-01-01

237

Managing Complexity in Multidisciplinary Visualization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As high performance computing technology progresses, computational simulations are becoming more advanced in their capabilities. In the computational aerosciences domain, single discipline steady-state simulations computed on a single grid are far from the state-of-the-art. In their place are complex, time-dependent multidisciplinary simulations that attempt to model a given geometry more realistically. The product of these multidisciplinary simulations is a massive amount of data stored in different formats, grid topologies, units of measure, etc., as a result of the differences in the simulated physical domains. In addition to the challenges posed by setting up and performing the simulation, additional challenges exist in analyzing computational results. Visualization plays an important role in the advancement of multidisciplinary simulations. To date, visualization has been used to aid in the interpretation of large amounts of simulation data. Because the human visual system is effective in digesting a large amount of information presented graphically, visualization has helped simulation scientists to understand complex simulation results. As these simulations become even more complex, integrating several different physical domains, visualization will be critical to digest the massive amount of information. Another important role for visualization is to provide a common communication medium from which the domain scientists can use to develop, debug, and analyze their work. Multidisciplinary analyses are the next step in simulation technology, not only in computational aerosciences, but in many other areas such as global climate modeling. Visualization researchers must understand and work towards the challenges posed by multidisciplinary simulation scenarios. This paper addresses some of these challenges, describing technologies that must be investigated to create a useful visualization analysis tool for domain scientists.

Miceli, Kristina D.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

1995-01-01

238

Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams.  

PubMed

Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members control a UAV to take reconnaissance photos. Experienced teams exceeded performance of inexperienced teams, suggesting transfer of previous command-and-control experience. Compared to inexperienced teams, experienced teams had fewer errors on process-related training knowledge, superior team process ratings, and communications containing fewer coordination-related utterances. These findings support the view that team cognition emerges through the interactions of team members, that interactions distinguish high-performing teams from average teams, and that these interactions transfer across different tasks. PMID:17924800

Cooke, Nancy J; Gorman, Jamie C; Duran, Jasmine L; Taylor, Amanda R

2007-09-01

239

Current multidisciplinary oncology series  

PubMed Central

“Cancers of the Colon and Rectum: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Diagnosis and Management” represents a truly multidisciplinary compendium of the management of these tumors that will be of value both for any physician involved in providing care for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients as well as for trainees of many medical disciplines.

Sebio, Ana

2014-01-01

240

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Stephen M. Fiore, PhD, is President of the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research and faculty with the University of Central Florida's Cognitive Sciences Program in the Department of Philosophy and Director of the Cognitive Sciences Laboratory at UCF's Institute for Simulation and Training. He maintains a multidisciplinary research interest that incorporates aspects of the cognitive, social, organizational, and computational sciences in the investigation of learning and performance in individuals and teams.

241

NASA Team Collaboration Pilot: Enabling NASA's Virtual Teams.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Most NASA projects and work activities are accomplished by teams of people. These teams are often geographically distributed - across NASA centers and NASA external partners, both domestic and international. NASA 'virtual' teams are stressed by the challe...

S. Prahst

2003-01-01

242

Sexual Assault Response Team (SART) Implementation and Collaborative Process: What Works Best for the Criminal Justice System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Historically, community services for sexual assault victims have been uncoordinated and inadequate. Sexual Assault Response Teams (SARTs) were created to coordinate efforts of the legal, medical, and mental health systems, and rape crisis centers, in orde...

D. Bybee J. W. Neal M. Greeson R. Campbell

2013-01-01

243

Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

2013-01-01

244

Review of Research on Team Effectiveness: Implications for Teams in Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Characteristics of new teams are reviewed with attention being given to variables that must be addressed to ensure their effectiveness. A process model of team building also is described, and implications of research on group effectiveness for multidisciplinary teams in schools are discussed. (Author/PN)

Abelson, Michael A.; Woodman, Richard W.

1983-01-01

245

23 CFR 630.1006 - Work zone safety and mobility policy.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...consideration and management of work zone impacts on all Federal-aid...projects. This policy shall address work zone impacts throughout the...characteristics and expected work zone impacts of individual projects...using a multi-disciplinary team and in partnership with the...

2010-04-01

246

Teamwork and team training in the ICU: Where do the similarities with aviation end?  

PubMed Central

The aviation industry has made significant progress in identifying the skills and behaviors that result in effective teamwork. Its conceptualization of teamwork, development of training programs, and design of assessment tools are highly relevant to the intensive care unit (ICU). Team skills are important for maintaining safety in both domains, as multidisciplinary teams must work effectively under highly complex, stressful, and uncertain conditions. However, there are substantial differences in the nature of work and structure of teams in the ICU in comparison with those in aviation. While intensive care medicine may wish to use the advances made by the aviation industry for conceptualizing team skills and implementing team training programs, interventions must be tailored to the highly specific demands of the ICU.

2011-01-01

247

Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

2007-08-01

248

The delta cooperative model: a dynamic and innovative team-work activity to develop research skills in microbiology.  

PubMed

The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM) is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM) program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i) student's perception of the workshops' effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii) research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii) oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student's knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83% and 75% respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how the this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology. PMID:23653564

Rios-Velazquez, Carlos; Robles-Suarez, Reynaldo; Gonzalez-Negron, Alberto J; Baez-Santos, Ivan

2006-05-01

249

The Delta Cooperative Model: a Dynamic and Innovative Team-Work Activity to Develop Research Skills in Microbiology  

PubMed Central

The Delta Cooperative Model (DCM) is a dynamic and innovative teamwork design created to develop fundamentals in research skills. High school students in the DCM belong to the Upward Bound Science and Math (UBSM) program at the Inter American University, Ponce Campus. After workshops on using the scientific method, students were organized into groups of three students with similar research interests. Each student had to take on a role within the group as either a researcher, data analyst, or research editor. Initially, each research team developed hypothesis-driven ideas on their proposed project. In intrateam research meetings, they emphasized team-specific tasks. Next, interteam meetings were held to present ideas and receive critical input. Finally, oral and poster research presentations were conducted at the UBSM science fair. Several team research projects covered topics in medical, environmental, and general microbiology. The three major assessment areas for the workshop and DCM included: (i) student’s perception of the workshops’ effectiveness in developing skills, content, and values; (ii) research team self- and group participation evaluation, and (iii) oral and poster presentation during the science fair. More than 91% of the students considered the workshops effective in the presentation of scientific method fundamentals. The combination of the workshop and the DCM increased student’s knowledge by 55% from pre- to posttests. Two rubrics were designed to assess the oral presentation and poster set-up. The poster and oral presentation scores averaged 83% and 75% respectively. Finally, we present a team assessment instrument that allows the self- and group evaluation of each research team. While the DCM has educational plasticity and versatility, here we document how the this model has been successfully incorporated in training and engaging students in scientific research in microbiology.

RIOS-VELAZQUEZ, CARLOS; ROBLES-SUAREZ, REYNALDO; GONZALEZ-NEGRON, ALBERTO J.; BAEZ-SANTOS, IVAN

2006-01-01

250

Sustainability of return to work in sick-listed employees with low-back pain. Two-year follow-up in a randomized clinical trial comparing multidisciplinary and brief intervention  

PubMed Central

Background Sick-listed employees with low back pain had similar return to work (RTW) rates at one-year follow-up in a randomized trial comparing two interventions, but the effects were modified by specific workplace related factors. The present study addressed the sustainability of the intervention effects by performing a two-year follow-up and by using different outcome measures. Methods A total of 351 employees sick-listed for 3–16 weeks due to LBP were recruited from their general practitioners and were randomly allocated to a hospital-based brief or multidisciplinary intervention. Outcome measures were based on sick leave registered in a national database of social and health-related benefits. RTW rates, RTW status, sick leave weeks and sick leave relapse were studied. Results During the two-year follow-up 80.0% and 77.3% had RTW for at least four weeks continuously, and the percentages with RTW at the 104th week were 61.1% and 58.0% in the brief and multidisciplinary intervention groups, respectively. At the 104th week 16.6% and 18.8% were on sick leave in the two groups, respectively, and about 12% were employed in modified jobs or participated in job training. The number of weeks on sick leave in the first year was significantly lower in the brief intervention group (median 14 weeks) than in the multidisciplinary intervention group (median 20 weeks), but during the second year the number of weeks on sick leave were not significantly different between intervention groups. Subgroups characterised by specific work related factors modified the effect of the intervention groups on RTW rates (p?=?0.017). No difference in sick leave relapse was found between the intervention groups. Conclusion The effects of the brief and multidisciplinary interventions at the two-year follow-up were in general similar to the effects at one-year follow-up. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18609003

2012-01-01

251

Study protocol of effectiveness of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-speficic sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial  

PubMed Central

Background Non-specific low back pain is a common cause for consultation with the general practitioner, generating increased health and social costs. This study will analyse the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention to reduce disability, severity of pain, anxiety and depression, to improve quality of life and to reduce the incidence of chronic low back pain in the working population with non-specific low back pain, compared to usual clinical care. Methods/Design A Cluster randomised clinical trial will be conducted in 38 Primary Health Care Centres located in Barcelona, Spain and its surrounding areas. The centres are randomly allocated to the multidisciplinary intervention or to usual clinical care. Patients between 18 and 65 years old (n = 932; 466 per arm) and with a diagnostic of a non-specific sub-acute low back pain are included. Patients in the intervention group are receiving the recommendations of clinical practice guidelines, in addition to a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention consisting of group educational sessions lasting a total of 10 hours. The main outcome is change in the score in the Roland Morris disability questionnaire at three months after onset of pain. Other outcomes are severity of pain, quality of life, duration of current non-specific low back pain episode, work sick leave and duration, Fear Avoidance Beliefs and Goldberg Questionnaires. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analysis will be by intention to treat. The intervention effect will be assessed through the standard error of measurement and the effect-size. Responsiveness of each scale will be evaluated by standardised response mean and receiver-operating characteristic method. Recovery according to the patient will be used as an external criterion. A multilevel regression will be performed on repeated measures. The time until the current episode of low back pain takes to subside will be analysed by Cox regression. Discussion We hope to provide evidence of the effectiveness of the proposed biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in avoiding the chronification of low back pain, and to reduce the duration of non-specific low back pain episodes. If the intervention is effective, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial Registration ISRCTN21392091

2010-01-01

252

Leadership for Distributed Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this dissertation was to study the little examined, yet important issue of leadership for distributed teams. Distributed teams are defined as: “teams of which members are geographically distributed and are therefore working predominantly via mediated communication means on an interdependent task and in realizing a joint goal” (adapted from Bell & Kozlowski, 2002 and Dubé & Paré,

J. P. G. De Rooij

2009-01-01

253

Issues of Multidisciplinary Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Issues of multidisciplinary design are considered in view of the aerodynamical and structural design of the airframe, i. e.\\u000a fuselage, wing, and tail unit. Background problems, like Cayley’s design paradigm are discussed, as well as ideal-typical\\u000a airframe definition and development phases, and the industrial challenges which numerical multidisciplinary design and optimization\\u000a (MDSO) poses. Finally the state of the art of

E. H. Hirschel; C. Weiland

254

A pilot study on the effects of a team building process on the perception of work environment in an integrative hospital for neurological rehabilitation  

PubMed Central

Background Neurological rehabilitation is one of the most care-intensive challenges in the health care system requiring specialist therapeutic and nursing knowledge. In this descriptive pilot study, we investigated the effects of a team building process on perceived work environment, self-ascribed professional competence, life satisfaction, and client satisfaction in an anthroposophic specialized hospital for neurological rehabilitation. The team-building process consisted of didactic instruction and training in problem-solving, teambuilding and constructive conflict resolution. Methods Seventy seven staff members and 44 patients' relatives were asked to complete a survey that included the Work Environment Scale (WES-10), a Life Satisfaction Scale (BMLSS), the Conviction of Therapeutic Competency (CTC) scale and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8). To evaluate the outcome of the team building process, we analyzed changes over time in the WES-10 subscales. Additionally the interrelationship between the WES-10 subscales with other subscales and with sociodemographic parameters like age, gender was calculated by means of a bivariate correlation analysis. Results The team building process had a significant positive effect on perceived work environment in only one area. There was a significant improvement in the ward staffs' perception of their ability to constructively resolve conflicts 3 years after inception of the team building process than there was before inception. However, even in a unit that utilized holistic treatment and nursing in the care of severely disable patients, such care necessitating a very heavy workload, the measurements on the Self Realization, Life Satisfaction and Conviction of Therapeutic Competency scales remained high and unchanged over the three year time period of the study. Conclusions Strategic interventions might be an option to improve interpersonal relationships and finally quality of patient care.

2010-01-01

255

Improving the delivery of care for patients with diabetes through understanding optimised team work and organisation in primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness and is an important cause of avoidable mortality. Patients are managed by the integrated activities of clinical and non-clinical members of the primary care team. Studies of the quality of care for patients with diabetes suggest less than optimum care in a number of areas. AIM: The aim of this

Martin P Eccles; Gillian Hawthorne; Marie Johnston; Margaret Hunter; Nick Steen; Jill Francis; Susan Hrisos; Marko Elovainio; Jeremy M Grimshaw

2009-01-01

256

American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: Implications for Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to…

Andrews, Arlene Bowers

2012-01-01

257

In-Time Project Status Notification for All Team Members in Global Software Development as Part of Their Work Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

In global software development (GSD) projects, all team members (e.g., project manager, quality assur- ance, technical leader, and developer) can benefit from being aware on the project status regarding their area of responsibility. While there is considerable at- tention on providing project overview data and tool support to the project manager, there is only weak support for the other roles,

Dindin Wahyudin; Matthias Heindl; Ronald Berger; Alexander Schatten; Stefan Biffl

258

Making Computing Science Students More Employable with Problem Based Learning and Cross-Site TeamWork  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract— Computing Science graduates need a global perspective of the software engineering industry to make them more employable. As well as gaining the technical and academic skill levels expected from their discipline, students must now learn to operate in ‘virtual teams’. This paper describes how we changed the curriculum of our Software Engineering Module at Newcastle University to incorporate problem-based

M. Devlin; C. Phillips; L. Marshall

2007-01-01

259

Developing a Parent-Professional Team Leadership Model in Group Work: Work with Families with Children Experiencing Behavioral and Emotional Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on the respective strengths of parent-led and professional-led groups, a parent-professional team leadership model for group interventions was developed and evaluated for families of youths with emotional and behavioral problems. The model was developed based on feedback from 26 parents in focus group sessions and recommendations from…

Ruffolo, Mary C.; Kuhn, Mary T.; Evans, Mary E.

2006-01-01

260

Delegation in Virtual Team: the Moderating Effects of Team Maturity and Team Distance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual teams are becoming an important work structure in software development projects. However, a number of issues arise due to the complexity and newness of the virtual team context. One such issue relates to when and how team leaders should delegate authority and responsibility to the team. Previous studies have yielded conflicting results. This work aims to answer this question

Suling Zhang; Marilyn Tremaine; Jerry Fjermestad; Allen Milewski; Patrick O'Sullivan

2006-01-01

261

They stand you in a corner; you are not to speak: nurses tell of abusive indoctrination in work teams dominated by bullies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports some of the findings from the first qualitative stage of a large national study of bullying in the nursing workplace currently being undertaken in Australia.\\u000aThe findings reported here reveal how relationships between bullies were embedded within informal organizational alliances, enabling bullies to control work teams and use emotional abuse and psychological violence as a means of

Marie Hutchinson; Margaret H Vickers; Debra Jackson; Lesley Wilkes

2006-01-01

262

Incorporating Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Knowledge and Skills into the Daily Work of Police Officers: A Focus Group Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This qualitative focus group study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training\\u000a for police officers. Thematic analysis of transcripts of focus group discussions revealed that officers report increased knowledge\\u000a of mental illnesses (which manifests as an improved ability to recognize and respond, reduced stereotyping\\/stigmatization,\\u000a greater empathy toward consumers and their caregivers, more patience when dealing

Sonya Hanafi; Masuma Bahora; Berivan N. Demir; Michael T. Compton

2008-01-01

263

Why and how to include anthropological perspective into multidisciplinary research in the Polish health system.  

