Sample records for multidisciplinary team working

  1. Multidisciplinary mental health teams.

    PubMed

    Slade, M; Rosen, A; Shankar, R

    1995-01-01

    This study surveyed current practice amongst 91 Indian and Australian staff working within multidisciplinary mental health teams, looking at leadership skills, conflict resolution and therapeutic abilities. Length of training was associated with management skills, though these skill were more developed by psychiatric nurses and occupational therapists working in community settings. Hospital settings involved less consensual decision-making than community teams. Psychiatric nurses spent most time in clinical work, and occupational therapists were rated as less skilled in the therapeutic activities assessed than any other profession. Psychiatrists and clinical psychologists undertook most research. The activities assessed in this study could be undertaken by a team comprising psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses and social workers, with clinical psychologists employed where possible, especially for research or service evaluation. PMID:8847199

  2. Overcoming obstacles to establish a multidisciplinary team approach to hepatobiliary diseases: a working model in a Caribbean setting

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Johnson, Peter B; Shah, Sundeep; Roberts, Patrick; Arthurs, Milton; Murphy, Trevor; Bonadie, Kimon O; Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Abu Hilal, Mohammed; Pearce, Neil W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction By providing a structured forum to exchange information and ideas, multidisciplinary team meetings improve working relationships, expedite investigations, promote evidence-based treatment, and ultimately improve clinical outcomes. Methods This discursive paper reports the introduction of a multidisciplinary team approach to manage hepatobiliary diseases in Jamaica, focusing on the challenges encountered and the methods used to overcome these obstacles. Conclusion Despite multiple challenges in resource-limited environments, a multidisciplinary team approach can be incorporated into clinical practice in developing nations. Policy makers should make it a priority to support clinical, operational, and governance aspects of the multidisciplinary teams. PMID:24920917

  3. Multidisciplinary Medical Team Meetings: An Analysis of Collaborative Working with Special Attention to Timing and Teleconferencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bridget Kane; Saturnino Luz

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe the process of a multi-disciplinary medical team meeting (MDTM), its functions and operation in\\u000a colocated and teleconference discussions. Our goal is to identify the elements and mechanics of operation that enhance or\\u000a threaten the dependability of the MDTM as a “system” and propose technologies and measures to make this system more reliable.\\u000a In particular, we

  4. HIV multidisciplinary teams work: support services improve access to and retention in HIV primary care.

    PubMed

    Sherer, R; Stieglitz, K; Narra, J; Jasek, J; Green, L; Moore, B; Shott, S; Cohen, M

    2002-08-01

    The multidisciplinary team model of HIV care evolved out of necessity due to the diverse characteristics and needs of people living with HIV disease. Though it is now accepted as the international standard of care, it represents a significant departure from methods of care for other infectious diseases, and debate continues regarding the effectiveness of its interventions. The debate has been largely uninformed by data; for example, little is known about the relationship between ancillary support services and primary care outcomes. We hypothesized that support services increase access to and retention in HIV primary care in an inner city public hospital clinic. We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinical data sets on 2,647 patients at the CORE Center, Chicago from 1997-1998 to investigate the relationship between four support services-case management (CM), transportation (TRANS), mental health (MH) and chemical dependency (CD)-and access to and retention in HIV primary care. We found that patients who received each of these services were significantly more likely to receive any care, regular care and had more visits than patients with no service, and retention increased by 15-18%. Female gender, younger age, self-pay status and IDU predicted less regular care. Need for all services was substantial and significantly greater in women. Outcomes improved to the greatest extent among patients who needed and received each service. We conclude that support services significantly increased access to and retention in HIV primary care. Our findings validate the multidisciplinary team model of HIV care, and suggest that health services that are tailored to the express needs of patients lead to better care and improved health outcomes. Further testing of changes in health care delivery to meet the rapidly changing needs of people living with HIV disease and respond to the constantly changing practice of HIV medicine is urgently needed to maintain and extend the advances in HIV care outcomes of the past decade. PMID:12204140

  5. Using an Undergraduate Materials Research Project to Foster Multidisciplinary Teaming Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, James A.; Cleary, Doug D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the use of undergraduate materials multidisciplinary research projects as a means of addressing the growing industrial demand for graduates experienced in working in multidisciplinary teams. It includes a detailed description of a project in which a multidisciplinary team of chemical engineering and civil engineering students…

  6. A Multidisciplinary Team Suicide Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadoff, Wallace L.; Crandall, Arlene B.

    In response to the recent suicide epidemic, many school districts have struggled to devise suicide prevention procedures. Smithtown Central School District in St. James, New York developed procedures in 1983 using research data on the warning signs and risk factors relating to the suicidal child. These procedures focus on a multidisciplinary team

  7. Multidisciplinary teams in geriatric wards: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Evers, H K

    1981-05-01

    This paper argues that the rhetoric of multidisciplinary teamwork is central to the provision of health care generally and geriatric care in particular. Yet the notion of teamwork is poorly defined, and the supposed benefits for patients are not always readily apparent. Looking at teamwork in practice, examples from research are used to illustrate how multidisciplinary decision making and work with patients can, under particular circumstances, take on the appearance of collaboration amongst a team of expert colleagues, which co-opts patients and relatives to the status of team members. But very often, multidisciplinary work with patients is coordinated not by mutual collaboration amongst a team of equals, but by means of established work routines which are broadly applied to whole categories of patients, and by the operation of the traditional hierarchy of social relations in health care. For long stay patients, the pervasiveness of the teamwork mythology and the frequent concurrent withdrawal of other professionals can, at worst, leave the nurses in the invidious position of having responsibility, but no formal or legal authority for caring for their patients: work which no other professional is anxious to do. This leads to negative outcomes for patients as well as for nurses. Finally, it is stressed that analysis of multidisciplinary teamwork both in theory and in practice is vital if we are to understand the conditions under which multidisciplinary teamwork both flourishes, and can be demonstrated to be a necessary condition for the creation of positive care outcomes for geriatric patients in hospital. This paper seeks to raise some of the issues which must be confronted in the endeavour. PMID:6787102

  8. Multi-Disciplinary Team Project With Software

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Creese, Robert

    Multi-disciplinary team projects are an important element in the ABET accreditation of engineering programs. The basic manufacturing processes course in the Industrial Engineering (IE) Program at West Virginia University is one of only two IE courses which are required by other engineering majors. A software program was developed to assist students in the evaluation of costs when selecting different materials and shapes to meet specific load and deflection requirements. The program has been used for four semesters to develop an appreciation of the effect of material selection and design upon the total cost of a multi-constrained project. Students have indicated several problems which resulted in model changes and the development of an instruction manual. The project has been modified so that several reports are required before the final project. This paper discusses the student responses and the effect of the use of multiple reports.

  9. Moving forward in patient safety: multidisciplinary team training.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kay; Auguste, Tamika

    2013-06-01

    Communication and teamwork deficiencies have been identified as major contributors to poor clinical outcomes in the labor and delivery unit. In response to these findings, multidisciplinary simulation-based team training techniques have developed to focus specifically on skills training for teams. The evidence demonstrates that multidisciplinary simulation-based team training minimizes poor outcomes by perfecting the elusive teamwork skills that cannot be taught in a didactic setting. Multidisciplinary simulation-based team training is also being used to detect latent system errors in existing or new units, to rehearse complicated procedures (surgical dress rehearsal), and to identify knowledge gaps of labor and delivery teams. Multidisciplinary simulation-based team training should be an integral component of ongoing quality-improvement efforts to ultimately produce teams of experts that perform proficiently. PMID:23721769

  10. Teaching ideas for generating critical and constructive insights into well-functioning multidisciplinary mental health teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret McAllister; Shirley Morrissey; Donna McAuliffe; Graham Davidson; Harry McConnell; Prasuna Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – It is now common place for mental health services to operate using multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) where several health professionals simultaneously maintain their disciplinary distinctiveness and assume complementary professional roles. This requires awareness of other team members' disciplines and good team-work skills. Yet in Australia, the preparation of health professionals continues to occur primarily in single-discipline programs, where interaction

  11. Structure and characteristics of community-based multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario: An environmental scan.

    PubMed

    Abrahamyan, Lusine; Wong, Josephine; Pham, Ba'; Trubiani, Gina; Carcone, Steven; Mitsakakis, Nicholas; Rosen, Laura; Rac, Valeria E; Krahn, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team approach is an essential component of evidence-based wound management in the community. The objective of this study was to identify and describe community-based multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario. For the study, a working definition of a multidisciplinary wound care team was developed, and a two-phase field evaluation was conducted. In phase I, a systematic survey with three search strategies (environmental scan) was conducted to identify all multidisciplinary wound care teams in Ontario. In phase II, the team leads were surveyed about the service models of the teams. We identified 49 wound care teams in Ontario. The highest ratio of Ontario seniors to wound team within each Ontario health planning region was 82,358:1; the lowest ratio was 14,151:1. Forty-four teams (90%) participated in the survey. The majority of teams existed for at least 5 years, were established as hospital outpatient clinics, and served patients with chronic wounds. Teams were heterogeneous in on-site capacity of specialized diagnostic testing and wound treatment, team size, and patient volume. Seventy-seven percent of teams had members from three or more disciplines. Several teams lacked essential disciplines. More research is needed to identify optimal service models leading to improved patient outcomes. PMID:25421743

  12. Team work: Construction

    E-print Network

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Team work: Construction Management The Division of Engineering Technology in an construction technology area, an associate degree in construction science, or college- level course work equivalent to an associate degree in construction related area

  13. Multidisciplinary Crisis Simulations: The Way Forward for Training Surgical Teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shabnam Undre; Maria Koutantji; Nick Sevdalis; Sanjay Gautama; Nowlan Selvapatt; Samantha Williams; Parvinderpal Sains; Peter McCulloch; Ara Darzi; Charles Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Background  High-reliability organizations have stressed the importance of nontechnical skills for safety and of regularly providing such\\u000a training to their teams. Recently safety skills training has been applied in the practice of medicine. In this study, we developed\\u000a and piloted a module using multidisciplinary crisis scenarios in a simulated operating theatre to train entire surgical teams.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Twenty teams participated (n = 80); each

  14. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

  15. Pressure ulcer prevention: the role of the multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Samuriwo, Ray

    Pressure ulcer prevention has long been a priority for health professionals; however, poor pressure-ulcer-related practices like poor documentation continue to be identified. Research has shown that the attitude and behaviour of some nurses towards pressure ulcer prevention are not conducive to the best possible patient outcomes.This article reviews the findings of a Straussian grounded theory study, which sought to ascertain the value that is placed on pressure ulcer prevention by nurses, but also revealed the role that other health professionals in the multidisciplinary team play in the maintenance of skin integrity. The findings of this study which are presented in this paper highlight a number of important issues. Firstly, nurses are expected to know how to prevent and manage pressure ulcers, but in reality they are very reliant on the advice and support of other health professionals to maintain their patients' skin integrity. In addition,the level of support that nurses get from other health professionals in the multidisciplinary varies tremendously. Therefore, nurses in clinical practice need to be proactive in seeking input from other health professionals, as there are many members of the multidisciplinary team who are able to give them the advice and support that they need in prevention and management. PMID:22489336

  16. What is a virtual multidisciplinary team (vMDT)?

    PubMed Central

    Munro, A J; Swartzman, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Multidisciplinary team meetings (MDTs), also known as tumour boards or multidisciplinary case conferences, are an integral component of contemporary cancer care. There are logistical problems with setting up and maintaining participation in these meetings. An ill-defined concept, the virtual MDT (vMDT), has arisen in response to these difficulties. We have, in order to provide clarity and to generate discussion, attempted to define the concept of the vMDT, outline its advantages and disadvantages, and consider some of the practical aspects involved in setting up a virtual MDT. Methods: This is an unstructured review of published evidence and personal experience relating to virtual teams in general, and to MDTs in particular. Results: We have devised a simple taxonomy for MDTs, discussed some of the practicalities involved in setting up a vMDT, and described some of the potential advantages and disadvantages associated with vMDTs. Conclusion: The vMDT may be useful for discussions concerning rare or unusual tumours, or for helping guide the assessment and management of patients with uncommon complications related to treatment. However, the vMDT is a niche concept and is currently unlikely to replace the more traditional face-to-face MDT in the management of common tumours at specific sites. PMID:23756866

  17. Making Science Teams Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Roxanne Greitz Miller

    2004-01-01

    While the importance of teamwork is emphasized in the National Science Education Standards, getting teams to share equally in the academic assignments and interact in a positive and productive manner often eludes even the best of teachers. These strategies for creating effective student teams include planning, student pre-assessment, communication with students and parents, motivational strategies, and arrangement of the classroom and activities.

  18. Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries

    PubMed Central

    Silbermann, M.; Pitsillides, B.; Al-Alfi, N.; Omran, S.; Al-Jabri, K.; Elshamy, K.; Ghrayeb, I.; Livneh, J.; Daher, M.; Charalambous, H.; Jafferri, A.; Fink, R.; El-Shamy, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists. PMID:24001762

  19. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  20. Multidisciplinary medical team meetings: a field study of collaboration in health care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane Li; Toni Robertson; Susan Hansen; Tim Mansfield; Jesper Kjeldskov

    2008-01-01

    We present an observational study that was conducted to guide the design of an enhanced collaboration platform to support distributed multidisciplinary team meetings between two hospitals. Our goal was to find out how the breast cancer multidisciplinary team collaborates in their face-to-face meetings and in their discussions using an existing video-conferencing system and to identify obstacles and issues to their

  1. Collaboration Within Different Settings: A Study of Co-located and Distributed Multidisciplinary Medical Team Meetings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toni Robertson; Jane Li; Kenton O’Hara; Susan Hansen

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports our findings from a study of multidisciplinary team meetings for the treatment and ongoing management of\\u000a breast cancer patients. The focus of the fieldwork was the meetings within and between a large group of multidisciplinary\\u000a health professionals from two hospitals in Sydney, a large public teaching hospital and a much smaller private hospital. The\\u000a paper examines the

  2. Can we optimize our teams? Multidisciplinary care for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Clavelou, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Established in 2003, the multiple sclerosis (MS) regional hospital network in the Auvergne area of France links not only neurologists but also many other specialists (e.g., urologists, ophthalmologists) and more than 400 other allied healthcare professionals (including physiotherapists, nurses, occupational therapists) involved in the care of patients with MS. This multidisciplinary network aims to improve quality of care for an estimated 1600 + MS patients in the Auvergne region through numerous training courses and medical support programs. The initiative is supported by the regional regulatory authority and receives public funding from the Auvergne regional state health insurance office. The Auvergne MS network has facilitated improvements in quality of care by coordinating patient care in the proximal vicinity of the patient's home and has provided useful information about MS epidemiology (incidence and prevalence) in the region. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the Auvergne MS network has explored other avenues of domiciliary-based care to seek improvements in the patient-centered management of MS. These include: access to high-dose methylprednisolone in the home, ensuring appropriate supervision and support; participation in national clinical research programs coordinated from hospital centers of excellence; provision of multidisciplinary clinic services where healthcare professionals across different disciplines can attend to the patient on the same day in the same center of care; development of individual and group-based cognitive therapy programs; educational programs focusing on the management of fatigue and cognitive impairment associated with MS; and educational programs focusing on optimal use of immunomodulating agents in MS patients. PMID:24289841

  3. Education and Multidisciplinary Team Approach in Childhood Diabetes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stuart J. Brink; Francesco G. Chiarelli

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most frequent chronic diseases in childhood. As in other chronic dis- eases (asthma, cystic fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, epilepsy) children and their families become the focus of self-treatment and the directors of their own care; thus, the health care team should be the guides who set the stage, provided advice and oversight and helped

  4. Undergraduate Students' Self-Efficacy and Cognitive Behaviors for Learning in Multidisciplinary Project Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaojun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate individual students' learning from the perspectives of self-efficacy and cognitive learning expressions in multidisciplinary project teams. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected to address the major research questions, which are aimed at understanding individual students'…

  5. Research studies and their implications for social work practice in a multidisciplinary center for lupus care.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Persad, Pretima; Erkan, Doruk; Kirou, Kyriakos; Horton, Roberta; Salmon, Jane E

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its psychosocial impact creates management challenges that require a multidisciplinary team approach for optimal patient care and outcomes. This article provides a brief report on current lupus-related research studies at the Mary Kirkland Center for Lupus Care at Hospital for Special Surgery. Studies and their social work implications highlight a comprehensive, integrated model for research, education, and patient care emphasizing interdisciplinary collaboration. Both basic science and clinical research are discussed, with a focus on the role of social workers as an integral part of the health care team in providing assessments and interventions and as support for patients in research studies. PMID:22905980

  6. Psychopathological aspects of kidney transplantation: Efficacy of a multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    De Pasquale, Concetta; Veroux, Massimiliano; Indelicato, Luisa; Sinagra, Nunzia; Giaquinta, Alessia; Fornaro, Michele; Veroux, Pierfrancesco; Pistorio, Maria L

    2014-12-24

    Renal transplantation is a well established treatment for end-stage renal disease, allowing most patients to return to a satisfactory quality of life. Studies have identified many problems that may affect adaptation to the transplanted condition and post-operative compliance. The psychological implications of transplantation have important consequences even on strictly physical aspects. Organ transplantation is very challenging for the patient and acts as an intense stressor stimulus to which the patient reacts with neurotransmitter and endocrine-metabolic changes. Transplantation can result in a psychosomatic crisis that requires the patient to mobilize all bio-psycho-social resources during the process of adaptation to the new foreign organ which may result in an alteration in self-representation and identity, with possible psychopathologic repercussions. These reactions are feasible in mental disorders, e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder, adjustment disorder, and psychosomatic disorders. In organ transplantation, the fruitful collaboration between professionals with diverse scientific expertise, calls for both a guarantee for mental health and greater effectiveness in challenging treatments for a viable association between patients, family members and doctors. Integrated and multidisciplinary care should include uniform criteria and procedures for standard assessments, for patient autonomy, adherence to therapy, new coping strategies and the adoption of more appropriate lifestyles. PMID:25540735

  7. Multidisciplinary team management in thoracic oncology: more than just a concept?

    PubMed

    Powell, Helen A; Baldwin, David R

    2014-06-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) management in thoracic oncology has been introduced over the past two decades with the aim of improving outcomes for patients. While MDT management has become the standard of care in some countries, not all healthcare systems have adopted this practice. In this article we review the history and implementation of MDT care in thoracic oncology and explore the evidence for, and challenges associated with, this system of working. There are many advantages of an MDT both to the patient, the clinicians and the wider population, but it is difficult to demonstrate a beneficial effect on outcomes such as treatment rates or survival given the substantial number of coexistent changes in the management of thoracic malignancies over the same time period. There are also some disadvantages associated with MDT working, particularly the costs of setting up the service and the time commitment from each of the healthcare professionals involved. Barriers to effective MDT working include poor attendance by some specialists, inadequate preparation and poor quality information about the patient. Variation in quality of MDTs has been reported so it is important that practice is monitored and areas for improvement identified. PMID:24525445

  8. The Benefits of Multidisciplinary Learning in Clinical Practice for Law, Finance, and Social Work Students: An Australian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyams, Ross; Brown, Grace; Foster, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In July 2010, the faculties of Law, Business and Economics, and Medicine at Monash University, Australia commenced placing law, finance, and social work students in a multidisciplinary clinic at a community legal service operated by the University. Students from the three disciplines began seeing legal service clients at the same time as a team.…

  9. Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes. Method This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary team work, and the perceptions of over 253 staff from 11 community rehabilitation and intermediate care teams in the UK. These data sources were merged using qualitative content analysis to arrive at a framework that identifies characteristics and proposes ten competencies that support effective interdisciplinary team work. Results Ten characteristics underpinning effective interdisciplinary team work were identified: positive leadership and management attributes; communication strategies and structures; personal rewards, training and development; appropriate resources and procedures; appropriate skill mix; supportive team climate; individual characteristics that support interdisciplinary team work; clarity of vision; quality and outcomes of care; and respecting and understanding roles. Conclusions We propose competency statements that an effective interdisciplinary team functioning at a high level should demonstrate. PMID:23663329

  10. A CEFAS Multidisciplinary Project Team The Rame Head Disposal Site Environmental impacts resulting from disposal of

    E-print Network

    .2. Characteristics of the Seabed 27 3.2.1. Acoustic data 27 3.2.2. Sediment texture 27 3.2.3. Underwater video 28 implications for licencing 24 3. Methods 25 3.1. Monitoring of Rame Head Disposal Site and Adjacent Seabed 25 3 Multidisciplinary Project Team ­ The Rame Head Disposal Site 3 4. Results 36 4.1. Characteristics of the Seabed 36 4

  11. Using peer observers to assess the quality of cancer multidisciplinary team meetings: a qualitative proof of concept study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jenny; Green, James SA; Sevdalis, Nick; Taylor, Cath

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary team (MDT) working is well established as the foundation for providing cancer services in the UK and elsewhere. A core activity is the weekly meeting (or case conference/tumor boards) where the treatment recommendations for individual patients are agreed. Evidence suggests that the quality of team working varies across cancer teams, and this may impact negatively on the decision-making process, and ultimately patient care. Feedback on performance by expert observers may improve performance, but can be resource-intensive to implement. This proof of concept study sought to: develop a structured observational assessment tool for use by peers (managers or clinicians from the local workforce) and explore its usability; assess the feasibility of the principle of observational assessment by peers; and explore the views of MDT members and observers about the utility of feedback from observational assessment. Methods For tool development, the content was informed by national clinical consensus recommendations for best practice in cancer MDTs and developed in collaboration with an expert steering group. It consisted of ten subdomains of team working observable in MDT meetings that were rated on a 10-point scale (very poor to very good). For observational assessment, a total of 19 peer observers used the tool (assessing performance in 20 cancer teams from four hospitals). For evaluation, telephone interviews with 64 team members and all peer observers were analyzed thematically. Results The tool was easy to use and areas for refinement were identified. Peer observers were identified and most indicated that undertaking observation was feasible. MDT members generally reported that observational assessment and feedback was useful, with the potential to facilitate improvements in team working. Conclusion This study suggests that observation and feedback by peers may provide a feasible and acceptable approach to enhance MDT performance. Further tool refinement and validation is required. PMID:25143743

  12. (Working Team meeting of IEA-CADDET)

    SciTech Connect

    Broders, M.A.

    1990-10-25

    The traveler serving as Delegate from the United States, Center for the Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy, (CADDET) National Team, participated in the activities of the annual International Energy Agency, CADDET Working Team meeting. Highlights of this meeting included progress/status presentations by 12 to 13 CADDET National Teams, development of future CADDET work plans including a prioritization of activities, and discussions of long range expectations for CADDET. Follow-up discussions were held with CADDET staff members which focused on US CADDET National Team contributions to the CADDET newsletter, brochures and register of demonstrated energy technologies.

  13. Part 1: Participatory Ergonomics Approach to Waste Container Handling Utilizing a Multidisciplinary Team

    SciTech Connect

    Zalk, D.M.; Tittiranonda, P.; Burastero, S.; Biggs, T.W.; Perry, C.M.; Tageson, R.; Barsnick, L.

    2000-02-07

    This multidisciplinary team approach to waste container handling, developed within the Grassroots Ergonomics process, presents participatory ergonomic interpretations of quantitative and qualitative aspects of this process resulting in a peer developed training. The lower back, shoulders, and wrists were identified as frequently injured areas, so these working postures were a primary focus for the creation of the workers' training. Handling procedures were analyzed by the team to identify common cycles involving one 5 gallon (60 pounds), two 5 gallons (60 and 54 pounds), 30 gallon (216 pounds), and 55 gallon (482 pounds) containers: lowering from transporting to/from transport vehicles, loading/unloading on transport vehicles, and loading onto pallet. Eleven experienced waste container handlers participated in this field analysis. Ergonomic exposure assessment tools measuring these field activities included posture analysis, posture targeting, Lumbar Motion Monitor{trademark} (LMM), and surface electromyography (sEMG) for the erector spinae, infraspinatus, and upper trapezius muscles. Posture analysis indicates that waste container handlers maintained non-neutral lower back postures (flexion, lateral bending, and rotation) for a mean of 51.7% of the time across all activities. The right wrist was in non-neutral postures (radial, ulnar, extension, and flexion) a mean of 30.5% of the time and the left wrist 31.4%. Non-neutral shoulder postures (elevation) were the least common, occurring 17.6% and 14.0% of the time in the right and left shoulders respectively. For training applications, each cycle had its own synchronized posture analysis and posture target diagram. Visual interpretations relating to the peak force modifications of the posture target diagrams proved to be invaluable for the workers' understanding of LMM and sEMG results (refer to Part II). Results were reviewed by the team's field technicians and their interpretations were developed into ergonomic training that address the issues originally raised. This training includes intervention methods, ergonomic tools used, dam acquired, and effects of waste container handling techniques on lower back, shoulder, and wrists and methods to help proactively reduce injuries associated with this profession.

  14. Are multidisciplinary teams in secondary care cost-effective? A systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cost effectiveness of management of patients within the context of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting in cancer and non-cancer teams in secondary care. Design Systematic review. Data sources EMBASE, MEDLINE, NHS EED, CINAHL, EconLit, Cochrane Library, and NHS HMIC. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort, case–control, before and after and cross-sectional study designs including an economic evaluation of management decisions made in any disease in secondary care within the context of an MDT meeting. Data extraction Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Consensus on Health Economic Criteria (CHEC-list). MDTs were defined by evidence of two characteristics: decision making requiring a minimum of two disciplines; and regular meetings to discuss diagnosis, treatment and/or patient management, occurring at a physical location or by teleconferencing. Studies that reported on the costs of administering, preparing for, and attending MDT meetings and/or the subsequent direct medical costs of care, non-medical costs, or indirect costs, and any health outcomes that were relevant to the disease being investigated were included and classified as cancer or non-cancer MDTs. Results Fifteen studies (11 RCTs in non-cancer care, 2 cohort studies in cancer and non-cancer care, and 2 before and after studies in cancer and non cancer care) were identified, all with a high risk of bias. Twelve papers reported the frequency of meetings which varied from daily to three monthly and all reported the number of disciplines included (mean 5, range 2 to 9). The results from all studies showed mixed effects; a high degree of heterogeneity prevented a meta-analysis of findings; and none of the studies reported how the potential savings of MDT working may offset the costs of administering, preparing for, and attending MDT meetings. Conclusions Current evidence is insufficient to determine whether MDT working is cost-effective or not in secondary care. Further studies aimed at understanding the key aspects of MDT working that lead to cost-effective cancer and non-cancer care are required. PMID:23557141

  15. Psychological Safety and Learning Behavior in Work Teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy Edmondson

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a model of team learning and tests it in a multimethod field study. It introduces the construct of team psychological safety—a shared belief held by members of a team that the team is safe for interpersonal risk taking—and models the effects of team psychological safety and team efficacy together on learning and performance in organizational work teams.

  16. Using Self-Regulating Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarr, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    A reaction to bureaucracy and its inherently authoritarian management and fragmented work styles, work-team organizations broaden and integrate responsibilities while focusing on outcomes. In April 1991, Lake Washington (Washington) School District successfully reorganized its central office staff, building administrators, and support personnel…

  17. Distributed expertise: qualitative study of a British network of multidisciplinary teams supporting parents of children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Swallow, V; Smith, T; Webb, N J A; Wirz, L; Qizalbash, L; Brennan, E; Birch, A; Sinha, M D; Krischock, L; van der Voort, J; King, D; Lambert, H; Milford, D V; Crowther, L; Saleem, M; Lunn, A; Williams, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term childhood conditions are often managed by hospital-based multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) of professionals with discipline specific expertise of a condition, in partnership with parents. However, little evidence exists on professional–parent interactions in this context. An exploration of professionals' accounts of the way they individually and collectively teach parents to manage their child's clinical care at home is, therefore, important for meeting parents' needs, informing policy and educating novice professionals. Using chronic kidney disease as an exemplar this paper reports on one aspect of a study of interactions between professionals and parents in a network of 12 children's kidney units in Britain. Methods We conducted semi-structured, qualitative interviews with a convenience sample of 112 professionals (clinical-psychologists, dietitians, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, play-workers, therapists and social workers), exploring accounts of their parent-educative activity. We analysed data using framework and the concept of distributed expertise. Results Four themes emerged that related to the way expertise was distributed within and across teams: (i) recognizing each other's' expertise, (ii) sharing expertise within the MDT, (iii) language interpretation, and (iv) acting as brokers. Two different professional identifications were also seen to co-exist within MDTs, with participants using the term ‘we’ both as the intra-professional ‘we’ (relating to the professional identity) when describing expertise within a disciplinary group (for example: ‘As dietitians we aim to give tailored advice to optimize children's growth’), and the inter-professional ‘we’ (a ‘team-identification’), when discussing expertise within the team (for example: ‘We work as a team and make sure we're all happy with every aspect of their training before they go home’). Conclusions This study highlights the dual identifications implicit in ‘being professional’ in this context (to the team and to one's profession) as well as the unique role that each member of a team contributes to children's care. Our methodology and results have the potential to be transferred to teams managing other conditions. PMID:24827413

  18. The Relationship between Work-Team Personality Composition and the Job Performance of Teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George A. Neuman; Stephen H. Wagner; Neil D. Christiansen

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the relationship between work team effectiveness and two distinct aspects of the personality composition of teams: (a) the average level of a given trait within a team, referred to as team personality elevation (TPE); and (b) the variability or differences in personality traits found within a team, or team personality diversity (TPD). Retail assistants

  19. Developing the role of a ward housekeeper within a multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Jo

    The implementation of a housekeeper induction competency programme demonstrates the innovative way that the clinical standards facilitator has led the development of the housekeeping service at one NHS Trust. This service has been developed to ensure that there is sufficient training, support and opportunity to share best practice for the housekeepers. A Trust-wide approach using the multidisciplinary team (including dieticians, catering and facilities managers) has contributed to the raising of standards in meeting the patients' nutritional needs, as well as improving the ward environment. NHS Estates guidance (DH, 2001b) relating to the housekeeping service and the Essence of Care benchmarks for nutrition (DH, 2001a) were used to provide this framework for continuous quality improvement. PMID:17353837

  20. Intensive care of children with burn injuries and the role of the multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Biasini, Augusto; Biasini, Marco; Stella, Marcello

    2014-11-01

    Trauma from burns and scalds in children is more common and more damaging than in adults, and may indicate abuse. The main goal of intensive care of an acute burn is to limit the extent of the systemic insult. Effective treatment of such acute physiological changes requires experienced monitoring by multidisciplinary teams, following appropriate emergency protocols at specialised burn centres in cases of major trauma. First aid involves maintaining a patent airway, supporting circulation and respiration, arresting the burning, managing pain and distress, reducing infection and considering transfer to specialist care. Advances in techniques and treatment have increased survival rates and ultimate quality of life, but education and prevention programmes are still required at all levels to reduce the incidence of burns among children. PMID:25369104

  1. International Preoperative Rectal Cancer Management: Staging, Neoadjuvant Treatment, and Impact of Multidisciplinary Teams

    PubMed Central

    Augestad, Knut M.; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Stulberg, Jonah; Reynolds, Harry; Senagore, Anthony; Champagne, Brad; Heriot, Alexander G.; Leblanc, Fabien

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding variations in preoperative treatment and practice for rectal cancer (RC) on an international level, yet practice variation may result in differences in recurrence and survival rates. Methods One hundred seventy-three international colorectal centers were invited to participate in a survey of preoperative management of rectal cancer. Results One hundred twenty-three (71%) responded, with a majority of respondents from North America, Europe, and Asia. Ninety-three percent have more than 5 years’ experience with rectal cancer surgery. Fifty-five percent use CT scan, 35% MRI, 29% ERUS, 12% digital rectal examination and 1% PET scan in all RC cases. Seventy-four percent consider threatened circumferential margin (CRM) an indication for neoadjuvant treatment. Ninety-two percent prefer 5-FU-based long-course neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT). A significant difference in practice exists between the US and non-US surgeons: poor histological differentiation as an indication for CRT (25% vs. 7.0%, p = 0.008), CRT for stage II and III rectal cancer (92% vs. 43%, p = 0.0001), MRI for all RC patients (20% vs. 42%, p = 0.03), and ERUS for all RC patients (43% vs. 21%, p = 0.01). Multidisciplinary team meetings significantly influence decisions for MRI (RR = 3.62), neoadjuvant treatment (threatened CRM, RR = 5.67, stage II + III RR = 2.98), quality of pathology report (RR = 4.85), and sphincter-saving surgery (RR = 3.81). Conclusions There was little consensus on staging, neoadjuvant treatment, and preoperative management of rectal cancer. Regular multidisciplinary team meetings influence decisions about neoadjuvant treatment and staging methods. PMID:20703471

  2. Patient Safety Reporting Systems: Sustained Quality Improvement Using a Multidisciplinary Team and “Good Catch” Awards

    PubMed Central

    Herzer, Kurt R.; Mirrer, Meredith; Xie, Yanjun; Steppan, Jochen; Li, Matthew; Jung, Clinton; Cover, Renee; Doyle, Peter A.; Mark, Lynette J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 1999, hospitals have made substantial commitments to healthcare quality and patient safety through individual initiatives of executive leadership involvement in quality, investments in safety culture, education and training for medical students and residents in quality and safety, the creation of patient safety committees, and implementation of patient safety reporting systems. Cohesive quality and safety approaches have become comprehensive programs to identify and mitigate hazards that could harm patients. This article moves to the next level with an intense refocusing of attention on one of the individual components of a comprehensive program--the patient safety reporting system—with a goal of maximized usefulness of the reports and long-term sustainability of quality improvements arising from them. Methods A six-phase framework was developed to deal with patient safety hazards: identify, report, analyze, mitigate, reward, and follow up. Unique features of this process included a multidisciplinary team to review reports, mitigate hazards, educate and empower providers, recognize the identifying/reporting individuals or groups with “Good Catch” awards, and follow up to determine if quality improvements were sustained over time. Results To date, 29 patient safety hazards have gone through this process with “Good Catch” awards being granted at our institution. These awards were presented at various times over the past 4 years since the process began in 2008. Follow-up revealed that 86% of the associated quality improvements have been sustained over time since the awards were given. We present the details of two of these “Good Catch” awards: vials of heparin with an unusually high concentration of the drug that posed a potential overdose hazard and a rapid infusion device that resisted practitioner control. Conclusion A multidisciplinary team's analysis and mitigation of hazards identified in a patient safety reporting system, positive recognition with a “Good Catch” award, education of practitioners, and long-term follow-up resulted in an outcome of sustained quality improvement initiatives. PMID:22946251

  3. Integrated Initiative Teams and Working Groups

    E-print Network

    Products Working Group Joe Masabni, co-chair Skip Richter, co-chair Gary Acuff Charles Allen Jenna Anding Weems Produce Safety Initiative Team Juan Anciso, co-chair Joe Masabni, co-chair Gary Acuff Juan Anciso Vahlenkamp Kevin Wagner Whit Weems Doug Welsh Clint Wolfe Extension ANR Regional Program Directors Galen

  4. High Involvement Work Teams [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium on high involvement work teams that was facilitated by Catherine M. Sleezer at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD) conference. "An Empirical Study of Employee Involvement in Designing and Managing Reward Systems" (William M. Kahnweiler) reports on a study of 300 organizations that found the…

  5. Intercultural competencies for culturally diverse work teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shannon Lloyd; Charmine Härtel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact that the level of individuals' intercultural competencies has on their satisfaction, trust and affective commitment and assessment of their work team. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An intercultural competencies classification system is developed in which the cognitive, affective and behavioural intercultural competencies predicted to impact upon individuals' responses toward, and assessments

  6. Automatic day-2 intervention by a multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship-team leads to multiple positive effects

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Hendrix, Ron; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Wilting, Kasper R.; Panday, Prashant N.; van Gemert-Pijnen, Lisette E.; Leliveld, Annemarie M.; van der Palen, Job; Friedrich, Alex W.; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial resistance rates are increasing. This is, among others, caused by incorrect or inappropriate use of antimicrobials. To target this, a multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship-team (A-Team) was implemented at the University Medical Center Groningen on a urology ward. Goal of this study is to evaluate the clinical effects of the case-audits done by this team, looking at length of stay (LOS) and antimicrobial use. Methods: Automatic e-mail alerts were sent after 48 h of consecutive antimicrobial use triggering the case-audits, consisting of an A-Team member visiting the ward, discussing the patient’s therapy with the bed-side physician and together deciding on further treatment based on available diagnostics and guidelines. Clinical effects of the audits were evaluated through an Interrupted Time Series analysis and a retrospective historic cohort. Results: A significant systemic reduction of antimicrobial consumption for all patients on the ward, both with and without case-audits was observed. Furthermore, LOS for patients with case-audits who were admitted primarily due to infections decreased to 6.20 days (95% CI: 5.59–6.81) compared to the historic cohort (7.57 days; 95% CI: 6.92–8.21; p = 0.012). Antimicrobial consumption decreased for these patients from 8.17 DDD/patient (95% CI: 7.10–9.24) to 5.93 DDD/patient (95% CI: 5.02–6.83; p = 0.008). For patients with severe underlying diseases (e.g., cancer) these outcome measures remained unchanged. Conclusion: The evaluation showed a considerable positive impact. Antibiotic use of the whole ward was reduced, transcending the intervened patients. Furthermore, LOS and mean antimicrobial consumption for a subgroup was reduced, thereby improving patient care and potentially lowering resistance rates. PMID:26089819

  7. A Multidisciplinary Health Care Team's Efforts to Improve Educational Attainment in Children with Sickle-Cell Anemia and Cerebral Infarcts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Allison; Herron, Sonya; McKinstry, Robert; Bacak, Stephen; Armstrong, Melissa; White, Desiree; DeBaun, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to improve the educational success of children with sickle-cell disease (SCD) and cerebral infarcts. A prospective intervention trial was conducted; a multidisciplinary team was created to maximize educational resources for children with SCD and cerebral infarcts. Students were evaluated systematically…

  8. Psychiatric Approaches for Disorders of Sex Development: Experience of a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Özbaran, Burcu; Özen, Samim; Gök?en, Damla; Korkmaz, Özlem; Onay, Hüseyin; Özk?nay, Ferda; Ço?ulu, Özgür; Erermi?, Serpil; Köse, Sezen; Avano?lu, Ali; Ulman, ?brahim; Darcan, ?ükran

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Disorders of sex development (DSD) are a group of congenital medical conditions that affect life as a whole. In this study, we aimed to reflect the experience of a multidisciplinary team in the clinical/psychiatric follow-up of a group of children and adolescents with DSD. Methods: The study group consisted of 51 patients diagnosed with DSD. The Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, Draw a Person Test and Children’s Apperception Test, and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGIS) were used for psychiatric evaluations. Results: The mean age of the patients was 7.8 years (median: 7.8; min: 1.0; max: 18.0). Genetic evaluation showed 46,XX configuration in 15 patients (29.4%) and 46,XY in 35 (68.6%). One patient (2.0%) was diagnosed to have a sex chromosome disorder. Forty patients (78.4%) had no problems with their given gender identity and gender role. Thirty-four (66.7%) patients had normal intellectual capacity. Twenty-eight (54.9%) patients did not have any psychiatric problem. Depression, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and adjustment disorders were the common diagnoses. The mean score of symptom severity on CGIS-severity-baseline was 6.15±0.68 and after one year, it was 1.46±0.51 (Z=-3.236 p=0.001). The mean score of CGI–Improvement was 1.23±0.44. Conclusion: It is important to identify and treat the psychiatric disorders encountered in patients with DSD. A psychiatrist needs to be included in the professional team following these patients. Examination and observation results need to be shared by holding periodic team meetings to establish a wholesome point of view for every unique child. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379031

  9. Psychological diversity and team interaction processes : A study of oil-drilling work teams in Nigeria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Afolabi A. Olukayode; Benjamin Osayawe Ehigie

    2005-01-01

    Purpose – To examine how psychological diversity among work team members affects team interaction processes. Psychological diversity is described in terms of personality attributes (emotional stability, extraversion, conscientiousness, openness to experience, and agreeableness), need for achievement (nAch), and emotional intelligence. Team interaction processes include workload sharing, team communication, member flexibility, social cohesion, team viability. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A survey research was

  10. Developing a Multidisciplinary Team for Disorders of Sex Development: Planning, Implementation, and Operation Tools for Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Mary Elizabeth; Karkazis, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) represent a new standard of care. While DSDs are too complex for care to be delivered effectively without specialized team management, these conditions are often considered to be too rare for their medical management to be a hospital priority. Many specialists involved in DSD care want to create a clinic or team, but there is no available guidance that bridges the gap between a group of like-minded DSD providers who want to improve care and the formation of a functional MDT. This is an important dilemma, and one with serious implications for the future of DSD care. If a network of multidisciplinary DSD teams is to be a reality, those directly involved in DSD care must be given the necessary program planning and team implementation tools. This paper offers a protocol and set of tools to meet this need. We present a 6-step process to team formation, and a sample set of tools that can be used to guide, develop, and evaluate a team throughout the course of its operation. PMID:22792098

  11. Multidisciplinary Team Contributions Within a Dedicated Outpatient Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic: A Prospective Descriptive Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pituskin, Edith, E-mail: pituskin@ualberta.c [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Dutka, Jennifer; Gagnon, Lori; Driga, Amy; Tachynski, Patty; Borschneck, Jo-Ann [Rapid Access Palliative Radiotherapy Program, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Department of Experimental Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient palliative RT clinic. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients referred for RT for painful bone metastases were screened for symptoms and needs relevant to their medications, nutritional intake, activities of daily living, and psychosocial and spiritual concerns from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Consultations by appropriate team members and resulting recommendations were collected prospectively. Patients who received RT were contacted by telephone 4 weeks later to assess symptom outcomes. Results: A total of 106 clinic visits by 82 individual patients occurred. As determined by screening form responses, the clinical Pharmacist, Occupational Therapist, Registered Dietician and Social Worker were consulted to provide assessments and recommendations within the time constraints presented by 1-day palliative RT delivery. In addition to pain relief, significant improvements in tiredness, depression, anxiety, drowsiness and overall well-being were reported at 4 weeks. Conclusions: Systematic screening of this population revealed previously unmet needs, addressed in the form of custom verbal and written recommendations. Multidisciplinary assessment is associated with a high number of recommendations and decreased symptom distress. Our findings lend strong support to the routine assessment by multiple supportive care professionals for patients with advanced cancer being considered for palliative RT.