PubMed

The article focuses on ways in which anthropological knowledge, incorporated into multidisciplinary and multilevel research projects, can be applied for understanding health- and illness-related behaviours and functioning of the health system in Poland. It selectively presents potential theoretical and methodological contributions of the anthropological discipline to the field of applied health research, and briefly reviews selected ethnographic theories and methods for researching and interpreting socio-cultural conditioning of healing, health and illness related practices. The review focuses on the following approaches: Critical Medical Anthropology, Cultural Interpretive Theory, phenomenology, narrative analysis, and the biography of pharmaceuticals. The author highlights the need for team work and use of a holistic perspective while analyzing the health system in Poland, and underlines the need for serious attention and financial support to be given to multidisciplinary research projects of which anthropology is a part. PMID:23020046

Witeska-M?ynarczyk, Anna D

2012-01-01

264

Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

2013-01-01

265

Asteroid team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this task is to support asteroid research and the operation of an Asteroid Team within the Earth and Space Sciences Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Asteroid Team carries out original research on asteroids in order to discover, better characterize and define asteroid properties. This information is needed for the planning and design of NASA asteroid flyby and rendezvous missions. The asteroid Team also provides scientific and technical advice to NASA and JPL on asteroid related programs. Work on asteroid classification continued and the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids was published. In the asteroid photometry program researchers obtained N or Q photometry for more than 50 asteroids, including the two M-earth-crossers. Compositional analysis of infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 micrometer) of asteroids is continuing. Over the next year the work on asteroid classification and composition will continue with the analysis of the 60 reduced infrared spectra which we now have at hand. The radiometry program will continue with the reduction of the N and Q bandpass data for the 57 asteroids in order to obtain albedos and diameters. This year the emphasis will shift to IRAS follow-up observations; which includes objects not observed by IRAS and objects with poor or peculiar IRAS data. As in previous year, we plan to give top priority to any opportunities for observing near-Earth asteroids and the support (through radiometric lightcurve observations from the IRTF) of any stellar occultations by asteroids for which occultation observation expeditions are fielded. Support of preparing of IRAS data for publication and of D. Matson for his participation in the NASA Planetary Astronomy Management and Operations Working Group will continue.

Matson, D. L.

1988-01-01

266

The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. Settings This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme ‘On Your Own Feet Ahead!’ in the Netherlands. Participantss A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1?year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Interventions Transition programme. Primary outcome measures Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). Results The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents’ characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (p<0.01) and changes in team climate (p<0.001) predicted the quality of chronic care delivery at T2. Conclusions The implementation of transition programmes requires a supportive and stimulating team climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents.

Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

2014-01-01

267

Skills Inventory for Teams (SIFT): A Resource for Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Skills Inventory for Teams (SIFT) was developed for early intervention practitioners from a variety of disciplines to help them evaluate their ability to work as part of an early intervention team in identifying and serving young children with disabilities. The Team Member section is designed to help individual team members identify the skills…

Garland, Corinne; And Others

268

The Component Packaging Problem: A Vehicle for the Development of Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Methodologies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes academic research which has resulted in an increased appreciation for multidisciplinary efforts among our students, colleagues and administrators. It has also generated a number of research ideas that emerged from the interaction between disciplines. Overall, 17 undergraduate students and 16 graduate students benefited directly from the NASA grant: an additional 11 graduate students were impacted and participated without financial support from NASA. The work resulted in 16 theses (with 7 to be completed in the near future), 67 papers or reports mostly published in 8 journals and/or presented at various conferences (a total of 83 papers, presentations and reports published based on NASA inspired or supported work). In addition, the faculty and students presented related work at many meetings, and continuing work has been proposed to NSF, the Army, Industry and other state and federal institutions to continue efforts in the direction of multidisciplinary and recently multi-objective design and analysis. The specific problem addressed is component packing which was solved as a multi-objective problem using iterative genetic algorithms and decomposition. Further testing and refinement of the methodology developed is presently under investigation. Teaming issues research and classes resulted in the publication of a web site, (http://design.eng.clemson.edu/psych4991) which provides pointers and techniques to interested parties. Specific advantages of using iterative genetic algorithms, hurdles faced and resolved, and institutional difficulties associated with multi-discipline teaming are described in some detail.

Fadel, Georges; Bridgewood, Michael; Figliola, Richard; Greenstein, Joel; Kostreva, Michael; Nowaczyk, Ronald; Stevenson, Steve

1999-01-01

269

[Ambulatory, interdisciplinary team work in the tension field between theory and practice--Vorarlberg social medicine organization].  

PubMed

Presented is the Social-Medical Organization active in the field of ambulatory neurological care of adults in Vorarlberg, Austria, offering interdisciplinary cooperation possibilities in terms of team consultation, case presentation and discussion, as well as supervision. Ambulatory interdisciplinary teamwork is situated in a theory-practice field of tension, with occupational training failing to teach interdisciplinary cooperation and interdisciplinarity role models not encountered either during practicals. The ensuing, deliberately identified problems and issues have been addressed in a planned process. Familiarization with the various occupational fields involved, with each field having its specific job profile, as well as the notions on cooperation among the various fields are presented. The role the various occupational fields have in neurological aftercare as well as existing job profile clichés are reflected upon. Communication is in addition hampered by the diversity of training contents in the various occupational fields. Focussing on case presentation and discussion, teams are considered a place for obtaining advice, for joint development of targets and strategies, and interdisciplinary interfacing is no longer perceived as threatening but as enriching and productive. The role of stronger family doctor inclusion in formulation therapy goals remains an issue as yet unsolved. PMID:10063513

Girardi, P; Acherer, E; Holzapfl, M; Strebl, L

1998-11-01

270

Integrating Multidisciplinary Engineering Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to design two distinct engineering qualification levels for an existing University of Technology programme, empirical evidence based on the current diploma is necessary to illuminate the nature of and the relationship between the "contextual" and "conceptual" elements underpinning a multidisciplinary engineering…

Wolff, Karin; Luckett, Kathy

2013-01-01

271

Evaluating Multidisciplinary Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a multidisciplinary program on population and world resources, focusing on the methodology used to evaluate the program. This methodology employs a questionnaire developed on the basis of six areas of knowledge and understanding. Sample results on students' perceptions related to core courses are provided in the form of histograms. (BC)

Bridgewater, P. B.; McDonald, R. J.

1984-01-01

272

Incorporating Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) knowledge and skills into the daily work of police officers: a focus group study.  

PubMed

This qualitative focus group study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training for police officers. Thematic analysis of transcripts of focus group discussions revealed that officers report increased knowledge of mental illnesses (which manifests as an improved ability to recognize and respond, reduced stereotyping/stigmatization, greater empathy toward consumers and their caregivers, more patience when dealing with consumers, and fewer arrests/more redirection toward treatment), as well as practical application of learned skills (evidenced by an ability to put individuals with mental illnesses at ease, reduced unpredictability of the crisis situation, and reduced risk of injury). Results highlight the potential for collaboration between law enforcement (and other public safety/criminal justice professions) and the mental health professions in the expanding CIT collaborative model. PMID:18465226

Hanafi, Sonya; Bahora, Masuma; Demir, Berivan N; Compton, Michael T

2008-12-01

273

The Loci Multidisciplinary Simulation System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Contents include the following: 1. An overview of the Loci Multidisciplinary Simulation System. 2. Topologically adaptive mesh generation. 3. Multidisciplinary simulations using Loci with the CHEM chemically reacting flow solver.

Luke, Ed

2002-01-01

274

Groupware System for Multidisciplinary Participation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Quality Decision Management, Inc. (QDM), in our Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) effort entitled, Groupware System for Multidisciplinary Participation, has developed a methodology and information architecture that support multidisciplinary partic...

D. A. Jeffrey D. S. Rhodes R. C. Byron

1994-01-01

275

Clinical audit of multidisciplinary care at a medium-sized hospital in Spain  

PubMed Central

Background Multidisciplinary care is a key enabler in the provision of high quality care for cancer patients. Despite compelling evidence supporting their benefit to patients and for providers, multidisciplinary cancer conferences (MCC) are not universally occurring. Team composition of MCC reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the body. Lack of nursing input can have a negative impact on team decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate multidisciplinary care and adherence to national recommendations at a medium-sized hospital through a clinical audit of cancer conferences and clinical records. Methods A total of 77 multidisciplinary cancer conferences were visited and 496 electronic health records were reviewed. The regularity of meetings and multidisciplinary attendance were evaluated. Each electronic health record was checked to verify documented prospective discussion before any treatment was started. Results Nine multidisciplinary teams meet on a weekly or biweekly basis at the hospital with an average number of ten people and six different specialties represented. Average duration of meetings was 46.8 min. Though most patients (64.5%) were discussed at some point at the relevant cancer conference, only 40% had a documented multidisciplinary team discussion prior to the first treatment. Pathological stage (pTNM) was documented in 53.6% of clinical records. Conclusions Nursing representatives should be included as usual attendees at cancer conferences. Prospective discussion of all cancer cases should be encouraged. Use of checklists and systematic collection of key information, specifically cancer staging, could improve clinical documentation in the electronic clinical record.

2014-01-01

276

Collaborative Design Processes: An Active and Reflective Learning Course in Multidisciplinary Collaboration.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a capstone course, graduate students from two universities participated in collaborative design in the architectural, engineering, and construction industries in multidisciplinary teams via the Internet. Students also developed process designs to integrate technology into multidisciplinary teamwork, combining active and reflective learning.…

O'Brien, William J.; Soibelman, Lucio; Elvin, George

2003-01-01

277

Work-related burns.  

PubMed

Work-related upper extremity burns often occur. The cause directs the course of action. Thermal burns should be assessed for system alterations, and depth of burn should be determined. Deep partial-thickness burns and more severe burns require a specialist evaluation. Chemical burns must be irrigated and the agent identified. Some chemical burns, such as those that involve phenols and metal fragments, require specific topical applications before water lavage. Hydrofluoric acid burns can cause life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities with a small, highly concentrated acid burn. The goal with any extremity burn is to provide the patient with a multidisciplinary team approach to achieve a functional, usable extremity. PMID:16647659

Pruitt, Valerie M

2006-01-01

278

Wireless Patient Information Provision and Sharing at the Point of Care using a Virtual Organization Framework in Clinical Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents a virtual organization (VO) framework which incorporates wireless technology support at the point of care in a clinical environment It reflects a move to patient centric healthcare provided by multi-disciplinary care teams working in an integrated way for patient care. The work highlights the importance of wireless technologies for addressing point of care issues faced by care

Mohyuddin; W. A. Gray; Hazel Bailey; Carol Jordan; David Morrey

2008-01-01

279

A multiple case study: The perceptions and experiences of four research scientist-science teacher teams, in a Scientific Work Experience Program for Teachers (SWEPT)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers (SWEPT) are a form of professional development that engages science teachers in real-world science. The teacher undertakes research in the expectation of being able to involve students in similar, inquiry-based activities back in the classroom. At the heart of each program is a mentored relationship between a teacher and a research scientist who collaborate to introduce some aspects of their research to the teacher's students. Qualitative research methodology, following frameworks designed by Stringer (1999), was used by the researcher to study four research scientist-science teacher teams as they interacted in a program known as the Federal Laboratories' Involvement in Research in Science and Technology for Science Teacher Enhancement Project (FIRST STEP). Three research questions were explored. First, what was the nature of the events, activities, and interactions within which the key features of their collaboration were embedded? Second, how did the participants perceive the effectiveness of their experience working together as a team? Third, how did participants' interpretations of their experiences relate to what was described in the literature? The outcomes of the research, based on four case studies, appeared to challenge some aspects of scientific work experience programs as detailed in the literature. The key feature to emerge was the importance of offering such programs to committed teachers, not necessarily with strong science backgrounds, but with a love of learning so that the scientific literacy of their students would be positively impacted. The mentored relationship between scientist and teacher did not necessarily have to be established ahead of time or to be based on "chemistry" between the participants but it did require commitment and enthusiasm from them both. The study confirmed that it was essential for each team to have common goals and that they focus their research effort to produce some form of curriculum material that the teacher would use with students.

Wilson, Herbert Craig

2001-12-01

280

A Reflection on the Work of an Educational Psychologist in Providing Supervision for a Team of Community Based Support Workers, Supporting Families with Vulnerable Adolescents at Risk of Exclusion from School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evolving role of the educational psychologist (EP) is discussed with an emphasis on the supervision provided for a team of support workers for vulnerable adolescents, working within a Local Service Team. This development is considered in the context of the Every Child Matters (DfES, 2004) agenda and the Farrell, Woods, Lewis, Rooney, Squire…

Maxwell, Tim

2013-01-01

281

Advances in Multi-disciplinary Interoperability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The challenge for addressing issues such as climate change, food security or ecosystem sustainability is that they require multi-disciplinary collaboration and the ability to integrate information across scientific domains. Multidisciplinary collaborations are difficult because each discipline has its own "language", protocols and formats for communicating within its community and handling data and information. EuroGEOSS demonstrates the added value to the scientific community and to society of making existing systems and applications interoperable and useful within the GEOSS and INSPIRE frameworks. In 2010, the project built an initial operating capacity of a multi-disciplinary Information System addressing three areas: drought, forestry and biodiversity. It is now furthering this development into an advanced operating capacity (http://www.eurogeoss.eu). The key to this capability is the creation of a broker that supports access to multiple resources through a common user interface and the automation of data search and access using state of the art information technology. EuroGEOSS hosted a conference on information systems and multi-disciplinary applications of science and technology. "EuroGEOSS: advancing the vision of GEOSS" provided a forum for developers, users and decision-makers working with advanced multi-disciplinary information systems to improve science and decisions for complex societal issues. In particular, the Conference addressed: Information systems for supporting multi-disciplinary research; Information systems and modeling for biodiversity, drought, forestry and related societal benefit areas; and Case studies of multi-disciplinary applications and outcomes. This paper will discuss the major finding of the conference and the directions for future development.

Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.; Huerta, J.; Rubio-Iglesias, J. M.; Serrano, J. J.

2012-04-01

282

Green Team | Poster  

Cancer.gov

Melissa Porter, who recently joined the staff of Craig Reynolds, Ph.D., director, Office of Scientific Operations, as administrative manager, has stepped forward to lead the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNL) Green Team in its efforts to promote a “green” work environment. “I am excited to lead the FNL Green Team and have been impressed by the enthusiasm and commitment of the FNL Green Team,” Porter said.

283

Diversity Team | Poster  

Cancer.gov

The Employee Diversity Team (EDT) is out and about this fall, making the NCI at Frederick community aware of various cultural traditions and events around Frederick County that employees can participate in. The team is working with staff members of Native American descent to feature a display case and movie selection celebrating Native American Heritage Month in November. The team will keep you informed about Frederick events taking place in November and December. Keep a look out for EDT e-mails.

284

Coordinated multidisciplinary care for ambulatory Huntington's disease patients. Evaluation of 18 months of implementation  

PubMed Central

Background A multidisciplinary outpatient department was set up in the northern part of the Netherlands because of a local lack of adequate treatment and care for Huntington's disease (HD)patients. Outreaching multidisciplinary care is a novel way to optimise functioning and quality of life of HD patients. The vast majority of patients want to stay home as long as possible. Huntington's disease is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder leading to complete disability and long term residence in a specialised institution. In this paper we outline this new type of treatment and give the results of 1.5 year, we also present the results of an inquiry on the appreciation of the working method. Methods In the first project half (1.5 yr) 28 patients were seen as had been anticipated. The multidisciplinary team consisting of an institutional physician, a psychologist, a speech and language therapist, a social worker, an occupational therapist and a case manager, assesses the stage of the disease and formulates, coordinates and implements the individual care and treatment plan in the home situation. After 1.5 year a questionnaire on the appreciation of the department was sent to patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, the lay organisation and Dutch "experts in the field". Results For the 28 HD patients a total of 242 problems and actions were verbalised in the care plan, which was accepted by the majority of the patients. Especially informal caregivers, the lay organisation and the Dutch "experts in the field" were enthusiastic on the outreaching and multidisciplinary nature of the department. The verdict over the continuance of the clinic was positive and unanimous. Conclusions We concluded that coordinating outreaching multidisciplinary care from an outpatient clinic into the dwelling place of the patient is feasible and appreciated.

2011-01-01

285

A Faculty Team Works to Create Content Linkages among Various Courses to Increase Meaningful Learning of Targeted Concepts of Microbiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

As research faculty with expertise in the area of host-pathogen interactions (HPI), we used a research group model to effect our professional development as scientific educators. We have established a working hypothesis: The implementation of a curriculum that forms bridges between our seven HPI courses allows our students to achieve deep and meaningful learning of HPI concepts. Working collaboratively, we

Gili Marbach-Ad; Volker Briken; Kenneth Frauwirth; Lian-Yong Gao; Steven W. Hutcheson; Sam W. Joseph; David Mosser; Beth Parent; Patricia Shields; Wenxia Song; Daniel C. Stein; Karen Swanson; Katerina V. Thompson; Robert Yuan; Ann C. Smith

2007-01-01

286

A Faculty Team Works to Create Content Linkages among Various Courses to Increase Meaningful Learning of Targeted Concepts of Microbiology  

PubMed Central

As research faculty with expertise in the area of host–pathogen interactions (HPI), we used a research group model to effect our professional development as scientific educators. We have established a working hypothesis: The implementation of a curriculum that forms bridges between our seven HPI courses allows our students to achieve deep and meaningful learning of HPI concepts. Working collaboratively, we identified common learning goals, and we chose two microorganisms to serve as anchors for student learning. We instituted variations of published active-learning methods to engage students in research-oriented learning. In parallel, we are developing an assessment tool. The value of this work is in the development of a teaching model that successfully allowed faculty who already work collaboratively in the research area of HPI to apply a “research group approach” to further scientific teaching initiatives at a research university. We achieved results that could not be accomplished by even the most dedicated instructor working in isolation.

Marbach-Ad, Gili; Briken, Volker; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Gao, Lian-Yong; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Joseph, Sam W.; Mosser, David; Parent, Beth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Swanson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina V.; Yuan, Robert

2007-01-01

287

Selective Mutism in Elementary School: Multidisciplinary Interventions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the symptoms of selective mutism and historical background for treatment. It provides a case study which illustrates successful multidisciplinary treatment outcomes for a child who was selectively mute. Issues relevant to speech-language pathologists working with elementary school children are discussed and treatment guidelines provided.…

Giddan, Jane J.; And Others

1997-01-01

288

A multidisciplinary motorcycle safety initiative.  

PubMed

Motorcycle registrations are on the rise in the United States, especially among riders over 40 years of age. While motorcycle popularity has been increasing, so have injuries and fatalities. Unfortunately, motorcycle crashes have been increasing at a disproportionately high rate. In 2007, motorcycle fatalities reached the highest level since the Department of Transportation began collecting data in 1975. Because of the increasing number of motorcycle crashes in Ohio and Central Ohio, a multidisciplinary team consisting of the Grant Medical Center's trauma program, Franklin County Safe Communities (a Columbus Public Health program), the American Motorcyclist Association, and Columbusbiker.com applied for and received a $5,000 motorcycle safety mini-grant from the American Public Health Association, Public Health Traffic Safety Institute. The mini-grant provided funding from October 2008 to September 2009. The 3 goals of the mini-grant were to promote "sharing the road" with motorcycles, inform the reentry riding community on the necessity of proper rider training, and train the Ohio injury prevention workforce on motorcycle safety and the motorcycling culture. However, the ultimate goal is to prevent death and reduce injury due to motorcycle crashes. PMID:20029285

Wermert, Amy; Opalek, Judy M

2009-01-01

289

Team Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chapter 5 of a volume on school leadership, this chapter reviews the literature to define and explain management teams and to describe several successful management team arrangements. The author begins by noting that team management has recently enjoyed a resurgence as a response to collective negotiations, but beyond this function can have value…

Lindelow, John

290

NIMROD: A Customer Focused, Team Driven Approach for Fusion Code Development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NIMROD is a new code that will be used for the analysis of existing fusion experiments, prediction of operational limits, and design of future devices. An approach called Integrated Product Development (IPD) is being used for the development of NIMROD. It is a dramatic departure from existing practice in the fusion program. Code development is being done by a self-directed, multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional team that consists of experts in plasma theory, experiment, computational physics, and computer science. Customer representatives (ITER, US experiments) are an integral part of the team. The team is using techniques such as Quality Function Deployment (QFD), Pugh Concept Selection, Rapid Prototyping, and Risk Management, during the design phase of NIMROD. Extensive use is made of communication and internet technology to support collaborative work. Our experience with using these team techniques for such a complex software development project will be reported.

Karandikar, H. M.; Schnack, D. D.

1996-11-01

291

Blog - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Empirical findings on the nature of scientific inquiry (i.e., "the science of science") indicate that research is increasingly being conducted by teams rather than individuals. Working on a cross-disciplinary research team also has been shown to be associated with producing more creative research that has higher scientific impact.

292

The W(h)ine Club: Women Finding Joy in Academic Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The W(h)ine Club is a multidisciplinary women's research team which has been working together for the past 10 years. The idea for this Viewpoint piece grew as we participated in a Women in Research programme. The aim of the programme was to improve academic publications among women. A group of us in the programme found ourselves repeatedly…

Selepe, Mosa; Grobler, Christa; Dicks, Emsie; Oldewage-Theron, Wilna

2012-01-01

293

Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intel...

R. W. Remington B. John K. Sycara

2003-01-01

294

Working Together: From School-Based Collaborative Teams to School-Community-Higher Education Connections. An Introductory Packet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet is designed to help in the development of collaborative efforts for educational improvement. "Working Together with Others To Enhance Programs and Resources" (from the Center for Mental Health in Schools) is the first selection. This discussion emphasizes that effectiveness is the real point of collaboration, and it explores the…

California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health Schools.

295

Indicators for follow-up of multidisciplinary teamwork in care processes: results of an international expert panel.  

PubMed

In order to study the impact of interventions on multidisciplinary teamwork in care processes, relevant indicators need to be defined. In the present study, the authors performed a Delphi survey of a purposively selected expert panel consisting of scientific researchers and hospital managers. Thirty-six experts from 13 countries participated. Each participant rated a list of team indicators on a scale of 1-6. Consensus was sought in two consecutive rounds. The content validity index (CVI) varied from 8% to 92%. A final list of 19 indicators was generated: 5 on team context/structure, 8 on team process, and 6 on team outcomes. Most relevant team indicators were as follows: "team relations," "quality of team leadership," "culture/climate for teamwork," "team perceived coordination of the care process," and "team vision." Scientific researchers and hospital managers that want to study and improve multidisciplinary teamwork in care processes should primarily focus on these team indicators. PMID:21190951

Deneckere, Svin; Robyns, Nathalie; Vanhaecht, Kris; Euwema, Martin; Panella, Massimiliano; Lodewijckx, Cathy; Leigheb, Fabrizio; Sermeus, Walter

2011-09-01

296

Applications of collaborative helping maps: supporting professional development, supervision and work teams in family-centered practice.  

PubMed

Collaborative, family-centered practice has become an influential approach in helping efforts across a broad spectrum of human services. This article draws from previous work that presented a principle-based, practice framework of Collaborative Helping and highlighted the use of Collaborative Helping maps as a tool both to help workers think their way through complex situations and to provide a guideline for constructive conversations between families and helpers about challenging issues. It builds on that work to examine ways to utilize Collaborative Helping maps at worker, supervisory, and organizational levels to enhance and sustain collaborative, family-centered practice and weave its core values and principles into the everyday fabric of organizational cultures in human service agencies and government agencies that serve poor and marginalized families and communities. PMID:24215323

Madsen, William C

2014-03-01

297

Clinical Work Sampling  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Existing systems of in-training evaluation (ITE) have been criticized as being unreliable and invalid methods for assessing student performance during clinical education. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, reliability, and validity of a clinical work sampling (CWS) approach to ITE. This approach focused on the following: (1) basing performance data on observed behaviors, (2) using multiple observers and occasions, (3) recording data at the time of performance, and (4) allowing for a feasible system to receive feedback. PARTICIPANTS Sixty-two third-year University of Ottawa students were assessed during their 8-week internal medicine inpatient experience. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Four performance rating forms (Admission Rating Form, Ward Rating Form, Multidisciplinary Team Rating Form, and Patient's Rating Form) were introduced to document student performance. Voluntary participation rates were variable (12%–64%) with patients excluded from the analysis because of low response rate (12%). The mean number of evaluations per student per rotation (19) exceeded the number of evaluations needed to achieve sufficient reliability. Reliability coefficients were high for the Ward Form (.86) and the Admission Form (.73) but not for the Multidisciplinary Team (.22) Form. There was an examiner effect (rater leniency), but this was small relative to real differences between students. Correlations between the Ward Form and the Admission Form were high (.47), while those with the Multidisciplinary Team Form were lower (.37 and .26, respectively). The CWS approach ITE was considered to be content valid by expert judges. CONCLUSIONS The collection of ongoing performance data was reasonably feasible, reliable, and valid.

Turnbull, J; MacFadyen, J; van Barneveld, C; Norman, G

2000-01-01

298

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Demonstrated success at grant writing for NIH and other government institutes using team science approaches. Work in non-profit sector with federal contracts and grants. Have written book on successful grant writing.

299

Enhancing Mental Models for Team Effectiveness.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The success of Canadian Forces operations relies on team members working cooperatively towards shared goals. It is commonly recognized that some form of shared knowledge contributes positively to team functioning, and as such the concept of team mental mo...

A. Blais A. Muller-Gass M. Ducan M. Jobidon

2011-01-01

300

42 CFR 488.314 - Survey teams.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Facilities § 488.314 Survey teams. (a) Team composition. (1) Surveys must be conducted by an interdisciplinary team of professionals, which must include... (i) The surveyor currently works, or, within the past two...

2010-10-01

301

Student team functioning and the effect on mathematical problem solving in a first-year engineering course  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABET requires that engineering graduates be able to work on multi-disciplinary teams and apply mathematics and science when solving engineering problems. One manner of integrating teamwork and engineering contexts in a first-year foundation engineering course is through the use of model-eliciting activities (MEAs)---realistic, client-driven problems based on the theoretical framework of models and modeling. This mixed methods study looks into

Tamara J Moore

2006-01-01

302

GRC RBCC Concept Multidisciplinary Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report outlines the GRC RBCC Concept for Multidisciplinary Analysis. The multidisciplinary coupling procedure is presented, along with technique validations and axisymmetric multidisciplinary inlet and structural results. The NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) test bed developments and code parallelization are also presented. These include milestones and accomplishments, a discussion of running R4 fan application on the PII cluster as compared to other platforms, and the National Combustor Code speedup.

Suresh, Ambady

2001-01-01

303

Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

1998-01-01

304

Team-Based Learning and Open-Book Quizzes: Determining What Works in an Introductory Geoscience Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concepts in Geology (EES 345) is an inquiry-based ten-week geoscience course for pre-service elementary and middle-school teachers at Wright State University. For most of them, this is the first and last geoscience class that they take. Required readings are an important part of the class because of the amount of vocabulary and number of concepts that students need to master. It is not possible to spend much class time on lectures that cover the same material, as students are expected to be doing hands-on activities, presentations, discussions, and laboratory exercises applying the material learned from reading. As the instructor, I administer frequent quizzes to encourage students to do the reading and to take notes. The quizzes are 10 multiple-choice questions each and the students are allowed to use a single page of notes. After they complete their quizzes individually, the students gather in groups of three or four and work on the same questions, but are allowed to discuss their answers. This motivates students further to be scrupulous about reading, enables them to help each other overcome mistakes, and helps them work out difficult problems that overwhelmed individuals in the group. The average group scores on in-class, closed- book quizzes are almost always higher than highest average individual score (more than 5% on the average), so even the best-prepared person in the group is managing to learn something from his or her peers. After the all the scores are recorded, I tally the number of correct group and individual answers to each question. If one or more groups gets a question wrong, it's clearly a hard question and worth going over during class time. If more than half of the groups get a question wrong, it is not scored as part of the total. When I used a new text last spring, students found the quizzes overwhelmingly hard. So I let students take the individual quizzes home to answer directly from the book and continued to give group quizzes in class. Students no longer brought notes to the group quizzes. In some groups, all individuals gave identical wrong answers to the same questions (and repeated that answer on the group quiz) indicating probable cooperation on the individual quizzes. The average group scores were no longer significantly higher than the average individual scores, indicating less learning, and the groups still had trouble answering questions involving problem-solving or synthesis or comparison of ideas.

Teed, R.

2008-12-01

305

Multidisciplinary care planning in the primary care management of completed stroke: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Chronic disease management requires input from multiple health professionals, both specialist and primary care providers. This study sought to assess the impact of co-ordinated multidisciplinary care in primary care, represented by the delivery of formal care planning by primary care teams or shared across primary-secondary teams, on outcomes in stroke, relative to usual care. METHODS: A Systematic review of

Geoffrey K Mitchell; Robyn M Brown; Lars Erikssen; Jennifer J Tieman

2008-01-01

306

Team building through team goal setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about how team goal setting contributes to the products of the team building process-team cohesion and team performance. This article outlines (a) the nature and extent of group goal setting that occurs within and outside of sport, (b) why team goal setting can enhance team cohesion and team performance, (c) the findings of research into the team

W. Neil Widmeyer; Kimberly Ducharme

1997-01-01

307

Could You Use a Multidisciplinary Care Team App?  

PubMed Central

Information technology generally serves 1 of 2 purposes: to replace tedious tasks or to extend the capabilities of the user. In health care, we are fortunate to have numerous opportunities to extend our capabilities. In this article, we explore how mobile and Web-based technologies can address the growing need to collaborate with all those concerned in care provision.

Felkey, Bill G.; Fox, Brent I.

2013-01-01

308

Team Agreement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To analyze how schools place students into special education, 66 case discussions were transcribed and assessment team members interviewed. Ways in which team participants weigh statements were examined through a taxonomy of their perceptions of learning disabilities and a match of the meeting discussions to subsequent placement decisions in light…

Sweeney, Cheryl

309

Trauma team.  

PubMed

The introduction of trauma teams has improved patient outcome independently. The aim of establishing a trauma team is to ensure the early mobilization and involvement of more experienced medical staff and thereby to improve patient outcome. The team approach allows for distribution of the several tasks in assessment and resuscitation of the patient in a 'horizontal approach', which may lead to a reduction in time from injury to critical interventions and thus have a direct bearing on the patient's ultimate outcome. A trauma team leader or supervisor, who coordinates the resuscitation and ensures adherence to guidelines, should lead the trauma team. There is a major national and international variety in trauma team composition, however crucial are a surgeon, an Emergency Medicine physician or both and anaesthetist. Advanced Trauma Life Support training, simulation-based training, and video review have all improved patient outcome and trauma team performance. Developments in the radiology, such as the use of computed tomography scanning in the emergency room and the endovascular treatment of bleeding foci, have changed treatment algorithms in selected patients. These developments and new insights in shock management may have a future impact on patient management and trauma team composition. PMID:24980423

Tiel Groenestege-Kreb, D; van Maarseveen, O; Leenen, L

2014-08-01

310

Finding the team for Mars: a psychological and human factors analysis of a Mars Desert Research Station crew.  

PubMed

A two-week mission in March and April of 2011 sent six team members to the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS). MDRS, a research facility in the high Utah desert, provides an analogue for the harsh and unusual working conditions that will be faced by men and women who one day explore Mars. During the mission a selection of quantitative and qualitative psychological tests were administered to the international, multidisciplinary team. A selection of the results are presented along with discussion. PMID:22317591

Sawyer, Benjamin D; Hancock, P A; Deaton, John; Suedfeld, Peter

2012-01-01

311

[Calciphylaxis: a multidisciplinary approach].  

PubMed

Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA) is a rare syndrome characterized by medial calcification of the small arteries and ischemia of the subcutaneous tissue that progresses to non-healing ulcers and gangrene. It is common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), associated with high morbidity and mortality, and there is no standard treatment at the present time. We report a case of CUA developing in a 70-year-old woman on dialysis, with a normal plasma concentration of parathyroid hormone but a body mass index of 40 kg/m(2) and receiving oral anticoagulant therapy. She was successfully treated with a multidisciplinary approach focused on medical and surgical therapy. PMID:19644842

Piantanida, Mariassunta; Plastino, G; Valente, V; Tassinari, J; Fabrizi, T; Orlandino, G

2009-01-01

312

Working with Your Treatment Team  

MedlinePLUS

... Lynn Scott Acerca de Cáncer de Cérvix Datos Tipos de Cáncer de Cérvix Nivel del Cáncer de Cérvix Prevención La Prueba del Pap Vacunas del VPH Antes de Tener Síntomas Síntomas Evaluar Su Riesgo ...

313

Surgical leadership and standardization of multidisciplinary breast cancer care: the evolution of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers.  

PubMed

Evidence has shown that multidisciplinary specialist team evaluation and management for cancer results in better patient outcomes. For breast cancer, breast centers are where this evaluation and management occurs. The National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers has helped standardize multidisciplinary breast cancer care by defining services and standards required of accredited breast centers. PMID:24882354

Bensenhaver, Jessica; Winchester, David P

2014-07-01

314

GEO Standard and Interoperability Forum (SIF) European Team  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The European GEO SIF has been initiated by the GIGAS project in an effort to better coordinate European requirements for GEO and GEOSS related activities, and is recognised by GEO as a regional SIF. To help advance the interoperability goals of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS), the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Architecture and Data Committee (ADC) has established a Standards and Interoperability Forum (SIF) to support GEO organizations offering components and services to GEOSS. The SIF will help GEOSS contributors understand how to work with the GEOSS interoperability guidelines and how to enter their "interoperability arrangements" (standards or other ad hoc arrangements for interoperability) into the GEOSS registries. This will greatly facilitate the utility of GEOSS and encourage significant increase in participation. To carry out its work most effectively, the SIF promotes to form Regional Teams. They will help to organize and optimize the support coming from the different parts of the World and reach out regional and multi-disciplinary Scientific Communities. This will allow to have true global representation in supporting GEOSS interoperability. A SIF European Team is foreseen. The main role of the SIF is facilitating interoperability and working with members and participating organizations as they offer data and information services to the users of GEOSS. In this framework, the purpose of having a European Regional Team is to increase efficiency in carrying out the work of the SIF. Experts can join the SIF European Team by registering at the SIF European Team wiki site: http://www.thegigasforum.eu/sif/

Nativi, Stefano

2010-05-01

315

Team Management of Cognitive Dysfunction in Children with Spina Bifida.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article presents a summary of the cognitive difficulties often encountered when a multidisciplinary team attempts to manage children with spina bifida. Suggestions for intervention and program planning are presented. A model for team management incorporating medical, allied health, and psychosocial professionals is presented. (Author/CL)

Knowlton, Douglas D.; And Others

1985-01-01

316

Team Performance and Space Safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses how space safety is influenced by the ability of teams to work and communicate effectively together. A multi-national team of six authors provides different perspectives on human systems, from both research and operational points of view. When operations involve teams whose members cross organizational and cultural boundaries as they do in current space operations, it is especially critical and challenging to facilitate the most effective team performance. Three key factors that affect team performance and space safety are discussed: (1) communication as related to team performance; (2) the influence of organizations, teams and culture and (3) team training interventions. Relevant research and current practices are described for each of the three areas and a summary in the form of recommendations is provided.