  12. The Preoperative Assessment of Hepatic Tumours: Evaluation of UK Regional Multidisciplinary Team Performance

    PubMed Central

    Wiggans, M. G.; Jackson, S. A.; Fox, B. M. T.; Mitchell, J. D.; Aroori, S.; Bowles, M. J.; Armstrong, E. M.; Shirley, J. F.; Stell, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In the UK, patients where liver resection is contemplated are discussed at hepatobiliary multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings. The aim was to assess MDT performance by identification of patients where radiological and pathological diagnoses differed. Materials and Methods. A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of all cases undergoing liver resection from March 2006 to January 2012 was performed. The presumed diagnosis as a result of radiological investigation and MDT discussion is recorded at the time of surgery. Imaging was reviewed by specialist gastrointestinal radiologists, and resultswereagreedonby consensus. Results. Four hundred and thirty-eight patients were studied. There was a significant increase in the use of preoperative imaging modalities (P ? 0.01) but no change in the rate of discrepant diagnosis over time. Forty-two individuals were identified whose final histological diagnosis was different to that following MDT discussion (9.6%). These included 30% of patients diagnosed preoperatively with hepatocellular carcinoma and 25% with cholangiocarcinoma of a major duct. Discussion. MDT assessment of patients preoperatively is accurate in terms of diagnosis. The highest rate of discrepancies occurred in patients with focal lesions without chronic liver disease or primary cancer, where hepatocellular carcinoma was overdiagnosed and peripheral cholangiocarcinoma underdiagnosed, where particular care should be taken. Additional care should be taken in these groups and preoperative multimodality imaging considered. PMID:24062601

  13. Collective autonomy and absenteeism within work teams: a team motivation approach.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Vincent; Aubé, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the role of collective autonomy in regard to team absenteeism by considering team potency as a motivational mediator and task routineness as a moderator. The sample consists of 90 work teams (327 members and 90 immediate superiors) drawn from a public safety organization. Results of structural equation modeling indicate that the relationships between collective autonomy and two indicators of team absenteeism (i.e., absence frequency and time lost) are mediated by team potency. Specifically, collective autonomy is positively related to team potency which in turn is negatively related to team absenteeism. Furthermore, results of hierarchical regression analyses show that task routineness moderates the relationships between collective autonomy and the two indicators of team absenteeism such that these relationships are stronger when the level of task routineness is low. On the whole, this study points out that collective autonomy may exercise a motivational effect on attendance at work within teams, but this effect is contingent on task routineness. PMID:23469476

  14. Human Assisted Robotic Team Campaigns for Aquatic

    E-print Network

    Caron, David

    Human Assisted Robotic Team Campaigns for Aquatic Monitoring Amarjeet Singh, Michael J. Stealey a multidisciplinary team of experts working closely with a robotic sensing and sampling system. We describe a human-robot. The multidisciplinary human team consisted of 25 investigators from robotics, computer sci- ence, engineering, biology

  15. To adopt is to adapt: the process of implementing the ICF with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team in England

    PubMed Central

    Tempest, Stephanie; Harries, Priscilla; Kilbride, Cherry; De Souza, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The success of the International Classifcation of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) depends on its uptake in clinical practice. This project aimed to explore ways the ICF could be used with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team and identify key learning from the implementation process. Method: Using an action research approach, iterative cycles of observe, plan, act and evaluate were used within three phases: exploratory; innovatory and refective. Thematic analysis was undertaken, using a model of immersion and crystallisation, on data collected via interview and focus groups, e-mail communications, minutes from relevant meetings, feld notes and a refective diary. Results: Two overall themes were determined from the data analysis which enabled implementation. There is a need to: (1) adopt the ICF in ways that meet local service needs; and (2) adapt the ICF language and format. Conclusions: The empirical fndings demonstrate how to make the ICF classifcation a clinical reality. First, we need to adopt the ICF as a vehicle to implement local service priorities e.g. to structure a multidisciplinary team report, thus enabling ownership of the implementation process. Second, we need to adapt the ICF terminology and format to make it acceptable for use by clinicians. PMID:22372376

  16. Multidisciplinary Teams and the Case Conference: Format Guidelines for Affecting Teacher Attitude and Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Jo M.; And Others

    The report describes the University of Florida Multidisciplinary Diagnostic and Training Program (MDTP), jointly administered through the Department of Pediatrics and the Department of Special Education. It functions as a diagnostic, training, and consultative resource to local school districts in north central Florida and provides short-term…

  17. Quality Indicators for Multidisciplinary Team Functioning in Community-Based Children’s Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Kutash, Krista; Acri, Mary; Pollock, Michele; Armusewicz, Kelsey; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the organizational social context in 21 community-based programs serving youth at-risk for out-of-home care due to emotional or behavioral disorders and their families and program performance on five quality indicators of team functioning in teams that included a family support specialist. Results indicate that programs with higher performance on structures to facilitate teamwork, informal communication mechanisms among team members, and the ability to integrate family support specialists as equal members of the team showed more positive organizational functioning. Implications for the role of quality indicators in health care reform efforts are discussed. PMID:23873037

  18. Abstract An approach for multidisciplinary team building is proposed through three steps. We suppose that

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ). First, the calculation of distance measure between task and team member (profile matching) are proposed building deal with psychological and sociological competencies (personality types, leadership

  19. Team Training for Team Science: What We Know Works & A Way Forward - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Links URL Download Pub Med DOI Scopus Team Training for Team Science: What We Know

  20. Work teams to favor knowledge management: towards communities of practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Celia Zárraga-Oberty; Petra De Saá-Pérez

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – To provide evidence about that the process called knowledge management can happen in work teams, but only if they have the necessary characteristics to be considered communities of practice. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – First, the paper identifies the characteristics of the work team that favor knowledge management from a revision of existing literature about communities of practice. Second, by means

  1. RefWorks in Three Steps: Undergraduate Team Bibliographies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yorke-Barber, Phil; Ghiculescu, Cristina; Possin, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    RefWorks is ideally suited for undergraduate students with team-based research projects as part of their course assessment. The Dorothy Hill Physical Sciences and Engineering Library at the University of Queensland taught students from three engineering courses how to use RefWorks to manage project references and to create team-based…

  2. [Developing team reflexivity as a learning and working tool for medical teams].

    PubMed

    Riskin, Arieh; Bamberger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Team reflexivity is a collective activity in which team members review their previous work, and develop ideas on how to modify their work behavior in order to achieve better future results. It is an important learning tool and a key factor in explaining the varying effectiveness of teams. Team reflexivity encompasses both self-awareness and agency, and includes three main activities: reflection, planning, and adaptation. The model of briefing-debriefing cycles promotes team reflexivity. Its key elements include: Pre-action briefing--setting objectives, roles, and strategies the mission, as well as proposing adaptations based on what was previously learnt from similar procedures; Post-action debriefing--reflecting on the procedure performed and reviewing the extent to which objectives were met, and what can be learnt for future tasks. Given the widespread attention to team-based work systems and organizational learning, efforts should be made toward ntroducing team reflexivity in health administration systems. Implementation could be difficult because most teams in hospitals are short-lived action teams formed for a particular event, with limited time and opportunity to consciously reflect upon their actions. But it is precisely in these contexts that reflexive processes have the most to offer instead of the natural impulsive collective logics. Team reflexivity suggests a potential solution to the major problems of iatorgenesis--avoidable medical errors, as it forces all team members to participate in a reflexive process together. Briefing-debriefing technology was studied mainly in surgical teams and was shown to enhance team-based learning and to improve quality-related outcomes and safety. PMID:24791567

  3. Self-directed work teams in marketing organizations.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, T F

    1999-01-01

    As marketing organizations move toward the 21st century they are becoming concerned with the development of self-directed work teams. Marketing organizations that have informed, motivated, skilled, trained, and committed employees will out perform organizations which operate in the traditional manner. Many self-directed work teams have grown out of the quality circles. The goal of these teams is to increase employee involvement in decisions of the organization to the greatest extent that employees' knowledge and training allow. In fact, today's marketing organizations need to be able to respond quickly to change driven by internal and external customers. The winning organizations will be able to produce more product with better quality in less time by staying lean, flexible, and implementing self-directed work teams. Marketing organizations that can commit to self-directed work teams will benefit by having customer and employee satisfaction, money saved, and excessive bureaucracy eliminated. PMID:10623198

  4. The Work of Recovery on Two Assertive Community Treatment Teams

    PubMed Central

    Salyers, Michelle P.; Stull, Laura G.; Rollins, Angela L.; Hopper, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The compatibility of recovery work with the Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) model has been debated; and little is known about how to best measure the work of recovery. Two ACT teams with high and low recovery orientation were identified by expert consensus and compared on a number of dimensions. Using an interpretive, qualitative approach to analyze interview and observation data, teams differed in the extent to which the environment, team structure, staff attitudes, and processes of working with consumers supported principles of recovery orientation. We present a model of recovery work and discuss implications for research and practice. PMID:20839045

  5. The work of recovery on two assertive community treatment teams.

    PubMed

    Salyers, Michelle P; Stull, Laura G; Rollins, Angela L; Hopper, Kim

    2011-05-01

    The compatibility of recovery work with the Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) model has been debated; and little is known about how to best measure the work of recovery. Two ACT teams with high and low recovery orientation were identified by expert consensus and compared on a number of dimensions. Using an interpretive, qualitative approach to analyze interview and observation data, teams differed in the extent to which the environment, team structure, staff attitudes, and processes of working with consumers supported principles of recovery orientation. We present a model of recovery work and discuss implications for research and practice. PMID:20839045

  6. The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Doo Hun; Petty, Gregory; Fontan, Johnny; Yoon, Seung Won

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between a self-directed work team and a traditional work team based on four work ethic subscales and identify differences in work ethic based on six demographic factors. The major findings from the study indicated there were significant differences in the work

  7. The multidisciplinary health care team in the management of stenosis in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gasparetto, Marco; Angriman, Imerio; Guariso, Graziella

    2015-01-01

    Background Stricture formation is a common complication of Crohn’s disease (CD), occurring in approximately one-third of all patients with this condition. Our aim was to summarize the available epidemiology data on strictures in patients with CD, to outline the principal evidence on diagnostic imaging, and to provide an overview of the current knowledge on treatment strategies, including surgical and endoscopic options. Overall, the unifying theme of this narrative review is the multidisciplinary approach in the clinical management of patients with stricturing CD. Methods A Medline search was performed, using “Inflammatory Bowel Disease”, “stricture”, “Crohn’s Disease”, “Ulcerative Colitis”, “endoscopic balloon dilatation” and “strictureplasty” as keywords. A selection of clinical cohort studies and systematic reviews were reviewed. Results Strictures in CD are described as either inflammatory or fibrotic. They can occur de novo, at sites of bowel anastomosis or in the ileal pouch. CD-related strictures generally show a poor response to medical therapies, and surgical bowel resection or surgical strictureplasty are often required. Over the last three decades, the potential role of endoscopic balloon dilatation has grown in importance, and nowadays this technique is a valid option, complementary to surgery. Conclusion Patients with stricturing CD require complex clinical management, which benefits from a multidisciplinary approach: gastroenterologists, pediatricians, radiologists, surgeons, specialist nurses, and dieticians are among the health care providers involved in supporting these patients throughout diagnosis, prevention of complications, and treatment. PMID:25878504

  8. Linking Team Resources to Work-Family Enrichment and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Emily M.; Perry, Sara Jansen; Carlson, Dawn S.; Smith, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Work-family scholars now recognize the potential positive effects of participation in one life domain (i.e., work or family) on performance in other life domains. We examined how employees might benefit from team resources, which are highly relevant to the modern workplace, in both work and nonwork domains via work-family enrichment. Using the…

  9. 4. APACHE INDIAN LABORER WITH TEAM AND SCRAPER WORKING ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. APACHE INDIAN LABORER WITH TEAM AND SCRAPER WORKING ON THE POWER CANAL LINE FOUR MILES ABOVE LIVINGSTONE, ARIZONA Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, June 14, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  10. An Empirical Study of Information Flows in Multidisciplinary Civil Engineering Design Teams using Lean Measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Effi Tribelsky; Rafael Sacks

    2011-01-01

    Achieving smooth and continual flow of information among teams of independent designers is one of the central difficulties in detailed design of complex civil engineering projects. Lean production flow phenomena such as bottlenecks, rework, large batches and long cycle times are common. This research sought correlation between the degree of success achieved, in terms of design document effectiveness, meeting budget

  11. Piloting the role of a pharmacist in a community palliative care multidisciplinary team: an Australian experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While the home is the most common setting for the provision of palliative care in Australia, a common problem encountered here is the inability of patient/carers to manage medications, which can lead to misadventure and hospitalisation. This can be averted through detection and resolution of drug related problems (DRPs) by a pharmacist; however, they are rarely included as members of the palliative care team. The aim of this study was to pilot a model of care that supports the role of a pharmacist in a community palliative care team. A component of the study was to develop a cost-effective model for continuing the inclusion of a pharmacist within a community palliative care service. Methods The study was undertaken (February March 2009-June 2010) in three phases. Development (Phase 1) involved a literature review; scoping the pharmacist's role; creating tools for recording DRPs and interventions, a communication and education strategy, a care pathway and evidence based patient information. These were then implemented in Phase 2. Evaluation (Phase 3) of the impact of the pharmacist's role from the perspectives of team members was undertaken using an online survey and focus group. Impact on clinical outcomes was determined by the number of patients screened to assess their risk of medication misadventure, as well as the number of medication reviews and interventions performed to resolve DRPs. Results The pharmacist screened most patients (88.4%, 373/422) referred to the palliative care service to assess their risk of medication misadventure, and undertook 52 home visits. Medication reviews were commonly conducted at the majority of home visits (88%, 46/52), and a variety of DRPs (113) were detected at this point, the most common being "patient requests drug information" (25%, 28/113) and "condition not adequately treated" (22%, 25/113). The pharmacist made 120 recommendations in relation to her interventions. Fifty percent of online survey respondents (10/20) had interacted 10 or more times with the pharmacist for advice. All felt that the pharmacist's role was helpful, improving their knowledge of the different medications used in palliative care. The six team members who participated in the focus group indicated that there were several benefits of the pharmacist's contributions towards medication screening and review. Conclusions The inclusion of a pharmacist in a community palliative care team lead to an increase in the medication-related knowledge and skills of its members, improved patients' medication management, and minimised related errors. The model of care created can potentially be duplicated by other palliative care services, although its cost-effectiveness was unable to be accurately tested within the study. PMID:22035160

  12. Management of infected nonunion of the long bones by a multidisciplinary team.

    PubMed

    Bose, D; Kugan, R; Stubbs, D; McNally, M

    2015-06-01

    Infected nonunion of a long bone continues to present difficulties in management. In addition to treating the infection, it is necessary to establish bony stability, encourage fracture union and reconstruct the soft-tissue envelope. We present a series of 67 infected nonunions of a long bone in 66 patients treated in a multidisciplinary unit. The operative treatment of patients suitable for limb salvage was performed as a single procedure. Antibiotic regimes were determined by the results of microbiological culture. At a mean follow-up of 52 months (22 to 97), 59 patients (88%) had an infection-free united fracture in a functioning limb. Seven others required amputation (three as primary treatment, three after late failure of limb salvage and one for recalcitrant pain after union). The initial operation achieved union in 54 (84%) of the salvaged limbs at a mean of nine months (three to 26), with recurrence of infection in 9%. Further surgery in those limbs that remained ununited increased the union rate to 62 (97%) of the 64 limbs treated by limb salvage at final follow-up. The use of internal fixation was associated with a higher risk of recurrent infection than external fixation. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015; 97-B:814-17. PMID:26033062

  13. 76 FR 10403 - Hewlett Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ...Packard (HP), Global Product Development, Engineering Workstation Refresh Team, Working On-Site...Technology Business Development Team, the Engineering Application Support Team, and the Engineering Workstation Refresh Team. On...

  14. [Multidisciplinary team in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention, from the assessment to the education: an educational project].

    PubMed

    Da Vico, Letizia; Ciompi, Maddalena; Schininà, Francesca; Sogaro, Elena; Mannelli, Weruska; Cortini, Sandro

    2014-03-01

    The authors explain the training project: "Multidisciplinarity in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention: from the evaluation to the therapeutic education", the rationale and purpose of a pathway for patients with ischemic heart disease treated in the acute phase with both medical and surgical means, and then placed in a rehabilitation program. The training project was transformed into a learning event for the Region of Sicily and later for the Region of Tuscany that has adopted it, encouraging the spread over the entire region. It highlights the role of the team, which focuses on the patient, converging on it multidisciplinary expertise whose goal is the reintegration of the subjects in their life-context, with appropriate evaluation, treatment and changes in lifestyle. From the valuations and declining the specific interventions to each job profile according to the principle of synergy obtained by multi-professional integration. All phases of the training project (assessment, intervention, evaluation) are addressed by each of the professionals (nurse, dietitian, physiotherapist, psychologist) that under the responsibility of the cardiologist realize, within the welfare, a concrete process of therapeutic education from which no one can ignore the "vision" of a global care of the patient. PMID:25508791

  15. [Multidisciplinary team in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention, from the assessment to the education: an educational project].

    PubMed

    Da Vico, Letizia; Ciompi, Maddalena; Schininà, Francesca; Sogaro, Elena; Mannelli, Weruska; Cortini, Sandro

    2014-03-01

    The authors explain the training project: "Multidisciplinarity in cardiac rehabilitation and secondary prevention: from the evaluation to the therapeutic education", the rationale and purpose of a pathway for patients with ischemic heart disease treated in the acute phase with both medical and surgical means, and then placed in a rehabilitation program. The training project was transformed into a learning event for the Region of Sicily and later for the Region of Tuscany that has adopted it, encouraging the spread over the entire region. It highlights the role of the team, which focuses on the patient, converging on it multidisciplinary expertise whose goal is the reintegration of the subjects in their life-context, with appropriate evaluation, treatment and changes in lifestyle. From the valuations and declining the specific interventions to each job profile according to the principle of synergy obtained by multi-professional integration. All phases of the training project (assessment, intervention, evaluation) are addressed by each of the professionals (nurse, dietitian, physiotherapist, psychologist) that under the responsibility of the cardiologist realize, within the welfare, a concrete process of therapeutic education from which no one can ignore the "vision" of a global care of the patient. PMID:25481939

  16. Primary care team working in Ireland: a qualitative exploration of team members' experiences in a new primary care service.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Norelee; Armstrong, Claire; Woodward, Oonagh; Cullen, Walter

    2015-07-01

    Team working is an integral aspect of primary care, but barriers to effective team working can limit the effectiveness of a primary care team (PCT). The establishment of new PCTs in Ireland provides an excellent opportunity to explore team working in action. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of team members working in a PCT. Team members (n = 19) from two PCTs were interviewed from May to June 2010 using a semi-structured interview guide. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using NVivo (version 8). Thematic analysis was used to explore the data. We identified five main themes that described the experiences of the team members. The themes were support for primary care, managing change, communication, evolution of roles and benefits of team working. Team members were generally supportive of primary care and had experienced benefits to their practice and to the care of their patients from participation in the team. Regular team meetings enabled communication and discussion of complex cases. Despite the significant scope for role conflict due to the varied employment arrangements of the team members, neither role nor interpersonal conflict was evident in the teams studied. In addition, despite the unusual team structure in Irish PCTs - where there is no formally appointed team leader or manager - general issues around team working and its benefits and challenges were very similar to those found in other international studies. This suggests, in contrast to some studies, that some aspects of the leadership role may not be as important in successful PCT functioning as previously thought. Nonetheless, team leadership was identified as an important issue in the further development of the teams. PMID:25429985

  17. Addressing sophisticated cyber threats demands a multidisciplinary team with a unique mindset. Sandia provides

    E-print Network

    , for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL. The president has pledged that U.S. government computer networks will be"secure, trustworthy, and resilient to solving the information security challenges facing our nation. Work on complex analysis problems to bring

  18. Team Work Survey To identify the present stage of the teamwork model where your team is presently

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Team Work Survey Objectives To identify the present stage of the teamwork model where your team is presently operating. Directions This questionnaire contains statements about teamwork. Next to each question

  19. Making Workers Visible: Unmasking Learning in a Work Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Sharon L.; Carter, Vicki K.; Schied, Fred M.

    2001-01-01

    A case study of a work team in a company using quality management strategies found that training to improve customer service actually served to shape workers' attitudes and control their behavior. The focus of this organizational learning was instrumental and served the interests of the organization, not the workers. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  20. The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Gregory C.; Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won; Fontan, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between self-directed work teams and traditional work groups using four work ethic subscales: dependable, considerate, ambitious, and cooperative (Dawson, [1999]; Petty, [1991]). Differences in measured work ethic scores were also compared across six demographic variables: age,…

  1. Participative Work Design in Lean Production: A Strategy for Dissolving the Paradox between Standardized Work and Team Proactivity by Stimulating Team Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz, Annika; Hansen, Niklas; Antoni, Conny

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore job design mechanisms that enhance team proactivity within a lean production system where autonomy is uttermost restricted. We propose and test a model where the team learning process of building shared meaning of work mediates the relationship between team participative decision-making, inter team

  2. Critical Education for Work: Multidisciplinary Approaches. Social and Policy Issues in Education: The David C. Anchin Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakes, Richard D., Ed.

    This book expands the meaning of today's education for work by offering five multidisciplinary approaches--school-to-work transitions, gender equity, labor education, economic democracy, and vocational education--revealing the complexities of personal, social, and cultural transformation. "Critical Education for Work" (Richard D. Lakes) is an…

  3. The effect of work shift on nurses' evaluations of patient behavior: Implications for team decision making

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald U. Robertson; Roger Mesmer; Arthur Y. Hoshino; Charles Steinmeyer

    1982-01-01

    The authors conceptualized multidisciplinary team decision making in terms of information collection, communication, and combination. The study explored the potentially biasing effects of situational variables on information collection. When compared with evening shift nurses, day shift nurses rated patients as much less competent. The authors discuss how this biased information collection can be transmitted throughout the decision process and suggest

  4. Culturally Diverse Teams that Work Kenji Klein, University of California, Irvine

    E-print Network

    Barrett, Jeffrey A.

    Culturally Diverse Teams that Work Kenji Klein, University of California, Irvine Globalization in the number and prevalence of culturally diverse work teams in companies across the globe. Such teams can, but that potential comes with some risk. Research on the performance of culturally diverse teams is divided

  5. (Mis) Perceptions and Interactions of Sleep Specialists and Generalists: Obstacles to Referrals to Sleep Specialists and the Multidisciplinary Team Management of Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sean M.; Murray, Suzanne; Castriotta, Richard J.; Landrigan, Christopher P.; Malhotra, Atul

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study assessed generalists' perceptions and challenges in providing care to sleep disorders patients and the role of sleep specialists in improving gaps in care. Methods: A mixed-method approach included qualitative (semi-structured interviews, discussion groups) and quantitative (online surveys) data collection techniques regarding care of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and shift work disorder (SWD). Results: Participants: OSA: generalists n = 165, specialists (internists, neurologists, psychiatrists, pulmonologists) n = 12; SWD: generalists n = 216, specialists n = 108. Generalists reported challenges in assessing sleep disorders and diagnosing patients with sleep complaints. Generalists lacked confidence (selected ? 3 on a 5-pt Likert scale) in managing polypharmacy and drug interactions (OSA: 54.2%; SWD: 62.6%), addiction (OSA: 61.8%), and continuous positive airway pressure (OSA: 66.5%). Generalists in both studies reported deficits in knowledge of monitoring sleep disorders (OSA: 57.7%; SWD: 78.7%), rather relying on patients' subjective reports; 23% of SWD generalists did not identify SWD as a medical condition. Challenges to generalist-specialist collaboration were reported, with 66% of generalists and 68% of specialists in the SWD study reporting lack of coordination as a barrier. Generalists reported lack of consistency in sleep medicine and a perceived lack of value in consulting with sleep specialists. Conclusions: Knowledge and attitudinal challenges were found in primary care of patients with sleep disorders. Sleep specialists need to clarify and educate practitioners regarding primary care's approach. Citation: Hayes SM; Murray S; Castriotta RJ; Landrigan CP; Malhotra A. (Mis) perceptions and interactions of sleep specialists and generalists: obstacles to referrals to sleep specialists and the multidisciplinary team management of sleep disorders. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(6):633-642. PMID:23243396

  6. Mercury Orbiter: Report of the Science Working Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, John W.; Slavin, James A.; Armstrong, Thomas P.; Farquhar, Robert W.; Akasofu, Syun I.; Baker, Daniel N.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Chupp, Edward L.; Clark, Pamela E.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the Mercury Orbiter Science Working Team which held three workshops in 1988 to 1989 under the auspices of the Space Physics and Planetary Exploration Divisions of NASA Headquarters. Spacecraft engineering and mission design studies at the Jet Propulsion Lab were conducted in parallel with this effort and are detailed elsewhere. The findings of the engineering study, summarized herein, indicate that spin stabilized spacecraft carrying comprehensive particles and fields experiments and key planetology instruments in high elliptical orbits can survive and function in Mercury orbit without costly sun shields and active cooling systems.

  7. Cost-Minimization Model of a Multidisciplinary Antibiotic Stewardship Team Based on a Successful Implementation on a Urology Ward of an Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alex W.; Luttjeboer, Jos; Nannan Panday, Prashant; Wilting, Kasper R.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Postma, Maarten J.; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to stimulate appropriate antimicrobial use and thereby lower the chances of resistance development, an Antibiotic Stewardship Team (A-Team) has been implemented at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Focus of the A-Team was a pro-active day 2 case-audit, which was financially evaluated here to calculate the return on investment from a hospital perspective. Methods Effects were evaluated by comparing audited patients with a historic cohort with the same diagnosis-related groups. Based upon this evaluation a cost-minimization model was created that can be used to predict the financial effects of a day 2 case-audit. Sensitivity analyses were performed to deal with uncertainties. Finally, the model was used to financially evaluate the A-Team. Results One whole year including 114 patients was evaluated. Implementation costs were calculated to be €17,732, which represent total costs spent to implement this A-Team. For this specific patient group admitted to a urology ward and consulted on day 2 by the A-Team, the model estimated total savings of €60,306 after one year for this single department, leading to a return on investment of 5.9. Conclusions The implemented multi-disciplinary A-Team performing a day 2 case-audit in the hospital had a positive return on investment caused by a reduced length of stay due to a more appropriate antibiotic therapy. Based on the extensive data analysis, a model of this intervention could be constructed. This model could be used by other institutions, using their own data to estimate the effects of a day 2 case-audit in their hospital. PMID:25955494

  8. Tension between U.S. labor law and work restructuring: A focus on team-based work systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick P. McHugh

    1995-01-01

    Team-based work systems are part of a new management commitment paradigm. Recently, concerns have been raised regarding the\\u000a legality of team-based work systems under the National Labor Relations Act. Workplace teams and team systems are not per se\\u000a illegal. This review indicates that there is a high degree of certainty regarding the conduct and characteristics necessary\\u000a to trigger legitimate challenges

  9. Working Together: Communicating on Teams. JobLink Winning at Work Instructor's Manual, Module 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coast Community Coll. District, Costa Mesa, CA.

    This instructor's manual for workplace trainers contains the materials required to conduct a course on working in teams. The course includes six lessons for workers, two lessons for supervisors, and strategies for helping workers continue to develop the skills taught in the course. The following materials are provided for each course: lesson plan,…

  10. The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT): A Multidisciplinary group for an improvement of Nanorisk Assessment and Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emond, C.; Rolando, C.; Hirano, S.; Schuster, F.; Jolliet, O.; Maghni, K.; Meyer-Plath, A.; Hallé, S.; Vandelac, L.; Sentein, C.; Torkaski, C.

    2011-07-01

    Nanotechnology allows the ability to design many new materials and devices with multiple applications, such as in medicine, electronics, and energy production. However, nanotechnology also raises several concerns about the toxicity and environmental impact of nanomaterials. A report published by the Council of Canadian Academies points out the necessity to respond about many uncertainties associated with risk assessment for ensuring the safety of health and environment. Nanotoxicology (or Nanosafety) is a part of the toxicology science that aims to study adverse effects of nanomaterials or nanoparticles on living organisms. This field includes different aspects from workers prevention to the environment protection. Group of researchers have initiated an international powerful interactive milieu for researchers to work in concert for a global and integrated study of many aspects of nanotoxicology. The International Team in NanosafeTy (TITNT) is composed of research scientists from 5 different countries (Canada, USA, Japan, France and Germany) working together on 6 different specific thematics, and organized as 9 different technology platforms (www.titnt.com). TITNT aims to study different features of nanomaterials related to nanosafety, such as in vivo and in vitro studies, life cycle, occupational protections and monitoring, early biomarkers detection, characterization and nanotoxicokinetic/dynamic assessment during and after nanoparticles synthesis and the societal, public policy and environmental aspects. While the rapid growth of nanotechnology is opening up a floodgate of opportunities, the legislation related is lagging behind mainly because of a lack of knowledge in the biosafety of most nanomaterials. The main goal of TITNT is to improve knowledge in nanosafety science for the benefit of the discipline, for better public policies and for the public itself.

  11. Multidisciplinary teams work closely with practic-ing physicians to focus on the delivery of personal-

    E-print Network

    Strynadka, Natalie

    . The advent of health care based on the molecular makeup of individuals ­ commonly called "personal- ized health care industry. UBC is ranked #1 in Canada in life science re- search by the London Times; the LSI is the largest life science institute at UBC. As the technological hub of the Personalized Medicine Initiative

  12. The Anonymity Factor in Making Multicultural Teams Work: Virtual and Real Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Roberta Wiig

    2012-01-01

    A major purpose of courses in intercultural communication is often to improve students' ability to perform well in situations with the potential to be both highly enlightening and highly difficult--in multicultural teams. This article reports the results of exercises in which members of a dysfunctional multicultural class were assigned to teams

  13. Evaluating Team Work on Student Projects: The Use of Behaviorally Anchored Scales To Evaluate Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Daniel; Cadiz, David

    One of the biggest problems students face in team projects is social loafing, a situation in which students may view team projects as a free ride. Social loafers let others do the work, knowing that the professor will only grade the completed project. This research examined the performance of students grading other student team members on a group…

  14. Multiagent approach to solve project team work allocation problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yee Ming Chen; Cheng-Wei Wei

    2009-01-01

    In today's fiercely competitive market, embedded software development teams are driven to do more with less: reduce time to market, costs and risk, while improving quality and predictability. There is also an increasing need to deliberately organise the teams that initially involves the division of the project into tasks; the selection of the right people; and the correct allocation of

  15. Psychological Identity x Psychological Reputation: How to recommend compatible peers in a work team

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Psychological Identity x Psychological Reputation: How to recommend compatible peers in a work team presents the on going PhD work dealing with the creation of a User psychological identity and reputation to be used to recommend peers to interact in a work team. Keywords: Psychological Profile, Psychological

  16. The demographic antecedents and performance consequences of the social-network structure in work teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kaisa Henttonen; Minna Janhonen; Jan-Erik Johanson; Kaisu Puumalainen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – Businesses are increasingly using teams as their fundamental organisational unit. This paper aims to explore the impact of demographic antecedents and the social-network structure, measured in terms of task-related advice-network density, centralisation and fragmentation, on work-team performance. The paper seeks to examine: the impact of the social-network structure (dense, fragmented or centralised) on work-team performance and the origins

  17. Cornell Waste Management Institute Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals

    E-print Network

    Wang, Z. Jane

    waste, what are you doing with your roadkill, are there plans for food scraps, etc.? In additionCornell Waste Management Institute ­ Program Work Team 1 Managing Organic Residuals Program Work Team ­ Annual Meeting Summary Cornell Waste Management Institute Date: March 10, 2011 Location

  18. Cross-Cultural Study into ICT Student Attitudes and Behaviours Concerning Teams and Project Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Deborah; Bilgin, Ayse

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a project involving information and communication technology (ICT) students in Australia and Singapore, working together as a virtual global team. The authors investigated the question: Can differences be found in the behaviours and attitudes of our two cohorts to working in teams? This would allow…

  19. Administrative Excellence Shaping Our Future Phase II Work Team Project Charter

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    UW-Madison Administrative Excellence ­ Shaping Our Future Phase II Work Team Project Charter Data of Administrative Excellence. This will include incorporating salient portions of the work completed within;requests made by this team · The established Administrative Excellence issue resolution processes

  20. Undergraduate Studies in Earthquake Information Technology (UseIT): Preparing Students for the Twenty-First Century Work Force via a Multidisciplinary and Collaborative Learning Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degroot, R. M.; Jordan, T. H.; Benthien, M. L.; Ihrig, M.; Berti, R.

    2009-12-01

    UseIT is one of the three undergraduate research programs sponsored by the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). The program allows students to work in multi-disciplinary collaborative teams to tackle a scientific “Grand Challenge.” The topic varies each year but it always entails performing computer science research that is needed by earthquake scientists, educators, and other target audiences. The program allows undergraduates to use the advanced tools of information technology to solve important problems in interdisciplinary earthquake research. Since the program began in 2002, 145 students have participated in UseIT. The program stresses problem solving and interdisciplinary cross training. A key aspect of the UseIT program is its flexible, yet structured, team approach. Students share their diverse skills and interests, creating a powerful synergy through this peer mentoring. The majority of UseIT interns have considerable computer science skill or aptitude, but successful UseIT interns have hailed from nearly three-dozen disciplines, all class levels, and all skill levels. Successful UseIT interns have in common a willingness to step outside their comfort zones and try new things. During the 2009 internship the focus of the program was to deliver SCEC Virtual Display of Objects (VDO) images and animations of faults and earthquake sequences to SCEC, the Earthquake Country Alliance, and other virtual organizations via a content management system that captures the metadata and guides the user. SCEC-VDO is the SCEC intern-developed visualization software that allows the user to see earthquake related phenomena in three and four dimensions. The 2009 Grand Challenge had special relevance for the interns because the products they created were used for The Great California ShakeOut. This talk will discuss lessons learned from this program, how it addresses the needs of the 21st century STEM work force, and highlights of the 2009 internship.

  1. [Cancers of the thyroid. Value of a regional registry on 627 patients diagnosed, treated and followed by a multidisciplinary team].

    PubMed

    Delisle, M J; Schvartz, C; Theobald, S; Maes, B; Vaudrey, C; Pochart, J M

    1996-01-01

    Since 1966, data from 1536 patients with a thyroid carcinoma, living in the French region Champagne-Ardenne, a geographical area with 1,350,000 inhabitants were registered. The creation of a multidisciplinary group and the involvement of the general practitioners, allowed us to reach an exhaustive and continued registration process for the French administrative area of Marne and Ardennes (855,000 inhibitants, 627 patients). The sex-ratio F/M was 3.8 and the median ages were respectively equal to 46 [10-93] and 52 [13-82] in females and males. In the age groups 10-14 and 15-19, 3 cases and 13 cases were respectively registered. An history of external irradiation was noted in 2.9% of the patients. The study of the incidence around the Chooz nuclear plant (Ardennes) did not show an increase of the risk. For the French administrative area Marne and Ardennes, for the period 1975-1979, the incidence rates, standardized on the European population, were equal to 1.75/100,000 in males (SD = 0.15) and 6.38/100,000 (SD = 0.29) in females. These values among the highest from the data published by the other European registries should be explained by a more intensive diagnosis procedure and an improvement in the accuracy of histological diagnosis. An increase of the incidence rate was observed between the periods 1975-1983 and 1984-1992 from 1.04 to 2.05/100,000 and 4.99 to 6.39/100,000 in males and females respectively. This was associated with changes in clinical and histological features and an improvement in survival curves. For patients under the age of 19, we have compared both periods before and after the accident of Chernobyl. The incidence rates increased from 0.13 to 0.45/100,000 and 0.49 to 1.81/100,000 in the age groups 10-14 and 15-19 respectively. This change was at the order of magnitude to this observed in our adults population. We did not found the histological aggressiveness which characterized the Chernobyl-induced thyroid cancer in children. The knowledge of the significant prognostic factors determined by multifactorial analyses is a major foundation of our therapeutic strategy. PMID:8734288

  2. A New Concept of Working Environment Improvement Within Multicultural Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makraiová, Jana; Cagá?ová, Dagmar; ?ambál, Miloš

    2012-12-01

    Multicultural team leaders under the conditions of globalisation process must understand that acquiring cultural awareness and diversity management skills is one of the premises for gaining competitive advantage and satisfying the employee? need for social cohesion. The concept presented in this paper goes beyond standard understanding of what cultural diversity management means, as it is not perceived as a set of activities that a business as a whole should be responsible for, but encourage every leader to take responsibility for its own awareness firstly. After understanding that cross-cultural competence is a lifelong learning process it is possible to start recognising one’s own cultural mindset before attempting to recognise those of people from other cultures. At this point it is a right time to spread the experience amongst other team members or associates.

  3. Key Concepts of Teams in an Organisation. Information Bank Working Paper Number 2541.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, D. T.

    Teams in an organization are more than cooperative working groups. Advantages of group work, as opposed to individual work, include producing a better end result, providing satisfaction for the individual and the organization, and assisting the organization through coordination and work allocation. Disadvantages of group work include producing a…

  4. Effects of Multidisciplinary Team Care on the Survival of Patients with Different Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chien-Chou; Wang, Yueh-Hsin; Chang, Yu-Chia; Wang, Shih-Ting

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan, cancer is the top cause of death, and the mortality rate of lung cancer is the highest of all cancers. Some studies have demonstrated that multidisciplinary team (MDT) care can improve survival rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. However, no study has discussed the effect of MDT care on different stages of NSCLC. The target population for this study consisted of patients with NSCLC newly diagnosed in the 2005–2010 Cancer Registry. The data was linked with the 2002–2011 National Health Insurance Research Database and the 2005–2011 Cause of Death Statistics Database. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to explore whether the involvement of MDT care had an effect on survival. This study applied the propensity score as a control variable to reduce selection bias between patients with and without involvement of MDT care. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of death of MDT participants with stage III & IV NSCLC was significantly lower than that of MDT non-participants (adjusted HR = 0.87, 95% confidence interval = 0.84-0.90). This study revealed that MDT care are significantly associated with higher survival rate of patients with stage III and IV NSCLC, and thus MDT care should be used in the treatment of these patients. PMID:25966317

  5. "Teamwork" or "Working as a Team"? The Theory and Practice of Top Team Working in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodfield, Steve; Kennie, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the theory and practice of teamwork in "top management teams" in UK higher education institutions. It is informed by some of the key findings from a recent two-year research project sponsored by the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education that investigated the different ways in which UK higher education institutions…

  6. We're Hiring Join the Team and Work on some of Today's Grand

    E-print Network

    Pinsky, Ross

    Computing, such as risk analytics, network security, software defined networking, high-end transaction and enthusiastic people to join our teams in Palo Alto and London to work in areas such as Analytics, HPC, Trading of the current openings follow. Acceleration Architect London, UK The Data Analytics team develops analytics

  7. Integrating Social Work into Undergraduate Education through a Community Action and Social Change Multidisciplinary Minor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Schuster, Katie; Ruffolo, Mary C.; Nicoll, Kerri Leyda

    2015-01-01

    Social work education has a long and successful history of developing change agents through bachelor of social work, master's of social work, and PhD programs, but these programs often create boundaries limiting the reach and infusion of social work perspectives. With rapid changes in social, economic, and political contexts, students from all…

  8. Severe asymptomatic non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in routine diabetes care; a multi-disciplinary team approach to diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Hazlehurst, Jonathan M.; Parker, Richard; Koushiappi, Elena; Mann, Jake; Khan, Sheeba; Philips, Angela; Chandler, Liz; Johnson, Jill; Round, Maria; Haydon, Geoffrey; Karamat, Mohammad A.; Newsome, Philip N.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To prospectively use a non-invasive algorithm to identify asymptomatic, advanced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a secondary care diabetes clinic and to determine the short-term effect of a multi-disciplinary team (MDT) approach in a liver clinic. Research design and methods: NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS) was calculated in 64 asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes. Advanced fibrosis was identified using transient elastography and confirmed with liver biopsy. In a subsequent retrospective study, 95 patients newly referred to the NAFLD MDT clinic were investigated and the impact of the MDT approach assessed. Results: 25/64 (39.0%) of patients with diabetes had a low NFS (<–1.455). 39/64 (61.0%) patients had a high or indeterminate NFS and were referred for review in the NAFLD MDT clinic, of which 23/39 attended for assessment. 19/23 (82.6%) were diagnosed with NAFLD, of which 6/19 (31.6%) patients had a positive transient elastography (?8 kPa). Liver biopsy confirmed advanced fibrosis in 5/6 cases, with moderate fibrosis in 1 case. In the retrospective study, 65/95 (68.4%) new referrals to the NAFLD MDT clinic had a diagnosis of NAFLD. Over a median 98 days (IQR 70–182) follow-up, there was a significant improvement in weight (–0.8 kg; P = 0.024), total cholesterol (–0.2 mmol/L; P = 0.044), ALT (alanine transmaminase, ?12.5 IU/L; P < 0.001) and GGT (gammu-glutamyl transferase, ?13.0 IU/L; P < 0.0001). 7/28 (25%) of patients with diabetes achieved >5% weight loss. Conclusions: A significant proportion of asymptomatic patients attending type 2 diabetes clinics have undiagnosed advanced NAFLD fibrosis. An MDT approach to NAFLD results in short-term improvements in metabolic and liver parameters. PMID:24131545

  9. A multidisciplinary approach to the prevention, evaluation, and management of work disability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Feuerstein

    1991-01-01

    Occupational musculoskeletal disorders represent a major challenge to the injured worker, his or her family, the various health care, health and safety, and human resource professionals that work in this area as well as employers and the workers' compensation system. The epidemiology of the occupational musculoskeletal disorders and work disability indicate the problem is growing. Given the multiple factors that

  10. Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

  11. A learning curve-based method to implement multifunctional work teams in the Brazilian footwear sector.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, L B de M; Anzanello, M J; Renner, J S

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a method for implementing multifunctional work teams in a footwear company that followed the Taylor/Ford system for decades. The suggested framework first applies a Learning Curve (LC) modeling to assess whether rotation between tasks of different complexities affects workers' learning rate and performance. Next, the Macroergonomic Work Analysis (MA) method (Guimarães, 1999, 2009) introduces multifunctional principles in work teams towards workers' training and resources improvement. When applied to a pilot line consisting of 100 workers, the intervention-reduced work related accidents in 80%, absenteeism in 45.65%, and eliminated work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), medical consultations, and turnover. Further, the output rate of the multifunctional team increased average 3% compared to the production rate of the regular lines following the Taylor/Ford system (with the same shoe model being manufactured), while the rework and spoilage rates were reduced 85% and 69%, respectively. PMID:21907970

  12. [Culture and cultural gaps in work teams: implications for organisational commitment].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, José C; Lanero, Ana; Yurrebaso, Amaia; Tejero, Blanca

    2007-05-01

    Some theoreticians of organisational commitment have proposed that culture is an important determinant of organisational commitment. Nevertheless, very few studies have examined the role that work teams culture (subculture) and their cultural gaps play in commitment. This study is an attempt to overcome this lack. Using a sample of 375 work teams from various public and private organisations, it was found that the results confirmed our proposals. Cultural gaps were negatively related to commitment; the teams subculture was positively related to commitment, and more highly to commitment to values than to commitment to continuing. Contrary to the results of other studies, the demographic variables (age, time on the team, time in the company) were not significant, except that educational level was related to the commitment to continue. The implications of these results are analysed. PMID:17425891

  13. Contact dermatitis due to benzisothiazolone in a works analytical team.

    PubMed

    Slovak, A J

    1980-04-01

    In the quality control laboratory of a chemical firm, 11 of 16 men developed dermatitis. Of the allergenic substances used, seven men reacted to benzisothiazolone, two to dinitrochlorobenzene, and none to diphenylamine. Two men were negative to all three substances. A poorly ventilated humid working environment was thought to be an important contributory factor. PMID:6446435

  14. Interdisciplinary and Team Teaching: How Do We Make It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Hope J.

    2003-01-01

    Integrating academic and career tech curriculum is one of the primary objectives of the Carl Perkins Vocational Education Act (1998 reauthorization) and a guiding principle of the School to Work Opportunities Act. It has proven to be an invaluable approach to teaching, and educators across the nation have experienced firsthand how the application…

  15. An Evidence-Based Multidisciplinary Practice Guideline to Reduce the Workload due to Lifting for Preventing Work-Related Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We developed an evidence-based practice guideline to support occupational safety and health (OSH) professionals in assessing the risk due to lifting and in selecting effective preventive measures for low back pain (LBP) in the Netherlands. The guideline was developed at the request of the Dutch government by a project team of experts and OSH professionals in lifting and work-related LBP. The recommendations for risk assessment were based on the quality of instruments to assess the risk on LBP due to lifting. Recommendations for interventions were based on a systematic review of the effects of worker- and work directed interventions to reduce back load due to lifting. The quality of the evidence was rated as strong (A), moderate (B), limited (C) or based on consensus (D). Finally, eight experts and twenty-four OSH professionals commented on and evaluated the content and the feasibility of the preliminary guideline. For risk assessment we recommend loads heavier than 25 kg always to be considered a risk for LBP while loads less than 3 kg do not pose a risk. For loads between 3–25 kg, risk assessment shall be performed using the Manual handling Assessment Charts (MAC)-Tool or National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) lifting equation. Effective work oriented interventions are patient lifting devices (Level A) and lifting devices for goods (Level C), optimizing working height (Level A) and reducing load mass (Level C). Ineffective work oriented preventive measures are regulations to ban lifting without proper alternatives (Level D). We do not recommend worker-oriented interventions but consider personal lift assist devices as promising (Level C). Ineffective worker-oriented preventive measures are training in lifting technique (Level A), use of back-belts (Level A) and pre-employment medical examinations (Level A). This multidisciplinary evidence-based practice guideline gives clear criteria whether an employee is at risk for LBP while lifting and provides an easy-reference for (in)effective risk reduction measures based on scientific evidence, experience, and consensus among OSH experts and practitioners. PMID:24999432

  16. Building Multidisciplinary Training Networks for Rural Development. Report of the Regional Workshop for Pre-service Training of Members of Multidisciplinary Educational Teams in Rural Areas (Pune, India, July 16-20, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    Papers designed to help build multidisciplinary training networks for rural development are collected in this document, an outgrowth of a regional training workshop attended by participants from Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Thailand, and India. The six papers deal with the objectives of the workshop which were to:…

  17. Effective Team Support: From Task and Cognitive Modeling to Software Agents for Time-Critical Complex Work Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie E.; Sycara, Katia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in completing a system for empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support a team's tasks, and in running experiments for the collection of baseline data.