Kanki, B. G.; Rogers, D. G.; Bessone, L.; Parke, B.; Sandal, G. M.; Whiteley, I.

317

Team Discretion, Team Pay Dispersion and Team Efficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

The traditional team tournament model needs too rigorous assumptions which cannot reflect the different features of organizational structure and management style. The new model introduces team discretion into the traditional model and proposes expected utility function of team efficiency. Next, non-linear programming method is adopted to analyze the relationship among team discretion, team pay dispersion and team efficiency. The results

Chang-zheng Zhang; Huai-zu Li

2007-01-01

318

Integrating principles and multidisciplinary projects in design education  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The critical need to improve engineering design education in the U.S. is presented and a number of actions to achieve that end are discussed. The importance of teaching undergraduates the latest methods and principles through the means of team design in multidisciplinary projects leading to a testable product is emphasized. Desirable training for design instructors is described and techniques for selecting and managing projects that teach effectively are discussed.

Nevill, Gale E., Jr.

1992-01-01

319

The Use of Modern Information and Communication Systems and Technology and Experienced Stress at Work in Mixed Deaf-Hearing Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we look at the use of ICST in two multilingual and deaf/hearing teams in an educational and research environment. We describe how job demands and job control (decision authority level) contribute to feelings of stress among the deaf and the hearing employees. We find that most information is received by all of the team members in…

van Gils, Gardy; van den Bogaerde, Beppie; de Lange, Rob

2010-01-01

320

Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

321

Breakfast: a multidisciplinary approach  

PubMed Central

Background The role of breakfast as an essential part of an healthy diet has been only recently promoted even if breakfast practices were known since the Middle Age. The growing scientific evidences on this topic are extremely sector-based nevertheless breakfast could be regarded from different point of views and from different expertises. This approach, that take into account history, sociology, anthropology, medicine, psychology and pedagogy, is useful to better understand the value of this meal in our culture. The aim of this paper was to analyse breakfast-related issues based on a multidisciplinary approach with input by specialists from different fields of learning. Discussion Breakfast is now recommended as part of a diet because it is associated with healthier macro- and micronutrient intakes, body mass index and lifestyle. Moreover recent studies showed that breakfast improves cognitive function, intuitive perception and academic performance. Research demonstrates the importance of providing breakfast not only to children but in adults and elderly too. Although the important role breakfast plays in maintaining the health, epidemiological data from industrialised countries reveal that many individuals either eat a nutritionally unhealthy breakfast or skip it completely. Summary The historical, bio-psychological and educational value of breakfast in our culture is extremely important and should be recognized and stressed by the scientific community. Efforts should be done to promote this practice for the individual health and well-being.

2013-01-01

322

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The research associate will be expected to work collaboratively with team members in shaping research questions, delivering Toolbox workshops, collecting data, analyzing data, presenting results at meetings, and producing articles for publication. Interaction with other Toolbox researchers working on diverse aspects of this broadly collaborative project is expected.

323

Pemphigus vulgaris: a multidisciplinary approach to management.  

PubMed

Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare but potentially life-threatening autoimmune disease affecting the mucosa and the skin. The disease is caused by circulating antibodies to desmosomes (important adhesion proteins linking cells together). Disruption of these intercellular connections results in a loss of cohesion between cells (acantholysis). The clinical result of this process is the development of multiple blisters that easily rupture, leaving behind painful sloughing eroded areas of mucosa and/or skin. We report a case of severe PV in a 56-year-old man presenting with widespread, painful, eroded mucocutaneous lesions. The severity of the disease demanded a range of medical and surgical specialties to successfully manage the problem. This paper highlights the importance of an early multidisciplinary team approach to improve the outcome of patients suffering with this disease. PMID:24343801

Vinall, Christopher; Stevens, Lucy; McArdle, Paul

2013-01-01

324

Ipilimumab and Its Toxicities: A Multidisciplinary Approach  

PubMed Central

The treatment for metastatic melanoma has evolved significantly in the past few years. Ipilimumab, an immunotherapy, is now in mainstream oncology practice given that it has shown improved overall survival in randomized clinical trials. Other immune modulating agents, such as programmed death receptor-1 and programmed death receptor ligand-1 antibodies, are showing promise in early clinical trials. This manuscript will review ipilimumab and its most common side effects. Immune-related adverse events (irAEs) are important to recognize early, and their presentation, timing of onset, and general recommendations for workup and management will be reviewed. Assembling a multidisciplinary team, as well as thorough education of the patient, is recommended to optimize patient care.

Agarwala, Sanjiv S.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Weber, Jeffrey S.

2013-01-01

325

Initial Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Framework  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Within the Supersonics (SUP) Project of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), an initial multidisciplinary design & analysis framework has been developed. A set of low- and intermediate-fidelity discipline design and analysis codes were integrated within a multidisciplinary design and analysis framework and demonstrated on two challenging test cases. The first test case demonstrates an initial capability to design for low boom and performance. The second test case demonstrates rapid assessment of a well-characterized design. The current system has been shown to greatly increase the design and analysis speed and capability, and many future areas for development were identified. This work has established a state-of-the-art capability for immediate use by supersonic concept designers and systems analysts at NASA, while also providing a strong base to build upon for future releases as more multifidelity capabilities are developed and integrated.

Ozoroski, L. P.; Geiselhart, K. A.; Padula, S. L.; Li, W.; Olson, E. D.; Campbell, R. L.; Shields, E. W.; Berton, J. J.; Gray, J. S.; Jones, S. M.; Naiman, C. G.; Seidel, J. A.; Moore, K. T.; Naylor, B. A.; Townsend, S.

2010-01-01

326

Distinctive Displays: A Multidisciplinary Caseplay.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a caseplay, which combines case study and role play, about a business merger. Management and finance issues addressed and ways to use it in single and multidisciplinary courses are discussed. (SK)

Silver, William S.; Howard, C. Thomas; Clouse, Maclyn L.

1999-01-01

327

Back to the Future of Social Work: Child and Adolescent Mental Health and the Post Qualifying Curriculum in England and Wales  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first social work course to focus on children's mental health in the UK began in 1929 at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The subsequent child guidance movement spawned the genesis of child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) where social workers held a pivotal and much-respected role among multi-disciplinary teams. This role has been undermined in

Steven Walker

2010-01-01

328

Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

2011-01-01

329

Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer  

PubMed Central

The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial) evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients’ views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care) have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients’ holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to reevaluate the structure and models of MDT-work to ensure that MDTs are an efficient use of resources.

Taylor, Cath; Shewbridge, Amanda; Harris, Jenny; Green, James S

2013-01-01

330

Multidisciplinary Graduate Education in Bioprocess Engineering  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the accomplishments of the University of Georgia in establishing an academic program geared toward the emerging biobased products industry. By virtue of its strengths and structure, the University of Georgia is particularly well-suited for developing a program focused on plant- and microbial-based bioproducts, and it was in this general area that this program was developed. The program had several unique characteristics. First, we implemented a distinguished lecture series that brought outstanding scientists and engineers to our University to interact with students and share their vision of the biobased economy. Second, we offered industrially-oriented and multidisciplinary courses that provided students with a broad background on various facets of biobased business and technology. Third, we provided the students with opportunities to expand beyond the classroom by engaging in research lab rotations and industrial internships. Fourth, each student was engaged in a creative research project as led by a multidisciplinary faculty team. Throughout the implementation of these activities, we maintained a student-centered, mentoring approach to education. The most tangible outcome of this project was the graduation of two students who participated in a variety of scholarly activities, culminating in research toward the completion of a thesis and dissertation. Both research projects involved the use of microorganisms to produce industrial products from agricultural substrates via fermentation processes. The research advanced our understanding of microorganisms as used for industrial processes and products, as described in several articles published in scholarly journals and presentations made at scientific conferences (see information on pp. 14-15). Another outcome is one graduate course, Fermentation Engineering Laboratory, which is a unique experiential and multidisciplinary course. This course will be offered in the future as an elective to graduate students in several engineering and science degree programs. Other significant developments have arisen as direct or indirect consequences of this project. The University of Georgia has established a B.S. Biochemical Engineering degree and an M.S. Biochemical Engineering degree. A strong component of these degree programs is education toward a biobased economy. We will integrate particularly positive components of this project (such as the distinguished lecture series) into these degree programs. The University of Georgia is establishing a Center for Biorefining and Carbon Cycling. This multidisciplinary Center houses a pilot scale biorefinery, comprising a pyrolysis unit and an ethanol plant. Together with new faculty positions that are currently being advertised, this project has encouraged the University of Georgia to assume a leadership role in the preparation of students in the biobased industries of the future.

Mark A. Eiteman

2006-04-18

331

Occurrence and Effects of Leader Delegation in Virtual Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Virtual teams are an important work structure in software development projects. However, little is known about what constitutes effective virtual team leadership, in particular, what amount of leader delegation is appropriate in a virtual environment? This study investigates virtual team leader delegation and explores the impact of delegation strategies on virtual team performance mediated by team motivation, team flexibility and

Suling Zhang; Marilyn Tremaine; Richard Egan; Allen E. Milewski; Linda Plotnick; Patrick O'sullivan; Jerry Fjermestad

2008-01-01

332

Sporting a new view: Team member schema similarity in sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers in sport psychology have focused little attention on the role of cognition in teams. However, in industrial\\/organizational psychology cognitive variables in work teams have been shown to be related to team performance and to psychological outcomes such as team viability. One purpose of the present article was to describe one conceptualization of cognition in teams, team member schema similarity

Joan R. Rentsch; Shaun W. Davenport

2006-01-01

333

Team Building  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A personal reminiscence of the events surrounding the establishment of Tertiary Education and Management (TEAM), the journal of the European Association for Institutional Research EAIR, the European Higher Education Society--and its development over its first decade, by the founding Editor, at the time of his retirement from the post.

Begg, Roddy

2005-01-01

334

Networking emergency teams in Jerusalem.  

PubMed

With the recent upsurge in terrorism, more and more attention is being directed at examining the effectiveness and efficiency of emergency teams. These teams tend to focus on their areas of expertise without necessarily communicating, cooperating or coordinating their operations. Research suggests that improved interpersonal communication and coordination enhances the overall work of each emergency team, and that their combined effort is far in excess of the sum of their individual endeavours. This paper outlines attempts made in Jerusalem to improve the performance of emergency teams and to help the helpers by holding training workshops, setting up a forum of co-workers and encouraging dialogue among various emergency teams in the city. A planned intervention programme was designed to enable informal networking between team leaders. The programme had an impact on team workers and resulted in a more coordinated and effective service delivery during emergencies. PMID:20735459

Yanay, Uri; Benjamin, Sharon; Yamin, Hanna Gimmon

2011-01-01

335

ED diversion: multidisciplinary approach engages high utilizers, helps them better navigate the health care system.  

PubMed

Working with partners, the St. Charles Health System in Bend, OR, has implemented an ED diversion project that is helping patients who frequent the ED connect with more appropriate settings for their primary care needs. The hospital identifies high ED utilizers using claims data, then a multidisciplinary engagement team establishes care plans for these patients. The most at-risk patients are paired with community health workers to help them better navigate the health care system. The ED diversion project has reduced unnecessary ED utilization by 45% to 70% in cohorts of patients that the hospital has analyzed thus far. The hospital contracts with a non-profit organization to supply and train community health workers. Community health workers follow a structured model that includes more than 80 different pathways to follow, based on patient conditions. PMID:22043590

2011-11-01

336

TeamSTEPPS(®) simulation-based training: an evidence-based strategy to improve trauma team performance.  

PubMed

Initial assessment and treatment of critically injured patients is time sensitive, creating a high-stress environment for trauma team members and patients. Effective leadership, communication, and clinical acumen are essential team dynamics for best patient outcomes. Innovative multidisciplinary TeamSTEPPS(®) simulation-based training is an effective model for teams in high-risk health care settings. Use of this simulation model has led to improved trauma team performance and patient outcomes while incorporating new physician and nursing personnel into a time-sensitive, high-stress environment. PMID:24199639

Harvey, Ellen M; Wright, Andrea; Taylor, Dallas; Bath, Jennifer; Collier, Bryan

2013-11-01

337

Leading virtual teams: hierarchical leadership, structural supports, and shared team leadership.  

PubMed

Using a field sample of 101 virtual teams, this research empirically evaluates the impact of traditional hierarchical leadership, structural supports, and shared team leadership on team performance. Building on Bell and Kozlowski's (2002) work, we expected structural supports and shared team leadership to be more, and hierarchical leadership to be less, strongly related to team performance when teams were more virtual in nature. As predicted, results from moderation analyses indicated that the extent to which teams were more virtual attenuated relations between hierarchical leadership and team performance but strengthened relations for structural supports and team performance. However, shared team leadership was significantly related to team performance regardless of the degree of virtuality. Results are discussed in terms of needed research extensions for understanding leadership processes in virtual teams and practical implications for leading virtual teams. PMID:23205494

Hoch, Julia E; Kozlowski, Steve W J

2014-05-01

338

Blog - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Addressing complex societal challenges, such as climate change or the diabetes pandemic, requires bringing together different types of knowledge from disparate academic disciplines and societal stakeholders (Stirling, 2007). There is evidence to suggest that scientific teams and organizations with diverse types of expertise are more capable of solving complex problems than experts working individually in narrow areas of expertise (Page, 2007).

339

Making This Team  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the sponsors of the Cohort at Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia--a program to increase the number of minority male students in Advanced Placement (AP) classes--the authors view their work with the young men in this program as very similar to coaching a team. The Cohort asks these young men to challenge and push themselves; to test…

Beitler, Alan; Bushong, Delores; Reid, Al

2004-01-01

340

Multidisciplinary care: experience of patients with complex needs.  

PubMed

The rapidly increasing prevalence of diabetes with its high morbidity and mortality raises the need for an integrated multidisciplinary service from health care providers across health sectors. The aim of this study was to explore the diabetic patients' experience of multidisciplinary care, in particular their perceptions, perceived barriers and facilitators. Thirteen patients with type-2 diabetes admitted to the emergency department of a local hospital in NSW were interviewed and completed a demographic questionnaire. Results showed that patients found it inconvenient to be referred to many health professionals because of multiple physical and psychosocial barriers. Separate sets of instructions from different health professionals were overwhelming, confusing and conflicting. Lack of a dedicated coordinator of care, follow up and support for self-management from health professionals were factors that contributed to patients' challenges in being actively involved in their care. The presence of multiple co-morbidities made it more difficult for patients to juggle priorities and 'commitments' to many health professionals. In addition, complex socioeconomic and cultural issues, such as financial difficulties, lack of transport and language barriers, intensified the challenge for these patients to navigate the health system independently. Few patients felt that having many health professionals involved in their care improved their diabetes control. Communication among the multidisciplinary care team was fragmented and had a negative effect on the coordination of care. The patients' perspective is important to identify the problems they experience and to formulate strategies for improving multidisciplinary care for patients with diabetes. PMID:23021199

Maneze, Della; Dennis, Sarah; Chen, Huei-Yang; Taggart, Jane; Vagholkar, Sanjyot; Bunker, Jeremy; Liaw, Siaw Teng

2014-01-01

341

Influence of an Infectious Diseases Specialist on ICU Multidisciplinary Rounds  

PubMed Central

Objective. To ascertain the influence of a physician infectious diseases specialist (IDS) on antibiotic use in a medical/surgical intensive care unit. Method. Over a 5-month period, the antibiotic regimens ordered by the ICU multidisciplinary team were studied. The days of antibiotic therapy (DOT) when management decisions included an IDS were compared to DOT in the absence of an IDS. The associated treatment expense was calculated. Results. Prior to multidisciplinary rounds (MDRs), 79-80% of the patients were receiving one or more antibiotic. IDS participation occurred in 61 multidisciplinary rounding sessions. There were 384 patients who before MDRs had orders for 669 days of antimicrobial therapy (DOT). After MDRs, the antimicrobial DOT were reduced to 511 with a concomitant cost saving of $3772. There were 51 MDR sessions that occurred in the absence of the IDS. There were 352 patients who before MDRs had orders for 593 DOT. After MDRs, the DOT were reduced to 572 with a cost savings of $727. The results were normalized by number of patients evaluated with statistically greater reductions when MDRs included the IDS. In addition, the number of rounding sessions with a reduction in DOT was greater with the participation of the IDS. Conclusion. The addition of an IDS to multidisciplinary ICU patient rounds resulted in a reduction in antibiotic DOT and attendant drug expense.