  18. Working practices and success of infection prevention and control teams: a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Hale, R; Powell, T; Drey, N S; Gould, D J

    2015-02-01

    Little research has been undertaken on how infection prevention and control (IPC) teams operate and how their effectiveness is assessed. This review aimed to explore how IPC teams embed IPC throughout hospitals, balance outbreak management with strategic aspects of IPC work (e.g. education), and how IPC team performance is measured. A scoping exercise was performed combining literature searches, evidence synthesis, and intelligence from expert advisers. Eleven publications were identified. One paper quantified how IPC nurses spend their time, two described daily activities of IPC teams, five described initiatives to embed IPC across organizations following legislation since 1999 in the UK or changes in the delivery of healthcare, and three explored the contribution of IPC intermediaries (link nurses and champions). Eight publications reported research findings. The others reported how IPC teams are embedding IPC practice in UK hospitals. In conclusion, there is scope for research to explore different models of IPC team-working and effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness. Other topics that need addressing are the willingness and ability of ward staff to assume increased responsibility for IPC and the effectiveness of intermediaries. PMID:25549828

  19. Activities of the NASA Exploration Team Human-Robotics Working Group Chris Culbert, Jen Rochlis, Fred Rehnmark, David Kortenkamp, Kevin Watson,

    E-print Network

    Kortenkamp, David

    Activities of the NASA Exploration Team Human-Robotics Working Group Chris Culbert, Jen Rochlis of the work performed by the NASA Exploration Team (NEXT) Human-Robotics Working Group. The team had of heterogeneous teams of human and robot pioneers is central to the NASA Exploration Team's strategic vision

  20. Climate for work group creativity and innovation: Norwegian validation of the team climate inventory (TCI).

    PubMed

    Mathisen, Gro Ellen; Einarsen, Ståle; Jørstad, Kari; Brønnick, Kolbjørn S

    2004-11-01

    The present study assessed the psychometric properties and the validity of the Norwegian translation of the Team Climate Inventory (TCI). The TCI is a measure of climate for innovation within groups at work and is based on the four-factor theory of climate for innovation (West, 1990). Cronbach's alpha revealed satisfactory reliabilities and exploratory factor analysis successfully extracted the four original factors as well as a fifth factor that has also been reported in other studies (N = 195 teams from a wide range of professions). Results from confirmatory factor analysis, using a different sample (N = 106 teams from the Norwegian public postal service), suggested that the five-factor solution had the most parsimonious fit. Criterion validity was explored by correlating TCI scores from 92 post offices and 395 postal distribution teams with customer satisfaction scores. Significant positive relationships were found between three of four TCI scales and customer satisfaction. PMID:15535807

  1. Realisation of Strategic Leadership in Leadership Teams' Work as Experienced by the Leadership Team Members of Basic Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahtero, Tapio Juhani; Kuusilehto-Awale, Lea

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a quantitative research into how the leadership team members of 49 basic education schools in the city of Vantaa, Finland, experienced the realisation of strategic leadership in their leadership teams' work. The data were collected by a survey of 24 statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, and analysed with the…

  2. Thriving in Multidisciplinary Research: Advice for New Bioinformatics Students

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Raymond K.

    2012-01-01

    The sciences have seen a large increase in demand for students in bioinformatics and multidisciplinary fields in general. Many new educational programs have been created to satisfy this demand, but navigating these programs requires a non-traditional outlook and emphasizes working in teams of individuals with distinct yet complementary skill sets. Written from the perspective of a current bioinformatics student, this article seeks to offer advice to prospective and current students in bioinformatics regarding what to expect in their educational program, how multidisciplinary fields differ from more traditional paths, and decisions that they will face on the road to becoming successful, productive bioinformaticists. PMID:23012580

  3. Minutes of TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team Meeting and Ocean Tides Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng (editor)

    1995-01-01

    This third TOPEX/POSEIDON Science Working Team meeting was held on December 4, 1994 to review progress in defining ocean tide models, precision Earth orbits, and various science algorithms. A related workshop on ocean tides convened to select the best models to be used by scientists in the Geophysical Data Records.

  4. A causal model of burnout among self-managed work team members.

    PubMed

    Elloy, D F; Terpening, W; Kohls, J

    2001-05-01

    The findings on burnout that are almost universally from research in service settings are applied to an industrial setting with self-managed work teams. Researchers formulated several hypotheses on the basis of this literature. These hypotheses were then used to develop a structural (causal) model that was tested and refined using LISREL 8. Data were collected from 320 employees concerning perceptions of several job and organization conditions, as well as the three components of burnout. Results indicated that role conflict contributed to emotional exhaustion, and participation in work teams diminished it. Job ambiguity, low co-worker support, and low job ability contributed to feelings of low personal accomplishment. These results were consistent with previous findings. When insufficient time to complete a job was removed from the workload measures, workload actually diminished burnout, a finding opposite from previous research. Other organization factors had no significant impact on burnout in this setting. PMID:11577974

  5. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory Across Generations. An emerging Multidisciplinary Work Area and an NEA Project - 12218

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Jantine [Belgian Nuclear Research Institute SCK.CEN, Mol (Belgium); Pescatore, Claudio [OECD NEA, Paris (France)

    2012-07-01

    Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference means for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, i.e. not dependent on human presence and intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. There is however no intention to forgo, at any time, knowledge and awareness either of the repository or of the waste that it contains. The preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) is seen as an integral part of radioactive waste management, supporting lengthy and complex socio-technical processes across pre-operational, operational and post-operational lifetimes. Long-term preservation of RK and M is an emerging multidisciplinary work area in which much learning is expected over the coming years. Novel methods are being sought that are least vulnerable to both natural degradation and to changes in socio-economic conditions. Progress has been made in individual countries, but there is a need to internationalise the thinking, compare approaches, investigate potential solutions and share decisions. This is the task of the NEA RK and M project. A major outcome of the project will be a 'menu-driven document' that will allow people to identify the main elements of a strategic action plan for RK and M preservation. In sum, the preservation of RK and M is a unprecedented task in which technical, scientific and social information is interwoven and needs to be developed and preserved across generations and across specialist boundaries. Important studies have been undertaken in the past decades to explore a variety of approaches to preserving RK and M across different timescales, including archives and markers. The work of the past in this area is useful, but innovative thinking is also needed. Seen from today's perspective, very little work is available on for example the contextualization of data for later use; on the systematic identification of mechanisms for RK and M transfer; on implementing a culture of RK and M-keeping in organisations; and on creating cultural links between the waste disposals and the siting communities. Moreover, international cooperation is recognised as being crucial in providing shared means and meanings for memory transmission over longer timescales. International cooperation has also been identified as a catalyst to ensure that a wide range of approaches and experiences is considered, thus potentially reducing uncertainty related to variations in approach. Overall, multiple approaches, requiring active and less active care, need to be considered from the start of the radioactive waste management programme and refined in the course of time. The RK and M project members want to further investigate and deliver support to fulfil this task. (authors)

  6. Simulation of a Forensic Chemistry Problem: A Multidisciplinary Project for Secondary School Chemistry Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project that uses a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving in analyzing a crime scene and suspect evidence. Requires each student to work effectively in a team, communicate in both written and oral forms, perform hands-on laboratory manipulations, and realize that the entire class was depending on their individual contributions…

  7. Knowledge and attitude toward interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in teaching hospitals in South East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Ugwu, George Onyemaechi; Ajah, Leonard Ogbonna; Ezugwu, Euzebus Chinonye; Onah, Paul; Onwuka, Chidinma Ifechi

    2015-01-01

    Background Interdisciplinary team working could facilitate the efficient provision and coordination of increasingly diverse health services, thereby improving the quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to describe knowledge of interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in two teaching hospitals in South East Nigeria and to determine their attitude toward an interdisciplinary collaborative approach to patient care in these institutions. Methods This was a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics and was carried out using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software version 17.0 for Windows. Results In total, 116 doctors participated in the study. The mean age of the respondents was 31.9±7.0 (range 22–51) years. Approximately 74% of respondents were aware of the concept of interdisciplinary team working. Approximately 15% of respondents who were aware of the concept of interdisciplinary team working had very good knowledge of it; 52% had good knowledge and 33% had poor knowledge. Twenty-nine percent of knowledgeable respondents reported ever receiving formal teaching/training on interdisciplinary team working in the course of their professional development. About 78% of those aware of team working believed that interdisciplinary teams would be useful in obstetrics and gynecology practice in Nigeria, with 89% stating that it would be very useful. Approximately 77% of those aware of team working would support establishment and implementation of interdisciplinary teams at their centers. Conclusion There was a high degree of knowledge of the concept and a positive attitude toward interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in the study centers. This suggests that the attitude of physicians may not be an impediment to implementation of a collaborative interdisciplinary approach to clinical care in the study centers.

  8. Cost effectiveness and cost utility analysis of multidisciplinary care in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised comparison of clinical nurse specialist care, inpatient team care, and day patient team care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W B van den Hout; G J Tijhuis; J M W Hazes; F C Breedveld; T P M Vliet Vlieland

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relative cost effectiveness of clinical nurse specialist care, inpatient team care, and day patient team care.Methods: Incremental cost effectiveness analysis and cost utility analysis, alongside a prospective randomised controlled trial with two year follow up. Included were patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with increasing difficulty in performing activities of daily living over the previous six weeks.

  9. Experiences of a health team working in a new urban settlement area in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Bulut, A; Uzel, N; Kutluay, T; Neyzi, O

    1991-10-01

    A project aiming at creating a model for comprehensive maternal and child health care for urban underdeveloped areas was started in a new settlement area of migrants in the vicinity of Istanbul. The project had an impact on health care status, particularly among infants and children, but the results indicated that more effort was needed to reach the mothers. It was noted that building space and the appearance of the work place influenced the prestige of the team. Absentee problems could be partly surmounted by repeated home visits. Based on this experience, it was concluded that health services in underdeveloped areas need to be supported by non medical personnel to act as home visitors and as mediators between the community and the health team. It was also concluded that an established recording system to include both clinical data and attendance is needed to define the cases who need special care. PMID:1955576

  10. Effective Team Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Male, Mary

    1991-01-01

    The Student Study Team (SST) is described as a California intervention model that encourages effective multidisciplinary team participation. The development, training, operation, and evaluation of such teams are discussed, and implementation recommendations are offered. The article includes a flow chart of the SST process, a meeting competency…

  11. Using multi-disciplinary strategic master facilities planning for organizations experiencing programmatic re-direction

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Weimer, W.C.; Bruce, W.A.

    1993-12-01

    Facility master planning is critical to the future productivity of a laboratory and the quality of worklife for the laboratory staff. For organizations undergoing programmatic re-direction, a master facility planning approach linked to the organization`s strategic planning process is even more important. Major changes in an organization such as programmatic re-direction can significantly impact a broad range of variables which exceed the expertise of traditional planning teams, e.g., capacity variability, work team organization, organizational culture, and work process simplification. By expanding the diversity of the participants of the planning team, there is a greater likelihood that a research organization`s scientific, organizational, economic, and employees` needs can be meshed in the strategic plan and facility plan. Recent recommendations from facility planners suggest drawing from diverse fields in building multi-disciplinary planning teams: Architecture, engineering, natural science, social psychology, and strategic planning (Gibson,1993). For organizations undergoing significant operational or culture change, the master facility planning team should also include members with expertise in organizational effectiveness, industrial engineering, human resources, and environmental psychology. A recent planning and design project provides an example which illustrates the use of an expanded multi-disciplinary team engaged in planning laboratory renovations for a research organization undergoing programmatic re-direction. The purpose of the proposed poster session is to present a multi-disciplinary master facility planning process linked to an organization`s strategic planning process or organizational strategies.

  12. “W.H.A.P. VAP!”: A Multidisciplinary Team Approach for Reducing the Incidence of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in a Community Hospital

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Ferris; M. Cox; D. Spence; F. Caruso; J. McDonald; S. Sauer; B. Schneiderhahn

    2004-01-01

    ISSUE: Missouri Baptist Medical Center is a 499-bed community hospital with two 10-bed, medical-surgical intensive care units (ICUs). The 2001 ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) mean rate for both ICUs was 9.54\\/1,000 ventilator days. A VAP prevention team was formed with Infection Control, critical care (CC) medical director, nurse managers and educators, respiratory therapy (RT) managers, and a pharmacist, dietician, and pulmonologist.PROJECT:

  13. Evaluating the influence of implicit models of mental disorder on processes of shared decision making within community-based multi-disciplinary teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Colombo; G. Bendelow; B. Fulford; S. Williams

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a qualitative study concerning the influence of implicit models of mental disorder on shared decision making within community-based mental health teams. One-hundred participants representing five distinct multi-agency groups: psychiatrists, community psychiatric nurses, approved social workers, patients and informal carers operating within Leicestershire, England were interviewed using a standard case vignette describing a person whose behaviour

  14. 23 CFR 630.1006 - Work zone safety and mobility policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...work zone impacts of individual projects or classes of projects. The States should institute...using a multi-disciplinary team and in partnership with the...policy for non-Federal-aid projects as...

  15. 23 CFR 630.1006 - Work zone safety and mobility policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...work zone impacts of individual projects or classes of projects. The States should institute...using a multi-disciplinary team and in partnership with the...policy for non-Federal-aid projects as...

  16. ‘When is a teacher not a teacher?’: knowledge creation and the professional identity of teachers within multi-agency teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Robinson; Angela Anning; Nick Frost

    2005-01-01

    Education is centre stage in current UK government initiatives to promote multi-agency team work. This paper draws on a research project which explored the way in which multi-disciplinary teams work and learn together in their practice with children, to consider the implications of ‘joined-up’ practice for theorizing dilemmas of knowledge creation and identity transformation for professionals in multi-agency teams. The

  17. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Educating Preschool Children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia and Septo-Optic Nerve Dysplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahar, Cheryl; Brody, Jill; McCann, Mary Ellen; Mendiola, Rosalinda; Slott, Gayle

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the observations and experiences of a multidisciplinary team at the Blind Childrens Center in Los Angeles, which works specifically with children from birth to 5 years of age who have been diagnosed with optic nerve hypoplasia and may have septo-optic displasia. Strategies for educational interventions are explained.…

  18. 18. Gender at Work: Eavesdropping on Communication Patterns in Two Token Teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine C. KOCH; Stephanie M. MÜLLER; Antje SCHROEER; Caja THIMM; Lenelis KRUSE; Joerg ZUMBACH

    In a national research project we assessed gender-related communicative patterns in 20 teams from diverse organizations. The sub-sample for this study consisted of two teams with one gender token each: a female token in an industrial team of eleven persons and a male token in a kindergarten team of eight persons. We focused on dominance and support-related behaviour in verbal

  19. Working Together for Safety: A State Team Approach to Preventing Occupational Injuries in Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Marc

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the Northeast Young Worker Resource Center. It begins with two case studies that demonstrate the value of the State team approach. The remainder of the document describes the experiences and activities of the State teams in the Northeast; the products developed by the teams for teens, parents, employers, school staff, health…

  20. Staffing work teams: Testing for individual-level knowledge, skill, and ability requirements for teamwork

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J Stevens

    1993-01-01

    The knowledge, skill, and ability requirements (KSAs) needed to be an effective team member in self-managed groups were examined. While substantial literatures address the proper design and management of these teams at group- and organizational-levels, little is known about the necessary characteristics of effective individual team members. An extensive review was conducted to identify these characteristics, focusing on (1) KSAs

  1. Multidisciplinary teamwork and communication training.

    PubMed

    Deering, Shad; Johnston, Lindsay C; Colacchio, Kathryn

    2011-04-01

    Every delivery is a multidisciplinary event, involving nursing, obstetricians, anesthesiologists, and pediatricians. Patients are often in labor across multiple provider shifts, necessitating numerous handoffs between teams. Each handoff provides an opportunity for errors. Although a traditional approach to improving patient outcomes has been to address individual knowledge and skills, it is now recognized that a significant number of complications result from team, rather than individual, failures. In 2004, a Sentinel Alert issued by the Joint Commission revealed that most cases of perinatal death and injury are caused by problems with an organization's culture and communication failures. It was recommended that hospitals implement teamwork training programs in an effort to improve outcomes. Instituting a multidisciplinary teamwork training program that uses simulation offers a risk-free environment to practice skills, including communication, role clarification, and mutual support. This experience should improve patient safety and outcomes, as well as enhance employee morale. PMID:21440817

  2. The Effectiveness of Self-Managed Work Teams in Government Organizations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seung-Bum YangMary; Mary E. Guy

    Purpose  The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of self-managed work teams in government organizations. The article\\u000a discussed three distinct indicators to organizational effectiveness: participant satisfaction, goal attainment, and system\\u000a resources.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design\\/Methodology\\/Approach  Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (SEM). Data were collected from a national survey of 176 city government\\u000a employees from 24 American cities.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Findings  Both self-management and

  3. Revisiting empowerment: a study of improvement work in health care teams.

    PubMed

    Müllern, Tomas; Nordin, Annika

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of team empowerment in a large clinic at a Swedish hospital. The focus of the study was to understand how a high degree of empowerment enabled the teams to develop and sustain a high level of performance. More specifically, a model of empowerment was used to identify important factors that contribute to team empowerment in 3 teams at the clinic. In the analysis of the empirical data, 21 factors were identified and the degree of empowerment in the 3 teams was assessed. PMID:22453819

  4. Multi-volume reference work with authoritative, multi-disciplinary, and comprehensive coverage of the soil sciences.

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of the soil sciences. Encyclopedia of Soils in the Environment on ScienceDirect: Authoritative, Extensive/7 access. Benefits of Online Access 2004 Elsevier Reference Works on ScienceDirect Encyclopedia of Soils, Integrated R www.sciencedirect.com Reference Works on ScienceDirect: Authoritative, Extensive, Integrated

  5. Communication, and Team-Working Skills in Second-Year Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Goldrick, Niamh B.; Marzec, Bartosz; Scully, P. Noelle; Draper, Sylvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2002, a multidisciplinary program has been used to encourage science students to build on their chemical knowledge and to appreciate how it applies to the world around them. The program is interactive and instills a new set of core learning skills that are often underrepresented in undergraduate curricula, namely, cooperative learning,…

  6. What makes teams work: Group effectiveness research from the shop floor to the executive suite

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan G. Cohen; Diane E. Bailey

    1997-01-01

    In this article, we summarize and review the research on teams and groups in organization settings published from January 1990 to April 1996. The article focuses on studies in which the dependent variables are concerned with various dimensions of effectiveness. A heuristic framework illustrating recent trends in the literature depicts team effectiveness as a function of task, group, and organization

  7. Global Teams: Futuristic Models of Collaborative Work for Today's Software Development Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georgios A. Dafoulas; Kathleen M. Swigger; Robert P. Brazile; Ferda Nur Alpaslan; Victor Lopez Cabrera; Fatma Cemile Serçe

    2009-01-01

    This paper emphasises the importance of global teams in the field of software development. The paper presents an approach for setting up pilot studies simulating those key features that make global software development teams particularly attractive to exploit and challenging to manage. The underlying research is supported by a research project funded by the US National Science Foundation with the

  8. Progress of the international work of the “imidacloprid flea susceptibility monitoring team

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Schroeder; B. L. Blagburn; D. L. Bledsoe; R. Bond; I. Denholm; M. W. Dryden; D. E. Jacobs; H. Mehlhorn; N. Mencke; P. Payne; M. K. Rust; M. B. Vaughn

    2003-01-01

    The “Imidacloprid Flea Susceptibility Monitoring Team” has aim to develop and validate a bioassay to effectively monitor and document susceptibility of cat flea ( Ctenocephalides felis) isolates to imidacloprid. A larval bioassay was developed, standardized and validated and agreed upon by the team as the reference diagnostic test kit as research has shown that the proposed WHO adult test was

  9. Teaching Note--An Exploration of Team-Based Learning and Social Work Education: A Natural Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael A.; Robinson, Michelle Bachelor; McCaskill, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The literature on team-based learning (TBL) as a pedagogical methodology in social work education is limited; however, TBL, which was developed as a model for business, has been successfully used as a teaching methodology in nursing, business, engineering, medical school, and many other disciplines in academia. This project examines the use of TBL…

  10. Self-Directed Work Teams in a Post-Apartheid Gold Mine: Perspectives from the Rock Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phatkathi, Timothy Sizwe

    2002-01-01

    A participant-observation study in a South African mining company that used self directed work team training identified organizational constraints that hindered training effectiveness: lack of materials, machinery breakdown, decentralized budget, and imposed standards. Miners more often used improvisation and initiative to solve daily problems,…

  11. Abstract--Multimedia groupware systems provide rich support for distributed team work. Yet effective design of these systems is

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    1 Abstract--Multimedia groupware systems provide rich support for distributed team work. Yet evolve design ideas. The problem is that multimedia groupware is hard to prototype because distributed multimedia systems are complex to implement. To solve this problem, we offer the Collabrary, a toolkit

  12. Abstract--Multimedia groupware systems provide rich support for distributed team work. Yet effective design of these

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    Abstract--Multimedia groupware systems provide rich support for distributed team work. Yet evolve design ideas. The problem is that multimedia groupware is hard to prototype because distributed multimedia systems are complex to implement. To solve this problem, we offer the Collabrary, a toolkit

  13. Oncoplastic multidisciplinary meetings: a necessity or luxury?

    PubMed

    Rusby, Jennifer E; Gough, Jenny; Harris, Paul A; MacNeill, Fiona A

    2011-05-01

    Although there is scant evidence to support multidisciplinary meetings in any cancer specialty, they are now regarded as best practice. We believe the oncoplastic multidisciplinary meeting plays a similarly important role, consolidating oncoplastic multidisciplinary working and allowing transparent decision making, standardisation of care and recording of results. This may drive oncoplastic surgery to an evidence-based position from which oncoplastic excellence can be achieved. PMID:22043493

  14. Effective Preassessment Team Procedures: Making the Process Work for Teachers and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormsbee, Christine K.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses effective preassessment team procedures for identifying students with special needs, including collecting comprehensive information about the student, documenting the student's problems, developing specific and detailed intervention plans, identifying support personnel to help implement the intervention plan, and…

  15. The relationship of the emotional climate of work and threat to patient outcome in a high-volume thoracic surgery operating room team

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Nurok; Linda A Evans; Stuart Lipsitz; Paul Satwicz; Andrea Kelly; Allan Frankel

    2011-01-01

    ContextIt is widely believed that the emotional climate of surgical team's work may affect patient outcome.ObjectiveTo analyse the relationship between the emotional climate of work and indices of threat to patient outcome.DesignInterventional study.SettingOperating rooms in a high-volume thoracic surgery centre from September 2007 to June 2008.ParticipantsThoracic surgery operating room teams.InterventionTwo 90 min team-skills training sessions focused on findings from a

  16. American Bar Association Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases: implications for social work.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-04-01

    When a client faces a penalty of death, defense attorneys may call on social workers in many capacities: mitigation specialist, expert witness, consulting specialist, direct witness, or defense-initiated victim outreach worker. The American Bar Association set forth standards for capital defense attorneys, which led an interdisciplinary team to produce the "Supplementary Guidelines for the Mitigation Function of Defense Teams in Death Penalty Cases" to promote the exceptional competence and diligence required when the consequence is life or death. This article summarizes the "Supplementary Guidelines," with implications for social work practice--that is, professional responsibility, competence, interviewing skill, knowledge of behavioral and mental impairment, records review, life history compilation, data interpretation, witness support, law-related knowledge, and testimony. The social work, which is scrutinized in a court of law, requires cultural competence, diverse oral and written communication skills, diligence, and the highest ethical standards. PMID:23038877

  17. Evaluating Team Project-Work Using Triangulation: Lessons from Communities in Northern Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Gordon; Jasaw, Godfred Seidu

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses triangulation to assess key aspects of a team-based, participatory action research programme for undergraduates in rural communities across northern Ghana. The perceptions of the programme and its effects on the students, staff and host communities are compared, showing areas of agreement and disagreement. The successes of the…

  18. Successful Group Work: Using Cooperative Learning and Team-Based Learning in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant-Vallone, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    This research study examined student perceptions of group experiences in the classroom. The author used cooperative learning and team-based learning to focus on three characteristics that are critical for the success of groups: structure of activities, relationships of group members, and accountability of group members. Results indicated that…

  19. Maestro: Work Together as a Team and Think Like the Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Terry

    2003-01-01

    Explains that the maestro concept is an approach to integrating writing, editing, and visual communication. Notes that the goal of the maestro concept is to find agreement on the best way to package a story, photos, art, and graphics for the reader. Concludes that the maestro team helps beginning journalism students become better verbal and visual…

  20. Red armbands for senior nurses goes against team-working ethic.

    PubMed

    Athey, Daniel

    2015-07-15

    I was disconcerted to read that senior nurses at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust in London are being given red armbands - similar to those worn by football team captains - to help patients identify them as the nurse in charge on the ward (news July 8). PMID:26174277

  1. Learning Needs of Occupational Therapists in the Area of Team Work Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Susan

    1997-01-01

    In-depth interviews with 14 and survey responses from 194 of 225 occupational therapists in health-care teams identified the following highest-ranked continuing education needs: advanced communication skills, negotiation, conflict resolution, and assertiveness. Quality assurance was the highest-ranked noncommunication skill. (SK)

  2. Multidisciplinary care for individuals with disorders of sex development

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lobo, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Recommendations regarding the care of individuals with disorders of sex development include that care be provided by multidisciplinary teams. This article will discuss team composition and function as well as the role of the gynecologist and barriers to such care. Recent findings Many barriers to multidisciplinary care exist, but recent reports stress the roles of different team members as well as tools for planning and implementation of such a team that may help to overcome such barriers. All current recommendations include the participation of a gynecologist in the disorders of sex development team. Gynecologists are in the unique position to continue to provide care as these individuals mature into adulthood. Summary Multidisciplinary care for patients with disorders of sex development is recommended and gynecologists provide unique expertise. PMID:25110979

  3. Interdisciplinary hospice team processes and multidimensional pain: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dugan Day, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Hospice teams may address multidimensional pain through the synergistic interaction of team members from various professional disciplines during regularly scheduled team meetings. However, the occurrence of that critical exchange has not been adequately described or documented. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore two processes in team pain palliation: communication and collaboration. Data were gathered through individual interviews and a 1-year observation of team members from two hospices (physicians, nurses, aides, chaplains, social workers). Utilizing constant comparison, 14 final thematic categories were discovered. Use of biopsychosocial/spiritual terms by all team members meant that the team had the common language needed to communicate about multidimensional pain. Interviews and observation revealed a gap in translating multidisciplinary communication in team meetings into collaborative acts for pain treatment. In addition, structural influences inhibited creativity in pain palliation. There was no mutual understanding of the purpose for team meetings, no recognition of the need to reflect on team process, or common definition of leadership. Social work roles in hospice should include leadership that moves teams toward interdisciplinary care for multidimensional pain. PMID:22424384

  4. Building synergistic EDP teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn M. Bartol

    1977-01-01

    A team is termed “synergistic” when the members working together are able to achieve results significantly beyond what could be expected from the same team members working relatively independently. Unfortunately, placing several employees into a work group and calling them a team does not necessarily result in the desired synergy. On the contrary, a team can function so ineffectively as

  5. Multidisciplinary Optimization Branch Experience Using iSIGHT Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Korte, J. J.; Dunn, H. J.; Salas, A. O.

    1999-01-01

    The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley is investigating frameworks for supporting multidisciplinary analysis and optimization research. A framework provides software and system services to integrate computational tasks and allows the researcher to concentrate more on the application and less on the programming details. A framework also provides a common working environment and a full range of optimization tools, and so increases the productivity of multidisciplinary research teams. Finally, a framework enables staff members to develop applications for use by disciplinary experts in other organizations. This year, the MDO Branch has gained experience with the iSIGHT framework. This paper describes experiences with four aerospace applications, including: (1) reusable launch vehicle sizing, (2) aerospike nozzle design, (3) low-noise rotorcraft trajectories, and (4) acoustic liner design. Brief overviews of each problem are provided, including the number and type of disciplinary codes and computation time estimates. In addition, the optimization methods, objective functions, design variables, and constraints are described for each problem. For each case, discussions on the advantages and disadvantages of using the iSIGHT framework are provided as well as notes on the ease of use of various advanced features and suggestions for areas of improvement.

  6. Bridging Gaps in Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Care: Nursing Coordination and Case Management

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederholt, Peggy A. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States)], E-mail: wiederholt@humonc.wisc.edu; Connor, Nadine P. [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Hartig, Gregory K. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States); Harari, Paul M. [University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

    2007-10-01

    Patients with advanced head and neck cancer face not only a life-threatening malignancy, but also a remarkably complex treatment regimen that can affect their cosmetic appearance and ability to speak, breathe, and swallow. These patients benefit from the coordinated interaction of a multidisciplinary team of specialists and a comprehensive plan of care to address their physical and psychosocial concerns, manage treatment-related toxicities, and prevent or limit long-term morbidities affecting health-related quality of life. Although little has been published on patient-provider communication with a multidisciplinary team, evidence has suggested that gaps often occur in communication between patients and providers, as well as between specialists. These communication gaps can hinder the multidisciplinary group from working toward common patient-centered goals in a coordinated 'interdisciplinary' manner. We discuss the role of a head-and-neck oncology nurse coordinator at a single institution in bridging gaps across the continuum of care, promoting an interdisciplinary team approach, and enhancing the overall quality of patient-centered head-and-neck cancer care.

  7. Strengths and weaknesses of working with the Global Trigger Tool method for retrospective record review: focus group interviews with team members

    PubMed Central

    Schildmeijer, Kristina; Nilsson, Lena; Perk, Joep; Årestedt, Kristofer; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to describe the strengths and weaknesses, from team member perspectives, of working with the Global Trigger Tool (GTT) method of retrospective record review to identify adverse events causing patient harm. Design A qualitative, descriptive approach with focus group interviews using content analysis. Setting 5 Swedish hospitals in 2011. Participants 5 GTT teams, with 5 physicians and 11 registered nurses. Intervention 5 focus group interviews were carried out with the five teams. Interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim. Results 8 categories emerged relating to the strengths and weaknesses of the GTT method. The categories found were: Usefulness of the GTT, Application of the GTT, Triggers, Preventability of harm, Team composition, Team tasks, Team members’ knowledge development and Documentation. Gradually, changes in the methodology were made by the teams, for example, the teams reported how the registered nurses divided up the charts into two sets, each being read respectively. The teams described the method as important and well functioning. Not only the most important, but also the most difficult, was the task of bringing the results back to the clinic. The teams found it easier to discuss findings at their own clinics. Conclusions The GTT method functions well for identifying adverse events and is strengthened by its adaptability to different specialties. However, small, gradual methodological changes together with continuingly developed expertise and adaption to looking at harm from a patient's perspective may contribute to large differences in assessment over time. PMID:24068761

  8. Managing Complexity in Multidisciplinary Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    As high performance computing technology progresses, computational simulations are becoming more advanced in their capabilities. In the computational aerosciences domain, single discipline steady-state simulations computed on a single grid are far from the state-of-the-art. In their place are complex, time-dependent multidisciplinary simulations that attempt to model a given geometry more realistically. The product of these multidisciplinary simulations is a massive amount of data stored in different formats, grid topologies, units of measure, etc., as a result of the differences in the simulated physical domains. In addition to the challenges posed by setting up and performing the simulation, additional challenges exist in analyzing computational results. Visualization plays an important role in the advancement of multidisciplinary simulations. To date, visualization has been used to aid in the interpretation of large amounts of simulation data. Because the human visual system is effective in digesting a large amount of information presented graphically, visualization has helped simulation scientists to understand complex simulation results. As these simulations become even more complex, integrating several different physical domains, visualization will be critical to digest the massive amount of information. Another important role for visualization is to provide a common communication medium from which the domain scientists can use to develop, debug, and analyze their work. Multidisciplinary analyses are the next step in simulation technology, not only in computational aerosciences, but in many other areas such as global climate modeling. Visualization researchers must understand and work towards the challenges posed by multidisciplinary simulation scenarios. This paper addresses some of these challenges, describing technologies that must be investigated to create a useful visualization analysis tool for domain scientists.

  9. Multidisciplinary Optimization Branch Experience Using iSIGHT Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, S. L.; Korte, J. J.; Dunn, H. J.; Salas, A. O.

    1999-01-01

    The Multidisciplinary Optimization (MDO) Branch at NASA Langley Research Center is investigating frameworks for supporting multidisciplinary analysis and optimization research. An optimization framework call improve the design process while reducing time and costs. A framework provides software and system services to integrate computational tasks and allows the researcher to concentrate more on the application and less on the programming details. A framework also provides a common working environment and a full range of optimization tools, and so increases the productivity of multidisciplinary research teams. Finally, a framework enables staff members to develop applications for use by disciplinary experts in other organizations. Since the release of version 4.0, the MDO Branch has gained experience with the iSIGHT framework developed by Engineous Software, Inc. This paper describes experiences with four aerospace applications: (1) reusable launch vehicle sizing, (2) aerospike nozzle design, (3) low-noise rotorcraft trajectories, and (4) acoustic liner design. All applications have been successfully tested using the iSIGHT framework, except for the aerospike nozzle problem, which is in progress. Brief overviews of each problem are provided. The problem descriptions include the number and type of disciplinary codes, as well as all estimate of the multidisciplinary analysis execution time. In addition, the optimization methods, objective functions, design variables, and design constraints are described for each problem. Discussions on the experience gained and lessons learned are provided for each problem. These discussions include the advantages and disadvantages of using the iSIGHT framework for each case as well as the ease of use of various advanced features. Potential areas of improvement are identified.

  10. Virtuoso teams.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Bill; Boynton, Andy

    2005-01-01

    Managing a traditional team seems pretty straightforward: Gather up whoever's available, give them time and space to do their jobs, and make sure they all play nicely together. But these teams produce results that are often as unremarkable as the teams themselves. When big change and high performance are required, a virtuoso team is far more likely to deliver outstanding and innovative results. Virtuoso teams are fundamentally different from the garden-variety work groups that most organizations form to pursue more modest goals. They comprise the top experts in their particular fields, are specially convened for ambitious projects, work with frenetic rhythm, and emanate a discernible energy. Not surprisingly, however, the superstars who make up these teams are renowned for being elitist, temperamental, egocentric, and difficult to work with. As a result, many managers fear that if they force such people to interact on a high-stakes project, the group just might implode. In this article, Bill Fischer and Andy Boynton put the inner workings of highly successful virtuoso teams on full display through three examples: the creative group behind West Side Story, the team of writers for Sid Caesar's 1950s-era television hit Your Show of Shows, and the high-powered technologists who averted an investor-relations crisis for Norsk Hydro, the Norwegian energy giant. Each of these teams accomplished enormous goals and changed their businesses, their customers, even their industries. And they did so by breaking all the conventional rules of collaboration--from the way they recruited the best members to the way they enforced their unusual processes, and from the high expectations they held to the exceptional results they produced. PMID:16028822

  11. Consensus statements regarding the multidisciplinary care of limb amputation patients in disasters or humanitarian emergencies: report of the 2011 Humanitarian Action Summit Surgical Working Group on amputations following disasters or conflict.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Lisa Marie; Gosney, James E; Chackungal, Smita; Altschuler, Eric; Black, Lynn; Burkle, Frederick M; Casey, Kathleen; Crandell, David; Demey, Didier; Di Giacomo, Lillian; Dohlman, Lena; Goldstein, Joshua; Gosselin, Richard; Ikeda, Keita; Le Roy, Andree; Linden, Allison; Mullaly, Catherine M; Nickerson, Jason; O'Connell, Colleen; Redmond, Anthony D; Richards, Adam; Rufsvold, Robert; Santos, Anna L R; Skelton, Terri; McQueen, Kelly

    2011-12-01

    Limb amputations are frequently performed as a result of trauma inflicted during conflict or disasters. As demonstrated during the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, coordinating care of these patients in austere settings is complex. During the 2011 Humanitarian Action Summit, consensus statements were developed for international organizations providing care to limb amputation patients during disasters or humanitarian emergencies. Expanded planning is needed for a multidisciplinary surgical care team, inclusive of surgeons, anesthesiologists, rehabilitation specialists and mental health professionals. Surgical providers should approach amputation using an operative technique that optimizes limb length and prosthetic fitting. Appropriate anesthesia care involves both peri-operative and long-term pain control. Rehabilitation specialists must be involved early in treatment, ideally before amputation, and should educate the surgical team in prosthetic considerations. Mental health specialists must be included to help the patient with community reintegration. A key step in developing local health systems the establishment of surgical outcomes monitoring. Such monitoring can optimizepatient follow-up and foster professional accountability for the treatment of amputation patients in disaster settings and humanitarian emergencies. PMID:22559308

  12. Multiple Viewpoints on Computer Supported Team Work Preprint. Final version available from

    E-print Network

    Blandford, Ann

    emergency medical dispatch. OSM focuses on the structure of the domain in question and the devices which in which they are working, the device representation(s) that support that work, and the quality of fit in that domain, the quality of fit between devices and users is revealed. As implied in its name, OSM

  13. "Bioengineering trains you to speak the many different technical languages needed to work in multidisciplinary teams that tackle the medical challenges of a rapidly

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Quinton (BS `58) is an innovator whose contributions to the world of medicine have been numerous. He started Quinton Instruments in 1953, building the first treadmills designed specifically for cardiac to artificial kidney patients easier and safer. Quinton was the UW 2009 Alumnus Summa Laude Dignatus

  14. Team Cognition in Experienced Command-and-Control Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Nancy J.; Gorman, Jamie C.; Duran, Jasmine L.; Taylor, Amanda R.

    2007-01-01

    Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members…

  15. A multidisciplinary identification model for youth handball

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stijn P. J. Matthys; Roel Vaeyens; Joric Vandendriessche; Barbara Vandorpe; Johan Pion; Aaron J. Coutts; Matthieu Lenoir; Renaat M. Philippaerts

    2011-01-01

    Talent identification in team sports is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. The purpose of this study was to examine differences between elite and non-elite handball players in three age groups: U14 (n=186), U16 (n=150), and U18 (n=92). A multidimensional test battery was assessed, taking biological maturation into account. Significant maturation effects were found for all anthropometric characteristics and most

  16. Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

  17. Addressing childhood obesity using a multidisciplinary approach with social workers.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Cara; Ai, Amy; Dietrick, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Childhood obesity can be effectively addressed with behavioral interventions in programs such as CATCH and Planet Health using a multidisciplinary approach. Social workers and school nurses are in close contact with children and youths at risk of obesity and their families within the school setting and are prepared to lead a multidisciplinary team in program planning, implementation, and evaluation related to reducing childhood obesity. PMID:26027424

  18. Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group & Hydrogen Production Technical Team Research Review

    E-print Network

    Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Working Group (BILIWG) & Hydrogen Production and Technology o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Targets DOE, Arlene Anderson o H2A Overview, NREL, Darlene Steward o Bio-Derived Liquids to Hydrogen Distributed Reforming Cost Analysis DTI

  19. Rewarding Shared Experience: Assessing Individual Contributions to Team-Based Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    Continuing education students are usually mature students who have a wealth of experience from which their peers and the lecturer could profit. An effective teaching method with such students is the use of cooperative work assignments, but a problem that prevents lecturers from using this method is the difficulty of assigning grades to individual…

  20. Teamwork and team training in the ICU: Where do the similarities with aviation end?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aviation industry has made significant progress in identifying the skills and behaviors that result in effective teamwork. Its conceptualization of teamwork, development of training programs, and design of assessment tools are highly relevant to the intensive care unit (ICU). Team skills are important for maintaining safety in both domains, as multidisciplinary teams must work effectively under highly complex, stressful, and uncertain conditions. However, there are substantial differences in the nature of work and structure of teams in the ICU in comparison with those in aviation. While intensive care medicine may wish to use the advances made by the aviation industry for conceptualizing team skills and implementing team training programs, interventions must be tailored to the highly specific demands of the ICU. PMID:22136283

  1. Why and how to include anthropological perspective into multidisciplinary research in the Polish health system.

    PubMed

    Witeska-M?ynarczyk, Anna D

    2012-01-01

    The article focuses on ways in which anthropological knowledge, incorporated into multidisciplinary and multilevel research projects, can be applied for understanding health- and illness-related behaviours and functioning of the health system in Poland. It selectively presents potential theoretical and methodological contributions of the anthropological discipline to the field of applied health research, and briefly reviews selected ethnographic theories and methods for researching and interpreting socio-cultural conditioning of healing, health and illness related practices. The review focuses on the following approaches: Critical Medical Anthropology, Cultural Interpretive Theory, phenomenology, narrative analysis, and the biography of pharmaceuticals. The author highlights the need for team work and use of a holistic perspective while analyzing the health system in Poland, and underlines the need for serious attention and financial support to be given to multidisciplinary research projects of which anthropology is a part. PMID:23020046

  2. Work Related Learning in the Undergraduate Curriculum AUL@W Team: Irene Bell, Lynn Naven, Margaret Berrie and Simon McKerrell

    E-print Network

    Glasgow, University of

    self-directed learning and metacognition. It therefore places much emphasis on reflexiveWork Related Learning in the Undergraduate Curriculum Psychology Case Study AUL@W Team: Irene Bell at Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) as an example of Work Related Learning to improve student

  3. Study protocol of effectiveness of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-speficic sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Non-specific low back pain is a common cause for consultation with the general practitioner, generating increased health and social costs. This study will analyse the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention to reduce disability, severity of pain, anxiety and depression, to improve quality of life and to reduce the incidence of chronic low back pain in the working population with non-specific low back pain, compared to usual clinical care. Methods/Design A Cluster randomised clinical trial will be conducted in 38 Primary Health Care Centres located in Barcelona, Spain and its surrounding areas. The centres are randomly allocated to the multidisciplinary intervention or to usual clinical care. Patients between 18 and 65 years old (n = 932; 466 per arm) and with a diagnostic of a non-specific sub-acute low back pain are included. Patients in the intervention group are receiving the recommendations of clinical practice guidelines, in addition to a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention consisting of group educational sessions lasting a total of 10 hours. The main outcome is change in the score in the Roland Morris disability questionnaire at three months after onset of pain. Other outcomes are severity of pain, quality of life, duration of current non-specific low back pain episode, work sick leave and duration, Fear Avoidance Beliefs and Goldberg Questionnaires. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Analysis will be by intention to treat. The intervention effect will be assessed through the standard error of measurement and the effect-size. Responsiveness of each scale will be evaluated by standardised response mean and receiver-operating characteristic method. Recovery according to the patient will be used as an external criterion. A multilevel regression will be performed on repeated measures. The time until the current episode of low back pain takes to subside will be analysed by Cox regression. Discussion We hope to provide evidence of the effectiveness of the proposed biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in avoiding the chronification of low back pain, and to reduce the duration of non-specific low back pain episodes. If the intervention is effective, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial Registration ISRCTN21392091 PMID:20067619

  4. The integrated model for interprofessional education: a design for preparing health professions' students to work in interprofessional teams.

    PubMed

    Grapczynski, Cynthia A; Schuurman, Shelley; Booth, Andrew D; Bambini, Deborah; Beel-Bates, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the process of helping students learn to work interprofessionally is figuring out how to design high-impact learning experiences that engage students in meaningful learning that is collaborative and experiential and can transform students understanding of their own and others' roles in the health care process. In this article, a model for interprofessional education, the Integrated Model for Interprofessional Education (IMIPE), is shared for introducing students in the health professions to the roles and responsibilities of some of the other healthcare professionals with whom they will work in practice. The IMIPE is a process model developed by an interprofessional faculty team used as the focal point of a pilot educational event for students from nursing, occupational therapy, physician assistant studies, and social work. The IMIPE is a derived model that combines concepts of holism, participation, and practical education, grounded in the adult educational philosophy of progressivism. Progressive adult education is focused on practical knowledge and problem-solving skills. The model uses collaborative, experiential, and transformative learning approaches to foster outcomes of communication, critical reflection, teamwork, ethics, and recognition of patient-client needs. These outcomes represent those identified by the World Health Organization and the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel. PMID:26046119

  5. Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Nancy J; Gorman, Jamie C; Duran, Jasmine L; Taylor, Amanda R

    2007-09-01

    Team cognition in experienced command-and-control teams is examined in an UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle) simulation. Five 3-person teams with experience working together in a command-and-control setting were compared to 10 inexperienced teams. Each team participated in five 40-min missions of a simulation in which interdependent team members control a UAV to take reconnaissance photos. Experienced teams exceeded performance of inexperienced teams, suggesting transfer of previous command-and-control experience. Compared to inexperienced teams, experienced teams had fewer errors on process-related training knowledge, superior team process ratings, and communications containing fewer coordination-related utterances. These findings support the view that team cognition emerges through the interactions of team members, that interactions distinguish high-performing teams from average teams, and that these interactions transfer across different tasks. PMID:17924800

  6. The Component Packaging Problem: A Vehicle for the Development of Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadel, Georges; Bridgewood, Michael; Figliola, Richard; Greenstein, Joel; Kostreva, Michael; Nowaczyk, Ronald; Stevenson, Steve

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes academic research which has resulted in an increased appreciation for multidisciplinary efforts among our students, colleagues and administrators. It has also generated a number of research ideas that emerged from the interaction between disciplines. Overall, 17 undergraduate students and 16 graduate students benefited directly from the NASA grant: an additional 11 graduate students were impacted and participated without financial support from NASA. The work resulted in 16 theses (with 7 to be completed in the near future), 67 papers or reports mostly published in 8 journals and/or presented at various conferences (a total of 83 papers, presentations and reports published based on NASA inspired or supported work). In addition, the faculty and students presented related work at many meetings, and continuing work has been proposed to NSF, the Army, Industry and other state and federal institutions to continue efforts in the direction of multidisciplinary and recently multi-objective design and analysis. The specific problem addressed is component packing which was solved as a multi-objective problem using iterative genetic algorithms and decomposition. Further testing and refinement of the methodology developed is presently under investigation. Teaming issues research and classes resulted in the publication of a web site, (http://design.eng.clemson.edu/psych4991) which provides pointers and techniques to interested parties. Specific advantages of using iterative genetic algorithms, hurdles faced and resolved, and institutional difficulties associated with multi-discipline teaming are described in some detail.

  7. Developing and applying a cross-disciplinary team handover information system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ying-Li; Chien, Tsai-Feng; Hsu, Su-Chen; Chang, Polun

    2013-01-01

    In order to avoid medical errors, it is very important to communicate with the medical team correctly, timely and efficiently. One of main reasons for the poor outcome of multidisciplinary handover in hospital is lacking effective tools for multidisciplinary handover. The project aimed to develop a workflow-based multidisciplinary handover information system, integrated with medical record browsing, multidisciplinary handover and event tracking, to improve the correctness and effectiveness of communication among the medical team members. PMID:23920959

  8. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Stephen M. Fiore, PhD, is President of the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research and faculty with the University of Central Florida's Cognitive Sciences Program in the Department of Philosophy and Director of the Cognitive Sciences Laboratory at UCF's Institute for Simulation and Training. He maintains a multidisciplinary research interest that incorporates aspects of the cognitive, social, organizational, and computational sciences in the investigation of learning and performance in individuals and teams.

  9. Groups Meet . . . Teams Improve: Building Teams That Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Janet; Dunn-Jensen, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most business students participate in team-based projects during undergraduate or graduate course work, the team experience does not always teach team skills or capture the team members' potential: Students complete the task at hand but the explicit process of becoming a team is often not learned. Drawing from organizational learning…

  10. The compatibility of psychosocial interventions (PSI) and assertive outreach: a survey of managers and PSI-trained staff working in UK assertive outreach teams.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, R; Harris, N

    2008-08-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on providing psychosocial interventions (PSI) and assertive outreach (AO) for people with severe and enduring mental illness living in the UK. This paper presents the findings of a telephone survey conducted with managers and PSI-trained staff working for AO teams in the Northwest of England. The aim of the study was to gain an insight into staff attitudes regarding the compatibility of PSI and AO. The survey also gathered more general information about the nature of the AO teams and the number of PSI-trained staff working within them. The results indicate that, although PSI-trained staff believe that PSI and AO are compatible, AO is not immune to the barriers to PSI implementation that exist in other service areas. There also appears to be a question regarding the extent to which teams are maintaining fidelity to the original AO model that was outlined by Stein and Test. PMID:18638208

  11. Initiation of a multidisciplinary summer studentship in palliative and supportive care in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Fairchild, Alysa; Watanabe, Sharon; Chambers, Carole; Yurick, Janice; Lem, Lisa; Tachynski, Patty

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The optimal setting for interprofessional education (IPE) for prelicensure health care trainees is unclear, especially in a field as complex and emotionally challenging as oncology. In this article, the authors describe the initiation of the Cross Cancer Institute Multidisciplinary Summer Studentship in Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology, a 6-week, multidisciplinary team-based clinical placement in supportive care, designed to incorporate features of best practice cooperative learning. Methods A steering committee established goals, structure, eligibility criteria, application process, funding, and a consensus approach to instruction and evaluation for the IPE program. Studentship components included mandatory and flexible clinical time, an exploratory investigation, discussion groups, and a presentation. Two senior students per iteration were selected from clinical nutrition, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, respiratory therapy, social work, and speech–language pathology applicants. These students completed questionnaires investigating their views of their own and others’ professions at baseline, at the end of the rotation, and 6 months after the studentship. Results Eight students from medicine, clinical nutrition, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and speech–language pathology have participated to date. At the elective’s end, students have described a more positive view of multidisciplinary team practice, with each participating discipline perceived as both more caring and more subservient than at baseline. In general, changes in attitudes were maintained 6 months after completion of the placement. Conclusion This 6-week multidisciplinary placement is feasible, successful, and potentially transferable to other academic settings. The results of this study suggest that even over as short a period as 6 weeks, objective attitudinal and perceptual change is seen. PMID:23055742

  12. Collaborative Design Processes: An Active and Reflective Learning Course in Multidisciplinary Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, William J.; Soibelman, Lucio; Elvin, George

    2003-01-01

    In a capstone course, graduate students from two universities participated in collaborative design in the architectural, engineering, and construction industries in multidisciplinary teams via the Internet. Students also developed process designs to integrate technology into multidisciplinary teamwork, combining active and reflective learning.…

  13. Integrating Multidisciplinary Engineering Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Karin; Luckett, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    In order to design two distinct engineering qualification levels for an existing University of Technology programme, empirical evidence based on the current diploma is necessary to illuminate the nature of and the relationship between the "contextual" and "conceptual" elements underpinning a multidisciplinary engineering…

  14. PeerWare: A Peer-to-Peer Middleware for Mobile TeamWork Carlo Ghezzi, Gianpaolo Cugola, and Gian Pietro Picco

    E-print Network

    Cugola, Gianpaolo

    }@elet.polimi.it May 19, 2003 Abstract The advantages of a peer-to-peer architecture reach well beyond the realm holds sig- nificant advantages over traditional client-server architectures. When a peer-to-peerPeerWare: A Peer-to-Peer Middleware for Mobile TeamWork Carlo Ghezzi, Gianpaolo Cugola, and Gian

  15. Computer-Based 3D Simulation: A Study of Communication Practices in a Trauma Team Performing Patient Examination and Diagnostic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krange, Ingeborg; Moen, Anne; Ludvigsen, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic work in trauma teams is critical for the patient's condition and for the possibility of survival. It is a difficult situation to train due to the inherently unpredictable and time-critical practice when an injured patient presents in the Emergency Room (ER). Different types of simulations have been developed for specialized training of…

  16. On behalf of the Simon Business School leadership team, we thank you for the incredible work you perform each and every day.

    E-print Network

    Portman, Douglas

    On behalf of the Simon Business School leadership team, we thank you for the incredible work you the Simon Business School. As a member of the Simon community, there are several opportunities you may be interested in supporting through the OneRochester Campaign. YELLOW RIBBON SCHOLARSHIP FUND The Simon School

  17. The Challenges and Benefits of Employing a Mobile Research Fellow to Facilitate Team Work on a Large, Interdisciplinary, Multi-Sited Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, Fraser; Punch, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years research funding has increasingly moved in favour of large, multi-partner, interdisciplinary and multi-site research projects. This article explores the benefits and challenges of employing a full-time research fellow to work across multiple field sites, with all the local research teams, on an international,…

  18. Bio-X NeuroVentures is pleased to announce a grant competition for purchase or fabrication of equipment by interdisciplinary teams of scientists working on

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    pt. font), including purpose, description of the equipment, user base, and arrangements for sharing of equipment by interdisciplinary teams of scientists working on innovative new technologies for the study equipment will benefit several laboratories across disciplines and enable creative research that would

  19. Development of an intervention to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders among hospital nurses based on the participatory approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soon-Lae Kim; Jong-Eun Lee

    2010-01-01

    The participatory approach has been widely used to improve the work environment. The purpose of this study was to develop an intervention to prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders in hospital nurses using the participatory approach. Based on the Participatory Action Oriented Training (PAOT) approach, the multidisciplinary team conducted the trainer workshop to develop a comprehensive intervention protocol, which yielded several practical

  20. Challenging cases in thyroid cancer: a multidisciplinary approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Tuttle; Richard Robbins; Steven M. Larson; H. William Strauss

    2004-01-01

    Recurrent thyroid cancer can present many complex management problems. Unfortunately, recurrent thyroid cancer is often refractory to radioiodine therapy. The proper use of external beam irradiation and surgical interventions can provide regional control of localized recurrences. Because of the complex nature of these patients, a multidisciplinary team approach to management which includes specialists in thyroid medicine and surgery, head and

  1. IEEE Multidisciplinary Engineering Education Magazine

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The IEEE Multidisciplinary Engineering Education Magazine is the official means of communication for IEEE student members and educators. This magazine publishes interesting, useful, and informative material on all aspects of multidisciplinary engineering education for the benefit of students and educators. With this mission statement in mind, IEEE Multidisciplinary Engineering Education Magazine encourages submissions, both feature articles and columns, on all aspects of multidisciplinary engineering education. Target Audience: Post-Graduate Students, 2-4 Year College Students

  2. Advances in Multi-disciplinary Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, J.; Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.; Huerta, J.; Rubio-Iglesias, J. M.; Serrano, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    The challenge for addressing issues such as climate change, food security or ecosystem sustainability is that they require multi-disciplinary collaboration and the ability to integrate information across scientific domains. Multidisciplinary collaborations are difficult because each discipline has its own "language", protocols and formats for communicating within its community and handling data and information. EuroGEOSS demonstrates the added value to the scientific community and to society of making existing systems and applications interoperable and useful within the GEOSS and INSPIRE frameworks. In 2010, the project built an initial operating capacity of a multi-disciplinary Information System addressing three areas: drought, forestry and biodiversity. It is now furthering this development into an advanced operating capacity (http://www.eurogeoss.eu). The key to this capability is the creation of a broker that supports access to multiple resources through a common user interface and the automation of data search and access using state of the art information technology. EuroGEOSS hosted a conference on information systems and multi-disciplinary applications of science and technology. "EuroGEOSS: advancing the vision of GEOSS" provided a forum for developers, users and decision-makers working with advanced multi-disciplinary information systems to improve science and decisions for complex societal issues. In particular, the Conference addressed: Information systems for supporting multi-disciplinary research; Information systems and modeling for biodiversity, drought, forestry and related societal benefit areas; and Case studies of multi-disciplinary applications and outcomes. This paper will discuss the major finding of the conference and the directions for future development.

  3. Working with families of hospitalized older adults with dementia: caregivers are useful resources and should be part of the care team.

    PubMed

    Bradway, Christine; Hirschman, Karen B

    2008-10-01

    Families provide a considerable amount of informal care and support for older adults living with dementia. And when an older adult with dementia is hospitalized, family caregivers should be seen as important sources of information and included as valuable members of the health care team. This article describes a best-practice approach to working with families and includes recommendations for using the Information for the Hospital Team About a Patient with Memory Problems form. For a free online video demonstrating the use of this form, go to http://links.lww.com/A301. PMID:18827544

  4. Benefits of synchronous collaboration support for an application-centered analysis team working on complex problems: a case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John M. Linebarger; Andrew J. Scholand; Mark A. Ehlen; Michael J. Procopio

    2005-01-01

    A month-long quasi-experiment was conducted using a distributed team responsible for modeling, simulation, and analysis. Six experiments of three different time durations (short, medium, and long) were performed. The primary goal was to discover if synchronous collaboration capability through a particular application improved the ability of the team to form a common mental model of the analysis problem(s) and solution(s).

  5. The W(h)ine Club: Women Finding Joy in Academic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selepe, Mosa; Grobler, Christa; Dicks, Emsie; Oldewage-Theron, Wilna

    2012-01-01

    The W(h)ine Club is a multidisciplinary women's research team which has been working together for the past 10 years. The idea for this Viewpoint piece grew as we participated in a Women in Research programme. The aim of the programme was to improve academic publications among women. A group of us in the programme found ourselves repeatedly…

  6. The trans-border doctorials between the UPV-EHU and the UPPA: a way forward in career development of a multicultural and pluridisciplinar team of PhD candidates

    E-print Network

    Dambrine, Marc

    work, communication, project management, entrepreneurship and innovation skills. Thus, doctoral innovation in the socio-economic world, developing cross-border diversity and multidisciplinary exchanges with universities. Special attention was paid to "learning by doing" principle application, to development of team

  7. NASA Team Collaboration Pilot: Enabling NASA's Virtual Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Most NASA projects and work activities are accomplished by teams of people. These teams are often geographically distributed - across NASA centers and NASA external partners, both domestic and international. NASA "virtual" teams are stressed by the challenge of getting team work done - across geographic boundaries and time zones. To get distributed work done, teams rely on established methods - travel, telephones, Video Teleconferencing (NASA VITS), and email. Time is our most critical resource - and team members are hindered by the overhead of travel and the difficulties of coordinating work across their virtual teams. Modern, Internet based team collaboration tools offer the potential to dramatically improve the ability of virtual teams to get distributed work done.

  8. Growing our own: building a native research team.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jacqueline S; Carter, Paula M

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/AN) made up less than 1% of the science, engineering and health doctorates in the U.S. Early introduction of AI/AN students to research and continued opportunities are necessary to develop successful AI/AN researchers who can better serve their communities. This team was developed to form a cohort of American Indian students, staff and faculty interested in research and becoming researchers. Since implementation, the program grew from one student to over 20 AI students ranging from freshmen just entering college to doctoral students working to complete their dissertations. This article highlights the team growth, increasing structure, student needs and the faculty and staff involved. It further addresses the support and educational aspects of growing an ongoing, multidisciplinary research team committed to ethical research in Native communities. The team addresses substance use prevalence, the relationship of substance abuse to other mental health diagnoses, and treatment issues. The team includes weekly team meetings, a Blackboard site on the Internet that is populated with resources and focused on sharing materials and information, a weekly journal club discussion of research articles, and collaborative discussions on each project and the barriers and challenges that need to be addressed to move forward. PMID:22880544

  9. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Rey, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  10. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Improving SCIP Compliance.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Ciara R; Strayer, Melissa; Huynh, Toan; Green, John M

    2015-07-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) is a national program aimed at reducing perioperative complications and is a quality benchmark metric for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This study evaluates whether a multidisciplinary program improved an institution's compliance with SCIP measures. Analysis of the facility's performance data identified three key areas of SCIP noncompliance: 1) timely discontinuation of perioperative antibiotics and urinary catheters, 2) initiation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, and 3) perioperative beta blocker administration. Multidisciplinary teams collaborated with providers and department chairs in reviewing and enable SCIP compliance. Anesthesia staff managed preoperative antibiotics. SCIP-compliant order sets, venous thromboembolism pop-up alerts, and progress note templates were added to the electronic medical record. Standardized education was provided to explain SCIP requirements, review noncompliant cases, and update teams on SCIP performance. Data were captured from January 2009 to March 2014. Ten SCIP fallouts were reported for general surgery specialties in January 2013, when the SCIP compliance project launched. Specifically, colon-related surgery achieved 100 per cent compliance. Six months after implementation, overall SCIP compliance at our institution improved by 65 per cent (from 90.7-98.6% compliance). PMID:26140888

  11. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

  12. Student Support Teams: Helping Students Succeed in General Education Classrooms or Working To Place Students in Special Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.; Hansen, Carol D.; Nieminen, Paul K.; Wright, E. Heath

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 24 elementary teachers found they were not using Student Support Teams (SST) as designed. Teachers believed the primary purpose of SST was to test and place students into special education, referred students with whom they had not been successful, and believed there was a covert evaluation process. (Contains references.)…

  13. Improving the delivery of care for patients with diabetes through understanding optimised team work and organisation in primary care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin P Eccles; Gillian Hawthorne; Marie Johnston; Margaret Hunter; Nick Steen; Jill Francis; Susan Hrisos; Marko Elovainio; Jeremy M Grimshaw

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness and is an important cause of avoidable mortality. Patients are managed by the integrated activities of clinical and non-clinical members of the primary care team. Studies of the quality of care for patients with diabetes suggest less than optimum care in a number of areas. AIM: The aim of this

  14. Getting a Cohesive Answer from a Common Start: Scalable Multidisciplinary Analysis through Transformation of a System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Bjorn; Chung, Seung H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges of systems engineering is in working multidisciplinary problems in a cohesive manner. When planning analysis of these problems, system engineers must tradeoff time and cost for analysis quality and quantity. The quality is associated with the fidelity of the multidisciplinary models and the quantity is associated with the design space that can be analyzed. The tradeoff is due to the resource intensive process of creating a cohesive multidisciplinary system model and analysis. Furthermore, reuse or extension of the models used in one stage of a product life cycle for another is a major challenge. Recent developments have enabled a much less resource-intensive and more rigorous approach than handwritten translation scripts or codes of multidisciplinary models and their analyses. The key is to work from a core system model defined in a MOF-based language such as SysML and in leveraging the emerging tool ecosystem, such as Query-View- Transform (QVT), from the OMG community. SysML was designed to model multidisciplinary systems and analyses. The QVT standard was designed to transform SysML models. The Europa Hability Mission (EHM) team has begun to exploit these capabilities. In one case, a Matlab/Simulink model is generated on the fly from a system description for power analysis written in SysML. In a more general case, a symbolic mathematical framework (supported by Wolfram Mathematica) is coordinated by data objects transformed from the system model, enabling extremely flexible and powerful tradespace exploration and analytical investigations of expected system performance.

  15. The role of team climate in improving the quality of chronic care delivery: a longitudinal study among professionals working with chronically ill adolescents in transitional care programmes

    PubMed Central

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde M H; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of implementing transition programmes in improving the quality of chronic care delivery and (2) identify the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery over time. Settings This longitudinal study was undertaken with professionals working in hospitals and rehabilitation units that participated in the transition programme ‘On Your Own Feet Ahead!’ in the Netherlands. Participantss A total of 145/180 respondents (80.6%) filled in the questionnaire at the beginning of the programme (T1), and 101/173 respondents (58.4%) did so 1?year later at the end of the programme (T2). A total of 90 (52%) respondents filled in the questionnaire at both time points. Two-tailed, paired t tests were used to investigate improvements over time and multilevel analyses to investigate the predictive role of (changes in) team climate on the quality of chronic care delivery. Interventions Transition programme. Primary outcome measures Quality of chronic care delivery measured with the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care Short version (ACIC-S). Results The overall ACIC-S score at T1 was 5.90, indicating basic or intermediate support for chronic care delivery. The mean ACIC-S score at T2 significantly improved to 6.70, indicating advanced support for chronic care. After adjusting for the quality of chronic care delivery at T1 and significant respondents’ characteristics, multilevel regression analyses showed that team climate at T1 (p<0.01) and changes in team climate (p<0.001) predicted the quality of chronic care delivery at T2. Conclusions The implementation of transition programmes requires a supportive and stimulating team climate to enhance the quality of chronic care delivery to chronically ill adolescents. PMID:24852302

  16. MedMyst: Animal Alert! Students learn how epidemiologists, microbiologists, and veterinarians work as a team to solve infectious disease outbreaks.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning

    2011-09-28

    In MedMyst: Animal Alert!, players learn about a mysterious disease that is affecting people in a distant tropical region. Players can choose to work as an epidemiologist, microbiologist, or veterinarian to determine what is making people sick. Animal Alert! can be played after Disease Defenders or independently of that mission. While role-playing as an expert, players will learn how epidemiologists, microbiologists, and veterinarians work as a team to solve infectious disease outbreaks. Each expert path has its own learning objectives.

  17. Study protocol of cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of a biopsychosocial multidisciplinary intervention in the evolution of non-specific sub-acute low back pain in the working population: cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low back pain (LBP), with high incidence and prevalence rate, is one of the most common reasons to consult the health system and is responsible for a significant amount of sick leave, leading to high health and social costs. The objective of the study is to assess the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a multidisciplinary biopsychosocial educational group intervention (MBEGI) of non-specific sub-acute LBP in comparison with the usual care in the working population recruited in primary healthcare centres. Methods/design The study design is a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a MBEGI in comparison with the usual care of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Measures on effectiveness and costs of both interventions will be obtained from a cluster randomised controlled clinical trial carried out in 38 Catalan primary health care centres, enrolling 932 patients between 18 and 65 years old with a diagnosis of non-specific sub-acute LBP. Effectiveness measures are: pharmaceutical treatments, work sick leave (% and duration in days), Roland Morris disability, McGill pain intensity, Fear Avoidance Beliefs (FAB) and Golberg Questionnaires. Utility measures will be calculated from the SF-12. The analysis will be performed from a social perspective. The temporal horizon is at 3 months (change to chronic LBP) and 12 months (evaluate the outcomes at long term). Assessment of outcomes will be blinded and will follow the intention-to-treat principle. Discussion We hope to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of MBEGI, see an improvement in the patients' quality of life, achieve a reduction in the duration of episodes and the chronicity of non-specific low back pain, and be able to report a decrease in the social costs. If the intervention is cost-effectiveness and cost-utility, it could be applied to Primary Health Care Centres. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN58719694 PMID:21859489

  18. Multidelity methods for multidisciplinary system design

    E-print Network

    March, Andrew I. (Andrew Irving)

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of multidisciplinary systems is critical as slight performance improvements can provide significant benefits over the system's life. However, optimization of multidisciplinary systems is often plagued by ...

  19. Submarine Landslides: A Multidisciplinary Crossroad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscardelli, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    The study of submarine landslides has advanced considerably in the last decade. A multitude of geoscience disciplines, including marine, petroleum and planetary geology, as well as geohazard assessments, are concerned with the study of these units. Oftentimes, researchers working in these fields disseminate their findings within their own communities and a multidisciplinary approach seems to lack. This presentation showcases several case studies in which a broader approach has increased our understanding of submarine landslides in a variety of geologic settings. Three-dimensional seismic data from several continental margins (Trinidad, Brazil, Morocco, Canada, GOM), as well as data from outcrop localities are shown to explore geomorphological complexities associated with submarine landslides. Discussion associated with the characterization and classification of submarine landslides is also part of this work. Topics that will be cover include: 1) how data from conventional oil and gas exploration activities can be used to increase our understanding of the dynamic behavior of submarine landslides, 2) analogies between terrestrial submarine landslides and potential Martian counterparts, 3) impact of submarine landslides in margin construction, as well as their economic significance and 4) the importance of quantifying the morphology of submarine landslides in a systematic fashion.

  20. Integrating principles and multidisciplinary projects in design education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevill, Gale E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The critical need to improve engineering design education in the U.S. is presented and a number of actions to achieve that end are discussed. The importance of teaching undergraduates the latest methods and principles through the means of team design in multidisciplinary projects leading to a testable product is emphasized. Desirable training for design instructors is described and techniques for selecting and managing projects that teach effectively are discussed.

  1. MedMyst Disease Defenders. Students learn how experts work as a team to solve infectious disease outbreaks while using the scientific method.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning

    2011-09-28

    This is a problem-based learning adventure game in which players investigate infectious disease outbreaks. By interacting with professionals in the field and in the laboratory, players learn about the science of infectious disease and real medical science careers. Players can choose to train with an epidemiologist, microbiologist, or veterinarian to learn how these experts work as a team to solve infectious disease outbreaks while using the scientific method. Each expert path has its own learning objectives and stresses different parts of the scientific method. Key topics covered in this game: Scientific method, science process skills, rabies, necropsy, case-control study. Also available in Spanish.

  2. Ipilimumab and Its Toxicities: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjiv S.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Weber, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment for metastatic melanoma has evolved significantly in the past few years. Ipilimumab, an immunotherapy, is now in mainstream oncology practice given that it has shown improved overall survival in randomized clinical trials. Other immune modulating agents, such as programmed death receptor-1 and programmed death receptor ligand-1 antibodies, are showing promise in early clinical trials. This manuscript will review ipilimumab and its most common side effects. Immune-related adverse events (irAEs) are important to recognize early, and their presentation, timing of onset, and general recommendations for workup and management will be reviewed. Assembling a multidisciplinary team, as well as thorough education of the patient, is recommended to optimize patient care. PMID:23774827

  3. Recent advances in multidisciplinary critical care.

    PubMed

    Blot, Stijn; Afonso, Elsa; Labeau, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The intensive care unit is a work environment where superior dedication is crucial for optimizing patients' outcomes. As this demanding commitment is multidisciplinary in nature, it requires special qualities of health care workers and organizations. Thus research in the field covers a broad spectrum of activities necessary to deliver cutting-edge care. However, given the numerous research articles and education activities available, it is difficult for modern critical care clinicians to keep up with the latest progress and innovation in the field. This article broadly summarizes new developments in multidisciplinary intensive care. It provides elementary information about advanced insights in the field via brief descriptions of selected articles grouped by specific topics. Issues considered include care for heart patients, mechanical ventilation, delirium, nutrition, pressure ulcers, early mobility, infection prevention, transplantation and organ donation, care for caregivers, and family matters. PMID:25554557

  4. Initial Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozoroski, L. P.; Geiselhart, K. A.; Padula, S. L.; Li, W.; Olson, E. D.; Campbell, R. L.; Shields, E. W.; Berton, J. J.; Gray, J. S.; Jones, S. M.; Naiman, C. G.; Seidel, J. A.; Moore, K. T.; Naylor, B. A.; Townsend, S.

    2010-01-01

    Within the Supersonics (SUP) Project of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP), an initial multidisciplinary design & analysis framework has been developed. A set of low- and intermediate-fidelity discipline design and analysis codes were integrated within a multidisciplinary design and analysis framework and demonstrated on two challenging test cases. The first test case demonstrates an initial capability to design for low boom and performance. The second test case demonstrates rapid assessment of a well-characterized design. The current system has been shown to greatly increase the design and analysis speed and capability, and many future areas for development were identified. This work has established a state-of-the-art capability for immediate use by supersonic concept designers and systems analysts at NASA, while also providing a strong base to build upon for future releases as more multifidelity capabilities are developed and integrated.

  5. Multidisciplinary care planning in the primary care management of completed stroke: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Geoffrey K; Brown, Robyn M; Erikssen, Lars; Tieman, Jennifer J

    2008-01-01

    Background Chronic disease management requires input from multiple health professionals, both specialist and primary care providers. This study sought to assess the impact of co-ordinated multidisciplinary care in primary care, represented by the delivery of formal care planning by primary care teams or shared across primary-secondary teams, on outcomes in stroke, relative to usual care. Methods A Systematic review of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL (all 1990–2006), Cochrane Library (Issue 1 2006), and grey literature from web based searching of web sites listed in the CCOHA Health Technology Assessment List Analysis used narrative analysis of findings of randomised and non-randomised trials, and observational and qualitative studies of patients with completed stroke in the primary care setting where care planning was undertaken by 1) a multi-disciplinary primary care team or 2) through shared care by primary and secondary providers. Results One thousand and forty-five citations were retrieved. Eighteen papers were included for analysis. Most care planning took part in the context of multidisciplinary team care based in hospitals with outreach to community patients. Mortality rates are not impacted by multidisciplinary care planning. Functional outcomes of the studies were inconsistent. It is uncertain whether the active engagement of GPs and other primary care professionals in the multidisciplinary care planning contributed to the outcomes in the studies showing a positive effect. There may be process benefits from multidisciplinary care planning that includes primary care professionals and GPs. Few studies actually described the tasks and roles GPs fulfilled and whether this matched what was presumed to be provided. Conclusion While multidisciplinary care planning may not unequivocally improve the care of patients with completed stroke, there may be process benefits such as improved task allocation between providers. Further study on the impact of active GP involvement in multidisciplinary care planning is warranted. PMID:18681977

  6. Multidisciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code, developed under the leadership of NASA Glenn Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multidisciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  7. Benefits of multidisciplinary teamwork in the management of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cath; Shewbridge, Amanda; Harris, Jenny; Green, James S

    2013-01-01

    The widespread introduction of multidisciplinary team (MDT)-work for breast cancer management has in part evolved due to the increasing complexity of diagnostic and treatment decision-making. An MDT approach aims to bring together the range of specialists required to discuss and agree treatment recommendations and ongoing management for individual patients. MDTs are resource-intensive yet we lack strong (randomized controlled trial) evidence of their effectiveness. Clinical consensus is generally favorable on the benefits of effective specialist MDT-work. Many studies have shown the benefits of receiving treatment from a specialist center, and evidence continues to accrue from comparative studies of clinical benefits of an MDT approach, including improved survival. Patients’ views of the MDT model of decision-making (and in particular its impact on involvement in decisions about their care) have been under-researched. Barriers to effective teamwork and poor decision-making include excessive caseload, low attendance at meetings, lack of leadership, poor communication, role ambiguity, and failure to consider patients’ holistic needs. Breast cancer nurses have a key role in relation to assessing holistic needs, and their specialist contribution has also been associated with improved patient experience and quality of life. This paper examines the evidence for the benefits of MDT-work, in particular for breast cancer. Evidence is considered within a context of growing cancer incidence at a time of increased financial restraint, and it may now be important to reevaluate the structure and models of MDT-work to ensure that MDTs are an efficient use of resources. PMID:24648761

  8. Safety teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph R. Muscatello; Brian P. Heshizer

    2002-01-01

    Background: Safety teams have become a popular means to recognize and prevent injuries in the workplace. In fact, organizations, such as OSHA, NIOSH, NIEHS, DOE, and the Ohio BWC, not only encourage safety teams, but have implemented them in their organizations. However, safety teams may not be legal as defined by NLRB Act Sections 2(5) and 8(a)(2). Objective: To determine

  9. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Demonstrated success at grant writing for NIH and other government institutes using team science approaches. Work in non-profit sector with federal contracts and grants. Have written book on successful grant writing.

  10. Team Learning: Collective Reflection Processes in Teacher Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlsson, Jon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to further studies of theoretical and conceptual understanding of teachers' team learning processes, with a main focus on team work, team atmosphere, and collective reflections. Design/methodology/approach: The empirical study was designed as a multi-case study in a research and development…

  11. Assessing the Quality and Comparative Effectiveness of Team-Based Care for Heart Failure: Who, What, Where, When, and How.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lauren B; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2015-07-01

    Team-based or multidisciplinary care may be a potential way to positively impact outcomes for heart failure (HF) patients by improving clinical outcomes, managing patient symptoms, and reducing costs. The multidisciplinary team includes the HF cardiologist, HF nurses, clinical pharmacists, dieticians, exercise specialists, mental health providers, social workers, primary care providers, and additional subspecialty providers. The timing and setting of multidisciplinary care depends on the needs of the patient and the resources available. Multidisciplinary HF teams should be evaluated based on their ability to achieve goals, as well as their potential for sustainability over time. PMID:26142644

  12. Meeting the needs of vulnerable patients: The need for team working across general practice and community nursing services

    PubMed Central

    While, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    General practitioners and district nurses have a long history of providing care outside the hospital setting. With health care increasingly moving out of the hospital setting, there are more opportunities for general practitioners and district nurses to work together to meet the health needs of the local population. However, the reduction in quali?ed specialist practitioner district nurses over the last decade is concerning. The need for an effective district nursing service has been recognised by the Department of Health in their own model – the nature of district nursing work, often over a long period, enables relationships to develop with the patient, family and informal carers as a basis for anticipatory care to manage long-term conditions. Communication and understanding of the role are central to enhance effective working between general practitioners and district nurses, which can be fostered by engagement in community-oriented integrated care and case management. PMID:25949736

  13. [Leisure--a way to alleviate tension in the work environment of an intensive care unit: a concept of the nursing team].

    PubMed

    Pereira, M E; Bueno, S M

    1997-10-01

    In the present study, we aimed at verifying close to ICU nursing team the service representation and this unit meaning, looking at finding the sense of leisure and its implication in the professional environment. We worked with DUMAZEDIER framework, considering the application of leisure in health promotion, through a quali-quantitative survey. We have investigated 10 members of the nursing team, among different categories, most of them were women, half single, from 28 to 45 years old, with predominantly 10 years in service. They showed pleasure in their job (90%), although they consider it stressing (50%). The job was identified as assistance (80%) and requiring vocation/donation (50%). They also showed relationship and communication. They have the concept of leisure as entertainment/deconcentration (80%), relaxation (20%) etc., emphasizing the importance of discussing the theme. They admit tension/stress caused in the location, considering the need of leisure in the service, to help communication and alleviate the tension. We suggest to nurses special attention on this. PMID:9485871

  14. Team Management of Cognitive Dysfunction in Children with Spina Bifida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Douglas D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The article presents a summary of the cognitive difficulties often encountered when a multidisciplinary team attempts to manage children with spina bifida. Suggestions for intervention and program planning are presented. A model for team management incorporating medical, allied health, and psychosocial professionals is presented. (Author/CL)

  15. A Team of Equals: Teaching Writing in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Lisa; MacKay, Bruce R.; MacKay, Marion B.; Funnell, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Writing across the curriculum (WAC) is a way of integrating the teaching of writing into specific academic disciplines. A problem faced in the WAC literature is how to develop a process that integrates the skills of multi-disciplinary teams. In this project, action research was used to develop a team comprising faculty from the applied sciences…

  16. A Faculty Team Works to Create Content Linkages among Various Courses to Increase Meaningful Learning of Targeted Concepts of Microbiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Briken, Volker; Frauwirth, Kenneth; Gao, Lian-Yong; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Joseph, Sam W.; Mosser, David; Parent, Beth; Shields, Patricia; Song, Wenxia; Stein, Daniel C.; Swanson, Karen; Thompson, Katerina V.; Yuan, Robert; Smith, Ann C.

    2007-01-01

    As research faculty with expertise in the area of host-pathogen interactions (HPI), we used a research group model to effect our professional development as scientific educators. We have established a working hypothesis: The implementation of a curriculum that forms bridges between our seven HPI courses allows our students to achieve deep and…

  17. Working Collaboratively: From School-Based Teams to School-Community-Higher Education Connections. An Introductory Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    Across the country, groups of people who often haven't worked together previously are combining their talents and resources to improve outcomes for children and youth. They often form groups called collaboratives. This packet provides some guidance for what makes such collaborative efforts successful and what gets in the way. It is designed as an…

  18. You and the Professional: A Team. Working with Professionals Who Will Assist You and Your Handicapped Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Learning Resource Center of Pennsylvania, King of Prussia.

    Intended for parents of handicapped children, the booklet provides guidelines for working effectively with a variety of professionals. Sections address the following areas: selecting a professional; making an appointment with medical, psychology, educational, and social services professionals; the professional interview; preparing for a…

  19. Multidisciplinary Care of the Patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Anne Marie; Meli, Yvonne; Meldrum, Catherine; Jellen, Patricia; Butler-Lebair, Marianne; Koczen-Doyle, Debra; Rising, Peter; Stavrolakes, Kim; Brogan, Frances

    2008-01-01

    The National Emphysema Treatment Trial used a multidisciplinary team approach to implement the maximum medical care protocol, including adjustment of medications and outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation for all patients and nutritional and psychological counseling as needed. This article discusses the benefits of such an approach in the care of the patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Team member roles complement each other and contribute to the goal of providing the highest-quality medical care. The primary focus of the team is to reinforce the medical plan and to provide patient education and support. This article reviews the elements of the initial patient assessment and the functional and nutritional assessment. Patient education focuses on medication use, recognition and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation symptoms, smoking cessation, advance directives, and travel. PMID:18453373

  20. Validation of the New Lucerne ICF Based Multidisciplinary Observation Scale (LIMOS) for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Claudia; Huberle, Elisabeth; Koenig-Bruhin, Monica; Plugshaupt, Tobias; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Nyffeler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Valid and multidisciplinary assessment of a stroke patient's ability to perform activities of daily living is very important to define individual goals and to plan targeted rehabilitation. Until today, there is no observation scale that relies on International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate the reliability and validity of a new multidisciplinary observation scale for stroke patients, shortly called LIMOS, which is based on ICF. Methods In a first phase, LIMOS was defined, using a Delphi approach, by an expert panel and a pilot testing was conducted in a small group of stroke patients (n =10) to investigate feasibility and practicability. In a second phase, LIMOS was assessed for its reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability) and validity in a large cohort of stroke patients (n = 102). For convergent validity, the correlation between total scores of the LIMOS and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) was assessed. Results LIMOS consisted of seven ICF chapters incorporating 45 domains. A high internal consistency (=0.98) of LIMOS was found. Furthermore, good test-retest reliability at item and subscale level was found. Principal component analysis revealed that among the seven ICF chapters, four components could be found: (1) interpersonal activities, mobility and self-care, (2) communication, (3) knowledge and general tasks, and (4) domestic life. Significant associations were found between LIMOS and the FIM indicating good convergent validity. Conclusions The new LIMOS is a reliable and valid observation scale for stroke patients based on ICF, which can be used by a multidisciplinary team working in a neurorehabilitation setting. PMID:26110769

  1. Multi-Disciplinary Analysis and Optimization Frameworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia Gutierrez

    2009-01-01

    Since July 2008, the Multidisciplinary Analysis & Optimization Working Group (MDAO WG) of the Systems Analysis Design & Optimization (SAD&O) discipline in the Fundamental Aeronautics Program s Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) project completed one major milestone, Define Architecture & Interfaces for Next Generation Open Source MDAO Framework Milestone (9/30/08), and is completing the Generation 1 Framework validation milestone, which is due December 2008. Included in the presentation are: details of progress on developing the Open MDAO framework, modeling and testing the Generation 1 Framework, progress toward establishing partnerships with external parties, and discussion of additional potential collaborations

  2. Strengthening Identification with the Team in Virtual Teams: The Leaders' Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anu Sivunen

    2006-01-01

    The number of virtual teams is increasing in today's workplaces. In virtual teams, the members can have different cultural backgrounds, they often work in different countries and are professionals in their own fields. In addition, as such diverse and dispersed teams communicate mainly through communication technology this raises the challenge for the team leader of how to unify the team

  3. Existing Student Study Team Processes in Selected Volunteer Special Education Local Plan Areas, School Districts, and Schools in California: A Descriptive Evaluation Study. Draft Preliminary Findings. Working Paper No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moger, Roxanne L.

    The paper is the third of a series of working papers developed by a project which conducted a cooperative study of existing student study team (SST) processes in nine California special education local plan areas. The working papers augment the final report by providing detailed descriptions of the methods used and the preliminary findings. This…

  4. Team-Based Learning and Open-Book Quizzes: Determining What Works in an Introductory Geoscience Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teed, R.

    2008-12-01

    Concepts in Geology (EES 345) is an inquiry-based ten-week geoscience course for pre-service elementary and middle-school teachers at Wright State University. For most of them, this is the first and last geoscience class that they take. Required readings are an important part of the class because of the amount of vocabulary and number of concepts that students need to master. It is not possible to spend much class time on lectures that cover the same material, as students are expected to be doing hands-on activities, presentations, discussions, and laboratory exercises applying the material learned from reading. As the instructor, I administer frequent quizzes to encourage students to do the reading and to take notes. The quizzes are 10 multiple-choice questions each and the students are allowed to use a single page of notes. After they complete their quizzes individually, the students gather in groups of three or four and work on the same questions, but are allowed to discuss their answers. This motivates students further to be scrupulous about reading, enables them to help each other overcome mistakes, and helps them work out difficult problems that overwhelmed individuals in the group. The average group scores on in-class, closed- book quizzes are almost always higher than highest average individual score (more than 5% on the average), so even the best-prepared person in the group is managing to learn something from his or her peers. After the all the scores are recorded, I tally the number of correct group and individual answers to each question. If one or more groups gets a question wrong, it's clearly a hard question and worth going over during class time. If more than half of the groups get a question wrong, it is not scored as part of the total. When I used a new text last spring, students found the quizzes overwhelmingly hard. So I let students take the individual quizzes home to answer directly from the book and continued to give group quizzes in class. Students no longer brought notes to the group quizzes. In some groups, all individuals gave identical wrong answers to the same questions (and repeated that answer on the group quiz) indicating probable cooperation on the individual quizzes. The average group scores were no longer significantly higher than the average individual scores, indicating less learning, and the groups still had trouble answering questions involving problem-solving or synthesis or comparison of ideas.