Gilbert, David N.

2014-01-01

342

Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Optimization Frameworks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since July 2008, the Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed one major milestone, Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework Milestone (9/30/08), and is completing the Generation 1 Framework validation milestone, which is due December 2008. Included in the presentation are: details of progress on developing the Open MDAO framework, modeling and testing the Generation 1 Framework, progress toward establishing partnerships with external parties, and discussion of additional potential collaborations

Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

2009-01-01

343

Team-oriented software practicum  

Microsoft Academic Search

New computer science graduates are inadequately prepared to apply their abstract knowledge, and they have rarely worked in the teams required in modern business. To remedy these shortcomings and alleviate the low motivation that often accompanies the first years of college, we proposed that a pilot group of entering freshmen should be formed into a four-year experimental team. Unlike traditional

J. C. Schlimmer; J. B. Fletcher; L. A. Hermens

1994-01-01

344

Who's on Your Health Care Team?  

MedlinePLUS

... easy access to the care you need. Your Health Care Team Work with your doctors to create the ... expect from your primary diabetes doctor. Visiting Your Health Care Team Stay up-to-date on our latest ...

345

Giant Serpentine Aneurysms: Multidisciplinary Management  

PubMed Central

Summary Sixty-five cases of intracranial giant serpentine aneurysms (GS?s), including 61 cases reported in the literature and four additional cases presented in this study were reviewed. The clinical presentation, possible causes, natural history, and especially management of GSAs are discussed with emphasis on the need for aggressive intervention and multidisciplinary management.

Anshun, W.; Feng, L.; Daming, W.

2000-01-01

346

Multidisciplinary education through software engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Software engineering is a multidisciplinary activity with professionals from many different backgrounds interacting together to build systems. For example, a software engineer may find him\\/herself interacting with technical writers, application specific specialists, database analysts, production engineers, and marketing professionals. One of the most important people to interact with the software engineer is the client who may not have very much

Susan A. Mengel; Locke Carter

1999-01-01

347

Part 1: Participatory Ergonomics Approach to Waste Container Handling Utilizing a Multidisciplimnary Team.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This multidisciplinary team approach to waste container handling, developed within the Grassroots Ergonomics process, presents participatory ergonomic interpretations of quantitative and qualitative aspects of this process resulting in a peer developed tr...

D. M. Zalk T. W. Biggs C. M. Perry R. Taageson P. Tittiranonda S. Burastero L. Barsnick

2000-01-01

348

Medical students' awareness of the role of physiotherapists in multidisciplinary healthcare.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Successful implementation of multidisciplinary healthcare approach may among other things depend on students' education and knowledge of the roles of healthcare professions other than their own. This study investigated medical students' awareness of the role of physiotherapists in multidisciplinary healthcare teams. Methods: One hundred and ninety-eight medical students of the University of Maiduguri, Nigeria, participated in this study. Each student completed a self-administered questionnaire that obtained information on demographics, awareness of role of physiotherapists and educational sources of information as well as suggestions about other sources of information about physiotherapy. Chi-square test was used to analyze differences in awareness by gender and year of study. Results: Although rates of awareness regarding some physiotherapy roles were high, many of the medical students were unaware that physiotherapists can practice on first-contact basis and autonomously. About 60% of the students also viewed the role of physiotherapists in the health team as one of providing assistance for medical work. Clinical ward round was the most common source of information on physiotherapy although many of the students suggested classroom lecture as a preferred means of obtaining information. Year of study resulted in significantly different level of awareness (p?

Vincent-Onabajo, Grace O; Mustapha, Abba; Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje Y

2014-07-01

349

Managing Geographically Dispersed Teams: From Temporary to Permanent Global Virtual Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rise and spread of information communication technologies (ICT) has enabled increasing use of geographically dispersed work teams (Global Virtual Teams). Originally, Global Virtual Teams were mainly organised into temporary projects. Little research has focused on the emergent challenge for organisations to move towards establishing permanent Global Virtual Teams in order to leverage knowledge sharing and cooperation across distance. To

Tine S. Hansen; Alexander Hope; Robert C. Moehler

2012-01-01

350

Reducing cancer disparities for minorities: a multidisciplinary research agenda to improve patient access to health systems, clinical trials, and effective cancer therapy. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

This report provides details on the successful efforts of an institution to consolidate the knowledge and experience of multidisciplinary teams (marketing, education, and outreach specialists) to advise clinical trial investigators on minority accrual.

351

The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Patient safety is of the utmost importance in health care. The patient safety culture in an institution has great impact on patient safety. To enhance patient safety and to design strategies to reduce medical injuries, there is a current focus on measuring the patient safety culture. The aim of the present study was to describe the patient safety culture in an ED at two different hospitals before and after a Quality improvement (QI) project that was aimed to enhance patient safety. Methods A repeated cross-sectional design, using the Hospital Survey On Patient Safety Culture questionnaire before and after a quality improvement project in two emergency departments at a county hospital and a university hospital. The questionnaire was developed to obtain a better understanding of the patient safety culture of an entire hospital or of specific departments. The Swedish version has 51 questions and 15 dimensions. Results At the county hospital, a difference between baseline and follow-up was observed in three dimensions. For two of these dimensions, Team-work within hospital and Communication openness, a higher score was measured at the follow-up. At the university hospital, a higher score was measured at follow-up for the two dimensions Team-work across hospital units and Team-work within hospital. Conclusion The result showed changes in the self-estimated patient safety culture, mainly regarding team-work and communication openness. Most of the improvements at follow-up were seen by physicians, and mainly at the county hospital.

2014-01-01

352

Cammp Team  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The International Space Station (ISS) Configuration Analysis Modeling and Mass Properties (CAMMP) Team is presenting a demo of certain CAMMP capabilities at a Booz Allen Hamilton conference in San Antonio. The team will be showing pictures of low fidelity, simplified ISS models, but no dimensions or technical data. The presentation will include a brief description of the contract and task, description and picture of the Topology, description of Generic Ground Rules and Constraints (GGR&C), description of Stage Analysis with constraints applied, and wrap up with description of other tasks such as Special Studies, Cable Routing, etc. The models include conceptual Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Lander images and animations created for promotional purposes, which are based entirely on public domain conceptual images from public NASA web sites and publicly available magazine articles and are not based on any actual designs, measurements, or 3D models. Conceptual Mars rover and lander are completely conceptual and are not based on any NASA designs or data. The demonstration includes High Fidelity Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of ISS provided by the ISS 3D CAD Team which will be used in a visual display to demonstrate the capabilities of the Teamcenter Visualization software. The demonstration will include 3D views of the CAD models including random measurements that will be taken to demonstrate the measurement tool. A 3D PDF file will be demonstrated of the Blue Book fidelity assembly complete model with no vehicles attached. The 3D zoom and rotation will be displayed as well as random measurements from the measurement tool. The External Configuration Analysis and Tracking Tool (ExCATT) Microsoft Access Database will be demonstrated to show its capabilities to organize and track hardware on ISS. The data included will be part numbers, serial numbers, historical, current, and future locations, of external hardware components on station. It includes dates of all external ISS events and flights and the associated hardware changes for each event. The hardware location information does not always reveal the exact location of the hardware, only the general location. In some cases the location is a module or carrier, in other cases it is a WIF socket, handrail, or attach point. Only small portions of the data will be displayed for demonstration purposes.

Evertt, Shonn F.; Collins, Michael; Hahn, William

2008-01-01

353

Systematic review of multidisciplinary interventions in heart failure  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine the impact of multidisciplinary interventions on hospital admission and mortality in heart failure. Design: Systematic review. Thirteen databases were searched and reference lists from included trials and related reviews were checked. Trial authors were contacted if further information was required. Setting: Randomised controlled trials conducted in both hospital and community settings. Patients: Trials were included if all, or a defined subgroup of patients, had a diagnosis of heart failure. Interventions: Multidisciplinary interventions were defined as those in which heart failure management was the responsibility of a multidisciplinary team including medical input plus one or more of the following: specialist nurse, pharmacist, dietician, or social worker. Interventions were separated into four mutually exclusive groups: provision of home visits; home physiological monitoring or televideo link; telephone follow up but no home visits; and hospital or clinic interventions alone. Pharmaceutical and exercise based interventions were excluded. Main outcome measures: All cause hospital admission, all cause mortality, and heart failure hospital admission. Results: 74 trials were identified, of which 30 contained relevant data for inclusion in meta-analyses. Multidisciplinary interventions reduced all cause admission (relative risk (RR) 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79 to 0.95, p ?=? 0.002), although significant heterogeneity was found (p ?=? 0.002). All cause mortality was also reduced (RR 0.79, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.92, p ?=? 0.002) as was heart failure admission (RR 0.70, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.81, p < 0.001). These results varied little with sensitivity analyses. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary interventions for heart failure reduce both hospital admission and all cause mortality. The most effective interventions were delivered at least partly in the home.

Holland, R; Battersby, J; Harvey, I; Lenaghan, E; Smith, J; Hay, L

2005-01-01

354

A Study in the Adaptation of Team Leader Style  

Microsoft Academic Search

I. INTRODUCTION Since the 90s at the 20th century, work team has become a popular concept in the field of management. Reasons are rich. Team has great potentials. Data show that about 40% of organizations in the west develop and use the form of work team. The work style based on team has already achieved remarkable fruits. In some world-known

Weimei Zhang; Lei Zhu

2011-01-01

355

BARREL Team Launching 20 Balloons  

NASA Video Gallery

A movie made by the NASA-Funded Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses, or BARREL, team on their work launching 20 balloons in Antarctica during the Dec. 2013/Jan. 2014 campa...

356

Predicting Organizational Orientation toward Teams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Questionnaire data from 81 managers and 364 employees identified five factors predicting high team orientation in organizations: relationships with management, innovation, control of work by immediate supervisors, group cohesiveness, and open group process. (SK)

Russ-Eft, Darlene

1993-01-01

357

A model of delivering multi-disciplinary care to people with 46 XY DSD  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2006, a consensus statement was jointly produced by the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society (LWPES) and the European Society of Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE) concerning the management of disorders of sex development (DSD) [1]. A recommendation provided by this consensus was that evaluation and long-term care for people affected by DSD should be performed at medical centers with multi-disciplinary teams

Blake W. Palmer; Amy B. Wisniewski; Traci L. Schaeffer; Ashwini Mallappa; Jeanie B. Tryggestad; Sowmya Krishnan; Laura J. Chalmers; Kenneth Copeland; Steven D. Chernausek; William G. Reiner; Bradley P. Kropp

358

The Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale: Reliability, Validity, and Scale Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and preliminary reliability and validity studies are reported for the Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale, a 110-item Likert scale that assesses satisfaction with team health care services. The methods used to construct subscales may have implications for other psychometric studies of satisfaction and quality…

Martin, Pamela Davis; Brantley, Philip J.; McKnight, G. Tipton; Jones, Glenn N.; Springer, Annette

1997-01-01

359

Effect of Team Building Practices on Safety Performance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Team Building creates a working atmosphere where characteristics are developed that enable the team to be effective. Construction projects that have successful safety programs have many of the same characteristics of effective teams. This thesis analyzes ...

M. T. Sykes

1998-01-01

360

Using Teams in Higher Education: Resources for Researchers and Practitioners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an annotated list of articles on use of teams in higher education, including organizing concepts for effective team-building, administrative strategies and effectiveness, case studies of teams at work, and lessons learned from the business context. (MSE)

Frost, Susan H.; Bidani, Pankaj

1998-01-01

361

Aeroelastic modeling for the FIT (Functional Integration Technology) team F/A-18 simulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of Langley Research Center's commitment to developing multidisciplinary integration methods to improve aerospace systems, the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team was established to perform dynamics integration research using an existing aircraft configuration, the F/A-18. An essential part of this effort has been the development of a comprehensive simulation modeling capability that includes structural, control, and propulsion dynamics as well as steady and unsteady aerodynamics. The structural and unsteady aerodynamics contributions come from an aeroelastic mode. Some details of the aeroelastic modeling done for the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team research are presented. Particular attention is given to work done in the area of correction factors to unsteady aerodynamics data.

Zeiler, Thomas A.; Wieseman, Carol D.

1989-01-01

362

Measuring Team Knowledge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multioperator tasks often require complex cognitive processing at the team level. Many team cognitive processes, such as situation assessment and coordination, are thought to rely on team knowledge. Team knowledge is multifaceted and comprises relatively generic knowledge in the form of team mental models and more specific team situation models. In this methodological review paper, we review recent efforts to

Nancy J. Cooke; Eduardo Salas; Janis A. Cannon-Bowers; Renée J. Stout

2000-01-01

363

Team Tune-Up: Examining Team Transcripts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a worksheet that can be used to examine documentation of team meetings in light of goals the team has established. Materials for this worksheet include copies of team transcripts, yellow and pink highlighters, and pencils. Directions for examining team transcripts are presented.

Journal of Staff Development, 2010

2010-01-01

364

Adopting Team Contracts to Initiate Team Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Creighton, Harris and Coleman (2005) suggest that educational leadership instructors introduce aspiring administrators to a sound knowledge base. Currently, engaging in teams is recommended for high performance and problem-solving. Bolton (1999) recommends that instructors coach teams so teaming skills are improved. But, oftentimes, there are team

Marcellino, Patricia Ann

2008-01-01

365

The case for a children's multidisciplinary food allergy clinic.  

PubMed

In the UK, up to 6% of children are affected by food allergy. Accurate diagnosis, appropriate dietary management, family education, support and continuing follow up are essential to prevent further reactions and optimise the child's nutritional intake and growth. Setting up an improved, one- stop service to achieve these goals, which includes the multidisciplinary team, is feasible and cost neutral. This audit and service evaluation involved questionnaires with parents and staff focus groups to examine provision in one area of England. The views of children were not included. Practitioners involved should consider further training if necessary. PMID:24805032

Denton, Sally-Ann; Holloway, Judith; Venter, Carina

2014-05-01

366

Multidisciplinary rounds have become a must, experts say.  

PubMed

Multidisciplinary rounds are a good way to improve throughput, reduce length of stay and readmissions, and improve patient satisfaction, experts say. They add: The meetings help the care team identify what is needed for discharge and get all of the disciplines on the same page. The structure and participants will vary by organization, but nursing, case management, finance, and pharmacy should be represented. The meetings should be at the same time and place every day and should last no more than 45 minutes. PMID:25065099

2014-08-01

367

Multidisciplinary Evaluation of Patients With Suspected Lung Cancer  

PubMed Central

Lung cancer diagnosis and treatment has evolved to require the input and expertise of multiple diverse medical and surgical specialties. The approach to lung cancer patients requires the adherence to a few principles that include thorough use of staging modalities to assure the proper treatment for each patient, and an understanding of the limitations and advantages of each of these modalities. Evidence is continuing to emerge that supports the notion that diagnostic workup and treatment of lung cancer patients is best done within the context of a multidisciplinary team devoted to this purpose.

Bauman, Kristy; Arenberg, Douglas

2009-01-01

368

Fabry's disease: a multidisciplinary disorder.  

PubMed Central

Fabry's disease is an X-linked hereditary disorder resulting in accumulation of a glycolipid (galactosylgalactosyl glucosylceramide) due to deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. The diagnosis can be made by histopathologic examination of skin biopsy, low activity of alpha-galactosidase in leucocytes and genetic examination. Treatment is symptomatic. We want to stress the multidisciplinary collaboration necessary to deal with this condition, in order to prevent acceleration of symptoms. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 2

Peters, F. P.; Sommer, A.; Vermeulen, A.; Cheriex, E. C.; Kho, T. L.