  5. Multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma: a model for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Gary S; Black, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A multidisciplinary model is a useful approach in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to coordinate, individualize, and optimize care. The HCC Multidisciplinary Team (MDT) at Temple University Hospital was established in 2008 and comprises hepatologists, interventional radiologists, transplant surgeons, oncologists, residents, midlevel providers, and support staff. Patients may be enrolled by referral from (1) oncologists at Temple, (2) the hepatitis screening clinic recently established at Temple and staffed by hepatology residents, or (3) community practices. MDT conferences are held weekly, during which cases are discussed (based on medical history, interpretation of images, and laboratory analyses) and treatment plans are formulated. The Temple treatment algorithm follows current standards of care, guided by tumor volume and morphology, but the novel multidisciplinary interaction challenges members to tailor therapy to achieve the best possible outcomes. Patients with a solitary lesion ? 2 cm may receive no treatment until eligible for transplantation or locoregional therapy or resection, with imaging every 3 to 6 months to monitor tumor progression. In patients with tumors > 2 cm and ? 5 cm, microwave ablation therapy is used if lesions are discrete and accessible. Conventional transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or drug-eluting bead TACE (DEB-TACE) or yttrium-90 microspheres are utilized in multifocal disease. Patients with lesions > 5 cm are candidates for TACE for downstaging the tumor. Sorafenib is typically reserved for unresectable lesions between 2 cm and 5 cm. Frequently, we administer sorafenib continuously and in combination with DEB-TACE. In our experience, sorafenib does not produce effects on the tumor vasculature or blood flow that would impair the efficacy of DEB-TACE. The literature documents improved outcomes in HCC and other cancers associated with the introduction of multidisciplinary care. The role and organization of the MDT is influenced by team culture, expertise, and process, as well as institutional and larger environmental contexts. PMID:23690690

  6. Integrated Multidisciplinary Optimization Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    OpenMDAO is an open-source MDAO framework. It is used to develop an integrated analysis and design environment for engineering challenges. This Phase II project integrated additional modules and design tools into OpenMDAO to perform discipline-specific analysis across multiple flight regimes at varying levels of fidelity. It also showcased a refined system architecture that allows the system to be less customized to a specific configuration (i.e., system and configuration separation). By delivering a capable and validated MDAO system along with a set of example applications to be used as a template for future users, this work greatly expands NASA's high-fidelity, physics-based MDAO capabilities and enables the design of revolutionary vehicles in a cost-effective manner. This proposed work complements M4 Engineering's expertise in developing modeling and simulation toolsets that solve relevant subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic demonstration applications.

  7. So, what's it really like to work in biotech?

    PubMed

    Belmont, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This essay provides insight into the daily life of a scientist in biotechnology, drawing on experience gained from working in companies ranging in size from four to more than 80,000 employees. The basic scientific training in molecular biology required for the work is similar between academia and industry, but the way in which these skills are applied differs. Biologists in industry settings work as part of large, multidisciplinary teams. This requires relinquishing the degree of intellectual freedom allowed in academia but offers an increased opportunity to see the fruits of one's labor translate into products with the potential to positively impact human or environmental health. PMID:23307104

  8. Multidisciplinary Institute for Child Sexual Abuse Intervention and Treatment Project. Final Report: Innovations in Protective Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis-Small, Lucretia; Cohen, Miye

    An evaluation was made of the Multidisciplinary Institute for Child Sexual Abuse Intervention and Treatment, a project established mainly to develop a curriculum for interdisciplinary child sexual abuse training, change attitudes and increase knowledge and skills of trainees, and promote a team approach toward training and case management among…

  9. The Charlson comorbidity score: a superior comorbidity assessment tool for the prostate cancer multidisciplinary meeting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Kastner; J Armitage; A Kimble; J Rawal; P G Carter; S Venn

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings use precise prognostic factors to select treatment options for patients with prostate cancer. Comorbidity is judged subjectively. Recent publications favour the Charlson comorbidity score (CS) for the use in the management of prostate cancer. We assess the feasibility of using the CS by our MDT in planning the treatment of patients with prostate cancer.Patients and

  10. Evaluation of Multidisciplinary Tobacco Cessation Training Program in a Large Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Timothy C.; Hamlett-Berry, Kim W.; Watanabe, Jonathan H.; Bounthavong, Mark; Zillich, Alan J.; Christofferson, Dana E.; Myers, Mark G.; Himstreet, Julianne E.; Belperio, Pamela S.; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health care professionals can have a dramatic impact by assisting patients with tobacco cessation but most have limited training. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of a 4-hour tobacco cessation training program. Methods: A team of multidisciplinary health care professionals created a veteran-specific tailored version of the Rx for…

  11. The Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale: Reliability, Validity, and Scale Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Pamela Davis; Brantley, Philip J.; McKnight, G. Tipton; Jones, Glenn N.; Springer, Annette

    1997-01-01

    The development and preliminary reliability and validity studies are reported for the Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale, a 110-item Likert scale that assesses satisfaction with team health care services. The methods used to construct subscales may have implications for other psychometric studies of satisfaction and quality…

  12. Final Scientific \\/ Technical Report: Multidisciplinary Graduate Training Program on Technologies for a Biobased Economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Mark Worden; Daina M. Briedis

    2006-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop a Multidisciplinary Graduate Training Program on Technologies for a Biobased Economy (TBE) at Michigan State University (MSU). Students completing the TBE Program are expected to be broadly trained in the disciplines relevant to the biobased products industry (BPI), to have strong research skills, to be able to work effectively in multidisciplinary

  13. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  14. Physics Education in a Multidisciplinary Materials Research Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, W. D.

    1997-03-01

    The MINT Center, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, is a multidisciplinary research program focusing on materials information storage. It involves 17 faculty, 10 post-doctoral fellows and 25 graduate students from six academic programs including Physics, Chemistry, Materials Science, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Electric al Engineering and Chemical Engineering, whose research is supported by university, federal and industrial funds. The research facilities (15,000 ft^2) which include faculty and student offices are located in one building and are maintained by the university and the Center at no cost to participating faculty. The academic requirements for the students are determined by the individual departments along relatively rigid, traditional grounds although several materials and device courses are offered for students from all departments. Within the Center, participants work in teams assigning responsibilities and sharing results at regularly scheduled meetings. Bi-weekly research seminars for all participants provide excellent opportunities for students to improve their communication skills and to receive critical input from a large, diverse audience. Strong collaboration with industrial partners in the storage industry supported by workshops, research reviews, internships, industrial visitors and participation in industry consortia give students a broader criteria for self-evaluation, higher motivation and excellent career opportunities. Physics students, because of their rigorous basic training, are an important element in a strong materials sciences program, but they often are deficient in the behavior and characterization of real materials. The curriculum for physics students should be broadened to prepare them fully for a rewarding career in this emerging discipline.

  15. Multidisciplinary rounds have become a must, experts say.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    Multidisciplinary rounds are a good way to improve throughput, reduce length of stay and readmissions, and improve patient satisfaction, experts say. They add: The meetings help the care team identify what is needed for discharge and get all of the disciplines on the same page. The structure and participants will vary by organization, but nursing, case management, finance, and pharmacy should be represented. The meetings should be at the same time and place every day and should last no more than 45 minutes. PMID:25065099

  16. A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Family Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Gail

    1985-01-01

    Describes the outreach services of an urban family health and social service organization catering to low-income young childbearing families in East Harlem, New York. Using an innovative multidisciplinary model, the organization's primary emphasis is on working with families in their own homes and eventually moving out into the community.…

  17. Multidisciplinary Students And Instructors: A Second-Year Games Course

    E-print Network

    Bowling, Michael

    . This paper describes our experiences with the course, emphasizing the issues of multidisciplinary in Science at the University of Alberta has had a strong research group working in artificial intelli- gence at the undergraduate level. Introducing a senior undergrad- uate course that was limited to CS majors was not appealing

  18. Cyberinfrastructure and Scientific Collaboration: Application of a Virtual Team Performance Framework with Potential Relevance to Education. WCER Working Paper No. 2010-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, Sara; Thorn, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify and describe some of the dimensions of scientific collaborations using high throughput computing (HTC) through the lens of a virtual team performance framework. A secondary purpose was to assess the viability of using a virtual team performance framework to study scientific collaborations using…

  19. Leading virtual teams: hierarchical leadership, structural supports, and shared team leadership.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Julia E; Kozlowski, Steve W J

    2014-05-01

    Using a field sample of 101 virtual teams, this research empirically evaluates the impact of traditional hierarchical leadership, structural supports, and shared team leadership on team performance. Building on Bell and Kozlowski's (2002) work, we expected structural supports and shared team leadership to be more, and hierarchical leadership to be less, strongly related to team performance when teams were more virtual in nature. As predicted, results from moderation analyses indicated that the extent to which teams were more virtual attenuated relations between hierarchical leadership and team performance but strengthened relations for structural supports and team performance. However, shared team leadership was significantly related to team performance regardless of the degree of virtuality. Results are discussed in terms of needed research extensions for understanding leadership processes in virtual teams and practical implications for leading virtual teams. PMID:23205494

  20. Hotel Executive Teams: Balance of Power Among Department Heads?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie M. Farber

    1994-01-01

    The focus on team approaches to performing work and insuring quality in hospitality organizations has raised questions about the effectiveness of work teams. This study examines power balances among department heads in hotel executive teams to assess political variables that may undermine the team's objectives of integrating departmental efforts in achieving quality in the participating hotels. An analysis of team

  1. Working with Your Treatment Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... recipients of its 2014-2015 Research Grant and Prizes. View the PDF . Education The next Gynecologic Cancer ... 2015 Research Awards Current Year Research Grants and Prizes Current Year Important Dates Research Grants & Awards Committee ...

  2. Computational differentiation and multidisciplinary design

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Griewank, A. [Institute of Scientific Computing, Technical Univ. of Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) by means of formal sensitivity analysis requires that each single-discipline analysis code supply not only the output functions for the (usually constrained) optimization process and other discipline analysis inputs, but also the derivatives of all of these output functions with respect to its input variables. Computational differentiation techniques and automatic differentiation tools enable MDO by providing accurate and efficient derivatives of computer programs with little human effort. We discuss the principles behind automatic differentiation and give a brief overview of automatic differentiation tools and how they can be employed judiciously, for example, for sparse Jacobians and to exploit parallelism. We show how, and under what circumstances, automatic differentiation applied to iterative solvers delivers the mathematically desired derivatives. We then show how derivatives that can now be feasibly obtained by computational differentiation techniques can lead to improved solution schemes for nonlinear coupled systems and multidisciplinary design optimization.

  3. Multidisciplinary management of advanced lung neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Piero; Guerrera, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Travis, William D.; Rossi, Giulio; Lausi, Paolo Olivo; Oliaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The optimal clinical management of aggressive/advanced lung neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is still debated, due to their rarity and the lack of prospective randomized studies. Results derive from retrospective mono-Institutional series, and few dedicated prospective trials, recently designed, are still ongoing. In low-grade tumors [bronchial carcinoids (BCs)] surgery, whenever feasible, remains the mainstay of treatment, and chemo/radiotherapy (RT) should be reserved to progressive diseases (PD). In case of resected N1-N2 BCs, a “watch and see” policy associated with a close clinical/radiological follow-up is recommended. Somatostatin analogs (SSA) seem to be effective in controlling BCs associated endocrine syndromes, while SSA antiproliferative effect has also been reported in the past. Targeted therapy with new drugs (Everolimus) seems to be very promising, but further trials are needed. Surgery alone is not sufficient to treat high-grade NETs: adjuvant CT is required also in early stages. Platinum-Etoposide regimen demonstrated to be the most effective; irinotecan and other biological drugs are considered very promising. In conclusion, the management of advanced lung NETs should be individualized by multidisciplinary teams which include Medical and Radiation Oncologists, Surgeons, Pathologists, Pulmonologists, Endocrinologists, Interventional Radiologists, and the prognosis is mainly dependent on tumor grade and its anatomical extent. PMID:25984363

  4. The Multidisciplinary Management of Osteosarcoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noah Federman; Nicholas Bernthal; Fritz C. Eilber; William D. Tap

    2009-01-01

    Opinion statement  Patients with suspected or confirmed osteosarcoma should be evaluated and treated at a comprehensive cancer center within\\u000a a multidisciplinary sarcoma program that includes pediatric, medical and radiation oncologists, orthopedic and surgical oncologists,\\u000a musculoskeletal pathologists, and radiologists. Successful treatment involves proper diagnosis, neoadjuvant and adjuvant multi-agent\\u000a chemotherapy, and aggressive surgery with an emphasis toward limb-preserving procedures. Treatment of osteosarcoma should

  5. Dr Alexandros Lappas, coordinator of NANOTAIL, gives us an overview of his team's work in developing cutting-edge nanotechnology at the new nanocrystals facility at the IESL-FORTH labs, Greece

    E-print Network

    Dr Alexandros Lappas, coordinator of NANOTAIL, gives us an overview of his team's work you provide an overview of the aims and focus of the NANOTAIL project? The main objective facility at the host institute offers cost-efficient, easily scalable and accessible nanomaterial

  6. A case history of multi-disciplinary integration in an offshore Indonesian field

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.; Aziz, A.; Diswarin, N. [and others

    1997-02-01

    This is the first in a 2-part series describing the case history of how a multi-disciplinary team (MDT) used a 3-D survey and a reservoir simulation to review and revise the development plans for the BM platform, located in the B Field, Offshore Northwest Java, Indonesia. Part 1 of this series discusses the multi-disciplinary team`s (MDT) petrophysical, geologic, geophysical and production data gathering efforts. These data were then used to develop a reservoir simulation model which initially found no problems with the BM platform. However, the initial simulation had contradictions concerning input structure maps and fluid contacts. As the problems with the reservoir model appeared, a 3-D seismic survey was planned, which will also be discussed in Part 1.

  7. Structuring a Project Management Course to Develop Team Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Edmonson, Charlie P.

    There is no escaping it. Working in industry requires working in teams. The industries hiring our graduates recognize this. TAC of ABET Criterion 2e requires it, stating graduates need an ability to function effectively on teams. How do we, as teachers, go about ensuring that our students learn how to work effectively on teams? How do we go about teaching them team work and team management skills? The traditional approach to developing team work and team management skills involves assigning students randomly to teams, giving them a project to work on, and expecting them to somehow magically learn to work effectively on teams. This they'll learn about teamwork if they work on teams approach fails to give students adequate preparation and insight into team work and team management skills. It doesn't work. Surveys of students reveal that they do not feel they knew how to effectively work on teams or how to be a team leader. This sentiment was echoed by respondents to last years project management survey. To effectively prepare students to work on teams, coordinated teambuilding and leadership skills training is needed. Beginning with a discussion of necessary project management and team skills, this paper will describe how to structure a project course to include techniques and exercises specifically designed to develop teamwork and team management skills and the benefits they provide.

  8. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that Montessorians' role is…

  9. Aeroelastic modeling for the FIT (Functional Integration Technology) team F/A-18 simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiler, Thomas A.; Wieseman, Carol D.

    1989-01-01

    As part of Langley Research Center's commitment to developing multidisciplinary integration methods to improve aerospace systems, the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team was established to perform dynamics integration research using an existing aircraft configuration, the F/A-18. An essential part of this effort has been the development of a comprehensive simulation modeling capability that includes structural, control, and propulsion dynamics as well as steady and unsteady aerodynamics. The structural and unsteady aerodynamics contributions come from an aeroelastic mode. Some details of the aeroelastic modeling done for the Functional Integration Technology (FIT) team research are presented. Particular attention is given to work done in the area of correction factors to unsteady aerodynamics data.

  10. Efficient Multidisciplinary Analysis Procedure Using Multi-Level Parallelization Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Hatay, Ferhat; Farhangnia, Mehrdad; Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Multidisciplinary applications are suitable for parallel computing environment by adopting the domain decomposition method. Immediately, a multidisciplinary application can be parallelized by solving each discipline separately. In order to perform coupled multidisciplinary analysis, coupling of each discipline can be accomplished by exchanging boundary data at the interfaces. This is regarded as discipline-level parallelization. Next level could be a "coarse-grain" parallelization of each discipline, which mainly depends on the physical geometry and nature of each discipline. For example, it is almost impossible for structured-grid based computational fluid dynamics codes to do flow analysis of an aircraft by using a single grid because of the complexity of its configuration. Thus, multi-block grid is commonly used to describe the details of complex geometry. Similarly, in structural analysis, the structure is frequently subdivided into substructures. Thus, the computation of each subdomain can be easily parallelized since each subdomain is solved separately independent of other domains. The parallelization is accomplished by solving each subdomain separately on a separate processor and exchanging the boundary conditions at domain interfaces periodically. However, the physical decomposition of the domain introduces explicit boundary conditions at the domain interfaces. This is not desirable for critical areas such as those containing shock waves or flow separations. Thus, a "fine-grain" parallelization is introduced to overcome this problem. The "fine-grain" parallelization is one that solves exactly the same system of equations of a subdomain by using more than one processors without introducing any explicit boundary conditions. An efficient multidisciplinary analysis procedure can be accomplished by successfully combining the above multi-level parallelism. A multidisciplinary analysis code, ENSAERO developed at NASA Ames Research Center is used in this study to implement the proposed approach. The communication data structure required for the proposed approach will be studied in detail. This work will demonstrate the feasibility of using multi-level parallelization approach in multidisciplinary analysis applications.

  11. PSU SEED Team 1 Report Summary

    E-print Network

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PSU SEED Team 1 Report Summary For our project, we worked in conjunction with SEED (Students for Environmentally Enlightened Design) and SEED Team 2 to complete a design for a library based out of a standard 40

  12. NCC: A Multidisciplinary Design/Analysis Tool for Combustion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Quealy, Angela

    1999-01-01

    A multi-disciplinary design/analysis tool for combustion systems is critical for optimizing the low-emission, high-performance combustor design process. Based on discussions between NASA Lewis Research Center and the jet engine companies, an industry-government team was formed in early 1995 to develop the National Combustion Code (NCC), which is an integrated system of computer codes for the design and analysis of combustion systems. NCC has advanced features that address the need to meet designer's requirements such as "assured accuracy", "fast turnaround", and "acceptable cost". The NCC development team is comprised of Allison Engine Company (Allison), CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE), NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC), and Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This development team operates under the guidance of the NCC steering committee. The "unstructured mesh" capability and "parallel computing" are fundamental features of NCC from its inception. The NCC system is composed of a set of "elements" which includes grid generator, main flow solver, turbulence module, turbulence and chemistry interaction module, chemistry module, spray module, radiation heat transfer module, data visualization module, and a post-processor for evaluating engine performance parameters. Each element may have contributions from several team members. Such a multi-source multi-element system needs to be integrated in a way that facilitates inter-module data communication, flexibility in module selection, and ease of integration.

  13. Team Assembly Mechanisms Determine Collaboration Network Structure and Team Performance

    PubMed Central

    Guimerà, Roger; Uzzi, Brian; Spiro, Jarrett; Nunes Amaral, Luís A.

    2007-01-01

    Agents in creative enterprises are embedded in networks that inspire, support, and evaluate their work. Here, we investigate how the mechanisms by which creative teams self-assemble determine the structure of these collaboration networks. We propose a model for the self-assembly of creative teams that has its basis in three parameters: team size, the fraction of newcomers in new productions, and the tendency of incumbents to repeat previous collaborations. The model suggests that the emergence of a large connected community of practitioners can be described as a phase transition. We find that team assembly mechanisms determine both the structure of the collaboration network and team performance for teams derived from both artistic and scientific fields. PMID:15860629

  14. Blog - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Addressing complex societal challenges, such as climate change or the diabetes pandemic, requires bringing together different types of knowledge from disparate academic disciplines and societal stakeholders (Stirling, 2007). There is evidence to suggest that scientific teams and organizations with diverse types of expertise are more capable of solving complex problems than experts working individually in narrow areas of expertise (Page, 2007).

  15. Watershed Assessment Program Team

    E-print Network

    Watershed Assessment Program Team Georgia Report David Radcliffe University of Georgia #12;Outline for Extension #12;Modeling Activities · Most of our work is with SWAT ­ Modeling flow, sediment, and P ­ Proposal to model urban storm-water control practices · Teach advanced graduate course ­ BASINS and SWAT

  16. Starting a cleft team: a primer.

    PubMed

    Capone, Randolph B; Butts, Sydney C; Jones, Lamont R

    2014-11-01

    Facial plastic surgeons have a comprehensive understanding of the challenges that patients with cleft lip and palate encounter in form and function. Because there are areas in the United States where access to cleft care is limited, opportunities exist for facial plastic surgeons to develop cleft teams to provide greater availability of services to patients. A consensus statement has been developed by the Cleft and Craniofacial Subcommittee of the Specialty Surgery Committee of the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery that outlines strategies for facial plastic surgeons who are prepared to assume leadership roles in domestic multidisciplinary cleft team initiatives. PMID:25444730

  17. Team Identity and Performance-based Compensation Effects on Performance 

    E-print Network

    Blazovich, Janell L.

    2010-01-16

    This study investigates whether team members work harder and perform better when they are compensated based on both team and individual performance than when compensated based on team or individual performance alone and whether teammates...

  18. Team Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begg, Roddy

    2005-01-01

    A personal reminiscence of the events surrounding the establishment of Tertiary Education and Management (TEAM), the journal of the European Association for Institutional Research EAIR, the European Higher Education Society--and its development over its first decade, by the founding Editor, at the time of his retirement from the post.

  19. Domain decomposition in multidisciplinary design: Role of artificial neural networks and intelligent agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Mehmet Ali

    This thesis examines decomposition based procedures in the optimal design of large-scale multidisciplinary systems. The use of formal optimization methods in such systems is complicated by the presence of a large number of design variables and constraints. Decomposition reduces a large-scale system into a sequence of smaller, more tractable subsystems, each with a smaller set of design variables and constraints. The decomposed subsystems, however, are not totally decoupled, and design changes in one subsystem may have a profound influence on changes in other subsystems. The present work examines the effectiveness of counterpropagation (CP) neural networks as a tool to account for this coupling. This capability derives from a pattern completion capability of such networks. The proposed approach is implemented for a class of structural design problems where the decomposed subsystems exhibit hierarchy, i.e., there is a distinct chain of command in the nature of couplings between the subsystems. The role of artificial neural networks is also explored in the context of concurrent subspace optimization (CSSO) where this decomposition based approach is applicable to problems where no distinct hierarchy of influences can be identified. Essential components of decomposition based design methods are strategies to identify a topology for problem decomposition, and to develop coordination strategies which account for couplings among the decomposed problems. The present thesis examines the effectiveness of artificial neural networks as a tool to both account for the coupling, and to develop methods to coordinate the solution in the different subproblems. The solution process for decomposition based design is further enhanced by a novel approach of using Intelligent Agents (IA's). This agent-based paradigm provides the necessary support structure for representing salient characteristics of the design, and for coordinating the solutions in different subproblems. The CSSO method is adapted in this environment, and results obtained with representative application problems indicate that it permits multidisciplinary design teams to work effectively on different parts of the problem by automating individual tasks, information sharing, and facilitating coordination among the engineering teams.

  20. Evaluation of a university hospital trauma team activation protocol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trond Dehli; Knut Fredriksen; Svein A Osbakk; Kristian Bartnes

    2011-01-01

    Background  Admission with a multidisciplinary trauma team may be vital for the severely injured patient, as this facilitates rapid diagnosis\\u000a and treatment. On the other hand, patients with minor injuries do not need the trauma team for adequate care. Correct triage\\u000a is important for optimal resource utilization. The aim of the study was to evaluate our criteria for activating the trauma

  1. The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety is of the utmost importance in health care. The patient safety culture in an institution has great impact on patient safety. To enhance patient safety and to design strategies to reduce medical injuries, there is a current focus on measuring the patient safety culture. The aim of the present study was to describe the patient safety culture in an ED at two different hospitals before and after a Quality improvement (QI) project that was aimed to enhance patient safety. Methods A repeated cross-sectional design, using the Hospital Survey On Patient Safety Culture questionnaire before and after a quality improvement project in two emergency departments at a county hospital and a university hospital. The questionnaire was developed to obtain a better understanding of the patient safety culture of an entire hospital or of specific departments. The Swedish version has 51 questions and 15 dimensions. Results At the county hospital, a difference between baseline and follow-up was observed in three dimensions. For two of these dimensions, Team-work within hospital and Communication openness, a higher score was measured at the follow-up. At the university hospital, a higher score was measured at follow-up for the two dimensions Team-work across hospital units and Team-work within hospital. Conclusion The result showed changes in the self-estimated patient safety culture, mainly regarding team-work and communication openness. Most of the improvements at follow-up were seen by physicians, and mainly at the county hospital. PMID:25005231

  2. UVM Outing Club Trip Logistics Planner All leadership teams taking out Outing Club trips need to complete this form. This is a working

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    UVM Outing Club Trip Logistics Planner All leadership teams taking out Outing Club trips need. Completed and detailed trip logistics planner 2. Copies of all participant AND leader medical forms 3? Copies of medical forms nad logistics planner? Picked up Purchase Orders, Gas Card, and Petty Cash? Food

  3. Roles and Responsibilities in Feature Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Jutta

    Agile development requires self-organizing teams. The set-up of a (feature) team has to enable self-organization. Special care has to be taken if the project is not only distributed, but also large and more than one feature team is involved. Every feature team needs in such a setting a product owner who ensures the continuous focus on business delivery. The product owners collaborate by working together in a virtual team. Each feature team is supported by a coach who ensures not only the agile process of the individual feature team but also across all feature teams. An architect (or if necessary a team of architects) takes care that the system is technically sound. Contrariwise to small co-located projects, large global projects require a project manager who deals with—among other things—internal and especially external politics.

  4. Orientation Core Team 2015 Applicant Information Sheet

    E-print Network

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    Orientation Core Team 2015 Applicant Information Sheet The Orientation Core Team is comprised in the implementation of orientation programs for all new students at Hopkins. The team reports to the Coordinator of Orientation and First Year Experience and works closely with the university community to plan and implement

  5. Team leadership at the 100-foot level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Trent

    2004-01-01

    Since teams continue to be an important part of an organization's design, understanding how to enhance their success should be a primary objective. Research consistently shows that team leaders exert a disproportionate effect on the success or failure of organizational work teams, making leadership an area that managers cannot ignore. While creating an organizational vision or inspiring others to follow

  6. A Multidisciplinary Teamwork Training Program: The Triad for Optimal Patient Safety (TOPS) Experience

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael; Vidyarthi, Arpana R.; Sharpe, Bradley A.; Gearhart, Susan; Bookwalter, Thomas; Barker, Jack; Alldredge, Brian K.; Blegen, Mary A.; Wachter, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION Communication and teamwork failures are a common cause of adverse events. Residency programs, with a mandate to teach systems-based practice, are particularly challenged to address these important skills. AIM To develop a multidisciplinary teamwork training program focused on teaching teamwork behaviors and communication skills. SETTING Internal medicine residents, hospitalists, nurses, pharmacists, and all other staff on a designated inpatient medical unit at an academic medical center. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION We developed a 4-h teamwork training program as part of the Triad for Optimal Patient Safety (TOPS) project. Teaching strategies combined didactic presentation, facilitated discussion using a safety trigger video, and small-group scenario-based exercises to practice effective communication skills and team behaviors. Development, planning, implementation, delivery, and evaluation of TOPS Training was conducted by a multidisciplinary team. PROGRAM EVALUATION We received 203 evaluations with a mean overall rating for the training of 4.49?±?0.79 on a 1–5 scale. Participants rated the multidisciplinary educational setting highly at 4.59?±?0.68. DISCUSSION We developed a multidisciplinary teamwork training program that was highly rated by all participating disciplines. The key was creating a shared forum to learn about and discuss interdisciplinary communication and teamwork. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-008-0793-8) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18830769

  7. An innovative, multidisciplinary strategy to improve retention of nursing students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Igbo, Immaculata N; Straker, Kathleen C; Landson, Margie J; Symes, Lene; Bernard, Lillian F; Hughes, Lisa A; Carroll, Theresa L

    2011-01-01

    Nursing students from disadvantaged backgrounds must overcome many barriers in order to succeed. This article will focus on how a multidisciplinary team helped 76 percent of these high-risk students persist in their nursing programs by addressing some of these barriers. Three baccalaureate nursing schools in the Texas Medical Center embarked on a three-year retention program designed to enhance the success of students identified by federal criteria as being at risk. Multidisciplinary teams led various activities, including a study skills component, which included preparing for lectures, taking notes, critical thinking, and test-taking strategies. Also addressed were written and oral communication skills, medical terminology, critical thinking, career coaching, and socialization activities. Collaboration among faculty and students at the three schools was key to the success of the program. PMID:22235693

  8. Multidisciplinary Obstetric Simulated Emergency Scenarios (MOSES): Promoting Patient Safety in Obstetrics with Teamwork-Focused Interprofessional Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeth, Della; Ayida, Gubby; Berridge, Emma Jane; Mackintosh, Nicola; Norris, Beverley; Sadler, Chris; Strachan, Alasdair

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We describe an example of simulation-based interprofessional continuing education, the multidisciplinary obstetric simulated emergency scenarios (MOSES) course, which was designed to enhance nontechnical skills among obstetric teams and, hence, improve patient safety. Participants' perceptions of MOSES courses, their learning, and…

  9. Product design team interactions and peer feedback as indicators of team success

    E-print Network

    Maouyo, Stephen Jojimbai

    2014-01-01

    Teams have become ubiquitous. They are used at all levels of academia, government, and industry, and their use spans all sectors and fields. Much work has been done on the factors that affect a team's performance and how ...

  10. New roles for mathematics in multi-disciplinary, upper secondary school projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mette Andresen; Lena Lindenskov

    2009-01-01

    A new concept, compulsory multi-disciplinary courses, was introduced in upper secondary school curriculum as a central part\\u000a of a recent reform. This paper reports from a case study of such a triple\\/four-disciplinary project in mathematics, physics,\\u000a chemistry and ‘general study preparation’ performed under the reform by a team of experienced teachers. The aim of the case\\u000a study was to inquire

  11. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

  12. Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stern, David P. (David Peter), 1931-

    Authored and curated by David P. Stern, these web pages introduce the concept of work and its relation to energy. An example of electric work and energy using the example of a Van de Graaff Generator. These pages are part of "From Stargazers to Starships", an extensive web site that introduces topics in physics and astronomy using space exploration and space science. Translations are available in French and Spanish.

  13. Multidisciplinary management--an opportunity for service integration.

    PubMed

    Cameron, M

    1997-01-01

    The management team of the future will enter an environment requiring facilitation, participation, clinical, and empowerment skills. Those individuals who possess a clinical orientation as well as business expertise will be sought to manage multidisciplinary units. The rapid changes in the health-care environment have forced organizations to restructure their operations. To achieve quality care, customer satisfaction, cost-effectiveness, and efficiency, service integration across the organization will be required. As we approach the 21st century, this standard will evolve until "all levels are managing patient care." Some of the restructuring trends occurring in the health-care industry have been collaboration service integration, management consolidation, and job elimination. The emphasis for the multidisciplinary manager of the future will include integrating the professional and clinical services, managing information, building community partnerships, promoting physician collaboration, and managing the change process. A model organization in the next century will move toward a people-oriented system with inclusion and empowerment initiatives. Service integration will affect all organizations, but the disciplines within the Clinical Support System will be the most affected. Future opportunities of leadership will exist for pathologists, nurses, or medical technologists as the professional silos of managers and clinicians continue to crumble. PMID:10175172

  14. Interventions for necrotizing pancreatitis: summary of a multidisciplinary consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Martin L; Werner, Jens; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Baron, Todd H; Besselink, Marc G; Windsor, John A; Horvath, Karen D; vanSonnenberg, Eric; Bollen, Thomas L; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2012-11-01

    Pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis may result in significant morbidity and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Many recommendations have been made for management of necrotizing pancreatitis, but no published guidelines have incorporated the many recent developments in minimally invasive techniques for necrosectomy. Hence, a multidisciplinary conference was convened to develop a consensus on interventions for necrotizing pancreatitis. Participants included most international experts from multiple disciplines. The evidence for efficacy of interventions was reviewed, presentations were given by experts, and a consensus was reached on each topic. In summary, intervention is primarily indicated for infected necrosis, less often for symptomatic sterile necrosis, and should ideally be delayed as long as possible, preferably 4 weeks or longer after the onset of disease, for better demarcation and liquefaction of the necrosis. Both the step-up approach using percutaneous drainage followed by minimally invasive video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement and per-oral endoscopic necrosectomy have been shown to have superior outcomes to traditional open necrosectomy with respect to short-term and long-term morbidity and are emerging as treatments of choice. Applicability of these techniques depends on the availability of specialized expertise and a multidisciplinary team dedicated to the management of severe acute pancreatitis and its complications. PMID:23086243

  15. Bioenergy research: a new paradigm in multidisciplinary research

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Udaya C.; Keller, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The field of biology is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary and cross-cutting. This changing research atmosphere is creating the way for a new kind of enquiry that while building upon the traditional research establishment is providing a new multidisciplinary framework to more effectively address scientific grand challenges. Using the US Department of Energy sponsored BioEnergy Science Center as an example, we highlight how impactful breakthroughs in biofuel science can be achieved within a large cross-disciplinary team environment. Such transformational insights are key to furthering our understanding and in generating models, theories and processes that can be used to overcome recalcitrance of biomass for sustainable biofuel production. Multidisciplinary approaches have an increasingly greater role to play in meeting rising demands for food, fibre, energy, clean environment and good health. Discoveries achieved by diverse minds and cross-applications of tools and analytical approaches have tremendous potential to fill existing knowledge gaps, clear roadblocks and facilitate translation of basic sciences discoveries as solutions towards addressing some of the most pressing global issues. PMID:20542958

  16. Implementing a multidisciplinary disaster simulation for undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Sharon W; Haynes, Sheila; Parker, Pamela; Dennis, Betty; McLin, Carlen; Welldaregay, Wodajo

    2011-01-01

    A liberal-arts-based undergraduate nursing program engaged in curriculum enhancement activities that led to the implementation of a disaster simulation for 81 multidisciplinary undergraduate students. A pretest/posttest design was used to determine the effectiveness of preparation for the simulation. Nursing students in three levels of the program received didactic preparation in disaster preparedness and were assigned to five different simulation response teams. One-way ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences for pretest and posttest scores, p = 0.05. An evaluation of student performance indicated that five of the eight nursing students assigned to the disaster site correctly triaged 81.2 percent of the victims; all eight nursing students assigned to the emergency department correctly reassessed the victims. Classroom didactic content, followed by a simulated learning experience, was found to be an effective teaching strategy for preparing undergraduate nursing students in disaster preparedness. PMID:21923004

  17. Multidisciplinary study of Hewett Field, Zechstein Kalk Formation

    SciTech Connect

    West, K.L. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States))

    1994-04-01

    New technology and a multidisciplinary team approach were effectively used by Phillips Petroleum for optimum reservoir development in the Hewett field, North Sea. Near-horizontal drilling technology and depositional environment and fracture studies were used by engineering and geology. Geophysics contributed structure and porosity trend maps and used new technology developed by Phillips called Incremental Pay Thickness modeling. IPT modeling enhances the integration of well-log data and seismic wiggle traces so porosity and pay thickness can be estimated directly from seismic data. Seismic amplitude values were mapped and processed into estimated porosity thickness using the IPT mathematical relationship. This interpretation aided in locating three successful development wells in areas of predicted high porosity, which increased production by 67 MMCF/D and optimized recovery.

  18. Multidisciplinary approach to the diagnosis and management of patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Craig M; Bunch, Frank T; Cavros, Nick G; Dippel, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is frequently diagnosed after permanent damage has occurred, resulting in a high rate of morbidity, amputation, and loss of life. Early and ongoing diagnosis and treatment is required for this progressive disease. Lifestyle modifications can prevent or delay disease progression and improve symptoms. Limb-sparing endovascular interventions can restore circulation based on appropriate diagnostic testing to pinpoint vascular targets, and intervention must occur as early as possible to ensure optimal clinical outcomes. An algorithm for the diagnosis and management of PAD was developed to enable a collaborative approach between the family practice and primary care physician or internist and various specialists that may include a diabetologist, endocrinologist, smoking cessation expert, hypertension and lipid specialist, endovascular interventionalist, vascular surgeon, orthopedist, neurologist, nurse practitioner, podiatrist, wound healing expert, and/or others. A multidisciplinary team working together has the greatest chance of providing optimal care for the patient with PAD and ensuring ongoing surveillance of the patient’s overall health, ultimately resulting in better quality of life and increased longevity for patients with PAD.

  19. Multidisciplinary approaches to solar hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Bren, Kara L

    2015-06-01

    This review summarizes three different approaches to engineering systems for the solar-driven evolution of hydrogen fuel from water: molecular, nanomaterials and biomolecular. Molecular systems have the advantage of being highly amenable to modification and detailed study and have provided great insight into photophysics, electron transfer and catalytic mechanism. However, they tend to display poor stability. Systems based on nanomaterials are more robust but also are more difficult to synthesize in a controlled manner and to modify and study in detail. Biomolecular systems share many properties with molecular systems and have the advantage of displaying inherently high efficiencies for light absorption, electron-hole separation and catalysis. However, biological systems must be engineered to couple modules that capture and convert solar photons to modules that produce hydrogen fuel. Furthermore, biological systems are prone to degradation when employed in vitro. Advances that use combinations of these three tactics also are described. Multidisciplinary approaches to this problem allow scientists to take advantage of the best features of biological, molecular and nanomaterials systems provided that the components can be coupled for efficient function. PMID:26052425

  20. Multidisciplinary Management of Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, William M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)], E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu; Mancuso, Anthony A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hinerman, Russell W.; Malyapa, Robert S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Werning, John W. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Villaret, Douglas B. [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2007-10-01

    The management of head and neck cancer has evolved into a multidisciplinary approach in which patients are evaluated before treatment and decisions depend on prospective multi-institutional trials, as well as retrospective outcome studies. The choice of one or more modalities to use in a given case varies with the tumor site and extent, as exemplified in the treatment of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. The goals of treatment include cure, laryngeal voice preservation, voice quality, optimal swallowing, and minimal xerostomia. Treatment options include transoral laser excision, radiotherapy (both definitive and postoperative), open partial laryngectomy, total laryngectomy, and neck dissection. The likelihood of local control and preservation of laryngeal function is related to tumor volume. Patients who have a relatively high risk of local recurrence undergo follow-up computed tomography scans every 3-4 months for the first 2 years after radiotherapy. Patients with suspicious findings on computed tomography might benefit from fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to differentiate post-radiotherapy changes from tumor.

  1. Pineal lesions: a multidisciplinary challenge.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Manfred; Emami, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    The pineal region is a complex anatomical compartment, harbouring the pineal gland surrounded by the quadrigeminal plate and the confluents of the internal cerebral veins to form the vein of Galen. The complexity of lesions in that region, however, goes far beyond the pineal parenchyma proper. Originating in the pineal gland, there are not only benign cysts but also numerous different tumour types. In addition, lesions such as tectal gliomas, tentorial meningiomas and choroid plexus papillomas arise from the surrounding structures, occupying that regions. Furthermore, the area has an affinity for metastatic lesions. Vascular lesions complete the spectrum mainly as small tectal arteriovenous malformations or cavernous haemangiomas.Taken together, there is a wide spectrum of lesions, many unique to that region, which call for a multidisciplinary approach. The limited access and anatomical complexity have generated a spectrum of anatomical approaches and raised the interest for neuroendoscopic approaches. Equally complex is the spectrum of treatment modalities such as microsurgery as the main option but stereotactic radiosurgery as an alternative or adjuvant to surgery for selected cases, radiation as for germinoma (see below) and or combinatorial chemotherapy, which may need to precede any other ablative technique as constituents.In this context, we review the current literature and our own series to obtain a snapshot sentiment of how to approach pineal lesions, how to interrelate alternative/competing concepts and review the recent technological advances. PMID:25411146

  2. Cammp Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evertt, Shonn F.; Collins, Michael; Hahn, William

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Configuration Analysis Modeling and Mass Properties (CAMMP) Team is presenting a demo of certain CAMMP capabilities at a Booz Allen Hamilton conference in San Antonio. The team will be showing pictures of low fidelity, simplified ISS models, but no dimensions or technical data. The presentation will include a brief description of the contract and task, description and picture of the Topology, description of Generic Ground Rules and Constraints (GGR&C), description of Stage Analysis with constraints applied, and wrap up with description of other tasks such as Special Studies, Cable Routing, etc. The models include conceptual Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Lander images and animations created for promotional purposes, which are based entirely on public domain conceptual images from public NASA web sites and publicly available magazine articles and are not based on any actual designs, measurements, or 3D models. Conceptual Mars rover and lander are completely conceptual and are not based on any NASA designs or data. The demonstration includes High Fidelity Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of ISS provided by the ISS 3D CAD Team which will be used in a visual display to demonstrate the capabilities of the Teamcenter Visualization software. The demonstration will include 3D views of the CAD models including random measurements that will be taken to demonstrate the measurement tool. A 3D PDF file will be demonstrated of the Blue Book fidelity assembly complete model with no vehicles attached. The 3D zoom and rotation will be displayed as well as random measurements from the measurement tool. The External Configuration Analysis and Tracking Tool (ExCATT) Microsoft Access Database will be demonstrated to show its capabilities to organize and track hardware on ISS. The data included will be part numbers, serial numbers, historical, current, and future locations, of external hardware components on station. It includes dates of all external ISS events and flights and the associated hardware changes for each event. The hardware location information does not always reveal the exact location of the hardware, only the general location. In some cases the location is a module or carrier, in other cases it is a WIF socket, handrail, or attach point. Only small portions of the data will be displayed for demonstration purposes.

  3. Diamonds in the Rough: A Case Study of Team Development Across Disciplines, Distances and Institutions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Fritz; Amy Boren

    Multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional teams are becoming more prevalent in higher education although research has generally focused on teams formed in the same organizations and\\/or the same field. This ethnographic case study analyzed the experiences of ten faculty in a successful technology-intensive, agriculture-related project. The team's development mirrored Tuckman's four-stage model. Members reported differences in motivation, timeline pressure, variations in evaluation and

  4. Multidisciplinary Management of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nystrom, Lukas M.; Reimer, Nickolas B.; Reith, John D.; Dang, Long; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Gibbs, C. Parker

    2013-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcoma is a rare malignancy, with approximately 11,000 cases per year encountered in the United States. It is primarily encountered in adults but can affect patients of any age. There are many histologic subtypes and the malignancy can be low or high grade. Appropriate staging work up includes a physical exam, advanced imaging, and a carefully planned biopsy. This information is then used to guide the discussion of definitive treatment of the tumor which typically involves surgical resection with a negative margin in addition to neoadjuvant or adjuvant external beam radiation. Advances in imaging and radiation therapy have made limb salvage surgery the standard of care, with local control rates greater than 90% in most modern series. Currently, the role of chemotherapy is not well defined and this treatment is typically reserved for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease and for certain histologic subtypes. The goal of this paper is to review the current state of the art in multidisciplinary management of soft tissue sarcoma. PMID:23983648

  5. Multidisciplinary Russian biomedical research in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, O. I.; Sychev, V. N.; Samarin, G. I.; Ilyin, E. A.; Belakovskiy, M. S.; Kussmaul, A. R.

    2014-08-01

    Research activities on a comprehensive multidisciplinary program are vital for enhancement of the system of crew's medical care, environmental health and hygiene in space missions. The primary goal of the program must be identification of patterns, intensity and dynamics of structural and functional shifts in organism induced by an aggregate of spaceflight factors including microgravity, isolation, artificial environment, space radiation, etc. Also, the program must pursue differential assessment of emerging deviations from the standpoint of adequacy to the spaceflight conditions and prospects of returning to Earth and guide the development of principles, methods and techniques necessary to maintain health and working capacity of humans during short- and long-duration missions and on return to Earth. Over 50 years, since 1963, the IBMP researchers apply systemic and innovational approaches to fundamental and exploratory studies in the fields of medical sciences, radiation biology, engineering science, biotechnology, etc. with participation of various biological specimens and human volunteers. Investigations aboard manned spacecrafts and biological satellites as well as in ground-based laboratories further enhancement of the medical care system for crews on orbital and remote space missions; they give insight into the fundamental problems of gravitational physiology and biology, psychophysiology, radiation biology, and contribute thereby to the development of knowledge, methods and technologies, as well as medical and scientific equipment.

  6. Multidisciplinary care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hulvat, Melissa C; Hansen, Nora M; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2009-02-01

    The care of patients with breast cancer has become increasingly complex with advancements in diagnostic modalities, surgical approaches, and adjuvant treatments. A multidisciplinary approach to breast cancer care is essential to the successful integration of available therapies. This article addresses the key components of multidisciplinary breast cancer care, with a special emphasis on new and emerging approaches over the past 10 years in the fields of diagnostics, surgery, radiation, medical oncology, and plastic surgery. PMID:19186235

  7. Working

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A new special section in the New York Times, Working, features articles on the American worker. For example, the current issue contains stories on the contrast between the recent trend in layoffs and employers's complaints that they are unable to fill job openings; what is "retaining and motivating...the American worker"; and the shortage of qualified legal talent. The site also offers a great deal of career and job advice such as an article on non-traditional jobs, job forecasts, and office design. Interviews include an audio piece with Robert B. Reich, the former US Secretary of Labor. And of course, what would a newspaper section on work be without a link to the Dilbert comic strip?

  8. Fluid balance during team sports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. Burke

    1997-01-01

    Sweat losses during team sports are influenced by the intermittent nature of the work rates (high-intensity exercise interspersed with low-level activity and both formal and informal rest periods), and a high level of inter- and intra-individual variability in workloads. Since many team sports have evolved in countries with cool climates, traditions and rules governing the time of play, duration of

  9. Multidisciplinary Modeling in Detailed Design for MDO of Complex Product

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wu Baogui; Pei Yanli; Wang Lifei; Ju Hong; Nie Huamin; Wang Zhengzhuang; Li Zhaoxue

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of MDO will firstly face difficulties of multidisciplinary partition of the complex product. How to ensure consistency in multidisciplinary concurrent design is a puzzle too. Conflicts generated by concurrent running of multi-models must be coordinated. Aim at the problems mentioned above, multidisciplinary modeling technique for MDO of complex product is proposed and the master model-oriented, multidisciplinary concurrent modeling routine

  10. [Modern methods application of genotyping of infectious diseases pathogens in the context of operational work of specialized anti-epidemic team during the XXII Olympic Winter Games and XI Paralympic Winter Games].

    PubMed

    Kuzkin, B P; Kulichenko, A N; Volynkina, A S; Efremenko, D V; Kuznetsova, I V; Kotenev, E S; Lyamkin, G I; Kartsev, N N; Klindukhov, V P

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the experience of genotyping and sequencing technologies in laboratories of specialized anti-epidemic team (SAET) during the XXII Olympic Winter Games and XI Paralympic Winter Games of 2014 in Sochi. The work carried out during the pre-Olympic period on performance of readiness by SAET for these studies is analyzed. The results of genotyping strains of pathogens during the Olympic Games are presented. A conclusion about the effectiveness of the use of molecular genetic techniques in terms of SAET is made. PMID:26016355

  11. Decision-Making Authority, Team Efficiency and Human Worker Satisfaction in Mixed Human-Robot Teams

    E-print Network

    Reif, Rafael

    for the scheduling of work would achieve such a maximization, and conducted an experiment on human subjects to testDecision-Making Authority, Team Efficiency and Human Worker Satisfaction in Mixed Human-Robot Teams highly autonomous mobile robots into human teams. However, with this capability comes the issue of how

  12. The big five personality factors and team performance: implications for selecting successful product design teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan L. Kichuk; Willi H. Wiesner

    1997-01-01

    In the pursuit of faster product development, product design teams are a growing phenomenon in many organizations. In order to be successful, these teams must be composed of people who work well together. However, despite the benefit of selecting the optimal combination of team members, this topic has received little attention. Personality has been identified as a potentially helpful selection

  13. Teams organization and performance in multi-human\\/multi-robot teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Lewis; Huadong Wang; Shih-Yi Chien; Paul Scerri; Prasanna Velagapudi; Katia P. Sycara; Breelyn Kane

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a theory for human control of robot teams based on considering how control varies across different task allocations. Our current work focuses on domains such as foraging in which robots perform largely independent tasks. The present study addresses the interaction between automation and organization of human teams in controlling large robot teams performing an Urban Search and

  14. Team Task Analysis: Identifying Tasks and Jobs That Are Team Based

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winfred Arthur; Bryan D. Edwards; Suzanne T. Bell; Anton J. Villado; Winston Bennett

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents initial information on the development and validation of three team task analysis scales. These scales were designed to quantitatively assess the extent to which a group of tasks or a job is team based. During a 2-week period, 52 male students working in 4-person teams were trained to perform a complex highly interdependent computer-simulated combat mission consisting

  15. Team Knowledge Sharing Intervention Effects on Team Shared Mental Models and Student Performance in an Undergraduate Science Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorski, Eric G.; Johnson, Tristan E.; Ruscher, Paul H.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a shared mental model (SMM) based intervention on student team mental model similarity and ultimately team performance in an undergraduate meteorology course. The team knowledge sharing (TKS) intervention was designed to promote team reflection, communication, and improvement planning. Results reveal that the TKS intervention was partially effective in enhancing student team SMM and team scores on meteorology lab assignments. The TKS intervention has potential for use in science courses where a teaming approach is used. Similar interventions could likely be developed, empirically examined, and potentially employed to promote success in handling complex challenges while working in teams in the classroom and beyond.

  16. What influences patient decision-making in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis multidisciplinary care? A study of patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hogden, Anne; Greenfield, David; Nugus, Peter; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are required to make decisions concerning quality of life and symptom management over the course of their disease. Clinicians perceive that patients’ ability to engage in timely decision-making is extremely challenging. However, we lack patient perspectives on this issue. This study aimed to explore patient experiences of ALS, and to identify factors influencing their decision-making in the specialized multidisciplinary care of ALS. Methods An exploratory study was conducted. Fourteen patients from two specialized ALS multidisciplinary clinics participated in semistructured interviews that were audio recorded and transcribed. Data were analyzed for emergent themes. Results Decision-making was influenced by three levels of factors, ie, structural, interactional, and personal. The structural factor was the decision-making environment of specialized multidisciplinary ALS clinics, which supported decision-making by providing patients with disease-specific information and specialized care planning. Interactional factors were the patient experiences of ALS, including patients’ reaction to the diagnosis, response to deterioration, and engagement with the multidisciplinary ALS team. Personal factors were patients’ personal philosophies, including their outlook on life, perceptions of control, and planning for the future. Patient approaches to decision-making reflected a focus on the present, rather than anticipating future progression of the disease and potential care needs. Conclusion Decision-making for symptom management and quality of life in ALS care is enhanced when the patient’s personal philosophy is supported by collaborative relationships between the patient and the multidisciplinary ALS team. Patients valued the support provided by the multidisciplinary team; however, their focus on living in the present diverged from the efforts of health professionals to prepare patients and their carers for the future. The challenge facing health professionals is how best to engage each patient in decision-making for their future needs, to bridge this gap. PMID:23226006

  17. Implementing Cooperative Learning in a Team-Teaching Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Linda A.; Tai, Lawrence S.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a graduate course based on a cooperative learning strategy involving structured group interaction. The authors team-taught a semester-long course in which student groups worked on a consulting project requiring interaction between three distinct teams--the student group, a faculty team, and a team of field…

  18. Making organisations virtual: the hidden cost of distributed teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karin Breu; Christopher J Hemingway

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports an exploratory case study that used boundary theory to investigate the impact of organisational virtualisation on work units. Specifically, the research analysed the transition in a public sector organisation from permanent, co-located teams to temporary virtual teams and its impact on team boundary properties and activities. The study contributes to existing knowledge of virtual teams and virtualisation

  19. Shoestring Budgets, Band-Aids, and Team Work: Challenges and Motivators in the Development of a Web-Based Resource for Undergraduate Clinical Skills Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Collan; Nyhof-Young, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Background Learning how to conduct a medical interview and perform a physical examination is fundamental to the practice of medicine; however, when this project began, the methods used to teach these skills to medical students at the University of Toronto (U of T) had not changed significantly since the early 1990s despite increasing outpatient care, shorter hospital stays, and heavy preceptor workloads. In response, a Web-based clinical skills resource was developed for the first-year undergraduate medical course—The Art and Science of Clinical Medicine I (ASCM I). Objectives This paper examines our experiences with the development of the ASCM I website and details the challenges and motivators inherent in the production of a Web-based, multimedia medical education tool at a large Canadian medical school. Methods Interviews and a focus group were conducted with the development team to discover the factors that positively and negatively affected the development process. Results Motivating factors included team attributes such as strong leadership and judicious use of medical students and faculty volunteers as developers. Other motivators included a growing lack of instructional equivalency across diverse clinical teaching sites and financial and resource support by the Faculty of Medicine. Barriers to development included an administrative environment that did not yet fully incorporate information technology into its teaching vision and framework, a lack of academic incentive for faculty participation, and inadequate technical support, space, and equipment. Conclusions The success of electronic educational resources such as the ASCM I website has caused a significant cultural shift within the Faculty of Medicine, resulting in the provision of more space, resources, and support for IT endeavours in the undergraduate medical curriculum. PMID:15914461

  20. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Team Science and Collaboration Practitioner. Consulting and advising for developing teams and institutions interested in participating in and supporting team science. Experience with bringing diverse groups together from various backgrounds and institutions to solve challenging scientific problems.

  1. Baseball Team 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    This thesis examines two mediums of nonverbal communication, food and clothing, in the works of four women writers from diverse cultural backgrounds. Four novels are discussed: Their Eyes Were Watching God (Zora Neale ...

  2. Successful Strategies for Teams Team Member Handbook

    E-print Network

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    , 2001. In 2006, Fortune Magazine devoted an entire issue to teams June 12, 2006. It is clear from you can do to increase your valueregardless of your level of authority. Useem, Fortune 2006 #12 LEARN TO TEAM? FACTS: 81% of Fortune 500 companies are building at least partially team- based

  3. Texas Stream Team Texas Stream Team Mission

    E-print Network

    Texas Stream Team #12;#12;Texas Stream Team Mission Expand understanding and awareness of water quality and nonpoint source pollution issues across Texas #12;Texas Stream Team Strategy Education, data- Texas Watch Begins I #12;Background 1991-1998 TWC/TNRCC Program Program: Data Collection, Water Quality

  4. Multidisciplinary unmanned technology teammate (MUTT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunovic, Nenad; Schneider, Anne; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Del Giorno, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) held an autonomous robot competition called CANINE in June 2012. The goal of the competition was to develop innovative and natural control methods for robots. This paper describes the winning technology, including the vision system, the operator interaction, and the autonomous mobility. The rules stated only gestures or voice commands could be used for control. The robots would learn a new object at the start of each phase, find the object after it was thrown into a field, and return the object to the operator. Each of the six phases became more difficult, including clutter of the same color or shape as the object, moving and stationary obstacles, and finding the operator who moved from the starting location to a new location. The Robotic Research Team integrated techniques in computer vision, speech recognition, object manipulation, and autonomous navigation. A multi-filter computer vision solution reliably detected the objects while rejecting objects of similar color or shape, even while the robot was in motion. A speech-based interface with short commands provided close to natural communication of complicated commands from the operator to the robot. An innovative gripper design allowed for efficient object pickup. A robust autonomous mobility and navigation solution for ground robotic platforms provided fast and reliable obstacle avoidance and course navigation. The research approach focused on winning the competition while remaining cognizant and relevant to real world applications.

  5. The Special Education Referral and Decision-Making Process for English Language Learners: Child Study Team Meetings and Placement Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Janette K.; Harry, Beth

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the special education referral and decision-making process for English language learners (ELLs), with a focus on Child Study Team (CST) meetings and placement conferences/multidisciplinary team meetings. We wished to learn how school personnel determined if ELLs who were struggling had disabilities, to what…

  6. Multidisciplinary Approach to Linear Aerospike Nozzle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korte, J. J.; Salas, A. O.; Dunn, H. J.; Alexandrov, N. M.; Follett, W. W.; Orient, G. E.; Hadid, A. H.

    1997-01-01

    A model of a linear aerospike rocket nozzle that consists of coupled aerodynamic and structural analyses has been developed. A nonlinear computational fluid dynamics code is used to calculate the aerodynamic thrust, and a three-dimensional fink-element model is used to determine the structural response and weight. The model will be used to demonstrate multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) capabilities for relevant engine concepts, assess performance of various MDO approaches, and provide a guide for future application development. In this study, the MDO problem is formulated using the multidisciplinary feasible (MDF) strategy. The results for the MDF formulation are presented with comparisons against sequential aerodynamic and structural optimized designs. Significant improvements are demonstrated by using a multidisciplinary approach in comparison with the single- discipline design strategy.

  7. Emerging multidisciplinary research across database management systems

    E-print Network

    Nica, Anisoara; Varde, Aparna

    2011-01-01

    The database community is exploring more and more multidisciplinary avenues: Data semantics overlaps with ontology management; reasoning tasks venture into the domain of artificial intelligence; and data stream management and information retrieval shake hands, e.g., when processing Web click-streams. These new research avenues become evident, for example, in the topics that doctoral students choose for their dissertations. This paper surveys the emerging multidisciplinary research by doctoral students in database systems and related areas. It is based on the PIKM 2010, which is the 3rd Ph.D. workshop at the International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management (CIKM). The topics addressed include ontology development, data streams, natural language processing, medical databases, green energy, cloud computing, and exploratory search. In addition to core ideas from the workshop, we list some open research questions in these multidisciplinary areas.

  8. Theoretical Description of Teaching-Learning Processes: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordogna, Clelia M.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2001-09-01

    A multidisciplinary approach based on concepts from sociology, educational psychology, statistical physics, and computational science is developed for the theoretical description of teaching-learning processes that take place in the classroom. The emerging model is consistent with well-established empirical results, such as the higher achievements reached working in collaborative groups and the influence of the structure of the group on the achievements of the individuals. Furthermore, another social learning process that takes place in massive interactions among individuals via the Internet is also investigated.

  9. Theoretical description of teaching-learning processes: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Bordogna, C M; Albano, E V

    2001-09-10

    A multidisciplinary approach based on concepts from sociology, educational psychology, statistical physics, and computational science is developed for the theoretical description of teaching-learning processes that take place in the classroom. The emerging model is consistent with well-established empirical results, such as the higher achievements reached working in collaborative groups and the influence of the structure of the group on the achievements of the individuals. Furthermore, another social learning process that takes place in massive interactions among individuals via the Internet is also investigated. PMID:11531550

  10. Team learning center design principles

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, B.; Loveland, J.; Whatley, A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    This is a preliminary report of a multi-year collaboration of the authors addressing the subject: Can a facility be designed for team learning and would it improve the efficiency and effectiveness of team interactions? Team learning in this context is a broad definition that covers all activities where small to large groups of people come together to work, to learn, and to share through team activities. Multimedia, networking, such as World Wide Web and other tools, are greatly enhancing the capability of individual learning. This paper addresses the application of technology and design to facilitate group or team learning. Many organizational meetings need tens of people to come together to do work as a large group and then divide into smaller subgroups of five to ten to work and then to return and report and interact with the larger group. Current facilities were not, in general, designed for this type of meeting. Problems with current facilities are defined and a preliminary design solution to many of the identified problems is presented.

  11. Sports Teams Extend Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

  12. Using Assessment for Developing Team Building Skills

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Akins, Lean M.

    "Ability to function in teams," "good team building skills," and "teamwork" are all now common phrases in the classifieds. It is increasingly important in society today, both in social and work environments, to be a good team player. But how do we actually develop those skills and evaluate whether our efforts have had a measurable impact so that we can adjust our approach for maximum benefit? This booklet presents a team assessment process developed to track and improve students team building skill as well as a complete description of its implementation. Preliminary research on team building skills development was performed with a group of community college students in the Electrical Technology Program. The results from the two year study indicate that active participation in the team assessment process is beneficial in developing team building and leadership skills in college students. All the materials necessary to implement the team assessment process for a classroom or workplace setting are provided in this booklet. Using these materials and methods can yield evidence of improved team building and leadership skills important in meeting accreditation standards or for use in evaluating corporate team skills and leadership development.

  13. Team task analysis: identifying tasks and jobs that are team based.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Winfred; Edwards, Bryan D; Bell, Suzanne T; Villado, Anton J; Bennett, Winston

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents initial information on the development and validation of three team task analysis scales. These scales were designed to quantitatively assess the extent to which a group of tasks or a job is team based. During a 2-week period, 52 male students working in 4-person teams were trained to perform a complex highly interdependent computer-simulated combat mission consisting of both individual- and team-based tasks. Our results indicated that the scales demonstrated high levels of interrater agreement. In addition, the scales differentiated between tasks that were predetermined to be individual versus team based. Finally, the results indicated that job-level ratings of team workflow were more strongly related to team performance than were aggregated task-level ratings of team-relatedness or team workflow. These results suggest that the scales presented here are an effective means of quantifying the extent to which tasks or jobs are team based. A research and practical implication of our findings is that the team task analysis scales could serve as criterion measures in the evaluation of team training interventions or predictors of team performance. PMID:16435704

  14. Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

  15. Development of a Multi-Disciplinary Aerothermostructural Model Applicable to Hypersonic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostyk, Chris; Risch, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The harsh and complex hypersonic flight environment has driven design and analysis improvements for many years. One of the defining characteristics of hypersonic flight is the coupled, multi-disciplinary nature of the dominant physics. In an effect to examine some of the multi-disciplinary problems associated with hypersonic flight engineers at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center developed a non-linear 6 degrees-of-freedom, full vehicle simulation that includes the necessary model capabilities: aerothermal heating, ablation, and thermal stress solutions. Development of the tool and results for some investigations will be presented. Requirements and improvements for future work will also be reviewed. The results of the work emphasize the need for a coupled, multi-disciplinary analysis to provide accurate

  16. The Role of an Integrated Multidisciplinary Clinic in the Management of Patients with Cutaneous Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kelly H.; Haverkos, Bradley M.; Hastings, Justin; Hu, Eileen; Philips, Ramez; Gru, Alejandro A.; Welliver, Meng Xu; Mishra, Anjali; Wong, Henry K.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    The clinical benefit of a multidisciplinary clinic practice model has been well described in a variety of medical specialties and cancer types. It proves particularly valuable when an integrated team is needed to optimally manage patients with rare or complex neoplasms. However, the ideal implementation of an integrated multidisciplinary care program for translational research and education has not been well reported. Herein, we propose how a multimodality cutaneous lymphoma (CL) clinic model can optimally manage CL patients. We offer our perspective on this model as an efficient means for delivering patient care, a continuing education resource for referring physicians, a conduit for translational and clinical research, and an educational tool for medical students, house staff, and fellows. PMID:26137450

  17. Rotor design optimization using a multidisciplinary approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. K. Straub; C. B. Callahan; J. D. Culp

    1992-01-01

    A multidisciplinary optimization tool for helicopter rotor blade design has been developed. It uses a comprehensive analysis program, CAMRAD\\/JA, capable of performing analyses in all involved disciplines in a consistent and efficient manner, together with CONMIN's method of feasible directions. Design variables, constraints, and objective functions have been chosen to address actual design requirements in a realistic manner. The optimization

  18. Education in Pharmacoeconomics: An International Multidisciplinary View

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen L. Rascati; Michael F. Drummond; Lieven Annemans; Peter G. Davey

    2004-01-01

    There is a global need for more training in pharmacoeconomics. Pharmacoeconomics is a relatively new discipline that draws from other more established disciplines; hence, multidisciplinary collaboration is recommended. Descriptions of opportunities for pharmacoeconomics education can be found in the literature and on websites, but research on the trends in pharmacoeconomics education is largely limited to training in US pharmacy schools.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1076 - Qualifications of dive team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Qualifications of dive team. 1926.1076 Section 1926.1076 Labor... § 1926.1076 Qualifications of dive team. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to...

  20. Developing Trust in Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Marie-Line

    2011-01-01

    Rapid globalization, advances in technology, flatter organizational structures, synergistic cooperation among firms, and a shift to knowledge work environments have led to the increasing use of virtual teams in organizations. Selecting, training, and socializing employees in virtual teamwork has therefore become an important human resource…

  1. “I Fired My Last Doctor for Not Taking Me Seriously”: Collaborating With a Difficult Medical Patient in a Multidisciplinary Primary Care Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jared Lyon Skillings; William J. Murdoch; John H. Porcerelli

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a multidisciplinary primary care assessment of a 32-year-old woman with multiple medical and psychological complaints. Following the collaborative care model, this assessment was conducted by a team consisting of a clinical health psychologist, Dr. J. L. Skillings, and a family physician, Dr. W. J. Murdoch. We describe the primary care environment in which this referral

  2. Multidisciplinary care in the oncology setting: historical perspective and data from lung and gynecology multidisciplinary clinics.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Laura Elise; Yordan, Edgardo; Malhotra, Deepak; Leyva, Ileana; Bortel, Katy; Schalk, Denise; Mellinger, Patricia; Huml, Marianne; Kesslering, Christy; Huml, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    Multidisciplinary care refers to a practice in which physicians from multiple specialties attend to the same patient population. There are many advantages to the model, including reduced time to treatment, coordinated treatment plans, increased patient and physician satisfaction, and increased enrollment onto clinical trials. At Central Dupage Hospital, multidisciplinary clinics have been instituted in lung and gynecologic cancer. We describe the structure and operation of each clinic and highlight their considerable success in improving patient care. PMID:21358946

  3. Multidisciplinary Care in the Oncology Setting: Historical Perspective and Data From Lung and Gynecology Multidisciplinary Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Laura Elise; Yordan, Edgardo; Malhotra, Deepak; Leyva, Ileana; Bortel, Katy; Schalk, Denise; Mellinger, Patricia; Huml, Marianne; Kesslering, Christy; Huml, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Multidisciplinary care refers to a practice in which physicians from multiple specialties attend to the same patient population. There are many advantages to the model, including reduced time to treatment, coordinated treatment plans, increased patient and physician satisfaction, and increased enrollment onto clinical trials. At Central Dupage Hospital, multidisciplinary clinics have been instituted in lung and gynecologic cancer. We describe the structure and operation of each clinic and highlight their considerable success in improving patient care. PMID:21358946

  4. Time Series Trends in Corporate Team Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Simon; Lesperance, Mary Ann

    1994-01-01

    In two studies, the Team Development Indicator was repeatedly administered to intact work groups participating in intensive 48-hour residential corporate adventure training (CAT) and various follow-up procedures. CAT significantly improved team behaviors in all training groups, but improvements were maintained or increased only in groups that…

  5. Towards Notifications for Mobile Response Teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Tarasewich; Christopher S. Campbell

    2004-01-01

    Mobile response teams, such as firefighters and combat personnel, encounter fast-paced, information- intensive situations with high rates of contextual shift. These situations require precise communication and coordination of actions between team members. This paper reviews our work to date concerning context modeling and the design and testing of pixel- based visual notification cues. We then present current research involving the

  6. Enhancing Mathematical Communication for Virtual Math Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl, Gerry; Çakir, Murat Perit; Weimar, Stephen; Weusijana, Baba Kofi; Ou, Jimmy Xiantong

    2010-01-01

    The Math Forum is an online resource center for pre-algebra, algebra, geometry and pre-calculus. Its Virtual Math Teams (VMT) service provides an integrated web-based environment for small teams of people to discuss math and to work collaboratively on math problems or explore interesting mathematical micro-worlds together. The VMT Project studies…

  7. Coordination in large-scale software teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Begel; Nachiappan Nagappan; Christopher Poile; Lucas Layman

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale software development requires coordination within and between very large engineering teams which may be located in different buildings, on different company campuses, and in different time zones. From a survey answered by 775 Microsoft software engineers, we learned how work was coordinated within and between teams and how engineers felt about their success at these tasks. The respondents revealed

  8. Manu Kurutao Programme Mori Development Team

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    .nz/labs/aerodynamics.shtml · Augmented Reality ­ www.hitlabnz.org/ index.php/research · Human Robot Interaction ­ www.hitlabnz. orgManu Kurutao Programme Mori Development Team Kimihia. 2013MORI #12;Contents 3 Manu Kurutao 4 participating in the Manu Kurutao programme to work as a team to combine their efforts, strengths and talents

  9. Globally Distributed Engineering Teams in Computational Fluid Dynamics and in Product Development 

    E-print Network

    Schmidt, Susanne R.

    2010-10-12

    Globally distributed engineering teams are a reality in globally operating companies. However, research on teams is often done by psychologists, with a focus on general team building and working processes, and seldom on ...

  10. Weaving a semantic grid for multidisciplinary collaborative design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Y. Zhang; J. W. Yin

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary attempt at weaving a Semantic Grid for multidisciplinary collaborative design over the internet. An ontology-based service-oriented modelling approach is proposed for distributed management of multidisciplinary design knowledge, through which, various Grid services for distributed applications are annotated with domain resource ontology to facilitate their autonomous deployment, reuse and federation in multidisciplinary collaborative design in a

  11. Developing high-performance cross-functional teams: Understanding motivations, functional loyalties, and teaming fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    Teamwork is the key to the future of effective technology management. Today`s technologies and markets have become too complex for individuals to work alone. Global competition, limited resources, cost consciousness, and time pressures have forced organizations and project managers to encourage teamwork. Many of these teams will be cross-functional teams that can draw on a multitude of talents and knowledge. To develop high-performing cross-functional teams, managers must understand motivations, functional loyalties, and the different backgrounds of the individual team members. To develop a better understanding of these issues, managers can learn from experience and from literature on teams and teaming concepts. When studying the literature to learn about cross-functional teaming, managers will find many good theoretical concepts, but when put into practice, these concepts have varying effects. This issue of varying effectiveness is what drives the research for this paper. The teaming concepts were studied to confirm or modify current understanding. The literature was compared with a {open_quotes}ground truth{close_quotes}, a survey of the reality of teaming practices, to examine the teaming concepts that the literature finds to be critical to the success of teams. These results are compared to existing teams to determine if such techniques apply in real-world cases.

  12. Attributes of top elite team-handball players.

    PubMed

    Massuça, Luís M; Fragoso, Isabel; Teles, Júlia

    2014-01-01

    Researchers in the field of excellence in sport performance are becoming increasingly focused on the study of sport-specific characteristics and requirements. In accordance with this, the purposes of this study were (a) to examine the morphologic-, fitness-, handball-specific skills and psychological and "biosocial" differences between top elite and nontop elite team-handball players and (b) to investigate the extent to which they may be used to identify top elite team-handball players. One hundred sixty-seven adult male team-handball players were studied and divided in 2 groups: top elite (n = 41) and nontop elite (n = 126). Twenty-eight morphologic-, 9 fitness-, 1 handball-specific skills and 2 psychological-based and 2 "biosocial"-based attributes were used. Top elite and nontop elite groups were compared for each variable of interest using Student's t-test, and 5 logistic regression analyses were performed with the athlete's performance group (top elite or nontop elite) as the dependent variable and the variables of each category as predictors. The results showed that (a) body mass, waist girth, radiale-dactylion length, midstylion-dactylion length, and absolute muscle mass (morphologic model); (b) 30-m sprint time, countermovement jump height and average power, abdominal strength and the class of performance in the Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance Test (fitness model); (c) offensive power (specific-skills model); (d) ego-based motivational orientation (psychological model); (e) socioeconomic status and the energy spent (for week) in handball activity (biosocial model); significantly (p < 0.05) contributed to predict the probability of an athlete to be a top elite team-handball player. Moreover, the fitness model exhibited higher percentages of correct classification (i.e., 91.5%) than all the other models did. This study provided (a) the rational to reduce the battery of tests for evaluation purposes, and (b) the initial step to work on building a multidisciplinary model to predict the probability of a handball athlete to be a top elite player. PMID:23591948

  13. The big five personality traits and individual satisfaction with the team

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miranda A. G. Peeters; Christel G. Rutte; Tuijl van Harrie F. J. M; Isabelle M. M. J. Reymen

    2006-01-01

    Relationships between team composition in terms of team members' Big Five personality traits and individual satisfaction with the team after project completion were researched. Questionnaires were filled out by 310 undergraduate students (N= 68 teams) working on an engineering design assignment. Individual satisfaction with the team was regressed onto individual, dissimilarity, and interaction scores. A positive main effect was found

  14. The Impact of Managerial Coaching on Learning Outcomes within the Team Context: An Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Marcia; Aguilar, Mariya Gavrilova

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between coaching expertise, project difficulty, and team empowerment on team learning outcomes within the context of a high-performance work team. Variables were tested using multiple regression analysis. The data were analyzed for two groups--team leaders and team members--using t-tests, factor analysis,…

  15. The Engineering Team Todd Allen (Team Leader)

    E-print Network

    Wood, Stephen L.

    The Engineering Team Todd Allen (Team Leader) tallen@fit.edu Major: Ocean Engineering Speciality: Naval Architecture Sean Kuhn skuhn@fit.edu Major: Ocean Engineering Speciality: Naval Architecture Joseph Caldwell jcaldwel@fit.edu Major: Ocean Engineering Speciality: Underwater Technologies Seth Noyes

  16. What Is Team Science? - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Team science is a collaborative effort to address a scientific challenge that leverages the strengths and expertise of professionals trained in different fields. Although traditional single-investigator driven approaches are ideal for many scientific endeavors, coordinated teams of investigators with diverse skills and knowledge may be especially helpful for studies of complex social problems with multiple causes.

  17. Design and Parametric Sizing of Deep Space Habitats Supporting NASA'S Human Space Flight Architecture Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toups, Larry; Simon, Matthew; Smitherman, David; Spexarth, Gary

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Human Space Flight Architecture Team (HAT) is a multi-disciplinary, cross-agency study team that conducts strategic analysis of integrated development approaches for human and robotic space exploration architectures. During each analysis cycle, HAT iterates and refines the definition of design reference missions (DRMs), which inform the definition of a set of integrated capabilities required to explore multiple destinations. An important capability identified in this capability-driven approach is habitation, which is necessary for crewmembers to live and work effectively during long duration transits to and operations at exploration destinations beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). This capability is captured by an element referred to as the Deep Space Habitat (DSH), which provides all equipment and resources for the functions required to support crew safety, health, and work including: life support, food preparation, waste management, sleep quarters, and housekeeping.The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the DSH capable of supporting crew during exploration missions. First, the paper describes the functionality required in a DSH to support the HAT defined exploration missions, the parameters affecting its design, and the assumptions used in the sizing of the habitat. Then, the process used for arriving at parametric sizing estimates to support additional HAT analyses is detailed. Finally, results from the HAT Cycle C DSH sizing are presented followed by a brief description of the remaining design trades and technological advancements necessary to enable the exploration habitation capability.

  18. Multidisciplinary Approach to Hepatic Metastases of Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Manatakis, Dimitrios K.; Delis, Spiridon G.; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Dervenis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Hemangiopericytoma is a rare primary tumor originating from Zimmerman's pericytes, with significant metastatic potential. Hepatic metastatic disease requires an aggressive approach by a multidisciplinary team of dedicated oncology specialists, to prolong survival in selected patients. We report on a patient with recurrent hepatic metastases of grade II intracranial hemangiopericytoma 5 years after initial treatment, managed by a stepwise combination of liver resection, radiofrequency ablation, and transarterial embolization. Although metastatic disease implies hematogenous dissemination, long-term survival after liver resection has been reported and major hepatectomies are justified in patients with adequate local control. Liver resections combined with transarterial embolization are highly recommended, due to hypervascularity of the tumor.

  19. Introducing an innovative, multidisciplinary concept of care - communication problems and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Christian D; Schott, Claus; Verveur, Doris; Pöschl, Johannes; Knaup, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Introducing an innovative, multidisciplinary concept of care means the change of existing structures both in work and communication flows which often involves problems. In this paper we describe exemplary the communication problems which arose during the introduction of the multidisciplinary concept of Family-Centred, Individualized Developmental Care of Premature Infants and Newborns at the Children's Hospital Heidelberg. We suggest workflow adaptations to achieve timeliness of information and present ideas to prevent communication problems e.g. caused by inadequate knowledge of staff. We used interviews, analyzed video-recordings and modified the Communication Observation Method [7] to analyze the present state of communication flows and structures. PMID:17917197

  20. A Semantic and Multidisciplinary Model for Professional and Social Networks Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christophe Thovex; Francky Trichet

    2011-01-01

    By bridge-building between the classical models of social networks analysis, ontologies engineering and physics, our work defines a multidisciplinary model of professional social networks analysis, dedicated to human and social capital management in enterprises and institutions. We introduce a semantic process of social graphs static and dynamic analysis, based on the enterprise content and producing decisional tools for the performance

  1. Integrating Real-World Experience in to a College Curriculum Using a Multidisciplinary Design Minor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jessica Brakora; Brian Gilchrist; James Holloway; Nilton Renno; Steven Skerlos; Toby Teory; Peter Washabaugh; Daryl Weinert

    2009-01-01

    The real world offers tremendous challenges and numerous opportunities for our engineering students after they complete their formal undergraduate education. Many of these challenges are intrinsically multidisciplinary and require work across the boundaries of traditional educational programs. Too often engineering programs fail to mirror this reality, but instead stovepipe student experiences along disciplinary boundaries (often excluding non-engineers entirely) and fail

  2. The Campus Lake Learning Community: Promoting a Multidisciplinary Approach to Environmental Problem Solving

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dorothy Jenkins

    2005-03-01

    A multidisciplinary learning community provided environmental management students the opportunity to work with students in different classes and majors to create designs for improving the appearance and environmental quality of a lake on a university campus. The experience increased student appreciation for the contribution of other disciplines in solving real-world problems.

  3. Integrated multidisciplinary design optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis for geometrically complex aeroelastic configurations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Charles Newman III

    1997-01-01

    The first two steps in the development of an integrated multidisciplinary design optimization procedure capable of analyzing the nonlinear fluid flow about geometrically complex aeroelastic configurations have been accomplished in the present work. For the first step, a three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed. The advantage of unstructured grids, when compared

  4. Best Practices in the Multidisciplinary Assessment of Emotional Disturbances: A Primer for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, Heidi L.; Levinson, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Emotional and behavioral difficulties often interfere with children's acquisition of academic, career, and social skills. Counselors assume an important role in the mandated multidisciplinary evaluation of children with emotional disturbance (ED), but the field lacks a standard battery of assessment procedures for working with children who have…

  5. Issues on Nonlinear Programming for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) in Ship Design Framework

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emilio F. Campana; Giovanni Fasano; Daniele Peri

    This work is concerned with the study and the evaluation of formulations for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) problems. The latter topic includes very dicult computational aspects, naturally arising from the simultaneous solution of several related optimization problems. In particular, in the naval applications deep interaction among dierent disciplines (i.e. optimization\\/feasibility problems) is claimed, in order to provide the solution. Each

  6. Barriers and facilitators to implement shared decision making in multidisciplinary sciatica care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Dutch multidisciplinary sciatica guideline recommends that the team of professionals involved in sciatica care and the patient together decide on surgical or prolonged conservative treatment (shared decision making [SDM]). Despite this recommendation, SDM is not yet integrated in sciatica care. Existing literature concerning barriers and facilitators to SDM implementation mainly focuses on one discipline only, whereas multidisciplinary care may involve other barriers and facilitators, or make these more complex for both professionals and patients. Therefore, this qualitative study aims to identify barriers and facilitators perceived by patients and professionals for SDM implementation in multidisciplinary sciatica care. Methods We conducted 40 semi-structured interviews with professionals involved in sciatica care (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, and orthopedic surgeons) and three focus groups among patients (six to eight per group). The interviews and focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed in full. Reported barriers and facilitators were classified according to the framework of Grol and Wensing. The software package Atlas.ti 7.0 was used for analysis. Results Professionals reported 53 barriers and 5 facilitators, and patients 35 barriers and 18 facilitators for SDM in sciatica care. Professionals perceived most barriers at the level of the organizational context, and facilitators at the level of the individual professional. Patients reported most barriers and facilitators at the level of the individual professional. Several barriers and facilitators correspond with barriers and facilitators found in the literature (e.g., lack of time, motivation) but also new barriers and facilitators were identified. Many of these new barriers mentioned by both professionals and patients were related to the multidisciplinary setting, such as lack of visibility, lack of trust in expertise of other disciplines, and lack of communication between disciplines. Conclusions This study identified barriers and facilitators for SDM in the multidisciplinary sciatica setting, by both professionals and patients. It is clear that more barriers than facilitators are perceived for implementation of SDM in sciatica care. Newly identified barriers and facilitators are related to the multidisciplinary care setting. Therefore, an effective implementation strategy of SDM in a multidisciplinary setting such as in sciatica care should focus on these barriers and facilitators. PMID:23968140

  7. Concurrent Mission and Systems Design at NASA Glenn Research Center: The Origins of the COMPASS Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Oleson, Steven R.; Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Established at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in 2006 to meet the need for rapid mission analysis and multi-disciplinary systems design for in-space and human missions, the Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team is a multidisciplinary, concurrent engineering group whose primary purpose is to perform integrated systems analysis, but it is also capable of designing any system that involves one or more of the disciplines present in the team. The authors were involved in the development of the COMPASS team and its design process, and are continuously making refinements and enhancements. The team was unofficially started in the early 2000s as part of the distributed team known as Team JIMO (Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter) in support of the multi-center collaborative JIMO spacecraft design during Project Prometheus. This paper documents the origins of a concurrent mission and systems design team at GRC and how it evolved into the COMPASS team, including defining the process, gathering the team and tools, building the facility, and performing studies.

  8. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us chantal savelsbergh Edit resource Area of Expertise: team and group process, communication

  9. Health Care Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NKF Newsroom Contact Us You are here Home » Health Care Team Good health care is always a team effort - especially for people ... chronic kidney failure. Since each member of the health care staff contributes to your care, it is important ...

  10. Your Dialysis Care Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact Us You are here Home » Your Dialysis Care Team Good health care is always a team ... your family improve your quality of life. Patient Care Technician and Biomedical Technician There are two kinds ...

  11. Multidisciplinary one-stage risk-reducing gynaecological and breast surgery with immediate reconstruction in BRCA-gene carrier women.

    PubMed

    Khadim, M F; Eastwood, P; Price, J; Morrison, P; Khan, K

    2013-12-01

    Familial breast cancer accounts for 5-10% of all breast cancers. Due to BRCA1/2 tumour suppressor gene mutation, hereditary breast and ovarian syndrome is the most common form. Risk-reducing gynaecological and breast surgery is offered to such patients in ever-increasing numbers. Hence, the development of a multi-specialty combined treatment approach is called for. Twenty-two BRCA gene-mutation carrier women underwent one-stage gynaecological and breast risk-reducing surgery and immediate reconstruction between January 2005 and December 2011 at the Belfast City Hospital. Their mean age was 41.2 years (median 41 years). Nearly half of the patients were BRCA2 and a quarter were BRCA1 carriers. The rest were positive for both genes. Hormone-replacement therapy was initiated in 14 women. Average theatre time and stay in the hospital were three hours and two and a half days, respectively. Two patients developed complications unrelated to combining the procedures. Both were treated conservatively and recovered. The one-stage approach logically proves economical by limiting the time the patients are in the hospital and away from work. We describe our multidisciplinary team service that is offering safe and economical one-stage risk-reducing surgery and reconstruction to young BRCA gene-mutation carrier women in Northern Ireland. PMID:24113619

  12. Recent advances in multidisciplinary management of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Asmaa I; Waked, Imam

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is increasing, and it is currently the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Potentially curative treatment options for HCC include resection, transplantation, and percutaneous ablation, whereas palliative treatments include trans-arterial chemoembolization (TACE), radioembolization, and systemic treatments. Due to the diversity of available treatment options and patients’ presentations, a multidisciplinary team should decide clinical management of HCC, according to tumor characteristics and stage of liver disease. Potentially curative treatments are suitable for very-early- and early-stage HCC. However, the vast majority of HCC patients are diagnosed in later stages, where the tumor characteristics or progress of liver disease prevent curative interventions. For patients with intermediate-stage HCC, TACE and radioembolization improve survival and are being evaluated in addition to potentially curative therapies or with systemic targeted therapy. There is currently no effective systemic chemotherapy, immunologic, or hormonal therapy for HCC, and sorafenib is the only approved molecular-targeted treatment for advanced HCC. Other targeted agents are under investigation; trials comparing new agents in combination with sorafenib are ongoing. Combinations of systemic targeted therapies with local treatments are being evaluated for further improvements in HCC patient outcomes. This article provides an updated and comprehensive overview of the current standards and trends in the treatment of HCC. PMID:25866604

  13. Advances in multidisciplinary treatment of rectal cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Changlin Zhao; Hongqin Sun; Yang Yang; Huimian Xu

    2009-01-01

    To summarize the advances in the multidisciplinary treatment of rectal cancer and to analyze the existing problems and development\\u000a prospects. The full text database retrieval system of MEDLINE and the periodicals of CHKD were searched. The words “rectal\\u000a cancer, diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, targeted therapy, analysis” were used as key words for retrieval of\\u000a literature concerning the values and clinical

  14. Integrated multidisciplinary analysis tool IMAT users' guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Frances T. (editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Integrated Multidisciplinary Analysis Tool (IMAT) is a computer software system developed at Langley Research Center. IMAT provides researchers and analysts with an efficient capability to analyze satellite controls systems influenced by structural dynamics. Using a menu-driven executive system, IMAT leads the user through the program options. IMAT links a relational database manager to commercial and in-house structural and controls analysis codes. This paper describes the IMAT software system and how to use it.

  15. Multifidelity, multidisciplinary optimization of turbomachines with shock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joly, Michael Marie

    Research on high-speed air-breathing propulsion aims at developing aircraft with antipodal range and space access. Before reaching high speed at high altitude, the flight vehicle needs to accelerate from takeoff to scramjet takeover. Air turbo rocket engines combine turbojet and rocket engine cycles to provide the necessary thrust in the so-called low-speed regime. Challenges related to turbomachinery components are multidisciplinary, since both the high compression ratio compressor and the powering high-pressure turbine operate in the transonic regime in compact environments with strong shock interactions. Besides, lightweight is vital to avoid hindering the scramjet operation. Recent progress in evolutionary computing provides aerospace engineers with robust and efficient optimization algorithms to address concurrent objectives. The present work investigates Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) of innovative transonic turbomachinery components. Inter-stage aerodynamic shock interaction in turbomachines are known to generate high-cycle fatigue on the rotor blades compromising their structural integrity. A soft-computing strategy is proposed to mitigate the vane downstream distortion, and shown to successfully attenuate the unsteady forcing on the rotor of a high-pressure turbine. Counter-rotation offers promising prospects to reduce the weight of the machine, with fewer stages and increased load per row. An integrated approach based on increasing level of fidelity and aero-structural coupling is then presented and allows achieving a highly loaded compact counter-rotating compressor.

  16. Blog - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    The Science of Team Science community has had a robust discussion about the importance of teamwork in team science.1,2 Organizations research has helped and can continue to help inform this discussion. It is a source of important insights to help understand and enhance teamwork in team science.

  17. Your Health Care Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Your Health Care Team You You are the most important member of your health care team. After all, you are the one who ... are the first to notice any problems. Your health care team depends on you to talk to them ...

  18. Contact - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    The Team Science Toolkit was developed, and is maintained, by the Science of Team Science (SciTS) team at the National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, Behavioral Research Program. To contact us, please email Dr. Kara L.

  19. Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award (CCITLA)

    Cancer.gov

    NCI’s Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Awards (CCITLAs) recognize mid-career clinical investigators at NCI-designated Cancer Centers working to improve the lives of people with cancer through clinical trials.