1997-01-01

369

Professionals' views on interprofessional stroke team functioning  

PubMed Central

Introduction The quality of integrated stroke care depends on smooth team functioning but professionals may not always work well together. Professionals’ perspectives on the factors that influence stroke team functioning remain largely unexamined. Understanding their experiences is critical to indentifying measures to improve team functioning. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that contributed to the success of interprofessional stroke teams as perceived by team members. Methods We distributed questionnaires to professionals within 34 integrated stroke care teams at various health care facilities in 9 Dutch regions. 558 respondents (response rate: 39%) completed the questionnaire. To account for the hierarchical structure of the study design we fitted a hierarchical random-effects model. The hierarchical structure comprised 558 stroke team members (level 1) nested in 34 teams (level 2). Results Analyses showed that personal development, social well-being, interprofessional education, communication, and role understanding significantly contributed to stroke team functioning. Team-level constructs affecting interprofessional stroke team functioning were communication and role understanding. No significant relationships were found with individual-level personal autonomy and team-level cohesion. Discussion and conclusion Our findings suggest that interventions to improve team members’ social well-being, communication, and role understanding will improve teams’ performance. To further advance interprofessional team functioning, healthcare organizations should pay attention to developing professionals’ interpersonal skills and interprofessional education.

Cramm, Jane M; Nieboer, Anna P

2011-01-01

370

Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization Generation 1 and Next Steps  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed three major milestones during Fiscal Year (FY)08: "Requirements Definition" Milestone (1/31/08); "GEN 1 Integrated Multi-disciplinary Toolset" (Annual Performance Goal) (6/30/08); and "Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework" Milestone (9/30/08). Details of all three milestones are explained including documentation available, potential partner collaborations, and next steps in FY09.

Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

2008-01-01

371

Development and Implementation of a Junior-Year Design Course in a Multidisciplinary Environment Along with Media Art and Marketing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Contemporary thought in engineering education is to provide the students with as much hands-on, real world experience as possible. Students are expected to hit the ground running in the work force immediately after their graduation and be savvy in many divergent skills such as teamwork, communication, project, people and business management. ABET (Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology) has included the multidisciplinary team experience as one of the assessable outcomes for students enrolled in any accredited engineering program. Social commentators have highlighted the need for businesses to succeed in a global environment and as such the education system must attempt to create engineers with global perspectives. There are several solutions to achieve this objective such as internships, co-op programs, student exchange programs, laboratory-intensive classes and the ever-popular Capstone Senior Design Project. This last and the most important topic of integrated design has been reviewed and discussed extensively in literature and engineering education conferences. There is considerable variability in the scope; breadth and depth of these capstone projects, the team size and composition and the time, and sponsors and budget for the projects. Some of these projects are fairly involved requiring budgets of up to $40,000 while some projects require graduate students as an integral part of the design team. One common theme in most of these projects is that the courses are designed for senior students enrolled mainly in engineering and other disciplines. While these projects are multidisciplinary, synchronization of course syllabi across the disciplines was not made.

Jones, Cathleen; Manohar, Priyadarshan; Radermacher, Jon

2009-07-16

372

A multi?disciplinary approach to family growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Little Sisters of the Assumption, a Family Health Service, has been working with high risk families in the East Harlem community for the past twenty?seven years. Using an innovative multidisciplinary model, it combines a home health agency staffed by nurses, a Medical Social Worker, Physical Therapist, Homemaker\\/Home Health Aides, and a Pastoral Minister; a grandmother program staffed by women

Gail Gordon

1985-01-01

373

[Combined screening for Down syndrome in Marseille multidisciplinary prenatal centers].  

PubMed

Combined screening for trisomy 21 (CS) is established since January 2010 in multidisciplinary centers for prenatal screening in Marseille. Our work investigates its implementation. To date, the false positive rate is 3.5% and the coverage of the SC after six months is 5.7% in our low-risk population. PMID:21111660

Ivorra-Deleuze, D; Bretelle, F; Heinemann, M; Lévy, A; Toga, C; Philip, N; Gamerre, M; Boubli, L; D'Ercole, C

2010-12-01

374

An empirical examination of the relationships between adult attention deficit, reliance on team mates and team member performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of adult attention deficit on team members, the relationships between team members, the task performance dynamics within teams and team member performance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A total of 304 management students working in self managing project teams completed measures of adult attention deficit, difficulty with necessary tasks, general independence,

Graeme H. Coetzer; Richard Trimble

2009-01-01

375

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The College of Business Administration is deeply involved in the Center for Collaboration Science and the ideal candidate will become part of the Center's Management Team and participate in the Center's efforts to develop grants and research projects in Collaboration Science. Additional duties include working with local and national organizations on Collaboration Science research and outreach projects, conducting and publishing academic research on Collaboration Science, and mentoring junior faculty and students on all levels on aspects of Collaboration Science research and teaching.

376

Arthrogryposis in infancy, multidisciplinary approach: case report  

PubMed Central

Background Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is an etiopathogenetically heterogeneous disorder characterised by non-progressive multiple intra-articular contractures, which can be recognised at birth. The frequency is estimated at 1 in 3,000 newborns. Etiopathogenesis of arthrogryposis is multifactorial. Case presentation We report first 26 weeks of life of a boy with severe arthrogryposis. Owing to the integrated rehabilitation approach and orthopaedic treatment a visible improvement in the range of motion as well as the functionality of the child was achieved. This article proposes a cooperation of various specialists: paediatrician, orthopaedist, specialist of medical rehabilitation and physiotherapist. Conclusions Rehabilitation of a child with arthrogryposis should be early, comprehensive and multidisciplinary. Corrective treatment of knee and hip joints in infants with arthrogryposis should be preceded by the ultrasound control. There are no reports in the literature on the ultrasound imaging techniques which can be used prior to the planned orthopaedic and rehabilitative treatment in infants with arthrogryposis. The experience of our team indicates that such an approach allows to minimise the diagnostic errors and to maintain an effective treatment without the risk of joint destabilisation.

2013-01-01

377

Sounds like Team Spirit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always trying to improve on what they've done before. Second, success in any endeavor stems from people who know how to interpret a composition to sound beautiful when played in a different style. For Knowledge Sharing to work, it must be adapted, reinterpreted, shaped and played with at the centers. In this regard, we've been blessed with another crazy, passionate, inspired artist named Claire Smith. Claire has turned Ames Research Center in California into APPL-west. She is so good and committed to what she does that I just refer people to her whenever they have questions about implementing project management development at the field level. Finally, any great effort requires talented people working behind the scenes, the people who formulate a business approach and know how to manage the money so that the music gets heard. I have known many brilliant and creative people with a ton of ideas that never take off due to an inability to work the business. Again, the Knowledge Sharing team has been fortunate to have competent and passionate people, specifically Tony Maturo and his procurement team at Goddard Space Flight Center, to make sure the process is in place to support the effort. This kind of support is every bit as crucial as the activity itself, and the efforts and creativity that go into successful procurement and contracting is a vital ingredient of this successful team.

Hoffman, Edward

2002-01-01

378

Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These web pages introduce the concept of work and its relation to energy. An example of electric work and energy using the example of a Van de Graaff Generator. These pages are part of "From Stargazers to Starships", an extensive web site that introduces topics in physics and astronomy using space exploration and space science. Translations are available in French and Spanish.

Stern, David

2006-07-16

379

Dynamically Reconfigurable Approach to Multidisciplinary Problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The complexity and autonomy of the constituent disciplines and the diversity of the disciplinary data formats make the task of integrating simulations into a multidisciplinary design optimization problem extremely time-consuming and difficult. We propose a dynamically reconfigurable approach to MDO problem formulation wherein an appropriate implementation of the disciplinary information results in basic computational components that can be combined into different MDO problem formulations and solution algorithms, including hybrid strategies, with relative ease. The ability to re-use the computational components is due to the special structure of the MDO problem. We believe that this structure can and should be used to formulate and solve optimization problems in the multidisciplinary context. The present work identifies the basic computational components in several MDO problem formulations and examines the dynamically reconfigurable approach in the context of a popular class of optimization methods. We show that if the disciplinary sensitivity information is implemented in a modular fashion, the transfer of sensitivity information among the formulations under study is straightforward. This enables not only experimentation with a variety of problem formations in a research environment, but also the flexible use of formulations in a production design environment.

Alexandrov, Natalie M.; Lewis, Robert Michael

2003-01-01

380

[Integrated multidisciplinary treatment of colorectal neoplasms].  

PubMed

In this retrospective study, the modality and advantages of the multidisciplinary diagnostic work-up and therapy regarding colorectal neoplasm were analysed. Over the period 2004-2008, 63 patients underwent multidisciplinary treatment for colorectal cancer. All patients underwent surgery (laparoscopic/open). Exeresis was supplemented by adjuvant chemotherapy in those cases beyond IIA stage; all cases of extraperitoneal rectal and anal canal neoplasms plus one case of carcinoma of the transverse colon, initially inoperable, underwent neoadjuvant radiotherapy plus chemotherapy. The treatment was initiated approximately 3 weeks after the diagnosis. Fifty-four percent of patients with colonic and upper rectal neoplasms were given adjuvant chemotherapy, starting around 4 weeks after surgery. Exeresis was performed in those patients with extraperitoneal rectal and anal canal neoplasms (12.7%) about 6-8 weeks after they had completed neoadjuvant therapy. At the end of the treatment, 76% of the overall total numbers of patients were in good condition (follow-up 4-50 months). The remaining 24% suffered recurrences about 13 months after the treatment for colonic and upper rectal neoplasm, and 8 1/2 months after treatment for extraperitoneal rectal/anal canal neoplasms. Seventy-five percent of the recurring cases underwent treatment again, with 50% success; the others are still undergoing treatment. The best therapeutic results were obtained by programmed integration of the various diagnostic-therapeutic steps according to an algorithm which we elaborated to evaluate all types of neoplasm at any stage of illness. PMID:19391334

Procacciante, Fabio; Caciolo, Fabiana; Diamantini, Giulia; Flati, Donato; Pitasi, Franca; Abilaliaj, Valmira; Covotta, Alfredo; Banelli, Enzo; Di Seri, Marisa; Citone, Giorgio

2009-01-01

381

Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents  

SciTech Connect

The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

Not Available

1993-11-01

382

Common Factors of High Performance Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Utilization of work teams is now wide spread in all types of organizations throughout the world. However, an understanding of the important factors common to high performance teams is rare. The purpose of this content analysis is to explore the literature and propose findings related to high performance teams. These include definition and types,…

Jackson, Bruce; Madsen, Susan R.

2005-01-01

383

The Administrative Team: Dynamism vs. Dysfunction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Before real success can come to any school, the administrative team must become a dynamic entity. The team and its ability to work within the school setting are fundamental to improving instruction and increasing student achievement. The team spirit that this group develops has ramifications on school climate that directly affect teachers,…

Tyson, Nathan

2008-01-01

384

The incidence of Parkinson's disease in a Bedford Community "Adult Working Age" Mental Health Team and its relationship with the use of atypical antipsychotics: an audit and description of current practice.  

PubMed

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative condition of aging, however it is only seen infrequently in an Adult 'Working Age' Community Mental Health Team. When it presents, it presents in a number of different situations, but, since antipsychotics may often cause extrapyramidal side effects, there is often the concern that iatrogenic parkinsonism may occur. Here we describe a number of different patients presenting in a CMHT who have been assessed and investigated for Parkinson's disease. In many of these medication for Parkinson's disease was started. Often the patients need to stay on an atypical antipsychotic because of the mental health symptoms which they present. We assess present practice in the team, and make recommendations. PMID:23995193

Holt, Clare; Agius, Mark

2013-09-01

385

["Continuity". Progress of a team in today's psychiatry].  

PubMed

Long-term psychiatric treatments still present unsolved problems. They are interesting as far as we do our best to keep them within the general frame of reference in the working practice of our sector. Our aim here, therefore, is not to define a model which could be used everywhere, but mainly to describe the ever-questioned research of a team involved in today's psychiatry. That team chose to organise their reflexion around two polarities representing good illustrations of the whole situation as they are faced with everyday: "Crisis" and "Continuity". The purpose of "continuity" is to find out and maintain a therapeutical position which would not oversimplify the difficult problems of psychosis--that is to say avoiding the care to psychotic patients to become a routine. In order to do so, we try to use at their best the current abilities of each team member, whose multi-disciplinary capabilities allow for an individualized and diversified approach; the care-givers also try to maintain a permanent and coherent dialogue between them. This therapeutical stance is time-consuming for all members of the team, but does not require any extra equipment. The point is to organise and maintain the function of a group of caregivers around and together with a specific patient and his environment. Today's psychiatry cannot but raise the question of iatrogenicity in its interventions, of which "Chronicity" might well be one of its end-results. With the "Continuity" concept, we intend to maintain a fairly clear therapeutical relationship both with the patient and his environment, thus preventing, as far as possible, defects in the future. PMID:3107452

Quartier, F

1986-11-01

386

Multidisciplinary approach in natural hazards: avoiding misunderstandings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is today widely recognised that a multidisciplinary approach is worthwhile when it comes to natural hazards. While the knowledge of scientists from different fields about those problematic is getting deeper everyday, the need for a brighter understanding of natural hazards and the risk they induce becomes more and more obvious. A risk situation cannot be limited to a single scientific field. It involves many components, each of them studied by a specific science. The understanding of the whole question of risk requires a dialogue between those sciences. The large amount of research projects based on a multidisciplinary approach shows that this need for dialogue is known and accepted. However, the participants of such projects encounter a problem in communication: they do not speak the same language. Even though scientists are willing to share with colleagues from other fields, they are facing the hinder of the specific terminology they use in their work. Social scientists, natural scientists and engineering scientists do not speak the same language, although they might use the same words. For instance, basic terms like "risk", "vulnerability", or concepts like "risk management" or "governance" might have very different meanings according to the scientists involved. The approach of risk situation itself is specific to each science. How can this hindrance be avoided? The first step of every research project (and further, every work in group on a risk related situation) could be a framing about terminology. It is necessary that all partners acknowledge the different vocabularies involved, and understand that their background and professional context influences their understanding of terms and concepts. The aim is not to negate those vocabularies, nor to define a new one that would fit to all sciences. It is to ensure that all partners are aware of the possible misunderstandings and accept that others might use other terminologies. Thus, major misunderstandings could be avoided. Such a framing process should be held for every situation involving cooperation, because the context and the situation are also influencing the understanding. Taking into account dissimilarities from the start and further, when working together, will make multidisciplinary projects more fruitful. For this purpose, the presentation will introduce possible actions and guidelines to help finding a common language.

Angignard, M.

2009-04-01

387

Sleep Team  

MedlinePLUS

... Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologists. Advance Practice Nurses/Physician Assistant Nurses and physicians work to assist the board ... for sleep patients. The role of nurses and physician assistants varies by state. Both practice within the scope ...

388

Shared Learning for Primary Health Care Teams: A Success Story.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A simulated learning exercise based on genograms was used with professionals in multidisciplinary primary health-care teams. Evaluation supported the importance of a positive learning environment, constructive use of personal and professional experiences, learner control, intellectual challenge and relevance, and reflection and debriefing. (SK)

Howkins, Elizabeth; Allison, Althea

1997-01-01

389

Blog - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The Team Science Toolkit is a dynamic, interactive website to support team science and the Science of Team Science (SciTS) field. The Toolkit provides resources for investigators who are using team science approaches, as well as scholars and evaluators who are studying or evaluating the processes and outcomes of team science.

390

Low-Educated Women with Chronic Pain Were Less Often Selected to Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Programs  

PubMed Central

Background There is a lack of research about a potential education-related bias in assessment of patients with chronic pain. The aim of this study was to analyze whether low-educated men and women with chronic pain were less often selected to multidisciplinary rehabilitation than those with high education. Methods The population consisted of consecutive patients (n?=?595 women, 266 men) referred during a three-year period from mainly primary health care centers for a multidisciplinary team assessment at a pain rehabilitation clinic at a university hospital in Northern Sweden. Patient data were collected from the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation National Pain Register. The outcome variable was being selected by the multidisciplinary team assessment to a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program. The independent variables were: sex, age, born outside Sweden, education, pain severity as well as the hospital, anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Results Low-educated women were less often selected to multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs than high-educated women (OR 0.55, CI 0.30–0.98), even after control for age, being born outside Sweden, pain intensity and HADS. No significant findings were found when comparing the results between high- and low-educated men. Conclusion Our findings can be interpreted as possible discrimination against low-educated women with chronic pain in hospital referrals to pain rehabilitation. There is a need for more gender-theoretical research emphasizing the importance of taking several power dimensions into account when analyzing possible bias in health care.

Hammarstrom, Anne; Haukenes, Inger; Fjellman Wiklund, Anncristine; Lehti, Arja; Wiklund, Maria; Evengard, Birgitta; Stalnacke, Britt-Marie

2014-01-01

391

Technical writing on self-directed teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many companies are reorganizing their work forces and encouraging teamwork by creating empowered or self-directed work teams (SDTs). While hardly a new management concept, companies are relying more heavily on teams to deliver competitive, high-quality goods and services. Consequently, employees of these companies find that they must change the way they work, in terms of both organization and process. This

J. L. Pauls

1994-01-01

392

Teams Talking Trials: Results of an RCT to improve the communication of cancer teams about treatment trials. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

A randomized trial was conducted to assess the effectiveness of a Teams Talking Trials Workshop in increasing clinical trials awareness, involvement, communication, and recruitment. Members of 22 multidisciplinary cancer teams in Wales, UK, participated in workshops and were surveyed pre- and post-intervention about trial-related awareness; attitudes toward trial management and recruitment; involvement in trials; and perceptions about the level of trial involvement within their teams.