  20. Multidisciplinary tailoring of hot composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is described for multidisciplinary analysis and tailoring of layered multi-material hot composite engine structural components subjected to simultaneous multiple discipline-specific thermal, structural, vibration, and acoustic loads. The effect of aggressive environments is also simulated. The simulation is based on a three-dimensional finite element analysis technique in conjunction with structural mechanics codes, thermal/acoustic analysis methods, and tailoring procedures. The integrated multidisciplinary simulation procedure is general-purpose including the coupled effects of nonlinearities in structure geometry, material, loading, and environmental complexities. The composite material behavior is assessed at all composite scales, i.e., laminate/ply/constituents (fiber/matrix), via a nonlinear material characterization hygro-thermo-mechanical model. Sample tailoring cases exhibiting nonlinear material/loading/environmental behavior of aircraft engine fan blades, are presented. The various multidisciplinary loads lead to different tailored designs, even those competing with each other, as in the case of minimum material cost versus minimum structure weight and in the case of minimum vibration frequency versus minimum acoustic noise.

  1. Impact of Interdisciplinary Team Review on Psychotropic Drug Use with Persons Who Have Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findholt, Nancy E.; Emmett, Catherine G.

    1990-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team, including representatives from medicine, psychology, and residential living, examined 436 mentally retarded residents' regimen of psychotropic medications, with the goal of finding the least restrictive method of behavior management and lowest drug dosage. Significant reductions in psychotropic drug use were observed,…

  2. Collective activities in a technology-mediated medical team. An analysis of epidemiological alert management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Gaudin; N. Bonnardel; L. Pellegrin; H. Chaudet

    2012-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory study of a complex and dynamic medical activity, namely the collective management of an epidemiological alert situation. With a view to improving our knowledge of how this activity is managed, we set up simulated situations of epidemiological alerts. A multidisciplinary medical team was assisted by a decision-support system called ASTER and we recorded a set of

  3. Improving patient safety in radiology: a work in progress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raymond W. Sze

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to share the experiences, including successes and failures, as well as the ongoing process of\\u000a developing and implementing a safety program in a large pediatric radiology department. Building a multidisciplinary pediatric\\u000a radiology safety team requires successful recruitment of team members, selection of a team leader, and proper and ongoing\\u000a training and tools, and protected

  4. The social structure of Open Source Software development teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Crowston; James Howison

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Open Source Software development,teams provide an interesting and convenient setting for studying distributed work. We begin by answering perhaps the most basic question: what is the social structure of these teams? Based on a social network analysis of interactions represented in 62,110 bug reports from 122 large and active projects, we find that some OSS teams are highly centralized,

  5. We Gain More Than We Give: Teaming in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Thomas S., Ed.; Erb, Thomas O., Ed.

    Despite increases in the number of middle school using interdisciplinary team teaching, many are struggling to articulate a clear defense of their teaming work in light of confounding and conflicting public demands. This compilation examines teaming in middle schools--its characteristics, knowledge base, current concerns and future adaptations.…

  6. Staying Alive! Training High-Risk Teams for Self Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley; Noe, Raymond; Weaver, Sallie

    2011-01-01

    Research examining teams working in high-risk operations has been lacking. The present symposium showcases research on team training that helps to optimize team performance in environments characterized by life or death situations arising spontaneously after long periods of mundane activity by pulling experts from diverse areas of industry: space flight, health care, and medical simulation.

  7. Team leader style: enhancing the creativity of employees in teams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca A. Thacker

    1997-01-01

    Shows that the communication style that team and project leaders use to enhance team creativity is of paramount importance in trying to promote creativity in the workplace. Team leaders need to be trained to exhibit a communication pattern that enhances team creativity, but they should be trained in such a way that team members perceive accurately the message the team

  8. The multidisciplinary approach in the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a patient case-based review.

    PubMed

    Tomassetti, Sara; Piciucchi, Sara; Tantalocco, Paola; Dubini, Alessandra; Poletti, Venerino

    2015-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a specific form of chronic, progressively fibrosing interstitial pneumonia that is associated with a significantly worse prognosis than other forms of chronic interstitial pneumonia. An early and accurate diagnosis of IPF is important to enable the initiation of disease-specific therapies, which have the potential to reduce disease progression, and the avoidance of inappropriate and potentially harmful drugs. Establishing an accurate diagnosis of IPF can be challenging. Recent studies and international guidelines advocate the importance of a multidisciplinary team (MDT) in the initial diagnostic assessment of patients with suspected IPF. Typical MDT members include a pulmonologist, a radiologist and a pathologist, with further input from a thoracic surgeon, a rheumatologist, a specialist nurse and an occupational physician where appropriate. Multidisciplinary diagnosis is considered the gold standard because it can improve the accuracy of diagnosis of IPF, avoid unnecessary testing (e.g. lung biopsy), and optimise patient management. Here we highlight the strengths and limitations of the multidisciplinary approach to IPF diagnosis through MDT discussion of two patient cases. PMID:25726558

  9. Diagnosis of palpable breast masses: ultrasound-guided large core biopsy in a multidisciplinary setting.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Hernan I; Vargas, M Perla; Gonzalez, Katherine D; Venegas, Rose; Canet, Martha; Burla, Melissa; Eldrageely, Kamal; Khalkhali, Iraj

    2004-10-01

    Cytologic diagnosis of palpable breast masses is an accepted method for diagnosis. However, the high nondiagnostic rate causes repeat biopsy, unnecessary delays, and increased costs. Our purpose is to evaluate the use of ultrasound (US)-guided large-core needle biopsy as part of the minimally invasive multidisciplinary diagnosis of palpable breast masses. We studied 502 consecutive patients with 510 palpable solid breast masses seen and evaluated by a multidisciplinary team. Patients had US-guided core biopsy. Clinical-imaging-pathologic correlation (CIPC) was done in all cases. Core biopsy was deemed conclusive if CIPC was congruent and was used to guide definitive management. The median age of our patients was 39 years. Median tumor size was 2.2 cm. Of these cases, 463 (91%) had a conclusive diagnosis on CIPC. Core needle findings on 47 masses were nondefinitive to guide therapy (fibroepithelial lesion, atypical ductal hyperplasia, intraductal papilloma, CIPC). Three cancers were detected in this group on excisional biopsy. In conclusion, US-guided large-core needle biopsy is a sensitive method for diagnosis of palpable breast masses. Multidisciplinary correlation of clinical findings, imaging, and pathology is essential for success. This approach improves use of operating room resources and maximizes patient participation in the decision-making process. PMID:15529839

  10. Experiencing Disruptive Behavior in a Team Using Daniel E. Krutz, James R. Vallino

    E-print Network

    Vallino, James R

    product on time and within budget. Far too often, however, the experience of working as a team, with its Institute of Technology introduced an activity in their Freshman Seminar course to help students work in a team-based environment. The specific focus was interacting with problematic team members. This team

  11. [A multi-disciplinary approach to diabetic foot patients--an organizational model for the treatment of leg complications in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Feldbrin, Zeev; Ovadia, Shmuel; Zubkov, Tatiana; Lipkin, Alexander; Wainstein, Julio; Vainstein, Hulio

    2011-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the major cause of non-traumatic limb amputations in the Western world. In the diabetic foot patient, 85% have developed a leg ulcer prior to limb amputation. Due to the complicated nature of therapy in such patients, a multi-disciplinary approach is warranted. In this review, we describe an organizational model which provides an immediate solution to the factors involved in the evolution of a diabetic foot. At the end of 2002, The Wolfson Medical Center administration decided to centralize the diabetic foot patients into one unit situated in the Department of Medicine C. Ten beds were allocated for this purpose and situated at the far end of the department reducing the potential spread of infections to the rest of the ward. With the opening of the unit, a multi-disciplinary team was established that included internists, orthopedists, vascular surgeons, diabeticians, infectious disease specialists, and a specialized nursing staff that acquired their expertise while working with the medical staff and consultants including plastic surgeons and orthotists as required. With the initiation of the Diabetic Foot Unit, there was a reduction of 50% in major amputations in the unit when compared to the preceding years. During the years 2003-2004, the major amputation rate dropped to Less than 8%. Treatment of the diabetic foot patient is complex. In order to reduce the morbidity of limb amputation, a Diabetic Foot Unit is justified. In addition, specialized staff working in concert enable a synergistic effort that cannot be acquired individually. Most importantly, the amputation rate can be significantly reduced by utilizing the Diabetic Foot Unit model. PMID:21874770

  12. Matched-pair analysis of race or ethnicity in outcomes of head and neck cancer patients receiving similar multidisciplinary care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leon M; Li, Guojun; Reitzel, Lorraine R; Pytynia, Kristen B; Zafereo, Mark E; Wei, Qingyi; Sturgis, Erich M

    2009-09-01

    It is unknown whether population-level racial or ethnic disparities in mortality from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) also occur in the setting of standardized multidisciplinary-team directed care. Therefore, we conducted a matched-pair study that controlled for several potentially confounding prognostic variables to assess whether a difference in survival exists for African American or Hispanic American compared with non-Hispanic white American SCCHN patients receiving similar care. Matched pairs were 81 African American case and 81 non-Hispanic white control patients and 100 Hispanic American cases and 100 matched non-Hispanic white controls selected from 1,833 patients of a prospective epidemiologic study of incident SCCHN within a single, large multidisciplinary cancer center. Matching variables included age (+/-10 years), sex, smoking status (never versus ever), site, tumor stage (T(1-2) versus T(3-4)), nodal status (negative versus positive), and treatment. Cases and controls were not significantly different in proportions of comorbidity score, alcohol use, subsite distribution, overall stage, or tumor grade. Matched-pair and log-rank analyses showed no significant differences between cases and controls in recurrence-free, disease-specific, or overall survival. Site-specific analyses suggested that more aggressive oropharyngeal cancers occurred more frequently in minority than in non-Hispanic white patients. We conclude that minority and non-Hispanic white SCCHN patients receiving similar multidisciplinary-team directed care at a tertiary cancer center have similar survival results overall. These results encourage reducing health disparities in SCCHN through public-health efforts to improve access to multidisciplinary oncologic care (and to preventive measures) and through individual clinician efforts to make the best multidisciplinary cancer treatment choices available for their minority patients. The subgroup finding suggests a biologically based racial/ethnic disparity among oropharyngeal patients and that prevention and treatment strategies should be tailored to different populations of these patients. PMID:19737985

  13. Create a Learning Team Road Map: A Well-Designed Plan Is Flexible and Focused on the Team's Goal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Learning teams must take many steps in making their time together meaningful and productive. Once teams know what they are setting out to accomplish through careful data analysis, their next step is to create a plan to guide their journey. Through this planning process, collaborative teams make clear their assumptions and beliefs about the work

  14. Is There a Career for Me? Antarctic Meteorite Teams

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a lesson about the scientific careers and opportunities in Antarctic meteorite team(s). Learners will view slides and read about meteorite recovery expeditions to Antarctica, explore science careers, evaluate the characteristics and skills required for curating and working with meteorites, create scientific teams, and make written and oral presentations about their chosen scientific teams. Materials and vocabulary lists, and advanced preparation and procedural tips are included. This is lesson 18 of 19 in Exploring Meteorite Mysteries.

  15. Building Content Knowledge in a Student Research Team

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deanna van Dijk

    At the beginning of a course-based research project, each student in a research team is asked to read primary literature related to the team investigation. A mix of provided readings and readings found by the students builds the team content knowledge concurrent with team work on research design and data collection. Students reflect and report on the readings in an annotated bibliography, which is a graded assignment in the course.

  16. Iatrogenic Biliary Injuries: Multidisciplinary Management in a Major Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Ibrahim Abdelkader; Shoreem, Hany Abdelmeged; Saleh, Sherif Mohamed; Hegazy, Osama; Housseni, Mohamed; Abbasy, Mohamed; Badra, Gamal; Ibrahim, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Background. Iatrogenic biliary injuries are considered as the most serious complications during cholecystectomy. Better outcomes of such injuries have been shown in cases managed in a specialized center. Objective. To evaluate biliary injuries management in major referral hepatobiliary center. Patients & Methods. Four hundred seventy-two consecutive patients with postcholecystectomy biliary injuries were managed with multidisciplinary team (hepatobiliary surgeon, gastroenterologist, and radiologist) at major Hepatobiliary Center in Egypt over 10-year period using endoscopy in 232 patients, percutaneous techniques in 42 patients, and surgery in 198 patients. Results. Endoscopy was very successful initial treatment of 232 patients (49%) with mild/moderate biliary leakage (68%) and biliary stricture (47%) with increased success by addition of percutaneous (Rendezvous technique) in 18 patients (3.8%). However, surgery was needed in 198 patients (42%) for major duct transection, ligation, major leakage, and massive stricture. Surgery was urgent in 62 patients and elective in 136 patients. Hepaticojejunostomy was done in most of cases with transanastomotic stents. There was one mortality after surgery due to biliary sepsis and postoperative stricture in 3 cases (1.5%) treated with percutaneous dilation and stenting. Conclusion. Management of biliary injuries was much better with multidisciplinary care team with initial minimal invasive technique to major surgery in major complex injury encouraging early referral to highly specialized hepatobiliary center. PMID:25435672

  17. Team Work: Sports and the Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degelman, Charles; Hayes, Bill

    This lesson plan uses students' interest in sports to teach good citizenship. With its focus on rules, responsibility, conflict resolution, and teamwork, the unit emphasizes the development of critical thinking, decision-making, and citizenship skills in young people. This lesson plan is part of a series of fully prepared, interactive classroom…

  18. GEOWOW: a drought scenario for multidisciplinary data access and use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Sorichetta, Alessandro; Roglia, Elena; Craglia, Massimo; Nativi, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Recent enhancements of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI; http://www.earthobservations.org/gci_gci.shtml), and in particular the introduction of a middleware in the GCI that brokers across heterogeneous information systems, have increased significantly the number of information resources discoverable worldwide. Now the challenge moves to the next level of ensuring access and use of the resources discovered, which have many different and domain-specific data models, communication protocols, encoding formats, etc. The GEOWOW Project - GEOSS interoperability for Weather, Ocean and Water, http://www.geowow.eu - developed a set of multidisciplinary use scenarios to advance the present GCI. This work describes the "Easy discovery and use of GEOSS resources for addressing multidisciplinary challenges related to drought scenarios" showcase demonstrated at the last GEO Plenary in Foz de Iguazu (Brazil). The scientific objectives of this showcase include: prevention and mitigation of water scarcity and drought situations, assessment of the population and geographical area potentially affected, evaluation of the possible distribution of mortality and economic loss risk, and support in building greater capacity to cope with drought. The need to address these challenges calls for producing scientifically robust and consistent information about the extent of land affected by drought and degradation. Similarly, in this context it is important: (i) to address uncertainties about the way in which various biological, physical, social, and economic factors interact each other and influence the occurrence of drought events, and (ii) to develop and test adequate indices and/or combination of them for monitoring and forecasting drought in different geographic locations and at various spatial scales (Brown et al., 2002). The scientific objectives above can be met with an increased interoperability across the multidisciplinary domains relevant to this drought scenario. In particular, we demonstrate in this instance (i) an improved search capability through semantically related resources, (ii) a harmonized access to the heterogeneous resources discovered, and (iii) a flexible transformation framework to access, download and use the resources discovered, and implement scientifically-sound scenarios that respond to environmental global challenges. This showcase demonstrates how the middleware services provided by the GEO Discovery and Access Broker - DAB (Nativi et al., 2013) - component can be used to address the multidisciplinary interoperability challenges. With respect to discovery, the GEO DAB allows to expand the traditional discovery functionalities using a set of semantically connected concepts delivered through vocabulary services. This makes it possible to obtain an extended result set, where the user can find new unexpected datasets of interest for her/his analysis. Moreover, the use of semantics-enabled queries makes it possible to search and retrieve data resources in multiple languages, which is a crucial issue in global research. With respect to access and use, the GEO DAB makes it possible for users to preview, access, and use the resources discovered according to a common grid environment. Users can define a common grid environment - Coordinate Reference System (CRS), spatial resolution, spatial extent (e.g., a subset of a discovered dataset), and data encoding format - to download all the datasets of interest. This is crucial for advancing an effective integrated exploitation of multidisciplinary data coming from heterogeneous sources. In normal practice, the manipulation of the data discovered (pre-processing) that is necessary ahead of the analysis has to be done by the user. The GEO DAB takes this burden away from the user providing a true added value service. The showcase presented here goes of course beyond the specifics of drought applications, and is of interest because it demonstrates real advancements in the use of complex system of systems, form simple discovery, to more semantically aware multilingual disc

  19. Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Tolarová, Marie M; Poulton, Donald; Aubert, Maryse M; Oh, HeeSoo; Ellerhorst, Thomas; Mosby, Terezie; Tolar, Miroslav; Boyd, Robert L

    2006-10-01

    There is no doubt modern genetics have greatly influenced our professional and personal lives during the last decade. Uncovering genetic causes of many medical and dental pathologies is helping to narrow the diagnosis and select a treatment plan that would provide the best outcome. Importantly, having an understanding of multifactorial etiology helps direct our attention toward prevention. We now understand much better our own health problems. In some cases, we can modify our lifestyle and diet in order to prevent "environmental factors" from triggering the mutated genes inherited from our parents. Good examples are diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. If we realize we might have inherited genes for cardiovascular problems from several ancestors who had heart attacks, we already know that these genes will make us only "susceptible" for disease. Those who exercise, watch one's weight, diet, and carefully monitor one's lifestyle will very likely--though possessing "susceptibility genes"--stay healthier and, maybe, will never experience any cardiovascular problems. In principle, the same applies for craniofacial anomalies, especially for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate. One needs to understand genetic and environmental causes of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts in order to prevent them. With all this in mind, the Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program have been established at the Department of Orthodontics, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. A partnership with Rotaplast International, Inc., has made it possible for the faculty, orthodontic residents, and students to participate in 27 multidisciplinary cleft medical missions in underdeveloped and developing countries by donating professional and educational services, and, last but not least, by collecting valuable data and specimens to further research. A significant number of research studies, including 15 master of science theses, have been accomplished in UOP's Craniofacial Genetics Laboratory, with contributions by faculty, undergraduate and graduate students. It has been leading to a better understanding of etiology of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts. It has been learned that genetic factors and environmental factors are ethnicity-specific and, in many places throughout the world, location-specific. Thus, a specific protocol for cleft prevention has to be worked out based on genetic and nutritional studies of each specific population group in order to be effective. This is our ultimate goal. PMID:17087397

  20. Concurrent engineering teams. Volume 2: Annotated bibliography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Karen J.; Dierolf, David A.

    1990-11-01

    Specific concurrent engineering practices vary among organizations. There are, however, various management practices that appear to work well for most organizations. This paper presents the reader with specific, useful examples from several defense contractors illustrating how multifunctional concurrent engineering teams are being organized and managed and how concurrent engineering team meetings are conducted and supported. The types of computer support that could be used to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of concurrent engineering team meetings are identified. The general findings are that there exists a direct relationship between total quality management (TQM) and concurrent engineering, and that many applications of computer-aided group problem solving are possible and practical today for the concurrent engineering team meetings. Areas identified for additional research are the documentation of the decision process and rationale during the product and process definition, the capturing of lessons learned during the implementation of concurrent engineering, and the performance evaluation and training of team members.

  1. Multidisciplinary perspectives on banana (Musa spp.) domestication

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Xavier; De Langhe, Edmond; Donohue, Mark; Lentfer, Carol; Vrydaghs, Luc; Bakry, Frédéric; Carreel, Françoise; Hippolyte, Isabelle; Horry, Jean-Pierre; Jenny, Christophe; Lebot, Vincent; Risterucci, Ange-Marie; Tomekpe, Kodjo; Doutrelepont, Hugues; Ball, Terry; Manwaring, Jason; de Maret, Pierre; Denham, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Original multidisciplinary research hereby clarifies the complex geodomestication pathways that generated the vast range of banana cultivars (cvs). Genetic analyses identify the wild ancestors of modern-day cvs and elucidate several key stages of domestication for different cv groups. Archaeology and linguistics shed light on the historical roles of people in the movement and cultivation of bananas from New Guinea to West Africa during the Holocene. The historical reconstruction of domestication processes is essential for breeding programs seeking to diversify and improve banana cvs for the future. PMID:21730145

  2. A multidisciplinary database for global distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, P.J. [Univ. of Wyoming Libraries, Laramie, WY (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The issue of selenium toxicity in the environment has been documented in the scientific literature for over 50 years. Recent studies reveal a complex connection between selenium and human and animal populations. This article introduces a bibliographic citation database on selenium in the environment developed for global distribution via the Internet by the University of Wyoming Libraries. The database incorporates material from commercial sources, print abstracts, indexes, and U.S. government literature, resulting in a multidisciplinary resource. Relevant disciplines include, biology, medicine, veterinary science, botany, chemistry, geology, pollution, aquatic sciences, ecology, and others. It covers the years 1985-1996 for most subject material, with additional years being added as resources permit.

  3. A multidisciplinary approach to short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Denegri, Andrea; Paparo, Francesco; Denegri, Roberto; Revelli, Matteo; Frascio, Marco; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Fornaro, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a complex clinical picture, characterized by signs and symptoms of malabsorption and subsequent malnutrition, which often occurs after extensive bowel resections. Short bowel syndrome's treatment must begin together with the planning of the first surgery, especially for disease that may need multiple interventions. Patients with short bowel should be individually managed because they all are different in diagnosis, length of the remaining bowel and in psychosocial characteristics. For all these reasons, a multidisciplinary approach between the various specialists is therefore needed. PMID:24393697

  4. Multidisciplinary Techniques and Novel Aircraft Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.; Raney, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley Research Center explores opportunities to improve airframe designs with smart technologies. Two elements of this basic research program are multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and advanced flow control. This paper describes examples where MDO techniques such as sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation, and genetic algorithms contribute to the design of novel control systems. In the test case, the design and use of distributed shapechange devices to provide low-rate maneuvering capability for a tailless aircraft is considered. The ability of MDO to add value to control system development is illustrated using results from several years of research funded by the Aircraft Morphing Program.

  5. Multidisciplinary Techniques and Novel Aircraft Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Rogers, James L.; Raney, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The Aircraft Morphing Program at NASA Langley Research Center explores opportunities to improve airframe designs with smart technologies. Two elements of this basic research program are multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) and advanced flow control. This paper describes examples where MDO techniques such as sensitivity analysis, automatic differentiation, and genetic algorithms contribute to the design of novel control systems. In the test case, the design and use of distributed shape-change devices to provide low-rate maneuvering capability for a tailless aircraft is considered. The ability of MDO to add value to control system development is illustrated using results from several years of research funded by the Aircraft Morphing Program.

  6. Teams for Teams Performance in Multi-Human/Multi-Robot Teams

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Michael

    Teams for Teams Performance in Multi-Human/Multi-Robot Teams Pei-Ju Lee, Huadong Wang, Shih and organization of human teams in controlling large robot teams performing an Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) task operators service robots from the population as needed. The experiment compares two member teams

  7. System-Wide Action Team (SWAT)--a new level of collaboration.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, C; Hardy, D

    2001-06-01

    A multidisciplinary System-Wide Action Team was coordinated by nursing leadership in response to increasing patient census and acuity. The primary objectives of the team were to develop mechanisms that would expedite patient's admissions and discharges, communicate key messages to all concerned staff, support each other, and communicate announcements about topics or urgent issues that relate to managing the hospital. The team has implemented improvement initiatives around diagnostic testing and scheduling, expediting the admission process, reducing discharge delays, and staffing to hospital census demands. PMID:12030171

  8. Panel Discussion on Multi-Disciplinary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is hosting the Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS) during the week of September 10, 2001. Included in this year's TFAWS is a panel session on Multidisciplinary Analysis techniques. The intent is to provide an opportunity for the users to gain information as to what product may be best suited for their applications environment and to provide feedback to you, the developers, on future desired developments. Potential users of multidisciplinary analysis (MDA) techniques are often overwhelmed by the number of choices available to them via commercial products and by the pace of new developments in this area. The purpose of this panel session is to provide a forum wherein MDA tools available and under development can be discussed, compared, and contrasted. The intent of this panel is to provide the end-user with the information necessary to make educated decisions on how to proceed with selecting their MDA tool. It is anticipated that the discussions this year will focus on MDA techniques that couple discipline codes or algorithms (as opposed to monolithic, unified MDA approaches). The MDA developers will be asked to prepare a product overview presentation addressing specific questions provided by the panel organizers. The purpose of these questions will be to establish the method employed by the particular MDA technique for communication between the discipline codes, to establish the similarities and differences amongst the various approaches, and to establish the range of experience and applications for each particular MDA approach.

  9. Information Management for a Large Multidisciplinary Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Randall, Donald P.; Cronin, Catherine K.

    1992-01-01

    In 1989, NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) initiated the High-Speed Airframe Integration Research (HiSAIR) Program to develop and demonstrate an integrated environment for high-speed aircraft design using advanced multidisciplinary analysis and optimization procedures. The major goals of this program were to evolve the interactions among disciplines and promote sharing of information, to provide a timely exchange of information among aeronautical disciplines, and to increase the awareness of the effects each discipline has upon other disciplines. LaRC historically has emphasized the advancement of analysis techniques. HiSAIR was founded to synthesize these advanced methods into a multidisciplinary design process emphasizing information feedback among disciplines and optimization. Crucial to the development of such an environment are the definition of the required data exchanges and the methodology for both recording the information and providing the exchanges in a timely manner. These requirements demand extensive use of data management techniques, graphic visualization, and interactive computing. HiSAIR represents the first attempt at LaRC to promote interdisciplinary information exchange on a large scale using advanced data management methodologies combined with state-of-the-art, scientific visualization techniques on graphics workstations in a distributed computing environment. The subject of this paper is the development of the data management system for HiSAIR.

  10. Multidisciplinary design optimization using multiobjective formulation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Pagaldipti, Narayanan S.

    1995-01-01

    This report addresses the development of a multidisciplinary optimization procedure using an efficient semi-analytical sensitivity analysis technique and multilevel decomposition for the design of aerospace vehicles. A semi-analytical sensitivity analysis procedure is developed for calculating computational grid sensitivities and aerodynamic design sensitivities. Accuracy and efficiency of the sensitivity analysis procedure is established through comparison of the results with those obtained using a finite difference technique. The developed sensitivity analysis technique are then used within a multidisciplinary optimization procedure for designing aerospace vehicles. The optimization problem, with the integration of aerodynamics and structures, is decomposed into two levels. Optimization is performed for improved aerodynamic performance at the first level and improved structural performance at the second level. Aerodynamic analysis is performed by solving the three-dimensional parabolized Navier Stokes equations. A nonlinear programming technique and an approximate analysis procedure are used for optimization. The proceduredeveloped is applied to design the wing of a high speed aircraft. Results obtained show significant improvements in the aircraft aerodynamic and structural performance when compared to a reference or baseline configuration. The use of the semi-analytical sensitivity technique provides significant computational savings.

  11. Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours in Response Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boon, Anne; Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Teams, teamwork and team learning have been the subject of many research studies over the last decades. This article aims at investigating and confirming the Team Learning Beliefs and Behaviours (TLB&B) model within a very specific population, i.e. police and firemen teams. Within this context, the paper asks whether the team's beliefs…

  12. Development and evaluation of a home enteral nutrition team.

    PubMed

    Dinenage, Sarah; Gower, Morwenna; Van Wyk, Joanna; Blamey, Anne; Ashbolt, Karen; Sutcliffe, Michelle; Green, Sue M

    2015-03-01

    The organisation of services to support the increasing number of people receiving enteral tube feeding (ETF) at home varies across regions. There is evidence that multi-disciplinary primary care teams focussed on home enteral nutrition (HEN) can provide cost-effective care. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a HEN Team in one UK city. A HEN Team comprising dietetians, nurses and a speech and language therapist was developed with the aim of delivering a quality service for people with gastrostomy tubes living at home. Team objectives were set and an underpinning framework of organisation developed including a care pathway and a schedule of training. Impact on patient outcomes was assessed in a pre-post test evaluation design. Patients and carers reported improved support in managing their ETF. Cost savings were realised through: (1) prevention of hospital admission and related transport for ETF related issues; (2) effective management and reduction of waste of feed and thickener; (3) balloon gastrostomy tube replacement by the HEN Team in the patient's home, and optimisation of nutritional status. This service evaluation demonstrated that the establishment of a dedicated multi-professional HEN Team focussed on achievement of key objectives improved patient experience and, although calculation of cost savings were estimates, provided evidence of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25751819

  13. Multidisciplinary life cycle metrics and tools for green buildings.

    PubMed

    Helgeson, Jennifer F; Lippiatt, Barbara C

    2009-07-01

    Building sector stakeholders need compelling metrics, tools, data, and case studies to support major investments in sustainable technologies. Proponents of green building widely claim that buildings integrating sustainable technologies are cost effective, but often these claims are based on incomplete, anecdotal evidence that is difficult to reproduce and defend. The claims suffer from 2 main weaknesses: 1) buildings on which claims are based are not necessarily "green" in a science-based, life cycle assessment (LCA) sense and 2) measures of cost effectiveness often are not based on standard methods for measuring economic worth. Yet, the building industry demands compelling metrics to justify sustainable building designs. The problem is hard to solve because, until now, neither methods nor robust data supporting defensible business cases were available. The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Building and Fire Research Laboratory is beginning to address these needs by developing metrics and tools for assessing the life cycle economic and environmental performance of buildings. Economic performance is measured with the use of standard life cycle costing methods. Environmental performance is measured by LCA methods that assess the "carbon footprint" of buildings, as well as 11 other sustainability metrics, including fossil fuel depletion, smog formation, water use, habitat alteration, indoor air quality, and effects on human health. Carbon efficiency ratios and other eco-efficiency metrics are established to yield science-based measures of the relative worth, or "business cases," for green buildings. Here, the approach is illustrated through a realistic building case study focused on different heating, ventilation, air conditioning technology energy efficiency. Additionally, the evolution of the Building for Environmental and Economic Sustainability multidisciplinary team and future plans in this area are described. PMID:20050028

  14. Simulation-based education for building clinical teams

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Stuart D; Flanagan, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    Failure to work as an effective team is commonly cited as a cause of adverse events and errors in emergency medicine. Until recently, individual knowledge and skills in managing emergencies were taught, without reference to the additional skills required to work as part of a team. Team training courses are now becoming commonplace, however their strategies and modes of delivery are varied. Just as different delivery methods of traditional education can result in different levels of retention and transfer to the real world, the same is true in team training of the material in different ways in traditional forms of education may lead to different levels of retention and transfer to the real world, the same is true in team training. As team training becomes more widespread, the effectiveness of different modes of delivery including the role of simulation-based education needs to be clearly understood. This review examines the basis of team working in emergency medicine, and the components of an effective emergency medical team. Lessons from other domains with more experience in team training are discussed, as well as the variations from these settings that can be observed in medical contexts. Methods and strategies for team training are listed, and experiences in other health care settings as well as emergency medicine are assessed. Finally, best practice guidelines for the development of team training programs in emergency medicine are presented. PMID:21063559

  15. Delaware's Dream Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    To librarians at the Delaware Division of Libraries, Governor Ruth Ann Minner, Secretary of State Harriet Smith Windsor, and Assistant Secretary of State Rick Geisenberger are "the Delaware Dream Team." The governor and her team supported funding for the 2004 statewide effort that resulted in the Delaware Master Plan for Library Services and…

  16. Teams for tomorrow [groupware

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Johansen

    1991-01-01

    Teams for tomorrow sounds like the title of a soap opera and this is intentional. Soap operas are a pop form of myth building and reinforcement. Soap operas give people a vicarious experience of their beliefs, their fears, and their fantasies. We need to create some `soap operas' about business teams, soap operas that real people can believe in. We

  17. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    The science of team science field empirically examines the processes by which large and small scientific teams, research centers, and institutes organize, communicate, and conduct research. It is concerned with understanding and managing circumstances that facilitate or hinder the effectiveness of collaborative research, including translational research.

  18. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  19. IDConsultants Team(Blueand

    E-print Network

    Batill, Stephen M.

    IDConsultants Pla-orm Groups Func4onal Groups Team(Blueand Gold) Chassis DriveTrain Control Actua4on Mechanisms Pla-ormA Pla-ormB Pla-ormC Pla-ormD TEAM #12;1. EveryengineeringstudentispartofaFunc4onalGroupANDaPla-ormGroup. 2. StudentsareassignedtoFunc4onalGroupsbyinstructorsandtoPla

  20. Teamwork and team leadership

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raimo Nurmi

    1996-01-01

    Explores some of the advantages and disadvantages of teamwork, suggesting that in present day companies teamwork is a must for the co-ordination of departments. Examines four team leadership styles - dictatorial, compromise, integrative teamwork and synergistic teamwork. Outlines the advantages and disadvantages of each. Concludes that synergistic teamwork, wherein the team creates something new and greater than the addition of

  1. Sitemap - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Home   About Team Science Study TS Links Key Articles   About the Toolkit Who

  2. Assembling the Project Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Donald B.

    2003-01-01

    Although the approval of a project's design and budget typically rests with the campus governing board, a project team determines the configuration, the cost, and the utility of the completed project. Because of the importance of these decisions, colleges and universities must select project team members carefully. (Author)

  3. Creating a Truly Multidisciplinary Entrepreneurial Educational Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John B. Ochs; Todd A. Watkins; Berrisford W Boothe

    2001-01-01

    In our age of technological growth and change, the role of the engineer has evolved from lone specialist to team player, from internally focused to globally aware, from reactionary to entrepreneur. The entrepreneur has created much of our social wealth. The characteristics of the entrepreneur transcend academic disciplines, and social as well as economic status. To foster these characteristics among

  4. MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TEAMS - A NECESSITY FOR RESEARCH IN PRECISION AGRICULTURE SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture may offer great promise for the future, but extensive additional research is required if that promise is to be realized. The research will not be easy, for few, if any, individuals have sufficiently broad training in the many disciplines (e.g. economics, engineering, crop and ...

  5. Natural physical factors in the Whitsand Bay area Cefas Multi-disciplinary Project Team

    E-print Network

    and sedimentary bedforms. Particle size analysis Distribution of gravel, sand, silt and clay in sea-bed sediments-term retention of fine sediment in Polhawn Cove. 2. There is no evidence of excessive silt levels in sediments% silt in these sediments. 3. Tidal modelling indicates that disposed sediments will tend

  6. Development of a Florida Seafood Program Using a Multi-Disciplinary Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abeels, Holly; Fluech, Bryan; Krimsky, Lisa; Saari, Brooke; Shephard, Elizabeth; Zamojski, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    The seafood industry in Florida is complex, with more than 80 varieties of Florida seafood commodities and an increasing number of imported products. This variety increases consumer confusion, especially with the growing concern about the origin, sustainability, and safety of seafood products. The objective of the Florida Seafood At Your…

  7. Rubric Development for Assessment of Undergraduate Research: Evaluating Multidisciplinary Team Projects

    E-print Network

    Newell, James A.

    University, Glassboro, NJ 08028 Abstract At Rowan University, all engineering students participate in clinic led by an engineering professor. The difficulty arises in trying to assess student learning of the Chemical Engineering Department, as a pilot study, developed four primary areas of importance

  8. Get Better Energy Performance Improvement Projects using a Multi-Disciplinary Team

    E-print Network

    McMullan, A.

    2011-01-01

    Unit Energy Study Process specialists modeled the unit using a simulation tool (Petro-SIM) and determined that fractionation was not optimal and identified changes to pump-around operation that would correct the issue and result in savings...

  9. Pharmacist testers in multidisciplinary health care team expand HIV point-of-care testing program.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Elizabeth M; Elrod, Shara; Allen, Deberenia; Eckardt, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of HIV serostatus is the first step to accessing treatment, reducing transmission, and mitigating public health challenges. We describe the expansion of an HIV point-of-care testing (POCT) program within a health care system utilizing pharmacists as testers. The testing program's expansion is detailed and its impact assessed. The POCT program was evaluated by comparing the number of traditional HIV venipuncture tests to the number of POCTs performed across the health system as well as comparing the number of POCTs performed by clinical pharmacists to the number of tests at other POCT locations. Although pharmacists' contributions to HIV prevention are well documented, pharmacists' involvement in HIV testing initiatives is still nascent. Our POCT program demonstrates an effective HIV testing initiative driven by pharmacists and other health care providers. PMID:24326407

  10. Early coordinated multidisciplinary intervention to prevent sickness absence and labour market exclusion in patients with low back pain: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders account for one third of the long-term absenteeism in Denmark and the number of individuals sick listed for more than four weeks is increasing. Compared to other diagnoses, patients with musculoskeletal diseases, including low back pain, are less likely to return to work after a period of sick leave. It seems that a multidisciplinary intervention, including cooperation between the health sector, the social sector and in the work place, has a positive effect on days off work due to musculoskeletal disorders and particularly low back pain. It is a challenge to coordinate this type of intervention, and the implementation of a return-to-work (RTW)-coordinator is suggested as an effective strategy in this process. The purpose of this paper is to describe the study protocol and present a new type of intervention, where the physiotherapist both has the role as RTW-coordinator and treating the patient. Methods/design A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is currently on-going. The RCT includes 770 patients with low back pain of minimum four weeks who are referred to an outpatient back centre. The study population consists of patients, who are sick-listed or at risk of sick-leave due to LBP. The control group is treated with usual care in a team of a physiotherapist, a chiropractor, a rheumatologist and a social worker employed at the centre. The Intervention group is treated with usual care and in addition intervention of a psychologist, an occupational physician, an ergonomist, a case manager from the municipal sickness benefit office, who has the authority in the actual case concerning sickness benefit payment and contact to the patients employer/work place. The treating physiotherapist is the RTW-coordinator. Outcome will be reported at the end of treatment as well as 6 and 12 months follow up. The primary outcome is number of days off work. Secondary outcomes are disability, pain, and quality of life. The study will follow the recommendations in CONSORT-statement in designing and reporting RCTs. Discussion This large RCT is testing the effectiveness of a preventive intervention targeting patients on short term sick leave or at risk being sick listed because of low back pain. We have developed a novel multidisciplinary team structure using the treating physiotherapist as the return to work coordinator, and having the case manager from the municipal sickness benefit office participating in team meetings. The study has the potential to contribute to the knowledge about how to target the challenges in the treatment of LBP. The aim is to prevent sickness absence and labour market exclusion - both on the individual level and economic costs at community level. Short term results will be available in 2014. This study is approved by the Danish Regional Ethics Committee (J.nr: H-C-2008-112) and is registered at. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01690234 PMID:23496897

  11. The Learning Curve for a Fetal Cardiac Intervention Team

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Stephen P.; Kreutzer, Jacqueline; McCaffrey, Frances M.; Sherman, Fredrick S.; Simhan, Hyagriv N.; Keller, Bradley B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Multiple technical difficulties are encountered when a multidisciplinary team of subspecialists begins a minimally-invasive fetal cardiac interventional program. We describe the learning curve. Study Design. Ten pregnant sheep underwent ultrasound-guided balloon valvuloplasty of the aortic valve. Team members and their roles remained constant through the trial. The time between needle insertion and entrance of the left ventricle at the aortic root was recorded. F-test was used to assess significance (P ? .05). Results. The time required to accurately position the needle tip at the aortic root decreased significantly over the course of the trial, from 12 minutes with the first attempt to one minute with the last (P = .003). Conclusion. A significant learning curve is encountered when a multidisciplinary team begins a minimally-invasive fetal cardiac intervention program. However, technical proficiency can be achieved with practice. Institutions interested in developing such a program should consider practice in an animal model before proceeding to the human fetus. PMID:22091354

  12. Research on the influencing mechanism of transformational leadership on team performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huang Qing

    2011-01-01

    This pa per is intended to explore the influencing mechanism of transformational leadership on team performance from the perspective of team efficacy and team cohesion by making an investigation of 12 working groups in Chinese enterprises and using structural equation modeling to analyze the collected data. The research results imply that transformational leadership has a positive correlation with team cohesion,

  13. Multidisciplinary clinical management of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Fahri; Ozkan, Melda Comert; Mete, Nihal Gokmen; Yilmaz, Mumtaz; Oruc, Nevin; Gurgun, Alev; Kayikcioglu, Meral; Guler, Ayse; Gokcay, Figen; Bilgir, Ferda; Ceylan, Cengiz; Bilgir, Oktay; Sari, Ismail Hakan; Saydam, Guray

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare, acquired disease caused by clonal expansion of one or more hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) lines due to a somatic mutation of the phosphatidylinositol glycan anchor (PIG-A) gene located on Xp22.1. PNH incidence is 1.5-2 cases per million of the population per year. PNH can affect multiple systems in the body and requires multidisciplinary clinical management. Patients can manifest with severe pancytopenia, life-threatening thrombosis affecting the hepatic, abdominal, cerebral, and subdermal veins, and high requirements for blood transfusion due to haemolytic anemia. PNH can also be associated with bone marrow failure. Advances in diagnostic techniques and a targeted therapeutic approach for PNH have emerged in the last two decades. Eculizumab, a promising humanized monoclonal antibody against C5, is the first approved therapy for PNH. PMID:26171279

  14. NASA Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report is a Year 1 interim report of the progress on the NASA multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Fellowship Program covering the period, January 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995. It summarizes progress in establishing the MDA Fellowship Program at Georgia Tech during the initial year. Progress in the advertisement of the program, recruiting results for the 1995-96 academic year, placement of the Fellows in industry during Summer 1995, program development at the M.S. and Ph.D. levels, and collaboration and dissemination of results are summarized in this report. Further details of the first year's progress will be included in the report from the Year 1 Workshop to be held at NASA Langley on December 7-8, 1995.

  15. NASA Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, D. P.; Craig, J. I.; Mavris, D. N.; Hale, M. A.; DeLaurentis, D.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a multi-year training grant for the development and implementation of a Multidisciplinary Design and Analysis (MDA) Fellowship Program at Georgia Tech. The Program funded the creation of graduate MS and PhD degree programs in aerospace systems design, analysis and integration. It also provided prestigious Fellowships with associated Industry Internships for outstanding engineering students. The graduate program has become the foundation for a vigorous and productive research effort and has produced: 20 MS degrees, 7 Ph.D. degrees, and has contributed to 9 ongoing Ph.D. students. The results of the research are documented in 32 publications (23 of which are included on a companion CDROM) and 4 annual student design reports (included on a companion CDROM). The legacy of this critical funding is the Center for Aerospace Systems Analysis at Georgia Tech which is continuing the graduate program, the research, and the industry internships established by this grant.

  16. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome treatment: a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Shani-Zur, Dana; Wolkomir, Keren

    2015-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects 9-23% of the general population. This diagnosis contributes to more frequent doctor visits and multiple consultations by patients. The current approach to treating IBS is symptomatic and consists of a regimen of first line pharmacological treatment options; the use of anti-depressant drugs is also common. The efficiency of complementary medicine in the treatment of IBS has been studied in the last few years. Qualitative multidisciplinary approach studies, using personalized medicines with complementary therapies are needed. We present the case of a 39-year-old woman with a diagnosis of IBS since 2009, who complained about gastrointestinal symptoms since the age of 13 and severe episodes of spasmodic stomach aches in the last year self-ranked as 10, on a 0-10 scale; 3-4 episodes a month, which last for 5 days, accompanied by severe flatulence and bloating. In addition, she has constipation (one bowel movement every 10 days), alternating with multiple diarrheic bowel movements (6 times a day). Using a multidisciplinary approach, including medicinal care, Chinese medicine, reflexology and naturopathy resulted in significant improvement in symptoms and quality of life, as well as gradual reduction of drugs, approved by her physician. Stomach ache self-ranked now as 1, on a 0-10 scale; and flatulence and bloating self-ranked as mild. Bowel movement frequency increased and is now every other day. She no longer has diarrheic and/or multiple bowel movements. This case report emphasizes the importance of integrative treatment in IBS and its benefit in improving patients' quality of life. PMID:25796677

  17. Multidisciplinary design optimization using response surface analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1992-01-01

    Aerospace conceptual vehicle design is a complex process which involves multidisciplinary studies of configuration and technology options considering many parameters at many values. NASA Langley's Vehicle Analysis Branch (VAB) has detailed computerized analysis capabilities in most of the key disciplines required by advanced vehicle design. Given a configuration, the capability exists to quickly determine its performance and lifecycle cost. The next step in vehicle design is to determine the best settings of design parameters that optimize the performance characteristics. Typical approach to design optimization is experience based, trial and error variation of many parameters one at a time where possible combinations usually number in the thousands. However, this approach can either lead to a very long and expensive design process or to a premature termination of the design process due to budget and/or schedule pressures. Furthermore, one variable at a time approach can not account for the interactions that occur among parts of systems and among disciplines. As a result, vehicle design may be far from optimal. Advanced multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) methods are needed to direct the search in an efficient and intelligent manner in order to drastically reduce the number of candidate designs to be evaluated. The payoffs in terms of enhanced performance and reduced cost are significant. A literature review yields two such advanced MDO methods used in aerospace design optimization; Taguchi methods and response surface methods. Taguchi methods provide a systematic and efficient method for design optimization for performance and cost. However, response surface method (RSM) leads to a better, more accurate exploration of the parameter space and to estimated optimum conditions with a small expenditure on experimental data. These two methods are described.

  18. Can absence make a team grow stronger?

    PubMed

    Majchrzak, Ann; Malhotra, Arvind; Stamps, Jeffrey; Lipnack, Jessica

    2004-05-01

    Some projects have such diverse requirements that they need a variety of specialists to work on them. But often the best-qualified specialists are scattered around the globe, perhaps at several companies. Remarkably, an extensive benchmarking study reveals, it isn't necessary to bring team members together to get their best work. In fact, they can be even more productive if they stay separated and do all their collaborating virtually. The scores of successful virtual teams the authors examined didn't have many of the psychological and practical obstacles that plagued their more traditional, face-to-face counterparts. Team members felt freer to contribute--especially outside their established areas of expertise. The fact that such groups could not assemble easily actually made their projects go faster, as people did not wait for meetings to make decisions, and individuals, in the comfort of their own offices, had full access to their files and the complementary knowledge of their local colleagues. Reaping those advantages, though, demanded shrewd management of a virtual team's work processes and social dynamics. Rather than depend on videoconferencing or e-mail, which could be unwieldy or exclusionary, successful virtual teams made extensive use of sophisticated online team rooms, where everyone could easily see the state of the work in progress, talk about the work in ongoing threaded discussions, and be reminded of decisions, rationales, and commitments. Differences were most effectively hashed out in tele-conferences, which team leaders also used to foster group identity and solidarity. When carefully managed in this way, the clash of perspectives led not to acrimony but, rather, to fundamental solutions, turning distance and diversity into competitive advantage. PMID:15146742

  19. Team PerformanceTeam Performance and Trainingand Training

    E-print Network

    Goldwasser, Shafi

    failures (e.g., aircraft, military accidents) Authors identify 3 primary teamwork dimensions: KSA Knowledge SelectionTeam Selection Individual traits (vary with team objectives) KSA's + personality traits

  20. The Business of Teaching and Learning through Multicultural Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Christina; Zander, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Team working is a key skill students need in this era of global complexity. Here we combine research with practice to develop a model for working in multicultural teams which can be used in International Business curricula. We formulate the 4 Cs model focusing on two areas: composition and communication. These two Cs have been chosen because they…

  1. Improving Virtual Team Collaboration Outcomes through Collaboration Process Structuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittman, Dawn R.; Hawkes, Mark; Deokar, Amit V.; Sarnikar, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    The ability to collaborate in a virtual team is a necessary skill set for today's knowledge workers and students to be effective in their work. Past research indicates that knowledge workers and students need to establish a formal process to perform work, develop clear goals and objectives, and facilitate better communication among team members.…

  2. Developing Team Skills through a Collaborative Writing Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Theda Ann

    2014-01-01

    Employers want students who are able to work effectively as members of a team, and expect universities to develop this ability in their graduates. This paper proposes a framework for a collaborative writing assignment that specifically develops students' ability to work in teams. The framework has been tested using two iterations of an action…

  3. Teams for Teams Performance in Multi-Human/Multi-Robot Teams

    E-print Network

    Scerri, Paul

    Teams for Teams Performance in Multi-Human/Multi-Robot Teams We are developing a theory for human control of robot teams based on considering how control varies across different task allocations. Our. The present study addresses the interaction between automation and organization of human teams in controlling

  4. Adaptive heterogeneous multi-robot teams

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control in robot missions involving loosely coupled, largely independent tasks. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, the author describes in detail the experimental results of an implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative box pushing demonstration. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes in the capabilities of the robot team.

  5. Establishment of interdisciplinary child protection teams in Turkey 2002–2006: Identifying the strongest link can make a difference!

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Canan A. Agirtan; Taner Akar; Seher Akbas; Recep Akdur; Cahide Aydin; Gulsen Aytar; Suat Ayy?ld?z; Sevgi Baskan; Tugba Belgemen; Ozdecan Bezirci; Ufuk Beyazova; Fatma Yucel Beyaztas; Bora Buken; Erhan Buken; Aysu D. Camurdan; Demet Can; Sevgi Canbaz; Gurol Cantürk; Meltem Ceyhan; Abdulhakim Coskun; Ahmet Celik; Fusun C. Cetin; Ayse Gul Coskun; Adnan Da?ç?nar; Yildiz Dallar; Birol Demirel; Billur Demirogullari; Orhan Derman; Dilek Dilli; Yusuf Ersahin; Burcu E?iyok; Gulin Evinc; Ozlem Gencer; Bahar Gökler; Hamit Hanci; Elvan Iseri; Aysun Baransel Isir; Nukhet Isiten; Gulsev Kale; Ferda Karadag; Nuray Kanbur; Birim Kiliç; Ebru Kultur; Derya Kurtay; Asli Kuruoglu; Suha Miral; Aysun B. Odabasi; Resmiye Oral; Filiz Simsek Orhon; Cengiz Özbesler; Dilsad Foto Ozdemir; M. Selim Ozkok; Elif Ozmert; Didem B. Oztop; Hamit Özyürek; Figen Pasli; Y?ld?z Peksen; Onur Polat; Figen Sahin; Ahmet R?fat Sahin; Serpil Salacin; Emine Suskan; Burak Tander; Deniz Tekin; Ozlem Teksam; Ulku Tiras; Y?lmaz Tomak; Ali Riza Tumer; Ahmet Turla; Betul Ulukol; Runa Uslu; Fatma V. Tas; Nilgun Vatandas; Sevtap Velipasaoglu; Fatih Yagmur; Aydin Ya?murlu; Songul Yalcin; Sukruye Yavuz; Kadriye Yurdakok

    2009-01-01

    ObjectivesThe University of Iowa Child Protection Program collaborated with Turkish professionals to develop a training program on child abuse and neglect during 2002–2006 with the goals of increasing professional awareness and number of multidisciplinary teams (MDT), regional collaborations, and assessed cases. This paper summarizes the 5-year outcome.

  6. The “I” in Team: Coach Incivility, Coach Sex, and Team Performance in Female Basketball Teams 

    E-print Network

    Smittick, Amber Leola

    2012-10-19

    With the continuing influx of teams in the workplace it is important to understand how incivility affects team success. The purpose of this study was to address this topic by investigating the effects of leader incivility towards team members...

  7. Teaching multidisciplinary environmental science in a wetland setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panno, S.V.; Hackley, Keith C.; Nuzzo, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    High-school students from across the country came to the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) to assist in field research for two weeks in July, 1994, as part of The Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth Summer Experience Program. During the research project at the ISGS, students were exposed to a multidisciplinary scientific investigation where geology, hydrogeology, ground-water chemistry, and plant biology could be directly observed and used to study the potentially destructive effects of nearby road and house construction on a fen-wetland complex. Experienced researchers provided classroom and field instruction to the students prior to leading the field investigations. Following field work, the students returned to the ISGS laboratories where they assisted with the chemical analysis of ground-water samples and compiled and interpreted their data. The students wrote up their results in standard scientific report format and gave oral presentations covering various aspects of the project to an audience of ISGS scientists and guests. The results of their work, which showed changes in the wetland's plant biodiversity resulting from urban development within the watershed, will provide data needed for the preservation of biodiversity in these and other wetlands.

  8. FUNDAMENTALSFUNDAMENTALS DEVELOPING EFFECTIVE TEAMS

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    App. All rights reserved. #12;Success and The Sweet Spot Competency Passion Sweet Spot Organization Needs Spot © 2010 NetApp. All rights reserved. #12;Olympic "Gold Medal" Teams © 2010 NetApp. All rights

  9. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Amanda Vogel Edit resource National Cancer Institute, EPN Building 6130 Executive

  10. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Joann Keyton Edit resource Box 8104 North Carolina State University Raleigh, NORTH

  11. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Bonnie Spring Edit resource Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University FSM 680

  12. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Howard Gadlin Edit resource Area of Expertise: NIH Ombudsman. Conflict resolution

  13. Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to main content at the National Institutes of Health www.cancer.gov Home About Team Science About the Toolkit Discover Contribute Connect News & Events About Us Gabriele Bammer Edit resource The Australian National University Canberra, ACT 0200

  14. Tech United Team Description

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. M. Lunenburg; Den Dolech

    This paper describes the research improvements in the mechanical, electrical and software design of the robots of team Tech United. The main improvements are an automated calibration procedure, active ball handling, a new solenoid kicker design and an active keeper.

  15. Team Learning for Healthcare Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Manukyan, Narine; Eppstein, Margaret J; Horbar, Jeffrey D

    2013-08-28

    In organized healthcare quality improvement collaboratives (QICs), teams of practitioners from different hospitals exchange information on clinical practices with the aim of improving health outcomes at their own institutions. However, what works in one hospital may not work in others with different local contexts because of nonlinear interactions among various demographics, treatments, and practices. In previous studies of collaborations where the goal is a collective problem solving, teams of diverse individuals have been shown to outperform teams of similar individuals. However, when the purpose of collaboration is knowledge diffusion in complex environments, it is not clear whether team diversity will help or hinder effective learning. In this paper, we first use an agent-based model of QICs to show that teams comprising similar individuals outperform those with more diverse individuals under nearly all conditions, and that this advantage increases with the complexity of the landscape and level of noise in assessing performance. Examination of data from a network of real hospitals provides encouraging evidence of a high degree of similarity in clinical practices, especially within teams of hospitals engaging in QIC teams. However, our model also suggests that groups of similar hospitals could benefit from larger teams and more open sharing of details on clinical outcomes than is currently the norm. To facilitate this, we propose a secure virtual collaboration system that would allow hospitals to efficiently identify potentially better practices in use at other institutions similar to theirs without any institutions having to sacrifice the privacy of their own data. Our results may also have implications for other types of data-driven diffusive learning such as in personalized medicine and evolutionary search in noisy, complex combinatorial optimization problems. PMID:25360395

  16. Knowledge Integration Team

    Cancer.gov

    The Knowledge Integration (KI) Team resides in the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program (EGRP)'s Office of the Associate Director (OAD). The Team is tasked with systematically integrating the rapidly accumulating knowledge base and tools for cancer epidemiology and genomics to accelerate research, evidence-based recommendations, and translation into prevention and clinical practice. It accomplishes this by creating and maintaining online information and databases, meta-research projects, and conducting systematic scientific literature reviews.

  17. Privacy - Team Science Toolkit

    Cancer.gov

    NCI complies with requirements for privacy and security established by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Your visit to the Team Science Toolkit is private and secure. When you visit the Team Science Toolkit, we do not collect any personally identifiable information (PII) about you unless you choose to explicitly provide it to us.

  18. Team Expo: A State-of-the-Art JSC Advanced Design Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Abhishek

    2001-01-01

    In concert with the NASA-wide Intelligent Synthesis Environment Program, the Exploration Office at the Johnson Space Center has assembled an Advanced Design Team. The purpose of this team is two-fold. The first is to identify, use, and develop software applications, tools, and design processes that streamline and enhance a collaborative engineering environment. The second is to use this collaborative engineering environment to produce conceptual, system-level-of-detail designs in a relatively short turnaround time, using a standing team of systems and integration experts. This includes running rapid trade studies on varying mission architectures, as well as producing vehicle and/or subsystem designs. The standing core team is made up of experts from all of the relevant engineering divisions (e.g. Power, Thermal, Structures, etc.) as well as representatives from Risk and Safety, Mission Operations, and Crew Life Sciences among others. The Team works together during 2- hour sessions in the same specially enhanced room to ensure real-time integration/identification of cross-disciplinary issues and solutions. All subsystem designs are collectively reviewed and approved during these same sessions. In addition there is an Information sub-team that captures and formats all data and makes it accessible for use by the following day. The result is Team Expo: an Advanced Design Team that is leading the change from a philosophy of "over the fence" design to one of collaborative engineering that pushes the envelope to achieve the next-generation analysis and design environment.

  19. Increasing Student-Learning Team Effectiveness with Team Charters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Phillip; Pavett, Cynthia; Hunsaker, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Because teams are a ubiquitous part of most organizations today, it is common for business educators to use team assignments to help students experientially learn about course concepts and team process. Unfortunately, students frequently experience a number of problems during team assignments. The authors describe the results of their research and…

  20. OOC Web Conferencing Team Report Web Conferencing Task Team

    E-print Network

    OOC Web Conferencing Team Report Web Conferencing Task Team Final Report ­ 1/24/2014 #12;OOC Web Conferencing Team Report 2 | P a g e Web Conferencing Task Team Final Report ­ 1/24/2014 Contents Executive..................................................................................................................................3 Growing need for web conferencing

  1. Six easy steps on how to create a lean sigma value stream map for a multidisciplinary clinical operation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Emily; Grooms, Richard; Mamidala, Soumya; Nagy, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Value stream mapping (VSM) is a very useful technique to visualize and quantify the complex workflows often seen in clinical environments. VSM brings together multidisciplinary teams to identify parts of processes, collect data, and develop interventional ideas. An example involving pediatric MRI with general anesthesia VSM is outlined. As the process progresses, the map shows a large delay between the fax referral and the date of the scheduled and registered appointment. Ideas for improved efficiency and metrics were identified to measure improvement within a 6-month period, and an intervention package was developed for the department. PMID:25467727

  2. How to turn a team of experts into an expert medical team: guidance from the aviation and military communities

    PubMed Central

    Burke, C; Salas, E; Wilson-Donnelly, K; Priest, H

    2004-01-01

    There is no question that interdisciplinary teams are becoming ubiquitous in healthcare. It is also true that experts do not necessarily combine to make an expert team. However when teams work well they can serve as adaptive systems that allow organisations to mitigate errors within complex domains, thereby increasing safety. The medical community has begun to recognise the importance of teams and as such has begun to implement team training interventions. Over the past 20 years the military and aviation communities have made a large investment in understanding teams and their requisite training requirements. There are many lessons that can be learned from these communities to accelerate the impact of team training within the medical community. Therefore, the purpose of the current paper is to begin to translate some of the lessons learned from the military and aviation communities into practical guidance that can be used by the medical community. PMID:15465963

  3. The Research Team's Preliminary Selection of Potentially Useful Tales from Three Different Cultures for Future Work in the Folktale Project. Folktale: A Cross-Cultural, Interdisciplinary Study of the Experience of Literature. Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollerup, Cay; And Others

    This report, the second of seven, part of an interdisciplinary project on the context of reading and reading research that explores similarities and dissimilarities in the response to literature in readers from different cultures, describes the way in which potentially useful texts, i.e. folktales, were selected by team members. The report first…

  4. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology. PMID:25991115

  5. Multidisciplinary, multimodal approach for a child with a traumatic facial scar.

    PubMed

    Admani, Shehla; Gertner, Jeffrey W; Grosman, Amanda; Shumaker, Peter R; Uebelhoer, Nathan S; Krakowski, Andrew C

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of disfiguring and disabling scars remains a field of active study, reinvigorated with recent advances in techniques and technologies. A variety of approaches can be utilized depending on scar characteristics, location, degree of tissue loss, and associated contractures. Just as traumatic scars can be complex and heterogeneous, the corresponding paradigm for treatment must also be flexible and multimodal for optimal improvement. This report describes a 3-year-old girl with a "mixed" (atrophic/hypertrophic), violaceous, contracted facial scar from a dog bite. It was treated with a novel approach utilizing a multidisciplinary pediatric scar team to combine autologous fat grafting, ablative fractional laser resurfacing, pulsed-dye laser, and laser-assisted delivery of a corticosteroid as concurrent, multimodal therapy to optimize the outcome. PMID:25922954

  6. Insights and advances in multidisciplinary critical care: a review of recent research.

    PubMed

    Blot, Stijn; Afonso, Elsa; Labeau, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    The intensive care unit is a work environment where superior dedication is pivotal to optimize patients' outcomes. As this demanding commitment is multidisciplinary in nature, it requires special qualities of health care workers and organizations. Thus research in the field covers a broad spectrum of activities necessary to deliver cutting-edge care. However, given the abundance of research articles and education activities available, it is difficult for modern critical care clinicians to keep up with the latest progress and innovations in the field. This article broadly summarizes new developments in multidisciplinary intensive care, providing elementary information about advanced insights in the field by briefly describing selected articles bundled in specific topics. Issues considered include cardiovascular care, monitoring, mechanical ventilation, infection and sepsis, nutrition, education, patient safety, pain assessment and control, delirium, mental health, ethics, and outcomes research. PMID:24382619

  7. Orchestrating Work and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These three papers were presented at a symposium on orchestrating work and learning in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Susan Lynham at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Team Learning: Processes, Interventions and Assessment" (Laurel S. Jeris et al.) explores team learning processes, paying specific…

  8. "Redefining smile-a multidisciplinary approach".

    PubMed

    Manne, Prakash; Zakkula, Srujana; Atla, Jyothi; Muvva, Suresh Babu; Sampath, Anche

    2013-07-01

    This article presents a case report of a 20 year old female who was very much dissatisfied with her facial appearance and smile.On examination, it was found that there was a Angles class II division 1 malocclusion and a generalised spacing in the anterior teeth, with a retained, deciduous, left maxillary canine and a malposed 15. On radiographic examination, an impacted 18, 23 was noticed. As the part of the treatment plan, the retained deciduous canine and the impacted permanent canine were extracted and an orthodontic correction of the malocclusion was accomplished. The missing canine was planned to be replaced with a fixed partial denture.The short clinical crown height of the abutment teeth was increased by crown lengthening procedures and the pontic space was contoured to receive a ovate pontic by using diode lasers. The missing tooth was restored by using an all ceramic three unit zirconia bridge. This multi-disciplinary approach improved the smile of the patient and it ultimately enhanced her aesthetics and self confidence. PMID:23998114

  9. An initiative in multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a joint NASA/Army initiative at the Langley Research Center to develop optimization procedures aimed at improving the rotor blade design process by integrating appropriate disciplines and accounting for important interactions among the disciplines. The activity is being guided by a Steering Committee made up of key NASA and Army researchers and managers. The committee, which has been named IRASC (Integrated Rotorcraft Analysis Steering Committee), has defined two principal foci for the activity: a white paper which sets forth the goals and plans of the effort; and a rotor design project which will validate the basic constituents, as well as the overall design methodology for multidisciplinary optimization. The optimization formulation is described in terms of the objective function, design variables, and constraints. Additionally, some of the analysis aspects are discussed and an initial attempt at defining the interdisciplinary couplings is summarized. At this writing, some significant progress has been made, principally in the areas of single discipline optimization. Results are given which represent accomplishments in rotor aerodynamic performance optimization for minimum hover horsepower, rotor dynamic optimization for vibration reduction, and rotor structural optimization for minimum weight.

  10. An initiative in multidisciplinary optimization of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a joint NASA/Army initiative at the Langley Research Center to develop optimization procedures aimed at improving the rotor blade design process by integrating appropriate disciplines and accounting for important interactions among the disciplines. The activity is being guided by a Steering Committee made up of key NASA and Army researchers and managers. The committee, which has been named IRASC (Integrated Rotorcraft Analysis Steering Committee), has defined two principal foci for the activity: a white paper which sets forth the goals and plans of the effort; and a rotor design project which will validate the basic constituents, as well as the overall design methodology for multidisciplinary optimization. The paper describes the optimization formulation in terms of the objective function, design variables, and constraints. Additionally, some of the analysis aspects are discussed and an initial attempt at defining the interdisciplinary couplings is summarized. At this writing, some significant progress has been made, principally in the areas of single discipline optimization. Results are given which represent accomplishments in rotor aerodynamic performance optimization for minimum hover horsepower, rotor dynamic optimization for vibration reduction, and rotor structural optimization for minimum weight.

  11. Coupled multi-disciplinary composites behavior simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of the computer code CSTEM (Coupled Structural/Thermal/Electro-Magnetic Analysis) are discussed and demonstrated. CSTEM computationally simulates the coupled response of layered multi-material composite structures subjected to simultaneous thermal, structural, vibration, acoustic, and electromagnetic loads and includes the effect of aggressive environments. The composite material behavior and structural response is determined at its various inherent scales: constituents (fiber/matrix), ply, laminate, and structural component. The thermal and mechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on various parameters such as temperature and moisture. The acoustic and electromagnetic properties also include dependence on vibration and electromagnetic wave frequencies, respectively. The simulation is based on a three dimensional finite element analysis in conjunction with composite mechanics and with structural tailoring codes, and with acoustic and electromagnetic analysis methods. An aircraft engine composite fan blade is selected as a typical structural component to demonstrate the CSTEM capabilities. Results of various coupled multi-disciplinary heat transfer, structural, vibration, acoustic, and electromagnetic analyses for temperature distribution, stress and displacement response, deformed shape, vibration frequencies, mode shapes, acoustic noise, and electromagnetic reflection from the fan blade are discussed for their coupled effects in hot and humid environments. Collectively, these results demonstrate the effectiveness of the CSTEM code in capturing the coupled effects on the various responses of composite structures subjected to simultaneous multiple real-life loads.

  12. Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Founded in 1986, the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research (MCEER) is located at the State University of New York at Buffalo. MCEER draws on the expertise of many researchers and industry partners from across the United States, as they are "dedicated to the discovery and development of new knowledge, tools and technologies that equip communities to become more disaster resilient in the face of earthquakes and other extreme events.� The Center receives funding from a wide range of institutions, including the National Science Foundation, the Federal Highway Administration, and the Department of Homeland Security. Along with the usual conference announcements and newsletters that one might expect to find on a homepage of this sort, visitors can also peruse their archive of webcasts, which include such past presentations as "Seismic Analysis of Woodframe Structures" and "Structural Control Technologies". Visitors will not be surprised to find that there are also a number of special reports on Hurricane Katrina that are worth taking a look at here.

  13. Multi-Disciplinary System Reliability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahadevan, Sankaran; Han, Song

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new methodology for estimating the reliability of engineering systems that encompass multiple disciplines. The methodology is formulated in the context of the NESSUS probabilistic structural analysis code developed under the leadership of NASA Lewis Research Center. The NESSUS code has been successfully applied to the reliability estimation of a variety of structural engineering systems. This study examines whether the features of NESSUS could be used to investigate the reliability of systems in other disciplines such as heat transfer, fluid mechanics, electrical circuits etc., without considerable programming effort specific to each discipline. In this study, the mechanical equivalence between system behavior models in different disciplines are investigated to achieve this objective. A new methodology is presented for the analysis of heat transfer, fluid flow, and electrical circuit problems using the structural analysis routines within NESSUS, by utilizing the equivalence between the computational quantities in different disciplines. This technique is integrated with the fast probability integration and system reliability techniques within the NESSUS code, to successfully compute the system reliability of multi-disciplinary systems. Traditional as well as progressive failure analysis methods for system reliability estimation are demonstrated, through a numerical example of a heat exchanger system involving failure modes in structural, heat transfer and fluid flow disciplines.

  14. Design Environment for Multifidelity and Multidisciplinary Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Michael

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges when developing propulsion systems is predicting the interacting effects between the fluid loads, thermal loads, and structural deflection. The interactions between technical disciplines often are not fully analyzed, and the analysis in one discipline often uses a simplified representation of other disciplines as an input or boundary condition. For example, the fluid forces in an engine generate static and dynamic rotor deflection, but the forces themselves are dependent on the rotor position and its orbit. It is important to consider the interaction between the physical phenomena where the outcome of each analysis is heavily dependent on the inputs (e.g., changes in flow due to deflection, changes in deflection due to fluid forces). A rigid design process also lacks the flexibility to employ multiple levels of fidelity in the analysis of each of the components. This project developed and validated an innovative design environment that has the flexibility to simultaneously analyze multiple disciplines and multiple components with multiple levels of model fidelity. Using NASA's open-source multidisciplinary design analysis and optimization (OpenMDAO) framework, this multifaceted system will provide substantially superior capabilities to current design tools.

  15. The complexity of globus: a multidisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Selleslagh, Margot; van Oudenhove, Lukas; Pauwels, Ans; Tack, Jan; Rommel, Nathalie

    2014-04-01

    Globus is a topic of interest for many specialties including otorhinolaryngology, gastroenterology and psychiatry/psychosomatic medicine, but, although many hypotheses have been suggested, key questions about its aetiology remain. This Review provides an overview of the extensive literature concerning this topic and discusses the quality of the evidence to date. Globus has been associated with oropharyngeal structural lesions, upper oesophageal sphincter disorders, oesophageal disorders, GERD, psychosocial factors and psychiatric comorbidity. However, findings are often contradictory and the literature remains highly inconclusive. Indeed, with the exception of patients with structural-based globus, the Rome III criteria for functional globus only apply to a subgroup of patients with idiopathic globus. In clinical reality, there exists a group of patients who present with idiopathic (nonstructural) globus, but nevertheless have dysphagia, odynophagia or GERD-exclusion criteria for globus diagnosis according to Rome III. The symptomatology of patients with globus might be broader than previously thought. It is therefore crucial to approach globus not from one single perspective, but from a multifactorial point of view, with focus on the coexistence and/or interactions of different mechanisms in globus pathogenesis. This approach could be translated to clinical practice by adopting a multidisciplinary method to patients presenting with globus. PMID:24296583

  16. Collaborative learning in mobile work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan Lundin; Maria Magnusson

    2003-01-01

    Moving towards more communication intensive organisations, where work tends to be mobile, understanding how to support learning in such work becomes increasingly important. This paper reports on a study of a customer relations team, where work is performed co-located, distributed as well as mobile. Collaborative learning within in this team is explored so as to inform the design of IT

  17. TEAMS & USPS Salary Ranges TEAMS -Exempt

    E-print Network

    Mazzotti, Frank

    (see below) Grade Minimum Maximum 1 $25,109.01 none 2 $28,425.81 none 3 $33,631.97 none 4 $39,661.09 none 5 $46,361.26 none 6 $53,970.75 none 7 $63,518.50 none TEAMS/USPS - Exempt/Non Exempt Salary Plans.62 IT Positions Salary Plans: TA12, TU2N Grade Minimum Maximum 15 $10.00 None 19 $10.37 None 23 $12.64 None 26 $15

  18. Leading Virtual Teams: Three Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James R.; Jeris, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated virtual team members' and leaders' perceptions of the role of the leader, and hindering and helping forces within virtual teams and their host organizations for developing leaders of such teams. It addresses the expressed need of virtual team leaders for the field of HRD to guide leadership development for this emerging…

  19. Assessing individual and team readiness

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeanna Chang; William Gibson; Emma Lander; Kelly O'Hargan; Susan Donohue; Stephanie Guerlain; Brian Clark; B. Eugene Parker

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine if teams can successfully predict their readiness to perform a mission via noninvasive methods. We present a method for assessing individual and team readiness in the form of a questionnaire designed to allow team members to predict the readiness of their team to perform a particular mission. To test the questionnaire's utility,

  20. Team LunaCY Outreach Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heise, James; Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    Iowa State University's Lunabotics Club, Team LunaCY, has worked hard to generate enthusiasm for robotics, engineering, and lunar activities. Team LunaCY participated in a variety of different outreach events making a strong impression on Iowa youth. These events led the chair of the mechanical engineering department, Dr. Ted Heindel, to refer to the club's outreach program as "the model that all other engineering clubs should follow." Team LunaCY's outreach activities totaled over 200 hours and captivated over 3000 students and adults throughout the course of this acaden1ic year, reaching out to people all over Iowa and to several special guests. These guests included Vice-President Joe Biden, during a visit to Iowa State University in March 2012, and astronaut Clayton Anderson, during a visit to Iowa State's campus in the fall 2011. Team LunaCY's outreach events created hands on learning opportunities for local youth ranging in age from elementary school children to high school students. The team strove to make a positive impression on Iowa youth and to encourage interest and involvement in scientific fields. The full list of events is shown in Table 1. Three of the major outreach events the team participated in were the FIRST LEGO League, Science Bound, and iExplore STEM Festival.

  1. Organization, Knowledge, and Identity: A Collaborative Team in a Nontraditional Engineering Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonso, Karen L.

    In a nontraditional engineering course students participated in internships in which they worked in teams for local industry or government clients to develop an engineering solution to an open-ended problem. This paper focuses on one of the teams as it solved the problem and explores the organization of the team's work within the constraints of…

  2. The Application of Six Sigma Methodologies to University Processes: The Use of Student Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Mildred Golden; Alexander, Christine; Taneja, Sonia; Tirumalasetty, Sowmya; Chadalavada, Deepthi

    2012-01-01

    The first student Six Sigma team (activated under a QEP Process Sub-team) evaluated the course and curriculum approval process. The goal was to streamline the process and thereby shorten process cycle time and reduce confusion about how the process works. Members of this team developed flowcharts on how the process is supposed to work (by…

  3. Evaluation of a university hospital trauma team activation protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Admission with a multidisciplinary trauma team may be vital for the severely injured patient, as this facilitates rapid diagnosis and treatment. On the other hand, patients with minor injuries do not need the trauma team for adequate care. Correct triage is important for optimal resource utilization. The aim of the study was to evaluate our criteria for activating the trauma team, and identify suboptimal criteria that might be changed in the interest of precision. Methods The study is an observational, retrospective cohort-study. All patients admitted with the trauma team (n = 382), all severely injured (Injury Severity Score (ISS) >15) (n = 161), and all undergoing an emergency procedure aimed at counteracting compromised airways, respiration or circulation at our hospital (n = 142) during 2006-2007 were included. Data were recorded from the admission records and the electronic patient records. The trauma team activation protocol was evaluated against the occurrence of severe injury and the occurrence of emergency procedures. Results A total of 441 patients were included. The overtriage was 71% and undertriage 32% when evaluating against ISS >15 as the standard of reference. When occurrence of emergency procedures was held as the standard of standard of reference, the over- and undertriage was 71% and 21%, respectively. Mechanism of injury-criteria for trauma team activation contributed the most to overtriage. The emergency procedures performed were mostly endotracheal intubation and external fixation of fractures. Less than 3% needed haemostatic laparotomy or thoracotomy. Approximately 2/3 of the overtriage represented isolated head or cervical spine injuries, and/or interhospital transfers. Conclusions The over- and undertriage of our protocol are both too high. To decrease overtriage we suggest omissions and modifications of some of the criteria. To decrease undertriage, transferred patients and patients with head injuries should be more thoroughly assessed against the trauma team activation criteria. PMID:21439095

  4. Project development teams: a novel mechanism for accelerating translational research.

    PubMed

    Sajdyk, Tammy J; Sors, Thomas G; Hunt, Joe D; Murray, Mary E; Deford, Melanie E; Shekhar, Anantha; Denne, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    The trend in conducting successful biomedical research is shifting from individual academic labs to coordinated collaborative research teams. Teams of experienced investigators with a wide variety of expertise are now critical for developing and maintaining a successful, productive research program. However, assembling a team whose members have the right expertise requires a great deal of time and many resources. To assist investigators seeking such resources, the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (Indiana CTSI) created the Project Development Teams (PDTs) program to support translational research on and across the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indiana University, Purdue University, and University of Notre Dame campuses. PDTs are multidisciplinary committees of seasoned researchers who assist investigators, at any stage of research, in transforming ideas/hypotheses into well-designed translational research projects. The teams help investigators capitalize on Indiana CTSI resources by providing investigators with, as needed, mentoring and career development; protocol development; pilot funding; institutional review board, regulatory, and/or nursing support; intellectual property support; access to institutional technology; and assistance with biostatistics, bioethics, recruiting participants, data mining, engaging community health, and collaborating with other investigators.Indiana CTSI leaders have analyzed metrics, collected since the inception of the PDT program in 2008 from both investigators and team members, and found evidence strongly suggesting that the highly responsive teams have become an important one-stop venue for facilitating productive interactions between basic and clinical scientists across four campuses, have aided in advancing the careers of junior faculty, and have helped investigators successfully obtain external funds. PMID:25319172

  5. An All-At-Once approach for multidisciplinary design

    E-print Network

    De La Garza, Antonio P

    1998-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the applicability of an All-aphics. At-once approach to a multi-disciplinary design problem, we consider the optimization of an aeroelastic, subsonic wing. As a first step, the aerodynamic and structural disciplines...

  6. Multifidelity, Multidisciplinary Optimization of Turbomachines with Shock Interaction 

    E-print Network

    Joly, Michael Marie

    2014-07-02

    rocket engines combine turbojet and rocket engine cycles to provide the necessary thrust in the so-called low-speed regime. Challenges related to turbomachinery components are multidisciplinary, since both the high compression ratio compressor...

  7. A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO STORMWATER MANAGEMENT AT THE WATERSHED SCALE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater runoff from extensive impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas has led to human safety risks and stream ecosystem impairment, triggering an interest in watershed-scale retrofit stormwater management. Such stormwater management is of multidisciplinary relevance, ...

  8. A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO STORMWATER MANAGEMENT AT THE catchment SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stormwater runoff from extensive impervious surfaces in urban and suburban areas has led to human safety risks and stream ecosystem impairment, triggering an interest in catchment-scale retrofit stormwater management. Such stormwater management is of multidisciplinary relevance, ...

  9. Emergence through conflict : the Multi-Disciplinary Design System (MDDS)

    E-print Network

    Alfaris, Anas (Anas Faris)

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation proposes a framework and a group of systematic methodologies to construct a computational Multi-Disciplinary Design System (MDDS) that can support the design of complex systems within a variety of domains. ...

  10. Communication in interdisciplinary teams: exploring closed-loop communication during in situ trauma team training

    PubMed Central

    Härgestam, Maria; Lindkvist, Marie; Brulin, Christine; Jacobsson, Maritha; Hultin, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Investigate the use of call-out (CO) and closed-loop communication (CLC) during a simulated emergency situation, and its relation to profession, age, gender, ethnicity, years in profession, educational experience, work experience and leadership style. Design Exploratory study. Setting In situ simulator-based interdisciplinary team training using trauma cases at an emergency department. Participants The result was based on 16 trauma teams with a total of 96 participants. Each team consisted of two physicians, two registered nurses and two enrolled nurses, identical to a standard trauma team. Results The results in this study showed that the use of CO and CLC in trauma teams was limited, with an average of 20 CO and 2.8 CLC/team. Previous participation in trauma team training did not increase the frequency of use of CLC while ?2 structured trauma courses correlated with increased use of CLC (risk ratio (RR) 3.17, CI 1.22 to 8.24). All professions in the trauma team were observed to initiate and terminate CLC (except for the enrolled nurse from the operation theatre). The frequency of team members’ use of CLC increased significantly with an egalitarian leadership style (RR 1.14, CI 1.04 to 1.26). Conclusions This study showed that despite focus on the importance of communication in terms of CO and CLC, the difficulty in achieving safe and reliable verbal communication within the interdisciplinary team remained. This finding indicates the need for validated training models combined with further implementation studies. PMID:24148213

  11. The work is partially supported by UMass President's Office for Science and Technology Initiative fund 2010.

    E-print Network

    Yu, Qian

    The work is partially supported by UMass President's Office for Science and Technology Initiative automation. The research flexes multidisciplinary expertise in traffic flow simulation, geosciences, sensing

  12. Technology Applications Team: Applications of aerospace technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Highlights of the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Applications Team activities over the past quarter are presented in Section 1.0. The Team's progress in fulfilling the requirements of the contract is summarized in Section 2.0. In addition to our market-driven approach to applications project development, RTI has placed increased effort on activities to commercialize technologies developed at NASA Centers. These Technology Commercialization efforts are summarized in Section 3.0. New problem statements prepared by the Team in the reporting period are presented in Section 4.0. The Team's transfer activities for ongoing projects with the NASA Centers are presented in Section 5.0. Section 6.0 summarizes the status of four add-on tasks. Travel for the reporting period is described in Section 7.0. The RTI Team staff and consultants and their project responsibilities are listed in Appendix A. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of many individuals to the RTI Technology Applications Team program. The time and effort contributed by managers, engineers, and scientists throughout NASA were essential to program success. Most important to the program has been a productive working relationship with the NASA Field Center Technology Utilization (TU) Offices. The RTI Team continues to strive for improved effectiveness as a resource to these offices. Industry managers, technical staff, medical researchers, and clinicians have been cooperative and open in their participation. The RTI Team looks forward to continuing expansion of its interaction with U.S. industry to facilitate the transfer of aerospace technology to the private sector.

  13. Nuclear Nonproliferation Ontology Assessment Team Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Strasburg, Jana D.; Hohimer, Ryan E.

    2012-01-01

    Final Report for the NA22 Simulations, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) Ontology Assessment Team's efforts from FY09-FY11. The Ontology Assessment Team began in May 2009 and concluded in September 2011. During this two-year time frame, the Ontology Assessment team had two objectives: (1) Assessing the utility of knowledge representation and semantic technologies for addressing nuclear nonproliferation challenges; and (2) Developing ontological support tools that would provide a framework for integrating across the Simulation, Algorithm and Modeling (SAM) program. The SAM Program was going through a large assessment and strategic planning effort during this time and as a result, the relative importance of these two objectives changed, altering the focus of the Ontology Assessment Team. In the end, the team conducted an assessment of the state of art, created an annotated bibliography, and developed a series of ontological support tools, demonstrations and presentations. A total of more than 35 individuals from 12 different research institutions participated in the Ontology Assessment Team. These included subject matter experts in several nuclear nonproliferation-related domains as well as experts in semantic technologies. Despite the diverse backgrounds and perspectives, the Ontology Assessment team functioned very well together and aspects could serve as a model for future inter-laboratory collaborations and working groups. While the team encountered several challenges and learned many lessons along the way, the Ontology Assessment effort was ultimately a success that led to several multi-lab research projects and opened up a new area of scientific exploration within the Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Verification.

  14. 3 2009 OSGOC -Research Work team Report Research Work Team Recommendations

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    of ensuring sufficient energy, healthy food, and clean water in the face of climate change, population growth and increased consumption requires research that investigates these issues from environmental, economic to sustainability questions. Second, the University has a rich legacy of engagement with the state of Minnesota

  15. Putting the "Team" in the Fine Arts Team: An Application of Business Management Team Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses current challenges to the idea of teamwork in fine arts teams, redefines the terms team and collaboration using a business management perspective, discusses the success of effective teams in the business world and the characteristics of those teams, and proposes the implementation of the business model of…

  16. ISSN0249-6399ISRNINRIA/RR--434--FR+ENG Project-Team PANAMA

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ISSN0249-6399ISRNINRIA/RR--434--FR+ENG RESEARCH REPORT N° 434 March 2013 Project-Team PANAMA Genre Vincent Project-Team PANAMA Research Report n° 434 -- March 2013 -- 26 pages Abstract: In this work we

  17. Establishing a multidisciplinary academic cosmetic center.

    PubMed

    Rao, Venkat K; Schmid, Daniel B; Hanson, Summer E; Bentz, Michael L

    2011-12-01

    The demand for cosmetic services has risen rapidly in recent years, but has slowed down with the current economic downturn. Managed care organizations and Medicare have been steadily reducing their reimbursements for physician services. The payment for reconstructive surgical procedures has been decreasing and is likely to worsen with healthcare reform, and many plastic surgery residency programs are facing fiscal challenges. An adequate volume of patients needing cosmetic services is necessary to recruit and train the best candidates to the residency programs. Self-pay patients will help ensure the fiscal viability of plastic surgery residency programs. Attracting patients to an academic healthcare center will become more difficult in a recession without the appropriate facilities, programs, and pricing strategies. Setting up a modern cosmetic services program at an academic center has some unique challenges, including funding, academic politics, and turf. The authors opened a free-standing academic multidisciplinary center at their medical school 3 years ago. The center is an off-site, 13,000-sq ft facility that includes faculty from plastic surgery, ear, nose, and throat, dermatology, and vascular surgery. In this article, the authors discuss the process of developing and executing a plan for starting an aesthetic services center in an academic setting. The financing of the center and factors in pricing services are discussed. The authors show the impact of the center on their cosmetic surgery patient volumes, resident education, and finances. They expect that their experience will be helpful to other plastic surgery programs at academic medical centers. PMID:22094775

  18. Multidisciplinary predialysis programs: quantification and limitations of their impact on patient outcomes in two Canadian settings.

    PubMed

    Levin, A; Lewis, M; Mortiboy, P; Faber, S; Hare, I; Porter, E C; Mendelssohn, D C

    1997-04-01

    A 1993 National Institutes of Health Consensus statement stressed the importance of early medical intervention in predialysis populations. Given the need for evidence-based practice, we report the outcomes of predialysis programs in two major Canadian cities. The purpose of this report was to determine whether the institution of a multidisciplinary predialysis program is of benefit to patients, and to analyze those factors that are important in actualizing those benefits. Data from two different studies is presented: (1) a prospective, nonrandomized cohort study comparing patients who were or were not exposed to an ongoing multidisciplinary predialysis team (St Paul's Hospital) and (2) a retrospective review of outcomes before and after the institution of a predialysis program (The Toronto Hospital). Although created independently in major academic centers in Canada, the programs both aimed to reduce urgent dialysis starts, improve preparedness for dialysis, and improve resource utilization. The Vancouver study was able to demonstrate significantly fewer urgent dialysis starts (13% v 35%; P < 0.05), more outpatient training (76% v 43%; P < 0.05), and less hospital days in the first month of dialysis (6.5 days v 13.5 days; P < 0.05). Cost savings of the program patients in 1993 are conservatively estimated to be $173,000 (Canadian dollars) or over $4,000 per patient. The Toronto study demonstrated success in predialysis access creation (86.3% of patients), but could not realize any benefit in terms of elective dialysis initiation due to well-documented hemodialysis resource constraints. We conclude that an approach to predialysis patients involving a multidisciplinary team can have a positive impact on quantitative outcomes, but essential elements for success include (1) early referral to a nephrology center, (2) adequate resources for dedicated predialysis program staff and infrastructure, and (3) available resources for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (dialysis stations). In times of economic constraints, objective data are necessary to justify resource-intensive proactive programs for patients with ESRD. Future studies should confirm and extend our observations so that optimum and cost-effective care for patients approaching ESRD is uniformly available. PMID:9100041

  19. More than Paper Load: What Does All This Student Work Tell Us?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Catherine Garrison

    Having faculty collaborative teams to evaluate student works is proposed in this article. The standards related to content and performance of student works should be agreed among team members. Team members should also be willing to implement change.

  20. Mini-Challenges Team Practice Activity

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    skills the team may eventually want to learn: · Programming with two light sensors · Combining the use a program until it works as planned · Combining multiple actions into one program · Measuring with the light and rotation sensors · Actions based on sensors, including when a robot encounters line or wall · Repeating