393

Working  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

394

Studying Team Science - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

The science of team science (SciTS) is a rapidly emerging field focused on understanding and enhancing the processes and outcomes of team science. A key goal of SciTS is to learn more about factors that maximize the efficiency, productivity, and effectiveness of team science initiatives.

395

Team memory: information management for business teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

A need exists to organize, integrate, and annotate information generated by business teams. To investigate this domain, a prototype `team memory' system has been developed based on prior theory in the domains of team and organizational memory, similar systems with related features, and data gathered from a case study of four longitudinal workgroups supported by an electronic collaboration system. This

Joline Morrison

1993-01-01

396

Family meetings in palliative care: Multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines  

PubMed Central

Background Support for family carers is a core function of palliative care. Family meetings are commonly recommended as a useful way for health care professionals to convey information, discuss goals of care and plan care strategies with patients and family carers. Yet it seems there is insufficient research to demonstrate the utlility of family meetings or the best way to conduct them. This study sought to develop multidisciplinary clinical practice guidelines for conducting family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting based on available evidence and consensus based expert opinion. Methods The guidelines were developed via the following methods: (1) A literature review; (2) Conceptual framework; (3) Refinement of the guidelines based on feedback from an expert panel and focus groups with multidisciplinary specialists from three palliative care units and three major teaching hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. Results The literature review revealed that no comprehensive exploration of the conduct and utility of family meetings in the specialist palliative care setting has occurred. Preliminary clinical guidelines were developed by the research team, based on relevant literature and a conceptual framework informed by: single session therapy, principles of therapeutic communication and models of coping and family consultation. A multidisciplinary expert panel refined the content of the guidelines and the applicability of the guidelines was then assessed via two focus groups of multidisciplinary palliative care specialists. The complete version of the guidelines is presented. Conclusion Family meetings provide an opportunity to enhance the quality of care provided to palliative care patients and their family carers. The clinical guidelines developed from this study offer a framework for preparing, conducting and evaluating family meetings. Future research and clinical implications are outlined.

Hudson, Peter; Quinn, Karen; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Aranda, Sanchia

2008-01-01

397

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Team Science and Collaboration Practitioner. Consulting and advising for developing teams and institutions interested in participating in and supporting team science. Experience with bringing diverse groups together from various backgrounds and institutions to solve challenging scientific problems.

398

A Team Approach for Providing Programs for Handicapped Learners in Vocational and Technical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Calls for a team approach to meeting the vocational needs of handicapped learners. Emphasizes the need for a multi-disciplinary approach to vocational programing. Specifies the competencies necessary to facilitate a team effort and provides an example of a cooperative approach to the individualized education programs. (Editor/CT)

Warden, Paul; And Others

1982-01-01

399

Characteristics of Students Referred to School Teams: Implications for Preventive Psychological Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 274 multidisciplinary staff members in 54 elementary and secondary schools participated in a study that identified the characteristics of students referred to school teams. The results suggested that meetings addressed academic and learning needs more often than emotional or psychological concerns. Implications for the practice of school psychology and the development of team-facilitated prevention programs are discussed.

Ester Cole

1992-01-01

400

Multidisciplinary Service Utilization Pattern by Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Single Institution Study  

PubMed Central

Purpose. To analyze the patterns and associations of adjunctive service visits by head and neck cancer patients receiving primary, concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients receiving adjunctive support during a uniform chemoradiation regimen for stages III-IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Univariate and multivariate models for each outcome were obtained from simple and multivariate linear regression analyses. Results. Fifty-two consecutive patients were assessed. Female gender, single marital status, and nonprivate insurance were factors associated with an increased number of social work visits. In a multivariate analysis, female gender and marital status were related to increased social work services. Female gender and stage IV disease were significant for increased nursing visits. In a multivariate analysis for nursing visits, living greater than 20 miles between home and hospital was a negative predictive factor. Conclusion. Treatment of advanced stage head and neck cancer with concurrent chemoradiation warrants a multidisciplinary approach. Female gender, single marital status, and stage IV disease were correlated with increased utilization of social work and nursing services. Distance over 20 miles from the center was a negative factor. This information may help guide the treatment team to allocate resources for the comprehensive care of patients.

Junn, Jacqueline C.; Kim, Irene A.; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Tan, Marietta; Fan, Katherine Y.; Lake, Spencer T.; Zaboli, David; Messing, Barbara P.; Ulmer, Karen; Harrer, Karen B.; Gold, Dorothy; Ryniak, Keri L.; Zinreich, Eva S.; Tang, Mei; Levine, Marshall A.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

2012-01-01

401

Multi-disciplinary optimization of aeroservoelastic systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of the research project was to continue the development of new methods for efficient aeroservoelastic analysis and optimization. The main targets were as follows: to complete the development of analytical tools for the investigation of flutter with large stiffness changes; to continue the work on efficient continuous gust response and sensitivity derivatives; and to advance the techniques of calculating dynamic loads with control and unsteady aerodynamic effects. An efficient and highly accurate mathematical model for time-domain analysis of flutter during which large structural changes occur was developed in cooperation with Carol D. Wieseman of NASA LaRC. The model was based on the second-year work 'Modal Coordinates for Aeroelastic Analysis with Large Local Structural Variations'. The work on continuous gust response was completed. An abstract of the paper 'Continuous Gust Response and Sensitivity Derivatives Using State-Space Models' was submitted for presentation in the 33rd Israel Annual Conference on Aviation and Astronautics, Feb. 1993. The abstract is given in Appendix A. The work extends the optimization model to deal with continuous gust objectives in a way that facilitates their inclusion in the efficient multi-disciplinary optimization scheme. Currently under development is a work designed to extend the analysis and optimization capabilities to loads and stress considerations. The work is on aircraft dynamic loads in response to impulsive and non-impulsive excitation. The work extends the formulations of the mode-displacement and summation-of-forces methods to include modes with significant local distortions, and load modes. An abstract of the paper,'Structural Dynamic Loads in Response to Impulsive Excitation' is given in appendix B. Another work performed this year under the Grant was 'Size-Reduction Techniques for the Determination of Efficient Aeroservoelastic Models' given in Appendix C.

Karpel, Mardechay

1992-11-01

402

Team Task Analysis: Identifying Tasks and Jobs That Are Team Based  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents initial information on the development and validation of three team task analysis scales. These scales were designed to quantitatively assess the extent to which a group of tasks or a job is team based. During a 2-week period, 52 male students working in 4-person teams were trained to perform a complex highly interdependent computer-simulated combat mission consisting

Winfred Arthur; Bryan D. Edwards; Suzanne T. Bell; Anton J. Villado; Winston Bennett

2005-01-01

403

Virtual Team Culture and the Amplification of Team Boundary Permeability on Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The implementation of virtual teams is briskly increasing, particularly among transnational organizations that find global virtual teams a natural way to address their needs for global reach. While proximal and virtual teams share many attributes, including similar performance measures, they differ in characteristics in the nature of the work.…

Workman, Michael

2005-01-01

404

Team Nutrition School Activity Planner. A How-To Guide for Team Nutrition Schools and Supporters.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This "how-to" guide for Team Nutrition fairs and tasting activities helps Team Nutrition supporters and schools understand how to work together to improve the health and education of children. Team Nutrition is the implementation tool for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's School Meals Initiative for Healthy Children. Section 1 of the guide…

Food and Consumer Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

405

Integration of Multidisciplinary Sensory Data:  

PubMed Central

The paper provides an overview of neuroinformatics research at Yale University being performed as part of the national Human Brain Project. This research is exploring the integration of multidisciplinary sensory data, using the olfactory system as a model domain. The neuroinformatics activities fall into three main areas: 1) building databases and related tools that support experimental olfactory research at Yale and can also serve as resources for the field as a whole, 2) using computer models (molecular models and neuronal models) to help understand data being collected experimentally and to help guide further laboratory experiments, 3) performing basic neuroinformatics research to develop new informatics technologies, including a flexible data model (EAV/CR, entity-attribute-value with classes and relationships) designed to facilitate the integration of diverse heterogeneous data within a single unifying framework.

Miller, Perry L.; Nadkarni, Prakash; Singer, Michael; Marenco, Luis; Hines, Michael; Shepherd, Gordon

2001-01-01

406

NPSS Multidisciplinary Integration and Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this task was to enhance the capability of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) by expanding its reach into the high-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis area. This task investigated numerical techniques to convert between cold static to hot running geometry of compressor blades. Numerical calculations of blade deformations were iteratively done with high fidelity flow simulations together with high fidelity structural analysis of the compressor blade. The flow simulations were performed with the Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis (ADPAC) code, while structural analyses were performed with the ANSYS code. High fidelity analyses were used to evaluate the effects on performance of: variations in tip clearance, uncertainty in manufacturing tolerance, variable inlet guide vane scheduling, and the effects of rotational speed on the hot running geometry of the compressor blades.

Hall, Edward J.; Rasche, Joseph; Simons, Todd A.; Hoyniak, Daniel

2006-01-01

407

TeamXchange: A Team Project Experience Involving Virtual Teams and Fluid Team Membership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

TeamXchange, an online team-based exercise, is described. TeamXchange is consistent with the collaborative model of learning and provides a means of fostering enhanced student learning and engagement through collaboration in virtual teams experiencing periodic membership changes. It was administered in an undergraduate Organizational Behavior…

Dineen, Brian R.

2005-01-01

408

Sports Teams Extend Reach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

Shah, Nirvi

2012-01-01

409

Team management: developing concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Asserts that teamwork is fundamental to continuous corporate improvement. Discusses the characteristics and benefits of team management on an organization-wide basis and examines the steps that can be taken by a company to support team management throughout the organization. Reviews the literature and case examples in order to articulate the following aspects of team management: the best team skills, the

Samuel M. Natale; Anthony F. Libertella; Barbara Edwards

1998-01-01

410

Never A Team Member; Suddenly A Team Leader!  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the 1960's there weren't many female engineering students, and `teaming' was not an official part of the curriculum. Teams were formed casually, as a way to share the enormous load of lab reports and problem sets -- that is unless you were one of those female students. Physical isolation and institutional lockdown in the female dorms made my participation in study teams extremely difficult. As a result, I got a better formal education (working all the problem sets myself), but I missed out on learning a very practical skill. Leading a team is hard work, particularly if you've never been a member of a team. One solution is to work harder than almost anyone else. Another trick is to choose a small pond in which to be a big frog. I chose SETI (the search for extraterrestrial intelligence) because I was captured by the idea that I live among the first generation of humans who can try to answer this ancient question (Are we alone?) by making observations, rather than accepting some belief system. I'm still hooked by that concept and struggling to make the pond bigger (and financially secure) to bring in the next generation and the generation-after-that, for as long as it may take to end our cosmic isolation, or accept our singularity.

Tarter, Jill

2006-04-01

411

Inside Teams in Education. Fastback 496.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes the many benefits that arise when educators work together as a team to solve problems and share decisions. Although not a quick fix for problems in education, a team-oriented culture helps people feel better about themselves and their efforts, encouraging staff at various levels in the school district to work together for…

Smialek, Mary Ann

412

A Multidisciplinary Clerkship in Emergency Medicine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At the New Jersey Medical School, an obligatory, multidisciplinary, fourth-year emergency medicine clerkship requires ambulance duty, emergency room rotation, medical specialty lectures, and a cardiac life support providers course. Particular problems associated with multidisciplinary courses are discussed. (Author/JMD)

And Others; Marshall, Carter L.

1979-01-01

413

The Early Nutrition Programming Project (EARNEST): 5 y of successful multidisciplinary collaborative research.  

PubMed

Differences in nutritional experiences during sensitive periods in early life, both before and after birth, can program a person's future development, metabolism, and health. A better scientific understanding of early nutrition programming holds enormous potential for implementing preventive strategies to enhance individuals' long-term health, well-being, and performance. This understanding could reduce costs of health care and social services and may enhance the wealth of societies. The Early Nutrition Programming Project (EARNEST) brought together a multidisciplinary team of international scientists and leaders in key areas of the early nutrition programming field from 40 major research centers across 16 European countries. The project had a total budget of 16.5 million Euros and was funded by the European Communities under the Sixth Framework Program for Research and Technical Development and coordinated by the Children's Hospital at Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich. The integrated program of work combined experimental studies in humans, prospective observational studies, and mechanistic animal work, including physiologic studies, cell culture models, and molecular biology techniques. The project lasted from April 2005 to October 2010. After the end of the project, the Early Nutrition Academy (http://www.early-nutrition.org) continues to serve as a platform for the exchange of information, scientific collaboration, and training activities in the area of programming. This article highlights some of the scientific results, achievements, and efforts of EARNEST. PMID:21974891

Koletzko, Berthold; Brands, Brigitte; Demmelmair, Hans

2011-12-01

414

When do bad apples not spoil the barrel? negative relationships in teams, team performance, and buffering mechanisms.  

PubMed

The study of negative relationships in teams has primarily focused on the impact of negative relationships on individual team member attitudes and performance in teams. The mechanisms and contingencies that can buffer against the damaging effects of negative relationships on team performance have received limited attention. Building on social interdependence theory and the multilevel model of team motivation, we examine in a sample of 73 work teams the team-level attributes that foster the promotive social interaction that can neutralize the adverse effect of negative relationships on team cohesion and, consequently, on team performance. The results indicate that high levels of team-member exchange as well as high task-interdependence attenuate how team cohesion and team performance suffer from negative relationships. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:24661274

de Jong, Jeroen P; Cur?eu, Petru L; Leenders, Roger Th A J

2014-05-01

415

Decentralized Formation Control for a Team of Anonymous Mobile Robots  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a coordination framework for mobile robot teams performing a task through cooperation. In cooperative robotics applications, robot teams are basically required to generate and maintain a geometric pattern, and adapt to their environment. Moreover, keeping the team formation, they continue to strive toward achieving their mission even if a part of team is unable to work and function

Geunho Lee; Nak Young Chong

2006-01-01

416

Facilitating virtual team relationships via Internet and conventional communication channels  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of personal relationships between team members is recognised as an important factor in enhancing effective working relationships among members of both co-located and virtual teams. However, little has been written on how to build these online relationships among virtual team members. This paper reports part of a qualitative research study on how facilitators of virtual teams build and

David J. Pauleen; Pak Yoong

2001-01-01

417

Team learning center design principles  

SciTech Connect

This is a preliminary report of a multi-year collaboration of the authors addressing the subject: Can a facility be designed for team learning and would it improve the efficiency and effectiveness of team interactions? Team learning in this context is a broad definition that covers all activities where small to large groups of people come together to work, to learn, and to share through team activities. Multimedia, networking, such as World Wide Web and other tools, are greatly enhancing the capability of individual learning. This paper addresses the application of technology and design to facilitate group or team learning. Many organizational meetings need tens of people to come together to do work as a large group and then divide into smaller subgroups of five to ten to work and then to return and report and interact with the larger group. Current facilities were not, in general, designed for this type of meeting. Problems with current facilities are defined and a preliminary design solution to many of the identified problems is presented.

Daily, B.; Loveland, J.; Whatley, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)] [and others

1995-06-01

418

Multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

KEYWORDS Geothermal sciences, geothermics, research, theory and application, numerical calculation, geothermal modeling, Technical University Darmstadt, Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) INTRODUCTION In times of global warming renewable, green energies are getting more and more important. The development of application of geothermal energy as a part of renewable energies in Germany is a multidisciplinary process of fast growing research and improvements. Geothermal energy is the energy, which is stored below earth's surface. The word geothermal derives from the Greek words geo (earth) and thermos (heat), so geothermal is a synonym to earth heat. Geothermal energy is one of the auspicious renewable energies. In average the temperature increases 3°C every 100 m of depth, which is termed as geothermal gradient. Therefore 99 percent of our planet is hotter than 1.000°C, while 99 percent of that last percent is even hotter than 100°C. Already in a depth of about 1 kilometer temperatures of 35 - 40°C can be achieved. While other renewable energies arise less or more from the sun, geothermal energy sources its heat from the earth's interior, which is caused mostly by radioactive decay of persistent isotopes. This means a possibility of a base-loadable form of energy supply. Especially efficient is the use of deep geothermal energy of high-enthalpie reservoirs, which means a high energy potential in low depths. In Germany no high-enthalpie reservoirs are given. To use the given low-enthalpie potential and to generate geothermal power efficiently inventions and improvements need to be performed. An important part of geothermal progresses is performed by universities with multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling. Especially in deep geothermal systems numerical calculations are essential for a correct dimensioning of the geothermal system. Therefore German universities and state aided organizations are developing numerical programs for a detailed use of application on geothermal systems. The history of this multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling performed by German universities is shown in this paper. Outstanding geothermal research programs of German universities and state aided organizations (BGR, LBEG, GGA) are pointed out. Actual geothermal modeling programs based on the Finite-Element-Method or the Finite-Differences-Method as well as analytical programs are introduced. National and international geothermal projects supported by German universities and state aided organizations are described. Examples of supervised shallow and deep geothermal systems are given. Actually the Technical University Darmstadt is performing a research program supported by a national organization, the Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi). Main aim of this research program titled experimental investigation for the verification of a Finite-Element-Multiphase-Model is to analyze the subsoil as a three-phases-model with separated consideration of conduction, convection and advection and their subsequent interaction. The latest developments of numerical projects as well as the actual state of the before mentioned research program are pointed out in the paper. REFERENCES Quick, H., Arslan, U., Meißner, S., Michael, J. 2007. Deep foundations and geothermal energy - a multi-purpose solution, IFHS: 8. International conference on multi-purpose high-rise towers and tall buildings, Abu Dhabi, 2007 Arslan, U. and Huber, H. 2008. Application of geothermal energy. University of Istanbul, Yapistanbul No. 3 / 2008, Turkey, 2008 Quick, Q., Michael, J., Arslan, U., Huber, H. 2010. History of International Geothermal Power Plants and Geothermal Projects in Germany, Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 Arslan, U., Huber, H. 2010. Education of Geothermal Sciences in Germany as part of an application orientated research, Proceedings European Civil Engineering Education and Training (EUCEET III) Special Volume, 2010

-Ing. Ulvi Arslan, Univ., ., Dr. _., Prof.; Heiko Huber, Dipl.-Ing.

2010-05-01

419

Recent advances in multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A joint activity involving NASA and Army researchers at NASA LaRC to develop optimization procedures to improve the rotor blade design process by integrating appropriate disciplines and accounting for all of the important interactions among the disciplines is described. The disciplines involved include rotor aerodynamics, rotor dynamics, rotor structures, airframe dynamics, and acoustics. The work is focused on combining these five key disciplines in an optimization procedure capable of designing a rotor system to satisfy multidisciplinary design requirements. Fundamental to the plan is a three-phased approach. In phase 1, the disciplines of blade dynamics, blade aerodynamics, and blade structure are closely coupled while acoustics and airframe dynamics are decoupled and are accounted for as effective constraints on the design for the first three disciplines. In phase 2, acoustics is integrated with the first three disciplines. Finally, in phase 3, airframe dynamics is integrated with the other four disciplines. Representative results from work performed to date are described. These include optimal placement of tuning masses for reduction of blade vibratory shear forces, integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization, and integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization. Examples of validating procedures are described.

Adelman, Howard M.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.

1992-01-01

420

Deficiencies in provision of integrated multidisciplinary podiatry care for patients with inflammatory arthritis: A UK district general hospital experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundFoot problems are highly prevalent in inflammatory arthritis (IA), especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Chronic inflammation can lead to permanent structural changes, deformity and disability. Early podiatry intervention in RA improves long term outcomes. National guidelines recommend that patients should be treated by a multidisciplinary team with dedicated podiatry services. In clinical practice funding constraints limit availability of these services.

M. Juarez; E. Price; D. Collins; L. Williamson

2010-01-01

421

Multidisciplinary Obstetric Simulated Emergency Scenarios (MOSES): Promoting Patient Safety in Obstetrics with Teamwork-Focused Interprofessional Simulations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: We describe an example of simulation-based interprofessional continuing education, the multidisciplinary obstetric simulated emergency scenarios (MOSES) course, which was designed to enhance nontechnical skills among obstetric teams and, hence, improve patient safety. Participants' perceptions of MOSES courses, their learning, and…

Freeth, Della; Ayida, Gubby; Berridge, Emma Jane; Mackintosh, Nicola; Norris, Beverley; Sadler, Chris; Strachan, Alasdair

2009-01-01

422

What Is Team Science? - Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Team science is a collaborative effort to address a scientific challenge that leverages the strengths and expertise of professionals trained in different fields. Although traditional single-investigator driven approaches are ideal for many scientific endeavors, coordinated teams of investigators with diverse skills and knowledge may be especially helpful for studies of complex social problems with multiple causes.

423

TEAM EMOTION RECOGNITION ACCURACY AND TEAM PERFORMANCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Teams' emotional skills can be more than the sum of their individual parts. Although theory emphasizes emotion as an interpersonal adapta- tion, emotion recognition skill has long been conceptualized as an indi- vidual-level intelligence. We introduce the construct of team emotion recognition accuracy (TERA) - the ability of members to recognize teammates' emotions - and present preliminary evidence for its

Hillary Anger Elfenbein; Jeffrey T. Polzer; Nalini Ambady

424

The myth of the top management team.  

PubMed

Companies all across the economic spectrum are making use of teams. They go by a variety of names and can be found at all levels. In fact, you are likely to find the group at the very top of an organization professing to be a team. But even in the best of companies, a so-called top team seldom functions as a real team. Real teams must follow a well-defined discipline to achieve their performance potential. And performance is the key issue--not the fostering of "team values" such as empowerment, sensitivity, or involvement. In recent years, the focus on performance was lost in many companies. Even today, CEOs and senior executives often see few gains in performance from their attempts to become more teamlike. Nevertheless, a team effort at the top can be essential to capturing the highest performance results possible--when the conditions are right. Good leadership requires differentiating between team and nonteam opportunities, and then acting accordingly. Three litmus tests must be passed for a team at the top to be effective. First, the team must shape collective work-products--these are tangible performance results that the group can achieve working together that surpass what the team members could have achieved working on their own. Second, the leadership role must shift, depending on the task at hand. And third, the team's members must be mutually accountable for the group's results. When these criteria can be met, senior executives should come together to achieve real team performance. When the criteria cannot be met, they should rely on the individual leadership skills that they have honed over the years. PMID:10174799

Katzenbach, J R

1997-01-01

425

Using Assessment for Developing Team Building Skills  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Ability to function in teams," "good team building skills," and "teamwork" are all now common phrases in the classifieds. It is increasingly important in society today, both in social and work environments, to be a good team player. But how do we actually develop those skills and evaluate whether our efforts have had a measurable impact so that we can adjust our approach for maximum benefit? This booklet presents a team assessment process developed to track and improve students team building skill as well as a complete description of its implementation. Preliminary research on team building skills development was performed with a group of community college students in the Electrical Technology Program. The results from the two year study indicate that active participation in the team assessment process is beneficial in developing team building and leadership skills in college students. All the materials necessary to implement the team assessment process for a classroom or workplace setting are provided in this booklet. Using these materials and methods can yield evidence of improved team building and leadership skills important in meeting accreditation standards or for use in evaluating corporate team skills and leadership development.

Akins, Lean M.; Barbuto, Daniel C.

2009-12-01

426

Towards understanding the relationship between team climate and software quality - a quasi-experimental study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes an empirical study that examined the work climate within software development teams. The question was\\u000a whether the team climate in software developer teams has any relation to software product quality. We define team climate\\u000a as the shared perceptions of the team’s work procedures and practices. The team climate factors examined were West and Anderson’s\\u000a participative safety, support

Silvia Teresita Acuña; Marta Gómez; Natalia Juristo Juzgado

2008-01-01

427

Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)], E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu; Mancuso, Anthony A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Werning, John W. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Villaret, Douglas B. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2007-10-01

428

Using teams and committees effectively.  

PubMed

In a corporate setting, the term "team" usually refers to members of a group with different responsibilities and/or skills working together to achieve a common goal or objective. The major reason why a company desires group as opposed to individual involvement is to derive sounder decisions. Two essential issues to resolve in establishing teams or committees are 1) who should be a member or representative; and 2) what is the charter or mandate for the group. Representatives join a team or group in numerous ways; four common methods are 1) appointment by the group member's supervisor; 2) recruitment by the team leader; 3) appointment by a senior manager; and 4) volunteering. There are various profiles of how groups can approach a decision, including "groupthink," the "ideal group process" and the "debating society" approach. Group meetings must be structured to ensure that decisions are reached and then implemented. Foresight and planning are essential prerequisites to have efficient teams and committees that work effectively and achieve their goals. PMID:15616679

Spilker, B

1998-09-01

429

A multidisciplinary approach to the study of the fluminense vegetation.  

PubMed

The fluminense vegetation, more specifically the flora from the Jurubatiba restinga has been investigated by a multidisciplinary team of botanists, chemist, radiobiologist, insect physiologists and geneticist. Vouchers of 564 specimens have been collected, identified, organized in an herbarium, and a database is being build up containing, in addition to classical botanical data, chemical data and information on the potential economic use either for landscape gardening, alternative foods or as medicinal plants. Phytochemical studies of the Guttiferae, Clusia hilariana, yielded oleanolic acid and nemorosone. Their biological activities against the haematophagous insect Rhodnius prolixus vector of Chagas disease have been investigated. Finally, it has been observed that aquatic plants possessed high levels of the natural radionuclide polonium-210, which seems to be originated mainly from soil rather than from atmospheric supply. PMID:11960185

Kelecom, Alphonse; Reis, Geisa L; Fevereiro, Paulo C A; Silva, Janie G; Santos, Marcelo G; Mello Neto, Cicero B; Gonzalez, Marcelo S; Gouvea, Rita C S; Almeida, Gilberto S S

2002-03-01

430

Developing Trust in Virtual Teams  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rapid globalization, advances in technology, flatter organizational structures, synergistic cooperation among firms, and a shift to knowledge work environments have led to the increasing use of virtual teams in organizations. Selecting, training, and socializing employees in virtual teamwork has therefore become an important human resource…

Germain, Marie-Line

2011-01-01

431

Bioenergy research: a new paradigm in multidisciplinary research  

PubMed Central

The field of biology is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary and cross-cutting. This changing research atmosphere is creating the way for a new kind of enquiry that while building upon the traditional research establishment is providing a new multidisciplinary framework to more effectively address scientific grand challenges. Using the US Department of Energy sponsored BioEnergy Science Center as an example, we highlight how impactful breakthroughs in biofuel science can be achieved within a large cross-disciplinary team environment. Such transformational insights are key to furthering our understanding and in generating models, theories and processes that can be used to overcome recalcitrance of biomass for sustainable biofuel production. Multidisciplinary approaches have an increasingly greater role to play in meeting rising demands for food, fibre, energy, clean environment and good health. Discoveries achieved by diverse minds and cross-applications of tools and analytical approaches have tremendous potential to fill existing knowledge gaps, clear roadblocks and facilitate translation of basic sciences discoveries as solutions towards addressing some of the most pressing global issues.

Kalluri, Udaya C.; Keller, Martin

2010-01-01

432

A relational conceptual framework for multidisciplinary health research centre infrastructure  

PubMed Central

Although multidisciplinary and team-based approaches are increasingly acknowledged as necessary to address some of the most pressing contemporary health challenges, many researchers struggle with a lack of infrastructure to facilitate and formalise the requisite collaborations. Specialised research centres have emerged as an important organisational solution, yet centre productivity and sustainability are frequently dictated by the availability and security of infrastructure funds. Despite being widely cited as a core component of research capacity building, infrastructure as a discrete concept has been rather analytically neglected, often treated as an implicit feature of research environments with little specification or relegated to a narrow category of physical or administrative inputs. The terms research infrastructure, capacity, and culture, among others, are deployed in overlapping and inconsistent ways, further obfuscating the crucial functions of infrastructure specifically and its relationships with associated concepts. The case is made for an expanded conceptualisation of research infrastructure, one that moves beyond conventional 'hardware' notions. Drawing on a case analysis of NEXUS, a multidisciplinary health research centre based at the University of British Columbia, Canada, a conceptual framework is proposed that integrates the tangible and intangible structures that interactively underlie research centre functioning. A relational approach holds potential to allow for more comprehensive accounting of the returns on infrastructure investment. For those developing new research centres or seeking to reinvigorate existing ones, this framework may be a useful guide for both centre design and evaluation.

2010-01-01

433

Value of team approach combined with clinical pathway for diabetic foot problems: a clinical evaluation  

PubMed Central

Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of management of diabetic foot problems (DFP) by the National University Hospital (NUH) Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot Team combined with a clinical pathway in terms of average length of stay (ALOS), readmission rates, hospitalisation cost per patient, major reamputation rate, and complication rate. Methods 939 patients admitted to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NUH, for DFP from 2002 (before team formation) to 2007 (after team formation). It consisted of six cohorts of patients – 61 for 2002, 70 for 2003, 148 for 2004, 180 for 2005, 262 for 2006, and 218 for 2007. All patients were managed by the NUH Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot Team combined with a clinical pathway. Statistical analyses were carried out for five parameters (ALOS, hospitalisation cost per patient, major amputation rate, readmission rate, and complication rate). Results From 2002 to 2007, the ALOS was significantly reduced from 20.36 days to 12.20 days (p=0.0005). Major amputation rate was significantly reduced from 31.15 to 11.01% (p<0.0005). There was also a significant reduction in complication rate from 19.67 to 7.34% (p=0.005). There were reductions in the hospitalisation cost per patient and readmission rate after formation of the multidisciplinary team but they were not statistically significant. Conclusion Our evaluation showed that a multidisciplinary team approach combined with the implementation of a clinical pathway in NUH was effective in reducing the ALOS, major amputation rate, and complication rate of DFP.

Nather, Aziz; Siok Bee, Chionh; Keng Lin, Wong; Xin-Bei Valerie, Chan; Liang, Shen; Tambyah, Paul A; Jorgensen, Adam; Nambiar, Ajay

2010-01-01

434

Your Dialysis Care Team  

MedlinePLUS

... Disease A to Z Health Guide Your Dialysis Care Team Good health care is always a team ... your family improve your quality of life. Patient Care Technician and Biomedical Technician There are two kinds ...

435

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us chantal savelsbergh Edit resource Area of Expertise: team and group process, communication

436

Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care  

PubMed Central

Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by dementia.

Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

2011-01-01

437

Review and Annotated Bibliography of the Literature Pertaining to Team and Small Group Performance (1989 to 1999).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The military, along with private industry, is relying more on small teams of specialized individuals who work together to achieve a common goal. Examples of these teams include emergency medical teams, aircrews, decision- making teams, industrial project ...

A. S. LaJoie, B. S. Sterling

1999-01-01

438

A Multidisciplinary Performance Analysis of a Lifting-Body Single-Stage-to-Orbit Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lockheed Martin Skunk Works (LMSW) is currently developing a single-stage-to-orbit reusable launch vehicle called VentureStar(TM) A team at NASA Langley Research Center participated with LMSW in the screening and evaluation of a number of early VentureStar(TM) configurations. The performance analyses that supported these initial studies were conducted to assess the effect of a lifting body shape, linear aerospike engine and metallic thermal protection system (TPS) on the weight and performance of the vehicle. These performance studies were performed in a multidisciplinary fashion that indirectly linked the trajectory optimization with weight estimation and aerothermal analysis tools. This approach was necessary to develop optimized ascent and entry trajectories that met all vehicle design constraints. Significant improvements in ascent performance were achieved when the vehicle flew a lifting trajectory and varied the engine mixture ratio during flight. Also, a considerable reduction in empty weight was possible by adjusting the total oxidizer-to-fuel and liftoff thrust-to-weight ratios. However, the optimal ascent flight profile had to be altered to ensure that the vehicle could be trimmed in pitch using only the flow diverting capability of the aerospike engine. Likewise, the optimal entry trajectory had to be tailored to meet TPS heating rate and transition constraints while satisfying a crossrange requirement.

Tartabini, Paul V.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Korte, J. J.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

2000-01-01

439

Multidisciplinary Highway Collision Investigation Training Course.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two (2) two week courses were conducted by Dynamic Science, Inc. at Phoenix, Arizona to train accident investigators and allied specialists. The course entitled 'Multidisciplinary Highway Collision Investigation Training' (MDHCIT) was developed by Dynamic...

J. D. Baird A. Heffernan

1980-01-01

440

Team Science Toolkit  

Cancer.gov

Anyone engaged in the practice or study of team science can benefit from using the Team Science Toolkit. If you are looking to learn from your colleagues' experiences, find resources you need, or add to the team science knowledge base, the Toolkit can help.

441

Team Development and Management.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Steps for implementing team management in libraries are discussed in the first of four articles. The second reviews the use of quality circles in librarianship, the third describes the implementation of self-management teams in technical services, and the fourth discusses nominal group technique as a team development tool. (CLB)

Hawkins, Katherine W.; And Others

1990-01-01

442

To Become a Team.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A discussion of team-building in organizations looks at the essential components of trust, common purpose, supportive internal and external environments, and cohesion. Barriers to team development, such as internal competition or communication problems, and the role of the team leader are also discussed. A student campus organization is used for…

Standley, Jeff

1993-01-01

443

Team-Building.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student activities programs are usually dependent on